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Sample records for fungal ferulic acid

  1. Mono- and dimeric ferulic acid release from brewer's spent grain by fungal feruloyl esterases.

    PubMed

    Faulds, C B; Sancho, A I; Bartolomé, B

    2002-12-01

    Ultraflo L, a beta-glucanase preparation from Humicola insolens sold for reducing viscosity problems in the brewing industry, exhibited activity against the methyl esters of ferulic, caffeic, p-coumaric and sinapic acids, displaying mainly type-B feruloyl esterase activity. Ultraflo also contained the ability to release 65% of the available ferulic acid (FA) together with three forms of diferulate from brewer's spent grain (BSG). An "esterase-free" Ultraflo preparation greatly enhanced the ability of a feruloyl esterase from Aspergillus niger, AnFAEA, to release FA (from 23 to 47%) and its dimeric forms, especially the 8,5' benzofuran form, from BSG. While total release of these phenolic acids was not observed, this synergistic enhancement of ferulate release demonstrates that FA and its dimeric forms present in BSG require the addition of more than a xylanase. This suggests either that FA is not solely attached to arabinoxylan in the barley cell wall, or that the cell wall polysaccharides in BSG hinder the accessibility of enzymes to the ferulates, due to processing treatments. PMID:12466893

  2. Expression of a fungal ferulic acid esterase in alfalfa modifies cell wall digestibility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is an important forage crop in North America owing to its high biomass production, perennial nature and ability to fix nitrogen. Feruloyl esterase (EC 3.1.1.73) hydrolyzes ester linkages in plant cell walls and has the potential to further improve alfalfa as biomass for biofuel production. Results In this study, faeB [GenBank:AJ309807] was synthesized at GenScript and sub-cloned into a novel pEACH vector containing different signaling peptides to target type B ferulic acid esterase (FAEB) proteins to the apoplast, chloroplast, endoplasmic reticulum and vacuole. Four constructs harboring faeB were transiently expressed in Nicotiana leaves, with FAEB accumulating at high levels in all target sites, except chloroplast. Stable transformed lines of alfalfa were subsequently obtained using Agrobacterium tumefaciens (LBA4404). Out of 136 transgenic plants regenerated, 18 independent lines exhibited FAEB activity. Subsequent in vitro digestibility and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of FAEB-expressing lines showed that they possessed modified cell wall morphology and composition with a reduction in ester linkages and elevated lignin content. Consequently, they were more recalcitrant to digestion by mixed ruminal microorganisms. Interestingly, delignification by alkaline peroxide treatment followed by exposure to a commercial cellulase mixture resulted in higher glucose release from transgenic lines as compared to the control line. Conclusion Modifying cell wall crosslinking has the potential to lower recalcitrance of holocellulose, but also exhibited unintended consequences on alfalfa cell wall digestibility due to elevated lignin content. The combination of efficient delignification treatment (alkaline peroxide) and transgenic esterase activity complement each other towards efficient and effective digestion of transgenic lines. PMID:24650274

  3. Ferulic Acid Esterase Activity from Schizophyllum commune†

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, C. Roger; Bilous, Doris

    1988-01-01

    Schizophyllum commune produced an esterase which released ferulic acid from starch-free wheat bran and from a soluble ferulic acid-sugar ester that was isolated from wheat bran. The preferred growth substrate for the production of ferulic acid esterase was cellulose. Growth on xylan-containing substrates (oat spelt xylan and starch-free wheat bran) resulted in activity levels that were significantly lower than those observed in cultures grown on cellulose. Similar observations were made for endoglucanase, p-nitrophenyllactopyranosidase, xylanase, and acetyl xylan esterase. Of the enzymes studied, only arabinofuranosidase was produced at maximum levels during growth on xylan-containing materials. Ferulic acid esterase that had been partially purified by DEAE chromatography released significant amounts of ferulic acid from wheat bran only in the presence of a xylanase-rich fraction, indicating that the esterase may not be able to readily attack high-molecular-weight substrates. The esterase acted efficiently, without xylanase addition, on a soluble sugar-ferulic acid substrate. PMID:16347629

  4. Esterification of ferulic acid with polyols using a ferulic acid esterase from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiyama, Moriyasu; Sakamoto, Tatsuji; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Murata, Shuichi; Kawasaki, Haruhiko

    2006-07-01

    Commercially available enzyme preparations were screened for enzymes that have a high ability to catalyze direct ester-synthesis of ferulic acid with glycerol. Only a preparation, Pectinase PL "Amano" produced by Aspergillus niger, feruloylated glycerol under the experimental conditions. The enzyme responsible for the esterification was purified and characterized. This enzyme, called FAE-PL, was found to be quite similar to an A. niger ferulic acid esterase (FAE-III) in terms of molecular mass, pH and temperature optima, substrate specificity on synthetic substrates, and the N-terminal amino acid sequence. FAE-PL highly catalyzed direct esterification of ferulic acid and sinapinic acid with glycerol. FAE-PL could feruloylate monomeric sugars including arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, and xylose. We determined the suitable conditions for direct esterification of ferulic acid with glycerol to be as follows: 1% ferulic acid in the presence of 85% glycerol and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide at pH 4.0 and 50 degrees C. Under these conditions, 81% of ferulic acid could be converted to 1-glyceryl ferulate, which was identified by (1)H-NMR. The ability of 1-glyceryl ferulate to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals was higher than that of the anti-oxidant butyl hydroxytoluene. PMID:16714088

  5. Amylose inclusion complexation of ferulic acid via lipophilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulic acid is an interesting phytochemical that exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, UV-absorber, and anticarcinogenic activities. These properties make it of interest in food formulations, cosmetics, polymer, and pharmaceutical applications. However, delivery of ferulic acid in...

  6. How is ferulic acid transported into the Golgi apparatus? Lignin

    E-print Network

    How is ferulic acid transported into the Golgi apparatus? Lignin polymerization is also influenced]. These ferulic acid residues are thought to initiate lignin polymerization. It is not known how ferulic acid in the cell wall field, but also creates novel opportunities for the manipulation of lignin in crop plants

  7. Ferulic acid esterase production by Streptomyces sp.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, G; Singh, R K; Mitra, A; Sen, S K

    2007-01-01

    Studies were carried out on ferulic acid esterase production using a culture of Streptomyces S10. In optimized condition, enzyme yield was 2.0 mU/ml in MBS medium, containing 1.5% de-starched wheat bran at 30 degrees C and initial pH 6.5 under agitated submerged culture. PMID:16427274

  8. COSMECEUTICAL ACTIVE INGREDIENT DERIVED FROM SOYBEAN OIL AND FERULIC ACID: SYNTHESIS OF APPLICATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulic acid is a natural plant phenol widely heralded for its ability to serve as a potent antioxidant. However, the low solubility of ferulic acid in lipids prevents it from protecting lipid membranes and associated structures. In its esterified forms, ferulic acid strongly absorbs light within ...

  9. Phenolic Biotransformations during Conversion of Ferulic Acid to Vanillin by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Baljinder; Kumar, Balvir

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin is widely used as food additive and as a masking agent in various pharmaceutical formulations. Ferulic acid is an important precursor of vanillin that is available in abundance in cell walls of cereals like wheat, corn, and rice. Phenolic biotransformations can occur during growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and their production can be made feasible using specialized LAB strains that have been reported to produce ferulic acid esterases. The present study aimed at screening a panel of LAB isolates for their ability to release phenolics from agrowaste materials like rice bran and their biotransformation to industrially important compounds such as ferulic acid, 4-ethyl phenol, vanillic acid, vanillin, and vanillyl alcohol. Bacterial isolates were evaluated using ferulic acid esterase, ferulic acid decarboxylase, and vanillin dehydrogenase assays. This work highlights the importance of lactic acid bacteria in phenolic biotransformations for the development of food grade flavours and additives. PMID:24066293

  10. Effect of cysteinyl caffeic acid, caffeic acid, and L-dopa on the oxidative cross-linking of feruloylated arabinoxylans by a fungal laccase.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Espinoza, M C; Rouau, X

    1999-02-01

    To study a way to covalently link arabinoxylans and proteins using a fungal laccase from the fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus, the effect of cysteinyl caffeic acid on the cross-linking of wheat arabinoxylans was investigated by means of capillary viscometry and RP-HPLC of alkali labile phenolic compounds. Cysteinyl caffeic acid provoked a delay in gelation and in the consumption of the esterified ferulic acid on arabinoxylans. When reacting free ferulic acid and cysteinyl caffeic acid with laccase, the ferulic acid consumption and the dehydrodimers production were also diminished. These results suggest that cysteinyl caffeic acid is oxidized while reducing the semiquinones of ferulic acid produced by laccase. Thus, ferulic acid could not be oxidized into dimers until all cysteinyl caffeic acid was consumed, preventing the cross-linking of feruloylated arabinoxylan chains. A similar mechanism is proposed in the case of caffeic acid and of L-Dopa. PMID:10563923

  11. Biotransformation of Ferulic acid to 4-Vinylguaiacol by Enterobacter soli and E. aerogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the conversion of ferulic acid to 4-vinylguaiacol (4-VG), vanillin, vanillyl alcohol and vanillic acid by five Enterobacter strains. These high-value chemicals are usually synthesized using chemical methods but biological synthesis adds value. Ferulic acid, a relatively inexpensive...

  12. Ferulic acid destabilizes preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hirohata, Mie; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2005-10-21

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS, would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported previously that curcumin (Cur) inhibits fA{beta} formation from A{beta} and destabilizes preformed fA{beta} in vitro. Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of ferulic acid (FA) on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 deg C in vitro. We next compared the anti-amyloidogenic activities of FA with Cur, rifampicin, and tetracycline. Ferulic acid dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-peptide, as well as their extension. Moreover, it destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. The overall activity of the molecules examined was in the order of: Cur > FA > rifampicin = tetracycline. FA could be a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  13. Molecular spectroscopic studies on the interaction of ferulic acid with calf thymus DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shufang; Sun, Xuejun; Qu, Fengli; Kong, Rongmei

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between ferulic acid and calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) under physiological conditions (Tris-HCl buffer solutions, pH 7.4) was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, DNA melting techniques, and viscosity measurements. Results indicated that a complex of ferulic acid with ctDNA was formed with a binding constant of K290K = 7.60 × 104 L mol-1 and K310K = 4.90 × 104 L mol-1. The thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change (?H°), entropy change (?S°) and Gibbs free energy (?G°) were calculated to be -1.69 × 104 J mol-1, 35.36 J K-1 mol-1 and -2.79 × 104 J mol-1 at 310 K, respectively. The acting forces between ferulic acid and DNA mainly included hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonds. Acridine orange displacement studies revealed that ferulic acid can substitute for AO probe in the AO-DNA complex which was indicative of intercalation binding. Thermal denaturation study suggested that the interaction of ferulic acid with DNA could result in the increase of the denaturation temperature, which indicated that the stabilization of the DNA helix was increased in the presence of ferulic acid. Spectroscopic techniques together with melting techniques and viscosity determination provided evidences of intercalation mode of binding for the interaction between ferulic acid and ctDNA.

  14. Heterologous Expression of Two Ferulic Acid Esterases from Penicillium Funiculosum

    SciTech Connect

    Knoshaug, E. P.; Selig, M. J.; Baker, J. O.; Decker, S. R.; Himmel, M. E.; Adney, W. S.

    2008-01-01

    Two recombinant ferulic acid esterases from Penicillium funiculosum produced in Aspergillus awamori were evaluated for their ability to improve the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The genes, faeA and faeB, were cloned from P. funiculosum and expressed in A. awamori using their native signal sequences. Both enzymes contain a catalytic domain connected to a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module by a threonine-rich linker peptide. Interestingly, the carbohydrate binding-module is N-terminal in FaeA and C-terminal in FaeB. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity using column chromatography, and their thermal stability was characterized by differential scanning microcalorimetry. We evaluated both enzymes for their potential to enhance the cellulolytic activity of purified Trichoderma reesei Cel7A on pretreated corn stover.

  15. Heterologous Expression of Two Ferulic Acid Esterases from Penicillium funiculosum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoshaug, Eric P.; Selig, Michael J.; Baker, John O.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Adney, William S.

    Two recombinant ferulic acid esterases from Penicillium funiculosum produced in Aspergillus awamori were evaluated for their ability to improve the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The genes, faeA and faeB, were cloned from P. funiculosum and expressed in A. awamori using their native signal sequences. Both enzymes contain a catalytic domain connected to a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module by a threonine-rich linker peptide. Interestingly, the carbohydrate binding-module is N-terminal in FaeA and C-terminal in FaeB. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity using column chromatography, and their thermal stability was characterized by differential scanning microcalorimetry. We evaluated both enzymes for their potential to enhance the cellulolytic activity of purified Trichoderma reesei Cel7A on pretreated corn stover.

  16. Ferulic Acid: A Hope for Alzheimer's Disease Therapy from Plants.

    PubMed

    Sgarbossa, Antonella; Giacomazza, Daniela; di Carlo, Marta

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of extracellular amyloid-beta peptide (A?) and intracellular neurofibrillar tangles, associated with loss of neurons in the brain and consequent learning and memory deficits. A? is the major component of the senile plaques and is believed to play a central role in the development and progress of AD both in oligomer and fibril forms. Inhibition of the formation of A? fibrils as well as the destabilization of preformed A? in the Central Nervous System (CNS) would be an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. Moreover, a large number of studies indicate that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction may play an important role in AD and their suppression or reduction via antioxidant use could be a promising preventive or therapeutic intervention for AD patients. Many antioxidant compounds have been demonstrated to protect the brain from A? neurotoxicity. Ferulic acid (FA) is an antioxidant naturally present in plant cell walls with anti-inflammatory activities and it is able to act as a free radical scavenger. Here we present the role of FA as inhibitor or disaggregating agent of amyloid structures as well as its effects on biological models. PMID:26184304

  17. Ferulic acid prevents liver injury and increases the anti-tumor effect of diosbulbin B in vivo *

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-ming; Sheng, Yu-chen; Ji, Li-li; Wang, Zheng-tao

    2014-01-01

    The present study is designed to investigate the protection by ferulic acid against the hepatotoxicity induced by diosbulbin B and its possible mechanism, and further observe whether ferulic acid augments diosbulbin B-induced anti-tumor activity. The results show that ferulic acid decreases diosbulbin B-increased serum alanine transaminase/aspartate transaminase (ALT/AST) levels. Ferulic acid also decreases lipid peroxide (LPO) levels which are elevated in diosbulbin B-treated mice. Histological evaluation of the liver demonstrates hydropic degeneration in diosbulbin B-treated mice, while ferulic acid reverses this injury. Moreover, the activities of copper- and zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and catalase (CAT) are decreased in the livers of diosbulbin B-treated mice, while ferulic acid reverses these decreases. Further results demonstrate that the mRNA expressions of CuZn-SOD and CAT in diosbulbin B-treated mouse liver are significantly decreased, while ferulic acid prevents this decrease. In addition, ferulic acid also augments diosbulbin B-induced tumor growth inhibition compared with diosbulbin B alone. Taken together, the present study shows that ferulic acid prevents diosbulbin B-induced liver injury via ameliorating diosbulbin B-induced liver oxidative stress injury and augments diosbulbin B-induced anti-tumor activity. PMID:24903991

  18. A complete enzymatic recovery of ferulic acid from corn residues with extracellular enzymes from Neosartorya spinosa NRRL185.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun-Dong; McClendon, Shara; Le, Tien; Taylor, Frank; Chen, Rachel Ruizhen

    2006-12-20

    An economic ferulic acid recovery from biomass via biological methods is of interest for a number of reasons. Ferulic acid is a precursor to vanillin synthesis. It is also a known antioxidant with potential food and medical applications. Despite its universal presence in all plant cell wall material, the complex structure of the plant cell wall makes ferulic acid recovery from biomass a challenging bioprocess. Previously, without pretreatment, very low (3-13%) recovery of ferulic acid from corn residues was achieved. We report here the discovery of a filamentous fungus Neosartorya spinosa NRRL185 capable of producing a full complement of enzymes to release ferulic acid and the development of an enzymatic process for a complete recovery of ferulic acid from corn bran and corn fibers. A partial characterization of the extracellular proteome of the microbe revealed the presence of at least seven cellulases and hemicellulases activities, including multiple iso-forms of xylanase and ferulic acid esterase. The recovered ferulic acid was bio-converted to vanillin, demonstrating its potential application in natural vanillin synthesis. The enzymatic ferulic acid recovery accompanied a significant release of reducing sugars (76-100%), suggesting much broader applications of the enzymes and enzyme mixtures from this organism. PMID:16917955

  19. An endogenous factor enhances ferulic acid decarboxylation catalyzed by phenolic acid decarboxylase from Candida guilliermondii

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The gene for a eukaryotic phenolic acid decarboxylase of Candida guilliermondii was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli for the first time. The structural gene contained an open reading frame of 504 bp, corresponding to 168 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 19,828 Da. The deduced amino sequence exhibited low similarity to those of functional phenolic acid decarboxylases previously reported from bacteria with 25-39% identity and to those of PAD1 and FDC1 proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae with less than 14% identity. The C. guilliermondii phenolic acid decarboxylase converted the main substrates ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid to the respective corresponding products. Surprisingly, the ultrafiltrate (Mr 10,000-cut-off) of the cell-free extract of C. guilliermondii remarkably activated the ferulic acid decarboxylation by the purified enzyme, whereas it was almost without effect on the p-coumaric acid decarboxylation. Gel-filtration chromatography of the ultrafiltrate suggested that an endogenous amino thiol-like compound with a molecular weight greater than Mr 1,400 was responsible for the activation. PMID:22217315

  20. Ferulic acid, an efficient inhibitor of type B trichothecene biosynthesis and Tri gene expression in Fusarium liquid cultures.

    PubMed

    Boutigny, Anne-Laure; Barreau, Christian; Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela; Verdal-Bonnin, Marie-Noëlle; Pinson-Gadais, Laëtitia; Richard-Forget, Florence

    2009-01-01

    The effect of ferulic acid, the most abundant phenolic acid in wheat bran, was studied in vitro on type B trichothecene biosynthesis by Fusarium. It was demonstrated that ferulic acid is an efficient inhibitor of mycotoxin production by all strains of Fusarium tested, including different chemotypes and species. To analyse the mechanism of toxin biosynthesis inhibition by ferulic acid, expression of representative Tri genes, involved in the trichothecene biosynthesis pathway, was monitored by real-time RT-PCR. A decrease in the level of Tri gene expression was measured, suggesting that inhibition of toxin synthesis by ferulic acid could be regulated at the transcriptional level. Moreover, toxin production was shown to be reduced proportionally to the initial amount of ferulic acid added in the culture medium. Addition of ferulic acid either at the spore germination step or to a mycelial culture resulted in the same final inhibitory effect on mycotoxin accumulation. A cumulative inhibitory effect on trichothecene biosynthesis was even observed with successive supplementation of ferulic acid. Ferulic acid, which content varies among wheat varieties, could then play an important role in modulating trichothecene biosynthesis by Fusarium in some wheat varieties. PMID:19249362

  1. The purification and characterization of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic (ferulic) acid esterase from Streptomyces olivochromogenes.

    PubMed

    Faulds, C B; Williamson, G

    1991-10-01

    A 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid (ferulic acid) esterase has been purified from the extracellular broth of cultures of Streptomyces olivochromogenes after growth on oat splet xylan. The purification procedure utilizes ion exchange on DEAE-BioGel A, anion exchange on Mono Q, gel filtration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The purified enzyme appeared as a single band on SDS-PAGE, with an apparent Mr of 29,000. Two bands, at pI7.9 and 8.5, were observed on isoelectric focusing. With methyl ferulate as substrate, the pH and temperature optima were 5.5 and 30 degrees C respectively, with a Km of 1.86 mM and Vmax of 0.3 mumols min-1 mg-1. The purfied enzyme released ferulic acid from de-starched wheat bran only in the presence of xylanase. PMID:1663152

  2. Ferulic acid combined with astragaloside IV protects against vascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yonghui; Qi, Fanghua; Song, Zhenhua; Zhang, Bo; Teng, Jialin

    2014-08-01

    Dysfunction of the endothelium is regarded as an important factor in the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus (DM). Unfortunately, prevention of the progression of vascular complications of DM remains pessimistic. Ferulic acid and astragaloside IV, isolated from traditional Chinese medicine Angelica sinensis and Radix astragali respectively, exhibit potential cardio-protective and anti-hyperglycemic properties. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects and underlying mechanism of ferulic acid and astragaloside IV against vascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rats. After the diabetic rat model was established using streptozotocin, sixty rats were divided into 6 groups (control, model, ferulic acid, astragaloside IV, ferulic acid + astragaloside IV, and metformin) and treated for 10 weeks. Blood samples were collected to measure levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbAlc), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), low density lipoproteins (Ox-LDL), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and creatinine (Cr), nitric oxide (NO) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and abdominal aorta tissue samples were collected for observing histological morphology changes of endothelium and detecting gene and protein expression of nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) P65, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?). We found that ferulic acid combined with astragaloside IV was capable of improving the structure of the aortic endothelium wall, attenuating the increase of HbAlc, TG, TC, LDL-C and Ox-LDL, promoting the release of NO and eNOS, and inhibiting over-activation of MCP-1, TNF-?, and NF-?B P65, without damage to liver and kidney function. In conclusion, ferulic acid combined with astragaloside IV exhibited significant protective effects against vascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rats through the NF-?B pathway involving decrease of Ox-LDL, increase of NO and eNOS, and activation of NF-?B P65, MCP-1 and TNF-?. PMID:25224628

  3. Ferulic Acid Exerts Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumor Activity by Targeting Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Song; Lu, Wei-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway; however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here, we identified ferulic acid as a novel fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) inhibitor and a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities. Ferulic acid demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, ferulic acid suppressed FGF1-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of ferulic acid on different molecular components and found that ferulic acid suppressed FGF1-triggered activation of FGFR1 and phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) signaling. Moreover, ferulic acid directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the PI3K-Akt pathway in melanoma cell. In vivo, using a melanoma xenograft model, ferulic acid showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of angiogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that ferulic acid targets the FGFR1-mediated PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, leading to the suppression of melanoma growth and angiogenesis. PMID:26473837

  4. A COMPLETE ENZYMATIC RECOVERY OF FERULIC ACID FROM CORN RESIDUES WITH EXTRACELLULAR ENZYMES FROM NEOSARTORYA SPINOSA NRRL 185

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An economic ferulic acid recovery from biomass via biological methods is of interest for a number of reasons. Ferulic acid is a precursor to vanillin synthesis. It is also a known antioxidant with potential food and medical applications. Despite its universal presence in all plant cell wall material...

  5. Overexpression of Aspergillus tubingensis faeA in protease-deficient Aspergillus niger enables ferulic acid production from plant material.

    PubMed

    Zwane, Eunice N; Rose, Shaunita H; van Zyl, Willem H; Rumbold, Karl; Viljoen-Bloom, Marinda

    2014-06-01

    The production of ferulic acid esterase involved in the release of ferulic acid side groups from xylan was investigated in strains of Aspergillus tubingensis, Aspergillus carneus, Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae. The highest activity on triticale bran as sole carbon source was observed with the A. tubingensis T8.4 strain, which produced a type A ferulic acid esterase active against methyl p-coumarate, methyl ferulate and methyl sinapate. The activity of the A. tubingensis ferulic acid esterase (AtFAEA) was inhibited twofold by glucose and induced twofold in the presence of maize bran. An initial accumulation of endoglucanase was followed by the production of endoxylanase, suggesting a combined action with ferulic acid esterase on maize bran. A genomic copy of the A. tubingensis faeA gene was cloned and expressed in A. niger D15#26 under the control of the A. niger gpd promoter. The recombinant strain has reduced protease activity and does not acidify the media, therefore promoting high-level expression of recombinant enzymes. It produced 13.5 U/ml FAEA after 5 days on autoclaved maize bran as sole carbon source, which was threefold higher than for the A. tubingensis donor strain. The recombinant AtFAEA was able to extract 50 % of the available ferulic acid from non-pretreated maize bran, making this enzyme suitable for the biological production of ferulic acid from lignocellulosic plant material. PMID:24664515

  6. FT-RAMAN SPECTRA OF UNSOAKED AND NAOH-SOAKED WHEAT KERNELS, BRAN AND FERULIC ACID

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sodium hydroxide (NaOH) test for determining wheat color class depends on the observation that upon soaking in NaOH, red wheat turns a darker red and white wheat turns straw yellow. To understand the mechanism of this test, Raman spectra of wheat bran, wheat starch, ferulic acid, and whole kern...

  7. Ferulic acid enhances IgE binding to peanut allergens in western blots.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because phenolic compounds can precipitate or complex with proteins, we postulated that interactions of phenolics with IgE antibodies help enhance IgE binding to peanut allergens in Western blots. Three different phenolics, such as, ferulic, caffeic and chlorogenic acids were examined. Each was mixe...

  8. Production and biochemical characterization of a type B ferulic acid esterase from Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Kheder, Fadi; Delaunay, Stéphane; Abo-Chameh, Ghassan; Paris, Cédric; Muniglia, Lionel; Girardin, Michel

    2009-06-01

    For the first time, the presence of a ferulic acid esterase (FAE) was demonstrated in Streptomyces ambofaciens. This extracellular enzyme was produced on a range of lignocellulosic substrates. The maximal level of activity was detected in the presence of either destarched wheat bran or oat spelt xylan as the sole carbon source. We found that 1% (m/v) of destarched wheat bran was the optimal concentration to induce its production. With this inducer, no ferulic acid dimers were released from the cell wall by the produced FAE. Interestingly, rape cattle cake (Brassica napus), which does not contain esterified ferulic acid, was also shown to induce the production of the FAE from S. ambofaciens. The FAE was partially purified from the culture supernatant. The purified enzyme was optimally active at pH 7 and 40 degrees C. The substrate specificity of the FAE from S. ambofaciens was investigated: the highest activity was determined with methyl p-coumarate, methyl ferulate, and methyl cinnamate. Furthermore, the FAE required a certain distance between the benzene ring and the ester bond to be active. According to these biochemical characteristics, the FAE from S. ambofaciens has been classified as a type B FAE. PMID:19767844

  9. Augmentation of ferulic acid-induced vasorelaxation with aging and its structure importance in thoracic aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Toshihiko; Kuroda, Takahiro; Kono, Miki; Hyoguchi, Mai; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2015-10-01

    Aging deteriorates vascular functions such as vascular reactivity and stiffness. Thus far, various reports suggest that bioactive compounds can improve vascular functions. However, few age-related studies of natural bioactive compounds are available. The present study attempted to evaluate age-related vasorelaxation of bioactive cinnamic acids, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid using aged rat thoracic aorta. Vasorelaxation was evaluated in thoracic aorta from both 8, 18, and 40 weeks old Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) respectively. The result indicated that caffeic acid possessed the vasorelaxation regardless of aging in WKY and SHR. Moreover, the vasorelaxation of ferulic acid enhanced with aging in SHR. The vasorelaxation behavior was acted in an endothelium-independent manner. To access structure importance of enhanced vasorelaxation, analogues of ferulic acid were tested. In 40 weeks old SHR, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid and coniferyl alcohol exhibited equivalent vasorelaxation activity with ferulic acid, providing the structural importance of methoxy-modified 3-position on the phenyl ring and 2-propenoic moiety. These results firstly demonstrated that enhanced vasorelaxation of ferulic acid with aging and 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid and coniferyl alcohol, along with ferulic acid, might exhibit the therapeutic potential of vasoactive power with aging. PMID:26310777

  10. Differential distribution of ferulic acid to the major plasma constituents in relation to its potential as an antioxidant.

    PubMed Central

    Castelluccio, C; Bolwell, G P; Gerrish, C; Rice-Evans, C

    1996-01-01

    The hydroxycinnamates, intermediates in the phenylpropanoid synthetic pathway, are effective in enhancing the resistance of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation in the order caffeic acid > ferulic acid > p-coumaric acid. It is unclear whether the mode of action of ferulic acid as an antioxidant is based on its activities in the aqueous or the lipophilic phase. Partitioning of 14C-labelled ferulic acid into plasma and its components, LDL and the albumin-rich fractions, has been studied under conditions of maximum aqueous solubility. The majority of ferulic acid associates with the albumin-rich fraction of the plasma, although a proportion is also found to partition between the LDL and aqueous phases; however, ferulic acid does not associate with the lipid portion of the LDL particle, suggesting that it exerts its antioxidant properties from the aqueous phase. This is of particular interest since the results demonstrate that ferulic acid is a more effective antioxidant against LDL oxidation than the hydrophilic antioxidant ascorbic acid. PMID:8687419

  11. Controlled release of tyrosol and ferulic acid encapsulated in chitosan-gelatin films after electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benbettaïeb, Nasreddine; Assifaoui, Ali; Karbowiak, Thomas; Debeaufort, Frédéric; Chambin, Odile

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the study of the release kinetics of antioxidants (ferulic acid and tyrosol) incorporated into chitosan-gelatin edible films after irradiation processes. The aim was to determine the influence of electron beam irradiation (at 60 kGy) on the retention of antioxidants in the film, their release in water (pH=7) at 25 °C, in relation with the barrier and mechanical properties of biopolymer films. The film preparation process coupled to the irradiation induced a loss of about 20% of tyrosol but did not affect the ferulic acid content. However, 27% of the ferulic acid remained entrapped in the biopolymer network during the release experiments whereas all tyrosol was released. Irradiation induced a reduction of the release rate for both compounds, revealing that cross-linking occurred during irradiation. This was confirmed by the mechanical properties enhancement which tensile strength value significantly increased and by the reduction of permeabilities. Although molecular weights, molar volume and molecular radius of the two compounds are very similar, the effective diffusivity of tyrosol was 40 times greater than that of ferulic acid. The much lower effective diffusion coefficient of ferulic acid as determined from the release kinetics was explained by the interactions settled between ferulic acid molecules and the gelatin-chitosan matrix. As expected, the electron beam irradiation allowed modulating the retention and then the release of antioxidants encapsulated.

  12. Cold water fish gelatin modification by a natural phenolic cross-linker (ferulic acid and caffeic acid).

    PubMed

    Araghi, Maryam; Moslehi, Zeinab; Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza; Mostahsan, Amir; Salamat, Nima; Daraei Garmakhany, Amir

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays use of edible films and coatings is increasing due to their biodegradability and environment friendly properties. Fish gelatin obtained from fish skin wastage can be used as an appropriate protein compound for replacing pork gelatin to produce edible film. In this study films were prepared by combination of fish gelatin and different concentration (0%, 1%, 3%, and 5%) of two phenolic compounds (caffeic acid and ferulic acid). The film was prepared at pH > 10 and temperature of 60?c under continuous injection of O2 and addition of the plasticizer sorbitol/glycerol. Results showed that solubility, oxygen permeability, and water vapor permeability were decreased for caffeic acid and the highest effect was observed at concentration of 5%. Solubility had a linear relationship with concentration of phenolic compound in film containing ferulic acid, however, no significant change was observed in vapor and O2 permeability. A comparison between two phenolic compounds showed that caffeic acid had the highest effect in decreasing solubility, water vapor permeability, and oxygen permeability. Caffeic acid is more effective phenolic compound compared with Ferulic acid that can increase safety of biodegradable packaging by improving their barrier and physicochemical properties. PMID:26405523

  13. Cold water fish gelatin modification by a natural phenolic cross-linker (ferulic acid and caffeic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Araghi, Maryam; Moslehi, Zeinab; Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza; Mostahsan, Amir; Salamat, Nima; Daraei Garmakhany, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays use of edible films and coatings is increasing due to their biodegradability and environment friendly properties. Fish gelatin obtained from fish skin wastage can be used as an appropriate protein compound for replacing pork gelatin to produce edible film. In this study films were prepared by combination of fish gelatin and different concentration (0%, 1%, 3%, and 5%) of two phenolic compounds (caffeic acid and ferulic acid). The film was prepared at pH > 10 and temperature of 60?c under continuous injection of O2 and addition of the plasticizer sorbitol/glycerol. Results showed that solubility, oxygen permeability, and water vapor permeability were decreased for caffeic acid and the highest effect was observed at concentration of 5%. Solubility had a linear relationship with concentration of phenolic compound in film containing ferulic acid, however, no significant change was observed in vapor and O2 permeability. A comparison between two phenolic compounds showed that caffeic acid had the highest effect in decreasing solubility, water vapor permeability, and oxygen permeability. Caffeic acid is more effective phenolic compound compared with Ferulic acid that can increase safety of biodegradable packaging by improving their barrier and physicochemical properties. PMID:26405523

  14. Generation of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accumulating heterologous endo-xylanase or ferulic acid esterase in the endosperm

    SciTech Connect

    Harholt, Jesper; Bach, Inga C; Lind-Bouquin, Solveig; Nunan, Kylie J.; Madrid, Susan M.; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holm, Preben B.; Scheller, Henrik V.

    2009-12-08

    Endo-xylanase (from Bacillus subtilis) or ferulic acid esterase (from Aspergillus niger) were expressed in wheat under the control of the endosperm specific 1DX5 glutenin promoter. Constructs both with and without the endoplasmic reticulum retention signal KDEL were used. Transgenic plants were recovered in all four cases but no qualitative differences could be observed whether KDEL was added or not. Endo-xylanase activity in transgenic grains was increased between two and three fold relative to wild type. The grains were shriveled and had a 25-33% decrease in mass. Extensive analysis of the cell walls showed a 10-15% increase in arabinose to xylose ratio, a 50% increase in the proportion of water extractable arabinoxylan, and a shift in the MW of the water extractable arabinoxylan from being mainly larger than 85 kD to being between 2 kD and 85 kD. Ferulic acid esterase expressing grains were also shriveled and the seed weight was decreased by 20-50%. No ferulic acid esterase activity could be detected in wild type grains whereas ferulic acid esterase activity was detected in transgenic lines. The grain cell walls had 15-40% increase in water unextractable arabinoxylan and a decrease in monomeric ferulic acid between 13 and 34%. In all the plants the observed changes are consistent with a plant response that serves to minimize the effect of the heterologously expressed enzymes by increasing arabinoxylan biosynthesis and cross-linking.

  15. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gallage, Nethaji J.; Hansen, Esben H.; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  16. Enzymatic production of ferulic acid from defatted rice bran by using a combination of bacterial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Uraji, Misugi; Kimura, Masayo; Inoue, Yosikazu; Kawakami, Kayoko; Kumagai, Yuya; Harazono, Koichi; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2013-11-01

    Ferulic acid (FA), which is present in the cell walls of some plants, is best known for its antioxidant property. By combining a commercial enzyme that shows FA esterase activity with several Streptomyces carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes, we succeeded in enhancing the enzymatic production of FA from defatted rice bran. In particular, the combination of three xylanases, an ?-L-arabinofuranosidase, and an acetyl xylan esterase from Streptomyces spp. produced the highest increase in the amount of released FAs among all the enzymes in the Streptomyces enzymes library. This enzyme combination also had an effect on FA production from other biomasses, such as raw rice bran, wheat bran, and corncob. PMID:23512135

  17. [Study on compatibility of Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma and Chuanxiong Rhizoma based on pharmacokinetics of effective components salvianolic acid B and ferulic acid in rat plasma].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-ying; Zhang, Hong; Dong, Yu; Ren, Wei-guang; Chen, Heng-wen

    2015-04-01

    A study was made on the pharmacokinetic regularity of effective components salvianolic acid B and ferulic acid in Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma (SMRR) and Chuanxiong Rhizoma(CR) in rats, so as to discuss the compatibility mechanism of Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma and Chuanxiong Rhizoma. Rats were randomly divided into three groups and intravenously injected with 50 mg x kg(-1) salvianolic acid B for the single SMRR extracts group, 0.5 mg x kg(-1) ferulic acid for the single CR extracts group and 50 mg x kg(-1) salvianolic acid B + 0.5 mg x kg(-1) ferulic acid for the SMRR and CR combination group. The blood samples were collected at different time points and purified by liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. With chloramphenicol as internal standard (IS), UPLC was adopted to determine concentrations of salvianolic acid B and ferulic acid. The pharmacokinetic parameters of salvianolic acid B and ferulic acid were calculated with WinNonlin 6.2 software and analyzed by SPSS 19.0 statistical software. The UPLC analysis method was adopted to determine salvianolic acid B and ferulic acid in rat plasma, including linear equation, stability, repeatability, precision and recovery. The established sample processing and analysis methods were stable and reliable, with significant differences in major pharmacokinetic parameters, e.g., area under the curve (AUC), mean residence time (MRT) and terminal half-life (t(1/2)). According to the experimental results, the combined application of SMRR and CR can significantly impact the pharmacokinetic process of their effective components in rats and promote the wide distribution, shorten the action time and prolong the in vivo action time of salvianolic acid B and increase the blood drug concentration and accelerate the clearance of ferulic acid in vivo. PMID:26281604

  18. Development of a new ferulic acid certified reference material for use in clinical chemistry and pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dezhi; Wang, Fengfeng; Zhang, Li; Gong, Ningbo; Lv, Yang

    2015-05-01

    This study compares the results of three certified methods, namely differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the mass balance (MB) method and coulometric titrimetry (CT), in the purity assessment of ferulic acid certified reference material (CRM). Purity and expanded uncertainty as determined by the three methods were respectively 99.81%, 0.16%; 99.79%, 0.16%; and 99.81%, 0.26% with, in all cases, a coverage factor (k) of 2 (P=95%). The purity results are consistent indicating that the combination of DSC, the MB method and CT provides a confident assessment of the purity of suitable CRMs like ferulic acid. PMID:26579451

  19. Development of a new ferulic acid certified reference material for use in clinical chemistry and pharmaceutical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dezhi; Wang, Fengfeng; Zhang, Li; Gong, Ningbo; Lv, Yang

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the results of three certified methods, namely differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the mass balance (MB) method and coulometric titrimetry (CT), in the purity assessment of ferulic acid certified reference material (CRM). Purity and expanded uncertainty as determined by the three methods were respectively 99.81%, 0.16%; 99.79%, 0.16%; and 99.81%, 0.26% with, in all cases, a coverage factor (k) of 2 (P=95%). The purity results are consistent indicating that the combination of DSC, the MB method and CT provides a confident assessment of the purity of suitable CRMs like ferulic acid. PMID:26579451

  20. Enzymatic oxidative treatments of wheat bran layers: effects on ferulic acid composition and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Peyron, S; Abecassis, J; Autran, J C; Rouau, X

    2001-10-01

    Enzymatic treatments known to induce the gelation of feruloylated arabinoxylans solutions were applied to tissue strips isolated from peripheral layers of wheat grain to tentatively produce in situ arabinoxylan reticulation. The treatments by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and manganese dependent peroxidase (MnP) induced a dimerization of ferulic acid (FA) in wheat bran with concomitant decrease of arabinoxylan solubility. Similar results were obtained, but to a lesser extent, by simple incubation of bran strips in water, suggesting the action of endogenous peroxidases. The fact that these treatments proved to be ineffective on the isolated aleurone layer and pericarp suggested that dimerization occurred mostly at the aleurone-pericarp interface. In addition, the MnP system generated a consumption of monomer and dimer of ferulic acid in the pericarp, perhaps due to their incorporation into lignin. Micro-mechanical tests using DMTA were performed on isolated tissue strips and showed that oxidation of wheat bran increased their mechanical strength (increase of stress and strain to rupture). PMID:11600009

  1. Synergistic inhibition of cancer cell proliferation with a combination of ?-tocotrienol and ferulic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Tatewaki, Naoto; Nishida, Hiroshi; Kurata, Tadao; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ?-Tocotrienol (?-T3) and ferulic acid (FA) synergistically inhibit cancer cell growth. • The combination of ?-T3 and FA induces G1 arrest by up-regulating p21. • The synergy is attributed to an increase in the cellular concentration of ?-T3 by FA. - Abstract: Rice bran consists of many functional compounds and thus much attention has been focused on the health benefits of its components. Here, we investigated the synergistic inhibitory effects of its components, particularly ?-tocotrienol (?-T3) and ferulic acid (FA), against the proliferation of an array of cancer cells, including DU-145 (prostate cancer), MCF-7 (breast cancer), and PANC-1 (pancreatic cancer) cells. The combination of ?-T3 and FA markedly reduced cell proliferation relative to ?-T3 alone, and FA had no effect when used alone. Although ?-T3 induced G1 arrest by up-regulating p21 in PANC-1 cells, more cells accumulated in G1 phase with the combination of ?-T3 and FA. This synergistic effect was attributed to an increase in the cellular concentration of ?-T3 by FA. Our results suggest that the combination of ?-T3 and FA may present a new strategy for cancer prevention and therapy.

  2. Biotransformation of Eugenol to Ferulic Acid by a Recombinant Strain of Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    Overhage, Jörg; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Priefert, Horst

    2002-01-01

    The gene loci ehyAB, calA, and calB, encoding eugenol hydroxylase, coniferyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase, respectively, which are involved in the first steps of eugenol catabolism in Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199, were amplified by PCR and combined to construct a catabolic gene cassette. This gene cassette was cloned in the newly designed broad-host-range vector pBBR1-JO2 (pBBR1-JO2ehyABcalAcalB) and transferred to Ralstonia eutropha H16. A recombinant strain of R. eutropha H16 harboring this plasmid expressed functionally active eugenol hydroxylase, coniferyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase. Cells of R. eutropha H16(pBBR1-JO2ehyABcalAcalB) from the late-exponential growth phase were used as biocatalysts for the biotransformation of eugenol to ferulic acid. A maximum conversion rate of 2.9 mmol of eugenol per h per liter of culture was achieved with a yield of 93.8 mol% of ferulic acid from eugenol within 20 h, without further optimization. PMID:12200281

  3. Octadecyl ferulate behavior in 1,2-dioleoylphosphocholine liposomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Octadecyl ferulate, a lipophilic derivative of ferulic acid having antioxidant properties, is found throughout the plant and fungi kingdoms. Octadecyl ferulate was prepared using solid acid catalyst, monitored using supercritical fluid chromatograph and purified to a 42% yield. Differential scanning...

  4. Thioacidolysis Marker Compound for Ferulic Acid Incorporation into Angiosperm Lignins (and an Indicator for Cinnamoyl-coenzyme-A Reductase Deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A molecular marker compound, derived from lignin by the thioacidolysis degradative method, for structures produced when ferulic acid is incorporated into lignification in angiosperms (poplar, Arabidopsis, tobacco) has been structurally identified as 1,2,2-trithioethyl ethylguaiacol [1-(4-hydroxy-3-m...

  5. Thermosensitive chitosan-based hydrogels for sustained release of ferulic acid on corneal wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Yao; Woung, Lin-Chung; Yen, Jiin-Cherng; Tseng, Po-Chen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Sung, Yen-Jen; Liu, Kuan-Ting; Cheng, Yung-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative damage to cornea can be induced by alkaline chemical burn which may cause vision loss or blindness. Recent studies showed that exogenous application of natural antioxidants may be a potential treatment for corneal wound healing. However, low ocular bioavailability and short residence time are the limiting factors of topically administered antioxidants. Ferulic acid (FA) is a natural phenolic compound and an excellent antioxidant. The study was aimed to investigate the effects of FA in corneal epithelial cells (CECs) under oxidative stress and evaluate the feasibility of use the thermosensitive chitosan-based hydrogel containing FA for corneal wound healing. The results demonstrated that post-treatment of FA on CECs could decrease the inflammation-level and apoptosis. In the rabbit corneal alkali burn model, post-treatment FA-loaded hydrogel may promote the corneal wound healing. The results of study suggest that FA-loaded hydrogel may have the potential applications in treating corneal alkali burn. PMID:26453882

  6. Factors affecting ferulic acid release from Brewer's spent grain by Fusarium oxysporum enzymatic system.

    PubMed

    Xiros, Charilaos; Moukouli, Maria; Topakas, Evangelos; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the factors affecting ferulic acid (FA) release from Brewer's spent grain (BSG), by the crude enzyme extract of Fusarium oxysporum were investigated. In order to evaluate the importance of the multienzyme preparation on FA release, the synergistic action of feruloyl esterase (FAE, FoFaeC-12213) and xylanase (Trichoderma longibrachiatum M3) monoenzymes was studied. More than double amount of FA release (1 mg g(-1) dry BSG) was observed during hydrolytic reactions by the crude enzyme extract compared to hydrolysis by the monoenzymes (0.37 mg g(-1) dry BSG). The protease content of the crude extract and the inhibitory effect of FA as an end-product were also evaluated concerning their effect on FA release. The protease treatment prior to hydrolysis by monoenzymes enhanced FA release about 100%, while, for the first time in literature, FA in solution found to have a significant inhibitory effect on FAE activity and on total FA release. PMID:19592240

  7. Cytotoxicity of Ferulic Acid on T24 Cell Line Differentiated by Different Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chiung-Chi; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Wang, Hui-Er; Chang, Chi-Huang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Chou, Kuang-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Ferulic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid) (FA) is a ubiquitous health beneficial phenolic acid. Although FA has shown a diversity of biological activities including anti-inflammatory, antihypercholesterolemic and anticancer bioactivities, studies revealing its adverse effects are accumulating. Recently, 3D-cultures are shown to exhibit uniquely biological behaviors different from that of 2D cultures. To understand whether the cytotoxicity of FA against the T24 cell line (a bladder cancer cell line) in 2D-culture could consistently retain similar bioactivity if cultured in the 3D-systems, we conducted this experiment with 2 mM FA. Much higher cytotoxicity was found for 3D- than 2D-culture, showing (2D vs. 3D): apoptotic rates, 64% and 76%; cell killing rates, 3.00 × 105?cells?mmol?1·h?1 and 2.63 × 106 cells?mmol?1·h?1, attaining a 8.77-fold. FA upregulated the activities at 72?h (2D vs. 3D in folds that of control): SOD, 1.73-folds (P < 0.05) versus 3.18 folds (P < 0.001); and catalase, 2.58 versus 1.33-folds. Comparing to the control (without FA), Bcl-2 was prominently downregulated while Bax, caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9 were more upregulated in 3D-cultures (P < 0.05). Conclusively, different microenvironments could elicit different biological significance which in part can be ascribed to different mass transport rate. PMID:23738328

  8. Structural Basis of Enzymatic Activity for the Ferulic Acid Decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lianming; Sun, Yuna; Huang, Jingwen; Li, Xuemei; Cao, Yi; Meng, Zhaohui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2011-01-01

    Microbial ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) catalyzes the transformation of ferulic acid to 4-hydroxy-3-methoxystyrene (4-vinylguaiacol) via non-oxidative decarboxylation. Here we report the crystal structures of the Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 FADase and the enzyme in complex with substrate analogues. Our analyses revealed that FADase possessed a half-opened bottom ?-barrel with the catalytic pocket located between the middle of the core ?-barrel and the helical bottom. Its structure shared a high degree of similarity with members of the phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) superfamily. Structural analysis revealed that FADase catalyzed reactions by an “open-closed” mechanism involving a pocket of 8×8×15 Å dimension on the surface of the enzyme. The active pocket could directly contact the solvent and allow the substrate to enter when induced by substrate analogues. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that the E134A mutation decreased the enzyme activity by more than 60%, and Y21A and Y27A mutations abolished the enzyme activity completely. The combined structural and mutagenesis results suggest that during decarboxylation of ferulic acid by FADase, Trp25 and Tyr27 are required for the entering and proper orientation of the substrate while Glu134 and Asn23 participate in proton transfer. PMID:21283705

  9. Determination of tacrine-6-ferulic acid in rat plasma by LC-MS/MS and its application to pharmacokinetics study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuman; Zhang, Peiting; Pi, Rongbiao; Zhou, Yuting; Deng, Xuejiao; Xie, Zhiyong; Liao, Qiongfeng

    2014-10-01

    Tacrine, as a drug for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD), has low efficacy owing to its single function and serious side effects. However, tacrine-6-ferulic acid (T6FA), the dimer which added ferulic acid to tacrine, has been found to be a promising multifunctional drug candidate for AD and much more potent and selective on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) than tacrine. The aim of the present work was to develop and validate an LC-MS/MS method with electrospray ionization for the quantification of T6FA in rat plasma using tacrine-3-ferulic acid (T3FA) as internal standard and to examine its application for pharmacokinetic study in rats. Following a single liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate, chromatographic separation was achieved at 25 °C on a BDS Hypersil C18 column with a mobile phase composed of 1% formic acid and methonal (30:70, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. Quantification was achieved by monitoring the selected ions at m/z 474.2 ? 298.1 for T6FA and m/z 432.2 ? 199.0 for T3FA. The method was validated to be rapid, specific, accurate and precise over the concentration range of 0.5-1000.0 ng/mL in rat samples. Furthermore, it was successfully applied for the pharmacokinetic measurement of T6FA with an oral administration at 40 mg/kg to rats. PMID:24706520

  10. Ferulic acid chronic treatment exerts antidepressant-like effect: role of antioxidant defense system.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Juliana; Rodrigues, Andre Felipe; Rós, Adriana de Sousa; de Castro, Bianca Blanski; de Lima, Daniela Delwing; Magro, Débora Delwing Dal; Zeni, Ana Lúcia Bertarello

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been claimed a place in pathophysiology of depression; however, the details of the neurobiology of this condition remains incompletely understood. Recently, treatments employing antioxidants have been thoroughly researched. Ferulic acid (FA) is a phenolic compound with antioxidant and antidepressant-like effects. Herein, we investigated the involvement of the antioxidant activity of chronic oral FA treatment in its antidepressant-like effect using the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swimming test (FST) in mice. The modulation of antioxidant system in blood, hippocampus and cerebral cortex was assessed after stress induction through TST and FST. Our results show that FA at the dose of 1 mg/kg has antidepressant-like effect without affecting locomotor activity. The stress induced by despair tests was able to decrease significantly the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the blood, catalase (CAT) in the blood and cerebral cortex and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in the cerebral cortex. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) levels were increased significantly in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, the results show that FA was capable to increase SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities and decrease TBA-RS levels in the blood, hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These findings demonstrated that FA treatment in low doses is capable to exert antidepressant-like effect with the involvement of the antioxidant defense system modulation. PMID:26340979

  11. Coencapsulation of Ferulic and Gallic acid in hp-b-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Olga, Gortzi; Styliani, Christophoridou; Ioannis, Roussis G

    2015-10-15

    The complexes formed by two polyphenols, trans-Ferulic acid (FA) and Gallic acid (GA) with 2-hydroxypropyl-b-cyclodextrin (HP?CD), by the spray-drying method, were studied. Encapsulation-efficiencies (EE) of the complexes prepared were evaluated by HPLC. In the case of co-encapsulation, the EE of GA was lowered, whereas that of FA was almost stable, indicating a possible antagonistic relationship between the two phenols for the HP?CD cavity. The physicochemical characterization of the complexes was carried out by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM observations revealed that the coencapsulated phenolic complex resulted in a more rounded shape outer surfaces of HP?CD than when encapsulated separately. FT-IR and DSC data indicated that the two polyphenols exhibit a possible interaction in the coencapsulated complex. The complexes showed no loss of their ability to scavenge DPPH radical relatively to the single agent at the concentrations used. PMID:25952838

  12. Structure and Mechanism of Ferulic Acid Decarboxylase (FDC1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiya, Mohammad Wadud; Lee, Soon Goo

    2015-01-01

    The nonoxidative decarboxylation of aromatic acids occurs in a range of microbes and is of interest for bioprocessing and metabolic engineering. Although phenolic acid decarboxylases provide useful tools for bioindustrial applications, the molecular bases for how these enzymes function are only beginning to be examined. Here we present the 2.35-Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the ferulic acid decarboxylase (FDC1; UbiD) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. FDC1 shares structural similarity with the UbiD family of enzymes that are involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis. The position of 4-vinylphenol, the product of p-coumaric acid decarboxylation, in the structure identifies a large hydrophobic cavity as the active site. Differences in the ?2e-?5 loop of chains in the crystal structure suggest that the conformational flexibility of this loop allows access to the active site. The structure also implicates Glu285 as the general base in the nonoxidative decarboxylation reaction catalyzed by FDC1. Biochemical analysis showed a loss of enzymatic activity in the E285A mutant. Modeling of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-5-decaprenylbenzoate, a partial structure of the physiological UbiD substrate, in the binding site suggests that an ?30-Å-long pocket adjacent to the catalytic site may accommodate the isoprenoid tail of the substrate needed for ubiquinone biosynthesis in yeast. The three-dimensional structure of yeast FDC1 provides a template for guiding protein engineering studies aimed at optimizing the efficiency of aromatic acid decarboxylation reactions in bioindustrial applications. PMID:25862228

  13. A modular esterase from Penicillium funiculosum which releases ferulic acid from plant cell walls and binds crystalline cellulose contains a carbohydrate binding module.

    PubMed

    Kroon, P A; Williamson, G; Fish, N M; Archer, D B; Belshaw, N J

    2000-12-01

    An esterase was isolated from cultures of the filamentous fungus Penicillium funiculosum grown on sugar beet pulp as the sole carbon source. The enzyme (ferulic acid esterase B, FAEB) was shown to be a cinnamoyl esterase (CE), efficiently releasing hydroxycinnamic acids from synthetic ester substrates and plant cell walls, and bound strongly to microcrystalline cellulose. A gene fragment was obtained by PCR using partial amino-acid sequences obtained from the pure enzyme and used to a probe a P. funiculosum genomic DNA library. A clone containing a 1120-bp ORF, faeB, was obtained which encoded a putative 353-residue preprotein including an 18-residue signal peptide, which when expressed in Eschericia coli produced CE activity. Northern analysis showed that transcription of faeB was tightly regulated, being stimulated by growth of the fungus on sugar beet pulp but inhibited by free glucose. The faeB promoter sequence contains putative motifs for binding an activator protein, XLNR, and a carbon catabolite repressor protein, CREA. FAEB was comprised of two distinct domains separated by a 20 residue Thr/Ser/Pro linker region. The N-terminal domain comprised 276 amino acids, contained a G-X-S-X-G motif typical of serine esterases, and was shown to be a member of a family comprising serine esterases, including microbial acetyl xylan esterases, poly (3-hydroxyalkanoate) depolymerases and CEs, and proteins of unknown function from Mycobacterium spp. and plants. The C-terminal domain comprised 39 amino acids and closely resembled the family 1 cellulose binding carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM) of fungal glycosyl hydrolases. This is the first report of a fungal CE with a CBM. PMID:11082184

  14. Ferulic acid-coupled chitosan: thermal stability and utilization as an antioxidant for biodegradable active packaging film.

    PubMed

    Woranuch, Sarekha; Yoksan, Rangrong; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2015-01-22

    The aim of the present research was to study the thermal stability of ferulic acid after coupling onto chitosan, and the possibility of using ferulic acid-coupled chitosan (FA-CTS) as an antioxidant for biodegradable active packaging film. FA-CTS was incorporated into biodegradable film via a two-step process, i.e. compounding extrusion at temperatures up to 150°C followed by blown film extrusion at temperatures up to 175°C. Although incorporation of FA-CTS with a content of 0.02-0.16% (w/w) caused decreased water vapor barrier property and reduced extensibility, the biodegradable films possessed improved oxygen barrier property and antioxidant activity. Radical scavenging activity and reducing power of film containing FA-CTS were higher than those of film containing naked ferulic acid, by about 254% and 94%, respectively. Tensile strength and rigidity of the films were not significantly affected by the addition of FA-CTS with a content of 0.02-0.08% (w/w). The above results suggested that FA-CTS could potentially be used as an antioxidant for active packaging film. PMID:25439957

  15. Ferulic acid ameliorates nerve injury induced by cerebral ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LEIMING; WANG, HONGSHENG; WANG, TIAN; JIANG, NA; YU, PENGFEI; CHONG, YATING; FU, FENGHUA

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of ferulic acid (FA) on nerve injury induced by cerebral ischemia. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery and reperfusion 90 min later in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Daily treatment of the rats with FA was initiated 30 min after the surgery, and was continued for 7 days. The efficacy of FA against nerve injury was assessed by neurological deficit scores as well as pathohistological observation. The expression levels in the brain and level in the peripheral blood of erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The results showed that FA attenuated nerve injury of the hippocampus, significantly ameliorated neurological deficits, and increased EPO but not G-CSF expression in the hippocampus and the peripheral blood of ischemic rats. The findings indicate that FA has certain protective effects on the nerve injury of cerebral ischemia, and suggest that promoting EPO in the brain and peripheral blood may be one of the neuroprotective mechanisms of FA. PMID:25667662

  16. Ferulic acid inhibits gamma radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and enhances the survival of mice.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Dharmendra Kumar; Devasagayam, Thomas Paul Asir

    2013-02-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a monophenolic phenylpropanoid occurring in plant products such as rice bran, green tea, and coffee beans. It has been shown to have significant antioxidant effects in many studies. In the present study, we show that intraperitoneal administration of FA at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight 1 hour prior to or immediately after whole-body ?-irradiation of mice with 4 Gy results in considerable reduction in the micronuclei formation in peripheral blood reticulocytes. Administration of the same amount of FA immediately after 4 Gy ?-irradiation showed significant decrease in the amount of DNA strand breaks in murine peripheral blood leukocytes and bone marrow cells as examined by comet assay. Further, immunostaining of mouse splenic lymphocytes for phspho-?H2AX was carried out, and it was observed that FA inhibits the ?H2AX foci formation. Finally, the survival of mice upon 6, 8, and 10 Gy ?-ray exposure was monitored. FA enhances the survival of mice by a factor of 2.5 at a dose of 6 Gy ?-radiation but not at higher doses. In conclusion, FA has protective potential in both pre- and postirradiation exposure scenarios and enhances the survival of mice possibly by decreasing DNA damage as examined by ?H2AX foci, micronuclei formation, and comet assay. PMID:23009583

  17. Ultrasensitive Detection of Ferulic Acid Using Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) Functionalized Graphene-Based Electrochemical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin-jie; Gao, Xia; Zhang, Pei; Feng, Shi-lan; Hu, Fang-di; Li, Ying-dong; Wang, Chun-ming

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical redox of ferulic acid (FA) was investigated systematically by cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) functionalized graphene-modified glassy carbon electrode (PDDA-G/GCE) as a working electrode. A simple and sensitive differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique was proposed for the direct quantitative determination of FA in Angelica sinensis and spiked human urine samples for the first time. The dependence of the intensities of currents and potentials on nature of the supporting electrolyte, pH, scan rate, and concentration was investigated. Under optimal conditions, the proposed sensor exhibited excellent electrochemical sensitivity to FA, and the oxidation peak current was proportional to FA concentration in the range of 8.95 × 10?8?M ~5.29 × 10?5?M, with a relatively low detection limit of 4.42 × 10?8?M. This fabricated sensor also displayed acceptable reproducibility, long-term stability, and high selectivity with negligible interferences from common interfering species. Besides, it was applied to detect FA in Angelica sinensis and biological samples with satisfactory results, making it a potential alternative tool for the quantitative detection of FA in pharmaceutical analysis. PMID:24900937

  18. Ferulic Acid: A Hope for Alzheimer’s Disease Therapy from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sgarbossa, Antonella; Giacomazza, Daniela; di Carlo, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of extracellular amyloid-beta peptide (A?) and intracellular neurofibrillar tangles, associated with loss of neurons in the brain and consequent learning and memory deficits. A? is the major component of the senile plaques and is believed to play a central role in the development and progress of AD both in oligomer and fibril forms. Inhibition of the formation of A? fibrils as well as the destabilization of preformed A? in the Central Nervous System (CNS) would be an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. Moreover, a large number of studies indicate that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction may play an important role in AD and their suppression or reduction via antioxidant use could be a promising preventive or therapeutic intervention for AD patients. Many antioxidant compounds have been demonstrated to protect the brain from A? neurotoxicity. Ferulic acid (FA) is an antioxidant naturally present in plant cell walls with anti-inflammatory activities and it is able to act as a free radical scavenger. Here we present the role of FA as inhibitor or disaggregating agent of amyloid structures as well as its effects on biological models. PMID:26184304

  19. Synergistic antidepressant-like effect of ferulic acid in combination with piperine: involvement of monoaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Li, Gaowen; Ruan, Lina; Chen, Ruijie; Wang, Renye; Xie, Xupei; Zhang, Meixi; Chen, Lichao; Yan, Qizhi; Reed, Miranda; Chen, Jiechun; Xu, Ying; Pan, Jianchun; Huang, Wu

    2015-12-01

    The lifetime prevalence rate for major depressive disorder (MDD) is approximately 17 % for most developed countries around the world. Dietary polyphenols are currently used as an adjuvant therapy to accelerate the therapeutic efficacy on depression. Ferulic acid (FA) or 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-cinnamic acid (Fig. 1a) is a main polyphenolic component of Chinese herb Radix Angelicae Sinensis, which is found to have antidepressant-like effects through regulating serotonergic and noradrenergic function. The present study examined the synergistic effect of low doses of FA combined with subthreshold dose of piperine, a bioavailability enhancer, on depression-like behaviors in mice, and investigated the possible mechanism. The administration of FA, even in the highest dose tested, reduced immobility time by 60 % in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests (TST and FST) in mice when compared to control. The maximal antidepressant-like effect of FA was obtained with 200 mg/kg. In addition, piperine only produced a weak antidepressant-like effect in the TST and FST. However, the evidence from the interaction analysis suggested a synergistic effect when low doses of FA were combined with a subthreshold dose of piperine. Further neurochemical evidence such as monoamine levels in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus and measurements of monoamine oxidase activity also supported a synergistic effect of FA and piperine in the enhancement of monoaminergic function. This finding supports the concept that the combination strategy might be an alternative therapy in the treatment of psychiatric disorders with high efficacy and low side effects. PMID:26220010

  20. Neuroprotective potential of ferulic acid in the rotenone model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Shreesh; Javed, Hayate; Azimullah, Sheikh; Abul Khair, Salema B; Haque, M Emdadul

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, and the second most common form of neurodegenerative disorders. In order to explore novel agents for the treatment of PD, in the current study, we have evaluated the neuroprotective efficacy of ferulic acid (FA) using rotenone (ROT)-induced rat model of PD. ROT was administered 2.5 mg/kg body weight to male Wistar rats for 4 weeks to induce the PD. Since PD is progressive and chronic in nature, the paradigm for evaluating FA was based on chronic administration for 4 weeks at the dose of 50 mg/kg, 30 minutes prior to ROT administration. ROT administration caused significant reduction in endogenous antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione. ROT challenge-induced lipid peroxidation evidenced by increased malondialdehyde following perturbation of antioxidant defense. Apart from oxidative stress, ROT also activated proinflammatory cytokines and enhanced inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The immunofluorescence analysis revealed a significant increase in the number of activated microglia and astrocytes accompanied by a significant loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta area upon ROT injection. However, treatment with FA rescued DA neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta area and nerve terminals in the striatum from the ROT insult. FA treatment also restored antioxidant enzymes, prevented depletion of glutathione, and inhibited lipid peroxidation. Following treatment with FA, the inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase and proinflammatory cytokines were also reduced. Further, the results were supported by a remarkable reduction of Iba-1 and GFAP hyperactivity clearly suggests attenuation of microglial and astrocytic activation. Results of our study suggest that FA has promising neuroprotective effect against degenerative changes in PD, and the protective effects are mediated through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26504373

  1. Influence of endogenous ferulic acid in whole wheat flour on bread crust aroma.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, Marlene R; Bin, Qing; Elias, Ryan J; Peterson, Devin G

    2012-11-14

    The influence of wheat flour type (refined (RWF)/whole (WWF)) on bread crust aroma was investigated. Differences were characterized by aroma extract dilution analysis and quantified utilizing stable isotope surrogate standards. For RWF breads, five aroma compounds were higher in concentration, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, 2-phenylethanol, 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline, and 2,4-dihyroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, by 4.0-, 3.0-, 2.1-, 1.7-, and 1.5-fold, respectively, whereas three compounds were lower, 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine, (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, and (E)-2-nonenal by 6.1-, 2.1-, and 1.8-fold, respectively. A trained sensory panel reported the perceived aroma intensity of characteristic fresh refined bread crust aroma was significantly higher in RWF compared to WWF crust samples. Addition of 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, 2-phenylethanol, 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline, and 2,4-dihyroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone to the WWF crust (at concentrations equivalent to those in the RWF crust) increased the intensity of the fresh refined bread crust aroma attribute; no significant difference was reported when compared to RWF crust. The liberation of ferulic acid from WWF during baking was related to the observed reduction in these five aroma compounds and provides novel insight into the mechanisms of flavor development in WWF bread. PMID:23106092

  2. Ferulic acid protects against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Yeon; Park, Juhyun; Lee, Kwan-Hoo; Lee, Dong-Ung; Kwak, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Yeong Shik; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2011-04-11

    Ferulic acid (FA), isolated from the root of Scrophularia buergeriana, is a phenolic compound possessing antioxidant, anticancer, and antiinflammatory activities. Here, we have investigated the hepatoprotective effect of FA against carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced acute liver injury. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with vehicle or FA (20, 40, and 80mg/kg) 1h before and 2h after CCl(4) (20?l/kg) injection. The serum activities of aminotransferases and the hepatic level of malondialdehyde were significantly higher after CCl(4) treatment, while the concentration of reduced glutathione was lower. These changes were attenuated by FA. The serum level and mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-? significantly increased after CCl(4) treatment, and FA attenuated these increases. The levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein and mRNA expression after CCl(4) treatment were significantly higher and FA reduced these increases. CCl(4)-treated mice showed increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B), and decreased levels of inhibitors of NF-?B in cytosol. Also, CCl(4) significantly increased the level of phosphorylated JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and nuclear translocation of activated c-Jun. FA significantly attenuated these changes. We also found that acute CCl(4) challenge induced TLR4, TLR2, and TLR9 protein and mRNA expression, and FA significantly inhibited TLR4 expression. These results suggest that FA protects from CCl(4)-induced acute liver injury through reduction of oxidative damage and inflammatory signaling pathways. PMID:21291945

  3. Evaluation of thermo sensitivity of curcumin and quantification of ferulic acid and vanillin as degradation products by a validated HPTLC method.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Nasir Ali

    2015-01-01

    Charismatic therapeutic potential of curcumin in biological research have triggered an interest to explore the thermal degradation pattern of curcumin, formation of ferulic acid and vanillin as degraded metabolites at different temperatures in methanol and corn oil. The results revealed 47% w/w loss of curcumin along with formation of 17% w/w vanillin and 9% w/w ferulic acid at boiling temperature of methanol while oil samples show 38.9% w/w loss of curcumin but not confirming the formation of ferulic acid and vanillin. Findings of this study revealed that formation of vanillin in methanol starts around 50°C and its concentration goes on increasing up to 70°C and then further degraded at boiling temperature of methanol. Formation of ferulic acid begins around 60°C and initially increases with rise of temperature and then decreases approaching boiling point of methanol. Vanillin as well as ferulic acid was absent in corn oil samples though degradation of curcumin was observed by reduction in peak area of curcumin. The present study was done by applying a validated high-performance thin-layer chromatography method. The method involved glass-backed HPTLC plates precoated with silica gel 60F254 as the stationary phase and toluene: ethyl acetate: methanol (8:1:1, v/v/v) as mobile phase. PMID:25631508

  4. Isofunctional enzymes PAD1 and UbiX catalyze formation of a novel cofactor required by ferulic acid decarboxylase and 4-hydroxy-3-polyprenylbenzoic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fengming; Ferguson, Kyle L; Boyer, David R; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina; Marsh, E Neil G

    2015-04-17

    The decarboxylation of antimicrobial aromatic acids such as phenylacrylic acid (cinnamic acid) and ferulic acid by yeast requires two enzymes described as phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase (PAD1) and ferulic acid decarboxylase (FDC). These enzymes are of interest for various biotechnological applications, such as the production of chemical feedstocks from lignin under mild conditions. However, the specific role of each protein in catalyzing the decarboxylation reaction remains unknown. To examine this, we have overexpressed and purified both PAD1 and FDC from E. coli. We demonstrate that PAD1 is a flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-containing protein. However, it does not function as a decarboxylase. Rather, PAD1 catalyzes the formation of a novel, diffusible cofactor required by FDC for decarboxylase activity. Coexpression of FDC and PAD1 results in the production of FDC with high levels cofactor bound. Holo-FDC catalyzes the decarboxylation of phenylacrylic acid, coumaric acid and ferulic acid with apparent kcat ranging from 1.4-4.6 s(-1). The UV-visible and mass spectra of the cofactor indicate that it appears to be a novel, modified form of reduced FMN; however, its instability precluded determination of its structure. The E. coli enzymes UbiX and UbiD are related by sequence to PAD1 and FDC respectively and are involved in the decarboxylation of 4-hydroxy-3-octaprenylbenzoic acid, an intermediate in ubiquinone biosynthesis. We found that endogenous UbiX can also activate FDC. This implies that the same cofactor is required for decarboxylation of 4-hydroxy-3-polyprenylbenzoic acid by UbiD and suggests a wider role for this cofactor in metabolism. PMID:25647642

  5. Synthesis of dehydrogenation polymers of ferulic acid with high specificity by a purified cell-wall peroxidase from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerlin, A; Wojtaszek, P; Bolwell, G P

    1994-01-01

    A cationic (pI 8.3) wall-bound peroxidase has been purified to homogeneity from suspension-cultured cells of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The enzyme was a glycoprotein and its M(r) was 46,000 as determined by SDS/Page and h.p.l.c. gel filtration. It was localized biochemically to microsomes and the cell wall, and the latter subcellular distribution was confirmed by immunogold techniques. The native enzyme showed absorption maxima at 403, 500 and 640 nm, with an RZ (A405/A280) of 3.3. The peroxidase oxidized guaïacol and natural phenolic acids. By desorption-chemical-ionization mass spectrometry the enzyme was found to oxidize the model compound, ferulic acid, into dehydrodiferulic acid. Kinetics studies indicated an apparent Km of 113.3 +/- 22.9 microM and a Vmax of 144 mumol.min-1.nmol-1 of protein at an H2O2 concentration of 100 microM. In comparison with a second French-bean peroxidase (FBP) and horseradish peroxidase, as a model, it acted with a 6-10-fold higher specificity in this capacity. It is a member of the peroxidase superfamily of bacterial, fungal and plant haem proteins by virtue of its highly conserved amino acid sequence within the proximal and distal haem-binding sites. This is good evidence that this particular FBP may function in constructing covalent cross-linkages in the wall during development and response to pathogens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8192663

  6. In vivo protective effect of ferulic acid against noise-induced hearing loss in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Fetoni, A R; Mancuso, C; Eramo, S L M; Ralli, M; Piacentini, R; Barone, E; Paludetti, G; Troiani, D

    2010-09-15

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a phenolic compound whose neuroprotective activity was extensively studied in vitro. In this study, we provided functional in vivo evidence that FA limits noise-induced hearing loss. Guinea-pigs exposed to acoustic trauma for 1 h exhibited a significant impairment in auditory function; this injury was evident as early as 1 day from noise exposure and persisted over 21 days. Ferulic acid (150 mg/kg i.p. for 4 days) counteracted noise-induced hearing loss at days 1, 3, 7 and 21 from noise exposure. The improvement of auditory function by FA was paralleled by a significant reduction in oxidative stress, apoptosis and increase in hair cell viability in the organ of Corti. Interestingly in the guinea-pig cochleae, the neuroprotective effect of FA was functionally related not only to its scavenging ability in the peri-traumatic period but also to the up-regulation of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1); in fact, FA-induced improvement of auditory function was counteracted by the HO inhibitor zinc-protoporphyrin-IX and paralleled the time-course of HO-1 induction over 3-7 days. These results confirm the antioxidant properties of FA as free-radical scavenger and suggest a role of HO-1 as an additional mediator against noise-induced ototoxicity. PMID:20600667

  7. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass. PMID:26059194

  8. Bioconversion of Ferulic Acid into Vanillic Acid by Means of a Vanillate-Negative Mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain BF13

    PubMed Central

    Civolani, Claudio; Barghini, Paolo; Roncetti, Anna Rita; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Schiesser, Alma

    2000-01-01

    From a ferulic-acid-degrading Pseudomonas fluorescens strain (BF13), we have isolated a transposon mutant, which retained the ability to bioconvert ferulic acid into vanillic acid but lost the ability to further degrade the latter acid. The mutant, BF13-97, was very stable, and therefore it was suitable to be used as a biocatalyst for the preparative synthesis of vanillic acid from ferulic acid. By use of resting cells we determined the effect on the bioconversion rate of several parameters, such as the addition of nutritional factors, the concentration of the biomass, and the carbon source on which the biomass was grown. The optimal yield of vanillic acid was obtained with cells pregrown on M9 medium containing p-coumaric acid (0.1% [wt/vol]) as a sole carbon source and yeast extract (0.001% [wt/vol]) as a source of nutritional factors. Under these conditions, 1 mg (wet weight) of biomass produced 0.23 mg of vanillic acid per h. The genomic region of BF13-97 flanking the transposon's site of insertion was cloned and sequenced revealing two open reading frames of 1,062 (vanA) and 954 (vanB) bp, respectively. The van genes are organized in a cluster and encode the subunits of the vanillate-O-demethylase, which catalyzes the first step of the vanillate catabolism. Amino acid sequences deduced from vanA and vanB genes were shown to have high identity with known VanAs and VanBs from Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter spp. Highly conserved regions known to exist in class IA oxygenases were also found in the vanillate-O-demethylase components from P. fluorescens BF13. The terminal oxygenase VanA is characterized by a conserved Rieske-type [2Fe-2S]R ligand center. The reductase VanB contains a plant-type ferredoxin [2Fe-2S]Fd, flavin mononucleotide, and NAD-ribose binding domains which are located in its C-terminal and N-terminal halves, respectively. Transfer of wild-type vanAB genes to BF13-97 complemented this mutant, which recovered its ability to grow on either vanillic or ferulic acid. PMID:10831404

  9. Ferulic acid enhances the chemical and biological properties of astragali radix: a stimulator for danggui buxue tang, an ancient Chinese herbal decoction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ken Y Z; Zhang, Zhen X; Du, Crystal Y Q; Zhang, Wendy L; Bi, Cathy W C; Choi, Roy C Y; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2014-02-01

    Danggui buxue tang, an ancient formula composed of astragali radix and Angelicae sinensis radix, has been used for treating menopausal irregularity in women for more than 800 years in China. In danggui buxue tang, the complete functions of astragali radix require the assistance of Angelicae sinensis radix, and both herbs have to work harmoniously in order to achieve the maximal therapeutic purposes. In order to analyze the relationship of the two herbs, the role of ferulic acid, a major chemical within Angelicae sinensis radix, in chemical and biological properties of astragali radix was determined. Using ferulic acid in the extraction of astragali radix, the amounts of astragaloside IV, calycosin, and formononetin were increased in the final extract; however, the astragali radix polysaccharide showed a minor increase. The chemical-enriched astragali radix extract showed robust induction in osteogenic and estrogenic activities in cultured osteosarcoma MG-63 and breast MCF-7 cells. However, ferulic acid itself did not show such biological responses. The current results strongly suggest that Angelicae sinensis radix-derived ferulic acid is a positive regulator for danggui buxue tang, which enhanced the solubilities of active ingredients derived from astragali radix, and which therefore increased the biological efficacies of danggui buxue tang. PMID:24488720

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF THE STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF A THIOACIDOLYSIS MARKER COMPOUND FOR FERULIC ACID INCORPORATION INTO ANGIOSPERM LIGNINS (AND AN INDICATOR FOR CINNAMOYL-CoA REDUCTASE DEFICIENCY)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A molecular marker compound, derived from lignin by the thioacidolysis degradative method, for structures produced when ferulic acid is incorporated into lignification in angiosperms (poplar, Arabidopsis, tobacco), has been structurally identified as 1,2,2-trithioethyl ethylguaiacol [1-(4-hydroxy-3-...

  11. Efficient production of lignocellulolytic enzymes xylanase, ?-xylosidase, ferulic acid esterase and ?-glucosidase by the mutant strain Aspergillus awamori 2B.361 U2/1

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Leda Maria Fortes; de Sousa Paredes, Raquel; Teixeira, Ricardo Sposina Sobral; da Silva, Ayla Sant’Ana; da Silva Bon, Elba Pinto

    2013-01-01

    The production of xylanase, ?-xylosidase, ferulic acid esterase and ?-glucosidase by Aspergillus awamori 2B.361 U2/1, a hyper producer of glucoamylase and pectinase, was evaluated using selected conditions regarding nitrogen nutrition. Submerged cultivations were carried out at 30 °C and 200 rpm in growth media containing 30 g wheat bran/L as main carbon source and either yeast extract, ammonium sulfate, sodium nitrate or urea, as nitrogen sources; in all cases it was used a fixed molar carbon to molar nitrogen concentration of 10.3. The use of poor nitrogen sources favored the accumulation of xylanase, ?-xylosidase and ferulic acid esterase to a peak concentrations of 44,880; 640 and 118 U/L, respectively, for sodium nitrate and of 34,580, 685 and 170 U/L, respectively, for urea. However, the highest ?-glucosidase accumulation of 10,470 U/L was observed when the rich organic nitrogen source yeast extract was used. The maxima accumulation of filter paper activity, xylanase, ?-xylosidase, ferulic acid esterase and ?-glucosidase by A. awamori 2B.361 U2/1 was compared to that produced by Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30. The level of ?-glucosidase was over 17-fold higher for the Aspergillus strain, whereas the levels of xylanase and ?-xylosidase were over 2-fold higher. This strain also produced ferulic acid esterase (170 U/L), which was not detected in the T. reesei culture. PMID:24294256

  12. Role of exogenously supplied ferulic and p-coumaric acids in mimicking the mode of action of acetolactate synthase inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Orcaray, Luis; Igal, María; Zabalza, Ana; Royuela, Mercedes

    2011-09-28

    Chlorsulfuron and imazethapyr (herbicides that inhibit acetolactate synthase; ALS, EC 4.1.3.18) produced a strong accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acids that was related to the induction of the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (EC 2.5.2.54). The exogenous application of two hydroxycinnamic acids, ferulic and p-coumaric acids, to pea plants resulted in their internal accumulation, arrested growth, carbohydrate and quinate accumulation in the leaves, and the induction of ethanolic fermentation. These effects resemble some of the physiological effects detected after acetolactate synthase inhibition and suggest important roles for ferulic and p-coumaric acids in the mode of action of herbicides inhibiting the biosynthesis of branched chain amino acids. PMID:21870840

  13. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR, UV/VIS), thermogravimetric and antimicrobial studies of Ca(II), Mn(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes of ferulic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowska, M.; Piekut, J.; Bruss, A.; Follet, C.; Sienkiewicz-Gromiuk, J.; ?wis?ocka, R.; Rz?czy?ska, Z.; Lewandowski, W.

    2014-03-01

    The molecular structure of Mn(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Ca(II) ferulates (4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamates) was studied. The selected metal ferulates were synthesized. Their composition was established by means of elementary and thermogravimetric analysis. The following spectroscopic methods were used: infrared (FT-IR), Raman (FT-Raman), nuclear magnetic resonance (13C, 1H NMR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV/VIS). On the basis of obtained results the electronic charge distribution in studied metal complexes in comparison with ferulic acid molecule was discussed. The microbiological study of ferulic acid and ferulates toward Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris was done.

  14. Poly(carbonate–amide)s Derived from Bio-Based Resources: Poly(ferulic acid-co-tyrosine)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA), a bio-based resource found in fruits and vegetables, was coupled with a hydroxyl-amino acid to generate a new class of monomers to afford poly(carbonate–amide)s with potential to degrade into natural products. l-Serine was first selected as the hydroxyl-amino partner for FA, from which the activated p-nitrophenyl carbonate monomer was synthesized. Unfortunately, polymerizations were unsuccessful, and the elimination product was systematically obtained. To avoid elimination, we revised our strategy and used l-tyrosine ethyl ester, which lacks an acidic proton on the ? position of the ethyl ester. Four new monomers were synthesized and converted into the corresponding poly(carbonate–amide)s with specific regioselectivities. The polymers were fully characterized through thermal and spectroscopic analyses. Preliminary fluorescent studies revealed interesting photophysical properties for the monomers and their corresponding poly(carbonate–amide)s, beyond the fluorescence characteristics of l-tyrosine and FA, making these materials potentially viable for sensing and/or imaging applications, in addition to their attractiveness as engineering materials derived from renewable resources. PMID:24839309

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF THE STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF A THIOACIDOLYSIS MARKER COMPOUND FOR FERULIC ACID INCORPORATION INTO ANGIOSPERM LIGNINS AND A PSEUDO-MARKER COMPOUND FOR CINNAMOYL-COA REDUCTASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A molecular marker compound, derived from lignin by the thioacidolysis degradative method, for structures produced during lignification when ferulic acid is incorporated into lignification in angiosperms (poplar, Arabidopsis, tobacco) has been structurally identified as 1,2,2-trithioethyl ethylguaia...

  16. Aqueous Extract of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and Ferulic Acid Reduce the Expression of TNF-? and IL-1? in LPS-Activated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Simón; Alarcón, Marcelo; Palomo, Iván

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation is essential for defending the body against pathogens; however, when inflammation becomes chronic, it is harmful to the body and is part of the pathophysiology of various diseases such as Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2) and Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) among others. In chronic inflammation macrophages play an important role, mainly through the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and Interleukin (IL)-1?, explained in part by activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a signaling pathway which culminates in the activation of Nuclear factor (NF)-?B, an important transcription factor in the expression of these proinflammatory genes. On the other hand, the benefits on health of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables are well described. In this work, the effects of aqueous extract of tomato and ferulic acid on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in LPS activated monocyte-derived THP-1 macrophages were investigated. In addition, using Western blot, we investigated whether the inhibition was due to the interference on activation of NF-?B. We found that both the tomato extract and ferulic acid presented inhibitory activity on the expression of TNF-? and IL-1? cytokine by inhibiting the activation of NF-?B. The current results suggest that tomatoes and ferulic acid may contribute to prevention of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26307961

  17. Ferulic Acid Alleviates Changes in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome Induced by High-Carbohydrate, High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Senaphan, Ketmanee; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Sangartit, Weerapon; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan; Prachaney, Parichat; Greenwald, Stephen E.; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Ferulic acid (FA) is the major phenolic compound found in rice oil and various fruits and vegetables. In this study, we examined the beneficial effects of FA in minimizing insulin resistance, vascular dysfunction and remodeling in a rat model of high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic changes, which is regarded as an analogue of metabolic syndrome (MS) in man. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high carbohydrate, high fat (HCHF) diet and 15% fructose in drinking water for 16 weeks, where control rats were fed with standard chow diet and tap water. FA (30 or 60 mg/kg) was orally administered to the HCHF and control rats during the last six weeks of the study. We observed that FA significantly improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles, and reduced elevated blood pressure, compared to untreated controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, FA also improved vascular function and prevented vascular remodeling of mesenteric arteries. The effects of FA in HCHF-induced MS may be realized through suppression of oxidative stress by down-regulation of p47phox, increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability with up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and suppression of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?). Our results suggest that supplementation of FA may have health benefits by minimizing the cardiovascular complications of MS and alleviating its symptoms. PMID:26247970

  18. Ferulic Acid Is a Nutraceutical ?-Secretase Modulator That Improves Behavioral Impairment and Alzheimer-like Pathology in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takashi; Tan, Jun; Town, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) proteolysis is required for production of amyloid-? (A?) peptides that comprise ?-amyloid plaques in brains of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Recent AD therapeutic interest has been directed toward a group of anti-amyloidogenic compounds extracted from plants. We orally administered the brain penetrant, small molecule phenolic compound ferulic acid (FA) to the transgenic PSAPP mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis (bearing mutant human APP and presenilin-1 transgenes) and evaluated behavioral impairment and AD-like pathology. Oral FA treatment for 6 months reversed transgene-associated behavioral deficits including defective: hyperactivity, object recognition, and spatial working and reference memory, but did not alter wild-type mouse behavior. Furthermore, brain parenchymal and cerebral vascular ?-amyloid deposits as well as abundance of various A? species including oligomers were decreased in FA-treated PSAPP mice. These effects occurred with decreased cleavage of the ?-carboxyl-terminal APP fragment, reduced ?-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 protein stability and activity, attenuated neuroinflammation, and stabilized oxidative stress. As in vitro validation, we treated well-characterized mutant human APP-overexpressing murine neuron-like cells with FA and found significantly decreased A? production and reduced amyloidogenic APP proteolysis. Collectively, these results highlight that FA is a ?-secretase modulator with therapeutic potential against AD. PMID:23409038

  19. Protective effect of the combinations of glycyrrhizic, ferulic and cinnamic acid pretreatment on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    GAO, YUQIN; HAO, JIPING; ZHANG, HONGKAO; QIAN, GUOQIANG; JIANG, RENWANG; HU, JING; WANG, JIANING; LEI, ZHANG; ZHAO, GUOPING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find an effective drug cocktail pretreatment to protect myocardial tissue of the heart from ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. The mechanisms underlying the effects of the drug cocktail were subsequently explored in order to expand the application of Dang-gui-si-ni-tang (DGSN), a Traditional Chinese Medicine. The active components of DGSN in the serum following oral administration were investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were then analyzed to show the effect of the active components in the treatment of myocardial I/R injury. An L16 (44) orthogonal experiment was utilized to determine the most effective cocktail mix and the mechanism underlying the effect of this mix on myocardial I/R injury was investigated. It was observed that FCG, a mixture of glycyrrhizic (50 mg/kg), cinnamic (200 mg/kg) and ferulic (300 mg/kg) acid, was the optimal drug cocktail present in DGSN. This was absorbed into the blood following oral administration and was shown to decrease MDA levels and increase the activity of SOD. In conclusion, the findings suggest that FCG, a combination of active ingredients in the DGSN decoction, can be absorbed into the blood and protect the myocardium from I/R injury. PMID:25574212

  20. Characterization and anticancer potential of ferulic acid-loaded chitosan nanoparticles against ME-180 human cervical cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Richa; Sharma, Asvene K.; Kaloti, Mandeep; Dutt, Dharm; Pruthi, Vikas

    2015-10-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a widely distributed hydroxycinnamic acid found in various cereals and fruits exhibiting potent antioxidant and anticancer activities. However, due to low solubility and permeability, its availability to biological systems is limited. Non-toxic chitosan-tripolyphosphate pentasodium (CS-TPP) nanoparticles (NPs) are used to load sparingly soluble molecules and drugs, increasing their bioavailability. In the present work, we have encapsulated FA into the CS-TPP NPs to increase its potential as a therapeutic agent. Different concentrations of FA were tested to obtain optimum sized FA-loaded CS-TPP nanoparticles (FA/CS-TPP NPs) by ionic gelation method. Nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analyses and evaluated for their anticancer activity against ME-180 human cervical cancer cell lines. The FTIR spectra confirmed the encapsulation of FA and thermal analysis depicted its degradation profile. A concentration-dependent relationship between FA encapsulation efficiency and FA/CS-TPP NPs diameter was observed. Smooth and spherical FA-loaded cytocompatible nanoparticles with an average diameter of 125 nm were obtained at 40 µM FA conc. The cytotoxicity of 40 µM FA/CS-TPP NPs against ME-180 cervical cancer cell lines was found to be higher as compared to 40 µM native FA. Apoptotic morphological changes as cytoplasmic remnants and damaged wrinkled cells in ME-180 cells were visualized using scanning electron microscopic and fluorescent microscopic techniques. Data concluded that chitosan enveloped FA nanoparticles could be exploited as an excellent therapeutic drug against cancer cells proliferation.

  1. The effect of ferulic acid ethyl ester on leptin-induced proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yung-Chieh; Lee, Yen-Mei; Hsu, Chih-Hsiung; Leu, Sy-Ying; Chiang, Hsiao-Yen; Yen, Mao-Hsiung; Cheng, Pao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is a peptide hormone, which has a central role in the regulation of body weight; it also exerts many potentially atherogenic effects. Ferulic acid ethyl ester (FAEE) has been approved for antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate whether FAEE can inhibit the atherogenic effects of leptin and the possible molecular mechanism of its action. Both of cell proliferation and migration were measured when the aortic smooth muscle cell (A10 cell) treated with leptin and/or FAEE. Phosphorylated p44/42MAPK, cell cycle-regulatory protein (for example, cyclin D1, p21, p27), ?-catenin and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) proteins levels were also measured. Results demonstrated that leptin (10, 100?ng?ml(-1)) significantly increased the proliferation of cells and the phosphorylation of p44/42MAPK in A10 cells. The proliferative effect of leptin was significantly reduced by the pretreatment of U0126 (0.5??M), a MEK inhibitor, in A10 cells. Meanwhile, leptin significantly increased the protein expression of cyclin D1, p21, ?-catenin and decreased the expression of p27 in A10 cells. In addition, leptin (10?ng?ml(-1)) significantly increased the migration of A10 cells and the expression of MMP-9 protein. Above effects of leptin were significantly reduced by the pretreatment of FAEE (1 and 10??M) in A10 cells. In conclusion, FAEE exerts multiple effects on leptin-induced cell proliferation and migration, including the inhibition of p44/42MAPK phosphorylation, cell cycle-regulatory proteins and MMP-9, thereby suggesting that FAEE may be a possible therapeutic approach to the inhibition of obese vascular disease. PMID:26315599

  2. Application of Two Newly Identified and Characterized Feruloyl Esterases from Streptomyces sp. in the Enzymatic Production of Ferulic Acid from Agricultural Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Uraji, Misugi; Arima, Jiro; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Harazono, Koichi; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA), a component of hemicellulose in plant cell walls, is a phenolic acid with several potential applications based on its antioxidant properties. Recent studies have shown that feruloyl esterase (FAE) is a key bacterial enzyme involved in FA production from agricultural biomass. In this study, we screened a library of 43 esterases from Streptomyces species and identified two enzymes, R18 and R43, that have FAE activity toward ethyl ferulate. In addition, we characterized their enzyme properties in detail. R18 and R43 showed esterase activity toward other hydroxycinnamic acid esters as well, such as methyl p-coumarate, methyl caffeate, and methyl sinapinate. The amino acid sequences of R18 and R43 were neither similar to each other, nor to other FAEs. We found that R18 and R43 individually showed the ability to produce FA from corn bran; however, combination with other Streptomyces enzymes, namely xylanase and ?-l-arabinofuranosidase, increased FA production from biomass such as corn bran, defatted rice bran, and wheat bran. These results suggest that R18 and R43 are effective FAEs for the enzymatic production of FA from biomass. PMID:25093500

  3. Application of two newly identified and characterized feruloyl esterases from Streptomyces sp. in the enzymatic production of ferulic acid from agricultural biomass.

    PubMed

    Uraji, Misugi; Arima, Jiro; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Harazono, Koichi; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA), a component of hemicellulose in plant cell walls, is a phenolic acid with several potential applications based on its antioxidant properties. Recent studies have shown that feruloyl esterase (FAE) is a key bacterial enzyme involved in FA production from agricultural biomass. In this study, we screened a library of 43 esterases from Streptomyces species and identified two enzymes, R18 and R43, that have FAE activity toward ethyl ferulate. In addition, we characterized their enzyme properties in detail. R18 and R43 showed esterase activity toward other hydroxycinnamic acid esters as well, such as methyl p-coumarate, methyl caffeate, and methyl sinapinate. The amino acid sequences of R18 and R43 were neither similar to each other, nor to other FAEs. We found that R18 and R43 individually showed the ability to produce FA from corn bran; however, combination with other Streptomyces enzymes, namely xylanase and ?-l-arabinofuranosidase, increased FA production from biomass such as corn bran, defatted rice bran, and wheat bran. These results suggest that R18 and R43 are effective FAEs for the enzymatic production of FA from biomass. PMID:25093500

  4. Assessment of the anticancer mechanism of ferulic acid via cell cycle and apoptotic pathways in human prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ero?lu, Canan; Seçme, Mücahit; Ba?c?, Gülseren; Dodurga, Yavuz

    2015-12-01

    Studies on genetic changes underlying prostate cancer and the possible signaling pathways are getting increased day by day, and new treatment methods are being searched for. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound, on cell cycle, apoptosis, invasion, and colony formation in the PC-3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. The effect of FA on cell viability was determined via a 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) method. Total RNA was isolated with Tri Reagent. Expression of 84 genes for both cell cycle and apoptosis separately was evaluated by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Protein expressions were evaluated by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, apoptotic effects of FA were observed with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Effects of FA on cell invasion and colony formation were determined using Matrigel chamber and colony assay, respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) dose of FA was found to be 300 ?M in PC-3 cells and 500 ?M in LNCaP cells. According to RT-PCR results, it was observed that FA inhibited cell proliferation by increasing the gene expressions of ATR, ATM, CDKN1A, CDKN1B, E2F4, RB1, and TP53 and decreasing the gene expressions of CCND1, CCND2, CCND3, CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6 in PC-3 cells. On the other hand, it was seen that FA suppressed cell proliferation by increasing in the gene expressions of CASP1, CASP2, CASP8, CYCS, FAS, FASLG, and TRADD and decreasing in the gene expressions of BCL2 and XIAP in LNCaP cells. In this study, protein expression of CDK4 and BCL2 genes significantly decreased in these cells. It could induce apoptosis in PC-3 and LNCaP cells. Also, it was observed that FA suppressed the invasion in PC-3 and LNCaP cells. Moreover, it suppressed the colony formation. In conclusion, it has been observed that FA may lead to cell cycle arrest in PC-3 cells while it may cause apoptosis in LNCaP cells. PMID:26124008

  5. Adaptation of the Carrez procedure for the purification of ferulic and p-coumaric acids released from lignocellulosic biomass prior to LC/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Culhaoglu, Tanya; Zheng, Dan; Méchin, Valérie; Baumberger, Stéphanie

    2011-10-15

    The objective of this study was to adapt and improve an environmentally friendly and fast routine method for the analysis of ferulic and p-coumaric acids released from grass cell-walls by alkaline hydrolysis. This methodological development was performed on maize samples selected for their contrasted contents in ferulic and p-coumaric acids as a consequence of their different maturity stages (from stage of 7th leaf with visible ligule to stage of silage harvest). We demonstrate that the Carrez method is an efficient substitute to the common solvent-consuming extraction by ethyl acetate for the preparation of samples suitable for HPLC-ESI-MS analysis. We prove that it is possible to replace methanol by ethanol in the Carrez step and at last we propose a scale reduction of this procedure that offer a first step towards high throughput determinations. The new method leads to a solvent consumption reduced by a factor 100 and only requires ethanol as organic solvent. PMID:21945212

  6. Simultaneous determination of hydroxysafflor yellow A and ferulic acid in rat plasma after oral administration of the co-extractum of Rhizoma chuanxiong and Flos Carthami by HPLC-diode array detector.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianping; Jin, Xuefeng; Huang, Luosheng; Ping, Qineng

    2007-08-01

    A simple, rapid and accurate HPLC method has been developed for simultaneous determination of hydroxysafflor yellow A and ferulic acid in rat plasma after oral administration of the co-extractum of Rhizoma chuanxiong and Flos Carthami. Plasma samples were deproteinized with 6% perchloric acid, and riboflavin was used as internal standard. The supernatant after centrifuge was injected into a Shimadzu C(18) (150 x 4.6 mm, i.d. 5 microm) column. Gradient elution for A:B (0 min, 90:10; 25 min, 70:30; 27 min, stop) was applied. The mobile phase was composed of 0.022 mol/L potassium dihydrogen phosphate solutions, adjusted to pH 3.0 with phosphoric acid for pump A, and 90% (v/v) acetonitrile for pump B. The assay was shown to be linear over the range 0.046-4.6 microg/mL (r(2) = 0.9995) for hydroxysafflor yellow A and 0.037-3.7 microg/mL (r(2) = 0.9998) for ferulic acid. Mean recovery was 97.5% for hydroxysafflor yellow A and 83.6% for ferulic acid. Both of the intra-day and inter-day precisions were ferulic acid were 0.046 and 0.037 microg/mL, respectively. The HPLC method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic studies of hydroxysafflor yellow A and ferulic acid in rat plasma after oral administration of the co-extractum of Rhizoma chuanxiong and Flos Carthami. PMID:17441216

  7. Octadecyl ferulate behavior in 1,2-Dioleoylphosphocholine liposomes.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kervin O; Compton, David L; Whitman, Nathan A; Laszlo, Joseph A; Appell, Michael; Vermillion, Karl E; Kim, Sanghoon

    2016-01-15

    Octadecyl ferulate was prepared using solid acid catalyst, monitored using Supercritical Fluid Chromatography and purified to a 42% yield. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements determined octadecyl ferulate to have melting/solidification phase transitions at 67 and 39°C, respectively. AFM imaging shows that 5-mol% present in a lipid bilayer induced domains to form. Phase behavior measurements confirmed that octadecyl ferulate increased transition temperature of phospholipids. Fluorescence measurements demonstrated that octadecyl ferulate stabilized liposomes against leakage, maintained antioxidant capacity within liposomes, and oriented such that the feruloyl moiety remained in the hydrophilic region of the bilayer. Molecular modeling calculation indicated that antioxidant activity was mostly influenced by interactions within the bilayer. PMID:26332862

  8. Octadecyl ferulate behavior in 1,2-Dioleoylphosphocholine liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Kervin O.; Compton, David L.; Whitman, Nathan A.; Laszlo, Joseph A.; Appell, Michael; Vermillion, Karl E.; Kim, Sanghoon

    2016-01-01

    Octadecyl ferulate was prepared using solid acid catalyst, monitored using Supercritical Fluid Chromatography and purified to a 42% yield. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements determined octadecyl ferulate to have melting/solidification phase transitions at 67 and 39 °C, respectively. AFM imaging shows that 5-mol% present in a lipid bilayer induced domains to form. Phase behavior measurements confirmed that octadecyl ferulate increased transition temperature of phospholipids. Fluorescence measurements demonstrated that octadecyl ferulate stabilized liposomes against leakage, maintained antioxidant capacity within liposomes, and oriented such that the feruloyl moiety remained in the hydrophilic region of the bilayer. Molecular modeling calculation indicated that antioxidant activity was mostly influenced by interactions within the bilayer.

  9. Humic substances can modulate the allelopathic potential of caffeic, ferulic, and salicylic acids for seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    PubMed

    Loffredo, Elisabetta; Monaci, Linda; Senesi, Nicola

    2005-11-30

    The capacity of a leonardite humic acid (LHA), a soil humic acid (SHA), and a soil fulvic acid (SFA) in modulating the allelopathic potential of caffeic acid (CA), ferulic acid (FA), and salicylic acid (SA) on seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was investigated. Lettuce showed a sensitivity greater than that of tomato to CA, FA, and SA phytotoxicity, which was significantly reduced or even suppressed in the presence of SHA or SFA, especially at the highest dose, but not LHA. In general, SFA was slightly more active than SHA, and the efficiency of the action depended on their concentration, the plant species and the organ examined, and the allelochemical. The daily measured residual concentration of CA and FA decreased drastically and that of SA slightly in the presence of germinating seeds of lettuce, which were thus able to absorb and/or enhance the degradation of CA and FA. The adsorption capacity of SHA for the three allelochemicals was small and decreased in the order FA > CA > SA, thus suggesting that adsorption could be a relevant mechanism, but not the only one, involved in the "antiallelopathic" action. PMID:16302757

  10. A COMPARISON OF THE ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES OF STERYL FERULATES WITH TOCOPHEROL AT HIGH TEMPERATURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steryl ferulates (esters of phytosterols and ferulic acid) have long been studied for their health-promoting properties partially owing to their capacity to inhibit oxidation. The good heat stability of rice bran oil has been attributed to its high content of steryl ferulates and tocopherols. It has...

  11. A Stability-Indicating HPLC-DAD Method for Determination of Ferulic Acid into Microparticles: Development, Validation, Forced Degradation, and Encapsulation Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Maria da Graça; Pupo, Yasmine Mendes; Padilha de Paula, Josiane; Zanin, Sandra Maria Warumby

    2015-01-01

    A simple stability-indicating HPLC-DAD method was validated for the determination of ferulic acid (FA) in polymeric microparticles. Chromatographic conditions consisted of a RP C18 column (250?mm × 4.60?mm, 5??m, 110?Å) using a mixture of methanol and water pH 3.0 (48?:?52?v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0?mL/min with UV detection at 320?nm. The developed method was validated as per ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, linearity, limit of quantification, limit of detection, accuracy, precision, and robustness provided suitable results regarding all parameters investigated. The calibration curve was linear in the concentration range of 10.0–70.0??g/mL with a correlation coefficient >0.999. Precision (intraday and interday) was demonstrated by a relative standard deviation lower than 2.0%. Accuracy was assessed by the recovery test of FA from polymeric microparticles (99.02% to 100.73%). Specificity showed no interference from the components of polymeric microparticles or from the degradation products derived from acidic, basic, and photolytic conditions. In conclusion, the method is suitable to be applied to assay FA as bulk drug and into polymeric microparticles and can be used for studying its stability and degradation kinetics. PMID:26075139

  12. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid on High Glucose-Induced Protein Glycation, Lipid Peroxidation, and Membrane Ion Pump Activity in Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sompong, Weerachat; Cheng, Henrique; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2015-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is the ubiquitous phytochemical phenolic derivative of cinnamic acid. Experimental studies in diabetic models demonstrate that FA possesses multiple mechanisms of action associated with anti-hyperglycemic activity. The mechanism by which FA prevents diabetes-associated vascular damages remains unknown. The aim of study was to investigate the protective effects of FA on protein glycation, lipid peroxidation, membrane ion pump activity, and phosphatidylserine exposure in high glucose-exposed human erythrocytes. Our results demonstrated that FA (10-100 ?M) significantly reduced the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) whereas 0.1-100 ?M concentrations inhibited lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes exposed to 45 mM glucose. This was associated with increased glucose consumption. High glucose treatment also caused a significant reduction in Na+/K+-ATPase activity in the erythrocyte plasma membrane which could be reversed by FA. Furthermore, we found that FA (0.1-100 ?M) prevented high glucose-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism of FA for the prevention of vascular dysfunction associated with diabetes. PMID:26053739

  13. Pharmacokinetic comparison of the vasorelaxant compound ferulic acid following the administration of Guanxin II to healthy volunteers and patients with angina pectoris

    PubMed Central

    LI, YUN-HUI; HUANG, XI; WANG, YANG; FAN, RONG; ZHANG, HONG-MIN; REN, PING; CHEN, YAO; ZHOU, HONG-HAO; LIU, ZHAO-QIAN; LIANG, YI-ZENG; LU, HONG-MEI

    2013-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. The Chinese medicinal formula Guanxin II has been shown to have a favorable effect in the attenuation of angina. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of ferulic acid (FA), which is a vasorelaxant compound present in Guanxin II, in healthy volunteers and patients with angina pectoris following the administration of Guanxin II. Ex vivo experiments were performed in order to investigate the vasorelaxant effect of FA on the human internal mammary artery (IMA) to provide evidence that it is a bioactive component of Guanxin II. Following the oral administration of Guanxin II, the FA levels in the serum were quantified by a simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Treatment with FA (10?8?10?3 M) caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of endothelial IMA rings following precontraction with KCl. Statistically significant differences were identified between the pharmaco-kinetic parameters Cmax, t1/2?, t1/2? and t1/2Ka of the healthy volunteers and the patients with angina pectoris following the oral administration of Guanxin II. FA is a bioactive compound absorbed from Guanxin II that attenuates angina pectoris, a condition that may modify the pharmacokinetics of FA. Not only do the pharmacokinetic parameters direct the clinical use of Guanxin II, but they may also be useful for exploring the pathology of angina pectoris. PMID:24223659

  14. Pharmacokinetic comparison of the vasorelaxant compound ferulic acid following the administration of Guanxin II to healthy volunteers and patients with angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Hui; Huang, Xi; Wang, Yang; Fan, Rong; Zhang, Hong-Min; Ren, Ping; Chen, Yao; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Lu, Hong-Mei

    2013-11-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. The Chinese medicinal formula Guanxin II has been shown to have a favorable effect in the attenuation of angina. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of ferulic acid (FA), which is a vasorelaxant compound present in Guanxin II, in healthy volunteers and patients with angina pectoris following the administration of Guanxin II. Ex vivo experiments were performed in order to investigate the vasorelaxant effect of FA on the human internal mammary artery (IMA) to provide evidence that it is a bioactive component of Guanxin II. Following the oral administration of Guanxin II, the FA levels in the serum were quantified by a simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Treatment with FA (10(-8)-10(-3) M) caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of endothelial IMA rings following precontraction with KCl. Statistically significant differences were identified between the pharmaco-kinetic parameters Cmax, t1/2?, t1/2? and t1/2Ka of the healthy volunteers and the patients with angina pectoris following the oral administration of Guanxin II. FA is a bioactive compound absorbed from Guanxin II that attenuates angina pectoris, a condition that may modify the pharmacokinetics of FA. Not only do the pharmacokinetic parameters direct the clinical use of Guanxin II, but they may also be useful for exploring the pathology of angina pectoris. PMID:24223659

  15. Ferulic Acid Induces Th1 Responses by Modulating the Function of Dendritic Cells and Ameliorates Th2-Mediated Allergic Airway Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Wang, Ching-Chiung; Huang, Huei-Mei; Lin, Chu-Lun; Leu, Sy-Jye; Lee, Yueh-Lun

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the immunomodulatory effects of ferulic acid (FA) on antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and its antiallergic effects against ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced Th2-mediated allergic asthma in mice. The activation of FA-treated bone marrow-derived DCs by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation induced a high level of interleukin- (IL-) 12 but reduced the expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1?, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) ?. Compared to control-treated DCs, FA significantly enhanced the expressions of Notch ligand Delta-like 4 (Dll4), MHC class II, and CD40 molecules by these DCs. Furthermore, these FA-treated DCs enhanced T-cell proliferation and Th1 cell polarization. In animal experiments, oral administration of FA reduced the levels of OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgG1 and enhanced IgG2a antibody production in serum. It also ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated eosinophilic pulmonary infiltration in dose-dependent manners. In addition, FA treatment inhibited the production of eotaxin, Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13), and proinflammatory cytokines but promoted the Th1 cytokine interferon- (IFN-) ? production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the culture supernatant of spleen cells. These findings suggest that FA exhibits an antiallergic effect via restoring Th1/Th2 imbalance by modulating DCs function in an asthmatic mouse model. PMID:26495021

  16. Redox cycling of endogenous copper by ferulic acid leads to cellular DNA breakage and consequent cell death: A putative cancer chemotherapy mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Tarique; Zafaryab, Md; Husain, Mohammed Amir; Ishqi, Hassan Mubarak; Rehman, Sayeed Ur; Moshahid Alam Rizvi, M; Tabish, Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a plant polyphenol showing diverse therapeutic effects against cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. FA is a known antioxidant at lower concentrations, however at higher concentrations or in the presence of metal ions such as copper, it may act as a pro-oxidant. It has been reported that copper levels are significantly raised in different malignancies. Cancer cells are under increased oxidative stress as compared to normal cells. Certain therapeutic substances like polyphenols can further increase this oxidative stress and kill cancer cells without affecting the proliferation of normal cells. Through various in vitro experiments we have shown that the pro-oxidant properties of FA are enhanced in the presence of copper. Comet assay demonstrated the ability of FA to cause oxidative DNA breakage in human peripheral lymphocytes which was ameliorated by specific copper-chelating agent such as neocuproine and scavengers of ROS. This suggested the mobilization of endogenous copper in ROS generation and consequent DNA damage. These results were further validated through cytotoxicity experiments involving different cell lines. Thus, we conclude that such a pro-oxidant mechanism involving endogenous copper better explains the anticancer activities of FA. This would be an alternate non-enzymatic, and copper-mediated pathway for the cytotoxic activities of FA where it can selectively target cancer cells with elevated levels of copper and ROS. PMID:26415834

  17. Novel tacrine-grafted Ugi adducts as multipotent anti-Alzheimer drugs: a synthetic renewal in tacrine-ferulic acid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Benchekroun, Mohamed; Bartolini, Manuela; Egea, Javier; Romero, Alejandro; Soriano, Elena; Pudlo, Marc; Luzet, Vincent; Andrisano, Vincenza; Jimeno, María-Luisa; López, Manuela G; Wehle, Sarah; Gharbi, Tijani; Refouvelet, Bernard; de Andrés, Lucía; Herrera-Arozamena, Clara; Monti, Barbara; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel; Decker, Michael; Marco-Contelles, José; Ismaili, Lhassane

    2015-03-01

    Herein we describe the design, multicomponent synthesis, and biological, molecular modeling and ADMET studies, as well as in vitro PAMPA-blood-brain barrier (BBB) analysis of new tacrine-ferulic acid hybrids (TFAHs). We identified (E)-3-(hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-N-{8[(7-methoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridin-9-yl)amino]octyl}-N-[2-(naphthalen-2-ylamino)2-oxoethyl]acrylamide (TFAH 10?n) as a particularly interesting multipotent compound that shows moderate and completely selective inhibition of human butyrylcholinesterase (IC50 =68.2?nM), strong antioxidant activity (4.29?equiv trolox in an oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay), and good ?-amyloid (A?) anti-aggregation properties (65.6?% at 1:1 ratio); moreover, it is able to permeate central nervous system (CNS) tissues, as determined by PAMPA-BBB assay. Notably, even when tested at very high concentrations, TFAH 10?n easily surpasses the other TFAHs in hepatotoxicity profiling (59.4?% cell viability at 1000??M), affording good neuroprotection against toxic insults such as A?1-40 , A?1-42 , H2 O2 , and oligomycin?A/rotenone on SH-SY5Y cells, at 1??M. The results reported herein support the development of new multipotent TFAH derivatives as potential drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25537267

  18. POD promoted oxidative gelation of water-extractable arabinoxylan through ferulic acid dimers. Evidence for its negative effect on malt filterability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianhui; Zhou, Ting; Li, Xiaomin; Cai, Guolin; Lu, Jian

    2016-04-15

    As a major component of non-starch polysaccharide in barley, arabinoxylan (AX) plays an important role in quality traits of malt and the final beer product. The Chinese barley malt has encountered filterability problems for a long time. The main reason caused by barley cultivar has been accepted in the malting and brewing industries. In our previous proteomic study, the peroxidase (POD) BP1 was found to be in quite high abundant in the filterability defect Chinese barley malt. Therefore, the present study tried to verify its negative effect on filterability, by surveying its activity in different malt samples and detecting effects of POD on AX gelation and filterability. The results showed that the activity of POD, as well as the content of AX bounded ferulic acid, were both negatively correlated with filterability, while the feruloyl esterase activity was positively correlated with it. In addition, AX gelation catalyzed by POD caused worse filterability, and the natural inhibitor of POD, vitamin C, could blocked the cross linking catalyzed by POD and thus improve the filterability. These results all suggested the great negative effect of POD on malt filterability. PMID:26616970

  19. FUNGAL ELICITOR-INDUCED FATTY ACID ACETYLENASES OCCUR WIDELY IN EVOLUTIONARILY-DISTANT PLANT FAMILIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal elicitor-induced ELI12 gene from parsley has been previously shown to encode a divergent form of the delta12-oleic acid desaturase [Kirsch et al. (1997) Plant Physiol. 115: 283-290]. In this report, we show that the ELI12 gene product is a fatty acid acetylenase or triple-bond-forming en...

  20. FUNGAL RESPONSIVE FATTY ACID ACETYLENASES OCCUR WIDELY IN EVOLUTIONARILY DISTANT PLANT FAMILIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal elicitor-induced ELI12 gene from parsley has been previously shown to encode a divergent form of the delta12-oleic acid desaturase. In this report, we show that the ELI12 gene product is a fatty acid acetylenase or triple bond-forming enzyme. Expression of this enzyme in transgenic soyb...

  1. Vanadate inhibition of fungal phyA and bacterial appA2 histidine acid phosphatases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal PhyA protein, which was first identified as an acid optimum phosphomonoesterase (EC 3.1.3.8), could also serve as a vanadate haloperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.10) provided the acid phosphatase activity is shutdown by vanadate. To understand how vanadate inhibits both phytate and pNPP degrading ac...

  2. Comparison of the impact of y-oryzanol and corn steryl ferulates on the polymerization of soybean oil during frying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn steryl ferulates (CSF), oryzanol, a combination of equal amounts of CSF and oryzanol, and ferulic acid were added to refined, bleached, deodorized, soybean oil at a concentration of 8.1-8.4 µmol/g oil, which corresponded to 0.5% (w/w) for the steryl ferulates. The rate of polymerized triacylgly...

  3. Effect of tocopherols on the anti-polymerization activity of oryzanol and corn steryl ferulates in soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steryl ferulates (SF) are ferulic acid esters of phytosterols and/or triterpene alcohols which have potential as frying oil antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-polymerization and antioxidant activity at frying temperatures of corn steryl ferulates (CSF), rice steryl f...

  4. Effects of Ferulic Acid and ?-Oryzanol on High-Fat and High-Fructose Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ou; Liu, Jia; Cheng, Qian; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Feng; Ji, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    Background The high morbidity of metabolic dysfunction diseases has heightened interest in seeking natural and safe compounds to maintain optimal health. ?-Oryzanol (OZ), the ferulic acid (FA) ester with phytosterols, mainly present in rice bran has been shown to improve markers of metabolic syndrome. This study investigates the effects of FA and OZ on alleviating high-fat and high-fructose diet (HFFD)-induced metabolic syndrome parameters. Methods Male SD rats were fed with a regular rodent diet, HFFD, or HFFD supplemented with 0.05% FA or 0.16% OZ (equimolar concentrations) for 13 weeks. Food intake, organ indices, serum lipid profiles, glucose metabolism, insulin resistance (IR) index and cytokine levels were analyzed. The mechanisms were further investigated in oleic acid-stimulated HepG2 cells by analyzing triglyceride (TG) content and lipogenesis-related gene expressions. Results In the in vivo study, FA and OZ exhibited similar effects in alleviating HFFD-induced obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and IR. However, only OZ treatment significantly decreased liver index and hepatic TG content, lowered serum levels of C-reactive protein and IL-6, and increased serum concentration of adiponectin. In the in vitro assay, only OZ administration significantly inhibited intracellular TG accumulation and down-regulated expression of stearoyl coenzyme-A desaturase-1, which might facilitate OZ to enhance its hepatoprotective effect. Conclusion OZ is more effective than FA in inhibiting hepatic fat accumulation and inflammation. Thus, FA and OZ could be used as dietary supplements to alleviate the deleterious effects of HFFD. PMID:25646799

  5. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of Ferulic Acid in Normal and Blood Deficiency Rats after Oral Administration of Angelica sinensis, Ligusticum chuanxiong and Their Combination

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weixia; Guo, Jianming; Tang, Yuping; Wang, Huan; Huang, Meiyan; Qian, Dawei; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2012-01-01

    Radix Angelica Sinensis (RAS) and Rhizome Ligusticum (RLC) combination is a popular herb pair commonly used in clinics for treatment of blood deficiency syndrome in China. The aim of this study is to compare the pharmacokinetic properties of ferulic acid (FA), a main bioactive constituent in both RAS and RLC, between normal and blood deficiency syndrome animals, and to investigate the influence of compatibility of RAS and RLC on the pharmacokinetic of FA. The blood deficiency rats were induced by injecting 2% Acetyl phenylhydrazine (APH) on the first day, every other day, to a total of five times, at the dosage of 100, 50, 50, 30, 30 mg/kg body mass, respectively. Quantification of FA in rat plasma was achieved by using a simple and rapid HPLC method. Plasma samples were collected at different time points to construct pharmacokinetic profiles by plotting drug concentration versus time, and estimate pharmacokinetic parameters. Between normal and blood deficiency model groups, both AUC(0–t) and Cmax of FA in blood deficiency rats after RAS-RLC extract administration increased significantly (P < 0.05), while clearance (CL) decreased significantly. Among three blood deficiency model groups, t1/2?, Vd, AUC(0–t) and AUC(0–?) all increased significantly in the RAS-RLC extract group compared with the RAS group. The results indicated that FA was absorbed better and eliminated slower in blood deficiency rats; RLC could significantly prolong the half-life of distribution, increase the volume of distribution and the absorption amount of FA of RAS in blood deficiency rats, which may be due to the synergic action when RAS and RLC were used together to treat blood deficiency syndrome. PMID:22489169

  6. The bioavailability of ferulic acid is governed primarily by the food matrix rather than its metabolism in intestine and liver in rats.

    PubMed

    Adam, Aline; Crespy, Vanessa; Levrat-Verny, Marie-Anne; Leenhardt, Fanny; Leuillet, Michel; Demigné, Christian; Rémésy, Christian

    2002-07-01

    The physiologic importance of ferulic acid (FA), and notably its antioxidant properties, depends upon its availability for absorption and subsequent interaction with target tissues. Because FA is widely present in cereals, the aim of the present study was to investigate its intestinal and hepatic metabolism in rats by in situ intestinal perfusion model (from 10 to 50 nmol/min), and its bioavailability in supplemented diets (from 10 to 250 micromol/d) or in a complex cereal matrix, i.e., whole flours from Valoris (Triticum aestivum) or Duriac (T. durum) cultivars and bran or white flour from the Valoris cultivar. In perfused rat intestine, net FA absorption was proportional to the perfused dose (R2 = 0.997); once absorbed, FA was completely recovered as conjugated forms in plasma and bile secretion (representing 5-7% of the perfused dose). In rats fed FA-enriched semipurified diets, FA absorption was quite efficient because approximately 50% of the ingested dose was recovered in urine. This extensive elimination by kidneys limited FA accumulation in plasma (typically 1 micromol/L in rats fed 50 micromol FA/d). In contrast, in rats fed cereal diets providing 56-81 micromol FA/d, urine excretion was 90-95% lower than in rats fed FA-enriched semipurified diets, and plasma concentrations were approximately 0.2-0.3 micromol/L. Thus, the cereal matrix appears to severely limit FA bioavailability. This inherently low bioavailability of FA in cereals likely reflects FA association with the fiber fraction through cross-linking with arabinoxylans and lignins. PMID:12097677

  7. Poly(ferulic acid-co-tyrosine): Effect of the Regiochemistry on the Photophysical and Physical Properties en Route to Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The photophysical and mechanical properties of novel poly(carbonate-amide)s derived from two biorenewable resources, ferulic acid (FA) and l-tyrosine ethyl ester, were evaluated in detail. From these two bio-based precursors, a series of four monomers were generated (having amide and/or carbonate coupling units with remaining functionalities to allow for carbonate formation) and transformed to a series of four poly(carbonate-amide)s. The simplest monomer, which was biphenolic and was obtained in a single amidation synthetic step, displayed bright, visible fluorescence that was twice brighter than FA. Multidimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of the polymers in solution highlighted the strong influence that regioselectivity and the degree of polymerization have on their photophysical properties. The regiochemistry of the system had little effect on the wettability, surface free energy, and Young’s modulus (ca. 2.5 GPa) in the solid state. Confocal imaging of solvent-cast films of each polymer revealed microscopically flat surfaces with fluorescent emission deep into the visible region. Fortuitously, one of the two regiorandom polymers (obtainable from the biphenolic monomer in only an overall two synthetic steps from FA and l-tyrosine ethyl ester) displayed the most promising fluorescent properties both in the solid state and in solution, allowing for the possibility of translating this system as a self-reporting or imaging agent in future applications. To further evaluate the potential of this polymer as a biodegradable material, hydrolytic degradation studies at different pH values and temperatures were investigated. Additionally, the antioxidant properties of the degradation products of this polymer were compared with its biphenolic monomer and FA. PMID:25364040

  8. Conservation, fiber digestibility, and nutritive value of corn harvested at 2 cutting heights and ensiled with fibrolytic enzymes, either alone or with a ferulic acid esterase-producing inoculant.

    PubMed

    Lynch, J P; Baah, J; Beauchemin, K A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of the use of a fibrolytic enzyme product, applied at ensiling either alone or in combination with a ferulic acid esterase-producing bacterial additive, on the chemical composition, conservation characteristics, and in vitro degradability of corn silage harvested at either conventional or high cutting height. Triplicate samples of corn were harvested to leave stubble of either a conventional (15cm; NC) or high (45cm; HC) height above ground. Sub-samples of chopped herbage were ensiled untreated or with a fibrolytic enzyme product containing xylanases and cellulases applied either alone (ENZ) or in combination with a ferulic acid esterase-producing silage inoculant (ENZ+FAEI). The fibrolytic enzyme treatment was applied at 2mL of enzyme product/kg of herbage dry matter (DM), and the inoculant was applied at 1.3×10(5) cfu/g of fresh herbage. Samples were packed into laboratory-scale silos, stored for 7, 28, or 70 d, and analyzed for fermentation characteristics, and samples ensiled for 70 d were also analyzed for DM losses, chemical composition, and in vitro ruminal degradability. After 70 d of ensiling, the fermentation characteristics of corn silages were generally unaffected by cutting height, whereas the neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and ash concentrations were lower and the starch concentration greater for silages made with crops harvested at HC compared with NC. After 70 d of ensiling, the acetic acid, ethanol concentrations, and the number of yeasts were greater, and the pH and neutral detergent fiber concentrations were lower, in silages produced using ENZ or ENZ+FAEI than the untreated silages, whereas ENZ+FAEI silages also incurred higher DM losses. No effect of additive treatment was observed on in vitro degradability indices after 48h ruminal incubation. The use of a fibrolytic enzyme product, either alone or in combination with a ferulic acid esterase-producing inoculant, at ensiling did not improve corn silage fermentation or its nutritive value and resulted in some negative effects on these parameters. The effects of using a fibrolytic enzyme product at ensiling, either alone or in combination with a ferulic acid esterase-producing inoculant, did not differ between corn harvested at either NC or HC. Silage made from HC had a greater starch content and lower fiber content than NC silage, whereas cutting height did not affect the in vitro digestibility indices. PMID:25483202

  9. Direct fungal fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass into itaconic, fumaric, and malic acids: current and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Mondala, Andro H

    2015-04-01

    Various economic and environmental sustainability concerns as well as consumer preference for bio-based products from natural sources have paved the way for the development and expansion of biorefining technologies. These involve the conversion of renewable biomass feedstock to fuels and chemicals using biological systems as alternatives to petroleum-based products. Filamentous fungi possess an expansive portfolio of products including the multifunctional organic acids itaconic, fumaric, and malic acids that have wide-ranging current applications and potentially addressable markets as platform chemicals. However, current bioprocessing technologies for the production of these compounds are mostly based on submerged fermentation, which necessitates physicochemical pretreatment and hydrolysis of lignocellulose biomass to soluble fermentable sugars in liquid media. This review will focus on current research work on fungal production of itaconic, fumaric, and malic acids and perspectives on the potential application of solid-state fungal cultivation techniques for the consolidated hydrolysis and organic acid fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:25557737

  10. Fungal Peptaibiotics: Assessing Potential Meteoritic Amino Acid Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bruckner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which are relatively rare in the terrestrial biosphere, has long been used as an indication of the indigeneity of meteoritic amino acids, however, the discovery of alpha-AIB in peptides producers by a widespread group of filamentous fungi indicates the possibility of a terrestrial biotic source for the alpha-AIB observed in some meteorites. The alpha-AIB-containing peptides produced by these fungi are dubbed peptaibiotics. We measured the molecular distribution and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids found in the total hydrolysates of four biologically synthesized peptaibiotics. We compared these aneasurenetts with those from the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Murchison and from three Antarctic CR2 carbonaceous chondrites in order to understand the peptaibiotics as a potential source of meteoritic contamination.

  11. Ferulic acid decreases cell viability and colony formation while inhibiting migration of MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fahrio?lu, Umut; Dodurga, Yavuz; Elmas, Levent; Seçme, Mücahit

    2016-01-15

    Novel and combinatorial treatment methods are becoming sought after entities in cancer treatment and these treatments are even more valuable for pancreatic cancer. The scientists are always on the lookout for new chemicals to help them in their fight against cancer. In this study, we examine the effects of ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound, on gene expression, viability, colony formation and migration/invasion in the cultured MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cell. Cytotoxic effects of FA were determined by using trypan blue dye exclusion test and Cell TiterGlo (CTG) assay. IC50 dose in MIA PaCa-2 cells was detected as 500?M/ml at the 72nd hour. Expression profiles of certain cell cycle and apoptosis genes such as CCND1 (cyclin D1),CDK4, CDK6, RB, p21, p16, p53, caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, caspase-10, Bcl-2, BCL-XL,BID, DR4,DR5,FADD,TRADD,PARP, APAF, Bax, Akt, PTEN, PUMA, NOXA, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1 and TIMP2 were determined by real-time PCR. The effect of FA on cell viability was determined by CellTiter-Glo® Luminescent Cell Viability Assay. Additionally, effects of FA on colony formation and invasion were also investigated. It was observed that FA caused a significant decrease in the expression of CCND1, CDK 4/6, Bcl2 and caspase 8 and 10 in the MIA PaCa-2 cells while causing an increase in the expression of p53, Bax, PTEN caspase 3 and 9. FA was observed to decrease colony formation while inhibiting cell invasion and migration as observed by the BioCoat Matrigel Invasion Chamber guide and colony formation assays. In conclusion, FA is thought to behave as an anti-cancer agent by affecting cell cycle, apoptotic, invasion and colony formation behavior of MIA PaCa-2 cells. Therefore, FA is placed as a strong candidate for further studies aimed at finding a better, more effective treatment approach for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26516023

  12. The nitric oxide-releasing derivative of ferulic acid NCX 2057 antagonized delay-dependent and scopolamine-induced performance deficits in a recognition memory task in the rat.

    PubMed

    Boultadakis, Antonios; Liakos, Panagiotis; Pitsikas, Nikolaos

    2010-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is considered as an intracellular messenger in the brain. Its involvement in learning and memory processes has been proposed. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of the NO-releasing derivative of ferulic acid NCX 2057 on rats' recognition memory. For this purpose the object recognition task was selected. Post-training treatment with NCX 2057 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and with the reference compound, the NO donor molsidomine (4 mg/kg, i.p.), antagonized extinction of recognition memory in the normal rat. Conversely, animals treated with the parent compound ferulic acid (1.9, 6.2 and 18.7 mg/kg, i.p.) failed to do so. In addition, NCX 2057 (3 and 10 mg/kg, i.p) reversed the scopolamine (0.2 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced performance deficits in this recognition memory task. These results indicate that this novel NO donor may modulate different aspects of recognition memory and suggest that an interaction between the nitrergic and cholinergic system is relevant to cognition. PMID:19744535

  13. Influence of phytosterol structure on antioxidant activity of steryl ferulates in frying oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steryl ferulates (SFs) occur in rice, corn, wheat, and rye, and are composed of plant sterols (phytosterols) esterified to ferulic acid. The structures of SFs from each cereal source differ due to differences in the phytosterol head group and these structural differences have been demonstrated to i...

  14. Imperfect pseudo-merohedral twinning in crystals of fungal fatty acid synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Jenni, Simon Ban, Nenad

    2009-02-01

    A case of imperfect pseudo-merohedral twinning in monoclinic crystals of fungal fatty acid synthase is discussed. A space-group transition during crystal dehydration resulted in a Moiré pattern-like interference of the twinned diffraction patterns. The recent high-resolution structures of fungal fatty acid synthase (FAS) have provided new insights into the principles of fatty acid biosynthesis by large multifunctional enzymes. The crystallographic phase problem for the 2.6 MDa fungal FAS was initially solved to 5 Å resolution using two crystal forms from Thermomyces lanuginosus. Monoclinic crystals in space group P2{sub 1} were obtained from orthorhombic crystals in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} by dehydration. Here, it is shown how this space-group transition induced imperfect pseudo-merohedral twinning in the monoclinic crystal, giving rise to a Moiré pattern-like interference of the two twin-related reciprocal lattices. The strategy for processing the twinned diffraction images and obtaining a quantitative analysis is presented. The twinning is also related to the packing of the molecules in the two crystal forms, which was derived from self-rotation function analysis and molecular-replacement solutions using a low-resolution electron microscopy map as a search model.

  15. Function and Regulation of Fungal Amino Acid Transporters: Insights from Predicted Structure.

    PubMed

    Gournas, Christos; Prévost, Martine; Krammer, Eva-Maria; André, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids constitute a major nutritional source for probably all fungi. Studies of model species such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans have shown that they possess multiple amino acid transporters. These proteins belong to a limited number of superfamilies, now defined according to protein fold in addition to sequence criteria, and differ in subcellular location, substrate specificity range, and regulation. Structural models of several of these transporters have recently been built, and the detailed molecular mechanisms of amino acid recognition and translocation are now being unveiled. Furthermore, the particular conformations adopted by some of these transporters in response to amino acid binding appear crucial to promoting their ubiquitin-dependent endocytosis and/or to triggering signaling responses. We here summarize current knowledge, derived mainly from studies on S. cerevisiae and A. nidulans, about the transport activities, regulation, and sensing role of fungal amino acid transporters, in relation to predicted structure. PMID:26721271

  16. Bioprocess development for docosahexaenoic acid from novel fungal isolate of Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Jini, Sugatha; Hridya, Azhikodan; Pandey, Ashok; Binod, Parameswaran

    2015-06-01

    Fungal cultures were isolated from soil samples collected from the Western Ghats regions of Kerala. Primary screening of isolated strains were done by Sudan black staining method and 15 lipid producing cultures were isolated. The fatty acid profiling of the positive strains were analyzed for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) production. Selected oleaginous cultures were grown in submerged culture condition to study the biomass yield and poly unsaturated fatty acid, DHA production. The optimization of production process under submerged conditions was carried out using statistical experimental design and confirmation of DHA was done by GC analysis. Maximum DHA production of 150 mg/l was achieved on 4 days of incubation at submerged condition in the presence of glucose as carbon source. PMID:26155676

  17. Soluble and cell wall-bound phenolic acids and ferulic acid dehydrodimers in rye flour and five bread model systems: insight into mechanisms of improved availability

    PubMed Central

    Dynkowska, Wioletta M; Cyran, Malgorzata R; Cegli?ska, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Background The bread-making process influences bread components, including phenolics that significantly contribute to its antioxidant properties. Five bread model systems made from different rye cultivars were investigated to compare their impact on concentration of ethanol-soluble (free and ester-bound) and insoluble phenolics. Results Breads produced by a straight dough method without acid addition (A) and three-stage sourdough method with 12 h native starter preparation (C) exhibited the highest, genotype-dependent concentrations of free phenolic acids. Dough acidification by direct acid addition (method B) or by gradual production during prolonged starter fermentation (24 and 48 h, for methods D and E) considerably decreased their level. However, breads B were enriched in soluble ester-bound fraction. Both direct methods, despite substantial differences in dough pH, caused a similar increase in the amount of insoluble ester-bound fraction. The contents of phenolic fractions in rye bread were positively related to activity level of feruloyl esterase and negatively to those of arabinoxylan-hydrolysing enzymes in wholemeal flour. Conclusion The solubility of rye bread phenolics may be enhanced by application of a suitable bread-making procedure with respect to rye cultivar, as the mechanisms of this process are also governed by a response of an individual genotype with specific biochemical profile. © 2014 Plant Breeding and Acclimatization Institute, National Research Institute. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25410263

  18. Effect of fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment on ethanol production from oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB).

    PubMed

    Ishola, Mofoluwake M; Isroi; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2014-08-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB), a lignocellulosic residue of palm oil industries was examined for ethanol production. Milled OPEFB exposed to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with enzymes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted just in 14.5% ethanol yield compared to the theoretical yield. Therefore, chemical pretreatment with phosphoric acid, a biological pretreatment with white-rot fungus Pleurotus floridanus, and their combination were carried out on OPEFB prior to the SSF. Pretreatment with phosphoric acid, combination of both methods and just fungal pretreatment improved the digestibility of OPEFB by 24.0, 16.5 and 4.5 times, respectively. During the SSF, phosphoric acid pretreatment, combination of fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment and just fungal pretreatment resulted in the highest 89.4%, 62.8% and 27.9% of the theoretical ethanol yield, respectively. However, the recovery of the OPEFB after the fungal pretreatment was 98.7%, which was higher than after phosphoric acid pretreatment (36.5%) and combined pretreatment (45.2%). PMID:24630370

  19. Direct Surface Analysis of Fungal Species by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B. ); Wahl, Jon H. ); Kingsley, Mark T. ); Wahl, Karen L. )

    2001-12-01

    Intact spores and/or hyphae of Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus oryzae, Trichoderma reesei and Phanerochaete chrysosporium are analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). This study investigates various methods of sample preparation and matrices to determine optimum collection and analysis criteria for fungal analysis by MALDI-MS. Fungi are applied to the MALDI sample target as untreated, sonicated, acid/heat treated, or blotted directly from the fungal culture with double-stick tape. Ferulic acid or sinapinic acid matrix solution is layered over the dried samples and analyzed by MALDI-MS. Statistical analysis of the data show that simply using double stick tape to collect and transfer to a MALDI sample plate typically worked as well as the other preparation methods, but requires the least sample handling.

  20. Pinus pinaster seedlings and their fungal symbionts show high plasticity in phosphorus acquisition in acidic soils.

    PubMed

    Ali, M A; Louche, J; Legname, E; Duchemin, M; Plassard, C

    2009-12-01

    Young seedlings of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Soland in Aït.) were grown in rhizoboxes using intact spodosol soil samples from the southwest of France, in Landes of Gascogne, presenting a large variation of phosphorus (P) availability. Soils were collected from a 93-year-old unfertilized stand and a 13-year-old P. pinaster stand with regular annual fertilization of either only P or P and nitrogen (N). After 6 months of culture in controlled conditions, different morphotypes of ectomycorrhiza (ECM) were used for the measurements of acid phosphatase activity and molecular identification of fungal species using amplification of the ITS region. Total biomass, N and P contents were measured in roots and shoots of plants. Bicarbonate- and NaOH-available inorganic P (Pi), organic P (Po) and ergosterol concentrations were measured in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The results showed that bulk soil from the 93-year-old forest stand presented the highest Po levels, but relatively higher bicarbonate-extractable Pi levels compared to 13-year-old unfertilized stand. Fertilizers significantly increased the concentrations of inorganic P fractions in bulk soil. Ergosterol contents in rhizosphere soil were increased by fertilizer application. The dominant fungal species was Rhizopogon luteolus forming 66.6% of analysed ECM tips. Acid phosphatase activity was highly variable and varied inversely with bicarbonate-extractable Pi levels in the rhizosphere soil. Total P or total N in plants was linearly correlated with total plant biomass, but the slope was steep only between total P and biomass in fertilized soil samples. In spite of high phosphatase activity in ECM tips, P availability remained a limiting nutrient in soil samples from unfertilized stands. Nevertheless young P. pinaster seedlings showed a high plasticity for biomass production at low P availability in soils. PMID:19840995

  1. Antioxidant properties and efficacies of synthesized alkyl caffeates, ferulates, and coumarates.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Durand, Erwann; Laguerre, Mickaël; Bayrasy, Christelle; Lecomte, Jérôme; Villeneuve, Pierre; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2014-12-31

    Caffeic, ferulic, and coumaric acids were lipophilized with saturated fatty alcohols (C1-C20). The antioxidant properties of these hydroxycinnamic acids and their alkyl esters were evaluated in various assays. Furthermore, the antioxidant efficiency of the compounds was evaluated in a simple o/w microemulsion using the conjugated autoxidizable triene (CAT) assay. All evaluated phenolipids had radical scavenging, reducing power, and metal chelating properties. Only caffeic acid and caffeates were able to form a complex with iron via their catechol group in the phenolic ring. In the o/w emulsion, the medium chain phenolipids of the three homologues series were most efficient. The antioxidant properties and efficacies were dependent upon functional groups substituted to the ring structure and were in the following order: caffeic acid and caffeates > ferulic acid and ferulates > coumaric acid and coumarates. Moreover, the results demonstrated that the test system has an impact on the antioxidative properties measured. PMID:25457614

  2. Rapid Stimulation of 5-Lipoxygenase Activity in Potato by the Fungal Elicitor Arachidonic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Bostock, Richard M.; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Choi, Doil; Ricker, Karin E.; Ward, Bernard L.

    1992-01-01

    The activity of lipoxygenase (LOX) in aged potato tuber discs increased by almost 2-fold following treatment of the discs with the fungal elicitor arachidonic acid (AA). Enzyme activity increased above that in untreated discs within 30 min after AA treatment, peaked at 1 to 3 h, and returned to near control levels by 6 h. The majority of the activity was detected in a soluble fraction (105,000g supernatant), but a minor portion was also associated with a particulate fraction enriched in microsomal membranes (105,000g pellet); both activities were similarly induced. 5-Hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid was the principal product following incubation of these extracts with AA. Antibodies to soybean LOX strongly reacted with a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 95-kD present in both soluble and particulate fractions whose abundance generally corresponded with LOX activity in extracts. LOX activity was not enhanced by treatment of the discs with nonelicitor fatty acids or by branched ?-glucans from the mycelium of Phytophthora infestans. Prior treatment of the discs with abscisic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, or n-propyl gallate, all of which have been shown to suppress AA induction of the hypersensitive response, inhibited the AA-induced increment in LOX activity. Cycloheximide pretreatment, which abolishes AA elicitor activity for other responses such as phytoalexin induction, did not inhibit LOX activity in water- or elicitor-treated discs but enhanced activity similar to that observed by AA treatment. The elicitor-induced increase in 5-LOX activity preceded or temporally paralleled the induction of other studied responses to AA, including the accumulation of mRNAs for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase reported here. The results are discussed in relation to the proposed role of the 5-LOX in signal-response coupling of arachidonate elicitation of the hypersensitive response. Images Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:16653144

  3. Firing Range Soils Yield a Diverse Array of Fungal Isolates Capable of Organic Acid Production and Pb Mineral Solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Tarah S.; Gottel, Neil R.; Basta, Nicholas; Jardine, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic sources of lead contamination in soils include mining and smelting activities, effluents and wastes, agricultural pesticides, domestic garbage dumps, and shooting ranges. While Pb is typically considered relatively insoluble in the soil environment, some fungi may potentially contribute to mobilization of heavy metal cations by means of secretion of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs). We sought to better understand the potential for metal mobilization within an indigenous fungal community at an abandoned shooting range in Oak Ridge, TN, where soil Pb contamination levels ranged from 24 to >2,700 mg Pb kg dry soil?1. We utilized culture-based assays to determine organic acid secretion and Pb-carbonate dissolution of a diverse collection of soil fungal isolates derived from the site and verified isolate distribution patterns within the community by 28S rRNA gene analysis of whole soils. The fungal isolates examined included both ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that excreted high levels (up to 27 mM) of a mixture of LMWOAs, including oxalic and citric acids, and several isolates demonstrated a marked ability to dissolve Pb-carbonate at high concentrations up to 10.5 g liter?1 (18.5 mM) in laboratory assays. Fungi within the indigenous community of these highly Pb-contaminated soils are capable of LMWOA secretion at levels greater than those of well-studied model organisms, such as Aspergillus niger. Additionally, these organisms were found in high relative abundance (>1%) in some of the most heavily contaminated soils. Our data highlight the need to understand more about autochthonous fungal communities at Pb-contaminated sites and how they may impact Pb biogeochemistry, solubility, and bioavailability, thus consequently potentially impacting human and ecosystem health. PMID:22729539

  4. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, Mark T

    2001-03-13

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, an d analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: (1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, (2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and (3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  5. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, Mark T.

    2001-03-13

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  6. Potential role of nuclear receptor ligand all-trans retinoic acids in the treatment of fungal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Yan; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Hong; Bi, Miao-Miao; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Wen-Song

    2015-01-01

    Fungal keratitis (FK) is a worldwide visual impairment disease. This infectious fungus initiates the primary innate immune response and, later the adaptive immune response. The inflammatory process is related to a variety of immune cells, including macrophages, helper T cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and Treg cells, and is associated with proinflammatory, chemotactic and regulatory cytokines. All-trans retinoic acids (ATRA) have diverse immunomodulatory actions in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. These retinoids regulate the transcriptional levels of target genes through the activation of nuclear receptors. Retinoic acid receptor ? (RAR ?), retinoic acid receptor ? (RAR ?), and retinoid X receptor ? (RXR ?) are expressed in the cornea and immune cells. This paper summarizes new findings regarding ATRA in immune and inflammatory diseases and analyzes the perspective application of ATRA in FK. PMID:26309886

  7. Mutualistic fungal endophytes produce phytohormones and organic acids that promote japonica rice plant growth under prolonged heat stress*

    PubMed Central

    Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Shahzad, Raheem; Ullah, Ihsan; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-01-01

    This study identifies the potential role in heat-stress mitigation of phytohormones and other secondary metabolites produced by the endophytic fungus Paecilomyces formosus LWL1 in japonica rice cultivar Dongjin. The japonica rice was grown in controlled chamber conditions with and without P. formosus LWL1 under no stress (NS) and prolonged heat stress (HS) conditions. Endophytic association under NS and HS conditions significantly improved plant growth attributes, such as plant height, fresh weight, dry weight, and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, P. formosus LWL1 protected the rice plants from HS compared with controls, indicated by the lower endogenous level of stress-signaling compounds such as abscisic acid (25.71%) and jasmonic acid (34.57%) and the increase in total protein content (18.76%–33.22%). Such fungal endophytes may be helpful for sustainable crop production under high environmental temperatures. PMID:26642184

  8. Mutualistic fungal endophytes produce phytohormones and organic acids that promote japonica rice plant growth under prolonged heat stress.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Shahzad, Raheem; Ullah, Ihsan; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-12-01

    This study identifies the potential role in heat-stress mitigation of phytohormones and other secondary metabolites produced by the endophytic fungus Paecilomyces formosus LWL1 in japonica rice cultivar Dongjin. The japonica rice was grown in controlled chamber conditions with and without P. formosus LWL1 under no stress (NS) and prolonged heat stress (HS) conditions. Endophytic association under NS and HS conditions significantly improved plant growth attributes, such as plant height, fresh weight, dry weight, and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, P. formosus LWL1 protected the rice plants from HS compared with controls, indicated by the lower endogenous level of stress-signaling compounds such as abscisic acid (25.71%) and jasmonic acid (34.57%) and the increase in total protein content (18.76%-33.22%). Such fungal endophytes may be helpful for sustainable crop production under high environmental temperatures. PMID:26642184

  9. Grass cell wall feruloylation: distribution of bound ferulate and candidate gene expression in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Molinari, Hugo B. C.; Pellny, Till K.; Freeman, Jackie; Shewry, Peter R.; Mitchell, Rowan A. C.

    2013-01-01

    The cell walls of grasses such as wheat, maize, rice, and sugar cane, contain large amounts of ferulate that is ester-linked to the cell wall polysaccharide glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX). This ferulate is considered to limit the digestibility of polysaccharide in grass biomass as it forms covalent linkages between polysaccharide and lignin components. Candidate genes within a grass-specific clade of the BAHD acyl-coA transferase superfamily have been identified as being responsible for the ester linkage of ferulate to GAX. Manipulation of these BAHD genes may therefore be a biotechnological target for increasing efficiency of conversion of grass biomass into biofuel. Here, we describe the expression of these candidate genes and amounts of bound ferulate from various tissues and developmental stages of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon. BAHD candidate transcripts and significant amounts of bound ferulate were present in every tissue and developmental stage. We hypothesize that BAHD candidate genes similar to the recently described Oryza sativa p-coumarate monolignol transferase (OsPMT) gene (PMT sub-clade) are principally responsible for the bound para-coumaric acid (pCA), and that other BAHD candidates (non-PMT sub-clade) are responsible for bound ferulic acid (FA). There were some similarities with between the ratio of expression non-PMT/PMT genes and the ratio of bound FA/pCA between tissue types, compatible with this hypothesis. However, much further work to modify BAHD genes in grasses and to characterize the heterologously expressed proteins is required to demonstrate their function. PMID:23508643

  10. Fungal Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... flu or tuberculosis. Some fungal diseases like fungal meningitis and bloodstream infections are less common than skin and lung infections but can be deadly. Types of fungal diseases Read about different types of ...

  11. Cannabiorci- and 8-chlorocannabiorcichromenic acid as fungal antagonists from Cylindrocarpon olidum.

    PubMed

    Quaghebeur, K; Coosemans, J; Toppet, S; Compernolle, F

    1994-09-01

    Cannabiorcichromenic acid and 8-chlorocannabiorcichromenic acid [8-chloro-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-2-(4-methyl-3-pentenyl)-2H-1-benzopyran -6- carboxylic acid] were identified as active components in cultures of Cylindrocarpon olidum which antagonized various other fungi. Experiments performed with the purified acids confirmed the antifungal activity; in addition, they revealed that the acids had antibiotic properties towards gram-positive bacteria and were toxic to nematodes. PMID:7765609

  12. Isolation of campesteryl ferulate and epi-campesteryl ferulate, two components of ?-oryzanol from rice bran.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuhua; Yanase, Emiko; Nakatsuka, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Campesteryl ferulate (3a, 24R/?) and epi-campesteryl ferulate (3b, 24S/?), components of rice bran ?-oryzanol, were isolated by the preparative recycle HPLC system using a combination of ODS silica and cholester packed columns at over 99% purity. Their purities and structures of 3a and 3b thus obtained were confirmed by HPLC analysis and physical data (1H- and 13C-NMR, MS spectra, and X-ray crystallography). PMID:23563552

  13. Acyl-carrier protein - Phosphopantetheinyltransferase partnerships in fungal fatty acid synthases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthesis of fatty acids is an essential primary metabolic process for energy storage and cellular structural integrity. Assembly of saturated fatty acids is achieved by fatty acid synthases (FASs) that combine acetyl- and malonyl-CoAs by repetitive decarboxylative Claisen condensations with su...

  14. Promoter sequence of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene 1 of lactic acid-producing fungus rhizopus oryzae and a method of expressing a gene of interest in fungal species

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2002-10-15

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of phosphoglycerate kinase gene 1 of a lactic acid-producing filamentous fungal strain, Rhizopus oryzae. The isolated promoter can constitutively regulate gene expression under various carbohydrate conditions. In addition, the present invention also provides a design of an integration vector for the transformation of a foreign gene in Rhizopus oryzae.

  15. Promoter sequence of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of lactic acid-producing fungus rhizopus oryzae and a method of expressing a gene of interest in fungal species

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2003-03-04

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of a lactic acid-producing filamentous fungal strain, Rhizopus oryzae. The isolated promoter can constitutively regulate gene expression under various carbohydrate conditions. In addition, the present invention also provides a design of an integration vector for the transformation of a foreign gene in Rhizopus oryzae.

  16. The Natural Diyne-Furan Fatty Acid EV-086 Is an Inhibitor of Fungal Delta-9 Fatty Acid Desaturation with Efficacy in a Model of Skin Dermatophytosis

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbacher, Melanie; Greve, Katrine B. V.; Brianza, Federico; Folly, Christophe; Heider, Harald; Lone, Museer A.; Long, Lisa; Meyer, Jean-Philippe; Roussel, Patrick; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Schneiter, Roger; Sorensen, Alexandra S.

    2014-01-01

    Human fungal infections represent a therapeutic challenge. Although effective strategies for treatment are available, resistance is spreading, and many therapies have unacceptable side effects. A clear need for novel antifungal targets and molecules is thus emerging. Here, we present the identification and characterization of the plant-derived diyne-furan fatty acid EV-086 as a novel antifungal compound. EV-086 has potent and broad-spectrum activity in vitro against Candida, Aspergillus, and Trichophyton spp., whereas activities against bacteria and human cell lines are very low. Chemical-genetic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion mutants identified lipid metabolic processes and organelle organization and biogenesis as targets of EV-086. Pathway modeling suggested that EV-086 inhibits delta-9 fatty acid desaturation, an essential process in S. cerevisiae, depending on the delta-9 fatty acid desaturase OLE1. Delta-9 unsaturated fatty acids—but not saturated fatty acids—antagonized the EV-086-mediated growth inhibition, and transcription of the OLE1 gene was strongly upregulated in the presence of EV-086. EV-086 increased the ratio of saturated to unsaturated free fatty acids and phosphatidylethanolamine fatty acyl chains, respectively. Furthermore, EV-086 was rapidly taken up into the lipid fraction of the cell and incorporated into phospholipids. Together, these findings demonstrate that EV-086 is an inhibitor of delta-9 fatty acid desaturation and that the mechanism of inhibition might involve an EV-086–phospholipid. Finally, EV-086 showed efficacy in a guinea pig skin dermatophytosis model of topical Trichophyton infection, which demonstrates that delta-9 fatty acid desaturation is a valid antifungal target, at least for dermatophytoses. PMID:24189258

  17. Xanosporic acid, an intermediate in bacterial degradation of the fungal phototoxin cercosporin

    E-print Network

    Daub, Margaret

    by Xanthomonas campestris pv zinniae to a non-toxic, unstable green metabolite xanosporic acid, identified via:P atropisomers. # 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Xanthomonas campestris pv. zinniae

  18. Bonding of hydroxycinnamic acids to lignin: ferulic and p-coumaric acids are predominantly linked at the benzyl position of lignin, not the beta-position, in grass cell walls.

    PubMed

    Lam, T B; Kadoya, K; Iiyama, K

    2001-07-01

    A suspension in dichloromethane-water (18:1, v/v) of various fractions containing hydroxycinnamic acid ester-ether bridges between lignin and polysaccharides prepared from cell walls of matured oat (Avena sativa L.) intemodes, and a solution of their acetates in the same solvent, were treated with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ). This reagent selectively cleaves benzyl ether and ester linkages of negatively charged aromatic nuclei. The sample treated with DDQ was directly hydrolysed either under mild (1 M NaOH, overnight at 37 degrees C) or severe (4 M NaOH, for 2 h at 170 degrees C) conditions. The hydroxycinnamic acids released in the hydrolysate were methylated with diazomethane and analysed quantitatively using gas chromatography. Significant portions of ether linkages between hydroxycinnamic acids and lignin were cleaved with DDQ, which suggests that most of the hydroxycinnamic acids were ether-linked at the benzyl position, and not the beta-position, of the lignin side chain as previously claimed. PMID:11423145

  19. Structural and functional studies of a phosphatidic acid-binding antifungal plant defensin MtDef4: Identification of an RGFRRR motif governing fungal cell entry

    SciTech Connect

    Sagaram, Uma S.; El-Mounadi, Kaoutar; Buchko, Garry W.; Berg, Howard R.; Kaur, Jagdeep; Pandurangi, Raghoottama; Smith, Thomas J.; Shah, Dilip

    2013-12-04

    A highly conserved plant defensin MtDef4 potently inhibits the growth of a filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum. MtDef4 is internalized by cells of F. graminearum. To determine its mechanism of fungal cell entry and antifungal action, NMR solution structure of MtDef4 has been determined. The analysis of its structure has revealed a positively charged patch on the surface of the protein consisting of arginine residues in its ?-core signature, a major determinant of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. Here, we report functional analysis of the RGFRRR motif of the ?-core signature of MtDef4. The replacement of RGFRRR to AAAARR or to RGFRAA not only abolishes fungal cell entry but also results in loss of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. MtDef4 binds strongly to phosphatidic acid (PA), a precursor for the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids and a signaling lipid known to recruit cytosolic proteins to membranes. Mutations of RGFRRR which abolish fungal cell entry of MtDef4 also impair its binding to PA. Our results suggest that RGFRRR motif is a translocation signal for entry of MtDef4 into fungal cells and that this positively charged motif likely mediates interaction of this defensin with PA as part of its antifungal action.

  20. New approach to the fungal decontamination of wheat used for wheat sprouts: effects of aminolevulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Luksiene, Zivile; Danilcenko, Honorata; Taraseviciene, Zivile; Anusevicius, Zilvinas; Maroziene, Audrone; Nivinskas, Henrikas

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays, there is a growing interest in natural, minimally processed, nutritional and healthy foods. Sprouted seeds can be offered as natural nutritive products. Regrettably, existing seed decontamination technologies are limited and have specific disadvantages. 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) as a novel and effective tool for wheat decontamination from microfungi is proposed in this work. Inhibition of wheat with 5-ALA revealed a drastically suppressed development of microfungi. Studies of wheat germination characteristics showed that 5-ALA stimulates the growth of wheat seedlings and roots without impairing the vigor of germination and the viability of seeds. 5-ALA also induces either marginal or significant activities of antioxidant enzymes which can be associated with enhanced cellular capacity to detoxify reactive oxygen species. The results indicate that 5-ALA application may be an effective, environmentally friendly and inexpensive technology to be used in producing sprouts for human consumption. PMID:17350127

  1. Enzymatic hydrolysis of steryl ferulates and steryl glycosides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steryl ferulates and steryl glycosides are phytosterol conjugates found characteristically in cereals. Their properties in enzymatic hydrolysis are, however, not yet well known. Steryl ferulates and steryl glycosides were extracted and purified from rye and wheat bran. Their rates of hydrolysis with...

  2. Biosynthesis of the mycotoxin tenuazonic acid by a fungal NRPS–PKS hybrid enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Motoyama, Takayuki; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA) is a well-known mycotoxin produced by various plant pathogenic fungi. However, its biosynthetic gene has been unknown to date. Here we identify the TeA biosynthetic gene from Magnaporthe oryzae by finding two TeA-inducing conditions of a low-producing strain. We demonstrate that TeA is synthesized from isoleucine and acetoacetyl-coenzyme A by TeA synthetase 1 (TAS1). TAS1 is a unique non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase (NRPS–PKS) hybrid enzyme that begins with an NRPS module. In contrast to other NRPS/PKS hybrid enzymes, the PKS portion of TAS1 has only a ketosynthase (KS) domain and this domain is indispensable for TAS1 activity. Phylogenetic analysis classifies this KS domain as an independent clade close to type I PKS KS domain. We demonstrate that the TAS1 KS domain conducts the final cyclization step for TeA release. These results indicate that TAS1 is a unique type of NRPS–PKS hybrid enzyme. PMID:26503170

  3. Biosynthesis of the mycotoxin tenuazonic acid by a fungal NRPS-PKS hybrid enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Motoyama, Takayuki; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA) is a well-known mycotoxin produced by various plant pathogenic fungi. However, its biosynthetic gene has been unknown to date. Here we identify the TeA biosynthetic gene from Magnaporthe oryzae by finding two TeA-inducing conditions of a low-producing strain. We demonstrate that TeA is synthesized from isoleucine and acetoacetyl-coenzyme A by TeA synthetase 1 (TAS1). TAS1 is a unique non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase (NRPS-PKS) hybrid enzyme that begins with an NRPS module. In contrast to other NRPS/PKS hybrid enzymes, the PKS portion of TAS1 has only a ketosynthase (KS) domain and this domain is indispensable for TAS1 activity. Phylogenetic analysis classifies this KS domain as an independent clade close to type I PKS KS domain. We demonstrate that the TAS1 KS domain conducts the final cyclization step for TeA release. These results indicate that TAS1 is a unique type of NRPS-PKS hybrid enzyme. PMID:26503170

  4. Endohyphal Bacterium Enhances Production of Indole-3-Acetic Acid by a Foliar Fungal Endophyte

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Michele T.; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K.; Wijeratne, Kithsiri; Gunatilaka, Leslie; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have been detected, but their effects have not been studied previously. Here we show not only that IAA is produced in vitro by a foliar endophyte (here identified as Pestalotiopsis aff. neglecta, Xylariales), but that IAA production is enhanced significantly when the endophyte hosts an endohyphal bacterium (here identified as Luteibacter sp., Xanthomonadales). Both the endophyte and the endophyte/bacterium complex appear to rely on an L-tryptophan dependent pathway for IAA synthesis. The bacterium can be isolated from the fungus when the symbiotic complex is cultivated at 36°C. In pure culture the bacterium does not produce IAA. Culture filtrate from the endophyte-bacterium complex significantly enhances growth of tomato in vitro relative to controls and to filtrate from the endophyte alone. Together these results speak to a facultative symbiosis between an endophyte and endohyphal bacterium that strongly influences IAA production, providing a new framework in which to explore endophyte-plant interactions. PMID:24086270

  5. Synthesis of isopropyl ferulate using silica-immobilized lipase in an organic medium.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Kanwar, Shamsher Singh

    2011-01-01

    Immobilization of lipases has proved to be a useful technique for improving an enzyme's activity in organic solvents. In the present study, the performance of a silica-immobilized lipase was evaluated for the synthesis of isopropyl ferulate in DMSO. The biocatalyst was cross-linked onto the matrix with 1% glutaraldehyde. The effects of various parameters, molar ratio of ferulic acid to isopropyl alcohol (25?mM?:?100?mM), concentration of biocatalyst (2.5-20?mg/mL), molecular sieves (25-250?mg/mL), and various salt ions, were studied consecutively as a function of percent esterification. Immobilized lipase at 25?mg/mL showed maximum esterification (~84%) of ferulic acid and isopropanol at a molar ratio of 25?mM?:?100?mM, respectively, in DMSO at 45°C in 3?h under shaking (150?rpm). To overcome the inhibitory effect of water (a byproduct) if any, in the reaction mixture, molecular sieves (3?Å × 1.5?mm; 100?mg/mL) were added to the reaction mixture to promote the forward reaction. Salt ions like Ca(2+), Cd(2+), and Fe(2+) enhanced the activity of immobilized biocatalyst while a few ions like Co(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Al(3+), and Na(+) had mild inhibitory effect. Approximately, one third of total decrease in the esterification efficacy was observed after the 5th repetitive cycle of esterification. PMID:21603272

  6. Growth of Arabidopsis seedlings on high fungal doses of Piriformospora indica has little effect on plant performance, stress, and defense gene expression in spite of elevated jasmonic acid and jasmonic acid-isoleucine levels in the roots.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Khabat; Camehl, Iris; Sherameti, Irena; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    The endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica colonizes the roots of many plant species including Arabidopsis and promotes their performance, biomass, and seed production as well as resistance against biotic and abiotic stress. Imbalances in the symbiotic interaction such as uncontrolled fungal growth result in the loss of benefits for the plants and activation of defense responses against the microbe. We exposed Arabidopsis seedlings to a dense hyphal lawn of P. indica. The seedlings continue to grow, accumulate normal amounts of chlorophyll, and the photosynthetic parameters demonstrate that they perform well. In spite of high fungal doses around the roots, the fungal material inside the roots was not significantly higher when compared with roots that live in a beneficial symbiosis with P. indica. Fifteen defense- and stress-related genes including PR2, PR3, PAL2, and ERF1 are only moderately upregulated in the roots on the fungal lawn, and the seedlings did not accumulate H2O2/radical oxygen species. However, accumulation of anthocyanin in P. indica-exposed seedlings indicates stress symptoms. Furthermore, the jasmonic acid (JA) and jasmonic acid-isoleucine (JA-Ile) levels were increased in the roots, and consequently PDF1.2 and a newly characterized gene for a 2-oxoglurate and Fe2+ -dependent oxygenase were upregulated more than 7-fold on the dense fungal lawn, in a JAR1- and EIN3-dependent manner. We conclude that growth of A. thaliana seedlings on high fungal doses of P. indica has little effect on the overall performance of the plants although elevated JA and JA-Ile levels in the roots induce a mild stress or defense response. PMID:24047645

  7. Soil water availability and microsite mediate fungal and bacterial phospholipid fatty acid biomarker abundances in Mojave Desert soils exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, V. L.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Ziegler, S. E.; Evans, R. D.

    2011-06-01

    Changes in the rates of nitrogen (N) cycling, microbial carbon (C) substrate use, and extracellular enzyme activities in a Mojave Desert ecosystem exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2 suggest shifts in the size and/or functional characteristics of microbial assemblages in two dominant soil microsites: plant interspaces and under the dominant shrub Larrea tridentata. We used ester-linked phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers as a proxy for microbial biomass to quantify spatial and temporal differences in soil microbial communities from February 2003 to May 2005. Further, we used the 13C signature of the fossil CO2 source for elevated CO2 plots to trace recent plant C inputs into soil organic matter (SOM) and broad microbial groups using ?13C (‰). Differences between individual ?13CPLFA and ?13CSOM for fungal biomarkers indicated active metabolism of newer C in elevated CO2 soils. Total PLFA-C was greater in shrub microsites compared to plant interspaces, and CO2 treatment differences within microsites increased under higher soil water availability. Total, fungal, and bacterial PLFA-C increased with decreasing soil volumetric water content (VWC) in both microsites, suggesting general adaptations to xeric desert conditions. Increases in fungal-to-bacterial PLFA-C ratio with decreasing VWC reflected functional group-specific responses to changing soil water availability. While temporal and spatial extremes in resource availability in desert ecosystems contribute to the difficulty in identifying common trends or mechanisms driving microbial responses in less extreme environments, we found that soil water availability and soil microsite interacted with elevated CO2 to shift fungal and bacterial biomarker abundances in Mojave Desert soils.

  8. Fungal hemolysins

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ajay P.; Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    Hemolysins are a class of proteins defined by their ability to lyse red cells but have been described to exhibit pleiotropic functions. These proteins have been extensively studied in bacteria and more recently in fungi. Within the last decade, a number of studies have characterized fungal hemolysins and revealed a fascinating yet diverse group of proteins. The purpose of this review is to provide a synopsis of the known fungal hemolysins with an emphasis on those belonging to the aegerolysin protein family. New insight and perspective into fungal hemolysins in biotechnology and health are additionally presented. PMID:22769586

  9. Ruminal bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity of dairy cows in response to ingestion of lauric or myristic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this experiment, part of a larger study, was to investigate changes in rumen bacterial, archaeal, and fungal diversity in cows with normal and reduced protozoal populations. In the main study, 6 lactating dairy cows were dosed intraruminally with 240 g/cow per day of stearic (contr...

  10. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... arthritis is infection of a joint by a fungus. ... Culture of joint fluid that grows fungus Joint x-ray showing joint changes Positive antibody test (serology) for fungal disease Synovial biopsy showing fungus

  11. Fungal Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... diagnosis is needed, as in cases of persistent, deep, or systemic infections, more extensive testing may be ... mouth (thrush) Vaginal itching and discharge (yeast infection) Deep and systemic fungal infections may cause a variety ...

  12. Fungal allergens.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, W E; Helbling, A; Salvaggio, J E; Lehrer, S B

    1995-01-01

    Airborne fungal spores occur widely and often in far greater concentrations than pollen grains. Immunoglobulin E-specific antigens (allergens) on airborne fungal spores induce type I hypersensitivity (allergic) respiratory reactions in sensitized atopic subjects, causing rhinitis and/or asthma. The prevalence of respiratory allergy to fungi is imprecisely known but is estimated at 20 to 30% of atopic (allergy-predisposed) individuals or up to 6% of the general population. Diagnosis and immunotherapy of allergy to fungi require well-characterized or standardized extracts that contain the relevant allergen(s) of the appropriate fungus. Production of standardized extracts is difficult since fungal extracts are complex mixtures and a variety of fungi are allergenic. Thus, the currently available extracts are largely nonstandardized, even uncharacterized, crude extracts. Recent significant progress in isolating and characterizing relevant fungal allergens is summarized in the present review. Particularly, some allergens from the genera Alternaria, Aspergillus, and Cladosporium are now thoroughly characterized, and allergens from several other genera, including some basidiomycetes, have also been purified. The availability of these extracts will facilitate definitive studies of fungal allergy prevalence and immunotherapy efficacy as well as enhance both the diagnosis and therapy of fungal allergy. PMID:7621398

  13. Fungal nail infection

    MedlinePLUS

    Nails - fungal infection; Onychomycosis; Infection - fungal - nails; Tinea unguium ... hair, nails, and outer skin layers. Common fungal infections include: Athlete's foot Jock itch Ringworm on the ...

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of antioxidant and antifungal activities of novel ricinoleate-based lipoconjugates of phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kunduru Konda; Ravinder, Thumu; Kanjilal, Sanjit

    2012-10-15

    Syntheses of four castor oil fatty acid-based novel lipoconjugates of phenolic acids were carried out following Mitsunobu methodology. The lipid part consists of methyl ricinoleate and its saturated analogue, methyl-12-hydroxystearate and the phenolic moieties are ferulic and vanillic acid. Synthesised compounds are evaluated for antioxidant activity using three in vitro assays (DPPH radical scavenging assay, DSC studies for oxidative induction temperature of linoleic acid and autoxidation of linoleic acid in Tween 20 micellar medium) and compared with three widely used antioxidants in the food industry, BHT, ?-tocopherol, and dodecyl gallate. Synthesised compounds are found to exhibit good antiradical activity. These compounds also exhibited very good antifungal activity against studied fungal strains. All these results suggested the applicability of the synthesised compounds as potent lipophilic antioxidants for combating oxidative stress. PMID:23442675

  15. SYNTHESIS AND IDENTIFICATION OF 2,5-BIS-(4-HYDROXY-3-METHOXYPHENYL)-TETRAHYDROFURAN-3,4-DICARBOXYLIC ACID, AN UNANTICIPATED FERULATE 8-8-COUPLING PRODUCT ACYLATING CEREAL PLANT CELL WALLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new product implicated in cereal grain polysaccharide cross-linking has been authenticated by independent synthesis. Saponification of cereal grain fiber releases the RRRS/SSSR-isomer of 2,5-di-(4´-hydroxy-3´-methoxyphenyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrofuran-3,4-dicarboxylic acid. The parent ester logically ...

  16. Fungal Entomopathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal entomopathogens are important biological control agents worldwide and have been the subject of intense research for more than100 years. They exhibit both sexual and asexual reproduction and produce different types of infective propagules. Their mode of action against insects involves attachme...

  17. Interesting effect of phytosterol structure on antioxidant activities of phytosteryl ferulates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In nature, phytosteryl ferulates usually occur as mixtures where the profiles of the phytosterols are influenced by the cereal source. When evaluating phytosteryl ferulates from corn and rice as potential antioxidants for frying, we found that phytosteryl ferulates from corn were superior to those f...

  18. Lamb and Cow Performance when Fed Corn Silage that has Reduced Ferulate Cross Linking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulate-mediated lignin/hemicellulose cross linking in grasses reduces in vitro NDF digestibility (IVNDFD). Impact of ferulate cross linking on animal performance was examined in lamb digestibility and dairy cow performance trials using the seedling ferulate ester (sfe) corn mutant that reduces cro...

  19. Effect of acid hydrolysis and fungal biotreatment on agro-industrial wastes for obtainment of free sugars for bioethanol production

    PubMed Central

    El-Tayeb, T.S.; Abdelhafez, A.A.; Ali, S.H.; Ramadan, E.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate selected chemical and microbiological treatments for the conversion of certain local agro-industrial wastes (rice straw, corn stalks, sawdust, sugar beet waste and sugarcane bagasse) to ethanol. The chemical composition of these feedstocks was determined. Conversion of wastes to free sugars by acid hydrolysis varied from one treatment to another. In single-stage dilute acid hydrolysis, increasing acid concentration from 1 % (v/v) to 5 % (v/v) decreased the conversion percentage of almost all treated agro-industrial wastes. Lower conversion percentages for some treatments were obtained when increasing the residence time from 90 to 120 min. The two-stage dilute acid hydrolysis by phosphoric acid (1.0 % v/v) followed by sulphuric acid (1.0 % v/v) resulted in the highest conversion percentage (41.3 % w/w) on treated sugar beet waste. This treatment when neutralized, amended with some nutrients and inoculated with baker’s yeast, achieved the highest ethanol concentration (1.0 % v/v). Formation of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were functions of type of acid hydrolysis, acid concentration, residence time and feedstock type. The highest bioconversion of 5 % wastes (37.8 % w/w) was recorded on sugar beet waste by Trichoderma viride EMCC 107. This treatment when followed by baker’s yeast fermentation, 0.41 % (v/v) ethanol and 8.2 % (v/w) conversion coefficient were obtained. PMID:24031984

  20. Changes in lipid, fatty acids and phospholipids composition of whole rice bran after solid-state fungal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Melissa Dos Santos; Feddern, Vivian; Kupski, Larine; Cipolatti, Eliane Pereira; Badiale-Furlong, Eliana; de Souza-Soares, Leonor Almeida

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fermented rice bran phospholipids, lipids and fatty acid content in a fermentation solid system with Rhizopus oryzae fungus. For this, aliquots were withdrawn every 24h over 120 h. The content of phospholipids was determined by colorimetric method. Esterified fatty acids were separated by gas chromatography, then identified and quantified. The total lipids from fermented rice bran (FB) decreased from 20.4% to 11.2% in the range between 0 h and 120 h of fermentation while phospholipid contents were increased up to 2.4 mg P g(lipid)(-1). In fermented bran, oleic, palmitic and linoleic acids prevailed, with a decrease in saturated fatty acids (20%) and increase in the unsaturated ones (5%). This study showed that rice bran fermentation with R. oryzae can be applied to the production of phospholipids altering the saturated to unsaturated fatty acid ratio. PMID:21715163

  1. MAIZE STEM TISSUES: FERULATE DEPOSITION IN DEVELOPING INTERNODE CELL WALLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been hypothesized that ferulates are only deposited in the primary cell wall of grasses. To test this hypothesis, the fourth elongating, above-ground internode of maize (Zea mays L.) was sampled from three maize hybrids throughout development. Cell wall composition was determined by the Uppsa...

  2. Protective Effect of Sodium Ferulate on Acetaldehyde-Treated Precision-Cut Rat Liver Slices

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Chun; Liao, Zhang-Xiu; Wu, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in hepatic fibrogenesis, and inhibition of HSC activation may prevent liver fibrosis. Acetaldehyde, the most deleterious metabolite of alcohol, triggers HSC activation in alcoholic liver injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of sodium ferulate (SF), a sodium salt of ferulic acid that is rich in fruits and vegetables, on acetaldehyde-stimulated HSC activation using precision-cut liver slices (PCLSs). Rat PCLSs were co-incubated with 350??M acetaldehyde and different concentrations of SF. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by measuring enzyme leakage and malondialdehyde content in tissue. ?-Smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor-?1, and hydroxyproline were determined to assess the activation of HSCs. In addition, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) were determined to evaluate collagen degradation. SF prominently prevented the enzyme leakage in acetaldehyde-treated slices and also inhibited HSC activation and collagen production stimulated by acetaldehyde. In addition, SF increased MMP-1 expression and decreased TIMP-1 expression. These results showed that SF protected PCLSs from acetaldehyde-stimulated HSC activation and liver injury, which may be associated with the attenuation of oxidative injury and acceleration of collagen degradation. PMID:22404575

  3. Comparative study of free and immobilized lipase from Bacillus aerius and its application in synthesis of ethyl ferulate.

    PubMed

    Saun, Nitin Kumar; Narwal, Sunil Kumar; Dogra, Priyanka; Chauhan, Ghanshyam Singh; Gupta, Reena

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a purified lipase from Bacillus aerius immobilized on celite matrix was used for synthesis of ethyl ferulate. The celite-bound lipase exposed to glutaraldehyde showed 90.02% binding efficiency. It took two hours to bind maximally onto the support. The pH and temperature optima of the immobilized lipase were same as those of free enzyme i.e 9.5 and 55°C. Among different substrates both free and immobilized lipase showed maximum affinity towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (p-NPP). The lipase activity was found to be stimulated in the presence of Mg(2+) in case of free enzyme while Zn(2+) and Fe(3+) showed stimulatory effect on immobilized lipase whereas salt ions as well as chelating agents inhibited activity of both free and immobilized lipase. Maximum enzyme activity was observed in n-hexane as organic solvent followed by n-heptane for both free and immobilized lipase, however CCl4, acetone and benzene inhibited the enzyme activity. Moreover, all the selected detergents (SDS, Triton X-100, Tween 80 and Tween 20) had an inhibitory effect on both free and immobilized enzyme activity. The celite bound lipase (1.5%) efficiently performed maximum esterification (2.51 moles/l) of ethanol and ferulic acid (100 mM each, at a molar ratio of 1:3) when incubated at 55°C for 48 h resulting in the formation of ester ethyl ferulate. PMID:25099909

  4. Influence of plant secondary metabolites on in vitro oxidation of methyl ferulate with cell wall peroxidases from lupine apoplast.

    PubMed

    Marczak, ?ukasz; Wojtaszek, Przemys?aw; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall peroxidases (POXs) were liberated to intercellular washing fluids (IWFs) and isolated together with other proteins and metabolites present in the apoplast of white lupine (Lupinus albus L. var. Bac) root. After separation of proteins from low molecular weight compounds, activity of peroxidases was monitored in in vitro experiments. Oxidation of methyl ferulate with H2O2 was studied in multi-component mixtures of plant metabolites. Secondary metabolites identified in IWFs or other natural products playing important roles in different physiological processes were applied as modifiers of the dehydrodimerization process during oxidation reactions performed in vitro. These were isoflavones and their conjugates, lupanine representing quinolizidine alkaloids synthesized in lupine, or other natural products such as quercetin, ascorbic, and salicylic acid. The influence of these substances on the oxidation kinetics of methyl ferulate was monitored with liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (LC/UV), and identification of compounds was confirmed with the liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (LC/MS) system. On the basis of data collected, it was possible to reveal changes in the activities of cell wall POXs. Application of the LC system permitted us to monitor, independently, quantitative changes of two or more reaction products in the mixtures. In multi-component combinations, oxidation yields of methyl ferulate by POXs were modified depending on the actual composition of the reaction mixture. We conclude that various classes of plant secondary metabolites can modify the yield of methyl ferulate oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of POX, due to interactions with the enzyme's active site (genistein) or radical scavenging properties of metabolites present in the reaction mixture. PMID:17928101

  5. Helvolic acid, an antibacterial nortriterpenoid from a fungal endophyte, Xylaria sp. of orchid Anoectochilus setaceus endemic to Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Ratnaweera, Pamoda B.; Williams, David E.; de Silva, E. Dilip; Wijesundera, Ravi L.C.; Dalisay, Doralyn S.; Andersen, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    An endophytic fungus was isolated from surface sterilized leaf segments of Anoectochilus setaceus, an orchid endemic to Sri Lanka, and was identified as Xylaria sp. by morphological characters and DNA sequencing. Bioassay-guided chromatographic fractionation of the organic extract of a laboratory culture of this fungus led to the isolation of the known antibacterial helvolic acid. Helvolic acid was active against the Gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis [minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC), 2 ?g mL?1] and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC, 4 ?g mL?1). PMID:24772371

  6. Production of l-lactic acid by the yeast Candida sonorensis expressing heterologous bacterial and fungal lactate dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polylactic acid is a renewable raw material that is increasingly used in the manufacture of bioplastics, which offers a more sustainable alternative to materials derived from fossil resources. Both lactic acid bacteria and genetically engineered yeast have been implemented in commercial scale in biotechnological production of lactic acid. In the present work, genes encoding l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of Lactobacillus helveticus, Bacillus megaterium and Rhizopus oryzae were expressed in a new host organism, the non-conventional yeast Candida sonorensis, with or without the competing ethanol fermentation pathway. Results Each LDH strain produced substantial amounts of lactate, but the properties of the heterologous LDH affected the distribution of carbon between lactate and by-products significantly, which was reflected in extra-and intracellular metabolite concentrations. Under neutralizing conditions C. sonorensis expressing L. helveticus LDH accumulated lactate up to 92 g/l at a yield of 0.94 g/g glucose, free of ethanol, in minimal medium containing 5 g/l dry cell weight. In rich medium with a final pH of 3.8, 49 g/l lactate was produced. The fermentation pathway was modified in some of the strains studied by deleting either one or both of the pyruvate decarboxylase encoding genes, PDC1 and PDC2. The deletion of both PDC genes together abolished ethanol production and did not result in significantly reduced growth characteristic to Saccharomyces cerevisiae deleted of PDC1 and PDC5. Conclusions We developed an organism without previous record of genetic engineering to produce L-lactic acid to a high concentration, introducing a novel host for the production of an industrially important metabolite, and opening the way for exploiting C. sonorensis in additional biotechnological applications. Comparison of metabolite production, growth, and enzyme activities in a representative set of transformed strains expressing different LDH genes in the presence and absence of a functional ethanol pathway, at neutral and low pH, generated a comprehensive picture of lactic acid production in this yeast. The findings are applicable in generation other lactic acid producing yeast, thus providing a significant contribution to the field of biotechnical production of lactic acid. PMID:23706009

  7. Digestion by fungal glycanases of arabinoxylans with different feruloylated side-chains.

    PubMed

    Wende, G; Fry, S C

    1997-07-01

    Alcohol-insoluble residues (AIRs) from Festuca and Zea cell cultures contained 7.4 and 35 nmol esterified ferulate mg-1, respectively. Driselase solubilised 79% of the feruloylated material from both AIRs. Of the feruloyl esters solubilised from Festuca and Zea AIRs, 72 and 56% respectively were small enough to be mobile on paper chromatography. The major feruloylated product of Zea AIR was the known 5-O-feruloyl-alpha-L-Araf-(1-->3)-beta-D-Xylp-(1-->4)- D-Xyl (Fer-Ara-Xyl-Xyl). In contrast, the smallest major feruloylated product of Festuca AIR was a feruloyl pentasaccharide (3) containing 3 Xyl, 1 Ara and 1 non-pentose residue (NPR). The Ara and two of the three Xyl groups of 3 were resistant to NaIO4. Mild acid hydrolysis of 3 gave xylobiose, a feruloyl trisaccharide and beta-D-Xylp-(1-->2)-(5-O-feruloyl)-L-Ara. Compound 3 was therefore NPR-(1-->3)-beta-D-Xylp-(1-->2)-(5-O-feruloyl)-alpha-L-Ar af-(1-->3)-beta-D-Xylp-(1-->4)-D-Xyl. We conclude that the complex feruloyl oligosaccharide side-chains of Festuca arabinoxylan do not protect the polysaccharide against hydrolysis by the fungal glycanases present in Driselase. PMID:9272966

  8. Comparative Genomics Suggests that the Fungal Pathogen Pneumocystis Is an Obligate Parasite Scavenging Amino Acids from Its Host's Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Philippe M.; Burdet, Frédéric X.; Cissé, Ousmane H.; Keller, Laurent; Taffé, Patrick; Sanglard, Dominique; Pagni, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungus causing severe pneumonia in immuno-compromised patients. Progress in understanding its pathogenicity and epidemiology has been hampered by the lack of a long-term in vitro culture method. Obligate parasitism of this pathogen has been suggested on the basis of various features but remains controversial. We analysed the 7.0 Mb draft genome sequence of the closely related species Pneumocystis carinii infecting rats, which is a well established experimental model of the disease. We predicted 8’085 (redundant) peptides and 14.9% of them were mapped onto the KEGG biochemical pathways. The proteome of the closely related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was used as a control for the annotation procedure (4’974 genes, 14.1% mapped). About two thirds of the mapped peptides of each organism (65.7% and 73.2%, respectively) corresponded to crucial enzymes for the basal metabolism and standard cellular processes. However, the proportion of P. carinii genes relative to those of S. pombe was significantly smaller for the “amino acid metabolism” category of pathways than for all other categories taken together (40 versus 114 against 278 versus 427, P<0.002). Importantly, we identified in P. carinii only 2 enzymes specifically dedicated to the synthesis of the 20 standard amino acids. By contrast all the 54 enzymes dedicated to this synthesis reported in the KEGG atlas for S. pombe were detected upon reannotation of S. pombe proteome (2 versus 54 against 278 versus 427, P<0.0001). This finding strongly suggests that species of the genus Pneumocystis are scavenging amino acids from their host's lung environment. Consequently, they would have no form able to live independently from another organism, and these parasites would be obligate in addition to being opportunistic. These findings have implications for the management of patients susceptible to P. jirovecii infection given that the only source of infection would be other humans. PMID:21188143

  9. Functional role of phenylacetic acid from metapleural gland secretions in controlling fungal pathogens in evolutionarily derived leaf-cutting ants.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Marín, Hermógenes; Nash, David R; Higginbotham, Sarah; Estrada, Catalina; van Zweden, Jelle S; d'Ettorre, Patrizia; Wcislo, William T; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2015-05-22

    Fungus-farming ant colonies vary four to five orders of magnitude in size. They employ compounds from actinomycete bacteria and exocrine glands as antimicrobial agents. Atta colonies have millions of ants and are particularly relevant for understanding hygienic strategies as they have abandoned their ancestors' prime dependence on antibiotic-based biological control in favour of using metapleural gland (MG) chemical secretions. Atta MGs are unique in synthesizing large quantities of phenylacetic acid (PAA), a known but little investigated antimicrobial agent. We show that particularly the smallest workers greatly reduce germination rates of Escovopsis and Metarhizium spores after actively applying PAA to experimental infection targets in garden fragments and transferring the spores to the ants' infrabuccal cavities. In vitro assays further indicated that Escovopsis strains isolated from evolutionarily derived leaf-cutting ants are less sensitive to PAA than strains from phylogenetically more basal fungus-farming ants, consistent with the dynamics of an evolutionary arms race between virulence and control for Escovopsis, but not Metarhizium. Atta ants form larger colonies with more extreme caste differentiation relative to other attines, in societies characterized by an almost complete absence of reproductive conflicts. We hypothesize that these changes are associated with unique evolutionary innovations in chemical pest management that appear robust against selection pressure for resistance by specialized mycopathogens. PMID:25925100

  10. The effect of in vitro digestion on steryl ferulates from rice (Oryza sativa L.) and other grains.

    PubMed

    Mandak, Eszter; Nyström, Laura

    2012-06-20

    Polished and cargo rice, wild rice, rice bran, corn bran, and wheat bran were subjected to a static in vitro digestion model, to monitor changes in their steryl ferulate content and composition. Free sterols, possible hydrolysis products of steryl ferulates, were also measured. Additionally, steryl ferulate bioaccessibility was calculated as the percentage of steryl ferulates liberated from the grain matrix into the digestive juice. Steryl ferulate content ranged between 6.1 and 3900 ?g/g and decreased by 1-63% due to digestion. A parallel increase in free sterols of more than 70% was observed in all samples. Additionally, bioaccessibility of steryl ferulates was found to be almost negligible. These findings suggest that intestinal enzymes immediately hydrolyze steryl ferulates, which are liberated from the grain matrix, and thus they are practically unavailable for absorption in the small intestine. This further indicates that the hydrolysis products of steryl ferulates could be bioactive in the gut. PMID:22607464

  11. Phytosterol moiety effects on stability, tocopherol interaction, and anti-polymerization activity of phytosteryl ferulates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antioxidant, anti-polymerization, stability, and interaction with tocopherols of corn and rice phytosteryl ferulates have been compared in several heating and frying studies. We have found that corn steryl ferulates are very protective of soybean oil from polymerization during heating and frying...

  12. Entomopathogenic fungal endophytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal endophytes are quite common in nature and some of them have been shown to have adverse effects against insects, nematodes, and plant pathogens. An introduction to fungal endophytes will be presented, followed by a discussion of research aimed at introducing Beauveria bassiana as a fungal endo...

  13. Anti-hypoxia Activity of the Novel NO Donor Acetyl Ferulic Isosorbide Mononitrate in Acute High-Altitude Hypoxia Mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peng-Cheng; Ma, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Wei; Li, Lin; Ren, Jun; Jing, Lin-lin; Jia, Zheng-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) may act as either a pro-oxidant or an antioxidant in biological systems. Previous work has found inhalation of NO improved survival in a high altitude rat model. NO donor isosorbide mononitrate derivants might have a protective effect against hypoxia. We synthesized a series of isosorbide mononitrate derivant compounds to test their anti-hypoxia activities. Normobaric hypoxia and hypobaric hypoxia models were used to study the protective role of NO donor in mice. The results showed isosorbide mononitrate derivants had protective effects in hypoxia mice. Among those compounds, acetyl ferulic isosorbide mononitrate (AFIM) was the most effective. It prolonged the survival time during the normobaric hypoxia test. It decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 in hypobaric hypoxia mice. The antioxidase activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) remained in normal ranges in the AFIM group. As a sign of mitochondrial dysfunction, the activities of ATPase were down regulated in mice under hypobaric hypoxia conditions. AFIM also protected ATPase activities. The protective effects of AFIM might come from a sustained NO supply and the release of acetyl ferulic acid with anti-oxidant activity. PMID:26328483

  14. PHENOLIC ACIDS PROFILES OF BEANS COMMONLY CONSUMED IN UNITED STATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic acids were saponified, extracted and analyzed by a high performance liquid chromatography procedure with diode array detection (DAD). Three phenolic acids namely, ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid and sinapic acid were detected and quantified in all dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) commonly con...

  15. Differential Effects of Methoxylated p-Coumaric Acids on Melanoma in B16/F10 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hoon Seok; Lee, Nam-Ho; Hyun, Chang-Gu; Shin, Dong-Bum

    2015-01-01

    As an approach to search for chemopreventive agents, we tested p-coumaric acid, 3-methoxy-p-coumaric acid (ferulic acid), and 3,5-dimethoxy-p-coumaric acid (sinapic acid) in B16/F10 melanoma cells. Intracellular melanin contents were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and cytotoxicity of the compounds were examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. p-Coumaric acid showed inhibitory effect on melanogenesis, but ferulic acid increased melanin content, and sinapic acid had almost no effect on melanogenesis. Treatment with ferulic acid resulted in a 2 to 3 fold elevation in the production of melanin. Correlatively, cell viability decreased in a dose-dependent manner when treated with ferulic acid. However, ferulic acid did not affect the LDH release from the cells. Treatment with sinapic acid resulted in a 50~60% elevation in the release of LDH when treated with a 200 ?g/mL concentration and showed neither cytostasis nor increase of melanin synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, p-coumaric acid inhibits melanogenesis, ferulic acid induces melanogenesis, and sinapic acid exerts cytotoxic effects in B16/F10 murine melanoma cells. The results indicate that the addition of methoxy groups to p-coumaric acid shows the melanogenic or cytotoxic effects in melanoma cells compared to the original compound. Therefore, this study suggests the possibility that methoxylated p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid can be used as a chemopreventive agent. PMID:25866753

  16. Regulation of Ferulate-5-Hydroxylase Expression in Arabidopsis in the Context of Sinapate Ester Biosynthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Ruegger, Max; Meyer, Knut; Cusumano, Joanne C.; Chapple, Clint

    1999-01-01

    Sinapic acid is an intermediate in syringyl lignin biosynthesis in angiosperms, and in some taxa serves as a precursor for soluble secondary metabolites. The biosynthesis and accumulation of the sinapate esters sinapoylglucose, sinapoylmalate, and sinapoylcholine are developmentally regulated in Arabidopsis and other members of the Brassicaceae. The FAH1 locus of Arabidopsis encodes the enzyme ferulate-5-hydroxylase (F5H), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in syringyl lignin biosynthesis and is required for the production of sinapate esters. Here we show that F5H expression parallels sinapate ester accumulation in developing siliques and seedlings, but is not rate limiting for their biosynthesis. RNA gel-blot analysis indicated that the tissue-specific and developmentally regulated expression of F5H mRNA is distinct from that of other phenylpropanoid genes. Efforts to identify constructs capable of complementing the sinapate ester-deficient phenotype of fah1 mutants demonstrated that F5H expression in leaves is dependent on sequences 3? of the F5H coding region. In contrast, the positive regulatory function of the downstream region is not required for F5H transcript or sinapoylcholine accumulation in embryos. PMID:9880351

  17. Nail Fungal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... know where or how you got a fungal nail infection. A warm, wet place is a good place for a fungus to grow. If you often wear heavy work ... in locker rooms, you can pick up a fungus from the warm, wet floors. ... fungal infections in their nails at the same time. This can happen because ...

  18. Loss of FERULATE 5-HYDROXYLASE Leads to Mediator-Dependent Inhibition of Soluble Phenylpropanoid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nickolas A.; Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Nyffeler, Kayleigh; Chapple, Clint

    2015-01-01

    Phenylpropanoids are phenylalanine-derived specialized metabolites and include important structural components of plant cell walls, such as lignin and hydroxycinnamic acids, as well as ultraviolet and visible light-absorbing pigments, such as hydroxycinnamate esters (HCEs) and anthocyanins. Previous work has revealed a remarkable degree of plasticity in HCE biosynthesis, such that most Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with blockages in the pathway simply redirect carbon flux to atypical HCEs. In contrast, the ferulic acid hydroxylase1 (fah1) mutant accumulates greatly reduced levels of HCEs, suggesting that phenylpropanoid biosynthesis may be repressed in response to the loss of FERULATE 5-HYDROXYLASE (F5H) activity. Here, we show that in fah1 mutant plants, the activity of HCE biosynthetic enzymes is not limiting for HCE accumulation, nor is phenylpropanoid flux diverted to the synthesis of cell wall components or flavonol glycosides. We further show that anthocyanin accumulation is also repressed in fah1 mutants and that this repression is specific to tissues in which F5H is normally expressed. Finally, we show that repression of both HCE and anthocyanin biosynthesis in fah1 mutants is dependent on the MED5a/5b subunits of the transcriptional coregulatory complex Mediator, which are similarly required for the repression of lignin biosynthesis and the stunted growth of the phenylpropanoid pathway mutant reduced epidermal fluorescence8. Taken together, these observations show that the synthesis of HCEs and anthocyanins is actively repressed in a MEDIATOR-dependent manner in Arabidopsis fah1 mutants and support an emerging model in which MED5a/5b act as central players in the homeostatic repression of phenylpropanoid metabolism. PMID:26048881

  19. Loss of FERULATE 5-HYDROXYLASE Leads to Mediator-Dependent Inhibition of Soluble Phenylpropanoid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nickolas A; Bonawitz, Nicholas D; Nyffeler, Kayleigh; Chapple, Clint

    2015-11-01

    Phenylpropanoids are phenylalanine-derived specialized metabolites and include important structural components of plant cell walls, such as lignin and hydroxycinnamic acids, as well as ultraviolet and visible light-absorbing pigments, such as hydroxycinnamate esters (HCEs) and anthocyanins. Previous work has revealed a remarkable degree of plasticity in HCE biosynthesis, such that most Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with blockages in the pathway simply redirect carbon flux to atypical HCEs. In contrast, the ferulic acid hydroxylase1 (fah1) mutant accumulates greatly reduced levels of HCEs, suggesting that phenylpropanoid biosynthesis may be repressed in response to the loss of FERULATE 5-HYDROXYLASE (F5H) activity. Here, we show that in fah1 mutant plants, the activity of HCE biosynthetic enzymes is not limiting for HCE accumulation, nor is phenylpropanoid flux diverted to the synthesis of cell wall components or flavonol glycosides. We further show that anthocyanin accumulation is also repressed in fah1 mutants and that this repression is specific to tissues in which F5H is normally expressed. Finally, we show that repression of both HCE and anthocyanin biosynthesis in fah1 mutants is dependent on the MED5a/5b subunits of the transcriptional coregulatory complex Mediator, which are similarly required for the repression of lignin biosynthesis and the stunted growth of the phenylpropanoid pathway mutant reduced epidermal fluorescence8. Taken together, these observations show that the synthesis of HCEs and anthocyanins is actively repressed in a MEDIATOR-dependent manner in Arabidopsis fah1 mutants and support an emerging model in which MED5a/5b act as central players in the homeostatic repression of phenylpropanoid metabolism. PMID:26048881

  20. Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  1. The Wood Rot Ascomycete Xylaria polymorpha Produces a Novel GH78 Glycoside Hydrolase That Exhibits ?-l-Rhamnosidase and Feruloyl Esterase Activities and Releases Hydroxycinnamic Acids from Lignocelluloses

    PubMed Central

    Nghi, Do Huu; Bittner, Britta; Kellner, Harald; Jehmlich, Nico; Ullrich, René; Pecyna, Marek J.; Nousiainen, Paula; Sipilä, Jussi; Huong, Le Mai; Hofrichter, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Soft rot (type II) fungi belonging to the family Xylariaceae are known to substantially degrade hardwood by means of their poorly understood lignocellulolytic system, which comprises various hydrolases, including feruloyl esterases and laccase. In the present study, several members of the Xylariaceae were found to exhibit high feruloyl esterase activity during growth on lignocellulosic materials such as wheat straw (up to 1,675 mU g?1) or beech wood (up to 80 mU g?1). Following the ester-cleaving activity toward methyl ferulate, a hydrolase of Xylaria polymorpha was produced in solid-state culture on wheat straw and purified by different steps of anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography to apparent homogeneity (specific activity, 2.2 U mg?1). The peptide sequence of the purified protein deduced from the gene sequence and verified by de novo peptide sequencing shows high similarity to putative ?-l-rhamnosidase sequences belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 78 (GH78; classified under EC 3.2.1.40). The purified enzyme (98 kDa by SDS-PAGE, 103 kDa by size-exclusion chromatography; pI 3.7) converted diverse glycosides (e.g., ?-l-rhamnopyranoside and ?-l-arabinofuranoside) but also natural and synthetic esters (e.g., chlorogenic acid, hydroxycinnamic acid glycoside esters, veratric acid esters, or p-nitrophenyl acetate) and released free hydroxycinnamic acids (ferulic and coumaric acid) from arabinoxylan and milled wheat straw. These catalytic properties strongly suggest that X. polymorpha GH78 is a multifunctional enzyme. It is the first fungal enzyme that combines glycosyl hydrolase with esterase activities and may help this soft rot fungus to degrade lignocelluloses. PMID:22544251

  2. The wood rot ascomycete Xylaria polymorpha produces a novel GH78 glycoside hydrolase that exhibits ?-L-rhamnosidase and feruloyl esterase activities and releases hydroxycinnamic acids from lignocelluloses.

    PubMed

    Nghi, Do Huu; Bittner, Britta; Kellner, Harald; Jehmlich, Nico; Ullrich, René; Pecyna, Marek J; Nousiainen, Paula; Sipilä, Jussi; Huong, Le Mai; Hofrichter, Martin; Liers, Christiane

    2012-07-01

    Soft rot (type II) fungi belonging to the family Xylariaceae are known to substantially degrade hardwood by means of their poorly understood lignocellulolytic system, which comprises various hydrolases, including feruloyl esterases and laccase. In the present study, several members of the Xylariaceae were found to exhibit high feruloyl esterase activity during growth on lignocellulosic materials such as wheat straw (up to 1,675 mU g(-1)) or beech wood (up to 80 mU g(-1)). Following the ester-cleaving activity toward methyl ferulate, a hydrolase of Xylaria polymorpha was produced in solid-state culture on wheat straw and purified by different steps of anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography to apparent homogeneity (specific activity, 2.2 U mg(-1)). The peptide sequence of the purified protein deduced from the gene sequence and verified by de novo peptide sequencing shows high similarity to putative ?-L-rhamnosidase sequences belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 78 (GH78; classified under EC 3.2.1.40). The purified enzyme (98 kDa by SDS-PAGE, 103 kDa by size-exclusion chromatography; pI 3.7) converted diverse glycosides (e.g., ?-L-rhamnopyranoside and ?-L-arabinofuranoside) but also natural and synthetic esters (e.g., chlorogenic acid, hydroxycinnamic acid glycoside esters, veratric acid esters, or p-nitrophenyl acetate) and released free hydroxycinnamic acids (ferulic and coumaric acid) from arabinoxylan and milled wheat straw. These catalytic properties strongly suggest that X. polymorpha GH78 is a multifunctional enzyme. It is the first fungal enzyme that combines glycosyl hydrolase with esterase activities and may help this soft rot fungus to degrade lignocelluloses. PMID:22544251

  3. Insect pathology and fungal entomopathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungi that occur inside asymptomatic plant tissues are known as fungal endophytes. Different genera of fungal entomopathogens have been reported as naturally occurring fungal endophytes, and it has been shown that it is possible to inoculate plants with fungal entomopathogens, making them endophytic...

  4. Fungal Nail Infection (Onychomycosis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disorders. In the most common form of fungal nail infections, fungus grows under the growing portion of the nail ... doctor may perform testing, such as scraping a nail to examine for fungi or clipping a nail to look for bacterial ...

  5. Granuloma, fungal (Majocchi's) (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    This is a picture of a fungal granuloma, a large, red (erythematous) patch (plaque) with a prominent border. Within the borders of the lesion are scattered blisters (pustules) that indicate deeper ...

  6. Who Gets Fungal Infections?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infections can also happen in people without weak immune systems Fungal infections that are not life-threatening, such ... likely to cause an infection. People with weak immune systems Infections that happen because a person’s immune system ...

  7. Fungal Skin Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Quiz) Structure and Function of the Skin (Video) Skin Cancer (News) Health Tip: Recognizing Signs of Nail Fungus (News) Health Tip: Easing Hives Additional Content Medical News Overview of Fungal Skin Infections by Denise M. Aaron, MD NOTE: This ...

  8. Fungal infections in children.

    PubMed

    Caputo, R V

    1986-01-01

    Fungal infections of the skin represent a relatively common problem in pediatric dermatology. Although fungal infections of the feet, nails, and groin are uncommon in the pediatric age group, fungal infections of the scalp are very common and must be diagnosed early because they may lead to permanent hair loss if left untreated. Perhaps the most significant change in fungal infections in children has occurred in tinea capitis, including the causative agent and the type of infection this organism may produce; these factors are focused upon in this article. Also discussed are infections caused by the yeast organisms Candida albicans and Pityrosporum orbiculare, as well as the deep mycoses, specifically chromoblastomycosis and cutaneous aspergillosis. PMID:2941199

  9. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  10. Immunotherapy of Fungal Infections.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kausik; Hamad, Mawieh

    2015-11-01

    Fungal organisms are ubiquitous in the environment. Pathogenic fungi, although relatively few in the whole gamut of microbial pathogens, are able to cause disease with varying degrees of severity in individuals with normal or impaired immunity. The disease state is an outcome of the fungal pathogen's interactions with the host immunity, and therefore, it stands to reason that deep/invasive fungal diseases be amenable to immunotherapy. Therefore, antifungal immunotherapy continues to be attractive as an adjunct to the currently available antifungal chemotherapy options for a number of reasons, including the fact that existing antifungal drugs, albeit largely effective, are not without limitations, and that morbidity and mortality associated with invasive mycoses are still unacceptably high. For several decades, intense basic research efforts have been directed at development of fungal immunotherapies. Nevertheless, this approach suffers from a severe bench-bedside disconnect owing to several reasons: the chemical and biological peculiarities of the fungal antigens, the complexities of host-pathogen interactions, an under-appreciation of the fungal disease landscape, the requirement of considerable financial investment to bring these therapies to clinical use, as well as practical problems associated with immunizations. In this general, non-exhaustive review, we summarize the features of ongoing research efforts directed towards devising safe and effective immunotherapeutic options for mycotic diseases, encompassing work on antifungal vaccines, adoptive cell transfers, cytokines, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and other agents. PMID:26575463

  11. MODEL STUDIES OF FERULATE-CONIFERYL ALCOHOL CROSS PRODUCT FORMATION IN PRIMARY MAIZE WALLS: IMPLICATIONS FOR LIGNIFICATION IN GRASSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulate and diferulates mediate cell wall cross-linking in grasses but little is known about their cross-coupling reactions with monolignols and their role in lignin formation in primary cell walls. Feruloylated primary walls of maize were artificially lignified and then saponified to release ferul...

  12. Differential Effects of Topical Vitamin E and C E Ferulic® Treatments on Ultraviolet Light B-Induced Cutaneous Tumor Development in Skh-1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Erin M.; Tober, Kathleen L.; Riggenbach, Judith A.; Kusewitt, Donna F.; Young, Gregory S.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.

    2013-01-01

    Because of the ever-increasing incidence of ultraviolet light B (UVB)-induced skin cancer, considerable attention is being paid to prevention through the use of both sunscreens and after sun treatments, many of which contain antioxidants. Vitamin E is included as an antioxidant in many sunscreens and lotions currently on the market. Studies examining the efficacy of vitamin E as a topical preventative agent for UVB-induced skin cancer have yielded conflicting results. A likely contributor to differences in study outcome is the stability of vitamin E in the particular formulation being tested. In the current study we examined the effects of topical vitamin E alone as well as vitamin E combined with vitamin C and ferulic acid in a more stable topical formula (C E Ferulic®). Mice were exposed to UVB for 10 weeks in order to induce skin damage. Then, before the appearance of any cutaneous lesions, mice were treated for 15 weeks with a topical antioxidant, without any further UVB exposure. We found that topical C E Ferulic decreased tumor number and tumor burden and prevented the development of malignant skin tumors in female mice with chronically UVB-damaged skin. In contrast, female mice chronically exposed to UVB and treated topically with vitamin E alone showed a trend towards increased tumor growth rate and exhibited increased levels of overall DNA damage, cutaneous proliferation, and angiogenesis compared to vehicle-treated mice. Thus, we have demonstrated that topical 5% alpha tocopherol may actually promote carcinogenesis when applied on chronically UVB-damaged skin while treating with a more stable antioxidant compound may offer therapeutic benefits. PMID:23691100

  13. Effects of microbial utilization of phenolic acids and their phenolic acid breakdown products on allelopathic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, U.

    1998-04-01

    Reversible sorption of phenolic acids by soils may provide some protection to phenolic acids from microbial degradation. In the absence of microbes, reversible sorption 35 days after addition of 0.5--3 {micro}mol/g of ferulic acid or p-coumaric acid was 8--14% in Cecil A{sub p} horizon and 31--38% in Cecil B{sub t} horizon soil materials. The reversibly sorbed/solution ratios (r/s) for ferulic acid or p-coumaric acid ranged from 0.12 to 0.25 in A{sub p} and 0.65 to 0.85 in B{sub t} horizon soil materials. When microbes were introduced, the r/s ratio for both the A{sub p} and B{sub t} horizon soil materials increased over time up to 5 and 2, respectively, thereby indicating a more rapid utilization of solution phenolic acids over reversibly sorbed phenolic acids. The increase in r/s ratio and the overall microbial utilization of ferulic acid and/or p-coumaric acid were much more rapid in A{sub p} than in B{sub t} horizon soil materials. Reversible sorption, however, provided protection of phenolic acids from microbial utilization for only very short periods of time. Differential soil fixation, microbial production of benzoic acids (e.g., vanillic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid) from cinnamic acids (e.g., ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid, respectively), and the subsequent differential utilization of cinnamic and benzoic acids by soil microbes indicated that these processes can substantially influence the magnitude and duration of the phytotoxicity of individual phenolic acids.

  14. Superficial Fungal Infections.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Neha; Pujalte, George G A; Reese, Stephanie T

    2015-12-01

    Superficial fungal infections grow in dark and moist areas and invade various parts of the body. These infections are easily treatable in immunocompetent individuals. In immunosuppressed individuals, the presentation can be quite severe, requiring use of more potent antifungal agents. The treatment for these conditions consists of topical antifungal agents, creams, and oral systemic medications. The use of prednisone can alter the appearance of superficial fungal infections, making them difficult to diagnose. It is important for primary care providers to become adept at understanding the epidemiology, transmission, clinical presentation, diagnosis techniques, and treatment options available. PMID:26612371

  15. Eurocin, a New Fungal Defensin

    PubMed Central

    Oeemig, Jesper S.; Lynggaard, Carina; Knudsen, Daniel H.; Hansen, Frederik T.; Nørgaard, Kent D.; Schneider, Tanja; Vad, Brian S.; Sandvang, Dorthe H.; Nielsen, Line A.; Neve, Søren; Kristensen, Hans-Henrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Otzen, Daniel E.; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are a new class of antibiotics that are promising for pharmaceutical applications because they have retained efficacy throughout evolution. One class of antimicrobial peptides are the defensins, which have been found in different species. Here we describe a new fungal defensin, eurocin. Eurocin acts against a range of Gram-positive human pathogens but not against Gram-negative bacteria. Eurocin consists of 42 amino acids, forming a cysteine-stabilized ?/?-fold. The thermal denaturation data point shows the disulfide bridges being responsible for the stability of the fold. Eurocin does not form pores in cell membranes at physiologically relevant concentrations; it does, however, lead to limited leakage of a fluorophore from small unilamellar vesicles. Eurocin interacts with detergent micelles, and it inhibits the synthesis of cell walls by binding equimolarly to the cell wall precursor lipid II. PMID:23093408

  16. Ferulates, amurenlactone A and amurenamide A from traditional Chinese medicine cortex Phellodendri Amurensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Yan; Wang, Dong; Cui, Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Two new ferulate compounds, amurenlactone A (1) and amurenamide A (2), along with 11 known compounds have been isolated from the cortex of Phellodendron amurense. The structures of the new compounds were established based on 1D, 2D NMR and mass spectral analyzes. The known compounds were identified by comparison with authentic samples. PMID:18464078

  17. Improved solid phase extraction of ferulate phytosterol esters from corn distiller's dried grain extract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently reported on the retention of valuable phytochemicals such as ferulate phytosterol esters (FPE), tocopherols (T), and tocotrienols (T3) in solvent and CO2 extracts of distillers dried grains (DDG). However, the extraction and purification of these phytochemicals, especially FPE, from the...

  18. Molecular characterization of ferulate 5-hydroxylase gene from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this research was to clone and characterize the expression pattern of a kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) F5H gene that encodes ferulate 5-hydroxylase in the phenylpropanoid pathway. Kenaf is well known as a fast growing dicotyledonous plant, which makes it a valuable biomass plant. The ...

  19. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  20. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa Junior, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  1. Current Status of Nonculture Methods for Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Siew Fah; Wong, Brian

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infections has increased dramatically in recent decades, especially among immunocompromised patients. However, the diagnosis of these infections in a timely fashion is often very difficult. Conventional microbiologic and histopathologic approaches generally are neither sensitive nor specific, and they often do not detect invasive fungal infection until late in the course of disease. Since early diagnosis may guide appropriate treatment and prevent mortality, there has been considerable interest in developing nonculture approaches to diagnosing fungal infections. These approaches include detection of specific host immune responses to fungal antigens, detection of specific macromolecular antigens using immunologic reagents, amplification and detection of specific fungal nucleic acid sequences, and detection and quantitation of specific fungal metabolite products. This work reviews the current status and recent developments as well as problems in the design of nonculture diagnostic methods for invasive fungal infections. PMID:12097252

  2. Secreted Fungal Effector Lipase Releases Free Fatty Acids to Inhibit Innate Immunity-Related Callose Formation during Wheat Head Infection[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Blümke, Antje; Falter, Christian; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Sode, Björn; Bode, Rainer; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Feussner, Ivo; Voigt, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    The deposition of the (1,3)-?-glucan cell wall polymer callose at sites of attempted penetration is a common plant defense response to intruding pathogens and part of the plant’s innate immunity. Infection of the Fusarium graminearum disruption mutant ?fgl1, which lacks the effector lipase FGL1, is restricted to inoculated wheat (Triticum aestivum) spikelets, whereas the wild-type strain colonized the whole wheat spike. Our studies here were aimed at analyzing the role of FGL1 in establishing full F. graminearum virulence. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy revealed that the ?fgl1 mutant strongly induced the deposition of spot-like callose patches in vascular bundles of directly inoculated spikelets, while these callose deposits were not observed in infections by the wild type. Elevated concentrations of the polyunsaturated free fatty acids (FFAs) linoleic and ?-linolenic acid, which we detected in F. graminearum wild type-infected wheat spike tissue compared with ?fgl1-infected tissue, provided clear evidence for a suggested function of FGL1 in suppressing callose biosynthesis. These FFAs not only inhibited plant callose biosynthesis in vitro and in planta but also partially restored virulence to the ?fgl1 mutant when applied during infection of wheat spikelets. Additional FFA analysis confirmed that the purified effector lipase FGL1 was sufficient to release linoleic and ?-linolenic acids from wheat spike tissue. We concluded that these two FFAs have a major function in the suppression of the innate immunity-related callose biosynthesis and, hence, the progress of F. graminearum wheat infection. PMID:24686113

  3. Efficacy of Oryza sativa husk and Quercus phillyraeoides extracts for the in vitro and in vivo control of fungal rot disease of white yam (Dioscorea rotundata Poir).

    PubMed

    Dania, Victor Ohileobo; Fadina, Olubunmi Omowunmi; Ayodele, Maria; Kumar, P Lava

    2014-01-01

    Tuber rot disease is a major constraint to white yam (Dioscorea rotundata) production, accounting for 50-60% of annual yield losses in Nigeria. The main method of control using synthetic fungicides is being discouraged due to human and environmental health hazards. The potential of Oryza sativa husk (OSH) and Quercus phillyraeoides (QP) extracts for the in vitro and in vivo control of six virulent rot-causing fungal pathogens, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Aspergillus niger, Rhizoctonia solani, Penicillium oxalicum, Sclerotium rolfsii, and Fusarium oxysporum was evaluated, using five different extract concentrations of 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, 2.5%, and 3.5% w/v. These fungi were isolated from rotted tubers of D. rotundata, across three agroecological zones in Nigeria-the Humid rainforest, Derived savanna, and southern Guinea savanna. All treatments were subjected to three methods of inoculation 48 hours before the application of both extracts and stored at 28?±?2°C for 6 months. Radial mycelial growth of the test pathogens was effectively inhibited at concentrations???3.5% w/v in vitro for both OSH and QP extracts. Rotting was significantly reduced (P???0.05) to between 0 to 18.8% and 0% to 20.9% for OSH and QP extracts respectively. The extracts significantly (P???0.05) inhibited percent rot of the test pathogens at 3.5% concentration w/v in vivo. Rot incidence was, however, lower in replicate tubers that were inoculated, treated with extracts and exposed than treatments that were covered. Phytochemical analysis of OSH and QP extracts revealed the presence of secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, ferulic acid, phlobatanins, Terpenoids, phenols, anthraquinone and pyroligneous acid. The efficacy of both extracts in reducing rot in this study recommends their development as prospective biopesticide formulation and use in the management of post-harvest rot of yam tubers. PMID:25674452

  4. Investigation of phenolic acids in yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) leaves and tubers.

    PubMed

    Simonovska, Breda; Vovk, Irena; Andrensek, Samo; Valentová, Katerina; Ulrichová, Jitka

    2003-10-17

    Thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) screening of crude extracts of dried leaves and tubers of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius, Asteraceae) and products of acid hydrolysis of tubers on the silica gel HPTLC plates using the developing solvents ethyl acetate-formic acid-water (85:10:15, v/v/v) and n-hexane-ethyl acetate-formic acid (20:19:1, v/v/v) proved the presence of chlorogenic, caffeic and ferulic acid. These phenolic acids were isolated from the crude extract of yacon leaves by preparative TLC, and identified after elution by HPLC/MS, as well as by direct injection of the crude extract into the HPLC/MS system. Acid hydrolysis of tubers released the increased amount of phenolic acids (e.g. caffeic acid and ferulic acid), flavonoid quercetin and an unidentified flavonoid, which was detected by TLC analysis. Ferulic acid, isomers of dicaffeoylquinic acid and still an unidentified derivative of chlorogenic acid (Mr = 562) as constituents of yacon leaves and ferulic acid as constituent of yacon tubers are reported here for the first time. These acids gave significant contribution to the radical scavenging activity detected directly on the TLC plate sprayed with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). PMID:14601830

  5. Fungal Sex and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Geraldine

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Human fungal pathogens are associated with diseases ranging from dandruff and skin colonization to invasive bloodstream infections. The major human pathogens belong to the Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus clades, and infections have high and increasing morbidity and mortality. Many human fungal pathogens were originally assumed to be asexual. However, recent advances in genome sequencing, which revealed that many species have retained the genes required for the sexual machinery, have dramatically influenced our understanding of the biology of these organisms. Predictions of a rare or cryptic sexual cycle have been supported experimentally for some species. Here, I examine the evidence that human pathogens reproduce sexually. The evolution of the mating-type locus in ascomycetes (including Candida and Aspergillus species) and basidiomycetes (Malassezia and Cryptococcus) is discussed. I provide an overview of how sex is suppressed in different species and discuss the potential associations with pathogenesis. PMID:20065328

  6. Fungal biotransformation of (+/-)-linalool.

    PubMed

    Mirata, Marco-Antonio; Wüst, Matthias; Mosandl, Armin; Schrader, Jens

    2008-05-14

    The biotransformation of (+/-)-linalool was investigated by screening 19 fungi. Product accumulation was enhanced by substrate feeding and, for the first time, lilac aldehydes and lilac alcohols were identified as fungal biotransformation byproduct using SPME-GC-MS headspace analysis. Aspergillus niger DSM 821, Botrytis cinerea 5901/02, and B. cinerea 02/FBII/2.1 produced different isomers of lilac aldehyde and lilac alcohol from linalool via 8-hydroxylinalool as postulated intermediate. Linalool oxides and 8-hydroxylinalool were the major products of fungal (+/-)-linalool biotransformations. Furanoid trans-(2 R,5 R)- and cis-(2 S,5 R)-linalool oxide as well as pyranoid trans-(2 R,5 S)- and cis-(2 S, 5 S)-linalool oxide were identified as the main stereoisomers with (3 S,6 S)-6,7-epoxylinalool and (3 R,6 S)-6,7-epoxylinalool as postulated key intermediates of fungal (+/-)-linalool oxyfunctionalization, respectively. With a conversion yield close to 100% and a productivity of 120 mg/L.day linalool oxides, Corynespora cassiicola DSM 62485 was identified as a novel highly stereoselective linalool transforming biocatalyst showing the highest productivity reported so far. PMID:18426215

  7. Fungal diseases of fish.

    PubMed

    Yanong, Roy P E

    2003-05-01

    Fungal diseases of fish have become increasingly important over the past 20 years. The traditional "fungi" are comprised of members from several different taxonomic kingdoms. Saprolegnia and other typical water molds are the "classic" secondary invaders, infecting more superficial areas of the body and requiring compromise of the exterior of the fish, poor water quality, or general immunosuppression. An increasing number of other environmental fungi are being reported from diseased fish, further testament to the opportunistic nature of many fungi. Common procedures such as air bladder deflation for many marine species collected at depth under nonsterile conditions may result in fungal infections of the swim bladder. Some fungi such as Aphanomyces and Fusarium can cause more invasive or systemic disease, often associated with changes in environmental factors such as temperature and salinity. Other fungi such as I. hoferi can be even more insidious and chronic, mimicking mycobacteriosis to a degree. Fungal diseases, in general, are very difficult to control or treat once they have taken hold. Prevention is, as always, the best medicine. Increased knowledge of basic biology will help guide treatment and control methods. Further research on general predisposing factors, species susceptibilities, immune system effects and other protective mechanisms in fish and more effective chemotherapeutics for external and systemic infections are needed. PMID:12836630

  8. Developments in Fungal Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa; Stchigel, Alberto M.

    1999-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially those caused by opportunistic species, have become substantially more common in recent decades. Numerous species cause human infections, and several new human pathogens are discovered yearly. This situation has created an increasing interest in fungal taxonomy and has led to the development of new methods and approaches to fungal biosystematics which have promoted important practical advances in identification procedures. However, the significance of some data provided by the new approaches is still unclear, and results drawn from such studies may even increase nomenclatural confusion. Analyses of rRNA and rDNA sequences constitute an important complement of the morphological criteria needed to allow clinical fungi to be more easily identified and placed on a single phylogenetic tree. Most of the pathogenic fungi so far described belong to the kingdom Fungi; two belong to the kingdom Chromista. Within the Fungi, they are distributed in three phyla and in 15 orders (Pneumocystidales, Saccharomycetales, Dothideales, Sordariales, Onygenales, Eurotiales, Hypocreales, Ophiostomatales, Microascales, Tremellales, Poriales, Stereales, Agaricales, Schizophyllales, and Ustilaginales). PMID:10398676

  9. Artificial biosynthesis of phenylpropanoic acids in a tyrosine overproducing Escherichia coli strain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The phenylpropanoid metabolites are an extremely diverse group of natural products biosynthesized by plants, fungi, and bacteria. Although these compounds are widely used in human health care and nutrition services, their availability is limited by regional variations, and isolation of single compounds from plants is often difficult. Recent advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have enabled artificial production of plant secondary metabolites in microorganisms. Results We develop an Escherichia coli system containing an artificial biosynthetic pathway that yields phenylpropanoic acids, such as 4-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid, from simple carbon sources. These artificial biosynthetic pathways contained a codon-optimized tal gene that improved the productivity of 4-coumaric acid and ferulic acid, but not caffeic acid in a minimal salt medium. These heterologous pathways extended in E. coli that had biosynthesis machinery overproducing tyrosine. Finally, the titers of 4-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid reached 974 mg/L, 150 mg/L, and 196 mg/L, respectively, in shake flasks after 36-hour cultivation. Conclusions We achieved one gram per liter scale production of 4-coumaric acid. In addition, maximum titers of 150 mg/L of caffeic acid and 196 mg/L of ferulic acid were achieved. Phenylpropanoic acids, such as 4-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid, have a great potential for pharmaceutical applications and food ingredients. This work forms a basis for further improvement in production and opens the possibility of microbial synthesis of more complex plant secondary metabolites derived from phenylpropanoic acids. PMID:23206756

  10. Antioxidant and Antimelanogenic activities of polyamine conjugates from corn bran and related hydroxycinnamic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antioxidant activity of three major polyamine conjugates, N,N'-dicoumaroyl- putrescine (DCP), N-p-coumaroyl-N'-feruloylputrescine (CFP) and N,N'-diferuloyl- putrescine (DFP) isolated from corn bran, and their related hydroxycinnamic acids, p-coumaric acid (CA) and ferulic acid (FA), were evaluat...

  11. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S.; Brettin, T.; Brockman, Fred J.; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Martinez, Antonio D.; Miller, R. M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald; Bennett, Joan W.; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steve; Heitman, Joseph; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Barbara G.; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael E.

    2008-09-30

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions.

  12. Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Correll, Daniel P; Luzi, Scott A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2015-12-01

    A 42 year old male presents with worsening pain and an increase in thick chronic drainage of the left sinus. Image studies show complete opacification of the left frontal sinus, left sphenoid sinus, and the left maxillary sinus. The patient was taken to the operating room and tissue for microscopic evaluation was obtained. The microscopic findings were classic for allergic fungal sinusitis: areas of alternating mucinous material and inflammatory cell debris and abundant Charcot-Leyden crystals. Cultures were performed and the patient began steroid therapy and desensitization therapy. PMID:25537829

  13. New strategic insights into managing fungal biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Elisa; Morace, Giulia; Borgo, Francesca; Rajendran, Ranjith; Sherry, Leighann; Nile, Christopher; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections have dramatically increased in the last decades in parallel with an increase of populations with impaired immunity, resulting from medical conditions such as cancer, transplantation, or other chronic diseases. Such opportunistic infections result from a complex relationship between fungi and host, and can range from self-limiting to chronic or life-threatening infections. Modern medicine, characterized by a wide use of biomedical devices, offers new niches for fungi to colonize and form biofilm communities. The capability of fungi to form biofilms is well documented and associated with increased drug tolerance and resistance. In addition, biofilm formation facilitates persistence in the host promoting a persistent inflammatory condition. With a limited availability of antifungals within our arsenal, new therapeutic approaches able to address both host and pathogenic factors that promote fungal disease progression, i.e., chronic inflammation and biofilm formation, could represent an advantage in the clinical setting. In this paper we discuss the antifungal properties of myriocin, fulvic acid, and acetylcholine in light of their already known anti-inflammatory activity and as candidate dual action therapeutics to treat opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:26500623

  14. Fungal fimbriae are composed of collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Celerin, M; Ray, J M; Schisler, N J; Day, A W; Stetler-Stevenson, W G; Laudenbach, D E

    1996-01-01

    Fungal fimbriae are surface appendages that were first described on the haploid cells of the smut fungus, Microbotryum violaceum. They are long (1-20 microm), narrow (7 nm) flexuous structures that have been implicated in cellular functions such as mating and pathogenesis. Since the initial description, numerous fungi from all five phyla have been shown to produce fimbriae on their extracellular surfaces. The present study analyses the protein component of M.violaceum fimbriae. The N-terminus and three internal amino acid sequences were determined. All four show a strong similarity to sequences which are characteristic of the collagen gene family. Enzymatic digests and immunochemical analyses support this finding. Based on these results, it is suggested that the proteinaceous subunits of fimbriae should be termed fungal collagens. Previously, collagen has been found only among members of the kingdom Animalia where it is the principal component of the animal extracellular matrix and is the most abundant animal protein. The unexpected finding of collagen in the members of the Mycota suggests that it may have evolved from a common ancestor that existed before the divergence of fungi and animals. Further, native fungal fimbriae can function as a mammalian extracellular matrix component. They can act as a substratum which permits animal cells to adhere, spread, and proliferate in a manner similar to animal collagens. The implications of this finding to both phylogeny and pathology are discussed. Images PMID:8887535

  15. Distribution of Introns in Fungal Histone Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Nishida, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina lack intron in their histone genes, except for an intron in one of histone H4 genes of Yarrowia lipolytica. On the other hand, Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina have introns in their histone genes. We compared the distributions of 81, 47, 79, and 98 introns in the fungal histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 genes, respectively. Based on the multiple alignments of the amino acid sequences of histones, we identified 19, 13, 31, and 22 intron insertion sites in the histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 genes, respectively. Surprisingly only one hot spot of introns in the histone H2A gene is shared between Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina, suggesting that most of introns of Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina were acquired independently. Our findings suggest that the common ancestor of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota maybe had a few introns in the histone genes. In the course of fungal evolution, Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina lost the histone introns; Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina acquired other introns independently. In addition, most of the introns have sequence similarity among introns of phylogenetically close species, strongly suggesting that horizontal intron transfer events between phylogenetically distant species have not occurred recently in the fungal histone genes. PMID:21304581

  16. Multi-stressor impacts on fungal diversity and ecosystem functions in streams: natural vs. anthropogenic stress.

    PubMed

    Tolkkinen, M; Mykrä, H; Annala, M; Markkola, A M; Vuori, K M; Muotka, T

    2015-03-01

    Biological assemblages are often subjected to multiple stressors emerging from both anthropogenic activities and naturally stressful conditions, and species' responses to simultaneous stressors may differ from those predicted based on the individual effects of each stressor alone. We studied the influence of land-use disturbance (forest drainage) on fungal decomposer assemblages and leaf decomposition rates in naturally harsh (low pH caused by black-shale dominated geology) vs. circumneutral streams. We used pyrosequencing to determine fungal richness and assemblage structure. Decomposition rates did not differ between circumneutral and naturally acidic reference sites. However, the effect of forest drainage on microbial decomposition was more pronounced in the naturally acidic streams than in circumneutral streams. Single-effect responses of fungal assemblages were mainly related to geology. Community similarity was significantly higher in the naturally acidic disturbed sites than in corresponding reference sites, suggesting that land-use disturbance simplifies fungal assemblages in naturally stressful conditions. Naturally acidic streams supported distinct fungal assemblages with many OTUs (operational taxonomic unit) unique to these streams. Our results indicate that fungal assemblages in streams are sensitive to both structural and functional impairment in response to multiple stressors. Anthropogenic degradation of naturally acidic streams may decrease regional fungal diversity and impair ecosystem functions, and these globally occurring environments therefore deserve special attention in conservation planning. PMID:26236864

  17. Fungal Entomopathogens in the Rhizosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic fungi are found in a wide variety of fungal groups from water molds to basidiomycetes, yet there are a number of fungal groups with no entomopathogenic representative. The order Hypocreales contains the largest number of entomogenous fungi including two of the most widely studied, ...

  18. Biological roles of fungal carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Avalos, Javier; Carmen Limón, M

    2015-08-01

    Carotenoids are terpenoid pigments widespread in nature, produced by bacteria, fungi, algae and plants. They are also found in animals, which usually obtain them through the diet. Carotenoids in plants provide striking yellow, orange or red colors to fruits and flowers, and play important metabolic and physiological functions, especially relevant in photosynthesis. Their functions are less clear in non-photosynthetic microorganisms. Different fungi produce diverse carotenoids, but the mutants unable to produce them do not exhibit phenotypic alterations in the laboratory, apart of lack of pigmentation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the functional basis for carotenoid production in fungi. Different lines of evidence support a protective role of carotenoids against oxidative stress and exposure to visible light or UV irradiation. In addition, the carotenoids are intermediary products in the biosynthesis of physiologically active apocarotenoids or derived compounds. This is the case of retinal, obtained from the symmetrical oxidative cleavage of ?-carotene. Retinal is the light-absorbing prosthetic group of the rhodopsins, membrane-bound photoreceptors present also in many fungal species. In Mucorales, ?-carotene is an intermediary in the synthesis of trisporoids, apocarotenoid derivatives that include the sexual hormones the trisporic acids, and they are also presumably used in the synthesis of sporopollenin polymers. In conclusion, fungi have adapted their ability to produce carotenoids for different non-essential functions, related with stress tolerance or with the synthesis of physiologically active by-products. PMID:25284291

  19. Fungal infections in immunocompromised travelers.

    PubMed

    Lortholary, Olivier; Charlier, Caroline; Lebeaux, David; Lecuit, Marc; Consigny, Paul Henri

    2013-03-01

    Immunocompromised patients represent an increasing group of travelers, for business, tourism, and visiting friends and relatives. Those with severe cellular immunodeficiency (advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection and transplant recipients) display the highest risk of fungal infections. International travel is less risky in most other types of immunodeficiency (except those with neutropenia). A systematic visit in a travel clinic for immunocompromised patients traveling to the tropics ensures that the specific risks of acquiring fungal infections (and others) are understood. When immunocompromised hosts return to their area of residence, a nonbacteriologically documented, potentially severe, febrile pneumonia, with or without dissemination signs (skin lesions, cytopenia) should alert for travel-acquired fungal infection, even years after return. Localized subcutaneous nodule may be also ascribed to fungal infection. Finally, infectious diseases physicians should be aware of major clinical patterns of travel-acquired fungal infection, as well as the fungi involved, and risk factors according to the geographical area visited. PMID:23175562

  20. THE CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFENSE RESPONSES TO FUNGAL INFECTION IN ALFALFA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme activity and transcript level of key flavonoid precursor enzymes, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (CA4H), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), were monitored alfalfa seedlings that had been challenged with the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum trifolii. Inoculation...

  1. Ameliorative effects of sodium ferulate on experimental colitis and their mechanisms in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei-Guo; Liu, Shao-Ping; Yu, Bao-Ping; Wu, Dong-Fang; Luo, He-Sheng; Yu, Jie-Ping

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ameliorative effects of sodium ferulate (SF) on acetic acid-induced colitis and their mechanisms in rats. METHODS: The colitis model of Sprague-Dawley rats was induced by intracolon enema with 8% (V/V) of acetic acid. The experimental animals were randomly divided into model control, 5-aminosalicylic acid therapy group and three dose of SF therapy groups. The 5 groups were treated intracolonically with normal saline, 5-aminosalicylic acid (100 mg•kg-1), and SF at the doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg·kg-1 respectively and daily (8: 00 am) for 7 d 24 h following the induction of colitis. A normal control group of rats clystered with normal saline instead of acetic acid was also included in the study. Pathological changes of the colonic mucosa were evaluated by the colon mucosa damage index (CMDI) and the histopathological score (HS). The insulted colonic mucosa was sampled for a variety of determinations at the end of experiment when the animals were sacrificed by decapitation. Colonic activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) were assayed with ultraviolet spectrophotometry. Colonic contents of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) were determined by radioimmunoassay. The expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) p65 proteins in the colonic tissue were detected with immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced colonic mucosal injury, inflammatory response and oxidative stress were observed in the animals clystered with acetic acid, which manifested as the significant increase of CMDI, HS, MPO activities, MDA and NO levels, PGE2 and TXB2 contents, as well as the expressions of iNOS, COX-2 and NF-?B p65 proteins in the colonic mucosa, although the colonic SOD activity was significantly decreased compared with the normal control (CMDI: 2.9 ± 0.6 vs 0.0 ± 0.0; HS: 4.3 ± 0.9 vs 0.7 ± 1.1; MPO: 98.1 ± 26.9 vs 24.8 ± 11.5; MDA: 57.53 ± 12.36 vs 9.21 ± 3.85; NO: 0.331 ± 0.092 vs 0.176 ± 0.045; PGE2: 186.2 ± 96.2 vs 42.8 ± 32.8; TXB2: 34.26 ± 13.51 vs 8.83 ± 3.75; iNOS: 0.365 ± 0.026 vs 0.053 ± 0.015; COX-2: 0.296 ± 0.028 vs 0.034 ± 0.013; NF-?B p65: 0.314 ± 0.026 vs 0.039 ± 0.012; SOD: 28.33 ± 1.17 vs 36.14 ± 1.91; P < 0.01). However, these parameters were found to be significantly ameliorated in rats treated locally with SF at the given dose protocols, especially at 400 mg·kg-1 and 800 mg·kg-1 doses (CMDI: 1.8 ± 0.8, 1.6 ± 0.9; HS: 3.3 ± 0.9, 3.1 ± 1.0; MPO: 63.8 ± 30.5, 36.2 ± 14.2; MDA: 41.84 ± 10.62, 37.34 ± 8.58; NO: 0.247 ± 0.042; 0.216 ± 0.033; PGE2: 77.2 ± 26.9, 58.4 ± 23.9; TXB2: 18.07 ± 14.83; 15.52 ± 8.62; iNOS:0.175 ± 0.018, 0.106 ± 0.019; COX-2: 0.064 ± 0.018, 0.056 ± 0.014; NF-?Bp65: 0.215 ± 0.019, 0.189 ± 0.016; SOD: 32.15 ± 4.26, 33.24 ± 3.69; P < 0.05-0.01). Moreover, a therapeutic dose protocol of 800 mg·kg-1 SF was observed as effective as 100 mg·kg-1 of 5-ASA in the amelioration of colonic mucosal injury as evaluated by CMDI and HS. CONCLUSION: Administration of SF intracolonically may have significant therapeutic effects on the rat model of colitis induced by acetic acid enema, which was probably due to the mechanism of antioxidation, inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism and NF-?B expression. PMID:14606091

  2. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal protein glomalin is a putative homolog of heat shock protein 60

    E-print Network

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal protein glomalin is a putative homolog of heat shock protein 60 tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A 17 amino acid sequence showing similarity to heat shock and produced in soil-free sterile

  3. Involvement of cell wall-bound phenolic acids in decrease in cell wall susceptibility to expansins during the cessation of rapid growth in internodes of floating rice.

    PubMed

    Sasayama, Daisuke; Azuma, Tetsushi; Itoh, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-15

    The cell walls in the elongating zone of submerged floating rice internodes show high susceptibility to expansins. When internode sections corresponding to such an elongation zone were incubated for 24h under osmotic stress conditions produced by treatment with 100mM polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG), the cell wall susceptibility to expansins remained at its initial level, while the susceptibility of internode sections incubated under unstressed conditions decreased considerably during the same period. The contents of polysaccharides and phenolic acids as ferulic, diferulic and p-coumaric acids in the cell walls of internode sections increased substantially under unstressed conditions, but the increases were almost completely prevented by osmotic stress. Ferulic acid applied to internode sections under osmotic stress reduced the susceptibility of the cell walls to expansins and increased the levels of ferulic and diferulic acids in the cell walls, with little effect on the accumulation of polysaccharides. In contrast, applied p-coumaric acid increased the level of p-coumaric acid in the cell walls without a change in the levels of ferulic and diferulic acids but did not reduce the susceptibility to expansins. These results suggest that the deposition of ferulic and diferulic acids is a primary determinant in regulating the reduction of the susceptibility of cell walls to expansins in floating rice internodes. PMID:20650543

  4. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS

    SciTech Connect

    de O Buanafina, Marcia Maria

    2013-10-16

    DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This proposal focuses on cell wall feruloylation and our long term goal is to identify and isolate novel genes controlling feruloylation and to characterize the phenotype of mutants in this pathway, with a spotlight on cell wall properties. Currently, the genes underlying AX feruloylation have not been identified and the isolation of such genes could be of great importance in manipulating ferulates accretion to the wall. Mutation of the feruloyl transferase gene(s) should lead to less ferulates secreted to the cell wall and reduced ferulate cross-linking. Our current research is based on the hypothesis that controlling the level of total feruloylation will have a direct impact on the level of cross-linking and in turn impact biomass utility for forage and biofuel production. Our results/accomplishments for this project so far include: 1. Mutagenised Brachypodium population. We have developed EMS mutagenized populations of model grass species Brachypodium distachyon. EMS populations have been developed from over 28,000 mutagenized seeds generating 5,184 M2 families. A total of 20,793 plants have been screened and 1,233 were originally selected. 2. Selected Brachypodium mutants: Potential mutants on their levels of cell wall ferulates and cell wall AX ? have been selected from 708 M2 families. A total of 303 back-crosses to no-mutagenized parental stock have been done, followed by selfing selected genotypes in order to confirm heritability of traits and to remove extraneous mutations generated by EMS mutagenesis. We are currently growing 12 F5 and F6 populations in order to assess CW composition. If low level of ferulates are confirmed in the candidate lines selected the mutation could be altered in different in one or several kinds of genes such as genes encoding an AX feruloyl transferase; genes encoding the arabinosyl transferase; genes encoding the synthesis of the xylan backbone; genes encoding enzymes of the monolignol pathway affecting FA formation or genes encoding transcription factors that control feruloylation. So it will require further investigations to confirm if we have a mutation on the ferulloyltransferase gene(s). We have also identified severe phenotypes which showed a significant change in the level of cell wall ferulates and sugars and have not survived. As this genotype did not reach flowering stage there was no seed production and so further analysis could not be done. 3. Candidate Gene Approach: Because of the likely long time expected to generate and identify candidate with mutation(s) on the feruloyltransferase gene, from our screening, we have in addition taken a bioinformatics approach in order to try to identify candidates gene(s) involved in feruloylation. Homologues of the rice feruloyl transferase genes belonging to Pfam PF02458 family were identified in Brachypodium distachyon by blasting EST sequences of putative rice arabinoxylan feruloyl transferase genes against Brachypodium and homologous sequences identified were tested for their expression level in Brachypodium. Sequences of the two Brachypodium genes, which showed highest expression and similarity to rice sequences, were used to design primers for construction of RNAi and over-expression vectors. These were transformed into Brachypodium using Agrobacterium transformation and plants generated have been analyzed for levels of cell wall ferulates and diferulates over generations T0 to T2 or T3. Our data shows a significant reduction if ferulates monomers and dimers from plants generated from RNAi::BdAT2 over 2-3 generations indicating that this gene might be a positive candidate for feruloylation in Brachypodium. However when BdAT2 was up regulated there was not much increase in the level of ferulates as would be expected. This lack of effect on the level of cell wall ferulates could be due to the CaMV::35S promoter used to drive the expression of the putative BdAT2 gene. We have shown previously that Aspergillus FAEA expression in tall fescue under CaMV::35S resulted in 1.9 fold decrease in activity compared to ac

  5. FungalRV: adhesin prediction and immunoinformatics portal for human fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The availability of sequence data of human pathogenic fungi generates opportunities to develop Bioinformatics tools and resources for vaccine development towards benefitting at-risk patients. Description We have developed a fungal adhesin predictor and an immunoinformatics database with predicted adhesins. Based on literature search and domain analysis, we prepared a positive dataset comprising adhesin protein sequences from human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Coccidioides immitis, Coccidioides posadasii, Histoplasma capsulatum, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Pneumocystis carinii, Pneumocystis jirovecii and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The negative dataset consisted of proteins with high probability to function intracellularly. We have used 3945 compositional properties including frequencies of mono, doublet, triplet, and multiplets of amino acids and hydrophobic properties as input features of protein sequences to Support Vector Machine. Best classifiers were identified through an exhaustive search of 588 parameters and meeting the criteria of best Mathews Correlation Coefficient and lowest coefficient of variation among the 3 fold cross validation datasets. The "FungalRV adhesin predictor" was built on three models whose average Mathews Correlation Coefficient was in the range 0.89-0.90 and its coefficient of variation across three fold cross validation datasets in the range 1.2% - 2.74% at threshold score of 0. We obtained an overall MCC value of 0.8702 considering all 8 pathogens, namely, C. albicans, C. glabrata, A. fumigatus, B. dermatitidis, C. immitis, C. posadasii, H. capsulatum and P. brasiliensis thus showing high sensitivity and specificity at a threshold of 0.511. In case of P. brasiliensis the algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 66.67%. A total of 307 fungal adhesins and adhesin like proteins were predicted from the entire proteomes of eight human pathogenic fungal species. The immunoinformatics analysis data on these proteins were organized for easy user interface analysis. A Web interface was developed for analysis by users. The predicted adhesin sequences were processed through 18 immunoinformatics algorithms and these data have been organized into MySQL backend. A user friendly interface has been developed for experimental researchers for retrieving information from the database. Conclusion FungalRV webserver facilitating the discovery process for novel human pathogenic fungal adhesin vaccine has been developed. PMID:21496229

  6. Enhanced Lignin Monomer Production Caused by Cinnamic Acid and Its Hydroxylated Derivatives Inhibits Soybean Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Rogério Barbosa; Salvador, Victor Hugo; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Bubna, Gisele Adriana; Finger-Teixeira, Aline; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Marchiosi, Rogério; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid and its hydroxylated derivatives (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids) are known allelochemicals that affect the seed germination and root growth of many plant species. Recent studies have indicated that the reduction of root growth by these allelochemicals is associated with premature cell wall lignification. We hypothesized that an influx of these compounds into the phenylpropanoid pathway increases the lignin monomer content and reduces the root growth. To confirm this hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of cinnamic, p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids on soybean root growth, lignin and the composition of p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) monomers. To this end, three-day-old seedlings were cultivated in nutrient solution with or without allelochemical (or selective enzymatic inhibitors of the phenylpropanoid pathway) in a growth chamber for 24 h. In general, the results showed that 1) cinnamic, p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic acids reduced root growth and increased lignin content; 2) cinnamic and p-coumaric acids increased p-hydroxyphenyl (H) monomer content, whereas p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic acids increased guaiacyl (G) content, and sinapic acid increased sinapyl (S) content; 3) when applied in conjunction with piperonylic acid (PIP, an inhibitor of the cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, C4H), cinnamic acid reduced H, G and S contents; and 4) when applied in conjunction with 3,4-(methylenedioxy)cinnamic acid (MDCA, an inhibitor of the 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, 4CL), p-coumaric acid reduced H, G and S contents, whereas caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids reduced G and S contents. These results confirm our hypothesis that exogenously applied allelochemicals are channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway causing excessive production of lignin and its main monomers. By consequence, an enhanced stiffening of the cell wall restricts soybean root growth. PMID:24312480

  7. Whole-cell fungal transformation of precursors into dyes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chemical methods of producing dyes involve extreme temperatures and unsafe toxic compounds. Application of oxidizing enzymes obtained from fungal species, for example laccase, is an alternative to chemical synthesis of dyes. Laccase can be replaced by fungal biomass acting as a whole-cell biocatalyst with properties comparable to the isolated form of the enzyme. The application of the whole-cell system simplifies the transformation process and reduces the time required for its completion. In the present work, four fungal strains with a well-known ability to produce laccase were tested for oxidation of 17 phenolic and non-phenolic precursors into stable and non-toxic dyes. Results An agar-plate screening test of the organic precursors was carried out using four fungal strains: Trametes versicolor, Fomes fomentarius, Abortiporus biennis, and Cerrena unicolor. Out of 17 precursors, nine were transformed into coloured substances in the presence of actively growing fungal mycelium. The immobilized fungal biomass catalyzed the transformation of 1 mM benzene and naphthalene derivatives in liquid cultures yielding stable and non-toxic products with good dyeing properties. The type of fungal strain had a large influence on the absorbance of the coloured products obtained after 48-hour transformation of the selected precursors, and the most effective was Fomes fomentarius (FF25). Whole-cell transformation of AHBS (3-amino-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid) into a phenoxazinone dye was carried out in four different systems: in aqueous media comprising low amounts of carbon and nitrogen source, in buffer, and in distilled water. Conclusions This study demonstrated the ability of four fungal strains belonging to the ecological type of white rot fungi to transform precursors into dyes. This paper highlights the potential of fungal biomass for replacing isolated enzymes as a cheaper industrial-grade biocatalyst for the synthesis of dyes and other commercially important products. The use of immobilized fungal biomass limits free migration of cells and facilitates their reuse in a continuous system for precursor transformation. PMID:20598166

  8. Can fungal biopesticides control malaria? 

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Matt B; Read, Andrew F

    2007-01-01

    Recent research has raised the prospect of using insect fungal pathogens for the control of vector-borne diseases such as malaria. In the past, microbial control of insect pests in both medical and agricultural sectors ...

  9. Cancer Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Where you live (geography) matters . Some disease-causing fungi are more common in certain parts of the ... of Page Preventing fungal infections in cancer patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because they are a ...

  10. Effects of Snake Fungal Disease

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Eastern rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) showing signs of fungal infection. Obvious external abnormalities are an opaque infected eye (spectacle) and roughened, crusty scales on the snout. Snake captured in New Jersey in March 2012....

  11. Effects of Snake Fungal Disease

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Northern water snake (Nerodia sipedon) with crusty and thickened scales overlaying raised blisters as a result of a fungal skin infection, captured from island in western Lake Erie, Ohio, in August 2009....

  12. Anthranilate-Activating Modules from Fungal Nonribosomal Peptide Assembly Lines†

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Brian D.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    Fungal natural products containing benzodiazepinone- and quinazolinone-fused ring systems can be assembled by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) using the conformationally restricted ?-amino acid anthranilate as one of the key building blocks. We validated that the first module of the acetylaszonalenin synthetase of Neosartorya fischeri NRRL 181 activates anthranilate to anthranilyl-AMP. With this as starting point, we then used bioinformatic predictions about fungal adenylation domain selectivities to identify and confirm an anthranilate-activating module in the fumiquinazoline A producer Aspergillus fumigatus Af293 as well as a second anthranilate-activating NRPS in N. fischeri. This establishes an anthranilate adenylation domain code for fungal NRPS and should facilitate detection and cloning of gene clusters for benzodiazepine- and quinazoline-containing polycyclic alkaloids with a wide range of biological activities. PMID:20225828

  13. Biosynthesis of Fungal Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Gavia, Diego J.; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a summary of recent research advances in elucidating the biosynthesis of fungal indole alkaloids. Different strategies used to incorporate and derivatize the indole/indoline moieties in various families of fungal indole alkaloids will be discussed, including tryptophan-containing nonribosomal peptides and polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrids; and alkaloids derived from other indole building blocks. This review also includes discussion regarding the downstream modifications that generate chemical and structural diversity among indole alkaloids. PMID:25180619

  14. Inhibitory effect of medicinal plant-derived carboxylic acids on the human transporters hOAT1, hOAT3, hOATP1B1, and hOATP2B1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Si, Duan-Yun; Yi, Xiu-Lin; Liu, Chang-Xiao

    2014-02-01

    A significant number of organic carboxylic acids have been shown to influence the absorption and distribution of drugs mediated by organic anion transporters (OATs). In this study, uptake experiments were performed to assess the inhibitory effects of cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, oleanolic acid, deoxycholic acid, and cynarin on hOAT1, hOAT3, hOATP1B1, and hOATP2B1. After a drug-drug interaction (DDI) investigation, cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, deoxycholic acid, and cynarin were found and validated to inhibit hOAT1 in a competitive manner, and deoxycholic acid was found to be an inhibitor of all four transporters. The apparent 50% inhibitory concentrations of cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, deoxycholic acid, and cynarin were estimated to be 133.87, 3.69, 90.03 and 6.03 ?mol·L(-1) for hOAT1, respectively. The apparent 50% inhibitory concentrations of deoxycholic acid were estimated to be 9.57 ?mol·L(-1) for hOAT3, 70.54 ?mol·L(-1) for hOATP1B1, and 168.27 ?mol·L(-1) for hOATP2B1. Because cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, and cynarin are ingredients of food or food additives, the present study suggests there are new food-drug interactions to be disclosed. In addition, deoxycholic acid may be used as a probe for studying the correlation of OATs and OATPs. PMID:24636064

  15. Fungal degradation of coal as a pretreatment for methane production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haider, Rizwan; Ghauri, Muhammad A.; SanFilipo, John R.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Orem, William H.; Tatu, Calin A.; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Akhtar, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    Coal conversion technologies can help in taking advantage of huge low rank coal reserves by converting those into alternative fuels like methane. In this regard, fungal degradation of coal can serve as a pretreatment step in order to make coal a suitable substrate for biological beneficiation. A fungal isolate MW1, identified as Penicillium chrysogenum on the basis of fungal ITS sequences, was isolated from a core sample of coal, taken from a well drilled by the US. Geological Survey in Montana, USA. The low rank coal samples, from major coal fields of Pakistan, were treated with MW1 for 7 days in the presence of 0.1% ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source and 0.1% glucose as a supplemental carbon source. Liquid extracts were analyzed through Excitation–Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) to obtain qualitative estimates of solubilized coal; these analyses indicated the release of complex organic functionalities. In addition, GC–MS analysis of these extracts confirmed the presence of single ring aromatics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic nitrogen compounds and aliphatics. Subsequently, the released organics were subjected to a bioassay for the generation of methane which conferred the potential application of fungal degradation as pretreatment. Additionally, fungal-mediated degradation was also prospected for extracting some other chemical entities like humic acids from brown coals with high huminite content especially from Thar, the largest lignite reserve of Pakistan.

  16. Traversing the fungal terpenome

    PubMed Central

    Quin, Maureen B.; Flynn, Christopher M.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Fungi (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) are prolific producers of structurally diverse terpenoid compounds. Classes of terpenoids identified in fungi include the sesqui-, di- and triterpenoids. Biosynthetic pathways and enzymes to terpenoids from each of these classes have been described. These typically involve the scaffold generating terpene synthases and cyclases, and scaffold tailoring enzymes such as e.g. cytochrome P450 monoxygenases, NAD(P)+ and flavin dependent oxidoreductases, and various group transferases that generate the final bioactive structures. The biosynthesis of several sesquiterpenoid mycotoxins and bioactive diterpenoids has been well-studied in Ascomycota (e.g. filamentous fungi). Little is known about the terpenoid biosynthetic pathways in Basidiomycota (e.g. mushroom forming fungi), although they produce a huge diversity of terpenoid natural products. Specifically, many trans-humulyl cation derived sesquiterpenoid natural products with potent bioactivities have been isolated. Biosynthetic gene clusters responsible for the production of trans-humulyl cation derived protoilludanes, and other sesquiterpenoids, can be rapidly identified by genome sequencing and bioinformatic methods. Genome mining combined with heterologous biosynthetic pathway refactoring has the potential to facilitate discovery and production of pharmaceutically relevant fungal terpenoids. PMID:25171145

  17. Eicosanoid biosynthesis inhibitors influence mortality of Pieris brassicae larvae co-injected with fungal conidia.

    PubMed

    Tunaz, Hasan

    2006-11-01

    Influence of fungal species (conidia spores) on mortality of Pieris brassicae larvae differed when injected into the larvae. The effects of B. bassiana (ARSEF-1151) were expressed in a conidial dose-dependent manner on mortality of the larvae. An increased and faster mortality of the larvae followed B. bassiana (ARSEF-1151) infection when the spores were co-injected with the eicosanoid biosynthesis inhibitors (dexamethasone, naproxen, phenidone, esculetin). These compounds express different modes of action. These lethal effects were reversed when dexamethasone was injected with eicosanoid precursor arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Nodulation is the predominant cellular reaction to bacterial and fungal injection in insects. Injection of each of five fungal species showed that nodulation intensity varies according to infecting fungal species. These findings support the idea that virulent effects of entomopathogenic, fungal species can be increased when P. brassicae immune systems are suppressed. PMID:17048247

  18. Metabolomics reveals insect metabolic responses associated with fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jiang; Luo, Feifei; Gao, Qiang; Shang, Yanfang; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-06-01

    The interactions between insects and pathogenic fungi are complex. We employed metabolomic techniques to profile insect metabolic dynamics upon infection by the pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. Silkworm larvae were infected with fungal spores and microscopic observations demonstrated that the exhaustion of insect hemocytes was coupled with fungal propagation in the insect body cavity. Metabolomic analyses revealed that fungal infection could significantly alter insect energy and nutrient metabolisms as well as the immune defense responses, including the upregulation of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, and lipids, but the downregulation of eicosanoids and amines. The insect antifeedant effect of the fungal infection was evident with the reduced level of maclurin (a component of mulberry leaves) in infected insects but elevated accumulations in control insects. Insecticidal and cytotoxic mycotoxins like oosporein and beauveriolides were also detected in insects at the later stages of infection. Taken together, the metabolomics data suggest that insect immune responses are energy-cost reactions and the strategies of nutrient deprivation, inhibition of host immune responses, and toxin production would be jointly employed by the fungus to kill insects. The data obtained in this study will facilitate future functional studies of genes and pathways associated with insect-fungus interactions. PMID:25895944

  19. Canine systemic fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Krohne, S G

    2000-09-01

    The principal route of infection for the disseminated fungal diseases discussed in this article is inhalation. In some cases, direct wound contamination and ingestion may also have an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease, especially in histoplasmosis. Another common theme of these diseases is the response of the immune system. If the inoculum is small and the animal is not immunocompromised, the infection may be limited to the respiratory tract and may resolve with few or no clinical signs. Dogs are usually presented to the veterinarian when the fungus has disseminated throughout the body via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, thus causing clinical signs secondary to specific organ infection. Draining skin tracts and lymphadenopathy occur in several of the diseases. The ocular location that is frequently affected is the choroid, where the organisms cause cell-mediated chorioretinitis. Early detection of these changes is important for saving vision and for diagnosing the systemic nature of the disease. Treatment is often effective, especially early in the disease, although it is expensive and long-term, with many animals needing over a year of treatment. Sometimes the treatment must continue lifelong. Ocular disease may not respond to treatment even when respiratory and other organ system clinical signs are rapidly improving. This isolation of the eye is similar to that of the CNS and requires regular monitoring of ocular disease, especially in the fundus, to ensure that systemic drugs are penetrating into the eye. Once the disease progresses to the anterior segment, the ocular prognosis worsens. Better penetration of the blood-retinal and blood-aqueous barriers may be achieved with fluconazole when compared with the other antifungal drugs. Secondary inflammatory ocular disease must also be monitored and treated appropriately to prevent scarring, which may cause vision loss or glaucoma. PMID:11033875

  20. Fungal pathogens of Proteaceae.

    PubMed

    Crous, P W; Summerell, B A; Swart, L; Denman, S; Taylor, J E; Bezuidenhout, C M; Palm, M E; Marincowitz, S; Groenewald, J Z

    2011-12-01

    Species of Leucadendron, Leucospermum and Protea (Proteaceae) are in high demand for the international floriculture market due to their brightly coloured and textured flowers or bracts. Fungal pathogens, however, create a serious problem in cultivating flawless blooms. The aim of the present study was to characterise several of these pathogens using morphology, culture characteristics, and DNA sequence data of the rRNA-ITS and LSU genes. In some cases additional genes such as TEF 1-? and CHS were also sequenced. Based on the results of this study, several novel species and genera are described. Brunneosphaerella leaf blight is shown to be caused by three species, namely B. jonkershoekensis on Protea repens, B. nitidae sp. nov. on Protea nitida and B. protearum on a wide host range of Protea spp. (South Africa). Coniothyrium-like species associated with Coniothyrium leaf spot are allocated to other genera, namely Curreya grandicipis on Protea grandiceps, and Microsphaeropsis proteae on P. nitida (South Africa). Diaporthe leucospermi is described on Leucospermum sp. (Australia), and Diplodina microsperma newly reported on Protea sp. (New Zealand). Pyrenophora blight is caused by a novel species, Pyrenophora leucospermi, and not Drechslera biseptata or D. dematoidea as previously reported. Fusicladium proteae is described on Protea sp. (South Africa), Pestalotiopsis protearum on Leucospermum cuneiforme (Zimbabwe), Ramularia vizellae and R. stellenboschensis on Protea spp. (South Africa), and Teratosphaeria capensis on Protea spp. (Portugal, South Africa). Aureobasidium leaf spot is shown to be caused by two species, namely A. proteae comb. nov. on Protea spp. (South Africa), and A. leucospermi sp. nov. on Leucospermum spp. (Indonesia, Portugal, South Africa). Novel genera and species elucidated in this study include Gordonomyces mucovaginatus and Pseudopassalora gouriqua (hyphomycetes), and Xenoconiothyrium catenata (coelomycete), all on Protea spp. (South Africa). PMID:22403475

  1. Cell wall fermentation kinetics are impacted more by lignin content and ferulate cross-linking than by lignin composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: We used a biomimetic model system to ascertain how reductions in ferulate-lignin cross-linking and shifts in lignin composition influence ruminal cell wall fermentation. Primary walls from maize cell suspensions with normal or reduced feruloylation were artificially lignified with variou...

  2. Knockout of the p-Coumarate Decarboxylase Gene from Lactobacillus plantarum Reveals the Existence of Two Other Inducible Enzymatic Activities Involved in Phenolic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Barthelmebs, Lise; Divies, Charles; Cavin, Jean-François

    2000-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum NC8 contains a pdc gene coding for p-coumaric acid decarboxylase activity (PDC). A food grade mutant, designated LPD1, in which the chromosomal pdc gene was replaced with the deleted pdc gene copy, was obtained by a two-step homologous recombination process using an unstable replicative vector. The LPD1 mutant strain remained able to weakly metabolize p-coumaric and ferulic acids into vinyl derivatives or into substituted phenyl propionic acids. We have shown that L. plantarum has a second acid phenol decarboxylase enzyme, better induced with ferulic acid than with p-coumaric acid, which also displays inducible acid phenol reductase activity that is mostly active when glucose is added. Those two enzymatic activities are in competition for p-coumaric and ferulic acid degradation, and the ratio of the corresponding derivatives depends on induction conditions. Moreover, PDC appeared to decarboxylate ferulic acid in vitro with a specific activity of about 10 nmol · min?1 · mg?1 in the presence of ammonium sulfate. Finally, PDC activity was shown to confer a selective advantage on LPNC8 grown in acidic media supplemented with p-coumaric acid, compared to the LPD1 mutant devoid of PDC activity. PMID:10919793

  3. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, M.

    2012-02-01

    The oceanic crust is believed to host the largest potential habitat for microbial life on Earth, yet, next to nothing is known about this deep, concealed biosphere. Here fossilised fungal colonies in subseafloor basalts are reported from three different seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. The fungal colonies consist of various characteristic structures interpreted as fungal hyphae, fruit bodies and spores. The fungal hyphae are well preserved with morphological characteristics such as hyphal walls, septa, thallic conidiogenesis, and hyphal tips with hyphal vesicles within. The fruit bodies consist of large (~50-200 ?m in diameter) body-like structures with a defined outer membrane and an interior filled with calcite. The fruit bodies have at some stage been emptied of their contents of spores and filled by carbonate forming fluids. A few fruit bodies not filled by calcite and with spores still within support this interpretation. Spore-like structures (ranging from a few ?m:s to ∼20 ?m in diameter) are also observed outside of the fruit bodies and in some cases concentrated to openings in the membrane of the fruit bodies. The hyphae, fruit bodies and spores are all closely associated with a crust lining the vein walls that probably represent a mineralized biofilm. The results support a fungal presence in deep subseafloor basalts and indicate that such habitats were vital between ∼81 and 48 Ma, and probably still is. It is suggested that near future ocean drilling programs prioritize sampling of live species to better understand this concealed biosphere.

  4. Fungal biotransformation of furanocoumarins by Aspergillus niger

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungi metabolize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a number of detoxification processes. Prevalent fungal detoxification pathways for aromatic compounds include the formation of sulfate and glycosidated conjugates. Such fungal metabolism has been extensively studied as models of mammalian metabo...

  5. Surface reactions of iron - enriched smectites: adsorption and transformation of hydroxy fatty acids and phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polubesova, Tamara; Olshansky, Yaniv; Eldad, Shay; Chefetz, Benny

    2014-05-01

    Iron-enriched smectites play an important role in adsorption and transformation of soil organic components. Soil organo-clay complexes, and in particular humin contain hydroxy fatty acids, which are derived from plant biopolymer cutin. Phenolic acids belong to another major group of organic acids detected in soil. They participate in various soil processes, and are of concern due to their allelopathic activity. We studied the reactivity of iron-enriched smectites (Fe(III)-montmorillonite and nontronite) toward both groups of acids. We used fatty acids- 9(10),16-dihydroxypalmitic acid (diHPA), isolated from curtin, and 9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic acid (triHPA); the following phenolic acids were used: ferulic, p-coumaric, syringic, and vanillic. Adsorption of both groups of acids was measured. The FTIR spectra of fatty acid-mineral complexes indicated inner-sphere complexation of fatty acids with iron-enriched smectites (versus outer-sphere complexation with Ca(II)-montmorillonite). The LC-MS results demonstrated enhanced esterification of fatty acids on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces (as compared to Ca(II)-montmorillonite). This study suggests that fatty acids can be esterified on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces, which results in the formation of stable organo-mineral complexes. These complexes may serve as a model for the study of natural soil organo-clay complexes and humin. The reaction of phenolic acids with Fe(III)-montmorillonite demonstrated their oxidative transformation by the mineral surfaces, which was affected by molecular structure of acids. The following order of their transformation was obtained: ferulic >syringic >p-coumaric >vanillic. The LC-MS analysis demonstrated the presence of dimers, trimers, and tetramers of ferulic acid on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite. Oxidation and transformation of ferulic acid were more intense on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite as compared to Fe(III) in solution due to stronger complexation on the Fe(III)-motnomrillonite surface. Our study demonstrate the importance of iron-enriched minerals for the abiotic formation of humic materials and for the transformation of aromatic (phenolic) pollutants.

  6. Kinetic Characterization of O-Phospho-L-Tyrosine Phosphohydrolase Activity of Two Fungal Phytases.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal phytases belonging to 'Histidine Acid Phosphatase' or HAP class of phosphomonoesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of phytic acid could also hydrolyze O-phospho-tyrosine. Two phytases from Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus awamori with pH optima 2.5 were tested for phospho-tyrosine hydrola...

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: FUNGAL TREATMENT BULLETIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fungal treatment technology uses white rot fungi (lignin degrading fungi) to treat organic contaminated soils in situ. Organic materials inoculated with the fungi are mechanically mixed into the contaminated soil. Using enzymes normally produced for wood degradation as well as ot...

  8. Biomineralization and formulation of endosulfan degrading bacterial and fungal consortiums.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jayanthi; Silambarasan, Sivagnanam

    2014-11-01

    Microbial degradation offers an effective approach to remove toxicants and in this study, a microbial consortium consisting of bacterial strains and fungal strains were originally obtained from endosulfan contaminated agricultural soils. Identification of the bacterial isolates by 16S rRNA sequences revealed the isolates to be Halophilic bacterium JAS4, Klebsiella pneumoniae JAS8, Enterobacter asburiae JAS5, and Enterobacter cloacae JAS7, whereas the fungal isolates were identified by 18S rRNA sequences and the isolates were Botryosphaeria laricina JAS6, Aspergillus tamarii JAS9 and Lasiodiplodia sp. JAS12. The biodegradation of endosulfan was monitored by using HPLC and FTIR analysis. The bacterial and fungal consortium could degrade 1000?mg l(-1) of endosulfan efficiently in aqueous medium and in soil. The infrared spectrum of endosulfan degraded samples in the aqueous medium by bacterial and fungal consortium showed bands at 1400 and 950?cm(-1) which are the characteristics of COOH group and acid dimer band respectively. In the present investigation, low cost solid materials such as sawdust, soil, fly ash, molasses and nutrients were used for the formulation of microbial consortium and to achieve greater multiplication and survival of the microbial strains. PMID:25454517

  9. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, M.

    2012-09-01

    The oceanic crust is believed to host the largest potential habitat for microbial life on Earth, yet, still we lack substantial information about the abundance, diversity, and consequence of its biosphere. The last two decades have involved major research accomplishments within this field and a change in view of the ocean crust and its potential to harbour life. Here fossilised fungal colonies in subseafloor basalts are reported from three different seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. The fungal colonies consist of various characteristic structures interpreted as fungal hyphae, fruit bodies and spores. The fungal hyphae are well preserved with morphological characteristics such as hyphal walls, septa, thallic conidiogenesis, and hyphal tips with hyphal vesicles within. The fruit bodies consist of large (∼50-200 µm in diameter) body-like structures with a defined outer membrane and an interior filled with calcite. The fruit bodies have at some stage been emptied of their contents of spores and filled by carbonate-forming fluids. A few fruit bodies not filled by calcite and with spores still within support this interpretation. Spore-like structures (ranging from a few µm to ∼20 µm in diameter) are also observed outside of the fruit bodies and in some cases concentrated to openings in the membrane of the fruit bodies. The hyphae, fruit bodies and spores are all closely associated with a crust lining the vein walls that probably represent a mineralized biofilm. The results support a fungal presence in deep subseafloor basalts and indicate that such habitats were vital between ∼81 and 48 Ma.

  10. Phylogenetic Distribution of Fungal Sterols

    PubMed Central

    Weete, John D.; Abril, Maritza; Blackwell, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    Background Ergosterol has been considered the “fungal sterol” for almost 125 years; however, additional sterol data superimposed on a recent molecular phylogeny of kingdom Fungi reveals a different and more complex situation. Methodology/Principal Findings The interpretation of sterol distribution data in a modern phylogenetic context indicates that there is a clear trend from cholesterol and other ?5 sterols in the earliest diverging fungal species to ergosterol in later diverging fungi. There are, however, deviations from this pattern in certain clades. Sterols of the diverse zoosporic and zygosporic forms exhibit structural diversity with cholesterol and 24-ethyl -?5 sterols in zoosporic taxa, and 24-methyl sterols in zygosporic fungi. For example, each of the three monophyletic lineages of zygosporic fungi has distinctive major sterols, ergosterol in Mucorales, 22-dihydroergosterol in Dimargaritales, Harpellales, and Kickxellales (DHK clade), and 24-methyl cholesterol in Entomophthorales. Other departures from ergosterol as the dominant sterol include: 24-ethyl cholesterol in Glomeromycota, 24-ethyl cholest-7-enol and 24-ethyl-cholesta-7,24(28)-dienol in rust fungi, brassicasterol in Taphrinales and hypogeous pezizalean species, and cholesterol in Pneumocystis. Conclusions/Significance Five dominant end products of sterol biosynthesis (cholesterol, ergosterol, 24-methyl cholesterol, 24-ethyl cholesterol, brassicasterol), and intermediates in the formation of 24-ethyl cholesterol, are major sterols in 175 species of Fungi. Although most fungi in the most speciose clades have ergosterol as a major sterol, sterols are more varied than currently understood, and their distribution supports certain clades of Fungi in current fungal phylogenies. In addition to the intellectual importance of understanding evolution of sterol synthesis in fungi, there is practical importance because certain antifungal drugs (e.g., azoles) target reactions in the synthesis of ergosterol. These findings also invalidate use of ergosterol as an indicator of biomass of certain fungal taxa (e.g., Glomeromycota). Data from this study are available from the Assembling the Fungal Tree of Life (AFTOL) Structural and Biochemical Database: http://aftol.umn.edu. PMID:20526375

  11. Fungal Exopolysaccharide: Production, Composition and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Subhadip; Banerjee, Debdulal

    2013-01-01

    Fungal exopolysaccharides (EPSs) have been recognized as high value biomacromolecules for the last two decades. These products, including pullulan, scleroglucan, and botryosphaeran, have several applications in industries, pharmaceuticals, medicine, foods etc. Although fungal EPSs are highly relevant, to date information concerning fungal biosynthesis is scarce and an extensive search for new fugal species that can produce novel EPSs is still needed. In most cases, the molecular weight variations and sugar compositions of fungal EPSs are dependent to culture medium composition and different physical conditions provided during fermentation. An inclusive and illustrative review on fungal EPS is presented here. The general outline of the present work includes fungal EPS production, their compositions and applications. An emphasis is also given to listing out different fungal strains that can produce EPSs. PMID:24826070

  12. Functional characterization of salicylate hydroxylase from the fungal endophyte Epichloë festucae

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Karen V.; Tian, Zipeng; Wang, Yifei; Smith, Jordan; Zylstra, Gerben; Huang, Bingru; Belanger, Faith C.

    2015-01-01

    Epichloë spp. are symbiotic fungal endophytes of many cool season grasses. The presence of the fungal endophytes often confers insect, drought, and disease tolerance to the host grasses. The presence of the fungal endophytes within the host plants does not elicit host defense responses. The molecular basis for this phenomenon is not known. Epichloë festucae, the endophyte of Festuca rubra, expresses a salicylate hydroxylase similar to NahG from the bacterium Pseudomonas putida. Few fungal salicylate hydroxylase enzymes have been reported. The in planta expression of an endophyte salicylate hydroxylase raised the possibility that degradation of plant-produced salicylic acid is a factor in the mechanism of how the endophyte avoids eliciting host plant defenses. Here we report the characterization of the E. festucae salicylate hydroxylase, designated Efe-shyA. Although the fungal enzyme has the expected activity, based on salicylic acid levels in endophyte-free and endophyte-infected plants it is unlikely that expression of the endophyte salicylate hydroxylase is a factor in the lack of a host defense response to the presence of the fungal endophyte. PMID:26055188

  13. Functional characterization of salicylate hydroxylase from the fungal endophyte Epichloë festucae.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Karen V; Tian, Zipeng; Wang, Yifei; Smith, Jordan; Zylstra, Gerben; Huang, Bingru; Belanger, Faith C

    2015-01-01

    Epichloë spp. are symbiotic fungal endophytes of many cool season grasses. The presence of the fungal endophytes often confers insect, drought, and disease tolerance to the host grasses. The presence of the fungal endophytes within the host plants does not elicit host defense responses. The molecular basis for this phenomenon is not known. Epichloë festucae, the endophyte of Festuca rubra, expresses a salicylate hydroxylase similar to NahG from the bacterium Pseudomonas putida. Few fungal salicylate hydroxylase enzymes have been reported. The in planta expression of an endophyte salicylate hydroxylase raised the possibility that degradation of plant-produced salicylic acid is a factor in the mechanism of how the endophyte avoids eliciting host plant defenses. Here we report the characterization of the E. festucae salicylate hydroxylase, designated Efe-shyA. Although the fungal enzyme has the expected activity, based on salicylic acid levels in endophyte-free and endophyte-infected plants it is unlikely that expression of the endophyte salicylate hydroxylase is a factor in the lack of a host defense response to the presence of the fungal endophyte. PMID:26055188

  14. Fungal Endophyte Diversity in Sarracenia

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Anthony; Bodri, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Fungal endophytes were isolated from 4 species of the carnivorous pitcher plant genus Sarracenia: S. minor, S. oreophila, S. purpurea, and S. psittacina. Twelve taxa of fungi, 8 within the Ascomycota and 4 within the Basidiomycota, were identified based on PCR amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS rDNA) with taxonomic identity assigned using the NCBI nucleotide megablast search tool. Endophytes are known to produce a large number of metabolites, some of which may contribute to the protection and survival of the host. We speculate that endophyte-infected Sarracenia may benefit from their fungal associates by their influence on nutrient availability from within pitchers and, possibly, by directly influencing the biota within pitchers. PMID:22427921

  15. Photochemical characterization of a novel fungal rhodopsin from Phaeosphaeria nodorum.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Solomon, Peter; Oliver, Richard P; Brown, Leonid S

    2011-11-01

    Eukaryotic microbial rhodopsins are widespread bacteriorhodopsin-like proteins found in many lower eukaryotic groups including fungi. Many fungi contain multiple rhodopsins, some significantly diverged from the original bacteriorhodopsin template. Although few fungal rhodopsins have been studied biophysically, both fast-cycling light-driven proton pumps and slow-cycling photosensors have been found. The purpose of this study was to characterize photochemically a new subgroup of fungal rhodopsins, the so-called auxiliary group. The study used the two known rhodopsin genes from the fungal wheat pathogen, Phaeosphaeria nodorum. One of the genes is a member of the auxiliary group while the other is highly similar to previously characterized proton-pumping Leptosphaeria rhodopsin. Auxiliary rhodopsin genes from a range of species form a distinct group with a unique primary structure and are located in carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster. Amino acid conservation pattern suggests that auxiliary rhodopsins retain the transmembrane core of bacteriorhodopsins, including all residues important for proton transport, but have unique polar intramembrane residues. Spectroscopic characterization of the two yeast-expressed Phaeosphaeria rhodopsins showed many similarities: absorption spectra, conformation of the retinal chromophore, fast photocycling, and carboxylic acid protonation changes. It is likely that both Phaeosphaeria rhodopsins are proton-pumping, at least in vitro. We suggest that auxiliary rhodopsins have separated from their ancestors fairly recently and have acquired the ability to interact with as yet unidentified transducers, performing a photosensory function without changing their spectral properties and basic photochemistry. PMID:21791197

  16. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, M.; Bengtson, S.

    2013-12-01

    The oceanic crust makes up the largest potential habitat for life on Earth, yet next to nothing is known about the abundance, diversity and ecology of its biosphere. Our understanding of the deep biosphere of subseafloor crust is, with a few exceptions, based on a fossil record. Surprisingly, a majority of the fossilized microorganisms have been interpreted or recently re-interpreted as remnants of fungi rather than prokaryotes. Even though this might be due to a bias in fossilization the presence of fungi in these settings can not be neglected. We have examined fossilized microorganisms in drilled basalt samples collected at the Emperor Seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomography microscopy (SRXTM) studies has revealed a complex morphology and internal structure that corresponds to characteristic fungal morphology. Chitin was detected in the fossilized hyphae, which is another strong argument in favour of a fungal interpretation. Chitin is absent in prokaryotes but a substantial constituent in fungal cell walls. The fungal colonies consist of both hyphae and yeast-like growth states as well as resting structures and possible fruit bodies, thus, the fungi exist in vital colonies in subseafloor basalts. The fungi have also been involved in extensive weathering of secondary mineralisations. In terrestrial environments fungi are known as an important geobiological agent that promotes mineral weathering and decomposition of organic matter, and they occur in vital symbiosis with other microorganisms. It is probable to assume that fungi would play a similar role in subseafloor basalts and have great impact on the ecology and on biogeochemical cycles in such environments.

  17. Systems Biology of Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Fabian; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Pollmächer, Johannes; Valiante, Vito; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of pathogenicity mechanisms of the most important human-pathogenic fungi, Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans, has gained great interest in the light of the steadily increasing number of cases of invasive fungal infections. A key feature of these infections is the interaction of the different fungal morphotypes with epithelial and immune effector cells in the human host. Because of the high level of complexity, it is necessary to describe and understand invasive fungal infection by taking a systems biological approach, i.e., by a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the non-linear and selective interactions of a large number of functionally diverse, and frequently multifunctional, sets of elements, e.g., genes, proteins, metabolites, which produce coherent and emergent behaviors in time and space. The recent advances in systems biology will now make it possible to uncover the structure and dynamics of molecular and cellular cause-effect relationships within these pathogenic interactions. We review current efforts to integrate omics and image-based data of host-pathogen interactions into network and spatio-temporal models. The modeling will help to elucidate pathogenicity mechanisms and to identify diagnostic biomarkers and potential drug targets for therapy and could thus pave the way for novel intervention strategies based on novel antifungal drugs and cell therapy. PMID:22485108

  18. Missing checkerboards? An absence of competitive signal in Alnus-associated ectomycorrhizal fungal communities

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nhu; Cohen, Hannah; Peay, Kabir

    2014-01-01

    A number of recent studies suggest that interspecific competition plays a key role in determining the structure of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal communities. Despite this growing consensus, there has been limited study of ECM fungal community dynamics in abiotically stressful environments, which are often dominated by positive rather than antagonistic interactions. In this study, we examined the ECM fungal communities associated with the host genus Alnus, which live in soils high in both nitrate and acidity. The nature of ECM fungal species interactions (i.e., antagonistic, neutral, or positive) was assessed using taxon co-occurrence and DNA sequence abundance correlational analyses. ECM fungal communities were sampled from root tips or mesh in-growth bags in three monodominant A. rubra plots at a site in Oregon, USA and identified using Illumina-based amplification of the ITS1 gene region. We found a total of 175 ECM fungal taxa; 16 of which were closely related to known Alnus-associated ECM fungi. Contrary to previous studies of ECM fungal communities, taxon co-occurrence analyses on both the total and Alnus-associated ECM datasets indicated that the ECM fungal communities in this system were not structured by interspecific competition. Instead, the co-occurrence patterns were consistent with either random assembly or significant positive interactions. Pair-wise correlational analyses were also more consistent with neutral or positive interactions. Taken together, our results suggest that interspecific competition does not appear to determine the structure of all ECM fungal communities and that abiotic conditions may be important in determining the specific type of interaction occurring among ECM fungi. PMID:25548729

  19. Digging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Krista L.; Payne, Sara G.; Palmer, Matthew I.; Gillikin, Caitlyn M.; Keefe, Dominique; Kim, Su Jin; Gedallovich, Seren M.; Discenza, Julia; Rangamannar, Ramya; Koshner, Jennifer A.; Massmann, Audrey L.; Orazi, Giulia; Essene, Adam; Leff, Jonathan W.; Fierer, Noah

    2013-01-01

    In urban environments, green roofs provide a number of benefits, including decreased urban heat island effects and reduced energy costs for buildings. However, little research has been done on the non-plant biota associated with green roofs, which likely affect their functionality. For the current study, we evaluated whether or not green roofs planted with two native plant communities in New York City functioned as habitats for soil fungal communities, and compared fungal communities in green roof growing media to soil microbial composition in five city parks, including Central Park and the High Line. Ten replicate roofs were sampled one year after planting; three of these roofs were more intensively sampled and compared to nearby city parks. Using Illumina sequencing of the fungal ITS region we found that green roofs supported a diverse fungal community, with numerous taxa belonging to fungal groups capable of surviving in disturbed and polluted habitats. Across roofs, there was significant biogeographical clustering of fungal communities, indicating that community assembly of roof microbes across the greater New York City area is locally variable. Green roof fungal communities were compositionally distinct from city parks and only 54% of the green roof taxa were also found in the park soils. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis revealed that park soils had greater microbial biomass and higher bacterial to fungal ratios than green roof substrates. City park soils were also more enriched with heavy metals, had lower pH, and lower quantities of total bases (Ca, K, and Mg) compared to green roof substrates. While fungal communities were compositionally distinct across green roofs, they did not differentiate by plant community. Together, these results suggest that fungi living in the growing medium of green roofs may be an underestimated component of these biotic systems functioning to support some of the valued ecological services of green roofs. PMID:23469260

  20. Invasive Fungal Infections after Natural Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Kaitlin

    2014-01-01

    The link between natural disasters and subsequent fungal infections in disaster-affected persons has been increasingly recognized. Fungal respiratory conditions associated with disasters include coccidioidomycosis, and fungi are among several organisms that can cause near-drowning pneumonia. Wound contamination with organic matter can lead to post-disaster skin and soft tissue fungal infections, notably mucormycosis. The role of climate change in the environmental growth, distribution, and dispersal mechanisms of pathogenic fungi is not fully understood; however, ongoing climate change could lead to increased disaster-associated fungal infections. Fungal infections are an often-overlooked clinical and public health issue, and increased awareness by health care providers, public health professionals, and community members regarding disaster-associated fungal infections is needed. PMID:24565446

  1. Invasive fungal infections after natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Park, Benjamin J

    2014-03-01

    The link between natural disasters and subsequent fungal infections in disaster-affected persons has been increasingly recognized. Fungal respiratory conditions associated with disasters include coccidioidomycosis, and fungi are among several organisms that can cause near-drowning pneumonia. Wound contamination with organic matter can lead to post-disaster skin and soft tissue fungal infections, notably mucormycosis. The role of climate change in the environmental growth, distribution, and dispersal mechanisms of pathogenic fungi is not fully understood; however, ongoing climate change could lead to increased disaster-associated fungal infections. Fungal infections are an often-overlooked clinical and public health issue, and increased awareness by health care providers, public health professionals, and community members regarding disaster-associated fungal infections is needed. PMID:24565446

  2. Changes in fungal communities along a boreal forest soil fertility gradient.

    PubMed

    Sterkenburg, Erica; Bahr, Adam; Brandström Durling, Mikael; Clemmensen, Karina E; Lindahl, Björn D

    2015-09-01

    Boreal forests harbour diverse fungal communities with decisive roles in decomposition and plant nutrition. Although changes in boreal plant communities along gradients in soil acidity and nitrogen (N) availability are well described, less is known about how fungal taxonomic and functional groups respond to soil fertility factors. We analysed fungal communities in humus and litter from 25 Swedish old-growth forests, ranging from N-rich Picea abies stands to acidic and N-poor Pinus sylvestris stands. 454-pyrosequencing of ITS2 amplicons was used to analyse community composition, and biomass was estimated by ergosterol analysis. Fungal community composition was significantly related to soil fertility at the levels of species, genera/orders and functional groups. Ascomycetes dominated in less fertile forests, whereas basidiomycetes increased in abundance in more fertile forests, both in litter and humus. The relative abundance of mycorrhizal fungi in the humus layer remained high even in the most fertile soils. Tolerance to acidity and nitrogen deficiency seems to be of greater importance than plant carbon (C) allocation patterns in determining responses of fungal communities to soil fertility, in old-growth boreal forests. PMID:25952659

  3. An organic solvent-tolerant phenolic acid decarboxylase from Bacillus licheniformis for the efficient bioconversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to vinyl phenol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongfei; Li, Lulu; Ding, Shaojun

    2015-06-01

    A new phenolic acid decarboxylase gene (blpad) from Bacillus licheniformis was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The full-length blpad encodes a 166-amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass and pI of 19,521 Da and 5.02, respectively. The recombinant BLPAD displayed maximum activity at 37 °C and pH 6.0. This enzyme possesses a broad substrate specificity and is able to decarboxylate p-coumaric, ferulic, caffeic, and sinapic acids at the relative ratios of specific activities 100:74.59:34.41:0.29. Kinetic constant K m values toward p-coumaric, ferulic, caffeic, and sinapic acids were 1.64, 1.55, 1.93, and 2.45 mM, and V max values were 268.43, 216.80, 119.07, and 0.78 U mg(-1), respectively. In comparison with other phenolic acid decarboxylases, BLPAD exhibited remarkable organic solvent tolerance and good thermal stability. BLPAD showed excellent catalytic performance in biphasic organic/aqueous systems and efficiently converted p-coumaric and ferulic acids into 4-vinylphenol and 4-vinylguaiacol. At 500 mM of p-coumaric and ferulic acids, the recombinant BLPAD produced a total 60.63 g l(-1) 4-vinylphenol and 58.30 g l(-1) 4-vinylguaiacol with the conversion yields 97.02 and 70.96 %, respectively. The low yield and product concentration are the crucial drawbacks to the practical bioproduction of vinyl phenol derivatives using phenolic acid decarboxylases. These unusual properties make BLPAD a desirable biocatalyst for commercial use in the bioconversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to vinyl phenol derivatives via enzymatic decarboxylation in a biphasic organic/aqueous reaction system. PMID:25547838

  4. Serpentine soils promote ectomycorrhizal fungal SARA BRANCO*

    E-print Network

    a reciprocal transplant experiment, where serpentine and nonserpentine ECM fungal communities were cultured by studies focusing on adaptation or environ- mental stress tolerance. Symbiotic species are often able

  5. Carbon requirements of some nematophagous, entomopathogenic and mycoparasitic hyphomycetes as fungal biocontrol agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, ManHong; Liu, XingZhong

    2006-05-01

    Thirty-three carbon sources were evaluated for their effects on spore germination, hyphal growth and sporulation of 11 fungal biocontrol agents, i.e. the nematophagous fungi Paecilomyces lilacinus, Pochonia chlamydosporia, Hirsutella rhossiliensis, H. minnesotensis and Arkansas Fungus 18, the entomopathogenic fungi Lecanicillium lecanii, Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae, and the mycoparasitic fungus Trichoderma viride. Variations in carbon requirements were found among the fungal species or strains tested. All strains studied except for T. viride grew on most carbon sources, although B. bassiana had more fastidious requirements for spore germination. Monosaccharides and disaccharides were suitable for fungal growth. For most isolates, D-glucose, D-mannose, sucrose and trehalose were superior to pectin and soluble starch among the polysaccharides and lactic acid among the organic acids. Both ethanol and methanol could accelerate growth of most isolates but not biomass. D-mannose, D-fructose and D-xylose were excellent carbon sources for sporulation, while D-glucose, sucrose, cellobiose, trehalose, chitin, dextrin, gelatin and lactic acid were better for some isolates. Neither sorbic acid nor linoleic acid could be utilized as a single carbon source. These findings provided a better understanding of the nutritional requirements of different fungal biocontrol agents that can benefit the mass production process. PMID:16649079

  6. Characterization of phytochemicals and antioxidant activities of red radish brines during lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Pu; Song, Li-Hua; Shen, Shan-Qi; Zhao, Shu-Juan; Pang, Jie; Qian, Bing-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Red radish (Raphanus L.) pickles are popular appetizers or spices in Asian-style cuisine. However, tons of radish brines are generated as wastes from industrial radish pickle production. In this study, we evaluated the dynamic changes in colour properties, phenolics, anthocyanin profiles, phenolic acid composition, flavonoids, and antioxidant properties in radish brines during lactic acid fermentation. The results showed that five flavonoids detected were four anthocyanins and one kaempferol derivative, including pelargonidin-3-digluoside-5-glucoside derivatives acylated with p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, p-coumaric and manolic acids, or ferulic and malonic acids. Amounts ranged from 15.5-19.3 µg/mL in total monomeric anthocyanins, and kaempferol-3,7-diglycoside (15-30 µg/mL). 4-Hydroxy-benzoic, gentisic, vanillic, syringic, p-coumaric, ferulic, sinapic and salicylic acids were detected in amounts that varied from 70.2-92.2 µg/mL, whereas the total phenolic content was 206-220 µg/mL. The change in colour of the brine was associated with the accumulation of lactic acid and anthocyanins. The ORAC and Fe2+ chelation capacity of radish brines generally decreased, whereas the reducing power measured as FRAP values was increased during the fermentation from day 5 to day 14. This study provided information on the phytochemicals and the antioxidative activities of red radish fermentation waste that might lead to further utilization as nutraceuticals or natural colorants. PMID:25004074

  7. Anticancer agents derived from natural cinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping; Shi, Yaling; Wang, Jinfeng; Shen, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the most dangerous disease that causes deaths all over the world. Natural products have afforded a rich source of drugs in a number of therapeutic fields including anticancer agents. Many significant drugs have been derived from natural sources by structural optimization of natural products. Cinnamic acid has gained great interest due to its antiproliferative, antioxidant, antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic potency. Currently it has been observed that cinnamic acid and its analogs such as caffeic acid, sinapic acid, ferulic acid, and isoferulic acid display various pharmacological activities, such as immunomodulation, anti-inflammation, anticancer and antioxidant. They have served to be the major sources of potential leading anticancer compounds. In this review, we focus on the anticancer potency of cinnamic acid derivatives and novel strategies to design these derivatives. We hope this review will be useful for researchers who are interested in developing anticancer agents. PMID:25634446

  8. POSSIBLE ROLE OF FUNGAL HEMOLYSINS IN SICK BUILDING SYNDROME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many fungi produce proteinaceous hemolytic agents. Like bacterial hemolysins, fungal hemolysins create pores or holes in membranes. Depending on which membranes are damaged, fungal hemolysins can produce a variety of effects. Fungal hemolysins can cause histamine release from ...

  9. Naming names: the etymology of fungal entomopathogens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chapter introduces the reader to the etymology of the generic names given to 26 fungal entomopathogens. Possessing some knowledge on how a name originates sometimes provides us with information on a fungal characteristic that might help us identify the organism, e.g., Conidiobolus, Cordyceps, P...

  10. Sorting of fungal-damaged white sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high-speed, color image-based sorting machine was modified to separate white sorghum with symptoms of fungal damage. Most of the sorghum tested was typically white, but over 27% of the bulk contained grains with fungal damage of various degrees, from severe to very slight. Grains with slight fun...

  11. Fungal endophytes in green coffee seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Green coffee seeds from Colombia, Guatemala, India, Kenya, Papua New Guinea, Puerto Rico, and Vietnam were sampled for the presence of fungal endophytes. Sections of surface sterilized seeds were plated on yeast malt agar, and fungal growth was isolated for subsequent DNA extraction and sequencing....

  12. Burden of serious fungal infections in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Khwakhali, Ushana Shrestha; Denning, David W

    2015-10-01

    There are few reports of serious fungal infections in Nepal though the pathogenic and allergenic fungi including Aspergillus species are common in the atmosphere. Herein, we estimate the burden of serious fungal infections in Nepal. All published papers reporting fungal infection rates from Nepal were identified. When few data existed, we used specific populations at risk and fungal infection frequencies in those populations to estimate national incidence or prevalence. Of the 27.3 M population, about 1.87% was estimated to suffer from serious fungal infections annually. We estimated the incidence of fungal keratitis at 73 per 100 000 annually. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is common with 215 765 cases, contributing to 1119 cases of invasive aspergillosis annually. Of 381 822 adult asthma cases, we estimated 9546 patients (range 2673-13 364) develop allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and 12 600 have severe asthma with fungal sensitisation. Based on 26 219 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis, the annual incidence of new chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) cases was estimated at 1678 with a 5 year period prevalence of 5289, 80% of CPA cases. Of 22 994 HIV patients with CD4 counts <350 not on antiretrovirals, Pneumocystis pneumonia was estimated at 990 cases annually. Cases of oral and oesophageal candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients were estimated at 10 347 and 2950, respectively. There is a significant burden of serious fungal infections in Nepal. Epidemiological studies are necessary to validate these estimates. PMID:26449506

  13. Gene Cloning, Transcriptional Analysis, Purification, and Characterization of Phenolic Acid Decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Cavin, Jean-François; Dartois, Véronique; Diviès, Charles

    1998-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis displays a substrate-inducible decarboxylating activity with the following three phenolic acids: ferulic, p-coumaric, and caffeic acids. Based on DNA sequence homologies between the Bacillus pumilus ferulate decarboxylase gene (fdc) (A. Zago, G. Degrassi, and C. V. Bruschi, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 61:4484–4486, 1995) and the Lactobacillus plantarum p-coumarate decarboxylase gene (pdc) (J.-F. Cavin, L. Barthelmebs, and C. Diviès, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:1939–1944, 1997), a DNA probe of about 300 nucleotides for the L. plantarum pdc gene was used to screen a B. subtilis genomic library in order to clone the corresponding gene in this bacterium. One clone was detected with this heterologous probe, and this clone exhibited phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) activity. The corresponding 5-kb insertion was partially sequenced and was found to contain a 528-bp open reading frame coding for a 161-amino-acid protein exhibiting 71 and 84% identity with the pdc- and fdc-encoded enzymes, respectively. The PAD gene (pad) is transcriptionally regulated by p-coumaric, ferulic, or caffeic acid; these three acids are the three substrates of PAD. The pad gene was overexpressed constitutively in Escherichia coli, and the stable purified enzyme was characterized. The difference in substrate specificity between this PAD and other PADs seems to be related to a few differences in the amino acid sequence. Therefore, this novel enzyme should facilitate identification of regions involved in catalysis and substrate specificity. PMID:9546183

  14. Industrial Fungal Enzymes: An Occupational Allergen Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high-molecular-weight allergens is a risk factor for the development and pathogenesis of IgE-mediated respiratory disease. In some occupational environments, workers are at an increased risk of exposure to fungal enzymes used in industrial production. Fungal enzymes have been associated with adverse health effects in the work place, in particular in baking occupations. Exposure-response relationships have been demonstrated, and atopic workers directly handling fungal enzymes are at an increased risk for IgE-mediated disease and occupational asthma. The utilization of new and emerging fungal enzymes in industrial production will present new occupational exposures. The production of antibody-based immunoassays is necessary for the assessment of occupational exposure and the development of threshold limit values. Allergen avoidance strategies including personal protective equipment, engineering controls, protein encapsulation, and reduction of airborne enzyme concentrations are required to mitigate occupational exposure to fungal enzymes. PMID:21747869

  15. Efficient screening of fungal cellobiohydrolase class I enzymes for thermostabilizing sequence blocks by

    E-print Network

    Snow, Christopher

    Efficient screening of fungal cellobiohydrolase class I enzymes for thermostabilizing sequence-based approach for screening homologous enzymes to identify stabilizing amino acid sequence blocks. This approach has been used to generate active, thermostable cellobiohy- drolase class I (CBH I) enzymes from

  16. Chemo-sensitization of fungal pathogens to antimicrobial agents using benzaldehyde analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activity of conventional antifungal agents, fludioxonil, strobilurin and antimycinA, which target the oxidative and osmotic stress response systems, was elevated by co-application of certain analogs of benzaldehyde. Fungal tolerance to 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde or 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid was foun...

  17. A potential plant-derived antifungal acetylenic acid mediates its activity by interfering with fatty acid homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    6-Nonadecynoic acid (6-NDA), a plant-derived acetylenic acid, exhibits strong inhibitory activity against the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. In the present study, transcriptional profiling coupled with mutant and biochemical analyses...

  18. Hydrodynamics, Fungal Physiology, and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Carreón, L; Galindo, E; Rocha-Valadéz, J A; Holguín-Salas, A; Corkidi, G

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous cultures, such as fungi and actinomycetes, contribute substantially to the pharmaceutical industry and to enzyme production, with an annual market of about 6 billion dollars. In mechanically stirred reactors, most frequently used in fermentation industry, microbial growth and metabolite productivity depend on complex interactions between hydrodynamics, oxygen transfer, and mycelial morphology. The dissipation of energy through mechanically stirring devices, either flasks or tanks, impacts both microbial growth through shearing forces on the cells and the transfer of mass and energy, improving the contact between phases (i.e., air bubbles and microorganisms) but also causing damage to the cells at high energy dissipation rates. Mechanical-induced signaling in the cells triggers the molecular responses to shear stress; however, the complete mechanism is not known. Volumetric power input and, more importantly, the energy dissipation/circulation function are the main parameters determining mycelial size, a phenomenon that can be explained by the interaction of mycelial aggregates and Kolmogorov eddies. The use of microparticles in fungal cultures is also a strategy to increase process productivity and reproducibility by controlling fungal morphology. In order to rigorously study the effects of hydrodynamics on the physiology of fungal microorganisms, it is necessary to rule out the possible associated effects of dissolved oxygen, something which has been reported scarcely. At the other hand, the processes of phase dispersion (including the suspended solid that is the filamentous biomass) are crucial in order to get an integral knowledge about biological and physicochemical interactions within the bioreactor. Digital image analysis is a powerful tool for getting relevant information in order to establish the mechanisms of mass transfer as well as to evaluate the viability of the mycelia. This review focuses on (a) the main characteristics of the two most common morphologies exhibited by filamentous microorganisms; (b) how hydrodynamic conditions affect morphology and physiology in filamentous cultures; and (c) techniques using digital image analysis to characterize the viability of filamentous microorganisms and mass transfer in multiphase dispersions. Representative case studies of fungi (Trichoderma harzianum and Pleurotus ostreatus) exhibiting different typical morphologies (disperse mycelia and pellets) are discussed. PMID:25652005

  19. Dancing genomes: fungal nuclear positioning

    PubMed Central

    Gladfelter, Amy; Berman, Judith

    2009-01-01

    The many different mechanisms that fungi use to transmit and share genetic material are mediated by a broad range of chromosome and nuclear dynamics. The mechanics underlying nuclear migration are well integrated into detailed models, in which the forces supplied by plus- and minus-end-directed microtubule motors position and move the nucleus in a cell. Although we know much about how cells move nuclei, we know much less about why the cell invests in so many different nuclear ‘dances’. Here, we briefly survey the available models for the mechanics of nuclear migration in fungi and then focus on examples of how fungal cells use these nuclear dances — the movement of intact nuclei in and between cells — to control the integrity, ploidy and assortment of specific genomes or individual chromosomes. PMID:19898490

  20. Fungal peritonitis in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Montane, B S; Mazza, I; Abitbol, C; Zilleruelo, G; Strauss, J; Coakley, S; Diaz, R

    1998-01-01

    Fungal peritonitis (FP) is a rare complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Although treatment with fluconazole (FCZ) has improved catheter survival and preservation of the peritoneal membrane, FP still carries a high morbidity and mortality in pediatrics. High-risk factors for FP include previous usage of systemic antibiotics and recurrent bacterial peritonitis. A prospective experience in the treatment of FP was conducted at the University of Miami/Jackson Children's Hospital from 1992 to 1997. All patients received either oral or intravenous loading dose of FCZ (5-7 mg/kg) followed by intraperitoneal (i.p.) FCZ (75 mg/L). Amphotericin B (amp B) was added when clinical sepsis was present. A total of 6 patients had FP (all Candida sp.; mean age: 6 years). Two of these patients were neonates with Tenckhoff-catheter placement at less than 1 week of age. Five patients achieved sterilization of the peritoneal fluid. One patient required catheter removal (C. tropicalis). The 2 neonates were infection free for 29 and 41 days, respectively, but both died of superimposed bacterial sepsis. The remaining 4 patients survived and completed 6 weeks of FCZ treatment. Two have had preservation of the peritoneal membrane for more than 1 year. The other 2 were switched to hemodialysis. We conclude that FCZ is an effective treatment for fungal peritonitis in pediatric patients. Adjunct therapy with amp B is usually necessary if sepsis is present. Although eradication of the fungus is possible in a majority of cases, neonates and immunocompromised hosts remain at high risk for morbidity and mortality. PMID:10649735

  1. Fungal degradation of calcium-, lead- and silicon-bearing minerals.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Ademola O; Gadd, Geoffrey M

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine nutritional influence on the ability of selected filamentous fungi to mediate biogenic weathering of the minerals, apatite, galena and obsidian in order to provide further understanding of the roles of fungi as biogeochemical agents, particularly in relation to the cycling of metals and associated elements found in minerals. The impact of three organic acid producing fungi (Aspergillus niger, Serpula himantioides and Trametes versicolor) on apatite, galena and obsidian was examined in the absence and presence of a carbon and energy source (glucose). Manifestation of fungal weathering included corrosion of mineral surfaces, modification of the mineral substrate through transformation into secondary minerals (i.e. crystal formation) and hyphal penetration of the mineral substrate. Physicochemical interactions of fungal metabolites, e.g. H+ and organic acids, with the minerals are thought to be the primary driving forces responsible. All experimental fungi were capable of mineral surface colonization in the absence and presence of glucose but corrosion of the mineral surface and secondary mineral formation were affected by glucose availability. Only S. himantioides and T. versicolor were able to corrode apatite in the absence of glucose but none of the fungi were capable of doing so with the other minerals. In addition, crystal formation with galena was entirely dependent on the availability of glucose. Penetration of the mineral substrates by fungal hyphae occurred but this did not follow any particular pattern. Although the presence of glucose in the media appeared to influence positively the mineral penetrating abilities of the fungi, the results obtained also showed that some geochemical change(s) might occur under nutrient-limited conditions. It was, however, unclear whether the hyphae actively penetrated the minerals or were growing into pre-existing pores or cracks. PMID:15984571

  2. 7 CFR 201.58d - Fungal endophyte test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fungal endophyte test. 201.58d Section 201.58d... REGULATIONS Examinations in the Administration of the Act § 201.58d Fungal endophyte test. A fungal endophyte test may be used to determine the amount of fungal endophyte (Acremonium spp.) in certain grasses....

  3. PNNL Fungal Biotechnology Core DOE-OBP Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Butcher, Mark G.; Collett, James R.; Culley, David E.; Dai, Ziyu; Magnuson, Jon K.; Panisko, Ellen A.

    2009-11-30

    In 2009, we continued to address barriers to fungal fermentation in the primary areas of morphology control, genomics, proteomics, fungal hyperproductivity, biomass-to-products via fungal based consolidated bioprocesses, and filamentous fungal ethanol. “Alternative renewable fuels from fungi” was added as a new subtask. Plans were also made to launch a new advanced strain development subtask in FY2010.

  4. Watershed-Scale Fungal Community Characterization along a pH Gradient in a Subsurface Environment Cocontaminated with Uranium and Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Jasrotia, Puja; Green, Stefan J.; Canion, Andy; Overholt, Will A.; Prakash, Om; Wafula, Denis; Hubbard, Daniela; Watson, David B.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Brooks, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment cocontaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution, and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semiquantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic small-subunit rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from the subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH <4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta, which were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples, were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota and within a single genus of the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions. PMID:24389927

  5. Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Jasrotia, Puja; Green, Stefan; Canion, Andy; Overholt, Will; Prakash, Om; Wafula, Dennis; Hubbard, Daniela; Watson, David B; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Kostka,

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

  6. Allergen Immunotherapy in an HIV+ Patient with Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Myles, Ian A.; Gada, Satyen

    2015-01-01

    Patients with HIV/AIDS can present with multiple types of fungal rhinosinusitis, fungal balls, granulomatous invasive fungal rhinosinusitis, acute or chronic invasive fungal rhinosinusitis, or allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS). Given the variable spectrum of immune status and susceptibility to severe infection from opportunistic pathogens it is extremely important that clinicians distinguish aggressive fungal invasive fungal disease from the much milder forms such as AFRS. Here we describe a patient with HIV and AFRS to both remind providers of the importance of ruling out invasive fungal disease and outline the other unique features of fungal sinusitis treatment in the HIV-positive population. Additionally we discuss the evidence for and against use of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) for fungal disease in general, as well as the evidence for AIT in the HIV population. PMID:25954557

  7. Expanding Fungal Diets Through Synthetic Algal-Fungal Mutualism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Alaisha; Galazka, Jonathan (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    Fungi can synthesize numerous molecules with important properties, and could be valuable production platforms for space exploration and colonization. However, as heterotrophs, fungi require reduced carbon. This limits their efficiency in locations such as Mars, where reduced carbon is scarce. We propose a system to induce mutualistic symbiosis between the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the filamentous fungi Neurospora crassa. This arrangement would mimic natural algal-fungal relationships found in lichens, but have added advantages including increased growth rate and genetic tractability. N. crassa would metabolize citrate (C6H5O7 (sup -3)) and release carbon dioxide (CO2) that C. reinhardtii would assimilate into organic sugars during photosynthesis. C. reinhardtii would metabolize nitrate (NO3-) and release ammonia (NH3) as a nitrogen source for N. crassa. A N. crassa mutant incapable of reducing nitrate will be used to force this interaction. This system eliminates the need to directly supply its participants with carbon dioxide and ammonia. Furthermore, the release of oxygen by C. reinhardtii via photosynthesis would enable N. crassa to respire. We hope to eventually create a system closer to lichen, in which the algae transfers not only nitrogen but reduced carbon, as organic sugars, to the fungus for growth and production of valuable compounds.

  8. An evaluation of antifungal agents for the treatment of fungal contamination in indoor air environments.

    PubMed

    Rogawansamy, Senthaamarai; Gaskin, Sharyn; Taylor, Michael; Pisaniello, Dino

    2015-06-01

    Fungal contamination in indoor environments has been associated with adverse health effects for the inhabitants. Remediation of fungal contamination requires removal of the fungi present and modifying the indoor environment to become less favourable to growth.  This may include treatment of indoor environments with an antifungal agent to prevent future growth. However there are limited published data or advice on chemical agents suitable for indoor fungal remediation. The aim of this study was to assess the relative efficacies of five commercially available cleaning agents with published or anecdotal use for indoor fungal remediation. The five agents included two common multi-purpose industrial disinfectants (Cavicide® and Virkon®), 70% ethanol, vinegar (4.0%-4.2% acetic acid), and a plant-derived compound (tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil) tested in both a liquid and vapour form. Tea tree oil has recently generated interest for its antimicrobial efficacy in clinical settings, but has not been widely employed for fungal remediation. Each antifungal agent was assessed for fungal growth inhibition using a disc diffusion method against a representative species from two common fungal genera, (Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum), which were isolated from air samples and are commonly found in indoor air. Tea tree oil demonstrated the greatest inhibitory effect on the growth of both fungi, applied in either a liquid or vapour form. Cavicide® and Virkon® demonstrated similar, although less, growth inhibition of both genera. Vinegar (4.0%-4.2% acetic acid) was found to only inhibit the growth of P. chrysogenum, while 70% ethanol was found to have no inhibitory effect on the growth of either fungi. There was a notable inhibition in sporulation, distinct from growth inhibition after exposure to tea tree oil, Virkon®, Cavicide® and vinegar. Results demonstrate that common cleaning and antifungal agents differ in their capacity to inhibit the growth of fungal genera found in the indoor air environment. The results indicate that tea tree oil was the most effective antifungal agent tested, and may have industrial application for the remediation of fungal contamination in residential and occupational buildings. PMID:26042369

  9. An Evaluation of Antifungal Agents for the Treatment of Fungal Contamination in Indoor Air Environments

    PubMed Central

    Rogawansamy, Senthaamarai; Gaskin, Sharyn; Taylor, Michael; Pisaniello, Dino

    2015-01-01

    Fungal contamination in indoor environments has been associated with adverse health effects for the inhabitants. Remediation of fungal contamination requires removal of the fungi present and modifying the indoor environment to become less favourable to growth.  This may include treatment of indoor environments with an antifungal agent to prevent future growth. However there are limited published data or advice on chemical agents suitable for indoor fungal remediation. The aim of this study was to assess the relative efficacies of five commercially available cleaning agents with published or anecdotal use for indoor fungal remediation. The five agents included two common multi-purpose industrial disinfectants (Cavicide® and Virkon®), 70% ethanol, vinegar (4.0%?4.2% acetic acid), and a plant-derived compound (tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil) tested in both a liquid and vapour form. Tea tree oil has recently generated interest for its antimicrobial efficacy in clinical settings, but has not been widely employed for fungal remediation. Each antifungal agent was assessed for fungal growth inhibition using a disc diffusion method against a representative species from two common fungal genera, (Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum), which were isolated from air samples and are commonly found in indoor air. Tea tree oil demonstrated the greatest inhibitory effect on the growth of both fungi, applied in either a liquid or vapour form. Cavicide® and Virkon® demonstrated similar, although less, growth inhibition of both genera. Vinegar (4.0%–4.2% acetic acid) was found to only inhibit the growth of P. chrysogenum, while 70% ethanol was found to have no inhibitory effect on the growth of either fungi. There was a notable inhibition in sporulation, distinct from growth inhibition after exposure to tea tree oil, Virkon®, Cavicide® and vinegar. Results demonstrate that common cleaning and antifungal agents differ in their capacity to inhibit the growth of fungal genera found in the indoor air environment. The results indicate that tea tree oil was the most effective antifungal agent tested, and may have industrial application for the remediation of fungal contamination in residential and occupational buildings. PMID:26042369

  10. Analysis of fungal ball rhinosinusitis by culturing fungal clumps under endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junyi; Li, Yunchuan; Lu, Xinxin; Wang, Xiangdong; Zang, Hongrui; Wang, Tong; Zhou, Bing; Zhang, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the clinical microbiology of fungal ball (FB) rhinosinusitis by culturing fungal clumps collected under endoscopic surgery. Methods: From April to November of 2012, fungal clumps were sampled by endoscopic surgery from patients diagnosed with FB using clinical and histopathological methods. The specimens were subjected to smear microscopy, and cultured for bacteria and fungi analysis. Results: Out of the 81 specimens from 80 patients, 69 (69/81, 85.19%) specimens were detected a mixed infection of bacteria and fungi. However, only 25 (25/81, 30.86%) specimens resulted in fungal growth. There were 12 (12/81, 14.81%) specimens with fungal infections alone. The cultured fungi included 36 strains belonging to five genera, and most of them were Aspergillus spp. (30/36, 83.3%). The cultured bacteria included 94 strains belonging to 16 genera, and the most frequently seen was Staphylococcus spp. (23/94, 35.94%). When it was fungal and Pseudomonas aeruginosa mixed infection, the fungal growth was inhibited (P = 0.002). Conclusion: Patients with fungal ball usually have mixed fungal and bacterial infections. The fungi from these samples are sometimes difficult to culture, which may be the result of the inhibition by bacteria in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26131186

  11. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Where you live (geography) matters . Some disease-causing fungi are more common in certain parts of the ... Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because they are a ...

  12. Organ Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Where you live (geography) matters. Some disease-causing fungi are more common in certain parts of the ... Page Preventing fungal infections in organ transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because they are a ...

  13. How to describe a new fungal species.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Keith A; Rossman, Amy Y

    2010-12-01

    The formal requirements and best practices for the publication of descriptions of new fungal species are discussed. Expectations for DNA sequences and cultures are considered. A model manuscript offers one possible approach to writing such a paper. PMID:22679569

  14. Air Contamination With Fungals In Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlat, Iuliana; Haiducu, Maria; Stepa, Raluca

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the studies was to determine the level and kind of fungal contamination of air in museum, deposits patrimony, restoration and conservation laboratories and their effects on health of workers. Microbiological air purity was measured with a SAS-100 Surface Air System impactor. The fungal contamination was observed in all 54 rooms where we made determinations. The highest levels of fungal were recorded at rooms with hygroscopic patrimony objects, eg carpets, chairs, upholstered chairs, books etc. The most species identified included under common allergens: Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Mucor. There fungal species belonging to the genus identified in this study, can trigger serious diseases museum workers, such as for example Aspergillus fumigatus, known allergies and toxic effects that may occur. In some places of the museum, occupational exposure limit values to fungi present in the air in the work environment, recommended by the specialized literature, have been overcome.

  15. Standard methods for fungal brood disease research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we describe the disease symptoms and protocols commonly used in research of honey bee fungal diseases chalkbrood and stonebrood, caused by Ascosphaera apis and Aspergillus spp. respectively....

  16. The structure and function of fungal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The structure and function of fungal cell walls were studied with particular emphasis on dermatophytes. Extraction, isolation, analysis, and observation of the cell wall structure and function were performed. The structure is described microscopically and chemically.

  17. Comparison and Validation of Some ITS Primer Pairs Useful for Fungal Metabarcoding Studies

    PubMed Central

    Op De Beeck, Michiel; Lievens, Bart; Busschaert, Pieter; Declerck, Stéphan; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Colpaert, Jan V.

    2014-01-01

    Current metabarcoding studies aiming to characterize microbial communities generally rely on the amplification and sequencing of relatively short DNA regions. For fungi, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) operon has been accepted as the formal fungal barcode. Despite an increasing number of fungal metabarcoding studies, the amplification efficiency of primers is generally not tested prior to their application in metabarcoding studies. Some of the challenges that metabarcoding primers should overcome efficiently are the amplification of target DNA strands in samples rich in non-target DNA and environmental pollutants, such as humic acids, that may have been co-extracted with DNA. In the current study, three selected primer pairs were tested for their suitability as fungal metabarcoding primers. The selected primer pairs include two primer pairs that have been frequently used in fungal metabarcoding studies (ITS1F/ITS2 and ITS3/ITS4) and a primer pair (ITS86F/ITS4) that has been shown to efficiently amplify the ITS2 region of a broad range of fungal taxa in environmental soil samples. The selected primer pairs were evaluated in a 454 amplicon pyrosequencing experiment, real-time PCR (qPCR) experiments and in silico analyses. Results indicate that experimental evaluation of primers provides valuable information that could aid in the selection of suitable primers for fungal metabarcoding studies. Furthermore, we show that the ITS86F/ITS4 primer pair outperforms other primer pairs tested in terms of in silico primer efficiency, PCR efficiency, coverage, number of reads and number of species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) obtained. These traits push the ITS86F/ITS4 primer pair forward as highly suitable for studying fungal diversity and community structures using DNA metabarcoding. PMID:24933453

  18. Burden of serious fungal infections in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Tudela, J L; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A; Gago, S; Cuenca-Estrella, M; León, C; Miro, J M; Nuñez Boluda, A; Ruiz Camps, I; Sole, A; Denning, D W

    2015-02-01

    Estimates of the incidence and prevalence of serious fungal infections, based on epidemiological data, are essential in order to inform public health priorities given the lack of resources dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of these serious fungal diseases. However, epidemiology of these infections is largely unknown, except for candidaemia and cryptococcosis. The aim of this work is to calculate the burden of serious fungal infections in Spain. All published epidemiology papers reporting fungal infection rates from Spain were identified. Where no data existed, we used specific populations at risk and fungal infection frequencies in those populations to estimate national incidence or prevalence, depending on the condition. Around 8.1 million people suffer a fungal infection every year. Most of them are skin or mucosal infections causing no deaths. Candidaemia is more common than in other European countries and has risen by 1.88-fold in frequency in the last decade (8.1 cases × 100,000). Good estimates of invasive aspergillosis (2.75 cases × 100,000) and mucormycosis (0.04 × 100,000) are available. Fungal infections with a high mortality such as invasive aspergillosis, candidaemia, Pneumocystis pneumonia and mucormycosis are not numerous in Spain, but they affect those with severe underlying diseases and are therefore linked to poor outcomes. Additional studies are required, especially for high burden diseases such as recurrent thrush in women (?9000 cases × 100,000 women), allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (126 cases × 100,000) and severe asthma with fungal sensitisation (198 cases × 100,000). PMID:25658565

  19. The amsterdam declaration on fungal nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, David L; Crous, Pedro W; Redhead, Scott A; Reynolds, Don R; Samson, Robert A; Seifert, Keith A; Taylor, John W; Wingfield, Michael J; Abaci, Ozlem; Aime, Catherine; Asan, Ahmet; Bai, Feng-Yan; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Begerow, Dominik; Berikten, Derya; Boekhout, Teun; Buchanan, Peter K; Burgess, Treena; Buzina, Walter; Cai, Lei; Cannon, Paul F; Crane, J Leland; Damm, Ulrike; Daniel, Heide-Marie; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Druzhinina, Irina; Dyer, Paul S; Eberhardt, Ursula; Fell, Jack W; Frisvad, Jens C; Geiser, David M; Geml, József; Glienke, Chirlei; Gräfenhan, Tom; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Groenewald, Marizeth; de Gruyter, Johannes; Guého-Kellermann, Eveline; Guo, Liang-Dong; Hibbett, David S; Hong, Seung-Beom; de Hoog, G Sybren; Houbraken, Jos; Huhndorf, Sabine M; Hyde, Kevin D; Ismail, Ahmed; Johnston, Peter R; Kadaifciler, Duygu G; Kirk, Paul M; Kõljalg, Urmas; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Lagneau, Paul-Emile; Lévesque, C André; Liu, Xingzhong; Lombard, Lorenzo; Meyer, Wieland; Miller, Andrew; Minter, David W; Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Norvell, Lorelei; Ozerskaya, Svetlana M; Oziç, Rasime; Pennycook, Shaun R; Peterson, Stephen W; Pettersson, Olga V; Quaedvlieg, William; Robert, Vincent A; Ruibal, Constantino; Schnürer, Johan; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Shivas, Roger; Slippers, Bernard; Spierenburg, Henk; Takashima, Masako; Ta?k?n, Evrim; Thines, Marco; Thrane, Ulf; Uztan, Alev Haliki; van Raak, Marcel; Varga, János; Vasco, Aida; Verkley, Gerard; Videira, Sandra I R; de Vries, Ronald P; Weir, Bevan S; Yilmaz, Neriman; Yurkov, Andrey; Zhang, Ning

    2011-06-01

    The Amsterdam Declaration on Fungal Nomenclature was agreed at an international symposium convened in Amsterdam on 19-20 April 2011 under the auspices of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF). The purpose of the symposium was to address the issue of whether or how the current system of naming pleomorphic fungi should be maintained or changed now that molecular data are routinely available. The issue is urgent as mycologists currently follow different practices, and no consensus was achieved by a Special Committee appointed in 2005 by the International Botanical Congress to advise on the problem. The Declaration recognizes the need for an orderly transitition to a single-name nomenclatural system for all fungi, and to provide mechanisms to protect names that otherwise then become endangered. That is, meaning that priority should be given to the first described name, except where that is a younger name in general use when the first author to select a name of a pleomorphic monophyletic genus is to be followed, and suggests controversial cases are referred to a body, such as the ICTF, which will report to the Committee for Fungi. If appropriate, the ICTF could be mandated to promote the implementation of the Declaration. In addition, but not forming part of the Declaration, are reports of discussions held during the symposium on the governance of the nomenclature of fungi, and the naming of fungi known only from an environmental nucleic acid sequence in particular. Possible amendments to the Draft BioCode (2011) to allow for the needs of mycologists are suggested for further consideration, and a possible example of how a fungus only known from the environment might be described is presented. PMID:22679594

  20. Burden of fungal infections in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Badiane, Aida S; Ndiaye, Daouda; Denning, David W

    2015-10-01

    Senegal has a high rate of tuberculosis and a low HIV seropositivity rate and aspergilloma, life-threatening fungal infections, dermatophytosis and mycetoma have been reported in this study. All published epidemiology papers reporting fungal infection rates from Senegal were identified. Where no data existed, we used specific populations at risk and fungal infection frequencies in each to estimate national incidence or prevalence. The results show that tinea capitis is common being found in 25% of children, ~1.5 million. About 191,000 Senegalese women get recurrent vaginal thrush, ?4 times annually. We estimate 685 incident cases of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) following TB and prevalence of 2160 cases. Asthma prevalence in adults varies from 3.2% to 8.2% (mean 5%); 9976 adults have allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and 13,168 have severe asthma with fungal sensitisation (SAFS). Of the 59,000 estimated HIV-positive patients, 366 develop cryptococcal meningitis; 1149 develop Pneumocystis pneumonia and 1946 develop oesophageal candidiasis, in which oral candidiasis (53%) and dermatophytosis (16%) are common. Since 2008-2010, 113 cases of mycetoma were diagnosed. In conclusion, we estimate that 1,743,507 (12.5%) people in Senegal suffer from a fungal infection, excluding oral candidiasis, fungal keratitis, invasive candidiasis or aspergillosis. Diagnostic and treatment deficiencies should be rectified to allow epidemiological studies. PMID:26449509

  1. The population biology of fungal invasions.

    PubMed

    Gladieux, P; Feurtey, A; Hood, M E; Snirc, A; Clavel, J; Dutech, C; Roy, M; Giraud, T

    2015-05-01

    Fungal invasions are increasingly recognized as a significant component of global changes, threatening ecosystem health and damaging food production. Invasive fungi also provide excellent models to evaluate the generality of results based on other eukaryotes. We first consider here the reasons why fungal invasions have long been overlooked: they tend to be inconspicuous, and inappropriate methods have been used for species recognition. We then review the information available on the patterns and mechanisms of fungal invasions. We examine the biological features underlying invasion success of certain fungal species. We review population structure analyses, revealing native source populations and strengths of bottlenecks. We highlight the documented ecological and evolutionary changes in invaded regions, including adaptation to temperature, increased virulence, hybridization, shifts to clonality and association with novel hosts. We discuss how the huge census size of most fungi allows adaptation even in bottlenecked, clonal invaders. We also present new analyses of the invasion of the anther-smut pathogen on white campion in North America, as a case study illustrating how an accurate knowledge of species limits and phylogeography of fungal populations can be used to decipher the origin of invasions. This case study shows that successful invasions can occur even when life history traits are particularly unfavourable to long-distance dispersal and even with a strong bottleneck. We conclude that fungal invasions are valuable models to contribute to our view of biological invasions, in particular by providing insights into the traits as well as ecological and evolutionary processes allowing successful introductions. PMID:25469955

  2. Maize EMBRYO SAC family peptides interact differentially with pollen tubes and fungal cells

    PubMed Central

    Woriedh, Mayada; Merkl, Rainer; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    EMBRYO SAC1-4 (ES1-4) peptides belong to the defensin subgroup of cysteine-rich peptides known to mediate pollen tube burst in Zea mays (maize). ES1-4 are reported here to also be capable of inhibiting germination and growth of the maize fungal pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Ustilago maydis at higher concentrations. Dividing the peptides into smaller pieces showed that a 15-amino-acid peptide located in a highly variable loop region lacking similarity to other defensins or defensin-like peptides binds to maize pollen tube surfaces, causing swelling prior to burst. This peptide fragment and a second conserved neighbouring fragment showed suppression of fungal germination and growth. The two peptides caused swelling of fungal cells, production of reactive oxygen species, and finally the formation of big vacuoles prior to burst at high peptide concentration. Furthermore, peptide fragments were found to bind differently to fungal cells. In necrotrophic F. graminearum, a peptide fragment named ES-d bound only at cell surfaces whereas the peptide ES-c bound at cell surfaces and also accumulated inside cells. Conversely, in biotrophic U. maydis, both peptide fragments accumulated inside cells, but, if applied at higher concentration, ES-c but not ES-d accumulated mainly in vacuoles. Mapping of peptide interaction sites identified amino acids differing in pollen tube burst and fungal response reactions. In summary, these findings indicate that residues targeting pollen tube burst in maize are specific to the ES family, while residues targeting fungal growth are conserved within defensins and defensin-like peptides. PMID:26071527

  3. Toxic fungal metabolites in food.

    PubMed

    Watson, D H

    1985-01-01

    About 100 fungal metabolites may cause cancer, embryological defects, or other histopathological effects in mammals. They are produced by a wide variety of fungi. Few of these metabolites have significant acute toxicity. With the exception of aflatoxin B1 and sterigmatocystin, there is no conclusive evidence that any of them is carcinogenic. However, several of the compounds are mutagenic. Cytochalasin D and T-2 toxin are probably teratogenic. A wide variety of other histopathological effects have been shown. Liver damage has been most frequently reported. In almost all cases the molecular bases of these effects have not been extensively investigated. Although much is known about the routes by which some of the compounds are synthesized in vivo, nothing is known about control at the molecular level of these biosynthetic routes. Little is known about the biological degradation of these compounds or about the levels and incidences of them in food and animal feed. Future work in all these areas will depend on the further development of sensitive assay methods that are applicable to their measurement in food, in animal feed, and in animal tissues and body fluids and on the application of these methods to define exposure to these compounds in the diet. PMID:3902369

  4. Transformation of Ferulic Acid to Vanillin Using a Fed-Batch SolidLiquid Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactor

    E-print Network

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    /products. This enhancement strategy might reasonably be expected in the production of other flavor and fragrance compounds of the most widely used flavor chemicals in the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries

  5. Comparison of the Yeast Proteome to Other Fungal Genomes to Find Core Fungal Genes

    E-print Network

    Baillie, David

    for an organism are also likely to be found in the conserved set of genes (Decottignies et al. 2003). StudiesComparison of the Yeast Proteome to Other Fungal Genomes to Find Core Fungal Genes Tom Hsiang,1 the hypothesis that fungi have a set of core genes that are not found in other organisms, as these genes may

  6. Etiological Analysis of Fungal Keratitis and Rapid Identification of Predominant Fungal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    He, Dan; Hao, Jilong; Gao, Song; Wan, Xue; Wang, Wanting; Shan, Qiushi; Wang, Li

    2016-02-01

    Fungal keratitis is a worldwide-distributed refractory and potentially blinding ocular infection caused by various fungi. It is necessary to investigate the etiological and epidemiological characteristics of this disease and establish a rapid and specific pathogenic identification method. Here, we isolated and identified fungal pathogens of 275 patients with presumed fungal keratitis from Jilin Province, China, and conducted statistical analyses of epidemiological information. The positive rate of fungal culture was 72.0 %. Fusarium sp. was the most common genus among 210 fungal isolates. The predominant species were Fusarium solani, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Candida glabrata, which accounted for over 50 % of the isolated organisms. Corneal trauma and previous use of drugs were the most important predisposing factors. In addition, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was designed with species-specific primers of the three species that could identify them with amplicons of approximately 330 bp from F. solani, 275 bp from A. fumigatus, and 230 bp from C. glabrata. Additionally, PCR with fungal universal primers and multiplex PCR were performed using DNA prepared by an improved DNA extraction method from corneal scrapings. With this method, fungal pathogens from corneal scrapings could be specifically and rapidly identified within 8 h. The culture-independent rapid identification of corneal scrapings may have great significance for the early diagnosis and treatment of fungal keratitis. PMID:26446032

  7. Association of fungal secondary metabolism and sclerotial biology

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Ana M.; Cary, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal secondary metabolism and morphological development have been shown to be intimately associated at the genetic level. Much of the literature has focused on the co-regulation of secondary metabolite production (e.g., sterigmatocystin and aflatoxin in Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus flavus, respectively) with conidiation or formation of sexual fruiting bodies. However, many of these genetic links also control sclerotial production. Sclerotia are resistant structures produced by a number of fungal genera. They also represent the principal source of primary inoculum for some phytopathogenic fungi. In nature, higher plants often concentrate secondary metabolites in reproductive structures as a means of defense against herbivores and insects. By analogy, fungi also sequester a number of secondary metabolites in sclerotia that act as a chemical defense system against fungivorous predators. These include antiinsectant compounds such as tetramic acids, indole diterpenoids, pyridones, and diketopiperazines. This chapter will focus on the molecular mechanisms governing production of secondary metabolites and the role they play in sclerotial development and fungal ecology, with particular emphasis on Aspergillus species. The global regulatory proteins VeA and LaeA, components of the velvet nuclear protein complex, serve as virulence factors and control both development and secondary metabolite production in many Aspergillus species. We will discuss a number of VeA- and LaeA-regulated secondary metabolic gene clusters in A. flavus that are postulated to be involved in sclerotial morphogenesis and chemical defense. The presence of multiple regulatory factors that control secondary metabolism and sclerotial formation suggests that fungi have evolved these complex regulatory mechanisms as a means to rapidly adapt chemical responses to protect sclerotia from predators, competitors and other environmental stressors. PMID:25762985

  8. An endophytic fungus isolated from finger millet (Eleusine coracana) produces anti-fungal natural products.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Walaa K; Schwan, Adrian; Davidson, Jeffrey; Strange, Philip; Liu, Huaizhi; Zhou, Ting; Auzanneau, France-Isabelle; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-01-01

    Finger millet is an ancient African cereal crop, domesticated 7000 years ago in Ethiopia, reaching India at 3000 BC. Finger millet is reported to be resistant to various fungal pathogens including Fusarium sp. We hypothesized that finger millet may host beneficial endophytes (plant-colonizing microbes) that contribute to the antifungal activity. Here we report the first isolation of endophyte(s) from finger millet. Five distinct fungal species were isolated from roots and predicted taxonomically based on 18S rDNA sequencing. Extracts from three putative endophytes inhibited growth of F. graminearum and three other pathogenic Fusarium species. The most potent anti-Fusarium strain (WF4, predicted to be a Phoma sp.) was confirmed to behave as an endophyte using pathogenicity and confocal microscopy experiments. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the WF4 extract identified four anti-fungal compounds, viridicatol, tenuazonic acid, alternariol, and alternariol monomethyl ether. All the purified compounds caused dramatic breakage of F. graminearum hyphae in vitro. These compounds have not previously been reported to have anti-Fusarium activity. None of the compounds, except for tenuazonic acid, have previously been reported to be produced by Phoma. We conclude that the ancient, disease-tolerant crop, finger millet, is a novel source of endophytic anti-fungal natural products. This paper suggests the value of the crops grown by subsistence farmers as sources of endophytes and their natural products. Application of these natural chemicals to solve real world problems will require further validation. PMID:26539183

  9. An endophytic fungus isolated from finger millet (Eleusine coracana) produces anti-fungal natural products

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Walaa K.; Schwan, Adrian; Davidson, Jeffrey; Strange, Philip; Liu, Huaizhi; Zhou, Ting; Auzanneau, France-Isabelle; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    Finger millet is an ancient African cereal crop, domesticated 7000 years ago in Ethiopia, reaching India at 3000 BC. Finger millet is reported to be resistant to various fungal pathogens including Fusarium sp. We hypothesized that finger millet may host beneficial endophytes (plant-colonizing microbes) that contribute to the antifungal activity. Here we report the first isolation of endophyte(s) from finger millet. Five distinct fungal species were isolated from roots and predicted taxonomically based on 18S rDNA sequencing. Extracts from three putative endophytes inhibited growth of F. graminearum and three other pathogenic Fusarium species. The most potent anti-Fusarium strain (WF4, predicted to be a Phoma sp.) was confirmed to behave as an endophyte using pathogenicity and confocal microscopy experiments. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the WF4 extract identified four anti-fungal compounds, viridicatol, tenuazonic acid, alternariol, and alternariol monomethyl ether. All the purified compounds caused dramatic breakage of F. graminearum hyphae in vitro. These compounds have not previously been reported to have anti-Fusarium activity. None of the compounds, except for tenuazonic acid, have previously been reported to be produced by Phoma. We conclude that the ancient, disease-tolerant crop, finger millet, is a novel source of endophytic anti-fungal natural products. This paper suggests the value of the crops grown by subsistence farmers as sources of endophytes and their natural products. Application of these natural chemicals to solve real world problems will require further validation. PMID:26539183

  10. The Effect of Silver Nanoparticles on Seasonal Change in Arctic Tundra Bacterial and Fungal Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niraj; Palmer, Gerald R.; Shah, Vishal; Walker, Virginia K.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of silver nanoparticles (NPs) and microparticles (MPs) on bacterial and fungal assemblages was studied in soils collected from a low arctic site. Two different concentrations (0.066% and 6.6%) of Ag NPs and Ag MPs were tested in microcosms that were exposed to temperatures mimicking a winter to summer transition. Toxicity was monitored by differential respiration, phospholipid fatty acid analysis, polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing. Notwithstanding the effect of Ag MPs, nanosilver had an obvious, additional impact on the microbial community, underscoring the importance of particle size in toxicity. This impact was evidenced by levels of differential respiration in 0.066% Ag NP-treated soil that were only half that of control soils, a decrease in signature bacterial fatty acids, and changes in both richness and evenness in bacterial and fungal DNA sequence assemblages. Prominent after Ag NP-treatment were Hypocreales fungi, which increased to 70%, from only 1% of fungal sequences under control conditions. Genera within this Order known for their antioxidant properties (Cordyceps/Isaria) dominated the fungal assemblage after NP addition. In contrast, sequences attributed to the nitrogen-fixing Rhizobiales bacteria appeared vulnerable to Ag NP-mediated toxicity. This combination of physiological, biochemical and molecular studies clearly demonstrate that Ag NPs can severely disrupt the natural seasonal progression of tundra assemblages. PMID:24926877

  11. Pathogenic Roles for Fungal Melanins

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Eric S.

    2000-01-01

    Melanins represent virulence factors for several pathogenic fungi; the number of examples is growing. Thus, albino mutants of several genera (in one case, mutated precisely in the melanizing enzyme) exhibit decreased virulence in mice. We consider the phenomenon in relation to known chemical properties of melanin, beginning with biosynthesis from ortho-hydroquinone precursors which, when oxidized enzymatically to quinones, polymerize spontaneously to melanin. It follows that melanizing intermediates are cross-linking reagents; melanization stabilizes the external cell wall against hydrolysis and is thought to determine semipermeability in the osmotic ram (the appressorium) of certain plant pathogens. Polymeric melanins undergo reversible oxidation-reduction reactions between cell wall-penetrating quinone and hydroquinone oxidation states and thus represent polymeric redox buffers; using strong oxidants, it is possible to titrate the melanin on living cells and thereby demonstrate protection conferred by melanin in several species. The amount of buffering per cell approximately neutralizes the amount of oxidant generated by a single macrophage. Moreover, the intermediate oxidation state, the semiquinone, is a very stable free radical and is thought to trap unpaired electrons. We have suggested that the oxidation state of external melanin may be regulated by external Fe(II). An independent hypothesis holds that in Cryptococcus neoformans, an important function of the melanizing enzyme (apart from melanization) is the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III), thereby forestalling generation of the harmful hydroxyl radical from H2O2. Thus, problems in fungal pathogenesis have led to evolving hypotheses regarding melanin functioning. PMID:11023965

  12. Fungal spores as potential ice nuclei in fog/cloud water and snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Heidi; Goncalves, Fabio L. T.; Schueller, Elisabeth; Puxbaum, Hans

    2010-05-01

    INTRODUCTION: In discussions about climate change and precipitation frequency biological ice nucleation has become an issue. While bacterial ice nucleation (IN) is already well characterized and even utilized in industrial processes such as the production of artificial snow or to improve freezing processes in food industry, less is known about the IN potential of fungal spores which are also ubiquitous in the atmosphere. A recent study performed at a mountain top in the Rocky Mountains suggests that fungal spores and/or pollen might play a role in increased IN abundance during periods of cloud cover (Bowers et al. 2009). In the present work concentrations of fungal spores in fog/cloud water and snow were determined. EXPERIMENTAL: Fog samples were taken with an active fog sampler in 2008 in a traffic dominated area and in a national park in São Paulo, Brazil. The number concentrations of fungal spores were determined by microscopic by direct enumeration by epifluorescence microscopy after staining with SYBR Gold nucleic acid gel stain (Bauer et al. 2008). RESULTS: In the fog water collected in the polluted area at a junction of two highly frequented highways around 22,000 fungal spores mL-1 were counted. Fog in the national park contained 35,000 spores mL-1. These results were compared with cloud water and snow samples from Mt. Rax, situated at the eastern rim of the Austrian Alps. Clouds contained on average 5,900 fungal spores mL-1 cloud water (1,300 - 11,000) or 2,200 spores m-3 (304 - 5,000). In freshly fallen snow spore concentrations were lower than in cloud water, around 1,000 fungal spores mL-1 were counted (Bauer et al. 2002). In both sets of samples representatives of the ice nucleating genus Fusarium could be observed. REFERENCES: Bauer, H., Kasper-Giebl, A., Löflund, M., Giebl, H., Hitzenberger, R., Zibuschka, F., Puxbaum, H. (2002). The contribution of bacteria and fungal spores to the organic carbon content of cloud water, precipitation and aerosols. Atmos. Res. 64, 109-119. Bauer, H., Schueller, E., Weinke, G. Berger, A., Hitzenberger, R., Marr, I.L., Puxbaum, H. (2008). Significant contributions of fungal spores to the organic carbon and to the aerosol mass balance of the urban atmospheric aerosol. Atmos. Environ. 42, 5542-5549. Bowers, R.M., Lauber, C.L., Wiedinmyer, C., Hamady, M., Hallar, A.G., Fall, R., Knight, R., Fierer, N. (2009). Characterization of airborne microbial communities at a high-elevation site and their potential to act as atmospheric ice nuclei. Appl. Environ. Microbiol: 75, 5121-5130.

  13. Burden of serious fungal infections in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Faini, Diana; Maokola, Werner; Furrer, Hansjakob; Hatz, Christoph; Battegay, Manuel; Tanner, Marcel; Denning, David W; Letang, Emilio

    2015-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of fungal infections in Tanzania remains unknown. We assessed the annual burden in the general population and among populations at risk. Data were extracted from 2012 reports of the Tanzanian AIDS program, WHO, reports, Tanzanian census, and from a comprehensive PubMed search. We used modelling and HIV data to estimate the burdens of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP), cryptococcal meningitis (CM) and candidiasis. Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and tuberculosis data were used to estimate the burden of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA). Burdens of candidaemia and Candida peritonitis were derived from critical care and/or cancer patients' data. In 2012, Tanzania's population was 43.6 million (mainland) with 1 500 000 people reported to be HIV-infected. Estimated burden of fungal infections was: 4412 CM, 9600 PCP, 81 051 and 88 509 oral and oesophageal candidiasis cases respectively. There were 10 437 estimated posttuberculosis CPA cases, whereas candidaemia and Candida peritonitis cases were 2181 and 327 respectively. No reliable data exist on blastomycosis, mucormycosis or fungal keratitis. Over 3% of Tanzanians suffer from serious fungal infections annually, mostly related to HIV. Cryptococcosis and PCP are major causes of mycoses-related deaths. National surveillance of fungal infections is urgently needed. PMID:26449510

  14. Fungal biosynthesis of the bibenzoquinone oosporein to evade insect immunity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Peng; Shang, Yanfang; Cen, Kai; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-09-01

    Quinones are widely distributed in nature and exhibit diverse biological or pharmacological activities; however, their biosynthetic machineries are largely unknown. The bibenzoquinone oosporein was first identified from the ascomycete insect pathogen Beauveria bassiana>50 y ago. The toxin can also be produced by different plant pathogenic and endophytic fungi with an array of biological activities. Here, we report the oosporein biosynthetic machinery in fungi, a polyketide synthase (PKS) pathway including seven genes for quinone biosynthesis. The PKS oosporein synthase 1 (OpS1) produces orsellinic acid that is hydroxylated to benzenetriol by the hydroxylase OpS4. The intermediate is oxidized either nonenzymatically to 5,5'-dideoxy-oosporein or enzymatically to benzenetetrol by the putative dioxygenase OpS7. The latter is further dimerized to oosporein by the catalase OpS5. The transcription factor OpS3 regulates intrapathway gene expression. Insect bioassays revealed that oosporein is required for fungal virulence and acts by evading host immunity to facilitate fungal multiplication in insects. These results contribute to the known mechanisms of quinone biosynthesis and the understanding of small molecules deployed by fungi that interact with their hosts. PMID:26305932

  15. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Joan W.; Inamdar, Arati A.

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that “volatoxin” might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties. PMID:26402705

  16. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    PubMed

    Bennett, Joan W; Inamdar, Arati A

    2015-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that "volatoxin" might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties. PMID:26402705

  17. Fungal biosynthesis of the bibenzoquinone oosporein to evade insect immunity

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Peng; Shang, Yanfang; Cen, Kai; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-01-01

    Quinones are widely distributed in nature and exhibit diverse biological or pharmacological activities; however, their biosynthetic machineries are largely unknown. The bibenzoquinone oosporein was first identified from the ascomycete insect pathogen Beauveria bassiana >50 y ago. The toxin can also be produced by different plant pathogenic and endophytic fungi with an array of biological activities. Here, we report the oosporein biosynthetic machinery in fungi, a polyketide synthase (PKS) pathway including seven genes for quinone biosynthesis. The PKS oosporein synthase 1 (OpS1) produces orsellinic acid that is hydroxylated to benzenetriol by the hydroxylase OpS4. The intermediate is oxidized either nonenzymatically to 5,5?-dideoxy-oosporein or enzymatically to benzenetetrol by the putative dioxygenase OpS7. The latter is further dimerized to oosporein by the catalase OpS5. The transcription factor OpS3 regulates intrapathway gene expression. Insect bioassays revealed that oosporein is required for fungal virulence and acts by evading host immunity to facilitate fungal multiplication in insects. These results contribute to the known mechanisms of quinone biosynthesis and the understanding of small molecules deployed by fungi that interact with their hosts. PMID:26305932

  18. Enhancement of commercial antifungal agents by kojic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kojic acid (KA), a natural by-product of fungal fermentation, is a commonly used food and cosmetic additive. We show that KA increases activity of amphotericin B and strobilurin, medical and agricultural antifungal agents, respectively, possibly targeting the fungal antioxidative system. KA shows pr...

  19. Unusual Fungal Infections in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Eswarappa, Mahesh; Varma, P. Vijay; Madhyastha, Rakesh; Reddy, Sujeeth; Gireesh, M. S.; Gurudev, K. C.; Mysorekar, Vijaya V.; Hemanth, Beena

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in renal transplant recipients. The causative agent and the risk factors differ depending on the period after the kidney transplant. Also the incidence varies according to the geographical area. We are reporting three cases of fungal infections in renal transplant recipients. Two of them have etiological agents which are common among immunosuppressed patients, but with an atypical clinical presentation, while one of them is a subcutaneous infection caused by a less frequent dematiaceous fungus, Aureobasidium pullulans. These cases highlight how a high index of clinical suspicion and prompt diagnosis is very much essential for better outcome. The emerging fungal infections and paucity of data regarding their management pose a challenge to the transplant physicians. PMID:25815239

  20. Prospects for the development of fungal vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Deepe, G S

    1997-01-01

    In an era that emphasizes the term "cost-effective," vaccines are the ideal solution to preventing disease at a relatively low cost to society. Much of the previous emphasis has been on childhood scourges such as measles, mumps, rubella, poliomyelitis, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. The concept of vaccines for fungal diseases has had less impact because of the perceived limited problem. However, fungal diseases have become increasingly appreciated as serious medical problems that require recognition and aggressive management. The escalation in the incidence and prevalence of infection has prompted a renewed interest in vaccine development. Herein, I discuss the most recent developments in the search for vaccines to combat fungal infections. Investigators have discovered several inert substances from various fungi that can mediate protection in animal models. The next challenge will be to find the suitable mode of delivery for these immunogens. PMID:9336663

  1. Re-Defining the Subsurface Biosphere: Characterization of Fungal Populations from Energy Limited Deep Marine Subsurface Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, B. K.; Ariza, M.; St. Peter, C.; Hoffman, C.; Edwards, K. J.; Mills, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The detection and characterization of metabolically active fungal populations within the deep marine subsurface will alter current ecosystem models that are limited to bacterial and archaeal populations. Although marine fungi have been studied for over fifty years, a detailed description of fungal populations within the deep subsurface is lacking. Fungi possess metabolic pathways capable of utilizing previously considered non-bioavailable energy reserves. Therefore, metabolically active fungi would occupy a unique niche within subsurface ecosystems, with the potential to provide an organic carbon source for heterotrophic prokaryotic populations not currently being considered in subsurface energy budgets. Sediments from the South Pacific Gyre subsurface, one of the most energy-limited environments on Earth, were collected during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Anaerobic and aerobic sediment slurry cultures using fresh sediment began directly following the completion of the Expedition (December 2010). From these cultures, multiple fungal lineages have been isolated on several media types that vary in carbon concentrations. Physical growth parameters of these subsurface fungal isolates were determined and compared to previously characterized lineages. Additionally, the overall diversity of metabolically active and dormant fungal populations was determined using high throughput sequencing of nucleic acids extracted from in situ cryopreserved South Pacific Gyre sediments. This project provides a robust step in determining the importance and impact of fungal populations within the marine subsurface biosphere.

  2. Invasion of the Central Nervous System by Cryptococcus neoformans Requires a Secreted Fungal Metalloprotease

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Kiem; Tham, Rick; Uhrig, John P.; Thompson, George R.; Na Pombejra, Sarisa; Jamklang, Mantana; Bautos, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus spp. cause life-threatening fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS), predominantly in patients with a compromised immune system. Why Cryptococcus neoformans has this remarkable tropism for the CNS is not clear. Recent research on cerebral pathogenesis of C. neoformans revealed a predominantly transcellular migration of cryptococci across the brain endothelium; however, the identities of key fungal virulence factors that function specifically to invade the CNS remain unresolved. Here we found that a novel, secreted metalloprotease (Mpr1) that we identified in the extracellular proteome of C. neoformans (CnMpr1) is required for establishing fungal disease in the CNS. Mpr1 belongs to a poorly characterized M36 class of fungalysins that are expressed in only some fungal species. A strain of C. neoformans lacking the gene encoding Mpr1 (mpr1?) failed to breach the endothelium in an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier (BBB). A mammalian host infected with the mpr1? null strain demonstrated significant improvement in survival due to a reduced brain fungal burden and lacked the brain pathology commonly associated with cryptococcal disease. The in vivo studies further indicate that Mpr1 is not required for fungal dissemination and Mpr1 likely targets the brain endothelium specifically. Remarkably, the sole expression of CnMPR1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in a robust migration of yeast cells across the brain endothelium, demonstrating Mpr1’s specific activity in breaching the BBB and suggesting that Mpr1 may function independently of the hyaluronic acid-CD44 pathway. This distinct role for Mpr1 may develop into innovative treatment options and facilitate a brain-specific drug delivery platform. PMID:24895304

  3. Expansion of the aspartate [beta]-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family: the first structure of a fungal ortholog

    SciTech Connect

    Arachea, B.T.; Liu, X.; Pavlovsky, A.G.; Viola, R.E.

    2010-08-13

    The enzyme aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) catalyzes a critical transformation that produces the first branch-point intermediate in an essential microbial amino-acid biosynthetic pathway. The first structure of an ASADH isolated from a fungal species (Candida albicans) has been determined as a complex with its pyridine nucleotide cofactor. This enzyme is a functional dimer, with a similar overall fold and domain organization to the structurally characterized bacterial ASADHs. However, there are differences in the secondary-structural elements and in cofactor binding that are likely to cause the lower catalytic efficiency of this fungal enzyme. Alterations in the dimer interface, through deletion of a helical subdomain and replacement of amino acids that participate in a hydrogen-bonding network, interrupt the intersubunit-communication channels required to support an alternating-site catalytic mechanism. The detailed functional information derived from this new structure will allow an assessment of ASADH as a possible target for antifungal drug development.

  4. Water reclamation and value-added animal feed from corn-ethanol stillage by fungal processing.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, M L; Khanal, S K; Pometto, A L; van Leeuwen, J Hans

    2014-01-01

    Rhizopus oligosporus was cultivated on thin stillage from a dry-grind corn ethanol plant. The aim of the research was to develop a process to replace the current energy-intensive flash evaporation and make use of this nutrient-rich stream to create a new co-product in the form of protein-rich biomass. Batch experiments in 5- and 50-L stirred bioreactors showed prolific fungal growth under non-sterile conditions. COD, suspended solids, glycerol, and organic acids removals, critical for in-plant water reuse, reached ca. 80%, 98%, 100% and 100%, respectively, within 5 d of fungal inoculation, enabling effluent recycle as process water. R. oligosporus contains 2% lysine, good levels of other essential amino acids, and 43% crude protein - a highly nutritious livestock feed. Avoiding water evaporation from thin stillage would furthermore save substantial energy inputs on corn ethanol plants. PMID:24269825

  5. Occlusion, carbon dioxide, and fungal skin infections.

    PubMed

    Allen, A M; King, R D

    1978-02-18

    Occlusion of the skin renders it susceptible to acute fungal skin infections (dermatophytosis and candidiasis). Occlusion also raised carbon-dioxide (CO2) tensions at the skin's surface. Comparable CO2 tnesions have a pronounced effect on the morphology and metabolism of dermatophytes in vitro. It is postulated that dermatophyte conida and hyphae produce infective units under conditions of raised CO2 tensions, and that occlusion of the skin produces the concentrations of CO2 required for the conversion. Fungal skin infections might be prevented or controlled by interference with the action of CO2 or by prevention of its accumulation under wet, occlusive clothing. PMID:75398

  6. Fungal Succession and Diversity in Ectomycorrhizal Associations: A Case

    E-print Network

    . Bigg2 Abstract This paper examines fungal succession among ectomycorrhiza-forming fungi by reviewing. Introduction This review paper focuses on fungal succession among ectomycorrhiza-forming fungi. Most

  7. Fungal Pneumonia: A Silent Epidemic Coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever)

    MedlinePLUS

    Fungal pneumonia: a silent epidemic Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) Coccidioidomycosis, a fungal disease called “cocci” or “valley fever,” is a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia in the southwestern US. A costly problem • In ...

  8. MycoCosm, an Integrated Fungal Genomics Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Shabalov, Igor; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-16

    MycoCosm is a web-based interactive fungal genomics resource, which was first released in March 2010, in response to an urgent call from the fungal community for integration of all fungal genomes and analytical tools in one place (Pan-fungal data resources meeting, Feb 21-22, 2010, Alexandria, VA). MycoCosm integrates genomics data and analysis tools to navigate through over 100 fungal genomes sequenced at JGI and elsewhere. This resource allows users to explore fungal genomes in the context of both genome-centric analysis and comparative genomics, and promotes user community participation in data submission, annotation and analysis. MycoCosm has over 4500 unique visitors/month or 35000+ visitors/year as well as hundreds of registered users contributing their data and expertise to this resource. Its scalable architecture allows significant expansion of the data expected from JGI Fungal Genomics Program, its users, and integration with external resources used by fungal community.

  9. Fungal Diversity Pseudocercospora flavomarginata sp. nov., from Eucalyptus

    E-print Network

    Fungal Diversity Pseudocercospora flavomarginata sp. nov., from Eucalyptus leaves in Thailand Gavin). Pseudocercospora flavomarginata sp. nov. from Eucalyptus leaves in Thailand. Fungal Diversity 22: 71 60 Mycosphaerella species have been linked to leaf diseases on Eucalyptus species, collectively known

  10. Azole fungicides - understanding resistance mechanisms in agricultural fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Price, Claire L; Parker, Josie E; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2015-08-01

    Plant fungal pathogens can have devastating effects on a wide range of crops, including cereals and fruit (such as wheat and grapes), causing losses in crop yield, which are costly to the agricultural economy and threaten food security. Azole antifungals are the treatment of choice; however, resistance has arisen against these compounds, which could lead to devastating consequences. Therefore, it is important to understand how these fungicides are used and how the resistance arises in order to tackle the problem fully. Here, we give an overview of the problem and discuss the mechanisms that mediate azole resistance in agriculture (point mutations in the CYP51 amino acid sequence, overexpression of the CYP51 enzyme and overexpression of genes encoding efflux pump proteins). © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25914201

  11. Phenolic acids and antioxidant activities in husk of different Thai rice varieties.

    PubMed

    Butsat, S; Siriamornpun, S

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the free and bound phenolic acids as well as their antioxidant activities in husk of 12 Thai rice varieties consisting of pigmented rice and normal rice. The pigmented rice husk gave higher free total phenolic contents than normal rice husk. However, there was no significant difference in bound total phenolic contents between pigmented rice and normal rice husks. Ferulic and p-coumaric acids were the major phenolic acids in the free fraction of pigmented rice husks, whereas vanillic acid was the dominant phenolic acid in the free fraction of normal rice husks. On the other hand, p-coumaric acid was highly found in bound form of both pigmented and normal rice husks. The antioxidant activity of husk extracts was positively correlated with the total free phenolics content and individual of phenolic acids especially ferulic acid. On the basis of this study, it is suggested that the rice husk could be a potential phenolic acid source and may therefore offer an effective source of natural antioxidant. Our findings provide valuable information on phenolic acids composition and antioxidant activity of husk for further food application. PMID:21339150

  12. Enhancing charge storage of conjugated polymer electrodes with phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Michal; R?bi?, Tomasz; Inganäs, Olle

    2016-01-01

    We here present studies of electrochemical doping of poly(1-aminoanthraquinone) (PAAQ) films with three structurally different phenolic acids. The examined phenolic acids (sinapic, ferulic and syringic acid) were selected due to their resemblance to redox active groups, which can be found in lignin. The outstanding electrochemical stability of PAAQ films synthesized for this work enabled extensive cycling of phenolic acid-doped PAAQ films. Potentiodynamic and charge-discharge studies revealed that phenolic acid-doped PAAQ films exhibited enhanced capacitance in comparison to undoped PAAQ films, together with appearance of redox activity characteristics specific for each dopant. Electrochemical kinetic studies performed on microelectrodes affirmed the fast electron transfer for hydroquinone-to-quinone reactions with these phenolic compounds. These results imply the potential application of phenolic acids in cheap and degradable energy storage devices.

  13. Interaction of milk whey protein with common phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Yu, Dandan; Sun, Jing; Guo, Huiyuan; Ding, Qingbo; Liu, Ruihai; Ren, Fazheng

    2014-01-01

    Phenolics-rich foods such as fruit juices and coffee are often consumed with milk. In this study, the interactions of ?-lactalbumin and ?-lactoglobulin with the phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and coumalic acid) were examined. Fluorescence, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies were used to analyze the binding modes, binding constants, and the effects of complexation on the conformation of whey protein. The results showed that binding constants of each whey protein-phenolic acid interaction ranged from 4 × 105 to 7 × 106 M-n and the number of binding sites n ranged from 1.28 ± 0.13 to 1.54 ± 0.34. Because of these interactions, the conformation of whey protein was altered, with a significant reduction in the amount of ?-helix and an increase in the amounts of ?-sheet and turn structures.

  14. PLPA4380 Fungal Genetics and Genomics B. Gillian Turgeon

    E-print Network

    Chen, Tsuhan

    PLPA4380 Fungal Genetics and Genomics B. Gillian Turgeon Spring 2016 Date Topic Wed Jan 27 Feb 22 Quiz Wed Feb 24 Sequenced fungal genomes: JGI Mycocosm tools Characteristics/ typical features/ comparative genomics/annotation Fri Feb 26 Sequenced fungal genomes: JGI Mycocosm tools Characteristics

  15. Overview of Fungal Infections - The Italian Experience.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Matteo; Righi, Elda

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of severe fungal infections has increased worldwide and represents a serious threat, especially among immunocompromised and critically ill patients. Most common pulmonary fungal infections include aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. Among nosocomial bloodstream infections, Candida spp. is the most common isolated fungus. Mortality rates up to 60% in critically ill patients with Candida infections and 90% in hematological patients with invasive aspergillosis are reported. Furthermore, fungal infections contribute to high morbidity and prolonged hospitalizations. Since standard cultural methods can show low sensitivity or provide delayed responses, new non-culture-dependent methods such as galactomannan ?-D-glucan are now available. Novel antifungal compounds (e.g., amphotericin B lipid formulations, last-generation azoles, and echinocandins) have been introduced in the recent years. Nevertheless, despite new advances the appropriate use of diagnostic assays along with a thorough therapeutic management remain the key to ensure an early appropriate targeted treatment that represents the crucial factor to attain a successful approach to severe fungal infections. PMID:26398544

  16. Fungal entomopathogens: new insights on their ecology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One important mechanism for insect pest control is the use of fungal entomopathogens. Even though these organisms have been studied for more than 100 years, their effective use in the field remains elusive. Recently, however, it has been discovered that many of these entomopathogenic fungi play addi...

  17. Fungal infections of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, P Anitha

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections in humans occur as a result of defects in the immune system. An increasing emergence in oral Candidal and non-Candidal fungal infections is evident in the past decade owing to the rise in the immunodeficient and immunocompromised population globally. Oral Candidal infection usually involves a compromised host and the compromise may be local or systemic. Local compromising factors include decreased salivation, poor oral hygiene, wearing dentures among others while systemic factors include diabetes mellitus, nutritional deficiency, HIV infection/AIDS and others. Oral candidiasis is generally a localized infection and rarely appears as a systemic fungal disease whereas oral non-Candidal fungal infections are usually signs of disseminated disease. Some of the non-Candidal fungi that were once considered exotic and geographically restricted are now seen worldwide, beyond their natural habitat, probably attributed to globalization and travels. Currently infections from these fungi are more prevalent than before and they may present either as primary oral lesions or as oral manifestations of systemic mycoses. This review discusses the various predisposing factors, clinical presentations, clinical differential diagnosis, diagnosis and management of oral candidiasis, as well as briefly highlights upon a few of the more exotic non-Candidal fungi that infect the oral mucosa. PMID:23422613

  18. The Amsterdam declaration on fungal nomenclature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Amsterdam Declaration on Fungal Nomenclature was developed at a international symposium convened in Amsterdam on 19-20 April 2011 under the auspices of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF). The purpose of the symposium was to address the issue of whether or how the curren...

  19. Grass fungal endophytes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Craven, Kelly

    2015-03-10

    The invention provides isolated fungal endophytes and synthetic combinations thereof with host grass plants. Methods for inoculating grass plant with the endophytes, for propagating the grass-endophyte combinations, and for producing feeds and biofuels from grass-endophyte combinations are also provided.

  20. ASSESSING ALLERGENICITY OF INDOOR AIR FUNGAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing Allergenicity of Indoor Air Fungal Contaminants
    M D W Ward1, M E Viana2, N Haykal-Coates1, L B Copeland1, S H Gavett1, and MJ K Selgrade1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC, USA. 2NCSU, CVM, Raleigh, NC, USA.
    Rationale: The indoor environment has increased in impor...

  1. How to describe a new fungal species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The formal and informal requirements for the publication of descriptions of new fungal species are discussed. This involves following the rules of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature as well as meeting the standards set by the editorial board of the journals in which these descriptions ...

  2. Standard methods for fungal brood disease research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chalkbrood and stonebrood are two fungal diseases associated with honey bee brood. Chalkbrood, caused by Ascosphaera apis, is a common and widespread disease that can result in severe reduction of emerging worker bees and thus overall colony productivity. Stonebrood is caused by Aspergillus spp. tha...

  3. Fungal infections of the folds (intertriginous areas).

    PubMed

    Metin, Ahmet; Dilek, Nursel; Demirseven, Duriye Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections are widespread, regardless of age and gender, in populations all around the world and may affect the skin and skin appendages. Although there are thousands of fungal infections from various genera and families in nature, those that are pathogenic for humans and nesting in skin folds are limited in number. The prevalence and distribution of these fungi vary according to the patients and certain environmental factors. Because the areas including the lids, external auditory canal, behind the ears, navel, inguinal region, and axillae, also called flexures, are underventilated and moist areas exposed to friction, they are especially sensitive to fungal infections. Fungi can both directly invade the skin, leading to infections, and indirectly stimulate immune mechanisms due to tissue interaction and their antigenic character and contribute to the development or exacerbation of secondary bacterial infections, seborrheic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. Superficial fungal infections can be classified and studied as dermatophyte infections, candidal infections, Malassezia infections, and other superficial infections independently from the involved skin fold areas. PMID:26051058

  4. Other fungal diseases of chickpea and lentil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are about 20 fungal diseases of chickpea and lentil that have very little information available. These diseases may not cause significant damage or may cause damage at specific and limited locales. Examples of these diseases include Cylindrosporium leaf spot and stem canker, Ozonium wilt and...

  5. Plant Fungal Pathogens: Methods and Protocols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the course of evolution, fungi have adapted to occupy specific niches, from symbiotically inhabiting the flora of the intestinal tract of mammals to saprophytic growth on leaf litter resting on the forest floor. In plant Fungal Pathogens: Methods and Protocols, expert researchers in the field ...

  6. Fungal Bioconversion of Lignocellulosic Residues; Opportunities & Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dashtban, Mehdi; Schraft, Heidi; Qin, Wensheng

    2009-01-01

    The development of alternative energy technology is critically important because of the rising prices of crude oil, security issues regarding the oil supply, and environmental issues such as global warming and air pollution. Bioconversion of biomass has significant advantages over other alternative energy strategies because biomass is the most abundant and also the most renewable biomaterial on our planet. Bioconversion of lignocellulosic residues is initiated primarily by microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria which are capable of degrading lignocellulolytic materials. Fungi such as Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger produce large amounts of extracellular cellulolytic enzymes, whereas bacterial and a few anaerobic fungal strains mostly produce cellulolytic enzymes in a complex called cellulosome, which is associated with the cell wall. In filamentous fungi, cellulolytic enzymes including endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases (exoglucanases) and ?-glucosidases work efficiently on cellulolytic residues in a synergistic manner. In addition to cellulolytic/hemicellulolytic activities, higher fungi such as basidiomycetes (e.g. Phanerochaete chrysosporium) have unique oxidative systems which together with ligninolytic enzymes are responsible for lignocellulose degradation. This review gives an overview of different fungal lignocellulolytic enzymatic systems including extracellular and cellulosome-associated in aerobic and anaerobic fungi, respectively. In addition, oxidative lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms of higher fungi are discussed. Moreover, this paper reviews the current status of the technology for bioconversion of biomass by fungi, with focus on mutagenesis, co-culturing and heterologous gene expression attempts to improve fungal lignocellulolytic activities to create robust fungal strains. PMID:19774110

  7. SINAPATE DEHYDRODIMERS AND SINAPALE-FERULATE HETERODIMERS IN CEREAL DIETARY FIBER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two 8 8-coupled sinapic acid dehydrodimers have been identified as saponification products from different insoluble and soluble cereal grain dietary fibers. The two 8-8-isomers were authenticated by comparison of their GLC retention times and mass spectra with authentic dehydrodimers synthesized fro...

  8. The specific role of fungal community structure on soil aggregation and carbon sequestration: results from long-term field study in a paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Rajasekaran; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is a crucial soil property that affects soil biota, biogeochemical processes and C sequestration. The relationship between soil aggregate stability and soil C cycling is well known but the influence of specific fungal community structure on this relationship is largely unknown in paddy soils. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term fertilisation (mineral fertiliser-MIN; farmyard manure-FYM; groundnut oil cake-GOC) effects on soil fungal community shifts associated with soil aggregates under rice-monoculture (RRR) and rice-legume-rice (RLR) systems. Fungal and bacterial communities were characterized using phospholipid fatty acids, and glucosamine and muramic acid were used as biomarkers for fungal and bacterial residues, respectively. Microbial biomass C and N, fungal biomass and residues were significantly higher in the organic fertiliser treatments than in the MIN treatment, for all aggregate sizes under both crop rotation systems. In general, fungal/bacterial biomass ratio and fungal residue C/bacterial residue C ratio were significantly higher in macroaggregate fractions (> 2000 and 250-2000 ?m) than in microaggregate fractions (53-250 and <53 ?m). In both crop rotation systems, the long-term application of FYM and GOC led to increased accumulation of saprotrophic fungi (SF) in aggregate fractions > 2000 ?m. In contrast, we found that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was surprisingly higher in aggregate fractions > 2000 ?m than in aggregate fraction 250-2000 ?m under MIN treatment. The RLR system showed significantly higher AMF biomass and fungal residue C/ bacterial residue C ratio in both macroaggregate fractions compared to the RRR system. The strong relationships between SF, AMF and water stable aggregates shows the specific contribution of fungi community on soil aggregate stability. Our results highlight the fact that changes within fungal community structure play an important role in shaping the soil aggregate stability and C sequestration in tropical agricultural ecosystems.

  9. In vitro anti-leishmanial and anti-fungal effects of new SbIII carboxylates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ring opening of phthalic anhydride has been carried out in acetic acid with glycine, ?-alanine, L-phenylalanine, and 4-aminobenzoic acid to yield, respectively, 2-{[(carboxymethyl)amino]carbonyl}benzoic acid (I), 2-{[(2-carboxyethyl)amino]carbonyl}benzoic acid (II), 2-{[(1-carboxy-2-phenylethyl)amino]carbonyl}benzoic acid (III), and 2-[(4-carboxyanilino)carbonyl]benzoic acid (IV). Compounds I-IV have been employed as ligands for Sb(III) center (complexes V-VIII) in aqueous medium. FTIR and 1H NMR spectra proved the deprotonation of carboxylic protons and coordination of imine group and thereby tridentate behaviour of the ligands as chelates. Elemental, MS, and TGA analytic data confirmed the structural hypothesis based on spectroscopic results. All the compounds have been assayed in vitro for anti-leishmanial and anti-fungal activities against five leishmanial strains L. major (JISH118), L. major (MHOM/PK/88/DESTO), L. tropica (K27), L. infantum (LEM3437), L. mex mex (LV4), and L. donovani (H43); and Aspergillus Flavus, Aspergillus Fumigants, Aspergillus Niger, and Fusarium Solani. Compound VII exhibited good anti-leishmanial as well as anti-fungal impacts comparable to reference drugs.

  10. Discovering Functions of Unannotated Genes from a Transcriptome Survey of Wild Fungal Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Christopher E.; Kowbel, David; Glass, N. Louise; Taylor, John W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most fungal genomes are poorly annotated, and many fungal traits of industrial and biomedical relevance are not well suited to classical genetic screens. Assigning genes to phenotypes on a genomic scale thus remains an urgent need in the field. We developed an approach to infer gene function from expression profiles of wild fungal isolates, and we applied our strategy to the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Using transcriptome measurements in 70 strains from two well-defined clades of this microbe, we first identified 2,247 cases in which the expression of an unannotated gene rose and fell across N. crassa strains in parallel with the expression of well-characterized genes. We then used image analysis of hyphal morphologies, quantitative growth assays, and expression profiling to test the functions of four genes predicted from our population analyses. The results revealed two factors that influenced regulation of metabolism of nonpreferred carbon and nitrogen sources, a gene that governed hyphal architecture, and a gene that mediated amino acid starvation resistance. These findings validate the power of our population-transcriptomic approach for inference of novel gene function, and we suggest that this strategy will be of broad utility for genome-scale annotation in many fungal systems. PMID:24692637

  11. Cloning and relational analysis of 15 novel fungal endoglucanases from family 12 glycosyl hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Fowler, Timothy; Phillips, Jay; van der Kley, Pim; van Solingen, Piet; Dankmeyer, Lydia; Power, Scott D

    2002-05-01

    Cellulases belong to the large family of glycosyl hydrolases (GHs) and are produced by a variety of bacteria and fungi. These extracellular enzymes act as endoglucanases (EGs), cellobiohydrolases or beta-glucosidases. In this paper, we describe molecular screening for EGs from the GH family 12. Using three homologous sequence boxes deduced from five previously known members of the family, we analysed 22 cellulase-producing fungal strains obtained from a diverse area of the fungal kingdom. Polymerase chain reactions using degenerate primers designed to the homologous protein boxes were used to identify the family 12 homologues. Several fungi showed the presence of multiple versions of the gene, while amino acid sequence analysis showed diversity in 15 novel members of the family, ranging from 26% to 96% similarity. Our sequence analysis shows that the phylogenetic tree of family 12 EGs can be divided into four subfamilies: 12-1 (fungal group I), 12-2 (fungal group II), 12-3 ( Streptomyces group in which Rhodothermus marinus fits) and 12-4 ( Thermophiles group). Erwinia carotovora may form a new subgroup. PMID:12073090

  12. A solid state fungal fermentation-based strategy for the hydrolysis of wheat straw?

    PubMed Central

    Pensupa, Nattha; Jin, Meng; Kokolski, Matt; Archer, David B.; Du, Chenyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a solid-state fungal fermentation-based pre-treatment strategy to convert wheat straw into a fermentable hydrolysate. Aspergillus niger was firstly cultured on wheat straw for production of cellulolytic enzymes and then the wheat straw was hydrolyzed by the enzyme solution into a fermentable hydrolysate. The optimum moisture content and three wheat straw modification methods were explored to improve cellulase production. At a moisture content of 89.5%, 10.2 ± 0.13 U/g cellulase activity was obtained using dilute acid modified wheat straw. The addition of yeast extract (0.5% w/v) and minerals significantly improved the cellulase production, to 24.0 ± 1.76 U/g. The hydrolysis of the fermented wheat straw using the fungal culture filtrate or commercial cellulase Ctec2 was performed, resulting in 4.34 and 3.13 g/L glucose respectively. It indicated that the fungal filtrate harvested from the fungal fermentation of wheat straw contained a more suitable enzyme mixture than the commercial cellulase. PMID:24121367

  13. A solid state fungal fermentation-based strategy for the hydrolysis of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Pensupa, Nattha; Jin, Meng; Kokolski, Matt; Archer, David B; Du, Chenyu

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports a solid-state fungal fermentation-based pre-treatment strategy to convert wheat straw into a fermentable hydrolysate. Aspergillus niger was firstly cultured on wheat straw for production of cellulolytic enzymes and then the wheat straw was hydrolyzed by the enzyme solution into a fermentable hydrolysate. The optimum moisture content and three wheat straw modification methods were explored to improve cellulase production. At a moisture content of 89.5%, 10.2 ± 0.13 U/g cellulase activity was obtained using dilute acid modified wheat straw. The addition of yeast extract (0.5% w/v) and minerals significantly improved the cellulase production, to 24.0 ± 1.76 U/g. The hydrolysis of the fermented wheat straw using the fungal culture filtrate or commercial cellulase Ctec2 was performed, resulting in 4.34 and 3.13 g/L glucose respectively. It indicated that the fungal filtrate harvested from the fungal fermentation of wheat straw contained a more suitable enzyme mixture than the commercial cellulase. PMID:24121367

  14. Cytochemical Labeling for Fungal and Host Components in Plant Tissues Inoculated with Fungal Wilt Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, G. B.; Baayen, R. P.; Chamberland, H.; Simard, M.; Rioux, D.; Charest, P. M.

    2004-08-01

    Antibodies to detect pectin in present investigations attached to distinct fibrils in vessel lumina. In carnation infected with an isolate of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp., labeling of pathogen cells also occurred; in a resistant cultivar (cv.), it was coincident with proximate pectin fibrils and linked to altered fungal walls, which was the opposite in the susceptible cv., indicating that hindrance of pathogen ability to degrade pectin may be related to resistance. Labeling of the fungus in culture was nil, except in media containing pectin, showing that pectin is not native to the pathogen. Labeling of fungal walls for cellulose in elm (inoculated with Ophiostoma novo-ulmi) and carnation also occurred, linked to adsorbed host wall components. The chitin probe often attached to dispersed matter, in vessel lumina, traceable to irregularly labeled fungal cells and host wall degradation products. With an anti-horseradish peroxidase probe, host and fungal walls were equally labeled, and with a glucosidase, differences of labeling between these walls were observed, depending on pH of the test solution. Fungal extracellular matter and filamentous structures, present in fungal walls, predominantly in another elm isolate (Phaeotheca dimorphospora), did not label with any of the probes used. However, in cultures of this fungus, extracellular material labeled, even at a distance from the colony margin, with an anti-fimbriae probe.

  15. Fungal Infections in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asif; El-Charabaty, Elie; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation has always been considered to be the standard therapeutic interventions in patients with end-stage organ failure. In 2008, more than 29,000 organ transplants were performed in US. Survival rates among transplant recipients have greatly improved due to better understanding of transplant biology and more effective immunosuppressive agents. After transplant, the extent of the immune response is influenced by the amount of interleukin 2 (IL-2) being produced by the T-helper cells. Transplant immunosuppressive therapy primarily targets T cell-mediated graft rejection. Calcineurin inhibitor, which includes cyclosporine, pimecrolimus and tacrolimus, impairs calcineurin-induced up-regulation of IL-2 expression, resulting in increased susceptibility to invasive fungal diseases. This immunosuppressive state allows infectious complication, leading to a high mortality rate. Currently, overall mortality due to invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in solid organ transplant recipients ranges between 25% and 80%. The risk of IFI following renal transplant is associated with the dosage of immunosuppressive agents given, environmental factors and post-transplant duration. Most fungal infections occur in the first 6 months after transplant because of the use of numerous immunosuppressors. Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. are the yeasts most frequently isolated, while most frequent filamentous fungi (molds) isolated are Aspergillus spp. The symptoms of systemic fungal infections are non-specific and early detection of fungal infections and proper therapy are important in improving survival and reducing mortality. This article will provide an insight on the risk factors and clinical presentation, compare variation in treatment of IFIs in renal transplant patients, and evaluate the role of prophylactic therapy in this group of patients. We also report the course and management of two renal transplant recipients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital, both of whom developed pulmonary complications secondary to Aspergillus infection. PMID:25883698

  16. Symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' land plants.

    PubMed Central

    Read, D J; Ducket, J G; Francis, R; Ligron, R; Russell, A

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of the current state of knowledge of symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' plants is provided. Three fungal phyla, the Zygomycota, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, are involved in forming these associations, each producing a distinctive suite of structural features in well-defined groups of 'lower' plants. Among the 'lower' plants only mosses and Equisetum appear to lack one or other of these types of association. The salient features of the symbioses produced by each fungal group are described and the relationships between these associations and those formed by the same or related fungi in 'higher' plants are discussed. Particular consideration is given to the question of the extent to which root fungus associations in 'lower' plants are analogous to 'mycorrhizas' of 'higher' plants and the need for analysis of the functional attributes of these symbioses is stressed. Zygomycetous fungi colonize a wide range of extant lower land plants (hornworts, many hepatics, lycopods, Ophioglossales, Psilotales and Gleicheniaceae), where they often produce structures analogous to those seen in the vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizas of higher plants, which are formed by members of the order Glomales. A preponderance of associations of this kind is in accordance with palaeohbotanical and molecular evidence indicating that glomalean fungi produced the archetypal symbioses with the first plants to emerge on to land. It is shown, probably for the first time, that glomalean fungi forming typical VA mycorrhiza with a higher plant (Plantago lanceolata) can colonize a thalloid liverwort (Pellia epiphylla), producing arbuscules and vesicles in the hepatic. The extent to which these associations, which are structurally analogous to mycorrhizas, have similar functions remains to be evaluated. Ascomycetous associations are found in a relatively small number of families of leafy liverworts. The structural features of the fungal colonization of rhizoids and underground axes of these plants are similar to those seen in mycorrhizal associations of ericaceous plants like Vaccinium. Cross inoculation experiments have confirmed that a typical mycorrhizal endophyte of ericaceous plants, Hymenoscyphus ericae, will form associations in liverworts which are structurally identical to those seen in nature. Again, the functional significance of these associations remains to be examined. Some members of the Jungermanniales and Metzgeriales form associations with basidiomycetous fungi. These produce intracellular coils of hyphae, which are similar to the pelotons seen in orchid mycorrhizas, which also involve basidiomycetes. The fungal associates of the autotrophic Aneura and of its heterotrophic relative Cryptothallus mirabilis have been isolated. In the latter case it has been shown that the fungal symbiont is an ectomycorrhizal associate of Betula, suggesting that the apparently obligate nature of the association between the hepatic and Betula in nature is based upon requirement for this particular heterotroph. PMID:10905611

  17. Symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' land plants.

    PubMed

    Read, D J; Ducket, J G; Francis, R; Ligron, R; Russell, A

    2000-06-29

    An analysis of the current state of knowledge of symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' plants is provided. Three fungal phyla, the Zygomycota, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, are involved in forming these associations, each producing a distinctive suite of structural features in well-defined groups of 'lower' plants. Among the 'lower' plants only mosses and Equisetum appear to lack one or other of these types of association. The salient features of the symbioses produced by each fungal group are described and the relationships between these associations and those formed by the same or related fungi in 'higher' plants are discussed. Particular consideration is given to the question of the extent to which root fungus associations in 'lower' plants are analogous to 'mycorrhizas' of 'higher' plants and the need for analysis of the functional attributes of these symbioses is stressed. Zygomycetous fungi colonize a wide range of extant lower land plants (hornworts, many hepatics, lycopods, Ophioglossales, Psilotales and Gleicheniaceae), where they often produce structures analogous to those seen in the vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizas of higher plants, which are formed by members of the order Glomales. A preponderance of associations of this kind is in accordance with palaeohbotanical and molecular evidence indicating that glomalean fungi produced the archetypal symbioses with the first plants to emerge on to land. It is shown, probably for the first time, that glomalean fungi forming typical VA mycorrhiza with a higher plant (Plantago lanceolata) can colonize a thalloid liverwort (Pellia epiphylla), producing arbuscules and vesicles in the hepatic. The extent to which these associations, which are structurally analogous to mycorrhizas, have similar functions remains to be evaluated. Ascomycetous associations are found in a relatively small number of families of leafy liverworts. The structural features of the fungal colonization of rhizoids and underground axes of these plants are similar to those seen in mycorrhizal associations of ericaceous plants like Vaccinium. Cross inoculation experiments have confirmed that a typical mycorrhizal endophyte of ericaceous plants, Hymenoscyphus ericae, will form associations in liverworts which are structurally identical to those seen in nature. Again, the functional significance of these associations remains to be examined. Some members of the Jungermanniales and Metzgeriales form associations with basidiomycetous fungi. These produce intracellular coils of hyphae, which are similar to the pelotons seen in orchid mycorrhizas, which also involve basidiomycetes. The fungal associates of the autotrophic Aneura and of its heterotrophic relative Cryptothallus mirabilis have been isolated. In the latter case it has been shown that the fungal symbiont is an ectomycorrhizal associate of Betula, suggesting that the apparently obligate nature of the association between the hepatic and Betula in nature is based upon requirement for this particular heterotroph. PMID:10905611

  18. The Contribution of DNA Metabarcoding to Fungal Conservation: Diversity Assessment, Habitat Partitioning and Mapping Red-Listed Fungi in Protected Coastal Salix repens Communities in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Geml, József; Gravendeel, Barbara; van der Gaag, Kristiaan J.; Neilen, Manon; Lammers, Youri; Raes, Niels; Semenova, Tatiana A.; de Knijff, Peter; Noordeloos, Machiel E.

    2014-01-01

    Western European coastal sand dunes are highly important for nature conservation. Communities of the creeping willow (Salix repens) represent one of the most characteristic and diverse vegetation types in the dunes. We report here the results of the first kingdom-wide fungal diversity assessment in S. repens coastal dune vegetation. We carried out massively parallel pyrosequencing of ITS rDNA from soil samples taken at ten sites in an extended area of joined nature reserves located along the North Sea coast of the Netherlands, representing habitats with varying soil pH and moisture levels. Fungal communities in Salix repens beds are highly diverse and we detected 1211 non-singleton fungal 97% sequence similarity OTUs after analyzing 688,434 ITS2 rDNA sequences. Our comparison along a north-south transect indicated strong correlation between soil pH and fungal community composition. The total fungal richness and the number OTUs of most fungal taxonomic groups negatively correlated with higher soil pH, with some exceptions. With regard to ecological groups, dark-septate endophytic fungi were more diverse in acidic soils, ectomycorrhizal fungi were represented by more OTUs in calcareous sites, while detected arbuscular mycorrhizal genera fungi showed opposing trends regarding pH. Furthermore, we detected numerous red listed species in our samples often from previously unknown locations, indicating that some of the fungal species currently considered rare may be more abundant in Dutch S. repens communities than previously thought. PMID:24937200

  19. N-trimethylchitosan/alginate layer-by-layer self assembly coatings act as "fungal repellents" to prevent biofilm formation on healthcare materials.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fuguang; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Wen, Jianchuan; Sun, Yuyu

    2015-02-18

    Fungal biofilm formation on healthcare materials is a significant clinical concern, often leading to medical-device-related infections, which are difficult to treat. A novel fungal repellent strategy is developed to control fungal biofilm formation. Methylacrylic acid (MAA) is grated onto poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based biomaterials via plasma-initiated grafting polymerization. A cationic polymer, trimethylchitosan (TMC), is synthesized by reacting chitosan with methyl iodide. Sodium alginate (SA) is used as an anionic polymer. TMC/SA multilayers are coated onto the MAA-grafted PMMA via layer-by-layer self-assembly. The TMC/SA multilayer coatings significantly reduce fungal initial adhesion, and effectively prevent fungal biofilm formation. It is concluded that the anti-adhesive property of the surface is due to its hydrophilicity, and that the biofilm-inhibiting action is attributed to the antifungal activity of TMC as well as the chelating function of TMC and SA, which may have acted as fungal repellents. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-immersion tests show that the biofilm-modulating effect of the multilayer coatings is stable for more than 4 weeks. Furthermore, the presence of TMC/SA multilayer coatings improves the biocompatibility of the original PMMA, offering a simple, yet effective, strategy for controlling fungal biofilm formation. PMID:25295485

  20. Indicators of airborne fungal concentrations in urban homes: understanding the conditions that affect indoor fungal exposures.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Judith A; Rosenbaum, Paula F; Anagnost, Susan E; Hunt, Andrew; Abraham, Jerrold L

    2015-06-01

    Indoor fungal exposure can compromise respiratory health. Low-income urban areas are of concern because of high asthma and allergy rates and housing disrepair. Understanding the conditions that affect indoor fungal exposures is important for assessing health risks and for developing mitigation strategies. We examined the types and concentrations of airborne fungi inside and outside of homes in low-income areas of Syracuse, NY as well as the effect of snow cover on fungal levels. At 103 homes, air samples for viable fungi were collected, occupants were interviewed and homes were inspected for visible mold, musty odors, water problems and other factors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to relate high fungal levels to home conditions. Predominant indoor fungi included Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Alternaria and hyaline unknowns. Basidiomycetes and an uncommon genus Acrodontium were also found frequently due to analysis methods developed for this project. With snow cover, outdoor total fungal levels were depressed and indoor concentrations were three times higher than outdoor on average with a maximum of 29 times higher. Visible mold was related to elevated levels of Penicillium (OR 4.11 95% CI 1.37-14.0) and bacteria (OR 3.79 95% CI 1.41-11.2). Musty, moldy odors were associated with elevated concentrations of total fungi (OR 3.48 95% CI 1.13-11.6) and basidiomycetes. Cockroaches, an indicator of moisture, were associated with elevated levels of Penicillium (OR 3.66 95% CI 1.16-13.1) and Aspergillus (OR 4.36 95% CI 1.60-13.4). Increasing relative humidity was associated with higher concentrations of Penicillium, yeasts and basidiomycetes. Visible mold, musty odors, indoor humidity and cockroaches are modifiable factors that were important determinants of indoor fungal exposures. Indoor air investigators should interpret indoor:outdoor fungal ratios cautiously when snow cover is present. PMID:25725196

  1. Preconditioning with glycyrrhizic, ferulic, paeoniflorin, cinnamic prevents rat hearts from ischemia/reperfusion injury via endothelial nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Guo-Qiang; Ding, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaozhao; Yin, Xiaofeng; Gao, Yuqin; Zhao, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to investigate the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NO) pathway is involved or not in the protective effects of glycyrrhizic, ferulic, paeoniflorin, cinnamic (GFPC) in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury Sprague-Dawley rats. Materials and Methods: Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) model was made by ligating the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery for 30 min and releasing for 120 min, then the left ventricular apical was fixed and sliced, morphological changes of myocardial microvascular endothelial cell (MMVEC) was observed by electron microscopy, apoptosis index of MMVEC was observed by means of TUNEL, serum NO was tested by methods of nitrate reduction, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase MB (CK-MB) was detected by automatic biochemical analyzer; Phosphorylated eNOS (PeNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) protein were measured by means of western blot. Results: In positive product control group, the serum levels of NO, LDH, CK-MB significantly increased (P < 0.05); MMVEC apoptosis was significantly decreased (P < 0.05); incidence of area at risk decreased significantly (P < 0.05); PeNOS protein increased (P < 0.05); iNOS protein decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Ischemic preconditioning of GFPC from GFPC plays a protective role in I/R heart through regulating the eNOS/NO signal pathway by increasing the PeNOS protein expression and decreasing the expression of iNOS protein. PMID:25829767

  2. Fungal invasion of the rhizosphere microbiome.

    PubMed

    Chapelle, Emilie; Mendes, Rodrigo; Bakker, Peter A Hm; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2016-01-01

    The rhizosphere is the infection court where soil-borne pathogens establish a parasitic relationship with the plant. To infect root tissue, pathogens have to compete with members of the rhizosphere microbiome for available nutrients and microsites. In disease-suppressive soils, pathogens are strongly restricted in growth by the activities of specific rhizosphere microorganisms. Here, we sequenced metagenomic DNA and RNA of the rhizosphere microbiome of sugar beet seedlings grown in a soil suppressive to the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. rRNA-based analyses showed that Oxalobacteraceae, Burkholderiaceae, Sphingobacteriaceae and Sphingomonadaceae were significantly more abundant in the rhizosphere upon fungal invasion. Metatranscriptomics revealed that stress-related genes (ppGpp metabolism and oxidative stress) were upregulated in these bacterial families. We postulate that the invading pathogenic fungus induces, directly or via the plant, stress responses in the rhizobacterial community that lead to shifts in microbiome composition and to activation of antagonistic traits that restrict pathogen infection. PMID:26023875

  3. Synthetic biology of fungal natural products.

    PubMed

    Mattern, Derek J; Valiante, Vito; Unkles, Shiela E; Brakhage, Axel A

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an ever-expanding field in science, also encompassing the research area of fungal natural product (NP) discovery and production. Until now, different aspects of synthetic biology have been covered in fungal NP studies from the manipulation of different regulatory elements and heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways to the engineering of different multidomain biosynthetic enzymes such as polyketide synthases or non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. The following review will cover some of the exemplary studies of synthetic biology in filamentous fungi showing the capacity of these eukaryotes to be used as model organisms in the field. From the vast array of different NPs produced to the ease for genetic manipulation, filamentous fungi have proven to be an invaluable source for the further development of synthetic biology tools. PMID:26284053

  4. Synthetic biology of fungal natural products

    PubMed Central

    Mattern, Derek J.; Valiante, Vito; Unkles, Shiela E.; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an ever-expanding field in science, also encompassing the research area of fungal natural product (NP) discovery and production. Until now, different aspects of synthetic biology have been covered in fungal NP studies from the manipulation of different regulatory elements and heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways to the engineering of different multidomain biosynthetic enzymes such as polyketide synthases or non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. The following review will cover some of the exemplary studies of synthetic biology in filamentous fungi showing the capacity of these eukaryotes to be used as model organisms in the field. From the vast array of different NPs produced to the ease for genetic manipulation, filamentous fungi have proven to be an invaluable source for the further development of synthetic biology tools. PMID:26284053

  5. Burden of serious fungal diseases in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Sinkó, János; Sulyok, Mihály; Denning, David W

    2015-10-01

    Valid data on the prevalence of serious fungal diseases are difficult to derive as in most countries these conditions are not reportable infections. To assess the burden of these infections in Hungary prevalence estimates from international peer-reviewed papers and population statistics were utilised. In the intensive care unit (ICU) population at least 370 cases of serious yeast and 52 mould infections can be expected yearly. The total number of candidaemia cases may be as high as 1110 annually. In patients with acute leukaemia and recipients of haematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplants the predicted incidence is more than 55 every year. Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis - though not a life-threatening condition - can adversely affect the quality of life of more than 177 000 Hungarian women. According to organisation for economic co-operation and development (OECD), 4.7% of total population older than 15 will suffer from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and 4.4% from asthma, adding another very broad risk group to the aforementioned categories susceptible for mycotic complications. Here more than 17 000 can have severe asthma with fungal sensitisation (SAFS) and more than 13 000 are at risk for developing allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). The incidence of dermatomycoses and other superficial fungal infections is even more difficult to assess but - according to international estimations - can effect around 14.3% of the total population. More than 1.6 million Hungarians may suffer from fungal diseases annually, with 33 000 cases being life threatening or very serious. This is an under-recognised problem of special importance for public health. PMID:26449504

  6. Coupled Metagenomic and Chemical Analyses of Degrading Fungal Necromass and Implications for Microbial Contributions to Stable Soil OC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, K. M.; Morgan, B. S. T.; Schultz, J.; Blair, N. E.; Egerton-Warburton, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fungi comprise a significant portion of total soil biomass, the turnover of which must represent a dominant flux within the soil carbon cycle. Fungal OC can turn over on time scales of days to months, but this process is poorly understood. Here, we examined temporal changes in the chemical and microbial community composition of fungal necromass during a 2 month decomposition experiment in which Fusarium avenaceum (a common saprophyte) was exposed to a natural soil microbial community. Over the course of the experiment, residual fungal necromass was harvested and analyzed using FTIR and thermochemolysis-GCMS to examine chemical changes in the tissue. Additionally, genomic DNA was extracted from tissues, amplified with barcoded ITS primers, and sequenced using the high-throughput Illumina platform to examine changes in microbial community composition. Up to 80% of the fungal necromass turned over in the first week. This rapid degradation phase corresponded to colonization of the necromass by known chitinolytic soil fungi including Mortierella species. Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes were among the dominant fungal species involved in degradation with very small contributions from Basidiomycetes. At the end of the 2 month degradation, only 15% of the original necromass remained. The residual material was rich in amide and C-O moieties which is consistent with previous work predicting that peptidoglycans are the main residual product from microbial tissue degradation. Straight-chain fatty acids exhibit varying degradation profiles, with some fatty acids (e.g. C16 and C18:1) degrading more rapidly than bulk tissue, others maintaining steady concentrations relative to bulk OC (e.g. C18), and some increasing in concentration throughout the degradation (e.g. C24). These results indicate that the turnover of fungal necromass has the potential to significantly influence a variety of soil OC properties, including C/N ratios, lipid biomarker distributions, and OC turnover times.

  7. Sebacinales everywhere: previously overlooked ubiquitous fungal endophytes.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Michael; Sýkorová, Zuzana; Garnica, Sigisfredo; Riess, Kai; Martos, Florent; Krause, Cornelia; Oberwinkler, Franz; Bauer, Robert; Redecker, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Inconspicuous basidiomycetes from the order Sebacinales are known to be involved in a puzzling variety of mutualistic plant-fungal symbioses (mycorrhizae), which presumably involve transport of mineral nutrients. Recently a few members of this fungal order not fitting this definition and commonly referred to as 'endophytes' have raised considerable interest by their ability to enhance plant growth and to increase resistance of their host plants against abiotic stress factors and fungal pathogens. Using DNA-based detection and electron microscopy, we show that Sebacinales are not only extremely versatile in their mycorrhizal associations, but are also almost universally present as symptomless endophytes. They occurred in field specimens of bryophytes, pteridophytes and all families of herbaceous angiosperms we investigated, including liverworts, wheat, maize, and the non-mycorrhizal model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. They were present in all habitats we studied on four continents. We even detected these fungi in herbarium specimens originating from pioneering field trips to North Africa in the 1830s/40s. No geographical or host patterns were detected. Our data suggest that the multitude of mycorrhizal interactions in Sebacinales may have arisen from an ancestral endophytic habit by specialization. Considering their proven beneficial influence on plant growth and their ubiquity, endophytic Sebacinales may be a previously unrecognized universal hidden force in plant ecosystems. PMID:21347229

  8. A combination approach to treating fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sanjib K; Fosso, Marina Y; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Azoles are antifungal drugs used to treat fungal infections such as candidiasis in humans. Their extensive use has led to the emergence of drug resistance, complicating antifungal therapy for yeast infections in critically ill patients. Combination therapy has become popular in clinical practice as a potential strategy to fight resistant fungal isolates. Recently, amphiphilic tobramycin analogues, C12 and C14, were shown to display antifungal activities. Herein, the antifungal synergy of C12 and C14 with four azoles, fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), posaconazole (POS), and voriconazole (VOR), was examined against seven Candida albicans strains. All tested strains were synergistically inhibited by C12 when combined with azoles, with the exception of C. albicans 64124 and MYA-2876 by FLC and VOR. Likewise, when combined with POS and ITC, C14 exhibited synergistic growth inhibition of all C. albicans strains, except C. albicans MYA-2876 by ITC. The combinations of FLC-C14 and VOR-C14 showed synergistic antifungal effect against three C. albicans and four C. albicans strains, respectively. Finally, synergism between C12/C14 and POS were confirmed by time-kill and disk diffusion assays. These results suggest the possibility of combining C12 or C14 with azoles to treat invasive fungal infections at lower administration doses or with a higher efficiency. PMID:26594050

  9. Sebacinales Everywhere: Previously Overlooked Ubiquitous Fungal Endophytes

    PubMed Central

    Weiß, Michael; Sýkorová, Zuzana; Garnica, Sigisfredo; Riess, Kai; Martos, Florent; Krause, Cornelia; Oberwinkler, Franz; Bauer, Robert; Redecker, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Inconspicuous basidiomycetes from the order Sebacinales are known to be involved in a puzzling variety of mutualistic plant-fungal symbioses (mycorrhizae), which presumably involve transport of mineral nutrients. Recently a few members of this fungal order not fitting this definition and commonly referred to as ‘endophytes’ have raised considerable interest by their ability to enhance plant growth and to increase resistance of their host plants against abiotic stress factors and fungal pathogens. Using DNA-based detection and electron microscopy, we show that Sebacinales are not only extremely versatile in their mycorrhizal associations, but are also almost universally present as symptomless endophytes. They occurred in field specimens of bryophytes, pteridophytes and all families of herbaceous angiosperms we investigated, including liverworts, wheat, maize, and the non-mycorrhizal model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. They were present in all habitats we studied on four continents. We even detected these fungi in herbarium specimens originating from pioneering field trips to North Africa in the 1830s/40s. No geographical or host patterns were detected. Our data suggest that the multitude of mycorrhizal interactions in Sebacinales may have arisen from an ancestral endophytic habit by specialization. Considering their proven beneficial influence on plant growth and their ubiquity, endophytic Sebacinales may be a previously unrecognized universal hidden force in plant ecosystems. PMID:21347229

  10. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Driskill, Brent R; Clenney, Timothy L; Gessler, Eric M

    2015-10-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a condition that has an allergic basis caused by exposure to fungi in the sinonasal tract leading to chronic inflammation. Despite standard treatment modalities, which typically include surgery and medical management of allergies, patients still have a high rate of recurrence. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been used as adjuvant treatment for AFS. Evidence exists to support the use of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) as a safe and efficacious method of treating allergies, but no studies have assessed the utility of SLIT in the management of allergic fungal sinusitis. A record review of cases of AFS that are currently or previously treated with sublingual immunotherapy from 2007 to 2011 was performed. Parameters of interest included serum IgE levels, changes in symptoms, Lund-McKay scores, decreased sensitization to fungal allergens associated with AFS, and serum IgE levels. Ten patients with diagnosed AFS were treated with SLIT. No adverse effects related to the use of SLIT therapy were identified. Decreases in subjective complaints, exam findings, Lund-McKay scores, and serum IgE levels were observed. Thus, sublingual immunotherapy appears to be a safe adjunct to the management of AFS that may improve patient outcomes. PMID:25902841

  11. A combination approach to treating fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjib K.; Fosso, Marina Y.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Azoles are antifungal drugs used to treat fungal infections such as candidiasis in humans. Their extensive use has led to the emergence of drug resistance, complicating antifungal therapy for yeast infections in critically ill patients. Combination therapy has become popular in clinical practice as a potential strategy to fight resistant fungal isolates. Recently, amphiphilic tobramycin analogues, C12 and C14, were shown to display antifungal activities. Herein, the antifungal synergy of C12 and C14 with four azoles, fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), posaconazole (POS), and voriconazole (VOR), was examined against seven Candida albicans strains. All tested strains were synergistically inhibited by C12 when combined with azoles, with the exception of C. albicans 64124 and MYA-2876 by FLC and VOR. Likewise, when combined with POS and ITC, C14 exhibited synergistic growth inhibition of all C. albicans strains, except C. albicans MYA-2876 by ITC. The combinations of FLC-C14 and VOR-C14 showed synergistic antifungal effect against three C. albicans and four C. albicans strains, respectively. Finally, synergism between C12/C14 and POS were confirmed by time-kill and disk diffusion assays. These results suggest the possibility of combining C12 or C14 with azoles to treat invasive fungal infections at lower administration doses or with a higher efficiency. PMID:26594050

  12. Simultaneous transcriptome analysis of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and tomato fruit pathosystem reveals novel fungal pathogenicity and fruit defense strategies.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Noam; Friedlander, Gilgi; Ment, Dana; Prusky, Dov; Fluhr, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides breaches the fruit cuticle but remains quiescent until fruit ripening signals a switch to necrotrophy, culminating in devastating anthracnose disease. There is a need to understand the distinct fungal arms strategy and the simultaneous fruit response. Transcriptome analysis of fungal-fruit interactions was carried out concurrently in the appressoria, quiescent and necrotrophic stages. Conidia germinating on unripe fruit cuticle showed stage-specific transcription that was accompanied by massive fruit defense responses. The subsequent quiescent stage showed the development of dendritic-like structures and swollen hyphae within the fruit epidermis. The quiescent fungal transcriptome was characterized by activation of chromatin remodeling genes and unsuspected environmental alkalization. Fruit response was portrayed by continued highly integrated massive up-regulation of defense genes. During cuticle infection of green or ripe fruit, fungi recapitulate the same developmental stages but with differing quiescent time spans. The necrotrophic stage showed a dramatic shift in fungal metabolism and up-regulation of pathogenicity factors. Fruit response to necrotrophy showed activation of the salicylic acid pathway, climaxing in cell death. Transcriptome analysis of C. gloeosporioides infection of fruit reveals its distinct stage-specific lifestyle and the concurrent changing fruit response, deepening our perception of the unfolding fungal-fruit arms and defenses race. PMID:25377514

  13. Endophytic fungal compounds active against Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane B; de Oliveira, Djalma M; Hughes, Alice Fs; Kohlhoff, Markus; LA Vieira, Mariana; Martins Vaz, Aline B; Ferreira, Mariana C; Carvalho, Camila R; Rosa, Luiz H; Rosa, Carlos A; Alves, Tânia Ma; Zani, Carlos L; Johann, Susana; Cota, Betania B

    2015-07-01

    Infections with Cryptococcus are invasive mycoses associated with significant morbidity and mortality, mainly in immunosuppressed patients. Several drugs have been introduced to combat these opportunistic infections. However, resistance of this organism to antifungal drugs has increased, causing difficulties in the treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the antifungal activity of ethanol extracts from endophytic fungi isolated from plants collected from different Brazilian ecosystems and to perform the fractionation of the most promising extract. Four-hundred fungal extracts were investigated by microdilution broth assays against Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii at a concentration of 500??g?ml(-1). Among them, the extract of Mycosphaerella sp. UFMGCB 2032, an endophytic fungus isolated from the plant Eugenia bimarginata DC. (Myrtaceae) exhibited outstanding antifungal activity against C. neoformans and C. gattii, with MIC values of 31.2??g?ml(-1) and 7.8??g?ml(-1), respectively. The fractionation of this extract using liquid-liquid partitioning and semi-preparative HPLC afforded two eicosanoic acids with antifungal activity, compound 1, (2S,3R,4R)-(E)-2-amino-3,4-dihydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-14-oxoeicos-6,12-dienoic acid with MIC values ranging from 1.3-2.50??g?ml(-1), and compound 2, known as myriocin, with MIC values of 0.5??g?ml(-1) against C. neoformans and C. gattii. These compounds are reported for the first time in the Mycosphaerella genus. PMID:25712396

  14. De novo production of metabolites by fungal co-culture of Trichophyton rubrum and Bionectria ochroleuca.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Samuel; Schumpp, Olivier; Bohni, Nadine; Monod, Michel; Gindro, Katia; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2013-06-28

    The co-cultivation of fungi has recently been described as a promising strategy to induce the production of novel metabolites through possible gene activation. A large screening of fungal co-cultures in solid media has identified an unusual long-distance growth inhibition between Trichophyton rubrum and Bionectria ochroleuca. To study metabolite induction in this particular fungal interaction, differential LC-MS-based metabolomics was performed on pure strain cultures and on their co-cultures. The comparison of the resulting fingerprints highlighted five de novo induced compounds, which were purified using software-oriented semipreparative HPLC-MS. One metabolite was successfully identified as 4?-hydroxysulfoxy-2,2?-dimethylthielavin P (a substituted trimer of 3,5-dimethylorsellinic acid). The nonsulfated form, as well as three other related compounds, were found in the pure strain culture of B. ochroleuca. PMID:23734767

  15. Accumulation of cadmium, lead, and nickel by fungal and wood biosorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Holan, Z.R.; Volesky, B.

    1995-05-01

    Native fungal biomass of fungi Absidia orchids, Penicillium chrysogenum, Rhizopus arrhizus, Rhizopus nugricans, and modified spruce sawdust (Picea engelmanii) sequestered metals in the following decreasing preference: Pb>Cd>Ni. The highest metal uptake was q{sub max}=351 mg Pb/g for A. orchidis biomass. P. chrysogenum biomass could accumulate cadmium best at 56 mg Cd/G. The sorption of nickel was the weakest always at >5 mg Ni/g. The spruce sawdust was modified by crosslinking, oxidation to acidic oxoforms, and by substitution. The highest metal uptake was observed in phosorylated sawdust reaching q{sub max}=224 mg Pb/g, 56 mg Cd/g, and 26 mg Ni/g. The latter value is comparable to the value of nickel sorption by wet commercial resin Duolite GT-73. Some improvement in metal uptake was also observed after reinforcement of fungal biomass. 40 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Evolution of virulence in fungal plant pathogens: exploiting fungal genomics to control plant disease.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Barbara J; Lowe, Rohan G T; Marcroft, Stephen J; van de Wouw, Angela P

    2015-01-01

    The propensity of a fungal pathogen to evolve virulence depends on features of its biology (e.g. mode of reproduction) and of its genome (e.g. amount of repetitive DNA). Populations of Leptosphaeria maculans, a pathogen of Brassica napus (canola), can evolve and overcome disease resistance bred into canola within three years of commercial release of a cultivar. Avirulence effector genes are key fungal genes that are complementary to resistance genes. In L. maculans these genes are embedded within inactivated transposable elements in genomic regions where they are readily mutated or deleted. The risk of resistance breakdown in the field can be minimised by monitoring disease severity of canola cultivars and virulence of fungal populations using high throughput molecular assays and by sowing canola cultivars with different resistance genes in subsequent years. This strategy has been exploited to avert yield losses due to blackleg disease in Australia. PMID:25725000

  17. Fungal Periprosthetic Joint Infection of the Hip: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schoof, Benjamin; Jakobs, Oliver; Schmidl, Stefan; Klatte, Till Orla; Frommelt, Lars; Gehrke, Thorsten; Gebauer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a severe complication of total joint arthroplasty with an incidence of approximately 1%. Due to the high risk of persisting infection, successful treatment of fungal PJI is challenging. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the current management of fungal PJI of the hip and, by systematically reviewing the cases published so far, to further improve the medical treatment of this serious complication of total hip arthroplasty. Thus, we conducted a systematic review of the available literature concerning fungal PJI in total hip arthroplasty, including 45 cases of fungal PJI. At the moment a two-stage revision procedure is favorable and there is an ongoing discussion on the therapeutic effect of antifungal drug loaded cement spacers on fungal periprosthetic infections of the hip. Due to the fact that there is rare experience with it, there is urgent need to establish guidelines for the treatment of fungal infections of total hip arthroplasty. PMID:25874063

  18. Interaction of cinnamic acid derivatives with ?-cyclodextrin in water: Experimental and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benguo; Zeng, Jie; Chen, Chen; Liu, Yonglan; Ma, Hanjun; Mo, Haizhen; Liang, Guizhao

    2016-03-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) can be used to improve the solubility and stability of cinnamic acid derivatives (CAs). However, there was no detailed report about understanding the effects of the substituent groups in the benzene ring on the inclusion behavior between CAs and CDs in aqueous solution. Here, the interaction of ?-CD with CAs, including caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and p-coumaric acid, in water was investigated by phase-solubility method, UV, fluorescence, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, together with ONIOM (our Own N-layer Integrated Orbital molecular Mechanics)-based QM/MM (Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics) calculations. Experimental results demonstrated that CAs could form 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex with ?-CD by non-covalent bonds, and that the maximum apparent stability constants were found in caffeic acid (176M(-1)) followed by p-coumaric acid (160M(-1)) and ferulic acid (133M(-1)). Moreover, our calculations reasonably illustrated the binding orientations of ?-CD with CAs determined by experimental observations. PMID:26471667

  19. Fungal BLAST and Model Organism BLASTP Best Hits: new comparison resources at the

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    Fungal BLAST and Model Organism BLASTP Best Hits: new comparison resources at the Saccharomyces and Fungal Alignment Viewers (1). The Fungal BLAST and Model Organism BLASTP Best Hits tools, described here from several other model organisms. FUNGAL BLAST The numerous publicly available fungal sequences

  20. Protective effects of the combination of sodium ferulate and oxymatrine on cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis in mice

    PubMed Central

    XU, MENGXIN; WANG, WEI; PEI, XIAOKUN; SUN, SONGMEI; XU, MINGBO; LIU, ZHIFENG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the combination of sodium ferulate (SF) and oxymatrine (OMT) on mice with cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis. Swiss male mice were randomly divided into a control group, CLP group, three SF + OMT groups (3.1+6.9; 6.2+13.8 and 12.3+27.7 mg/kg), SF (6.2 mg/kg) group and OMT (13.8 mg/kg) group. Eight hours after the administration of the drugs, the survival rates and survival times of the animals were monitored. In addition, the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio; alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in the serum; the C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-? (IFN-?) levels in the serum and lung and liver homogenates; and the malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxidase dismutase (SOD) levels in the lung and liver homogenates were measured. The bacterial load in the serum was also studied. Following treatment with the combination of SF and OMT, the survival rate increased and the survival time was prolonged; CLP-induced increases in the lung W/D ratio and the levels of ALT, AST, LDH, CRP, IL-6, IFN-? and MDA were significantly reduced; and the SOD activity levels were increased, compared with those of the untreated animals with CLP-induced sepsis. These results indicated that the combination of SF and OMT induced protective effects against CLP-induced lethal sepsis of mice. The possible mechanism of these effects may be associated with the alleviation of systemic inflammation and diminishment of oxidative injury. PMID:24940428

  1. Involvement of guanylate cyclase and K+ channels in relaxation evoked by ferulate nitrate in rat aorta artery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhan-Qing; Xu, Jing-Feng; Wang, Jin-Ping; Zhao, Wei-Juan; Zeng, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Vasorelaxant properties of N-2-(ferulamidoethyl)-nitrate (ferulate nitrate, FLNT), a newly synthesized nitrate, were compared with those of isosorbide dinitrate, nicorandil, nitroglycerin, and 8-bromoguanosine 3,5-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP) in rat aorta pre-contracted by phenylephrine. FLNT produced vasorelaxation in a concentration-dependent manner (0.1 - 100 µM). The degree of relaxation induced by FLNT was similar to that induced by isosorbide dinitrate. In addition, removal of endothelium did not affect the relaxant effect of FLNT. FLNT caused a rightward shift of the cumulative concentration-response curves of phenylephrine and reduced the maximal efficacy of contraction. 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 µM) and K(+)-channel blockers charybdotoxin (CHT, 0.1 µM) and BaCl(2) (1 µM) reduced the relaxant effect of FLNT in the endothelium-denuded arteries, whereas glibenclamide (1 µM) and 4-aminopyridine (1 mM) failed to influence FLNT-induced vasorelaxation. Furthermore, in the presence of ODQ, both CHT (0.1 µM) and BaCl(2) (1 µM) still significantly reduced the relaxation evoked by FLNT. Pretreatment of vessels with hydroxocobalamin, a nitric oxide scavenger, abolished the FLNT effect. These findings demonstrate that FLNT induces relaxation of the rat aorta rings endothelium-independently. Furthermore, we demonstrated that FLNT-induced vasorelaxation is related to its stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase and activation of K(+) channels. PMID:22510967

  2. Emerging fungal threats to animal, plant and ecosystem health

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Matthew C.; Henk, Daniel. A.; Briggs, Cheryl J.; Brownstein, John S.; Madoff, Lawrence C.; McCraw, Sarah L.; Gurr, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    The past two decades have seen an increasing number of virulent infectious diseases in natural populations and managed landscapes. In both animals and plants, an unprecedented number of fungal and fungal-like diseases have recently caused some of the most severe die-offs and extinctions ever witnessed in wild species, and are jeopardizing food security. Human activity is intensifying fungal disease dispersal by modifying natural environments and thus creating new opportunities for evolution. We argue that nascent fungal infections will cause increasing attrition of biodiversity, with wider implications for human and ecosystem health, unless steps are taken to tighten biosecurity worldwide. PMID:22498624

  3. Fungal biogeography. Global diversity and geography of soil fungi.

    PubMed

    Tedersoo, Leho; Bahram, Mohammad; Põlme, Sergei; Kõljalg, Urmas; Yorou, Nourou S; Wijesundera, Ravi; Villarreal Ruiz, Luis; Vasco-Palacios, Aída M; Thu, Pham Quang; Suija, Ave; Smith, Matthew E; Sharp, Cathy; Saluveer, Erki; Saitta, Alessandro; Rosas, Miguel; Riit, Taavi; Ratkowsky, David; Pritsch, Karin; Põldmaa, Kadri; Piepenbring, Meike; Phosri, Cherdchai; Peterson, Marko; Parts, Kaarin; Pärtel, Kadri; Otsing, Eveli; Nouhra, Eduardo; Njouonkou, André L; Nilsson, R Henrik; Morgado, Luis N; Mayor, Jordan; May, Tom W; Majuakim, Luiza; Lodge, D Jean; Lee, Su See; Larsson, Karl-Henrik; Kohout, Petr; Hosaka, Kentaro; Hiiesalu, Indrek; Henkel, Terry W; Harend, Helery; Guo, Liang-dong; Greslebin, Alina; Grelet, Gwen; Geml, Jozsef; Gates, Genevieve; Dunstan, William; Dunk, Chris; Drenkhan, Rein; Dearnaley, John; De Kesel, André; Dang, Tan; Chen, Xin; Buegger, Franz; Brearley, Francis Q; Bonito, Gregory; Anslan, Sten; Abell, Sandra; Abarenkov, Kessy

    2014-11-28

    Fungi play major roles in ecosystem processes, but the determinants of fungal diversity and biogeographic patterns remain poorly understood. Using DNA metabarcoding data from hundreds of globally distributed soil samples, we demonstrate that fungal richness is decoupled from plant diversity. The plant-to-fungus richness ratio declines exponentially toward the poles. Climatic factors, followed by edaphic and spatial variables, constitute the best predictors of fungal richness and community composition at the global scale. Fungi show similar latitudinal diversity gradients to other organisms, with several notable exceptions. These findings advance our understanding of global fungal diversity patterns and permit integration of fungi into a general macroecological framework. PMID:25430773

  4. Fungal diversity on fallen leaves of Ficus in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Kai; Hyde, Kevin D; Soytong, Kasem; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2008-10-01

    Fallen leaves of Ficus altissima, F. virens, F. benjamina, F. fistulosa and F. semicordata, were collected in Chiang Mai Province in northern Thailand and examined for fungi. Eighty taxa were identified, comprising 56 anamorphic taxa, 23 ascomycetes and 1 basidiomycete. Common fungal species occurring on five host species with high frequency of occurrence were Beltraniella nilgirica, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Ophioceras leptosporum, Periconia byssoides and Septonema harknessi. Colletotrichum and Stachybotrys were also common genera. The leaves of different Ficus species supported diverse fungal taxa, and the fungal assemblages on the different hosts showed varying overlap. The fungal diversity of saprobes at the host species level is discussed. PMID:18837113

  5. Urinary excretion of phenolic acids in rats fed cranberry, blueberry, or black raspberry powder.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Ramesh; Howard, Luke R; Prior, Ronald L

    2014-05-01

    Dietary polyphenolics can be converted into smaller phenolic acids (PA) by microorganisms in the colon and may contribute to health benefits associated with the parent polyphenolics. Urinary excretion of 18 PA and their conjugates was studied, using HPLC-MS/MS, in rats fed AIN93G-based diets containing 5% (dry weight basis) of either cranberry (CB), blueberry (BB), or black raspberry (BRB). Hippuric, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylacetic, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids were excreted in greatest quantity in the urine over a 24 h period in all diets. Primary PA excreted in the berry diets were 4-hydroxycinnamic acid for CB; chlorogenic, ferulic, and 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acids for BB; and 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic, 3-hydroxybenzoic, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acids for BRB. PA were present in conjugated form with cinnamic acid derivatives being 50-70% and phenylacetic acid derivatives conjugated <10%. Conjugated, and not just the free, PA are significant contributors to total urinary excretion. PMID:24180593

  6. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Zeinab G.; Kalansuriya, Pabasara; Capon, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a preliminary investigation of the use the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall constituent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a natural chemical cue to stimulate and alter the expression of fungal secondary metabolism. Integrated high-throughput micro-cultivation and micro-analysis methods determined that 6 of 40 (15%) of fungi tested responded to an optimal exposure to LPS (0.6 ng/mL) by activating, enhancing or accelerating secondary metabolite production. To explore the possible mechanisms behind this effect, we employed light and fluorescent microscopy in conjunction with a nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive fluorescent dye and an NO scavenger to provide evidence that LPS stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism coincided with LPS activation of NO. Several case studies demonstrated that LPS stimulation can be scaled from single microplate well (1.5 mL) to preparative (>400 mL) scale cultures. For example, LPS treatment of Penicillium sp. (ACM-4616) enhanced pseurotin A and activated pseurotin A1 and pseurotin A2 biosynthesis, whereas LPS treatment of Aspergillus sp. (CMB-M81F) substantially accelerated and enhanced the biosynthesis of shornephine A and a series of biosynthetically related ardeemins and activated production of neoasterriquinone. As an indication of broader potential, we provide evidence that cultures of Penicillium sp. (CMB-TF0411), Aspergillus niger (ACM-4993F), Rhizopus oryzae (ACM-165F) and Thanatephorus cucumeris (ACM-194F) were responsive to LPS stimulation, the latter two examples being particular noteworthy as neither are known to produce secondary metabolites. Our results encourage the view that LPS stimulation can be used as a valuable tool to expand the molecular discovery potential of fungal strains that either have been exhaustively studied by or are unresponsive to traditional culture methodology. PMID:25379339

  7. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Zeinab G; Kalansuriya, Pabasara; Capon, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    We report on a preliminary investigation of the use the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall constituent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a natural chemical cue to stimulate and alter the expression of fungal secondary metabolism. Integrated high-throughput micro-cultivation and micro-analysis methods determined that 6 of 40 (15%) of fungi tested responded to an optimal exposure to LPS (0.6 ng/mL) by activating, enhancing or accelerating secondary metabolite production. To explore the possible mechanisms behind this effect, we employed light and fluorescent microscopy in conjunction with a nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive fluorescent dye and an NO scavenger to provide evidence that LPS stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism coincided with LPS activation of NO. Several case studies demonstrated that LPS stimulation can be scaled from single microplate well (1.5 mL) to preparative (>400 mL) scale cultures. For example, LPS treatment of Penicillium sp. (ACM-4616) enhanced pseurotin A and activated pseurotin A1 and pseurotin A2 biosynthesis, whereas LPS treatment of Aspergillus sp. (CMB-M81F) substantially accelerated and enhanced the biosynthesis of shornephine A and a series of biosynthetically related ardeemins and activated production of neoasterriquinone. As an indication of broader potential, we provide evidence that cultures of Penicillium sp. (CMB-TF0411), Aspergillus niger (ACM-4993F), Rhizopus oryzae (ACM-165F) and Thanatephorus cucumeris (ACM-194F) were responsive to LPS stimulation, the latter two examples being particular noteworthy as neither are known to produce secondary metabolites. Our results encourage the view that LPS stimulation can be used as a valuable tool to expand the molecular discovery potential of fungal strains that either have been exhaustively studied by or are unresponsive to traditional culture methodology. PMID:25379339

  8. Fungal Cell Gigantism during Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Rodas, Rocío; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 µm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with ?-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20–50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens. PMID:20585557

  9. Geographic variation in allergic fungal rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, B J; Barnes, L; Bernstein, J M; Brown, D; Clark, C E; Cook, P R; DeWitt, W S; Graham, S M; Gordon, B; Javer, A R; Krouse, J H; Kuhn, F A; Levine, H L; Manning, S C; Marple, B F; Morgan, A H; Osguthorpe, J D; Skedros, D; Rains, B M; Ramadan, H H; Terrell, J E; Yonkers, A J

    2000-04-01

    Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS) has a worldwide distribution. This survey of 20 otolaryngologic practices throughout the United States confirmed a variation in the frequency of AFRS relative to endoscopic sinus procedures performed for all other diagnoses. The highest incidence occurred in Memphis, Tennessee at 23%, with three other southern practices reporting a frequency of at least 10%. In the northern locations the frequency ranged from 0 to 4%. No correlation with mould counts was demonstrated, possibly because of incomplete mould data relative to most of the surgical locations. PMID:10736417

  10. Simultaneous estimation of phenolic acids in sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) using RP-HPLC with DAD.

    PubMed

    Arimboor, Ranjith; Kumar, K Sarin; Arumughan, C

    2008-05-12

    A RP-HPLC-DAD method was developed and validated for the simultaneous analysis of nine phenolic acids including gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, salicylic acid, p-coumaric acid, cinnamic acid, caffiec acid and ferulic acid in sea buckthorn (SB) (Hippophaë rhamnoides) berries and leaves. The method was validated in terms of linearity, LOD, precision, accuracy and recovery and found to be satisfactory. Phenolic acid derivatives in anatomical parts of SB berries and leaves were separated into free phenolic acids, phenolic acids bound as esters and phenolic acids bound as glycosides and profiled in HPLC. Berry pulp contained a total of 1068 mg/kg phenolic acids, of which 58.8% was derived from phenolic glycosides. Free phenolic acids and phenolic acid esters constituted 20.0% and 21.2%, respectively, of total phenolic acids in SB berry pulp. The total phenolic acid content in seed kernel (5741 mg/kg) was higher than that in berry pulp and seed coat (Table 2). Phenolic acids liberated from soluble esters constituted the major fraction of phenolic acids (57.3% of total phenolic acids) in seed kernel. 8.4% and 34.3% of total phenolic acids in seed kernel were, respectively contributed by free and phenolic acids liberated from glycosidic bonds. The total soluble phenolic acids content in seed coat (448 mg/kg) was lower than that in seed kernel and pulp (Table 2). Proportion of free phenolic acids in total phenolic acids in seed coat was higher than that in seed kernel and pulp. Phenolic acids bound as esters and glycosides, respectively contributed 49.1% and 20.3% of total phenolic acids in seed coat. The major fraction (approximately 70%) of phenolic acids in SB berries was found to be concentrated in the seeds. Gallic acid was the predominant phenolic acid both in free and bound forms in SB berry parts and leaves. PMID:18194847

  11. Toward Developing a Universal Treatment for Fungal Disease Using Radioimmunotherapy Targeting Common Fungal Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, R. A.; Guimaraes, A. J.; Hopcraft, S.; Jiang, Z.; Bonilla, K.; Morgenstern, A.; Bruchertseifer, F.; Del Poeta, M.; Torosantucci, A.; Cassone, A.; Nosanchuk, J. D.; Casadevall, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previously, we demonstrated the ability of radiolabeled antibodies recognizing the cryptococcal polysaccharide capsule to kill Cryptococcus neoformans both in vitro and in infected mice. This approach, known as radioimmunotherapy (RIT), uses the exquisite ability of antibodies to bind antigens to deliver microbicidal radiation. To create RIT reagents which would be efficacious against all major medically important fungi, we have selected monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to common surface fungal antigens such as heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), which is found on the surface of diverse fungi; beta (1,3)-glucan, which is a major constituent of fungal cell walls; ceramide which is found at the cell surface, and melanin, a polymer present in the fungal cell wall. Methods MAbs 4E12, an IgG2a to fungal HSP60; 2G8, an IgG2b to beta-(1,3)-glucan; and 6D2, an IgM to melanin, were labeled with the alpha particle emitting radionuclide 213-Bismuth (213Bi) using the chelator CHXA”. B11, an IgM antibody to glucosylceramide, was labeled with the beta emitter 188-Rhenium (188Re). Model organisms Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans were used to assess the cytotoxicity of these compounds after exposure to either radiolabeled mAbs or controls. Results 213Bi-mAbs to HSP60 and to the beta-(1,3)-glucan each reduced the viability of both fungi by 80–100%.The 213Bi-6D2mAb to melanin killed 22%of C. neoformans, but did not kill C. albicans. B11 mAb against fungal ceramide was effective against wild-type C. neoformans, but was unable to kill a mutant lacking the ceramide target. Unlabeled mAbs and radiolabeled irrelevant control mAbs caused no killing. Conclusion Our results suggest that it is feasible to develop RIT against fungal pathogens by targeting common antigens and such an approach could be developed against fungal diseases for which existing therapy is unsatisfactory. PMID:22048869

  12. Optimization of acid hydrolysis conditions for feruloylated oligosaccharides from rice bran through response surface methodolgy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ken Yuon; Lai, Phoency; Lu, Shin; Fang, Yi Ting; Chen, Hua Han

    2008-10-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the hydrolysis conditions with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) to obtain the maximum amount of feruloylated oligosaccharides from rice bran. The TFA concentration and hydrolysis time effects on feruloylated oligosaccharides recovery are studied. The optimum hydrolysis conditions for maximizing feruloylated oligosaccharides recovery were 193 mM TFA concentration and 1.36 h of hydrolysis time. Under these conditions the corresponding acyl ferulic group quantity was 78.63 microg in 1 mL of hydrolysate. The model was experimentally verified with a satisfactory coefficient of R (2) (= 0.96). The quantity of acyl ferulic group in the feruloylated oligosaccharides, purified using Amberlite XAD-4, was 916.12 microg/g of rice bran under the optimum hydrolysis conditions. The proposed method accounted for 54.08% of the total acyl ferulic group in rice bran. The results suggest that the proposed conditions were useful in maximizing recovery of feruloylated oligosaccharides from rice bran. PMID:18781762

  13. Methods for transforming and expression screening of filamentous fungal cells with a DNA library

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Lamsa, Michael; Cherry, Joel; Ward, Connie

    2015-06-02

    The present invention relates to methods for expression screening of filamentous fungal transformants, comprising: (a) isolating single colony transformants of a DNA library introduced into E. coli; (b) preparing DNA from each of the single colony E. coli transformants; (c) introducing a sample of each of the DNA preparations of step (b) into separate suspensions of protoplasts of a filamentous fungus to obtain transformants thereof, wherein each transformant contains one or more copies of an individual polynucleotide from the DNA library; (d) growing the individual filamentous fungal transformants of step (c) on selective growth medium, thereby permitting growth of the filamentous fungal transformants, while suppressing growth of untransformed filamentous fungi; and (e) measuring activity or a property of each polypeptide encoded by the individual polynucleotides. The present invention also relates to isolated polynucleotides encoding polypeptides of interest obtained by such methods, to nucleic acid constructs, expression vectors, and recombinant host cells comprising the isolated polynucleotides, and to methods of producing the polypeptides encoded by the isolated polynucleotides.

  14. Fungal pathogen uses sex pheromone receptor for chemotropic sensing of host plant signals.

    PubMed

    Turrà, David; El Ghalid, Mennat; Rossi, Federico; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2015-11-26

    For more than a century, fungal pathogens and symbionts have been known to orient hyphal growth towards chemical stimuli from the host plant. However, the nature of the plant signals as well as the mechanisms underlying the chemotropic response have remained elusive. Here we show that directed growth of the soil-inhabiting plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum towards the roots of the host tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is triggered by the catalytic activity of secreted class III peroxidases, a family of haem-containing enzymes present in all land plants. The chemotropic response requires conserved elements of the fungal cell integrity mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade and the seven-pass transmembrane protein Ste2, a functional homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sex pheromone ? receptor. We further show that directed hyphal growth of F. oxysporum towards nutrient sources such as sugars and amino acids is governed by a functionally distinct MAPK cascade. These results reveal a potentially conserved chemotropic mechanism in root-colonizing fungi, and suggest a new function for the fungal pheromone-sensing machinery in locating plant hosts in a complex environment such as the soil. PMID:26503056

  15. Fungal Endophthalmitis Associated with Compounded Products

    PubMed Central

    Mikosz, Christina A.; Smith, Rachel M.; Kim, Moon; Tyson, Clara; Lee, Ellen H.; Adams, Eleanor; Straif-Bourgeois, Susanne; Sowadsky, Rick; Arroyo, Shannon; Grant-Greene, Yoran; Duran, Julie; Vasquez, Yvonne; Robinson, Byron F.; Harris, Julie R.; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Török, Thomas J.; Mascola, Laurene

    2014-01-01

    Fungal endophthalmitis is a rare but serious infection. In March 2012, several cases of probable and laboratory-confirmed fungal endophthalmitis occurring after invasive ocular procedures were reported nationwide. We identified 47 cases in 9 states: 21 patients had been exposed to the intraocular dye Brilliant Blue G (BBG) during retinal surgery, and the other 26 had received an intravitreal injection containing triamcinolone acetonide. Both drugs were produced by Franck’s Compounding Lab (Ocala, FL, USA). Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex mold was identified in specimens from BBG-exposed case-patients and an unopened BBG vial. Bipolaris hawaiiensis mold was identified in specimens from triamcinolone-exposed case-patients. Exposure to either product was the only factor associated with case status. Of 40 case-patients for whom data were available, 39 (98%) lost vision. These concurrent outbreaks, associated with 1 compounding pharmacy, resulted in a product recall. Ensuring safety and integrity of compounded medications is critical for preventing further outbreaks associated with compounded products. PMID:24447640

  16. Bacterial, Fungal, Parasitic, and Viral Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.

    2008-01-01

    Infectious myositis may be caused by a broad range of bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral agents. Infectious myositis is overall uncommon given the relative resistance of the musculature to infection. For example, inciting events, including trauma, surgery, or the presence of foreign bodies or devitalized tissue, are often present in cases of bacterial myositis. Bacterial causes are categorized by clinical presentation, anatomic location, and causative organisms into the categories of pyomyositis, psoas abscess, Staphylococcus aureus myositis, group A streptococcal necrotizing myositis, group B streptococcal myositis, clostridial gas gangrene, and nonclostridial myositis. Fungal myositis is rare and usually occurs among immunocompromised hosts. Parasitic myositis is most commonly a result of trichinosis or cystericercosis, but other protozoa or helminths may be involved. A parasitic cause of myositis is suggested by the travel history and presence of eosinophilia. Viruses may cause diffuse muscle involvement with clinical manifestations, such as benign acute myositis (most commonly due to influenza virus), pleurodynia (coxsackievirus B), acute rhabdomyolysis, or an immune-mediated polymyositis. The diagnosis of myositis is suggested by the clinical picture and radiologic imaging, and the etiologic agent is confirmed by microbiologic or serologic testing. Therapy is based on the clinical presentation and the underlying pathogen. PMID:18625683

  17. Burden of serious fungal infections in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Corzo-León, D E; Armstrong-James, D; Denning, D W

    2015-10-01

    Serious fungal infections (SFIs) could be more frequent than are recognised. Estimates of the incidence and prevalence of SFIs are essential in order to identify public health problems. We estimated the rates of SFIs in Mexico, following a methodology similar to that used in prior studies. We obtained information about the general population and populations at risk. A systematic literature search was undertaken to identify epidemiological reports of SFIs in Mexico. When Mexican reports were unavailable, we based our estimates on international literature. The most prevalent SFIs in Mexico are recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (5999 per 100 000) followed by allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (60 per 100 000), chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (15.9 per 100 000), fungal keratitis (10.4 per 100 000), invasive candidiasis (8.6 per 100 000) and SFIs in HIV (8.2 per 100 000); coccidioidomycosis (7.6 per 100 000), IA (4.56 per 100 000). These correspond to 2 749 159 people affected in any year (2.45% of the population), probably >10 000 deaths and 7000 blind eyes. SFIs affect immunocompromised and healthy populations. Most are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Validation of these estimates with epidemiological studies is required. The burdens indicate that an urgent need to improve medical skills, surveillance, diagnosis, and management of SFIs exists. PMID:26449505

  18. Fungal and Parasitic Infections of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Stephen A.; Penn, Christopher C.; Negvesky, Gerald J.; Butrus, Salim I.

    2000-01-01

    The unique structure of the human eye as well as exposure of the eye directly to the environment renders it vulnerable to a number of uncommon infectious diseases caused by fungi and parasites. Host defenses directed against these microorganisms, once anatomical barriers are breached, are often insufficient to prevent loss of vision. Therefore, the timely identification and treatment of the involved microorganisms are paramount. The anatomy of the eye and its surrounding structures is presented with an emphasis upon the association of the anatomy with specific infection of fungi and parasites. For example, filamentous fungal infections of the eye are usually due to penetrating trauma by objects contaminated by vegetable matter of the cornea or globe or, by extension, of infection from adjacent paranasal sinuses. Fungal endophthalmitis and chorioretinitis, on the other hand, are usually the result of antecedent fungemia seeding the ocular tissue. Candida spp. are the most common cause of endogenous endophthalmitis, although initial infection with the dimorphic fungi may lead to infection and scarring of the chorioretina. Contact lens wear is associated with keratitis caused by yeasts, filamentous fungi, and Acanthamoebae spp. Most parasitic infections of the eye, however, arise following bloodborne carriage of the microorganism to the eye or adjacent structures. PMID:11023963

  19. Combat-Related Invasive Fungal Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    Combat-related invasive fungal (mold) wound infections (IFIs) have emerged as an important and morbid complication following explosive blast injuries among military personnel. Similar to trauma-associated IFI cases among civilian populations, as in agricultural accidents and natural disasters, these infections occur in the setting of penetrating wounds contaminated by environmental debris. Specific risk factors for combat-related IFI include dismounted (patrolling on foot) blast injuries occurring mostly in southern Afghanistan, resulting in above knee amputations requiring resuscitation with large-volume blood transfusions. Diagnosis of IFI is based upon early identification of a recurrently necrotic wound following serial debridement and tissue-based histopathology examination with special stains to detect invasive disease. Fungal culture of affected tissue also provides supportive information. Aggressive surgical debridement of affected tissue is the primary therapy. Empiric antifungal therapy should be considered when there is a strong suspicion for IFI. Both liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole should be considered initially for treatment since many of the cases involve not only Mucorales species but also Aspergillus or Fusarium spp., with narrowing of regimen based upon clinical mycology findings. PMID:25530825

  20. Fungi and fungal toxins as weapons.

    PubMed

    Paterson, R Russell M

    2006-09-01

    Recent aggressive attacks on innocent citizens have resulted in governments increasing security. However, there is a good case for prevention rather than reaction. Bioweapons, mycotoxins, fungal biocontrol agents (FBCA), and even pharmaceuticals contain, or are, toxins and need to be considered in the context of the new paradigm. Is it desirable to discuss such issues? None of the fungi are (a) as toxic as botulinum toxin from Clostridium botulinum, and (b) as dangerous as nuclear weapons. One toxin may be defined as a pharmaceutical and vice versa simply by a small change in concentration or a moiety. Mycotoxins are defined as naturally occurring toxic compounds obtained from fungi. They are the biggest chronic health risk when incorporated into the diet. The current list of fungal toxins as biochemical weapons is small, although awareness is growing of the threats they may pose. T-2 toxin is perhaps the biggest concern. A clear distinction is required between the biological (fungus) and chemical (toxin) aspects of the issue. There is an obvious requirement to be able to trace these fungi and compounds in the environment and to know when concentrations are abnormal. Many FBCA, produce toxins. This paper indicates how to treat mycotoxicosis and decontaminate mycotoxins. There is considerable confusion and inconsistency surrounding this topic which requires assessment in an impartial and scientific manner. PMID:16908123

  1. Synthesis and assembly of fungal melanin

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Melanin is a unique pigment with myriad functions that is found in all biological kingdoms. It is multifunctional, providing defense against environmental stresses such as ultraviolet (UV) light, oxidizing agents and ionizing radiation. Melanin contributes to the ability of fungi to survive in harsh environments. In addition, it plays a role in fungal pathogenesis. Melanin is an amorphous polymer that is produced by one of two synthetic pathways. Fungi may synthesize melanin from endogenous substrate via a 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) intermediate. Alternatively, some fungi produce melanin from l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa). The detailed chemical structure of melanin is not known. However, microscopic studies show that it has an overall granular structure. In fungi, melanin granules are localized to the cell wall where they are likely cross-linked to polysaccharides. Recent studies suggest the fungal melanin may be synthesized in internal vesicles akin to mammalian melanosomes and transported to the cell wall. Potential applications of melanin take advantage of melanin's radioprotective properties and propensity to bind to a variety of substances. PMID:22173481

  2. Standard methods for fungal brood disease research

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Annette Bruun; Aronstein, Kathrine; Flores, José Manuel; Vojvodic, Svjetlana; Palacio, María Alejandra; Spivak, Marla

    2013-01-01

    Summary Chalkbrood and stonebrood are two fungal diseases associated with honey bee brood. Chalkbrood, caused by Ascosphaera apis, is a common and widespread disease that can result in severe reduction of emerging worker bees and thus overall colony productivity. Stonebrood is caused by Aspergillus spp. that are rarely observed, so the impact on colony health is not very well understood. A major concern with the presence of Aspergillus in honey bees is the production of airborne conidia, which can lead to allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary aspergilloma, or even invasive aspergillosis in lung tissues upon inhalation by humans. In the current chapter we describe the honey bee disease symptoms of these fungal pathogens. In addition, we provide research methodologies and protocols for isolating and culturing, in vivo and in vitro assays that are commonly used to study these host pathogen interactions. We give guidelines on the preferred methods used in current research and the application of molecular techniques. We have added photographs, drawings and illustrations to assist bee-extension personnel and bee scientists in the control of these two diseases. PMID:24198438

  3. Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis due to Curvularia lunata.

    PubMed

    Cavanna, Caterina; Seminari, Elena; Pusateri, Alessandro; Mangione, Francesca; Lallitto, Fabiola; Esposto, Maria Carmela; Pagella, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of Curvularia lunata infection in an immunocompetent male with an initial diagnosis of suspected left side allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), treated surgically. He had a relapse of nasal polyposis and underwent a surgical revision under local anaesthesia with endoscopic nasal polypectomy. The histological examination of the surgical specimen showed an inflammatory polyp of the paranasal sinuses, with eosinophil and lymphocyte infiltration, but without evidence of fungi. However, Curvularia spp fungus grew in cultures of nasal sinus drainage and bioptical specimens. The fungus was identified by DNA sequencing as C. lunata. The patient was then treated with itraconazole (200 mg BID for 4 weeks), mometasone furoate nasal spray (100 mcg BID for 6 months) and normal saline nasal irrigations. At the last follow-up endoscopic evaluation after 19 month from treatment, the patient was symptomless and free from disease. No polyp recurrence nor seromucous discharges were noticed. This first case of C. lunata-associated AFRS reported in Italy, highlights the difficulty of this diagnosis and the usefulness of molecular identification of the fungal species involved. PMID:24858653

  4. Effect of Cover Crops on Soil Fungal Diversity and Biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of various cover crops (sordan, mustard, canola, honeysweet, and fallow) to influence soil fungal biomass and diversity were tested in a potato field in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Soil samples (0-5 cm depth) were randomly selected from each cover crop plot and soil fungal communitie...

  5. A novel method to scale up fungal endophyte isolations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimations of species diversity are influenced by sampling intensity which in turn is influenced by methodology. For fungal endophyte diversity studies, the methodology includes surface-sterilization prior to isolation of endophytes. Surface-sterilization is an essential component of fungal endophy...

  6. Bat White-Nose Syndrome: An Emerging Fungal Pathogen?

    E-print Network

    Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    %)] with cutaneous fungal infection had little or no identifiable fat reserves, crucial for suc- cessful hibernation- ous fungal infection. These bats were collected between 1 February and 1 April 2008 from all states-associated cutaneous infection. Worldwide, bats play critical ecological roles in insect control, plant pollination

  7. Edaphic sorting drives arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community assembly

    E-print Network

    Edaphic sorting drives arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community assembly in a serpentine/non-serpentine. Edaphic sorting drives arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community assembly in a serpentine/non-serpentine mosaic landscape. Ecosphere 3(5):42. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES12-00059.1 Abstract. Serpentine soil

  8. Fungal Diversity Identification of Botryosphaeriaceae from Eucalyptus, Acacia

    E-print Network

    Fungal Diversity 103 Identification of Botryosphaeriaceae from Eucalyptus, Acacia and Pinus). Identification of Botryosphaeriaceae from Eucalyptus, Acacia and Pinus in Venezuela. Fungal Diversity 25: 103-125. Species of the Botryosphaeriaceae are pathogens of many plantation trees, including species of Acacia

  9. Chemogenomic analysis of fungal stress-response systems using phytochemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal pathogens can cause major problems for both agriculture and human health. By infecting crop plants, fungi cause the plant to die or spoil its productivity. Some fungi actually produce toxic substances that are harmful, if ingested. Fungal infections of humans can also result in major health p...

  10. First genomic survey of human skin fungal diversity

    Cancer.gov

    Fungal infections of the skin affect 29 million people in the United States. In the first study of human fungal skin diversity, National Institutes of Health researchers sequenced the DNA of fungi that thrive at different skin sites of healthy adults to d

  11. Fungal Diversity Chrysoporthe doradensis sp. nov. pathogenic to Eucalyptus in

    E-print Network

    Fungal Diversity Chrysoporthe doradensis sp. nov. pathogenic to Eucalyptus in Ecuador Marieka. and Wingfield, M.J. (2005). Chrysoporthe doradensis sp. nov. pathogenic to Eucalyptus in Ecuador. Fungal Eucalyptus in various South American countries. This disease has not previously been recorded from Ecuador

  12. 7 CFR 201.58d - Fungal endophyte test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...preparation of aniline blue stain for use in testing grass seed and plant material for the presence of fungal endophyte: (1) Prepare...3) Use stain as-is or dilute with water if staining is too dark. (b) Procedure for determining levels of fungal...

  13. Characterization of the Biosynthetic Pathway of Fungal Aromatic Polyketides

    E-print Network

    Li, Yanran

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic polyketides comprise an important and structurally diverse group of natural products synthesized from microbes and plants. (plant diseases have been linked to fungal mycotoxins,(2) many of which are aromaticplant diseases have been linked to fungal mycotoxins, many of which are aromatic

  14. Twenty-second Fungal Genetics Conference - Asilomar, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan D. Walton

    2003-06-30

    The purpose of the Twenty Second Fungal Genetics Conference is to bring together scientists and students who are interested in genetic approaches to studying the biology of filamentous fungi. It is intended to stimulate thinking and discussion in an atmosphere that supports interactions between scientists at different levels and in different disciplines. Topics range from the basic to the applied. Filamentous fungi impact human affairs in many ways. In the environment they are the most important agents of decay and nutrient turnover. They are used extensively in the food industry for the production of food enzymes such as pectinase and food additives such as citric acid. They are used in the production of fermented foods such as alcoholic drinks, bread, cheese, and soy sauce. More than a dozen species of mushrooms are used as foods directly. Many of our most important antibiotics, such as penicillin, cyclosporin, and lovastatin, come from fungi. Fungi also have many negative impacts on human health and economics. Fungi are serious pathogens in immuno-compromised patients. Fungi are the single largest group of plant pathogens and thus a serious limit on crop productivity throughout the world. Many fungi are allergenic, and mold contamination of residences and commercial buildings is now recognized as a serious public health threat. As decomposers, fungi cause extensive damage to just about all natural and synthetic materials.

  15. A fungal monooxygenase-derived jasmonate attenuates host innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Rajesh N; Benke, Peter I; Qu, Ziwei; Chen, Yuan Yi Constance; Yang, Fan; Swarup, Sanjay; Naqvi, Naweed I

    2015-09-01

    Distinct modifications fine-tune the activity of jasmonic acid (JA) in regulating plant growth and immunity. Hydroxylated JA (12OH-JA) promotes flower and tuber development but prevents induction of JA signaling, plant defense or both. However, biosynthesis of 12OH-JA has remained elusive. We report here an antibiotic biosynthesis monooxygenase (Abm) that converts endogenous free JA into 12OH-JA in the model rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Such fungal 12OH-JA is secreted during host penetration and helps evade the defense response. Loss of Abm in M. oryzae led to accumulation of methyl JA (MeJA), which induces host defense and blocks invasive growth. Exogenously added 12OH-JA markedly attenuated abm?-induced immunity in rice. Notably, Abm itself is secreted after invasion and most likely converts plant JA into 12OH-JA to facilitate host colonization. This study sheds light on the chemical arms race during plant-pathogen interaction, reveals Abm as an antifungal target and outlines a synthetic strategy for transformation of a versatile small-molecule phytohormone. PMID:26258762

  16. Cultured fungal associates from the deep-sea coral Lophelia pertusa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galkiewicz, Julia P.; Stellick, Sarah H.; Gray, Michael A.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2012-01-01

    The cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa provides important habitat to many deep-sea fishes and invertebrates. Studies of the microbial taxa associated with L. pertusa thus far have focused on bacteria, neglecting the microeukaryotic members. This is the first study to culture fungi from living L. pertusa and to investigate carbon source utilization by the fungal associates. Twenty-seven fungal isolates from seven families, including both filamentous and yeast morphotypes, were cultured from healthy L. pertusa colonies collected from the northern Gulf of Mexico, the West Florida Slope, and the western Atlantic Ocean off the Florida coast. Isolates from different sites were phylogenetically closely related, indicating these genera are widely distributed in association with L. pertusa. Biolog™ Filamentous Fungi microtiter plates were employed to determine the functional capacity of a subset of isolates to grow on varied carbon sources. While four of the isolates exhibited no growth on any provided carbon source, the rest (n=10) grew on 8.3–66.7% of carbon sources available. Carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids were the most commonly metabolized carbon sources, with overlap between the carbon sources used and amino acids found in L. pertusa mucus. This study represents the first attempt to characterize a microeukaryotic group associated with L. pertusa. However, the functional role of fungi within the coral holobiont remains unclear.

  17. Outcomes of fungal interactions are determined by soil invertebrate grazers.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Thomas W; Boddy, Lynne; Jones, T Hefin

    2011-11-01

    Saprotrophic fungal community composition, determined by the outcome of competitive mycelial interactions, is one of the many key factors affecting soil nutrient mineralisation and decomposition rates. Fungal communities are not generally predicted to be regulated by top-down factors, such as predation, but rather by bottom-up factors, including resource availability. We show that invertebrate grazers can exert selective pressures on fungal decomposer communities in soil, reversing the outcomes of competitive interactions. By feeding selectively on the cord-forming fungus Resinicium bicolor, isopods prevented the competitive exclusion of Hypholoma fasciculare and Phanerochaete velutina in soil and wood. Nematode populations also reversed the outcomes of competitive interactions by stimulating growth of less competitive fungi. These represent two opposing mechanisms by which soil fauna may influence fungal community composition and diversity. Factors affecting soil invertebrate communities will have direct consequences for fungal-mediated nutrient cycling in woodland soils. PMID:21929699

  18. The burden of serious fungal diseases in Russia.

    PubMed

    Klimko, N; Kozlova, Y; Khostelidi, S; Shadrivova, O; Borzova, Y; Burygina, E; Vasilieva, N; Denning, D W

    2015-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of fungal infections in Russia is unknown. We estimated the burden of fungal infections in Russia according to the methodology of the LIFE program (www.LIFE-worldwide.org). The total number of patients with serious and chronic mycoses in Russia in 2011 was three million. Most of these patients (2607 494) had superficial fungal infections (recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis, oral and oesophageal candidiasis with HIV infection and tinea capitis). Invasive and chronic fungal infections (invasive candidiasis, invasive and chronic aspergillosis, cryptococcal meningitis, mucormycosis and Pneumocystis pneumonia) affected 69 331 patients. The total number of adults with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and severe asthma with fungal sensitisation was 406 082. PMID:26449508

  19. Fungicide Effects on Fungal Community Composition in the Wheat Phyllosphere

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Ida; Friberg, Hanna; Steinberg, Christian; Persson, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The fungicides used to control diseases in cereal production can have adverse effects on non-target fungi, with possible consequences for plant health and productivity. This study examined fungicide effects on fungal communities on winter wheat leaves in two areas of Sweden. High-throughput 454 sequencing of the fungal ITS2 region yielded 235 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the species level from the 18 fields studied. It was found that commonly used fungicides had moderate but significant effect on fungal community composition in the wheat phyllosphere. The relative abundance of several saprotrophs was altered by fungicide use, while the effect on common wheat pathogens was mixed. The fungal community on wheat leaves consisted mainly of basidiomycete yeasts, saprotrophic ascomycetes and plant pathogens. A core set of six fungal OTUs representing saprotrophic species was identified. These were present across all fields, although overall the difference in OTU richness was large between the two areas studied. PMID:25369054

  20. Fungal endophytes characterization from four species of Diplazium Swartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affina-Eliya, A. A.; Noraini, T.; Nazlina, I.; Ruzi, A. R.

    2014-09-01

    Four species on genus Diplazium namely Diplazium tomentosum, D. sorzogonense, D. asperum and D. accedens of Peninsular Malaysia were studied for presence of fungal endophyte. The objective of this study is to characterize fungal endophytes in the rhizome of four Diplazium species. The rhizome was surface sterilized and incubated to isolate fungal endophytes. Characterization of the colonies was performed by macroscopic morphological, microscopic identification, types of hyphae and mycelium, and spore structure. For isolation that produces spores, the structure of conidiophores and conidia were identified. From this study, four fungal have been isolated and determined as Aspergillus sp. (isolates AE 1), Aspergillus fumigatus (isolates AE 2), Aspergillus versicolor (isolates AE 3) and Verticillium sp. (isolates AE 4). The fungal isolates from this study were classified from the same family Moniliaceae.

  1. Model simulations of fungal spore distribution over the Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Tabish U.; Valsan, Aswathy E.; Ojha, N.; Ravikrishna, R.; Narasimhan, Balaji; Gunthe, Sachin S.

    2015-12-01

    Fungal spores play important role in the health of humans, animals, and plants by constituting a class of the primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs). Additionally, these could mediate the hydrological cycle by acting as nuclei for ice and cloud formation (IN and CCN respectively). Various processes in the biosphere and the variations in the meteorological conditions control the releasing mechanism of spores through active wet and dry discharge. In the present paper, we simulate the concentration of fungal spores over the Indian region during three distinct meteorological seasons by combining a numerical model (WRF-Chem) with the fungal spore emissions based on land-use type. Maiden high-resolution regional simulations revealed large spatial gradient and strong seasonal dependence in the concentration of fungal spores over the Indian region. The fungal spore concentrations are found to be the highest during winter (0-70 ?g m-3 in December), moderately higher during summer (0-35 ?g m-3 in May) and lowest during the monsoon (0-25 ?g m-3 in July). The elevated concentrations during winter are attributed to the shallower boundary layer trapping the emitted fungal spores in smaller volume. In contrast, the deeper boundary layer mixing in May and stronger monsoonal-convection in July distribute the fungal spores throughout the lower troposphere (?5 km). We suggest that the higher fungal spore concentrations during winter could have potential health impacts. While, stronger vertical mixing could enable fungal spores to influence the cloud formation during summer and monsoon. Our study provides the first information about the distribution and seasonal variation of fungal spores over the densely populated and observationally sparse Indian region.

  2. Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, Jon K.; Lasure, Linda L.

    2004-05-03

    Many of the commercial production processes for organic acids are excellent examples of fungal biotechnology. However, unlike penicillin, the organic acids have had a less visible impact on human well-being. Indeed, organic acid fermentations are often not even identified as fungal bioprocesses, having been overshadowed by the successful deployment of the ?-lactam processes. Yet, in terms of productivity, fungal organic acid processes may be the best examples of all. For example, commercial processes using Aspergillus niger in aerated stirred-tank-reactors can convert glucose to citric acid with greater than 80% efficiency and at final concentrations in hundreds of grams per liter. Surprisingly, this phenomenal productivity has been the object of relatively few research programs. Perhaps a greater understanding of this extraordinary capacity of filamentous fungi to produce organic acids in high concentrations will allow greater exploitation of these organisms via application of new knowledge in this era of genomics-based biotechnology. In this chapter, we will explore the biochemistry and modern genetic aspects of the current and potential commercial processes for making organic acids. The organisms involved, with a few exceptions, are filamentous fungi, and this review is limited to that group. Although yeasts including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, species of Rhodotorula, Pichia, and Hansenula are important organisms in fungal biotechnology, they have not been significant for commercial organic acid production, with one exception. The yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, and related yeast species, may be in use commercially to produce citric acid (Lopez-Garcia, 2002). Furthermore, in the near future engineered yeasts may provide new commercial processes to make lactic acid (Porro, Bianchi, Ranzi, Frontali, Vai, Winkler, & Alberghina, 2002). This chapter is divided into two parts. The first contains a review of the commercial aspects of current and potential large-scale processes for fungal organic acid production. The second presents a detailed review of current knowledge of the biochemistry and genetic regulation of organic acid biosynthesis. The organic acids considered are limited to polyfunctional acids containing one or more carboxyl groups, hydroxyl groups, or both, that are closely tied to central metabolic pathways. A major objective of the review is to link the biochemistry of organic acid production to the available genomic data.

  3. Fungal microcolonies on indoor surfaces — an explanation for the base-level fungal spore counts in indoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasanen, A.-L.; Heinonen-Tanski, H.; Kalliokoski, P.; Jantunen, M. J.

    In the subarctic winter, fungal spores are found in indoor air even when outdoor spore levels are very low. The results of this study support an explanation that some indoor airborne fungal spores are derived from unnoticeable fungal microcolonies, which may develop on temporarily wet surfaces. Laboratory experiments on Penicillium verrucosum indicated that the fungus germinated on new wallpaper very quickly (about half an hour) under moist conditions. Hyphal growth and sporulation of the fungus on moist wallpaper occured within one day of incubation. In gravity-settling tape samples from occasionally wet surfaces in a suburban home, large spore aggregates, hyphal fragments with some spores and spores in the germination stage were found, indicating fungal growth. These experiments showed that fungal microcolonies can develop within a week on occasionally wet indoor surfaces.

  4. Bacterial and fungal growth for monitoring the impact of wildfire combined or not with different soil stabilization treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro, Ana; Baath, Erland; Díaz-Raviña, Montserrat

    2015-04-01

    Soil stabilization techniques are rapidly gaining acceptance as efficient tool for reducing post-fire erosion. However, despite its interest, information concerning their impact on soil biota is scarce. We examined, under field conditions, the bacterial and fungal medium-term responses in a hillslope area located in Laza (NW Spain) affected by a high severity wildfire with the following treatments established by triplicate (4 x 20 m plots): unburnt control soil, burnt control soil, burnt soil with rye seeding and burnt soil with straw mulch. The bacterial and fungal growth, as well as respiration, were measured 4 years after fire and application of treatments using leucine incorporation for bacterial growth and acetate-in-ergosterol incorporation for fungal growth. The results showed that soil respiration and fungal biomass were negatively affected by fire, in the top layer (0-5 cm), while bacterial and fungal growth was stimulated. These microbial changes induced by fire were associated with modifications in organic matter (50% reduction in C content) and soil pH (increase of 0.5-0.9 units). Thus, the results suggested that under acid environment (pH in water 3.5) post-fire conditions might have favoured both microbial groups, which is supported by the fact that estimated bacterial and fungal growth were positive and significant correlated with soil pH (range of 3.5-4.5). This contrast with the well-known reported investigations showing that bacteria rather than fungi proliferation occurred after prescribed fire or wildfire; it should be noticed, however, that soils with a higher pH than that in the present study were used. Our data also indicated that bacterial and fungal communities were not significantly affected by seeding and mulching treatments. The results highlighted the importance of pre-fire soil pH as key factor in determining the microbial response after fire. Acknowledgements. A. Barreiro is recipient of FPU grant from Spanish Ministry of Education. Keywords: wildfire, seeding, mulching, bacterial growth, fungal growth

  5. Fungal stress biology: a preface to the Fungal Stress Responses special edition.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Drauzio E N; Alder-Rangel, Alene; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Finlay, Roger D; Kupiec, Martin; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Braga, Gilberto U L; Corrochano, Luis M; Hallsworth, John E

    2015-08-01

    There is currently an urgent need to increase global food security, reverse the trends of increasing cancer rates, protect environmental health, and mitigate climate change. Toward these ends, it is imperative to improve soil health and crop productivity, reduce food spoilage, reduce pesticide usage by increasing the use of biological control, optimize bioremediation of polluted sites, and generate energy from sustainable sources such as biofuels. This review focuses on fungi that can help provide solutions to such problems. We discuss key aspects of fungal stress biology in the context of the papers published in this Special Issue of Current Genetics. This area of biology has relevance to pure and applied research on fungal (and indeed other) systems, including biological control of insect pests, roles of saprotrophic fungi in agriculture and forestry, mycotoxin contamination of the food-supply chain, optimization of microbial fermentations including those used for bioethanol production, plant pathology, the limits of life on Earth, and astrobiology. PMID:26116075

  6. Selection to sequence: opportunities in fungal genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.

    2009-12-01

    Selection is a biological force, causing genotypic and phenotypic change over time. Whether environmental or human induced, selective pressures shape the genotypes and the phenotypes of organisms both in nature and in the laboratory. In nature, selective pressure is highly dynamic and the sum of the environment and other organisms. In the laboratory, selection is used in genetic studies and industrial strain development programs to isolate mutants affecting biological processes of interest to researchers. Selective pressures are important considerations for fungal biology. In the laboratory a number of fungi are used as experimental systems to study a wide range of biological processes and in nature fungi are important pathogens of plants and animals and play key roles in carbon and nitrogen cycling. The continued development of high throughput sequencing technologies makes it possible to characterize at the genomic level, the effect of selective pressures both in the lab and in nature for filamentous fungi as well as other organisms.

  7. The Fungal Biome of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Organisms residing in the oral cavity (oral microbiota) contribute to health and disease, and influence diseases like gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral candidiasis (the most common oral complication of HIV-infection). These organisms are also associated with cancer and other systemic diseases including upper respiratory infections. There is limited knowledge regarding how oral microbes interact together and influence the host immune system. Characterizing the oral microbial community (oral microbiota) in health and disease represents a critical step in gaining insight into various members of this community. While most of the studies characterizing oral microbiota have focused on bacterial community, there are few encouraging studies characterizing the oral mycobiome (the fungal component of the oral microbiota). Our group recently characterized the oral mycobiome in health and disease focusing on HIV. In this chapter we will describe the methods used by our group for characterization of the oral mycobiome. PMID:26519069

  8. Molecular characterization of coprophilous fungal communities reveals sequences related to root-associated fungal endophytes.

    PubMed

    Herrera, José; Poudel, Ravin; Khidir, Hana H

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the use of molecular methods to characterize the coprophilous fungal communities (CFC) that inhabit the dung of four species of mammalian herbivores at two sites, Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) in New Mexico and Wind Cave National Park (WCNP) in South Dakota. Results reveal that CFC from domesticated cattle (Bos taurus) at SNWR, and bison (Bison bison) and black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at WCNP were diverse but dominated primarily by members within eight taxonomic orders, including the rarely cultured and anaerobic order Neocallimastigales. In addition, 7.7% (138 of 1,788) of the sequences obtained from all dung samples were at least 97% similar to root-associated fungal (RAF) sequences previously described from blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), a common forage grass found throughout North America and growing at both study sites. In contrast, 95.8% (295 of 308) of the sequences and four of the total seven operational taxonomic units obtained from pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) dung belonged to the Pleosporalean order. We hypothesize that some herbivore vectors disperse non-systemic (non-clavicipitaceous) fungal endophytes. These dispersal events, it is argued, are most likely to occur via herbivores that occasionally forage and masticate root tissue, especially in arid regions where aboveground vegetation is sparse. The results of this study suggest that some (possibly many) members of the RAF community can expand their ecological role to include colonizing dung. PMID:20842497

  9. Fungal spore transport through a building structure.

    PubMed

    Airaksinen, M; Kurnitski, J; Pasanen, P; Seppänen, O

    2004-04-01

    The study carried out laboratory measurements with a full-scale timber frame structure to determine penetration of inert particles with size distribution from 0.6 to 4 microm and spores of Penicillium and Cladosporium through the structure. Pressure difference over and air leakage through the structure were varied. Measurements at moderate pressure differences resulted in the penetration factors within the range of 0.05-0.2 for inert particles, and indicated also the penetration of fungal spores through the structure. The measurements showed that the penetration was highly dependent on pressure difference over the structure but not on holes in surface boards of the structure. The results show that surface contacts between the frames and mineral wool may have a significant effect on penetration. The penetration was approximately constant within particle size rage of 0.6-2.5 microm, but particles with diameter of 4.0 microm did not penetrate through the structure at all even at a higher-pressure difference of 20 Pa, except in the case of direct flow-path through the structure. Results have important consequences for practical design showing that penetration of fungal spores through the building envelope is difficult to prevent by sealing. The only effective way to prevent penetration seems to be balancing or pressurizing the building. In cold climates, moisture condensation risk should be taken into account if pressure is higher indoors than outdoors. Determined penetration factors were highly dependent on the pressure difference. Mechanical exhaust ventilation needs a special consideration as de-pressurizing the building may cause health risk if there is hazardous contamination in the building envelope exists. PMID:15009415

  10. Primordial Enemies: Fungal Pathogens in Thrips Societies

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Christine; Wilson, Peter D.; Hoggard, Stephen; Gillings, Michael; Palmer, Chris; Smith, Shannon; Beattie, Doug; Hussey, Sam; Stow, Adam; Beattie, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Microbial pathogens are ancient selective agents that have driven many aspects of multicellular evolution, including genetic, behavioural, chemical and immune defence systems. It appears that fungi specialised to attack insects were already present in the environments in which social insects first evolved and we hypothesise that if the early stages of social evolution required antifungal defences, then covariance between levels of sociality and antifungal defences might be evident in extant lineages, the defences becoming stronger with group size and increasing social organisation. Thus, we compared the activity of cuticular antifungal compounds in thrips species (Insecta: Thysanoptera) representing a gradient of increasing group size and sociality: solitary, communal, social and eusocial, against the entomopathogen Cordyceps bassiana. Solitary and communal species showed little or no activity. In contrast, the social and eusocial species killed this fungus, suggesting that the evolution of sociality has been accompanied by sharp increases in the effectiveness of antifungal compounds. The antiquity of fungal entomopathogens, demonstrated by fossil finds, coupled with the unequivocal response of thrips colonies to them shown here, suggests two new insights into the evolution of thrips sociality: First, traits that enabled nascent colonies to defend themselves against microbial pathogens should be added to those considered essential for social evolution. Second, limits to the strength of antimicrobials, through resource constraints or self-antibiosis, may have been overcome by increase in the numbers of individuals secreting them, thus driving increases in colony size. If this is the case for social thrips, then we may ask: did antimicrobial traits and microbes such as fungal entomopathogens play an integral part in the evolution of insect sociality in general? PMID:23185420

  11. Expression in Escherichia coli of Native and Chimeric Phenolic Acid Decarboxylases with Modified Enzymatic Activities and Method for Screening Recombinant E. coli Strains Expressing These Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Barthelmebs, Lise; Diviès, Charles; Cavin, Jean-François

    2001-01-01

    Four bacterial phenolic acid decarboxylases (PAD) from Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus pumilus were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their activities on p-coumaric, ferulic, and caffeic acids were compared. Although these four enzymes displayed 61% amino acid sequence identity, they exhibit different activities for ferulic and caffeic acid metabolism. To elucidate the domain(s) that determines these differences, chimeric PAD proteins were constructed and expressed in E. coli by exchanging their individual carboxy-terminal portions. Analysis of the chimeric enzyme activities suggests that the C-terminal region may be involved in determining PAD substrate specificity and catalytic capacity. In order to test phenolic acid toxicity, the levels of growth of recombinant E. coli displaying and not displaying PAD activity were compared on medium supplemented with different concentrations of phenolic acids and with differing pHs. Though these acids already have a slight inhibitory effect on E. coli, vinyl phenol derivatives, created during decarboxylation of phenolic acids, were much more inhibitory to the E. coli control strain. To take advantage of this property, a solid medium with the appropriate pH and phenolic acid concentration was developed; in this medium the recombinant E. coli strains expressing PAD activity form colonies approximately five times smaller than those formed by strains devoid of PAD activity. PMID:11229892

  12. Pyrosequencing Reveals Fungal Communities in the Rhizosphere of Xinjiang Jujube

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Jian-Gui; Qin, Wei; Xiao, Cheng-Ze; Zhao, Xu; Jiang, Hong-Xia; Sui, Jun-Kang; Sa, Rong-Bo; Wang, Wei-Yan; Liu, Xun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are important soil components as both decomposers and plant symbionts and play a major role in ecological and biogeochemical processes. However, little is known about the richness and structure of fungal communities. DNA sequencing technologies allow for the direct estimation of microbial community diversity, avoiding culture-based biases. We therefore used 454 pyrosequencing to investigate the fungal communities in the rhizosphere of Xinjiang jujube. We obtained no less than 40,488 internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA reads, the number of each sample was 6943, 6647, 6584, 6550, 6860, and 6904, and we used bioinformatics and multivariate statistics to analyze the results. The index of diversity showed greater richness in the rhizosphere fungal community of a 3-year-old jujube than in that of an 8-year-old jujube. Most operational taxonomic units belonged to Ascomycota, and taxonomic analyses identified Hypocreales as the dominant fungal order. Our results demonstrated that the fungal orders are present in different proportions in different sampling areas. Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed a significant correlation between soil properties and the abundance of fungal phyla. Our results indicated lower fungal diversity in the rhizosphere of Xinjiang jujube than that reported in other studies, and we hope our findings provide a reference for future research. PMID:25685820

  13. Pyrosequencing reveals fungal communities in the rhizosphere of Xinjiang Jujube.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Jian-Gui; Qin, Wei; Xiao, Cheng-Ze; Zhao, Xu; Jiang, Hong-Xia; Sui, Jun-Kang; Sa, Rong-Bo; Wang, Wei-Yan; Liu, Xun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are important soil components as both decomposers and plant symbionts and play a major role in ecological and biogeochemical processes. However, little is known about the richness and structure of fungal communities. DNA sequencing technologies allow for the direct estimation of microbial community diversity, avoiding culture-based biases. We therefore used 454 pyrosequencing to investigate the fungal communities in the rhizosphere of Xinjiang jujube. We obtained no less than 40,488 internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA reads, the number of each sample was 6943, 6647, 6584, 6550, 6860, and 6904, and we used bioinformatics and multivariate statistics to analyze the results. The index of diversity showed greater richness in the rhizosphere fungal community of a 3-year-old jujube than in that of an 8-year-old jujube. Most operational taxonomic units belonged to Ascomycota, and taxonomic analyses identified Hypocreales as the dominant fungal order. Our results demonstrated that the fungal orders are present in different proportions in different sampling areas. Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed a significant correlation between soil properties and the abundance of fungal phyla. Our results indicated lower fungal diversity in the rhizosphere of Xinjiang jujube than that reported in other studies, and we hope our findings provide a reference for future research. PMID:25685820

  14. Estimating the Burden of Fungal Diseases in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ben, Ronen; Denning, David W

    2015-06-01

    Fungal diseases affect a large proportion of the population, ranging in severity from mild superficial infections to life-threatening invasive diseases. Estimates of disease burden are needed to inform public health policies. We estimated the incidence of fungal diseases in Israel based on published surveillance data and risk-based calculations using previously established models. Deaths associated with fungal diseases were estimated from local surveillance data (candidemia) and published reports (invasive aspergillosis). Candidemia was estimated in 649 persons/year and invasive aspergillosis in 254 persons/year; the associated mortality was 2.75 and 0.96 per 100,000 population/year, respectively. Recurrent Candida vulvovaginitis occurs in 130,440 women annually. National incidence rates of cryptococcosis, pneumocystis pneumonia and mucormycosis could not be reliably estimated. Single-center data-derived estimates yielded 24, 26 and 20 cases/year, respectively. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, asthma with fungal sensitization and allergic fungal sinusitis affect 8297 (range 2323-11,615), 14,372 (14,372-17,965) and 39,922 (15,969-183,643) persons, respectively. In Israel, candidemia and invasive aspergillosis rank high among infection-related causes of mortality. Allergic fungal diseases cause chronic or recurrent symptoms in a large population and may contribute to asthma-related hospitalization and death. These general estimates should serve as a primer for future efforts to study fungal epidemiology. PMID:26233998

  15. Effects of the fungal endophyte Acremonium coenophialum on nitrogen accumulation and metabolism in tall fescue

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, P.C. ); Evans, J.J.; Bacon, C.W. )

    1990-03-01

    Infection by the fungal endophyte Acremonium coenophialum affected the accumulation of inorganic and organic N in leaf blades and leaf sheaths of KY31 tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) grown under greenhouse conditions. Total soluble amino acid concentrations were increased in either the blade or sheath of the leaf from infected plants. A number of amino acids were significantly increased in the sheath, but only asparagine increased in the blade. Infection resulted in higher sheath NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentrations, whereas NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} concentrations decreased in both leaf parts. The effects on amino acid, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentrations were dependent upon the level of N fertilization and were usually apparent only at the high rate (10 millimolar) of application. Administration of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} to the leaf blades increased the accumulation of {sup 14}C in their amino acid fraction but not in the sheaths of infected plants. This may indicate that infection increased amino acid synthesis in the blade but that translocation to the sheath, which is the site of fungal colonization, was not affected. Glutamine synthetase activity was greater in leaf blades of infected plants at high and low N rates of fertilization, but nitrate reductase activity was not affected in either part of the leaf. Increased activities of glutamine synthetase together with the other observed changes in N accumulation and metabolism in endophyte-infected tall fescue suggest that NH{sub 4}{sup +} reassimilation could also be affected in the leaf blade.

  16. In Silico Studies on Fungal Metabolite against Skin Cancer Protein (4,5-Diarylisoxazole HSP90 Chaperone)

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Saravanakumar; Sahu, Sunil Kumar; Kandasamy, Kathiresan

    2012-01-01

    This work was to find out the dominant secondary metabolites derived from the fungus Trichoderma and to test them against skin cancer protein. The metabolites were extracted in 80% methanol from the fungal biomass of Trichoderma isolated from mangrove sediment. The crude methanol extract was purified and analysed for the secondary metabolites by GC-MS. Three predominant compounds (heptadecanoic acid, 16 methyl-, methyl ester; 9,12-octadecadienoic acid; cis-9-octadecenoic acid) identified in the extracts were screened against the skin cancer protein (Hsp90) by in-silico docking method. Of the compounds, heptadecanoic acid, 16 methyl, methyl ester was the most potent having the docking score of ?11.4592?Kcal/mol. This value was better than the standard drug “dyclonine”. This work recommends the heptadecanoic acid, 16 methyl, methyl ester for further in vitro and in vivo studies towards its development as anticancer drug. PMID:22991673

  17. Changes of phenolic acids and antioxidant activities during potherb mustard (Brassica juncea, Coss.) pickling.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhongxiang; Hu, Yuxia; Liu, Donghong; Chen, Jianchu; Ye, Xingqian

    2008-06-01

    Phenolic acids in potherb mustard (Brassica juncea, Coss.) were determined and the effects of pickling methods on the contents of total free phenolic acids, total phenolic acids, total phenolics, and antioxidant activities were investigated. Gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and sinapic acid were identified in the present study. The contents of total free phenolic acids, total phenolic acids and total phenolics in fresh potherb mustard were 84.8±0.58?g/g dry weight (DW), 539±1.36?g/g DW, and 7.95±0.28mg/g DW, respectively. The total free phenolic acids increased during the pickling processes, but the total phenolic acids, total phenolics, and antioxidant activities decreased. However, after 5 weeks of fermentation, all the pickling methods retained over 70% of total phenolic contents and above 65% of antioxidant capacities. The results indicated that pickling processes were relatively good methods for the preservation of phenolic acids and antioxidants for potherb mustard. PMID:26065739

  18. Fungal Biofilms: Relevance in the Setting of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Luis R.; Fries, Bettina C.

    2011-01-01

    The use of indwelling medical devices is rapidly growing and is often complicated by infections with biofilm-forming microbes that are resistant to antimicrobial agents and host defense mechanisms. Fungal biofilms have emerged as a clinical problem associated with these medical device infections, causing significant morbidity and mortality. This review discusses the recent advances in the understanding of fungal biofilms, including the role of fungal surface components in adherence, gene expression, and quorum sensing in biofilm formation. We propose novel strategies for the prevention or eradication of microbial colonization of medical prosthetic devices. PMID:21660222

  19. Onychomycosis to Fungal Superinfection: Prevention Strategies and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A

    2015-10-01

    Onychomycosis is the most common fungal skin infection, and it is frequently seen in the setting of other concomitant fungal infections, the most common being tinea pedis. Infected nails become a reservoir of fungal organisms that may infect the skin, and vice versa. Early, effective treatment of the nails is necessary for preventing not only permanent structural damage but also the spread and superinfection of the surrounding skin and soft tissue. Moreover, treatment of the skin is important for preventing re-infection of the nails.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2015;14(suppl 10):s32-s34. PMID:26461832

  20. Cytochrome P450 enzymes in the fungal kingdom.

    PubMed

    Crešnar, B; Petri?, S

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases of fungi are involved in many essential cellular processes and play diverse roles. The enzymes catalyze the conversion of hydrophobic intermediates of primary and secondary metabolic pathways, detoxify natural and environmental pollutants and allow fungi to grow under different conditions. Fungal genome sequencing projects have enabled the annotation of several thousand novel cytochromes P450, many of which constitute new families. This review presents the characteristics of fungal cytochrome P450 systems and updates information on the functions of characterized fungal P450 monooxygenases as well as outlines the currently used strategies for determining the function of the many putative P450 enzymes. PMID:20619366

  1. New molecular markers for fungal phylogenetics: Two genes for species level systematics in the Sordariomycetes (Ascomycota)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although significant progress has been made resolving deep branches of the fungal tree of life in recent works, many fungal systematists are interested in species-level questions to both define species and to assess fungal biodiversity. Fungal genome sequences are a useful resource to systematic bio...

  2. Insect peptide metchnikowin confers on barley a selective capacity for resistance to fungal ascomycetes pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rahnamaeian, Mohammad; Langen, Gregor; Imani, Jafargholi; Khalifa, Walaa; Altincicek, Boran; von Wettstein, Diter; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The potential of metchnikowin, a 26-amino acid residue proline-rich antimicrobial peptide synthesized in the fat body of Drosophila melanogaster was explored to engineer disease resistance in barley against devastating fungal plant pathogens. The synthetic peptide caused strong in vitro growth inhibition (IC50 value ?1 ?M) of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. Transgenic barley expressing the metchnikowin gene in its 52-amino acid pre-pro-peptide form under the control of the inducible mannopine synthase (mas) gene promoter from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens displayed enhanced resistance to powdery mildew as well as Fusarium head blight and root rot. In response to these pathogens, metchnikowin accumulated in plant apoplastic space, specifying that the insect signal peptide is functional in monocotyledons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that the peptide is markedly effective against fungal pathogens of the phylum Ascomycota but, clearly, less active against Basidiomycota fungi. Importantly, germination of the mutualistic basidiomycete mycorrhizal fungus Piriformospora indica was affected only at concentrations beyond 50 ?M. These results suggest that antifungal peptides from insects are a valuable source for crop plant improvements and their differential activities toward different phyla of fungi denote a capacity for insect peptides to be used as selective measures on specific plant diseases. PMID:19734262

  3. Insect peptide metchnikowin confers on barley a selective capacity for resistance to fungal ascomycetes pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rahnamaeian, Mohammad; Langen, Gregor; Imani, Jafargholi; Khalifa, Walaa; Altincicek, Boran; von Wettstein, Diter; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The potential of metchnikowin, a 26-amino acid residue proline-rich antimicrobial peptide synthesized in the fat body of Drosophila melanogaster was explored to engineer disease resistance in barley against devastating fungal plant pathogens. The synthetic peptide caused strong in vitro growth inhibition (IC(50) value approximately 1 muM) of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. Transgenic barley expressing the metchnikowin gene in its 52-amino acid pre-pro-peptide form under the control of the inducible mannopine synthase (mas) gene promoter from the T(i) plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens displayed enhanced resistance to powdery mildew as well as Fusarium head blight and root rot. In response to these pathogens, metchnikowin accumulated in plant apoplastic space, specifying that the insect signal peptide is functional in monocotyledons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that the peptide is markedly effective against fungal pathogens of the phylum Ascomycota but, clearly, less active against Basidiomycota fungi. Importantly, germination of the mutualistic basidiomycete mycorrhizal fungus Piriformospora indica was affected only at concentrations beyond 50 muM. These results suggest that antifungal peptides from insects are a valuable source for crop plant improvements and their differential activities toward different phyla of fungi denote a capacity for insect peptides to be used as selective measures on specific plant diseases. PMID:19734262

  4. Expression of Fungal diacylglycerol acyltransferase2 Genes to Increase Kernel Oil in Maize[OA

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Janette; Brackenridge, Doug; Colletti, Ron; Daley, Maureen; Hawkins, Deborah J.; Xiong, Hui; Mai, Jennifer; Screen, Steve E.; Val, Dale; Lardizabal, Kathryn; Gruys, Ken; Deikman, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) oil has high value but is only about 4% of the grain by weight. To increase kernel oil content, fungal diacylglycerol acyltransferase2 (DGAT2) genes from Umbelopsis (formerly Mortierella) ramanniana and Neurospora crassa were introduced into maize using an embryo-enhanced promoter. The protein encoded by the N. crassa gene was longer than that of U. ramanniana. It included 353 amino acids that aligned to the U. ramanniana DGAT2A protein and a 243-amino acid sequence at the amino terminus that was unique to the N. crassa DGAT2 protein. Two forms of N. crassa DGAT2 were tested: the predicted full-length protein (L-NcDGAT2) and a shorter form (S-NcDGAT2) that encoded just the sequences that share homology with the U. ramanniana protein. Expression of all three transgenes in maize resulted in small but statistically significant increases in kernel oil. S-NcDGAT2 had the biggest impact on kernel oil, with a 26% (relative) increase in oil in kernels of the best events (inbred). Increases in kernel oil were also obtained in both conventional and high-oil hybrids, and grain yield was not affected by expression of these fungal DGAT2 transgenes. PMID:21245192

  5. Analysis of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Degradation in Agrobacterium fabrum Reveals a Coenzyme A-Dependent, Beta-Oxidative Deacetylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Campillo, Tony; Renoud, Sébastien; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Vial, Ludovic; Baude, Jessica; Gaillard, Vincent; Bellvert, Floriant; Chamignon, Cécile; Comte, Gilles; Lavire, Céline; Hommais, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Agrobacterium fabrum (genomospecies G8 of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex) is known to have species-specific genes involved in ferulic acid degradation. Here, we characterized, by genetic and analytical means, intermediates of degradation as feruloyl coenzyme A (feruloyl-CoA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-?-hydroxypropionyl–CoA, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-?-ketopropionyl–CoA, vanillic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The genes atu1416, atu1417, and atu1420 have been experimentally shown to be necessary for the degradation of ferulic acid. Moreover, the genes atu1415 and atu1421 have been experimentally demonstrated to be essential for this degradation and are proposed to encode a phenylhydroxypropionyl-CoA dehydrogenase and a 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-?-ketopropionic acid (HMPKP)–CoA ?-keto-thiolase, respectively. We thus demonstrated that the A. fabrum hydroxycinnamic degradation pathway is an original coenzyme A-dependent ?-oxidative deacetylation that could also transform p-coumaric and caffeic acids. Finally, we showed that this pathway enables the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants and their use for growth, likely providing the species an ecological advantage in hydroxycinnamic-rich environments, such as plant roots or decaying plant materials. PMID:24657856

  6. Inhibition profile of a series of phenolic acids on bovine lactoperoxidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, S Beyza Ozturk; Sisecioglu, Melda; Cankaya, Murat; Gulcin, ?lhami; Ozdemir, Hasan

    2015-06-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) catalyzes the oxidation of numerous of organic and inorganic substrates by hydrogen peroxide. It has very vital activity in the innate immune system by decreasing or stopping the activation of the bacteria in milk and mucosal secretions. This study's purpose was to investigate in vitro effect of some phenolic acids (ellagic, gallic, ferulic, caffeic, quercetin, p-coumaric, syringic, catechol and epicatechin) on the purified LPO. This enzyme was purified from milk by using different methods such as Amberlite CG-50 resin, CM-Sephadex C-50 ion-exchange and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. LPO was purified 28.7-fold with a yield of 20.03%. We found phenolic acids have inhibition effects on bovine LPO enzyme to different concentrations. Our study showed lower concentrations of caffeic acid, ferulic acid and quercetin exhibited much higher inhibitory effect on enzyme, so these three of them were clearly a more potent inhibitor than the others were. All of compounds were non-competitive inhibitors. PMID:25198891

  7. Structure of a fungal form of aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Gopal; Viola, Ronald E

    2015-11-01

    Aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) functions at a critical junction in the aspartate-biosynthetic pathway and represents a valid target for antimicrobial drug design. This enzyme catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reductive dephosphorylation of ?-aspartyl phosphate to produce the key intermediate aspartate semialdehyde. Production of this intermediate represents the first committed step in the biosynthesis of the essential amino acids methionine, isoleucine and threonine in fungi, and also the amino acid lysine in bacteria. The structure of a new fungal form of ASADH from Cryptococcus neoformans has been determined to 2.6?Å resolution. The overall structure of CnASADH is similar to those of its bacterial orthologs, but with some critical differences both in biological assembly and in secondary-structural features that can potentially be exploited for the development of species-selective drugs. PMID:26527262

  8. Photoprotolytic Processes of Umbelliferone and Proposed Function in Resistance to Fungal Infection.

    PubMed

    Simkovitch, Ron; Huppert, Dan

    2015-11-19

    The photoprotolytic processes of 7-hydroxy-coumarin (Umb) were investigated by steady-state and time-resolved-fluorescence techniques. We found that the Umb compound is a photoacid with pKa* ? 0.4 and a rate constant of the excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) to water of 2 × 10(10) s(-1). Umb is also a photobase and accepts an excess proton in solution and also directly from weak acids like acetic acid. When Umb is adsorbed on cellulose it also functions as a photoacid and a photobase. Hydroxycoumarins are known to accumulate next to fungal-, bacterial-, and viral-infected regions in the leaves and stems of plants in general and also in trees. We propose that these compounds when irradiated by sunlight UV, combat the fungi or bacteria by excited-state proton-transfer reactions. These photoprotolytic reactions provide a universal resistance mechanism to infections in plants. PMID:26488429

  9. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    E-print Network

    Holder, Jason W.

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, ...

  10. Fungal Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis by Candida parapsilosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shokohi, Tahereh; Nouraei, Seyed Mahmood; Afsarian, Mohammad Hosein; Najafi, Narges; Mehdipour, Shirin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is rare but serious complication of valve replacement surgery. Candida species, particularly Candida albicans is the most common isolated pathogen in fungal PVE (1–6%of cases). Case Presentation: We describe a 35-year-old woman who underwent mechanical mitral valve replacement about 3 years ago. She was admitted with neurological symptoms and later with dyspnea and hypotension. Transesophageal echocardiography showed large and mobile prosthetic valve vegetation. She underwent mitral valve surgery. The explanted valve and vegetation revealed lots of budding yeasts and the isolated yeast was identified as C. parapsilosis. Amphotericin B and broad spectrum antibiotic were started immediately. Unfortunately, the patient died two days after surgery, due to sepsis probably related to the candidemia. Conclusions: Fungal endocarditis is uncommon infection, but it is a serious problem in patients with prosthetic valve. Fungal PVE can occur years after the surgery, thus long-term follow-up is essential. PMID:25147692

  11. 7 CFR 201.58d - Fungal endophyte test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... dilute with water if staining is too dark. (b) Procedure for determining levels of fungal endophyte in... under consideration. (2) Digest seed at room temperature for 12-16 hours in a 5 percent sodium...

  12. 7 CFR 201.58d - Fungal endophyte test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dilute with water if staining is too dark. (b) Procedure for determining levels of fungal endophyte in... under consideration. (2) Digest seed at room temperature for 12-16 hours in a 5 percent sodium...

  13. Medications that Weaken Your Immune System and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Where you live (geography) matters. Some disease-causing fungi are more common in certain parts of the ... fungal infections while taking corticosteroids or TNF inhibitors Fungi are difficult to avoid because they are a ...

  14. Initial fungal effector production is mediated by early endosome motility.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yujiro

    2015-01-01

    Fungal plant pathogenicity is facilitated by effector proteins that are specifically expressed during infection and are responsible for suppressing plant defense mechanisms. Recent studies have elucidated the detailed molecular mechanisms of effector action throughout fungal infection. However, little is known about the trafficking and secretion of effectors in fungal hyphae during the initial stage of infection. Using state-of-the-art microscopy we have demonstrated that early endosome (EE) motility is required for effector production during fungal infection. Moreover, the MAPK Crk1 has been shown to travel on EEs and to function as a negative regulator of effector expression, suggesting that motile EEs are involved in signal transduction. Here I further discuss possible mechanisms whereby EE motility regulates effector expression in the initial stages of infection. PMID:26480479

  15. Fungal model systems and the elucidation of pathogenicity determinants

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Nadales, Elena; Almeida Nogueira, Maria Filomena; Baldin, Clara; Castanheira, Sónia; El Ghalid, Mennat; Grund, Elisabeth; Lengeler, Klaus; Marchegiani, Elisabetta; Mehrotra, Pankaj Vinod; Moretti, Marino; Naik, Vikram; Oses-Ruiz, Miriam; Oskarsson, Therese; Schäfer, Katja; Wasserstrom, Lisa; Brakhage, Axel A.; Gow, Neil A.R.; Kahmann, Regine; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Perez-Martin, José; Di Pietro, Antonio; Talbot, Nicholas J.; Toquin, Valerie; Walther, Andrea; Wendland, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Fungi have the capacity to cause devastating diseases of both plants and animals, causing significant harvest losses that threaten food security and human mycoses with high mortality rates. As a consequence, there is a critical need to promote development of new antifungal drugs, which requires a comprehensive molecular knowledge of fungal pathogenesis. In this review, we critically evaluate current knowledge of seven fungal organisms used as major research models for fungal pathogenesis. These include pathogens of both animals and plants; Ashbya gossypii, Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, Fusarium oxysporum, Magnaporthe oryzae, Ustilago maydis and Zymoseptoria tritici. We present key insights into the virulence mechanisms deployed by each species and a comparative overview of key insights obtained from genomic analysis. We then consider current trends and future challenges associated with the study of fungal pathogenicity. PMID:25011008

  16. FUNGAL OSTEOMYELITIS IN TWO BUFFLEHEAD DUCKLINGS (BUCEPHALA ALBEOLA).

    PubMed

    Hurley-Sanders, Jennifer L; Larsen, R Scott; Troan, Brigid; Loomis, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Over a 25-mo span from a single zoologic collection, two bufflehead ducklings (Bucephala albeola) presented with pelvic limb paresis and were euthanized. On postmortem examination, the first duckling had intralesional fungal hyphae consistent with Aspergillus sp. in the spinal vertebrae and within pulmonary granulomas. In the second duckling, evidence of a thoracic spinal lesion was detected antemortem by using thermographic imaging. At postmortem examination, fungal hyphae consistent with Mucor sp. were found within the vertebrae. Although fungal infections of the respiratory system are commonly reported in waterfowl, infections that involve the spinal cord and vertebrae are unusual. These cases highlight the importance of consideration of axial skeleton fungal disease in neurologic presentations and the use of thermography for noninvasive diagnostic screening. PMID:26352972

  17. Sphingolipids as Regulators of the Phagocytic Response to Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Arielle M.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Luberto, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections pose a significant risk for the increasing population of individuals who are immunocompromised. Phagocytes play an important role in immune defense against fungal pathogens, but the interactions between host and fungi are still not well understood. Sphingolipids have been shown to play an important role in many cell functions, including the function of phagocytes. In this review, we discuss major findings that relate to the importance of sphingolipids in macrophage and neutrophil function and the role of macrophages and neutrophils in the most common types of fungal infections, as well as studies that have linked these three concepts to show the importance of sphingolipid signaling in immune response to fungal infections. PMID:26688618

  18. Temporal variation in fungal communities associated with tropical hummingbirds and

    E-print Network

    Fukami, Tadashi

    Temporal variation in fungal communities associated with tropical hummingbirds and nectarivorous 2014 Corresponding editor: Nicole Hynson Keywords: Bats Countryside biogeography Hummingbirds Nectar on the bills of hummingbirds and in the mouths of nectarivorous bats was investigated along a gradient

  19. 7 CFR 201.58d - Fungal endophyte test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...endophyte (Acremonium spp.) in certain grasses. (a) Method of preparation of aniline blue stain for use in testing grass seed and plant material for the presence...determining levels of fungal endophyte in grass seed: (1) Take a...

  20. 7 CFR 201.58d - Fungal endophyte test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...endophyte (Acremonium spp.) in certain grasses. (a) Method of preparation of aniline blue stain for use in testing grass seed and plant material for the presence...determining levels of fungal endophyte in grass seed: (1) Take a...

  1. Outcomes of fungal interactions are determined by soil invertebrate grazers

    E-print Network

    , Cardiff, CF10 3AX, UK *Correspondence: E-mail: boddyl@cardiff.ac.uk Abstract Saprotrophic fungal community their compositions are less well understood (Wardle 2006). Saprotrophic basidiomycete fungi are the primary

  2. Genotypic variation in phenolic acids, vitamin E and fatty acids in whole grain rice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lilei; Li, Guanglei; Li, Mei; Xu, Feifei; Beta, Trust; Bao, Jinsong

    2016-04-15

    The genetic diversity of phenolic content (PC), individual phenolic acids, vitamin E isomers (VE) and fatty acids (FA) in the whole grain rice were investigated. The most abundant phenolic acid was ferulic acid ranging from 155.6 to 271.1?g/g and comprising approximately 40-57% of total phenolic acid (TPA). The predominant tocopherols (T) and tocotrienols (T3) were ?-T (6.43-12.67?g/g) and ?-T3 (12.88-32.75?g/g). The unsaturated fractions of FAs accounted for 74-81% of the total FAs in rice. Most of the phytochemicals among phenolics and VEs showed significant differences between white and red rice, with red rice demonstrating significantly higher levels. However, white rice had higher content of oleic, linolenic, eicosenoic and total fatty acids than red rice. The wide genetic diversity in whole grain rice allows food processors to have a good selection for producing rice products, and breeders to have new rice lines that can be bred for high nutrient levels. PMID:26617016

  3. Mycobiome of the Bat White Nose Syndrome Affected Caves and Mines Reveals Diversity of Fungi and Local Adaptation by the Fungal Pathogen Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Sunanda S.; Li, Xiaojiang; Okoniewski, Joseph C.; Hicks, Alan C.; Davis, April D.; Broussard, Kelly; LaDeau, Shannon L.; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    Current investigations of bat White Nose Syndrome (WNS) and the causative fungus Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans (Pd) are intensely focused on the reasons for the appearance of the disease in the Northeast and its rapid spread in the US and Canada. Urgent steps are still needed for the mitigation or control of Pd to save bats. We hypothesized that a focus on fungal community would advance the understanding of ecology and ecosystem processes that are crucial in the disease transmission cycle. This study was conducted in 2010–2011 in New York and Vermont using 90 samples from four mines and two caves situated within the epicenter of WNS. We used culture-dependent (CD) and culture-independent (CI) methods to catalogue all fungi (‘mycobiome’). CD methods included fungal isolations followed by phenotypic and molecular identifications. CI methods included amplification of DNA extracted from environmental samples with universal fungal primers followed by cloning and sequencing. CD methods yielded 675 fungal isolates and CI method yielded 594 fungal environmental nucleic acid sequences (FENAS). The core mycobiome of WNS comprised of 136 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) recovered in culture and 248 OTUs recovered in clone libraries. The fungal community was diverse across the sites, although a subgroup of dominant cosmopolitan fungi was present. The frequent recovery of Pd (18% of samples positive by culture) even in the presence of dominant, cosmopolitan fungal genera suggests some level of local adaptation in WNS-afflicted habitats, while the extensive distribution of Pd (48% of samples positive by real-time PCR) suggests an active reservoir of the pathogen at these sites. These findings underscore the need for integrated disease control measures that target both bats and Pd in the hibernacula for the control of WNS. PMID:25264864

  4. Ectomycorrhizal fungal associates of Pinus contorta in soils associated with a hot spring in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullings, K.; Makhija, S.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular methods and comparisons of fruiting patterns (i.e., presence or absence of fungal fruiting bodies in different soil types) were used to determine ectomycorrhizal (EM) associates of Pinus contorta in soils associated with a thermal soil classified as ultra-acidic to extremely acidic (pH 2 to 4). EM were sampled by obtaining 36 soil cores from six paired plots (three cores each) of both thermal soils and forest soils directly adjacent to the thermal area. Fruiting bodies (mushrooms) were collected for molecular identification and to compare fruiting body (above-ground) diversity to below-ground diversity. Our results indicate (i) that there were significant decreases in both the level of EM infection (130 +/- 22 EM root tips/core in forest soil; 68 +/- 22 EM root tips/core in thermal soil) and EM fungal species richness (4.0 +/- 0.5 species/core in forest soil; 1.2 +/- 0.2 species/core in thermal soil) in soils associated with the thermal feature; (ii) that the EM mycota of thermal soils was comprised of a small set of dominant species and included very few rare species, while the EM mycota of forest soils contained a few dominant species and several rare EM fungal species; (iii) that Dermocybe phoenecius and a species of Inocybe, which was rare in forest soils, were the dominant EM fungal species in thermal soils; (iv) that other than the single Inocybe species, there was no overlap in the EM fungal communities of the forest and thermal soils; and (v) that the fungal species forming the majority of the above-ground fruiting structures in thermal soils (Pisolithus tinctorius, which is commonly used in remediation of acid soils) was not detected on a single EM root tip in either type of soil. Thus, P. tinctorius may have a different role in these thermal soils. Our results suggest that this species may not perform well in remediation of all acid soils and that factors such as pH, soil temperature, and soil chemistry may interact to influence EM fungal community structure. In addition, we identified at least one new species with potential for use in remediation of hot acidic soil.

  5. Ectomycorrhizal fungal associates of Pinus contorta in soils associated with a hot spring in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Cullings, K; Makhija, S

    2001-12-01

    Molecular methods and comparisons of fruiting patterns (i.e., presence or absence of fungal fruiting bodies in different soil types) were used to determine ectomycorrhizal (EM) associates of Pinus contorta in soils associated with a thermal soil classified as ultra-acidic to extremely acidic (pH 2 to 4). EM were sampled by obtaining 36 soil cores from six paired plots (three cores each) of both thermal soils and forest soils directly adjacent to the thermal area. Fruiting bodies (mushrooms) were collected for molecular identification and to compare fruiting body (above-ground) diversity to below-ground diversity. Our results indicate (i) that there were significant decreases in both the level of EM infection (130 +/- 22 EM root tips/core in forest soil; 68 +/- 22 EM root tips/core in thermal soil) and EM fungal species richness (4.0 +/- 0.5 species/core in forest soil; 1.2 +/- 0.2 species/core in thermal soil) in soils associated with the thermal feature; (ii) that the EM mycota of thermal soils was comprised of a small set of dominant species and included very few rare species, while the EM mycota of forest soils contained a few dominant species and several rare EM fungal species; (iii) that Dermocybe phoenecius and a species of Inocybe, which was rare in forest soils, were the dominant EM fungal species in thermal soils; (iv) that other than the single Inocybe species, there was no overlap in the EM fungal communities of the forest and thermal soils; and (v) that the fungal species forming the majority of the above-ground fruiting structures in thermal soils (Pisolithus tinctorius, which is commonly used in remediation of acid soils) was not detected on a single EM root tip in either type of soil. Thus, P. tinctorius may have a different role in these thermal soils. Our results suggest that this species may not perform well in remediation of all acid soils and that factors such as pH, soil temperature, and soil chemistry may interact to influence EM fungal community structure. In addition, we identified at least one new species with potential for use in remediation of hot acidic soil. PMID:11722904

  6. Ectomycorrhizal Fungal Associates of Pinus contorta in Soils Associated with a Hot Spring in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    PubMed Central

    Cullings, Ken; Makhija, Shilpa

    2001-01-01

    Molecular methods and comparisons of fruiting patterns (i.e., presence or absence of fungal fruiting bodies in different soil types) were used to determine ectomycorrhizal (EM) associates of Pinus contorta in soils associated with a thermal soil classified as ultra-acidic to extremely acidic (pH 2 to 4). EM were sampled by obtaining 36 soil cores from six paired plots (three cores each) of both thermal soils and forest soils directly adjacent to the thermal area. Fruiting bodies (mushrooms) were collected for molecular identification and to compare fruiting body (above-ground) diversity to below-ground diversity. Our results indicate (i) that there were significant decreases in both the level of EM infection (130 ± 22 EM root tips/core in forest soil; 68 ± 22 EM root tips/core in thermal soil) and EM fungal species richness (4.0 ± 0.5 species/core in forest soil; 1.2 ± 0.2 species/core in thermal soil) in soils associated with the thermal feature; (ii) that the EM mycota of thermal soils was comprised of a small set of dominant species and included very few rare species, while the EM mycota of forest soils contained a few dominant species and several rare EM fungal species; (iii) that Dermocybe phoenecius and a species of Inocybe, which was rare in forest soils, were the dominant EM fungal species in thermal soils; (iv) that other than the single Inocybe species, there was no overlap in the EM fungal communities of the forest and thermal soils; and (v) that the fungal species forming the majority of the above-ground fruiting structures in thermal soils (Pisolithus tinctorius, which is commonly used in remediation of acid soils) was not detected on a single EM root tip in either type of soil. Thus, P. tinctorius may have a different role in these thermal soils. Our results suggest that this species may not perform well in remediation of all acid soils and that factors such as pH, soil temperature, and soil chemistry may interact to influence EM fungal community structure. In addition, we identified at least one new species with potential for use in remediation of hot acidic soil. PMID:11722904

  7. Untangling the fungal niche: the trait-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Thomas W.; Maynard, Daniel S.; Crowther, Terence R.; Peccia, Jordan; Smith, Jeffrey R.; Bradford, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are prominent components of most terrestrial ecosystems, both in terms of biomass and ecosystem functioning, but the hyper-diverse nature of most communities has obscured the search for unifying principles governing community organization. In particular, unlike plants and animals, observational studies provide little evidence for the existence of niche processes in structuring fungal communities at broad spatial scales. This limits our capacity to predict how communities, and their functioning, vary across landscapes. We outline how a shift in focus, from taxonomy toward functional traits, might prove to be valuable in the search for general patterns in fungal ecology. We build on theoretical advances in plant and animal ecology to provide an empirical framework for a trait-based approach in fungal community ecology. Drawing upon specific characteristics of the fungal system, we highlight the significance of drought stress and combat in structuring free-living fungal communities. We propose a conceptual model to formalize how trade-offs between stress-tolerance and combative dominance are likely to organize communities across environmental gradients. Given that the survival of a fungus in a given environment is contingent on its ability to tolerate antagonistic competitors, measuring variation in combat trait expression along environmental gradients provides a means of elucidating realized, from fundamental niche spaces. We conclude that, using a trait-based understanding of how niche processes structure fungal communities across time and space, we can ultimately link communities with ecosystem functioning. Our trait-based framework highlights fundamental uncertainties that require testing in the fungal system, given their potential to uncover general mechanisms in fungal ecology. PMID:25400630

  8. Manfred Girbardt and Charles Bracker: outstanding pioneers in fungal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bartnicki-Garcia, Salomon

    2015-01-01

    Midway through the twentieth century, the availability of new and improved optical and electronic microscopes facilitated rapid advances in the elucidation of the fine structure of fungal cells. In this Essay, I pay tribute to Manfred Girbardt (1919-1991) and Charles Bracker (1938-2012)—two individuals who, despite being separated by geography and the restrictions of the Cold War, both made equally fundamental discoveries in fungal cell ultrastructure and set high standards for specimen manipulation and image processing. PMID:25383602

  9. Fungal community on decomposing leaf litter undergoes rapid successional changes

    PubMed Central

    Vo?íšková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Fungi are considered the primary decomposers of dead plant biomass in terrestrial ecosystems. However, current knowledge regarding the successive changes in fungal communities during litter decomposition is limited. Here we explored the development of the fungal community over 24 months of litter decomposition in a temperate forest with dominant Quercus petraea using 454-pyrosequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and cellobiohydrolase I (cbhI) genes, which encode exocellulases, to specifically address cellulose decomposers. To quantify the involvement of phyllosphere fungi in litter decomposition, the fungal communities in live leaves and leaves immediately before abscission were also analysed. The results showed rapid succession of fungi with dramatic changes in the composition of the fungal community. Furthermore, most of the abundant taxa only temporarily dominated in the substrate. Fungal diversity was lowest at leaf senescence, increased until month 4 and did not significantly change during subsequent decomposition. Highly diverse community of phyllosphere fungi inhabits live oak leaves 2 months before abscission, and these phyllosphere taxa comprise a significant share of the fungal community during early decomposition up to the fourth month. Sequences assigned to the Ascomycota showed highest relative abundances in live leaves and during the early stages of decomposition. In contrast, the relative abundance of sequences assigned to the Basidiomycota phylum, particularly basidiomycetous yeasts, increased with time. Although cellulose was available in the litter during all stages of decomposition, the community of cellulolytic fungi changed substantially over time. The results indicate that litter decomposition is a highly complex process mediated by various fungal taxa. PMID:23051693

  10. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePLUS

    Aspartic acid is a nonessential amino acids . Amino acids are building blocks of proteins. "Nonessential" means that our ... this amino acid from the food we eat. Aspartic acid is also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps ...

  11. Prevalence of Fungal Skin Infections in Iranian Wrestlers

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Razaghi, Alireza; Noori, Adel; Hashemi, Sayed-Jamal; Asghari, Rajab; Ziaee, Vahid

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Fungal infections are one of the most common skin infections. Athletes, especially in contact sports such as wrestlers are the group at risk of fungal skin infections (FSI). The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of FSI and some effective factors in wrestlers in Tehran, Iran. Methods This study was a cross-sectional descriptive study which was conducted in 2009 and subjects were wrestlers of wrestling clubs of Tehran, Iran. In this study the prevalence of FSI and its related factors was collected based on clinical history, physical examination and laboratory tests. We also determined the rate of dermatophytic contamination of wrestling mats. The relationship between independent variables and incidence of fungal infection analyzed by Chi square test and regression analysis. Results In this study, out of 454 wrestlers, 111 (24.5%) subjects had suspicious fungal skin lesions on physical examination. The Prevalence of FSI was 8.2% in all of the wrestlers (34.2% of the wrestlers with suspicious lesion). Malassezia furfur (50%) and trichophyton tonsurans (30%) were the most common causative agents. Epidermophyton floccosum (7.5%), Trichophyton rubrum (5%), Candida albicans (5%) and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (2.5%) were other isolated fungi. Eleven wrestling mats (44%) were contaminated with different fungal organisms. Conclusion The prevalence of fungal skin infection in Iranian wrestlers is relatively high. Appropriate preventive measures need to be prepared and implemented to reduce incidence of FSI in wrestlers. PMID:23785573

  12. Forestry impacts on the hidden fungal biodiversity associated with bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Davey, Marie L; Kauserud, Håvard; Ohlson, Mikael

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have revealed an unexpectedly high, cryptic diversity of fungi associated with boreal forest bryophytes. Forestry practices heavily influence the boreal forest and fundamentally transform the landscape. However, little is known about how bryophyte-associated fungal communities are affected by these large-scale habitat transformations. This study assesses to what degree bryophyte-associated fungal communities are structured across the forest successional stages created by current forestry practices. Shoots of Hylocomium splendens were collected in Picea abies dominated forests of different ages, and their associated fungal communities were surveyed by pyrosequencing of ITS2 amplicons. Although community richness, diversity and evenness were relatively stable across the forest types and all were consistently dominated by ascomycete taxa, there was a marked shift in fungal community composition between young and old forests. Numerous fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed distinct affinities for different forest ages. Spatial structure was also detected among the sites, suggesting that environmental gradients resulting from the topography of the study area and dispersal limitations may also significantly affect bryophyte-associated fungal community structure. This study confirms that Hylocomium splendens hosts an immense diversity of fungi and demonstrates that this community is structured in part by forest age, and as such is highly influenced by modern forestry practices. PMID:25056806

  13. Fungal community dynamics and driving factors during agricultural waste composting.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man; Zhang, Jiachao; Xu, Yuxin; Xiao, Hua; An, Wenhao; Xi, Hui; Xue, Zhiyong; Huang, Hongli; Chen, Xiaoyang; Shen, Alin

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify the driving factors behind fungal community dynamics during agricultural waste composting. Fungal community abundance and structure were determined by quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis combined with DNA sequencing. The effects of physico-chemical parameters on fungal community abundance and structure were evaluated by least significant difference tests and redundancy analysis. The results showed that Cladosporium bruhnei, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Scytalidium thermophilum, Tilletiopsis penniseti, and Coprinopsis altramentaria were prominent during the composting process. The greatest variation in the distribution of fungal community structure was statistically explained by pile temperature and total organic carbon (TOC) (P?Fungal community abundance was found to be significantly related to pH, while pH was significantly influenced by pile temperature and nitrate levels (P?fungal community during composting. PMID:26289327

  14. Comparing fungal band formulations for Asian longhorned beetle biological control.

    PubMed

    Ugine, Todd A; Jenkins, Nina E; Gardescu, Sana; Hajek, Ann E

    2013-07-01

    Experiments were conducted with the fungal entomopathogen Metarhizium brunneum to determine the feasibility of using agar-based fungal bands versus two new types of oil-formulated fungal bands for Asian longhorned beetle management. We investigated conidial retention and survival on three types of bands attached to trees in New York and Pennsylvania: standard polyester fiber agar-based bands containing fungal cultures, and two types of bands made by soaking either polyester fiber or jute burlap with oil-conidia suspensions. Fungal band formulation did not affect the number or viability of conidia on bands over the 2-month test period, although percentage conidial viability decreased significantly with time for all band types. In a laboratory experiment testing the effect of the three band formulations on conidial acquisition and beetle survival, traditional agar-based fungal bands delivered the most conidia to adult beetles and killed higher percentages of beetles significantly faster (median survival time of 27d) than the two oil-formulated materials (36-37d). We also tested the effect of band formulation on conidial acquisition by adult beetles kept individually in cages with a single band for 24h, and significantly more conidia (3-7times) were acquired by beetles from agar-based bands compared to the two oil formulations. PMID:23628142

  15. The fungal genome initiative and lessons learned from genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Christina A; Birren, Bruce W

    2010-01-01

    The sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enabled systematic genome-wide experimental approaches, demonstrating the power of having the complete genome of an organism. The rapid impact of these methods on research in yeast mobilized an effort to expand genomic resources for other fungi. The "fungal genome initiative" represents an organized genome sequencing effort to promote comparative and evolutionary studies across the fungal kingdom. Through such an approach, scientists can not only better understand specific organisms but also illuminate the shared and unique aspects of fungal biology that underlie the importance of fungi in biomedical research, health, food production, and industry. To date, assembled genomes for over 100 fungi are available in public databases, and many more sequencing projects are underway. Here, we discuss both examples of findings from comparative analysis of fungal sequences, with a specific emphasis on yeast genomes, and on the analytical approaches taken to mine fungal genomes. New sequencing methods are accelerating comparative studies of fungi by reducing the cost and difficulty of sequencing. This has driven more common use of sequencing applications, such as to study genome-wide variation in populations or to deeply profile RNA transcripts. These and further technological innovations will continue to be piloted in yeasts and other fungi, and will expand the applications of sequencing to study fungal biology. PMID:20946837

  16. Evaluation of nested PCR in diagnosis of fungal rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Badiee, Parisa; Gandomi, Behrooz; Sabz, Gholamabbass; Khodami, Bijan; Choopanizadeh, Maral; Jafarian, Hadis

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Given the importance of rapid diagnosis for fungal rhinosinusitis, this study aimed to evaluate the use of nested PCR to identify Aspergillus and Mucor species in clinical samples from patients with suspected fungal rhinosinusitis. Methods: Functional endoscopic sinus surgery specimens were collected from 98 patients with rhinosinusitis from 2012 to 2013. All samples were ground and cultured on sabouraud dextrose agar. The isolated fungi were identified based on their macroscopic and microscopic features. Fungal DNA was extracted from the tissue samples and nested PCR was performed with two sets of primers for Mucor and Aspergillus. Results: Direct microscopic showed that 5.1% contained fungal components and 9.2% exhibited growth of fungi in culture. The most common agents isolated were Aspergillus fumigatus (n= 3), Aspergillus flavus (n=2), Penicillium sp (n=3) and Alternaria sp. (n=1). Mucor sp. was identified in the pathology smear from 1 patient. Positive results for fungal rhinosinusitis were obtained for a total of 10.2% by culture or pathology smear. Positive PCR results were obtained in 72 samples for Aspergillus and 31 samples for Mucor. Conclusion: Our results suggest that endoscopic sinus surgery specimens are not suitable for nested PCR, probably because of the accumulation of fungi that contaminate the environmental air. This drawback is a limiting factor for diagnosis with nasal cavity specimens. Therefore, molecular methods and conventional culture techniques are helpful complementary diagnostic methods to detect fungal rhinosinusitis and determine appropriate management for these patients.

  17. Innovative biorefinery concept for sugar-based ethanol industries: production of protein-rich fungal biomass on vinasse as an aquaculture feed ingredient.

    PubMed

    Nitayavardhana, Saoharit; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2010-12-01

    This study examined the potential of producing a protein-rich fungus, Rhizopus microsporus (var. oligosporus), as an aquaculture feed ingredient on vinasse generated during sugar-based ethanol fermentation. Optimization studies showed prolific fungal growth at pH 5.0 and 30 degrees C on vinasse with nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) supplementation. The molasses-vinasse resulted in the highest specific fungal biomass yield of 0.21 (g biomass increase/(g initial biomassxg soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) removed)). Organic and inorganic matters were significantly reduced, e.g., 42.02% SCOD and 24.41% total dissolved solids. Thus, the treated effluent could be recycled as process water or used for land applications. The fungal biomass was found to have 45.55% crude protein with significantly high amino acids, arginine and threonine. The integration of innovative fungal technology with sugar-based ethanol production could provide an opportunity for producing food-grade fungal protein for animal feed application with simultaneous water reclamation. PMID:20688513

  18. Fungal membrane organization: the eisosome concept.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Lois M; Konopka, James B

    2014-01-01

    The fungal plasma membrane is organized into specialized domains that vary in size, stability, and composition. Membrane compartment of Can1(MCC)/eisosome domains that were recently discovered in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are interesting because they represent a novel type of membrane domain that is important for plasma membrane organization, sphingolipid homeostasis, and cell wall morphogenesis. The MCC portion was identified as stable punctate patches that correspond to furrows in the plasma membrane that are about 300 nm long and 50 nm deep. These domains contain integral membrane proteins, including the tetraspan proteins Sur7 and Nce102. The eisosome portion includes proteins peripherally associated with the cytoplasmic side of the MCC, including the Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs-domain proteins Pil1 and Lsp1, which assemble into filaments that curve the membrane to form the furrows. By comparing MCC/eisosome domains in diverse fungi, researchers are identifying common features that further our understanding of their unique biogenesis, structure, and function. PMID:25002088

  19. An unusual cause of fungal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Dharmic, S.; Nair, Shraddha; Harish, M.

    2015-01-01

    A 65 year old female, known asthmatic on steroids intermittently, with no other co-morbidity presented with fever, breathlessness and cough with mucoid expectoration of ten days duration with bilateral crepts, went for Type II respiratory failure and was intubated followed by tracheostomy in view of prolonged ventilator support. In spite of high end antibiotics as per sputum culture sensitivity, weaning off the ventilator was not possible. Blood investigations revealed leucocytosis with neutrophilic predominance and IgE levels were within normal limits. CT chest showed multiple patchy consolidations of the right upper, middle and lower lobes with ground glass appearance and enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. Work up for retrovirus, tuberculosis and Sputum for KOH mount was negative. No evidence of sputum and blood eosinophilia. BAL sample grew Curvularia species. Fluconazole 150mg OD was added. Serial imaging of the chest showed resolution of the consolidation and was weaned off the ventilator and was comfortable on room air. Pneumonia caused by Curvularia, in an immune competent patient is very rare. Even in broncho pulmonary involvement these fungi usually occur in allergic conditions as in ABPA than appearing as a solitary cause for lung infection. But if diagnosed and treated early, will respond well to triazoles. This case report highlights a unilateral fungal pneumonia with dramatic clinical improvement post treatment once the rare causative organism was identified. PMID:26015753

  20. Fungal biology: compiling genomes and exploiting them

    SciTech Connect

    Labbe, Jessy L; Uehling, Jessie K; Payen, Thibaut; Plett, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The last 10 years have seen the cost of sequencing complete genomes decrease at an incredible speed. This has led to an increase in the number of genomes sequenced in all the fungal tree of life as well as a wide variety of plant genomes. The increase in sequencing has permitted us to study the evolution of organisms on a genomic scale. A number of talks during the conference discussed the importance of transposable elements (TEs) that are present in almost all species of fungi. These TEs represent an especially large percentage of genomic space in fungi that interact with plants. Thierry Rouxel (INRA, Nancy, France) showed the link between speciation in the Leptosphaeria complex and the expansion of TE families. For example in the Leptosphaeria complex, one species associated with oilseed rape has experienced a recent and massive burst of movement by a few TE families. The alterations caused by these TEs took place in discrete regions of the genome leading to shuffling of the genomic landscape and the appearance of genes specific to the species, such as effectors useful for the interactions with a particular plant (Rouxel et al., 2011). Other presentations showed the importance of TEs in affecting genome organization. For example, in Amanita different species appear to have been invaded by different TE families (Veneault-Fourrey & Martin, 2011).

  1. Intraspecific Diversity Regulates Fungal Productivity and Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Anna; Solan, Martin; Taylor, Andrew F. S.; Alexander, Ian J.; Johnson, David

    2010-01-01

    Individuals and not just species are key components of biodiversity, yet the relationship between intraspecific diversity and ecosystem functioning in microbial systems remains largely untested. This limits our ability to understand and predict the effects of altered genetic diversity in regulating key ecosystem processes and functions. Here, we use a model fungal system to test the hypothesis that intraspecific genotypic richness of Paxillus obscurosporus stimulates biomass and CO2 efflux, but that this is dependent on nitrogen supply. Using controlled experimental microcosms, we show that populations containing several genotypes (maximum 8) of the fungus had greater productivity and produced significantly more CO2 than those with fewer genotypes. Moreover, intraspecific diversity had a much stronger effect than a four-fold manipulation of the carbon:nitrogen ratio of the growth medium. The effects of intraspecific diversity were underpinned by strong roles of individuals, but overall intraspecific diversity increased the propensity of populations to over-yield, indicating that both complementarity and selection effects can operate within species. Our data demonstrate the importance of intraspecific diversity over a range of nitrogen concentrations, and the need to consider fine scale phylogenetic information of microbial communities in understanding their contribution to ecosystem processes. PMID:20830299

  2. Lignin degradation by selected fungal species.

    PubMed

    Kneževi?, Aleksandar; Milovanovi?, Ivan; Staji?, Mirjana; Lon?ar, Nikola; Br?eski, Ilija; Vukojevi?, Jelena; Cilerdži?, Jasmina

    2013-06-01

    As biological decomposition of plant biomass represents a popular alternative environmental-friendly and economically justified process, screening of ligninolytic enzyme systems of various fungal species is a topical study area. The goal of the study was to obtain clear insight into the dynamics of laccase, Mn-dependent peroxidase, and Mn-independent peroxidase activity and levels of wheat straw lignin degradation in seven wood-rotting fungi. The best laccase producers were Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus eryngii. Lenzites betulinus and Fomitopsis pinicola were the best Mn-dependent peroxidase producers, and P. ostreatus the weakest one. The peak of Mn-independent peroxidase was noted in Dichomytus squalens, and the minimum value in P. ostreatus. The profiles of the three enzymes, obtained by isoelectric focusing, were variable depending on the species and cultivation period. D. squalens was the best lignin degrader (34.1% of total lignin amount), and P. ostreatus and P. eryngii the weakest ones (7.1% and 14.5%, respectively). PMID:23612169

  3. Fungal secretomes enhance sugar beet pulp hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kracher, Daniel; Oros, Damir; Yao, Wanying; Preims, Marita; Rezic, Iva; Haltrich, Dietmar; Rezic, Tonci; Ludwig, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose makes enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass for the production of second generation biofuels a major challenge. This work investigates an efficient and economic approach for the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp (SBP), which is a difficult to degrade, hemicellulose-rich by-product of the table sugar industry. Three fungal strains were grown on different substrates and the production of various extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes involved in pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose breakdown were monitored. In a second step, the ability of the culture supernatants to hydrolyze thermally pretreated SBP was tested in batch experiments. The supernatant of Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne facultative plant pathogen, was found to have the highest hydrolytic activity on SBP and was selected for further hydrolyzation experiments. A low enzyme load of 0.2 mg g–1 protein from the culture supernatant was sufficient to hydrolyze a large fraction of the pectin and hemicelluloses present in SBP. The addition of Trichoderma reesei cellulase (1–17.5 mg g–1 SBP) resulted in almost complete hydrolyzation of cellulose. It was found that the combination of pectinolytic, hemicellulolytic, and cellulolytic activities works synergistically on the complex SBP composite, and a combination of these hydrolytic enzymes is required to achieve a high degree of enzymatic SBP hydrolysis with a low enzyme load. PMID:24677771

  4. Fungal Laccases and Their Applications in Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Buddolla; Rajesh, Bandi; Janardhan, Avilala; Kumar, Arthala Praveen; Narasimha, Golla

    2014-01-01

    Laccases are blue multicopper oxidases, which catalyze the monoelectronic oxidation of a broad spectrum of substrates, for example, ortho- and para-diphenols, polyphenols, aminophenols, and aromatic or aliphatic amines, coupled with a full, four-electron reduction of O2 to H2O. Hence, they are capable of degrading lignin and are present abundantly in many white-rot fungi. Laccases decolorize and detoxify the industrial effluents and help in wastewater treatment. They act on both phenolic and nonphenolic lignin-related compounds as well as highly recalcitrant environmental pollutants, and they can be effectively used in paper and pulp industries, textile industries, xenobiotic degradation, and bioremediation and act as biosensors. Recently, laccase has been applied to nanobiotechnology, which is an increasing research field, and catalyzes electron transfer reactions without additional cofactors. Several techniques have been developed for the immobilization of biomolecule such as micropatterning, self-assembled monolayer, and layer-by-layer techniques, which immobilize laccase and preserve their enzymatic activity. In this review, we describe the fungal source of laccases and their application in environment protection. PMID:24959348

  5. A self-sustaining advanced lignocellulosic biofuel production by integration of anaerobic digestion and aerobic fungal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yuan; Ruan, Zhenhua; Zhong, Yingkui; Archer, Steven; Liu, Yan; Liao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    High energy demand hinders the development and application of aerobic microbial biofuel production from lignocellulosic materials. In order to address this issue, this study focused on developing an integrated system including anaerobic digestion and aerobic fungal fermentation to convert corn stover, animal manure and food wastes into microbial lipids for biodiesel production. Dairy manure and food waste were first anaerobically digested to produce energy and solid digestate (AD fiber). AD fiber and corn stover were then processed by a combined alkali and acid hydrolysis, followed by fungal lipid accumulation. The integrated process can generate 1L biodiesel and 1.9 kg methane from 12.8 kg dry dairy manure, 3.1 kg dry food wastes and 12.2 kg dry corn stover with a positive net energy of 57 MJ, which concludes a self-sustaining lignocellulosic biodiesel process and provides a new route to co-utilize corn stover and organic wastes for advanced biofuel production. PMID:25543542

  6. Revisiting the host effect on ectomycorrhizal fungal communities: implications from host-fungal associations in relict Pseudotsuga japonica forests.

    PubMed

    Murata, Masao; Kinoshita, Akihiko; Nara, Kazuhide

    2013-11-01

    Host identity is among the most important factors in structuring ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal communities. Both host-fungal coevolution and host shifts can account for the observed host effect, but their relative significance in ECM fungal communities is not well understood. To investigate these two host-related mechanisms, we used relict forests of Pseudotsuga japonica, which is an endangered endemic species in Japan. As with other Asian Pseudotsuga species, P. japonica has been isolated from North American Pseudotsuga spp. since the Oligocene and has evolved independently as a warm-temperate species. We collected 100 soil samples from four major localities in which P. japonica was mixed with other conifers and broadleaf trees. ECM tips in the soil samples were subjected to molecular analyses to identify both ECM fungi and host species. While 136 ECM fungal species were identified in total, their communities were significantly different between host groups, confirming the existence of the host effect on ECM fungal communities. None of the 68 ECM fungal species found on P. japonica belonged to Pseudotsuga-specific lineages (e.g., Rhizopogon and Suillus subgroups) that are common in North America. Most of ECM fungi on P. japonica were shared with other host fungi or phylogenetically close to known ECM fungi on other hosts in Asia. These results suggest that after migrating, Pseudotsuga-specific fungal lineages may have become extinct in small isolated populations in Japan. Instead, most of the ECM fungal symbionts on P. japonica likely originated from host shifts in the region. PMID:23702643

  7. A general separation method of phenolic acids using pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography and its application to oat bran.

    PubMed

    Dong, Genlai; Xu, Jiangning; Gu, Yanxiang; Wei, Yun

    2015-06-15

    pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography technique for the separation of natural and synthetic mixtures has been widely used, especially for organic acids and alkaloids. Phenolic acids are very important compounds due to the potential treatment for a wide variety of diseases. However, there is not a general method for their separation. In this work, the conditions of pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography, involving solvent systems, concentration of retainer and eluter, flow rate of mobile phase as well as sample pretreatment, were optimized to improve extraction efficiency and reduce separation time. Finally a general separation method for seven common phenolic acids has been established using pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography. The separation of these phenolic acids was performed with a two-phase solvent system composed of methyl tert-butyl ether/acetonitrile/water at a volume ratio of 4.75: 0.25: 5, where 3mM trifluoroacetic acid was added to the organic stationary phase as a retainer and 3mM NH4OH was added to the aqueous mobile phase as an eluter. As a result, seven phenolic acids, including syringic acid, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid were successfully separated with the purities of 95.9%, 67.3%, 96.9%, 82.4%, 97.0%, 91.0%, and 97.2%, respectively. The established general method has been applied to the crude sample of oat bran pretreated with AB-8 resin. A total of 49.5mg of syringic acid, 109.2mg of p-coumaric acid and 184.5mg of ferulic acid were successfully purified in one run from 1.22g crude extract with the purities of 95.2%, 93.0%, and 91.8%, respectively. PMID:25939096

  8. Exploiting the fungal highway: development of a novel tool for the in situ isolation of bacteria migrating along fungal mycelium.

    PubMed

    Simon, Anaele; Bindschedler, Saskia; Job, Daniel; Wick, Lukas Y; Filippidou, Sevasti; Kooli, Wafa M; Verrecchia, Eric P; Junier, Pilar

    2015-11-01

    Fungi and bacteria form various associations that are central to numerous environmental processes. In the so-called fungal highway, bacteria disperse along fungal mycelium. We developed a novel tool for the in situ isolation of bacteria moving along fungal hyphae as well as for the recovery of fungi potentially involved in dispersal, both of which are attracted towards a target culture medium. We present the validation and the results of the first in situ test. Couples of fungi and bacteria were isolated from soil. Amongst the enriched organisms, we identified several species of fast-growing fungi (Fusarium sp. and Chaetomium sp.), as well as various potentially associated bacterial groups, including Variovorax soli, Olivibacter soli, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and several species of the genera Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter and Ochrobactrum. Migration of bacteria along fungal hyphae across a discontinuous medium was confirmed in most of the cases. Although the majority of the bacteria for which migration was confirmed were also positive for flagellar motility, not all motile bacteria dispersed using their potential fungal partner. In addition, the importance of hydrophobicity of the fungal mycelial surface was confirmed. Future applications of the columns include targeting different types of microorganisms and their interactions, either by enrichment or by state of the art molecular biological methods. PMID:26432804

  9. Hydroxycinnamic Acid Antioxidants: An Electrochemical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, José; Gaspar, Alexandra; Garrido, E. Manuela; Garrido, Jorge; Borges, Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acids (such as ferulic, caffeic, sinapic, and p-coumaric acids) are a group of compounds highly abundant in food that may account for about one-third of the phenolic compounds in our diet. Hydroxycinnamic acids have gained an increasing interest in health because they are known to be potent antioxidants. These compounds have been described as chain-breaking antioxidants acting through radical scavenging activity, that is related to their hydrogen or electron donating capacity and to the ability to delocalize/stabilize the resulting phenoxyl radical within their structure. The free radical scavenger ability of antioxidants can be predicted from standard one-electron potentials. Thus, voltammetric methods have often been applied to characterize a diversity of natural and synthetic antioxidants essentially to get an insight into their mechanism and also as an important tool for the rational design of new and potent antioxidants. The structure-property-activity relationships (SPARs) correlations already established for this type of compounds suggest that redox potentials could be considered a good measure of antioxidant activity and an accurate guideline on the drug discovery and development process. Due to its magnitude in the antioxidant field, the electrochemistry of hydroxycinnamic acid-based antioxidants is reviewed highlighting the structure-property-activity relationships (SPARs) obtained so far. PMID:23956973

  10. Interactions of low molecular weight aromatic acids and amino acids with goethite, kaolinite and bentonite with or without organic matter coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jiajia; Jansen, Boris; Cerli, Chiara; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2015-04-01

    Interaction of organic matter molecules with the soil's solid phase is a key factor influencing the stabilization of carbon in soils and thus forms a crucial aspect of the global carbon cycle. While subject of much research attention so far, we still have much to learn about such interactions at the molecular level; in particular in the light of competition between different classes of organic molecules and in the presence of previously adsorbed soil organic matter. We studied the interaction of a group of low molecular weight (LMW) aromatic acids (salicylic, syringic, vanillic and ferulic acid) and amino acids (lysine, glutamic, leucine and phenylalanine) on goethite, kaolinite and bentonite with and without previously adsorbed dissolved organic matter (DOM). For this we used batch experiments at pH = 6.0 where some of the organic compounds were positively charged (i.e. lysine) or negatively charged (i.e. glutamic and salicylic acid) while the minerals also displayed positively (i.e. goethite) or negatively charged surfaces (i.e. bentonite). We found much higher sorption of salicylic acid and lysine than other compounds. On the bare minerals we found a great variety of sorption strength, with salicylic acid strongly adsorbed, while syringic, vanillic and ferulic acid showed little or no adsorption. For the amino acids, protonated lysine showed a stronger affinity to negatively charged kaolinite and bentonite than other amino acids. While deprotonated glutamic acid showed the strongest adsorption on goethite. Leucine and phenylalanine showed hardly any adsorption on any of the minerals. When present concurrently, amino acids decreased the sorption of salicylic acid on the three types of mineral, while the presence of LMW aromatic acids increased the sorption of lysine on kaolinite and bentonite and the sorption of glutamic acid on goethite. The presence of previously adsorbed DOM reduced the sorption of salicylic acid and lysine. The results confirm that interactions of different classes of organic molecules with solid soil phases cannot be understood in isolation, but must be interpreted in the context of the presence of other classes of molecules. It seems that the presence of methoxy groups decreases the adsorption of aromatic acids to minerals. We did not find evidence for protein conditioning of any mineral surface, i.e. increased adsorption of aromatic acids after adsorption of amino acids.

  11. The marine sponge-derived polyketide endoperoxide plakortide F acid mediates its antifungal activity by interfering with calcium homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plakortide F acid (PFA) is a marine-derived polyketide endoperoxide exhibiting strong inhibitory activity against several clinically important fungal pathogens. In the present study, transcriptional profiling coupled with mutant and biochemical analyses were conducted using the model organism Sacch...

  12. A fungal conserved gene from the basidiomycete Hebeloma cylindrosporum is essential for efficient ectomycorrhiza formation.

    PubMed

    Doré, Jeanne; Marmeisse, Roland; Combier, Jean-Philippe; Gay, Gilles

    2014-10-01

    We used Agrobacterium-mediated insertional mutagenesis to identify genes in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum that are essential for efficient mycorrhiza formation. One of the mutants presented a dramatically reduced ability to form ectomycorrhizas when grown in the presence of Pinus pinaster. It failed to form mycorrhizas in the presence of glucose at 0.5 g liter(-1), a condition favorable for mycorrhiza formation by the wild-type strain. However, it formed few mycorrhizas when glucose was replaced by fructose or when glucose concentration was increased to 1 g liter(-1). Scanning electron microscopy examination of these mycorrhizas revealed that this mutant was unable to differentiate true fungal sheath and Hartig net. Molecular analyses showed that the single-copy disrupting T-DNA was integrated 6,884 bp downstream from the start codon, of an open reading frame potentially encoding a 3,096-amino-acid-long protein. This gene, which we named HcMycE1, has orthologs in numerous fungi as well as different other eukaryotic microorganisms. RNAi inactivation of HcMycE1 in the wild-type strain also led to a mycorrhizal defect, demonstrating that the nonmycorrhizal phenotype of the mutant was due to mutagenic T-DNA integration in HcMycE1. In the wild-type strain colonizing P. pinaster roots, HcMycE1 was transiently upregulated before symbiotic structure differentiation. Together with the inability of the mutant to differentiate these structures, this suggests that HcMycE1 plays a crucial role upstream of the fungal sheath and Hartig net differentiation. This study provides the first characterization of a fungal mutant altered in mycorrhizal ability. PMID:24918768

  13. Fungal Exposure Modulates the Effect of Polymorphisms of Chitinases on Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ann Chen; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Rogers, Christine A.; Klanderman, Barbara J.; Litonjua, Augusto A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Chitinases are enzymes that cleave chitin, which is present in fungal cells. Two types of human chitinases, chitotriosidase and acidic mammalian chitinase, and the chitinase-like protein, YKL-40, seem to play an important role in asthma. We hypothesized that exposure to environmental fungi may modulate the effect of chitinases in individuals with asthma. Objectives: To explore whether interactions between high fungal exposure and common genetic variants in the two chitinases in humans, CHIT1 and CHIA, and the chitinase 3-like 1 gene, CHI3L1, are associated with severe asthma exacerbations and other asthma-related outcomes. Methods: Forty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CHIT1, CHIA, and CHI3L1 and one CHIT1 duplication were genotyped in 395 subjects and their parents as part of the Childhood Asthma Management Program. Household levels of mold (an index of fungal exposure) were determined on house dust samples. We conducted family-based association tests with gene–environment interactions. Our outcome was severe exacerbation, defined as emergency department visits and hospitalizations from asthma over a 4-year period, and our secondary outcomes included indices of lung function and allergy-related phenotypes. Measurements and Main Results: Of the 395 subjects who had mold levels at randomization, 24% (95 subjects) had levels that were greater than 25,000 units per gram of house dust (high mold exposure). High mold exposure significantly modified the relation between three SNPs in CHIT1 (rs2486953, rs4950936, and rs1417149) and severe exacerbations (P for interaction 0.0010 for rs2486953, 0.0008 for rs4950936, and 0.0005 for rs1417149). High mold exposure did not significantly modify the relationship between any of the other variants and outcomes. Conclusions: Environmental exposure to fungi, modifies the effect of CHIT1 SNPs on severe asthma exacerbations. PMID:20538957

  14. Evaluation of Microbial Bacterial and Fungal Diversity in Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt Infection

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Tamara D.; Pope, Christopher E.; Browd, Samuel R.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Zerr, Danielle M.; Hoffman, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection can be recalcitrant. Recurrence is common despite appropriate therapy for the pathogens identified by culture. Improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are required, and culture-independent molecular approaches to cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections have not been described. Objectives To identify the bacteria and fungi present in cerebrospinal fluid from children with cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection using a high-throughput sequencing approach, and to compare those results to those from negative controls and conventional culture. Methods This descriptive study included eight children ?18 years old undergoing treatment for culture-identified cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection. After routine aerobic culture of each cerebrospinal fluid sample, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extraction was followed by amplification of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and the fungal ITS DNA region tag-encoded FLX-Titanium amplicon pyrosequencing and microbial phylogenetic analysis. Results The microbiota analyses for the initial cerebrospinal fluid samples from all eight infections identified a variety of bacteria and fungi, many of which did not grow in conventional culture. Detection by conventional culture did not predict the relative abundance of an organism by pyrosequencing, but in all cases, at least one bacterial taxon was detected by both conventional culture and pyrosequencing. Individual bacterial species fluctuated in relative abundance but remained above the limits of detection during infection treatment. Conclusions Numerous bacterial and fungal organisms were detected in these cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections, even during and after treatment, indicating diverse and recalcitrant shunt microbiota. In evaluating cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection, fungal and anaerobic bacterial cultures should be considered in addition to aerobic bacterial cultures, and culture-independent approaches offer a promising alternative diagnostic approach. More effective treatment of cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections is needed to reduce unacceptably high rates of reinfection, and this work suggests that one effective strategy may be reduction of the diverse microbiota present in infection. PMID:24421877

  15. The inhibitory effect of Mesembryanthemum edule (L.) bolus essential oil on some pathogenic fungal isolates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesembryanthemum edule is a medicinal plant which has been indicated by Xhosa traditional healers in the treatment HIV associated diseases such as tuberculosis, dysentery, diabetic mellitus, laryngitis, mouth infections, ringworm eczema and vaginal infections. The investigation of the essential oil of this plant could help to verify the rationale behind the use of the plant as a cure for these illnesses. Methods The essential oil from M. edule was analysed by GC/MS. Concentration ranging from 0.005 - 5 mg/ml of the hydro-distilled essential oil was tested against some fungal strains, using micro-dilution method. The plant minimum inhibitory activity on the fungal strains was determined. Result GC/MS analysis of the essential oil resulted in the identification of 28 compounds representing 99.99% of the total essential oil. A total amount of 10.6 and 36.61% constituents were obtained as monoterpenes and oxygenated monoterpenes. The amount of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (3.58%) was low compared to the oxygenated sesquiterpenes with pick area of 9.28%. Total oil content of diterpenes and oxygenated diterpenes detected from the essential oil were 1.43% and 19.24%. The fatty acids and their methyl esters content present in the essential oil extract were found to be 19.25%. Antifungal activity of the essential oil extract tested against the pathogenic fungal, inhibited C. albican, C. krusei, C. rugosa, C. glabrata and C. neoformans with MICs range of 0.02-0.31 mg/ml. the activity of the essential oil was found competing with nystatin and amphotericin B used as control. Conclusion Having accounted the profile chemical constituent found in M. edule oil and its important antifungal properties, we consider that its essential oil might be useful in pharmaceutical and food industry as natural antibiotic and food preservative. PMID:24885234

  16. Submicronic Fungal Bioaerosols: High-Resolution Microscopic Characterization and Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Afanou, Komlavi Anani; Straumfors, Anne; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Nilsen, Terje; Synnes, Ole; Skaar, Ida; Hjeljord, Linda; Tronsmo, Arne; Green, Brett James

    2014-01-01

    Submicronic particles released from fungal cultures have been suggested to be additional sources of personal exposure in mold-contaminated buildings. In vitro generation of these particles has been studied with particle counters, eventually supplemented by autofluorescence, that recognize fragments by size and discriminate biotic from abiotic particles. However, the fungal origin of submicronic particles remains unclear. In this study, submicronic fungal particles derived from Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, and Penicillium chrysogenum cultures grown on agar and gypsum board were aerosolized and enumerated using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). A novel bioaerosol generator and a fungal spores source strength tester were compared at 12 and 20 liters min?1 airflow. The overall median numbers of aerosolized submicronic particles were 2 × 105 cm?2, 2.6 × 103 cm?2, and 0.9 × 103 cm?2 for A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, and P. chrysogenum, respectively. A. fumigatus released significantly (P < 0.001) more particles than A. versicolor and P. chrysogenum. The ratios of submicronic fragments to larger particles, regardless of media type, were 1:3, 5:1, and 1:2 for A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, and P. chrysogenum, respectively. Spore fragments identified by the presence of rodlets amounted to 13%, 2%, and 0% of the submicronic particles released from A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, and P. chrysogenum, respectively. Submicronic particles with and without rodlets were also aerosolized from cultures grown on cellophane-covered media, indirectly confirming their fungal origin. Both hyphae and conidia could fragment into submicronic particles and aerosolize in vitro. These findings further highlight the potential contribution of fungal fragments to personal fungal exposure. PMID:25217010

  17. Impacts of Asian dust events on atmospheric fungal communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Eun Mi; Kim, Yong Pyo; Jeong, Kweon; Kim, Ik Soo; Eom, Suk Won; Choi, Young Zoo; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2013-12-01

    The composition of atmospheric fungi in Seoul during Asian dust events were assessed by culturing and by molecular methods such as mold specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR) and internal transcribed spacer cloning (ITS cloning). Culturable fungal concentrations in the air were monitored from May 2008 to July 2011 and 3 pairs of ITS clone libraries, one during Asian dust (AD) day and the other during the adjacent non Asian dust (NAD) day for each pair, were constructed after direct DNA extraction from total suspended particles (TSP) samples. In addition, six aeroallergenic fungi in the atmosphere were also assessed by MSQPCR from October, 2009 to November, 2011. The levels of the airborne culturable fungal concentrations during AD days was significantly higher than that of NAD days (P < 0.005). In addition, the correlation of culturable fungal concentrations with particulate matters equal to or less than 10 ?m in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) concentrations was observed to be high (0.775) for the AD days while correlation coefficients of PM10 as well as other particulate parameters with airborne fungal concentrations were significantly negative for the NAD days during intensive monitoring periods (May to June, 2008). It was found that during AD days several airborne allergenic fungal levels measured with MSQPCR increased up to 5-12 times depending on the species. Comparison of AD vs. NAD clones showed significant differences (P < 0.05) in all three cases using libshuff. In addition, high proportions of uncultured soil fungus isolated from semi-arid regions were observed only in AD clone libraries. Thus, it was concluded that AD impacts not only airborne fungal concentrations but also fungal communities.

  18. Aerodynamic characteristics and respiratory deposition of fungal fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Sung-Chul; Schmechel, Detlef; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Reponen, Tiina

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of fungal fragments and to estimate their respiratory deposition. Fragments and spores of three different fungal species ( Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium melinii, and Stachybotrys chartarum) were aerosolized by the fungal spore source strength tester (FSSST). An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) measured the size distribution in real-time and collected the aerosolized fungal particles simultaneously onto 12 impactor stages in the size range of 0.3-10 ?m utilizing water-soluble ZEF-X10 coating of the impaction stages to prevent spore bounce. For S. chartarum, the average concentration of released fungal fragments was 380 particles cm -3, which was about 514 times higher than that of spores. A. versicolor was found to release comparable amount of spores and fragments. Microscopic analysis confirmed that S. chartarum and A. versicolor did not show any significant spore bounce, whereas the size distribution of P. melinii fragments was masked by spore bounce. Respiratory deposition was calculated using a computer-based model, LUDEP 2.07, for an adult male and a 3-month-old infant utilizing the database on the concentration and size distribution of S. chartarum and A. versicolor aerosols measured by the ELPI. Total deposition fractions for fragments and spores were 27-46% and 84-95%, respectively, showing slightly higher values in an infant than in an adult. For S. chartarum, fragments demonstrated 230-250 fold higher respiratory deposition than spores, while the number of deposited fragments and spores of A. versicolor were comparable. It was revealed that the deposition ratio (the number of deposited fragments divided by that of deposited spores) in the lower airways for an infant was 4-5 times higher than that for an adult. As fungal fragments have been shown to contain mycotoxins and antigens, further exposure assessment should include the measurement of fungal fragments for evaluating mold exposures in damp buildings.

  19. Untangling above- and belowground mycorrhizal fungal networks in tropical orchids.

    PubMed

    Leake, J R; Cameron, D D

    2012-10-01

    Orchids typically depend on fungi for establishment from seeds, forming mycorrhizal associations with basidiomycete fungal partners in the polyphyletic group rhizoctonia from early stages of germination, sometimes with very high specificity. This has raised important questions about the roles of plant and fungal phylogenetics, and their habitat preferences, in controlling which fungi associate with which plants. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Martos et al. (2012) report the largest network analysis to date for orchids and their mycorrhizal fungi, sampling a total of over 450 plants from nearly half the 150 tropical orchid species on Reunion Island, encompassing its main terrestrial and epiphytic orchid genera. The authors found a total of 95 operational taxonomic units of mycorrhizal fungi and investigated the architecture and nestedness of their bipartite networks with 73 orchid species. The most striking finding was a major ecological barrier between above- and belowground mycorrhizal fungal networks, despite both epiphytic and terrestrial orchids often associating with closely related taxa across all three major lineages of rhizoctonia fungi. The fungal partnerships of the epiphytes and terrestrial species involved a diversity of fungal taxa in a modular network architecture, with only about one in ten mycorrhizal fungi partnering orchids in both groups. In contrast, plant and fungal phylogenetics had weak or no effects on the network. This highlights the power of recently developed ecological network analyses to give new insights into controls on plant-fungal symbioses and raises exciting new hypotheses about the differences in properties and functioning of mycorrhiza in epiphytic and terrestrial orchids. PMID:23057699

  20. Submicronic fungal bioaerosols: high-resolution microscopic characterization and quantification.

    PubMed

    Afanou, Komlavi Anani; Straumfors, Anne; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Nilsen, Terje; Synnes, Ole; Skaar, Ida; Hjeljord, Linda; Tronsmo, Arne; Green, Brett James; Eduard, Wijnand

    2014-11-01

    Submicronic particles released from fungal cultures have been suggested to be additional sources of personal exposure in mold-contaminated buildings. In vitro generation of these particles has been studied with particle counters, eventually supplemented by autofluorescence, that recognize fragments by size and discriminate biotic from abiotic particles. However, the fungal origin of submicronic particles remains unclear. In this study, submicronic fungal particles derived from Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, and Penicillium chrysogenum cultures grown on agar and gypsum board were aerosolized and enumerated using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). A novel bioaerosol generator and a fungal spores source strength tester were compared at 12 and 20 liters min(-1) airflow. The overall median numbers of aerosolized submicronic particles were 2 × 10(5) cm(-2), 2.6 × 10(3) cm(-2), and 0.9 × 10(3) cm(-2) for A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, and P. chrysogenum, respectively. A. fumigatus released significantly (P < 0.001) more particles than A. versicolor and P. chrysogenum. The ratios of submicronic fragments to larger particles, regardless of media type, were 1:3, 5:1, and 1:2 for A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, and P. chrysogenum, respectively. Spore fragments identified by the presence of rodlets amounted to 13%, 2%, and 0% of the submicronic particles released from A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, and P. chrysogenum, respectively. Submicronic particles with and without rodlets were also aerosolized from cultures grown on cellophane-covered media, indirectly confirming their fungal origin. Both hyphae and conidia could fragment into submicronic particles and aerosolize in vitro. These findings further highlight the potential contribution of fungal fragments to personal fungal exposure. PMID:25217010