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Sample records for furnace slag cement

  1. Evaluation of steel furnace slags as cement additives

    SciTech Connect

    Tuefekci, M.; Demirbas, A.; Genc, H.

    1997-11-01

    Chemical and physical properties and strength development have been studied for six granulated steel furnace slags from the normal steelmaking process. This paper reports results of research performed to develop cement mixture proportions using these slags. The influence of slag proportions, specific surface, and water demand on compressive strength and bulk density of cement blends are presented in this paper. The different test results, which were compared with the Turkish Standards, in general, were found to be within the limits.

  2. Strength and pore structure of ternary blended cement mortars containing blast furnace slag and silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Bagel, L.

    1998-07-01

    Blended cement mortars with fixed workability and incorporating blast furnace slag and silica fume, were tested for compressive strength and mercury intrusion, with a view to comparing their performance with that of plain Portland cement mortar and/or slag-cement mortar. The obtained results showed that with high portions of slag and silica fume in the binding system, the mortars reached relatively satisfactory level of compressive strength and contributed to the significantly denser pore structure.

  3. Valorization of electric arc furnace primary steelmaking slags for cement applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Seok; Kim, Kee-Seok; Jung, Sung Suk; Hwang, Jin Ill; Choi, Jae-Seok; Sohn, Il

    2015-07-01

    To produce supplementary cementitious materials from electric arc furnace (EAF) slags, FeO was reduced using a two-stage reduction process that included an Al-dross reduction reaction followed by direct carbon reduction. A decrease in FeO was observed on tapping after the first-stage reduction, and further reduction with a stirred carbon rod in the second-stage reduction resulted in final FeO content below 5wt%, which is compatible with cement clinker applications. The reduced electric arc furnace slags (REAFS) mixed with cement at a unit ratio exhibited physical properties comparable to those of commercialized ground granulated blast furnace slags (GGBFS). Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to obtain fundamental information on the cooling characteristics and conditions required to obtain amorphous REAFS. REAFS can be applied in cement mixtures to achieve the hydraulic properties needed for commercial use. PMID:25863765

  4. Chromium stabilization chemistry of paint removal wastes in Portland cement and blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect

    Boy, J.H.; Race, T.D.; Reinbold, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    The use of cement based systems for solidification and stabilization of hazardous wastes has been proposed. The stabilization of Cr contaminated paint removal wastes in ordinary Portland cement and in a Portland cement and blast furnace slag matrix was investigated. A loading by volume of 75% waste and 25% cement (or cement + slag) was used. The expression of pore solution was utilized to determine the chemical environment encountered by the waste species in the cement matrix. The highly alkaline conditions of ordinary Portland cement determined the stability of the metal species, with Cr being highly soluble. The replacement of 25% of the Portland cement by blast furnace slag was found to decrease the [OH-] of the pore solution resulting in a decrease of the Cr concentration. For cement wastes forms hydrated for 28 days, the Cr concentration decreased in the expressed pore solution. During the TCLP tests the cement waste form and extraction solution were found to react, changing the chemistry of the extraction solution. The expression of pore solution was found to give a direct measure of the chemistry of the waste species in the cement matrix. This avoids the reaction of the TCLP extraction solution with the cement matrix which changes the solubility of the hazardous metals. 15 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Hydrolyzed Portland cement clinker and air-cooled blast furnace slag SO{sub 2} sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, M.D.; Kenney, M.E.

    1999-07-01

    The preparation, morphologies, densities, mean particle sizes, surface areas, compositions, SO{sub 2}-uptakes, calcium utilizations and 100% SO{sub 2} capture times of SO{sub 2} flue gas sorbents derived by the hydrolysis of cement clinker and of air-cooled blast furnace slag are described and discussed. The hydrolyzed clinker sorbent is highly effective. While it is less effective, the slag sorbent, because it is so much cheaper, is the more attractive of the two.

  6. Application of Granulated Blast Furnace Slag in Cement Composites Exposed to Biogenic Acid Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalcikova, M.; Estokova, A.; Luptakova, A.

    2015-11-01

    The deterioration of cement-based materials used for the civil infrastructure has led to the realization that cement-based materials, such as concrete, must be improved in terms of their properties and durability. Leaching of calcium ions increases the porosity of cement- based materials, consequently resulting in a negative effect on durability since it provides an entry for aggressive harmful ions, causing corrosion of concrete. The use supplementary cementing composite materials have been reported to improve the resistance of concrete to deterioration by aggressive chemicals. The paper is focused on the investigation of the influence of biogenic acid attack on the cement composites affected by bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. The concrete specimens with 65 wt. % addition of antimicrobial activated granulated blast furnace slag as durability increasing factor as well as without any addition were studied. The experiments proceeded during 150 days under model laboratory conditions. The pH values and chemical composition of leachates were measured after each 30- day cycle. The calcium and silicon contents in leachates were evaluated using X - ray fluorescence method (XRF). Summarizing the results, the 65% wt. addition of antimicrobial activated granulated blast furnace slag was not confirmed to be more resistant.

  7. Valorisation of electric arc furnace steel slag as raw material for low energy belite cements.

    PubMed

    Iacobescu, R I; Koumpouri, D; Pontikes, Y; Saban, R; Angelopoulos, G N

    2011-11-30

    In this paper, the valorisation of electric arc furnace steel slag (EAFS) in the production of low energy belite cements is studied. Three types of clinkers were prepared with 0 wt.% (BC), 5 wt.% (BC5) and 10 wt.% (BC10) EAFS, respectively. The design of the raw mixes was based on the compositional indices lime saturation factor (LSF), alumina ratio (AR) and silica ratio (SR). The clinkering temperature was studied for the range 1280-1400°C; firing was performed at 1380°C based on the results regarding free lime and the evolution of microstructure. In order to activate the belite, clinkers were cooled fast by blown air and concurrent crushing. The results demonstrate that the microstructure of the produced clinkers is dominated by belite and alite crystals, with tricalcium aluminate and tetracalcium-alumino-ferrite present as micro-crystalline interstitial phases. The prepared cements presented low early strength development as expected for belite-rich compositions; however the 28-day results were 47.5 MPa, 46.6 MPa and 42.8 MPa for BC, BC5 and BC10, respectively. These values are comparable with OPC CEMI 32.5 N (32.5-52.5 MPa) according to EN 197-1. A fast setting behaviour was also observed, particularly in the case of BC10, whereas soundness did not exceed 1mm. PMID:21944704

  8. Characterisation of magnesium potassium phosphate cements blended with fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Laura J.; Bernal, Susan A.; Walling, Samuel A.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Provis, John L.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2015-08-15

    Magnesium potassium phosphate cements (MKPCs), blended with 50 wt.% fly ash (FA) or ground granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS) to reduce heat evolution, water demand and cost, were assessed using compressive strength, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy on {sup 25}Mg, {sup 27}Al, {sup 29}Si, {sup 31}P and {sup 39}K nuclei. We present the first definitive evidence that dissolution of the glassy aluminosilicate phases of both FA and GBFS occurred under the pH conditions of MKPC. In addition to the main binder phase, struvite-K, an amorphous orthophosphate phase was detected in FA/MKPC and GBFS/MKPC systems. It was postulated that an aluminium phosphate phase was formed, however, no significant Al–O–P interactions were identified. High-field NMR analysis of the GBFS/MKPC system indicated the potential formation of a potassium-aluminosilicate phase. This study demonstrates the need for further research on these binders, as both FA and GBFS are generally regarded as inert fillers within MKPC.

  9. The radiation stability of ground granulated blast furnace slag/ordinary Portland cement grouts containing organic admixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, J.D.; Fairhall, G.A.

    1993-12-31

    At the British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) Sellafield reprocessing plant in the United Kingdom, cement grouts based on ground granulated blast-furnace slag (BFS) and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) are used extensively for immobilizing radioactive wastes. These grouts have excluded organic admixtures in order to reduce process complexity and uncertainties, regarding the performance of organic admixtures with BFS/OPC grouts, particularly under irradiation. This study has investigated the effects of sulfonated melamine formaldehyde and naphthalene condensates on grout properties. The results show grout settlement and strengths increase on addition of additives, with the additives remaining largely in the pore solution. Under irradiation the additives breakdown liberating hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Strength and product dimensions are unaffected by irradiation.

  10. Triple-activated blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, W.J.

    1995-12-31

    The current shortage of portland cement in the world will require the use of Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBFS) to fill demands in many industrialized countries. Therefore, an extensive series of triple-activated slag experiments have been undertaken to optimize an economical combination of mechanical properties for alkali-activated slags. Na{sub 2}OSiO{sub 2} (N Grade), Ca(OH){sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} have been added as activators in 5 to 10, 0 to 5 and 0 to 5 weight percentages of water and slag in a mix with a water:cement ratio of 1:1. Silica Fume and Sika 10 superplasticizer have been added as 1 and 10 weight percent of slag. Set times, initial hardening times and compressive strengths at percentages of the mix to identify more refined formulations. Finally, the resulting aggregate to develop a triple-activated slag formulation with the ultimate objective of contributing toward satisfying the world shortage of high performance concrete.

  11. Durability of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, K.; Alharbi, N.; Matheu, P. S.; Varela, B.; Hailstone, R.

    2015-11-01

    The alkali activation of blast furnace slag has the potential to reduce the environmental impact of cementitious materials and to be applied in geographic zones where weather is a factor that negatively affects performance of materials based on Ordinary Portland Cement. The scientific literature provides many examples of alkali activated slag with high compressive strengths; however research into the durability and resistance to aggressive environments is still necessary for applications in harsh weather conditions. In this study two design mixes of blast furnace slag with mine tailings were activated with a potassium based solution. The design mixes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET analysis and compressive strength testing. Freeze-thaw testing up to 100 freeze-thaw cycles was performed in 10% road salt solution. Our findings included compressive strength of up to 100 MPa after 28 days of curing and 120 MPa after freeze-thaw testing. The relationship between pore size, compressive strength, and compressive strength after freeze-thaw was explored.

  12. 50. Taken from highline; "B" furnace slag pots, pipe is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Taken from high-line; "B" furnace slag pots, pipe is main blast furnace gas line from "C" furnace dust catcher; levy, slag hauler, removing slag. Looking east - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  13. Slag/mud mixtures improve cementing operations in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Peiyan; Huang, B.

    1996-12-23

    The use of blast furnace slag, which is inexpensive and widely available throughout China, can with proper activators and retarders, solidify mud into an excellent cementing material. The use of slag-mix has been somewhat controversial. Some experts claim slag-mix is the most important progress to date in mud-to-cement conversion and has become another choice for cementing practices.They also believed there were no fundamental limitations to its application downhole, and conceivably the material could be used for any well cemented. Other experts have different points of view and thought it might have limits for oil field use. In their studies, the basic mud had to be diluted by 60% or more with water before the blast furnace slag (BFS) was added. Their slag slurries showed a high incidence of cracking and apparent brittle nature, bad settling stability, and volume shrinkage. To date, the Chinese National petroleum Corp. (CNPC) has used mud solidification by slag successfully on 22 cementing jobs in the Sichun, Changqing, Jidong, and Shengli oil fields.The major purpose of these investigations was to determine the application of slag-mix technology to various cementing operations.

  14. Skid resistance performance of asphalt wearing courses with electric arc furnace slag aggregates.

    PubMed

    Kehagia, Fotini

    2009-05-01

    Metallurgical slags are by-products of the iron and steel industry and are subdivided into blast furnace slag and steel slag according to the different steel-producing processes. In Greece, slags are mostly produced from steelmaking using the electric arc furnace process, and subsequently are either disposed in a random way or utilized by the cement industry. Steel slag has been recently used, worldwide, as hard aggregates in wearing courses in order to improve the skidding resistance of asphalt pavements. At the Highway Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki research has been carried out in the field of steel slags, and especially in electric arc furnace (EAF) slag, to evaluate their possible use in highway engineering. In this paper, the recent results of anti-skidding performance of steel slag aggregates in highway pavements are presented. PMID:19423603

  15. Characterisation of Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag cement-like composites for the immobilisation of sulfate bearing nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mobasher, Neda; Bernal, Susan A.; Hussain, Oday H.; Apperley, David C.; Kinoshita, Hajime; Provis, John L.

    2014-12-15

    Soluble sulfate ions in nuclear waste can have detrimental effects on cementitious wasteforms and disposal facilities based on Portland cement. As an alternative, Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag composites are studied for immobilisation of sulfate-bearing nuclear wastes. Calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C–A–S–H) with some barium substitution is the main binder phase, with barium also present in the low solubility salts BaSO{sub 4} and BaCO{sub 3}, along with Ba-substituted calcium sulfoaluminate hydrates, and a hydrotalcite-type layered double hydroxide. This reaction product assemblage indicates that Ba(OH){sub 2} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} act as alkaline activators and control the reaction of the slag in addition to forming insoluble BaSO{sub 4}, and this restricts sulfate availability for further reaction as long as sufficient Ba(OH){sub 2} is added. An increased content of Ba(OH){sub 2} promotes a higher degree of reaction, and the formation of a highly cross-linked C–A–S–H gel. These Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag composite binders could be effective in the immobilisation of sulfate-bearing nuclear wastes.

  16. Effect of blast furnace slag on self-healing of microcracks in cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Haoliang; Ye, Guang; Damidot, Denis

    2014-06-01

    The physico-chemical process of self-healing in blast furnace slag cement paste was investigated in this paper. With a high slag content i.e., 66% in cement paste and saturated Ca(OH)₂ solution as activator, it was found that the reaction products formed in cracks are composed of C-S-H, ettringite, hydrogarnet and OH–hydrotalcite. The fraction of C-S-H in the reaction products is much larger than the other minerals. Large amount of ettringite formed in cracks indicates the leaching of SO₄⁻² ions from the bulk paste and consequently the recrystallization. Self-healing proceeds fast within 50 h and then slows down. According to thermodynamic modeling, when the newly formed reaction products are carbonated, the filling fraction of crack increases first and then decreases. Low soluble minerals such as silica gel, gibbsite and calcite are formed. Compared to Portland cement paste, the potential of self-healing in slag cement paste is higher when the percentage of slag is high. Highlights: • Self-healing reaction products in slag cement paste were characterized. • Self-healing reaction products formed in time were quantified with image analysis. • Self-healing in slag cement paste was simulated with a reactive transport model. • Effect of carbonation on self-healing was investigated by thermodynamic modeling. • Effect of slag on self-healing was discussed based on experiments and simulation.

  17. Allowable gas temperature at outlet from furnace subject to slagging

    SciTech Connect

    A.N. Alekhnovich; N.V. Artem'eva; V.V. Bogomolov

    2007-03-15

    The paper is devoted to substantiation and prediction of the allowable gas temperature at the outlet from a furnace subject to slagging. The non-optimality of values recommended by effective methodical instructions regarding the design of furnace devices is demonstrated. Utilizing knowledge gained from temperature measurements in boilers, and the situation regarding the slagging of heating surfaces located at the outlet from the furnace, new, frequently higher values are proposed. A method for evaluating the allowable gas temperature at the outlet from a furnace subject to slagging is suggested on the basis of data regarding the chemical composition of the mineral portion of coals.

  18. Greener durable concretes through geopolymerisation of blast furnace slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamane, N. P.; Nataraja, M. C.; Jeyalakshmi, R.; Nithiyanantham, S.

    2015-05-01

    The eco-friendliness of concrete is quantified by parameters such as ‘embodied energy’ (EE) and ‘embodied CO2 emission’ (ECO2e), besides duration of designed ‘service life’. It may be noted that ECO2e is also referred as carbon footprint (CF) in the literature. Geopolymer (GP) is an inorganic polymeric gel, a type of amorphous alumino-silicate product, which can be synthesised by polycondensation reactions. The concrete reported in this paper was prepared using industrial wastes in the form of blast furnace slag, fly ash as geopolymeric source materials and sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide as activators. Many mechanical properties such as compressive strength, chloride diffusion, steel corrosion, rapid chloride permeability test and rapid migration test are compared with Portland cement.

  19. Use of CaO as an activator for producing a price-competitive non-cement structural binder using ground granulated blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Sik; Jun, Yubin; Lee, Changha Oh, Jae Eun

    2013-12-15

    The use of calcium oxide (CaO) demonstrates a superior potential for the activation of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), and it produces a higher mechanical strength than calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH){sub 2}]. The mechanical strength differences between CaO- and Ca(OH){sub 2}-activated GGBFS binders are explored using isothermal calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA and DTA) as well as compressive strength testing. Calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H), Ca(OH){sub 2} and a hydrotalcite-like phase are found as reaction products in all samples. The TGA and DTA results indicate that the use of CaO produces more C–S–H, although this is not likely to be the primary cause of higher strength development in the CaO-activated GGBFS. Rather, other factors such as porosity may govern the strength at a higher order of magnitude. Significant reduction of Ca(OH){sub 2} occurs only with the use of Ca(OH){sub 2}, followed by the formation of carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), indicating carbonation. -- Highlights: •CaO showed a better potential for the activation of GGBFS than Ca(OH){sub 2}. •Strength test, XRD, TGA/DTA and isothermal calorimetry are used. •C-S-H, Ca(OH){sub 2}, and a hydrotalcite-like phase are found in all samples. •The use of Ca(OH){sub 2} causes some degree of carbonation.

  20. A General Viscosity Model for Molten Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Lei; Lai, Chaobin

    2014-06-01

    Blast furnace slag is the most abundant slag in the steel industry. Its metallurgical properties are determined to a great extent by its viscosity. Therefore, it is necessary to establish a reliable viscosity model for blast furnace slag. In the current work, a simple, accurate, and physically meaningful viscosity model for a wide composition range of blast furnace slags is developed based on the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) equation: log η = A + B/( T - C). The model is calibrated by a database containing 365 compositions and 1233 measurements of synthetic and industrial slags. The parameter A has a value of -3.10. The parameters B and C are related to the mass fraction ratio of (CaO + MgO) to (SiO2 + Al2O3) and liquidus temperature of the slag, respectively. Present viscosity model accurately predicts the viscosity of blast furnace slag with relative average error (Δ) of 0.211 (±0.180) and root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.239 Pa·s. A slight modification of this model can also predict the glass transition temperature of blast furnace slag satisfactorily.

  1. Chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated by sodium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Kovtun, Maxim Kearsley, Elsabe P. Shekhovtsova, Julia

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents results of a study on chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated using sodium carbonate. As strength development of alkali-activated slag cements containing neutral GBFS and sodium carbonate as activator at room temperature is known to be slow, three accelerators were investigated: sodium hydroxide, ordinary Portland cement and a combination of silica fume and slaked lime. In all cements, the main hydration product is C–(A)–S–H, but its structure varies between tobermorite and riversideite depending on the accelerator used. Calcite and gaylussite are present in all systems and they were formed due to either cation exchange reaction between the slag and the activator, or carbonation. With accelerators, compressive strength up to 15 MPa can be achieved within 24 h in comparison to 2.5 MPa after 48 h for a mix without an accelerator.

  2. 15. TAKING A CAST AT FURNACE NO. 1 HOT SLAG, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. TAKING A CAST AT FURNACE NO. 1 HOT SLAG, BY-PRODUCT IN SMELTING OF PIG IRON, CAN BE SEEN FLOWING INTO THE SLAG YARD. VIEW IS LOOKING SOUTH. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. Alkali-slag cements for the immobilization of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, C.; Day, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    Alkali-slag cements consist of glassy slag and an alkaline activator and can show both higher early and later strengths than Type III Portland cement, if a proper alkaline activator is used. An examination of microstructure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes with the help of XRD and SEM with EDAX shows that the main hydration product is C-S-H (B) with low C/S ratio and no crystalline substances exist such as Ca(OH){sub 2}, Al (OH){sub 3} and sulphoaluminates. Mercury intrusion tests indicate that hardened alkali-slag cement pastes have a lower porosity than ordinary Portland cement, and contain mainly gel pores. The fine pore structure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes will restrict the ingress of deleterious substances and the leaching of harmful species such as radionuclides. The leachability of Cs{sup + } from hardened alkali-slag cement pastes is only half of that from hardened Portland cement. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-slag cements are a better solidification matrix than Portland cement for radioactive wastes.

  4. Applicability of Carbonated Electric Arc Furnace Slag to Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, S.; Arisawa, R.; Hisyamudin, M. N. N.; Murakami, K.; Maegawa, A.; Izaki, M.

    2012-03-01

    Authors have been studying the absorption of CO2 in the steelmaking slag. In this study, an application of the electric arc furnace slag after the carbonation to admixture of mortar was investigated with the JIS (A6206-1997) method for ground granulated blast-furnace slag for concrete. The percent flows for the test mortar were smaller than that for the standard mortar. The percent flow of the carbonated slag whose average particle size of more than approximately 4 μm increased with an increase in the average size of the particles. Because the compressive strengths of the test mortar cured for 91 days were almost the same as those cured 28 days, the slag after the carbonation was thought not to have self-hardening property for a medium and long term. The compressive strength for the test mortar was almost unchanged within a range of approximately 2 to 7 μm of the average particle size, and it in this range was highest. The activity indexes for the test mortar prepared with the slag after the carbonation ranged from approximately 40 to 60 %.

  5. Recycling of ladle slag in cement composites: Environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Serjun, Vesna Zalar; Mladenovič, Ana; Mirtič, Breda; Meden, Anton; Ščančar, Janez; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    In the present work compact and ground cement composites in which 30% of cement by mass was replaced by ladle slag were investigated for their chemical and physico-mechanical properties. To evaluate long-term environmental impacts, leachability test based on diffusion, which combined both, diffusion and dissolution of contaminants, was performed in water and saline water. Total element concentrations and Cr(VI) were determined in leachates over a time period of 180days. At the end of the experiment, the mineralogical composition and the physico-mechanical stability of cement composites was also assessed. The results revealed that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were immobilized by the hydration products formed in the cement composites with the addition of ladle slag. Cr(VI) content originating from the cement was also appreciably reduced by Fe(II) from minerals present in the added ladle slag, which thus had significant positive environmental effects. Among metals, only Mo and Ba were leached in elevated concentrations, but solely in ground cement composites with the addition of ladle slag. Lower V concentrations were observed in leachates of ground than compact composite. It was demonstrated that the presence of ladle slag in cement composites can even contribute to improved mortar resistance. The investigated ladle slag can be successfully implemented in cement composites as supplementary cementitious material. PMID:26008145

  6. Blast furnace slag-modified grouts for in situ stabilization of chromium-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1995-12-01

    Blast furnace slag-modified grouts were used to stabilize soils contaminated with trivalent and hexavalent chromium. Slag content, grout/soil ratio and water/cementitious material ratio were varied to determine the effects on leachability of chromium, permeability and compressive strength. Slag-modified grouts successfully stabilized Cr(VI)-contaminated soil to give low leachability, thereby allowing omission of the pretreatment stage to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) necessary with lime and ordinary Portland cement stabilization procedures. Leachability of both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) decreased with increasing slag content. The permanence of leach resistance is enhanced by higher slag levels in grout. Compressive strength of grout-treated soil ranges from 6 to 36 MPa and permeability is of the order of 10{sup {minus}11} to 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s, depending on mix proportions. Slag-modified grouts have potential for in situ stabilization of Cr(III)- or Cr(VI)-contaminated landfills.

  7. Waste Heat Recovery from Blast Furnace Slag by Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuelin; Lv, Xuewei; Bai, Chenguang; Qiu, Guibao; Chen, Pan

    2012-08-01

    Blast furnace (BF) slag, which is the main byproduct in the ironmaking process, contains large amounts of sensible heat. To recover the heat, a new waste heat-recovery system—granulating molten BF slag by rotary multinozzles cup atomizer and pyrolyzing printed circuited board with obtained hot BF slag particle—was proposed in this study. The feasibility of the waste heat-recovery system was verified by dry granulation and pyrolyzation experiments. The energy of hot BF slag could be converted to chemical energy through the pyrolysis reaction, and a large amount of combustible gas like CO, H2, C m H n , and CH4 can be generated during the process.

  8. Vanadium bioavailability in soils amended with blast furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Maja A; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Cubadda, Francesco; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2015-10-15

    Blast furnace (BF) slags are commonly applied as soil amendments and in road fill material. In Sweden they are also naturally high in vanadium. The aim of this study was to assess the vanadium bioavailability in BF slags when applied to soil. Two soils were amended with up to 29% BF slag (containing 800 mg V kg(-1)) and equilibrated outdoors for 10 months before conducting a barley shoot growth assay. Additional soil samples were spiked with dissolved vanadate(V) for which assays were conducted two weeks (freshly spiked) and 10 months (aged) after spiking. The BF slag vanadium was dominated by vanadium(III) as shown by V K-edge XANES spectroscopy. In contrast, results obtained by HPLC-ICP-MS showed that vanadium(V), the most toxic vanadium species, was predominant in the soil solution. Barley shoot growth was not affected by the BF slag additions. This was likely due to limited dissolution of vanadium from the BF slag, preventing an increase of dissolved vanadium above toxic thresholds. The difference in vanadium bioavailability among treatments was explained by the vanadium concentration in the soil solution. It was concluded that the vanadium in BF slag is sparingly available. These findings should be of importance in environmental risk assessment. PMID:25917693

  9. Properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag

    SciTech Connect

    Kourounis, S.; Tsivilis, S. . E-mail: stsiv@central.ntua.gr; Tsakiridis, P.E.; Papadimitriou, G.D.; Tsibouki, Z.

    2007-06-15

    The present research study investigates the properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag, a by-product of the conversion process of iron to steel. For this purpose, a reference sample and three cements containing up to 45% w/w steel slag were tested. The steel slag fraction used was the '0-5 mm', due to its high content in calcium silicate phases. Initial and final setting time, standard consistency, flow of normal mortar, autoclave expansion and compressive strength at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days were measured. The hydrated products were identified by X-ray diffraction while the non-evaporable water was determined by TGA. The microstructure of the hardened cement pastes and their morphological characteristics were examined by scanning electron microscopy. It is concluded that slag can be used in the production of composite cements of the strength classes 42.5 and 32.5 of EN 197-1. In addition, the slag cements present satisfactory physical properties. The steel slag slows down the hydration of the blended cements, due to the morphology of contained C{sub 2}S and its low content in calcium silicates.

  10. Uranium distribution in pseudowollastonite slag from a phosphorus furnace

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Edward; Altschuler, Zalman S.

    1956-01-01

    Silicate slag from the Victor Chemical Company phosphorus furnace at Tarpon Springs, Fla., has been found to consist essentially of pseudowollastonite, α-CaSiO3. The first-formed crystals are euhedral laths which form a mesh making up most of the slag. As the slag continues to solidify, its composition changes slightly and more equant, subhedral crystals of pseudowollastonite are deposited within the framework of the earlier material. Finally, anherdral masses of fibrous, poorly crystallized material are deposited in the remaining pore spaces which are not always completely filled. Spherules of iron phosphide, Fe2P, occur very sparsely in the slag as inclusions from the immiscible iron phosphide melt. Uranium content increases in the later crystal products of the slag, and by heavy-liquid fractionation it has been possible to segregate partially the phases and to obtain a fourfold concentration of uranium in 5 percent of the material and a twofold concentration in 30 percent of the material. Nuclear-emulsion studies indicate that the last phases of the silicate slag are actually eight times as radioactive as the early phases. In addition, the iron phosphide spherules are comparably enriches in uranium.

  11. Evaluation of electric arc furnace-processed steel slag for dermal corrosion, irritation, and sensitization from dermal contact.

    PubMed

    Suh, Mina; Troese, Matthew J; Hall, Debra A; Yasso, Blair; Yzenas, John J; Proctor, Debora M

    2014-12-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag is alkaline (pH of ~11-12) and contains metals, most notably chromium and nickel, and thus has potential to cause dermal irritation and sensitization at sufficient dose. Dermal contact with EAF slag occurs in many occupational and environmental settings because it is used widely in construction and other industrial sectors for various applications including asphaltic paving, road bases, construction fill, and as feed for cement kilns construction. However, no published study has characterized the potential for dermal effects associated with EAF slag. To assess dermal irritation, corrosion and sensitizing potential of EAF slag, in vitro and in vivo dermal toxicity assays were conducted based on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. In vitro dermal corrosion and irritation testing (OECD 431 and 439) of EAF slag was conducted using the reconstructed human epidermal (RHE) tissue model. In vivo dermal toxicity and delayed contact sensitization testing (OECD 404 and 406) were conducted in rabbits and guinea pigs, respectively. EAF slag was not corrosive and not irritating in any tests. The results of the delayed contact dermal sensitization test indicate that EAF slag is not a dermal sensitizer. These findings are supported by the observation that metals in EAF slag occur as oxides of low solubility with leachates that are well below toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) limits. Based on these results and in accordance to the OECD guidelines, EAF slag is not considered a dermal sensitizer, corrosive or irritant. PMID:24395402

  12. Preparation of calcium silicate absorbent from iron blast furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Brodnax, L F; Rochelle, G T

    2000-09-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) solids were prepared from hydrated lime and iron blast furnace slag in an aqueous agitated slurry at 92 degrees C. While it was hoped a minimal lime/slag ratio could be used to create near-amorphous CSH, the surface area of the product improved by increasing the lime/slag weight ratio to 2. The addition of gypsum to the lime/slag system dramatically improved the formation of surface area, creating solids with 139 m2/g after 30 hr of reaction when only a minimal amount of lime was present. The SO2 reactivity of solids prepared with gypsum greatly exceeded that of hydrated lime, achieving greater than 70-80% conversion of the alkalinity after 1 hr of reaction with SO2. The use of CaCl2 as an additive to the lime/slag system, in lieu of gypsum, also produced high-surface-area solids, 115 m2/g after 21 hr of reaction. However, the SO2 reactivity of these sorbents was relatively low given the high surface area. This emphasized that the correlation between surface area and SO2 reactivity was highly dependent on the solid phase, which was subsequently dependent on slurry composition. PMID:11055162

  13. Mechanical and leaching behaviour of slag-cement and lime-activated slag stabilised/solidified contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kogbara, Reginald B; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2011-05-01

    Stabilisation/solidification (S/S) is an effective technique for reducing the leachability of contaminants in soils. Very few studies have investigated the use of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) for S/S treatment of contaminated soils, although it has been shown to be effective in ground improvement. This study sought to investigate the potential of GGBS activated by cement and lime for S/S treatment of a mixed contaminated soil. A sandy soil spiked with 3000mg/kg each of a cocktail of heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu and Pb) and 10,000mg/kg of diesel was treated with binder blends of one part hydrated lime to four parts GGBS (lime-slag), and one part cement to nine parts GGBS (slag-cement). Three binder dosages, 5, 10 and 20% (m/m) were used and contaminated soil-cement samples were compacted to their optimum water contents. The effectiveness of the treatment was assessed using unconfined compressive strength (UCS), permeability and acid neutralisation capacity (ANC) tests with determination of contaminant leachability at the different acid additions. UCS values of up to 800kPa were recorded at 28days. The lowest coefficient of permeability recorded was 5×10(-9)m/s. With up to 20% binder dosage, the leachability of the contaminants was reduced to meet relevant environmental quality standards and landfill waste acceptance criteria. The pH-dependent leachability of the metals decreased over time. The results show that GGBS activated by cement and lime would be effective in reducing the leachability of contaminants in contaminated soils. PMID:21420148

  14. Reduction Kinetics of Electric Arc Furnace Oxidizing Slag by Al-Fe Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehong; Oh, Joon Seok; Lee, Joonho

    2016-07-01

    Effects of temperature and slag basicity on the reduction rate of iron oxide in molten synthetic electric arc furnace oxidizing slag by Al-40 wt.%Fe alloy was investigated. An alloy sample was dropped into molten slag in an MgO crucible. When the initial slag temperature was 1723 K, there was no reduction. However, when the initial slag temperature was 1773 K and the slag basicity was 1.1, the reduction was initiated and the temperature of the slag rapidly increased. When the slag basicity was 1.1, increasing the initial slag temperature from 1773 K to 1823 K increases the reaction rate. As the slag basicity increased from 1.1 to 1.4 at 1773 K, the reaction rate increased. From SEM analysis, it was found that an Al2O3 or a spinel phase at the slag-metal interface inhibited the reaction at a lower temperature and a lower slag basicity.

  15. Effect of the content of the crystalline and vitreous phases of blast-furnace slags on their properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gindis, Ya.P.

    1987-10-01

    Studies carried out on the hydrochannel granulation plant with a variety of blast-furnace slag from the southern Ukraine determined that, depending on their cooling conditions, it was possible to obtain materials with differing contents of the crystalline and glassy phases which have different porosities. These studies showed that, depending on the changes in these features, ordinary (solid) or porous granulated slag or slag pumice with different properties was obtained. The dependence of the hydraulic activity of the materials obtained (and cements based on them) on the cooling conditions of the melts (specific flow rates of water) has been shown to have an extremum and a maximum. The maximum value of the hydraulic activity has been determined to correspond to granulated slag which has a porous structure and contains 6-26% crystalline phase (mainly melilite), while the remainder consists of amorphous and devitrified glass, the content of the latter being of the order of 20-40%.

  16. Evaluation on chemical stability of lead blast furnace (LBF) and imperial smelting furnace (ISF) slags.

    PubMed

    Yin, Nang-Htay; Sivry, Yann; Guyot, François; Lens, Piet N L; van Hullebusch, Eric D

    2016-09-15

    The leaching behavior of Pb and Zn from lead blast furnace (LBF) and imperial smelting furnace (ISF) slags sampled in the North of France was studied as a function of pHs and under two atmospheres (open air and nitrogen). The leaching of major elements from the slags was monitored as a function of pH (4, 5.5, 7, 8.5 and 10) under both atmospheres for different slag-water interaction times (1 day and 9 days). The leaching results were coupled with a geochemical model; Visual MINTEQ version 3.0, and a detailed morphological and mineralogical analysis was performed on the leached slags by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Significant amounts of Ca, Fe and Zn were released under acidic conditions (pH 4) with a decrease towards the neutral to alkaline conditions (pH 7 and 10) for both LBF and ISF slags. On the other hand, Fe leachability was limited at neutral to alkaline pH for both slags. The concentrations of all elements increased gradually after 216 h compared to initial 24 h of leaching period. The presence of oxygen under open-air atmosphere not only enhanced oxidative weathering but also encouraged formation of secondary oxide and carbonate phases. Formation of carbonates and clay minerals was suggested by Visual MINTEQ which was further confirmed by SEM & TEM. The hydration and partial dissolution of hardystonite, as well as the destabilization of amorphous glassy matrix mainly contributed to the release of major elements, whereas the spinel related oxides were resistant against pH changes and atmospheres within the time frame concerned for both LBF and ISF slags. The total amount of Pb leached out at pH 7 under both atmospheres suggested that both LBF and ISF slags are prone to weathering even at neutral environmental conditions. PMID:27240207

  17. Characterization of environmentally-friendly alkali activated slag cements and ancient building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakulich, Aaron Richard

    Alternative cement technologies are an area of increasing interest due to growing environmental concerns and the relatively large carbon footprint of the cement industry. Many new cements have been developed, but one of the most promising is that made from granulated, ground blast furnace slag activated by a high-pH solution. Another is related to the discovery that some of the pyramid limestone blocks may have been cast using a combination of diatomaceous earth activated by lime which provides the high pH needed to dissolve the diatomaceous earth and bind the limestone aggregate together. The emphasis of this thesis is not on the latter---which was explored elsewhere---but on the results supplying further evidence that some of the pyramid blocks were indeed reconstituted limestone. The goal of this work is to chemically and mechanically characterize both alkali-activated slag cements as well as a number of historic materials, which may be ancient analogues to cement. Alkali activated slag cements were produced with a number of additives; concretes were made with the addition of a fine limestone aggregate. These materials were characterized mechanically and by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and TGA. Samples from several Egyptian pyramids, an 'ancient floor' in Colorado, and the 'Bosnian Pyramids' were investigated. In the cements, it has been unequivocally shown that C-S-H, the same binding phase that is produced in ordinary portland cement, has been produced, as well as a variety of mineral side products. Significant recarbonation occurs during the first 20 months, but only for the Na2CO3-activated formulae. Radiocarbon dating proves that the 'Bosnian Pyramids' and 'ancient floors' are not made from any type of recarbonated lime; however, Egyptian pyramid limestones were finite, thus suggesting that they are of a synthetic nature. XRD and FTIR results were inconclusive, while TGA results indicate the limestones are identical to naturally occurring limestones, and SEM

  18. Marble-type glass based on blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, P.D.; Smirnov, V.G.; Trifonova, T.E.; Sergeev, Yu.N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the recovery and use of blast furnace wastes as coloring agents in the manufacture of imitation marble glass. The slags consist of a series of metal oxides each of which is tested for the color it generates when reacted and annealed with the molten glass. Comparative tests were also run against non-waste coloring agents and it was found that the waste-derived colorants were equal or superior both in process behavior and in generating the appropriate optical properties in the finished glass.

  19. Influence of slag blended cement concrete on chloride diffusion rate

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghanian, C.; Arjemandi, M.

    1997-06-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the effect of 0 to 30% partial replacement of cement by slag on chloride diffusion rate in concrete. Concretes with 0 to 30% slag were used and exposed to 2 to 5% NaCl solutions. The effect of different external salt concentration solutions and the influence of water-cement ratios ranging from 0.45 to 0.75 was also studied. In this research, different curing methods such as 9 to 18 days exposure to 100% humidity and 9 to 18 days submersion in distilled water were selected. The results indicated that after 90 days of exposure to salt solutions an/d 108 days of concrete age, chloride diffusivity for concretes containing slag almost remained the same. This effect was more pronounced for water-cement ratio of 0.45 and curing condition of 18 days submersion in water. An increase in water-cement ratio beyond 0.55 indicated a higher chloride diffusion rate. Curing condition for slag blended cement concrete also indicated a different behavior in chloride diffusivity. The best curing method obtained for this type of concrete was 18 days submersion in water.

  20. Use of ancient copper slags in Portland cement and alkali activated cement matrices.

    PubMed

    Nazer, Amin; Payá, Jordi; Borrachero, María Victoria; Monzó, José

    2016-02-01

    Some Chilean copper slag dumps from the nineteenth century still remain, without a proposed use that encourages recycling and reduces environmental impact. In this paper, the copper slag abandoned in landfills is proposed as a new building material. The slags studied were taken from Playa Negra and Púquios dumps, both located in the region of Atacama in northern Chile. Pozzolanic activity in lime and Portland cement systems, as well as the alkali activation in pastes with copper slag cured at different temperatures, was studied. The reactivity of the slag was measured using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electrical conductivity and pH in aqueous suspension and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Furthermore, copper slag-Portland cement mortars with the substitution of 25% (by weight) of cement by copper slag and alkali-activated slag mortars cured at 20 and 65 °C were made, to determine the compressive strength. The results indicate that the ancient copper slags studied have interesting binding properties for the construction sector. PMID:26615227

  1. Study of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-05-01

    Five samples of Bismuth-Ground granulated blast furnace slag (Bi-GGBFS) concretes were prepared using composition (0.6 cement + x Bi2O3 + (0.4-x) GGBFS, x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25) by keeping constant water (W) cement (C) ratio. Mass attenuation coefficients (μm) of these prepared samples were calculated using a computer program winXCOM at different gamma ray energies, whereas effective atomic numbers (Zeff) is calculated using mathematical formulas. The radiation shielding properties of Bi-GGBFS concrete has been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes.

  2. Carbothermic Reduction of Titanium-Bearing Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Yu-Lan; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-03-01

    The carbothermic reduction experiments were carried out for titanium-bearing blast furnace slag in Panzhihua Iron and Steel Company in argon atmosphere at high temperatures. The effects of reduction temperature, isothermal treatment time and carbon content on the formation of TiC were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The XRD pattern results showed that MgAl2O4 phase disappeared and the main phase of the reduced sample was TiC when the reduction temperature was higher than 1,773 K. The SEM pictures showed that the reduction rate of the titanium-bearing blast furnace slag could be increased by enhancing the temperature and the C content (carbon ratio ≤1.0). Furthermore, it was also found that TiC had the tendency of concentrating around the iron. The effects of additives such as Fe and CaCl2 on the formation of TiC were also studied in the present study.

  3. ALKALI-ACTIVATED SLAG CEMENTS AS A SUSTAINABLE BUILDING MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall goal of this project is to develop and characterize alkali-activated slag cements with minimal carbon footprints, as well as to answer scientific questions that have yet to be satisfactorily addressed by prior research. These questions include the final disposition...

  4. Studies on the corrosion resistance of reinforced steel in concrete with ground granulated blast-furnace slag--An overview.

    PubMed

    Song, Ha-Won; Saraswathy, Velu

    2006-11-16

    The partial replacement of clinker, the main constituent of ordinary Portland cement by pozzolanic or latent hydraulic industrial by-products such as ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), effectively lowers the cost of cement by saving energy in the production process. It also reduces CO2 emissions from the cement plant and offers a low priced solution to the environmental problem of depositing industrial wastes. The utilization of GGBFS as partial replacement of Portland cement takes advantage of economic, technical and environmental benefits of this material. Recently offshore, coastal and marine concrete structures were constructed using GGBFS concrete because high volume of GGBFS can contribute to the reduction of chloride ingress. In this paper, the influence of using GGBFS in reinforced concrete structures from the durability aspects such as chloride ingress and corrosion resistance, long term durability, microstructure and porosity of GGBFS concrete has been reviewed and discussed. PMID:16930831

  5. Electrode Arrangement As Substitute Bottom For An Electrothermic Slag Smelting Furnace.

    DOEpatents

    Aune, Jan Arthur; Brinch, Jon Christian; Johansen, Kai

    2005-12-27

    The electrode arrangement uses vertically oriented electrodes with side wall contacts for an electrothermic smelting furnace for aluminum production. The side wall contacts are radially moveable into the furnace to compensate for wear on the contacts. The side wall contacts can be hollow to allow a slag forming charge to be fed to the furnace.

  6. Stabilization of mercury using waste ladle furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Sun, Darren Delai; Zhang, Lilin; Lai, Dickson

    2013-12-01

    Disposal of mercury waste has always provided unique challenges due to its high degree of complexity and volatility. This study evaluated the feasibility of using waste LF slag to form a cementitious matrix capable of providing an effective stabilization/solidification solution for the treatment of mercury wastes. The new matrix was synthesized and simulated through a combination of alkali activation and autoclaving process and doped with mercury nitrate at increasing dosage while monitoring the final form of the mercury and its effects on the mineral stability and structure of the new matrix. Compressive strength of up to 20 N/mm2 was achievable for the original matrix. Promising results were obtained in terms of reduced leachability of the mercury when compared to ordinary Portland cement systems at low doping concentration of around 0.5% by weight. A series of precipitation reactions was found to be the main cause responsible for this successful stabilization, especially the metal sulfide precipitation that occurred with the sulfur present in the original waste LF slag. PMID:24558709

  7. Minimization of Copper Losses in Copper Smelting Slag During Electric Furnace Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coursol, Pascal; Cardona Valencia, Nubia; Mackey, Phillip; Bell, Stacy; Davis, Boyd

    2012-11-01

    In the quest to achieve the highest metal recovery during the smelting of copper concentrates, this study has evaluated the minimum level of soluble copper in iron-silicate slags. The experimental work was performed under slag-cleaning conditions for different levels of Fe in the matte and for a range of Fe/SiO2 ratios in the slag. All experiments were carried out under conditions where three phases were present (copper-matte-slag), which is the condition typically prevailing in many slag-cleaning electric furnaces. The %Fe in the electric furnace matte was varied between 0.5 wt.% and 11 wt.%, and two different Fe/SiO2 ratios in the slag were used (targeted values were 1.4 and 1.6). All experiments were performed at 1200°C. From thermodynamic considerations, from industrial experience, and from the results obtained in this study, the minimum soluble copper content in the electric furnace slag is expected to be near 0.55 wt.% Cu. This level does not account for a portion of the copper present as mechanically entrained matte/metal droplets. Taking this into account, the current authors believe an overall copper level in discard slag between 0.7 wt.% and 0.8 wt.% can be obtained with optimal operating conditions. For these conditions, the copper losses in the slag are roughly 75% as dissolved copper and 25% as entrained matte and copper. Such conditions include operating the electric furnace at metallic copper saturation, maintaining the %Fe in the electric furnace matte between 6 wt.% and 9 wt.%, not exceeding a slag temperature of 1250°C, and controlling the Fe/SiO2 ratio in the smelting furnace slag at ≤1.5. In addition, magnetite reduction needs to be performed efficiently during the slag-cleaning cycle so as to maintain a total magnetite content of ≤7 wt.% in the discard slag. The authors further consider that under exceptionally well-controlled conditions, a copper content in electric furnace discard slag between 0.55 wt.% and 0.7 wt.% can be obtained, by

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Zinc Slag Fuming Process in Top-Submerged Lance Smelting Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Nazmul; Naser, Jamal; Brooks, Geoffrey; Reuter, Markus A.; Matusewicz, Robert W.

    2012-02-01

    Slag fuming is a reductive treatment process for molten zinciferous slags for extracting zinc in the form of metal vapor by injecting or adding a reductant source such as pulverized coal or lump coal and natural gas. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to study the zinc slag fuming process from imperial smelting furnace (ISF) slag in a top-submerged lance furnace and to investigate the details of fluid flow, reaction kinetics, and heat transfer in the furnace. The model integrates combustion phenomena and chemical reactions with the heat, mass, and momentum interfacial interaction between the phases present in the system. A commercial CFD package AVL Fire 2009.2 (AVL, Graz, Austria) coupled with a number of user-defined subroutines in FORTRAN programming language were used to develop the model. The model is based on three-dimensional (3-D) Eulerian multiphase flow approach, and it predicts the velocity and temperature field of the molten slag bath, generated turbulence, and vortex and plume shape at the lance tip. The model also predicts the mass fractions of slag and gaseous components inside the furnace. The model predicted that the percent of ZnO in the slag bath decreases linearly with time and is consistent broadly with the experimental data. The zinc fuming rate from the slag bath predicted by the model was validated through macrostep validation process against the experimental study of Waladan et al. The model results predicted that the rate of ZnO reduction is controlled by the mass transfer of ZnO from the bulk slag to slag-gas interface and rate of gas-carbon reaction for the specified simulation time studied. Although the model is based on zinc slag fuming, the basic approach could be expanded or applied for the CFD analysis of analogous systems.

  9. A mathematical model of slagging of the furnace of the pulverized-coal-firing boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernetskii, M. Yu.; Alekhnovich, A. N.; Dekterev, A. A.

    2012-08-01

    The mathematical model of furnace slagging integrated into the Sigma-Flow program system of computational hydrodynamics has been developed; this system makes it possible to calculate aerodynamics, processes of heat-and-mass exchange, and combustion processes in complex technological facilities, including pulverized-coal-firing furnaces.

  10. Effects of Carbo-Nitridation Process of Ti-Bearing Blast Furnace Slag on Iron Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z.; Zhang, X. M.; Xu, Y.

    In order to prepare corrosion-resistant refractory material, experiment chooses Ti-bearing Blast Furnace Slag as raw materials which were treated by the method of carbo-nitridation. Finally, the corrosion resistance properties of the material can be improved by this method. The carbo-nitridation process affects the iron content of the slag in the study, which have a beneficial effect on the synthesis of Ti (C. N). The results indicated that the iron content of the slag significantly increased in process of Ti (C. N) synthesis: and the iron content of slag showed an upward trend with the increase of holding time.

  11. THE IMPACT OF DISSOLVED SALTS ON PASTES CONTAINING FLY ASH, CEMENT AND SLAG

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

    2009-09-21

    The degree of hydration of a mixture of cementitious materials (Class F fly ash, blast furnace slag and portland cement) in highly concentrated alkaline salt solutions is enhanced by the addition of aluminate to the salt solution. This increase in the degree of hydration, as monitored with isothermal calorimetry, leads to higher values of dynamic Young's modulus and compressive strength and lower values of total porosity. This enhancement in performance properties of these cementitious waste forms by increased hydration is beneficial to the retention of the radionuclides that are also present in the salt solution. The aluminate ions in the solution act first to retard the set time of the mix but then enhance the hydration reactions following the induction period. In fact, the aluminate ions increase the degree of hydration by {approx}35% over the degree of hydration for the same mix with a lower aluminate concentration. An increase in the blast furnace slag concentration and a decrease in the water to cementitious materials ratio produced mixes with higher values of Young's modulus and lower values of total porosity. Therefore, these operational factors can be fine tuned to enhance performance properties of cementitious waste form. Empirical models for Young modulus, heat of hydration and total porosity were developed to predict the values of these properties. These linear models used only statistically significant compositional and operational factors and provided insight into those factors that control these properties.

  12. Enhanced phosphorus removal from wastewater by growing deep-sea bacterium combined with basic oxygen furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weizhi; Huang, Zhaosong; Sun, Cuiping; Zhao, Haixia; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2016-08-01

    As one solid waste with potential for phosphorus removal, application of slags in water treatment merits attention. But it was inhibited greatly by alkaline solution (pH>9.5) and cemented clogging generated. To give one solution, phosphorus removal was investigated by combining deep-sea bacterium Alteromonas 522-1 and basic oxygen furnace slag (BOFS). Results showed that by the combination, not only higher phosphorous removal efficiency (>90%) but also neutral solution pH of 7.8-8.0 were achieved at wide ranges of initial solution pH value of 5.0-9.0, phosphorus concentration of 5-30mg/L, salinity of 0.5-3.5%, and temperature of 15-35°C. Moreover, sedimentary property was also improved with lower amount of sludge production and alleviated BOFS cementation with increased porosity and enlarged particle size. These results provided a promising strategy for the phosphorus recovery with slags in large-scale wastewater treatment. PMID:27179297

  13. Interfaces Between Coke, Slag, and Metal in the Tuyere Level of a Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kejiang; Zhang, Jianliang; Liu, Zhengjian; Barati, Mansoor; Zhong, Jianbo; Wei, Mengfang; Wang, Guangwei; Jiao, Kexin; Yang, Tianjun

    2015-04-01

    An in-depth understanding about the reactions in the high-temperature zone of a blast furnace is significant to optimize both the current and future blast furnace process. The interfaces between coke, slag, and metal were observed using scanning electronic microscope with samples obtained from the tuyere level of a blast furnace. Two types of slag phases were identified, one originating from coke ash and the other from the bosh slag. Slag formed by coke ash was seen to cover the coke surface, which may hinder the reaction of coke with both gas and liquid iron. The reduction of FeO from the bosh slag (originated from the primary slag) occurs in the coke/slag interface with the reduced iron forming a metal layer surrounding the coke surface. The reduction of SiO2 occurs both in and outside the coke, and the reduced silicon reacts with iron to form iron silicide if the two species come into contact. Further study is proposed based on the results of this study.

  14. Use of Artificial Neural Network for the Simulation of Radon Emission Concentration of Granulated Blast Furnace Slag Mortar.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hong-Seok; Xing, Shuli; Lee, Malrey; Lee, Young-Keun; So, Seung-Young

    2016-05-01

    In this study, an artificial neural networks study was carried out to predict the quantity of radon of Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GBFS) cement mortar. A data set of a laboratory work, in which a total of 3 mortars were produced, was utilized in the Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) study. The mortar mixture parameters were three different GBFS ratios (0%, 20%, 40%). Measurement radon of moist cured specimens was measured at 3, 10, 30, 100, 365 days by sensing technology for continuous monitoring of indoor air quality (IAQ). ANN model is constructed, trained and tested using these data. The data used in the ANN model are arranged in a format of two input parameters that cover the cement, GBFS and age of samples and, an output parameter which is concentrations of radon emission of mortar. The results showed that ANN can be an alternative approach for the predicting the radon concentration of GBFS mortar using mortar ingredients as input parameters. PMID:27483913

  15. Hydraulic activity of cement mixed with slag from vitrified solid waste incinerator fly ash.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kae-Long; Wang, Kuen-Sheng; Tzeng, Bor-Yu; Lin, Chung-Yei

    2003-12-01

    This study investigates the effects of the slag composition on the hydraulic activity in slag blended cement pastes that incorporate synthetic slag prepared by melting CaO-modified municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash. Two types of composition-modified slag were prepared for this study. First, fly ash was mixed with the modifier (CaO) at 5% and 15% (by weight) respectively, resulting in two fly ash mixtures. These mixtures were then melted at 1400 degrees C for 30 minutes and milled to produce two types of slag with different modifier contents, designated as C1-slag and C2-slag. These synthetic slags were blended with ordinary Portland cement at various weight ratios ranging from 10% to 40%. The synthetic slags presented sufficient hydraulic activity, and the heavy metal leaching concentrations all met the EPA's regulatory thresholds. The pore size distribution was determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry, and the results correlated with the compressive strength. The results also indicate that the incorporation of the 10% C1-slag tended to enhance the hydration degree of slag blended cement pastes during the early ages (3-28 days). However, at later ages, no significant difference in hydration degree was observed between ordinary Portland cement pastes and 10% C1-slag blended cement pastes. In the 10% C2-slag case, the trend was similar, but with a more limited enhancement during the early ages (3-28 days). Thus vitrified waste incinerator fly ash is a technically useful additive to cement, reducing the disposal needs for the toxic fly ash. PMID:14986718

  16. Characterization of Slag, Fly Ash and Portland Cement for Saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J

    2006-02-01

    Batch-to-batch variability in the chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, slag and portland cement (binders) will be an ongoing concern over the many years that salt waste from Tank 50 will be processed into grout at the Saltstone Processing Facility. This batch-to-batch variability in the properties of the binder materials translates to variability in the fresh and cured properties of Saltstone. Therefore, it is important to quantify the batch-to-batch variability of the binder materials and the resultant variation in grout properties. This report is the starting point for that process by providing the baseline (reference point) binder properties to which future batches of binder materials can be compared. For this characterization effort, properties of fly ash, slag and portland cement were obtained and documented in this report. These properties included particle size distribution by laser light scattering and dry sieving, particle size and morphology by scanning electron microscopy, true, aerated and tapped densities, chemical composition, rheological properties of the water based slurries made from individual binder material, and volatility through thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The properties presented in this report also provide a baseline data set to assist in problem solving efforts when or if unanticipated and/or unwanted processing events occur at the Saltstone Processing Facility.

  17. Effect of sodium monofluorophosphate treatment on microstructure and frost salt scaling durability of slag cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Copuroglu, O. . E-mail: o.copuroglu@citg.tudelft.nl; Fraaij, A.L.A.; Bijen, J.M.J.M.

    2006-08-15

    Sodium-monofluorophosphate (Na-MFP) is currently in use as a surface applied corrosion inhibitor in the concrete industry. Its basic mechanism is to protect the passive layer of the reinforcement steel against disruption due to carbonation. Carbonation is known as the most detrimental environmental effect on blast furnace slag cement (BFSC) concrete with respect to frost salt scaling. In this paper the effect of Na-MFP on the microstructure and frost salt scaling resistance of carbonated BFSC paste is presented. The results of electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are discussed. It is found that the treatment modifies the microstructure and improves the resistance of carbonated BFSC paste against frost salt attack.

  18. Corrosion behavior of steel in concrete made with slag-blended cement

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghanian, C.

    1999-03-01

    Concretes formulated with slag as a partial replacement for cement were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of steel embedded in concrete, resistivity, and the compressive strength of the concrete. Corrosion rates and pitting corrosion of steel in concrete with up to 30% slag and exposed to sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions decreased. Slag-blended cement concrete increased concrete resistivity. A water-to-cement ratio <0.55 and submersion in water for a period of 18 days gave the best chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) diffusion resistance from the external salt solutions. Compressive strength of the concrete decreased with addition of slag in the early ages of the concrete. After 5 months of age, compressive strength of the concrete increased with addition of slag. This trend continued with up to 30% slag addition.

  19. Environmental impacts of asphalt mixes with electric arc furnace steel slag.

    PubMed

    Milačič, Radmila; Zuliani, Tea; Oblak, Tina; Mladenovič, Ana; Ančar, Janez Šč

    2011-01-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag can be used as an alternative high-quality material in road construction. Although asphalts with slag aggregates have been recognized as environmentally acceptable, there is a lack of data concerning the potential leaching of toxic Cr(VI) due to the highly alkaline media of EAF slag. Leaching of selected water extractable metals from slag indicated elevated concentrations of total chromium and Cr(VI). To estimate the environmental impacts of asphalt mixes with slag, leachability tests based on diffusion were performed using pure water and salt water as leaching agents. Compact and ground asphalt composites with natural aggregates, and asphalt composites in which the natural aggregates were completely replaced by slag were prepared. The concentrations of total chromium and Cr(VI) were determined in leachates over a time period of 6 mo. After 1 and 6 mo, the concentrations of some other metals were also determined in the leachates. The results indicated that chromium in leachates from asphalt composites with the addition of slag was present almost solely in its hexavalent form. However, the concentrations were very low (below 25 μg L) and did not represent an environmental burden. The leaching of other metals from asphalt composites with the addition of slag was negligible. Therefore, the investigated EAF slag can be considered as environmentally safe substitute for natural aggregates in asphalt mixes. PMID:21712585

  20. Investigation of the phosphorus removal capacities of basic oxygen furnace slag under variable conditions.

    PubMed

    Han, Chong; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Wangjin; Wu, Qianqian; Yang, He; Xue, Xiangxin

    2016-05-01

    Effects of reaction time, initial phosphorus concentration, basic oxygen furnace slag (BOF-slag) dosage and size, and temperature on the phosphorus removal capacities (PRCs) of BOF-slag have been investigated in detail through batch tests. Weakly bound phosphorus, Fe- and Al-associated phosphorus, and Ca-associated phosphorus from fresh and reacted BOF-slag were analysed using sequential chemical extraction processes. It was determined that the PRCs of BOF-slag increased with the increase of initial phosphorus concentration and temperature while it decreased with the increase of BOF-slag dosage and size. The phosphorus removed by BOF-slag was primarily assigned to weakly bound phosphorus and Ca-associated phosphorus. Weakly bound phosphorus showed a significant decrease with the increase in all experimental parameter values. However, Ca-associated phosphorus exhibited a prominent increase with increasing reaction time, initial phosphorus concentration, and temperature. These demonstrate that experimental parameters can simultaneously affect the PRCs of BOF-slag and the ways of phosphorus removal by BOF-slag. PMID:26507932

  1. Experimental investigation of basic oxygen furnace slag used as aggregate in asphalt mixture.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yongjie; Wu, Shaopeng; Hou, Haobo; Zha, Jin

    2006-11-16

    Chinese researchers have commenced a great deal of researches on the development of application fields of basic oxygen steel making furnace slag (BOF slag) for many years. Lots of new applications and properties have been found, but few of them in asphalt mixture of road construction engineering. This paper discussed the feasibility of BOF steel slag used as aggregate in asphalt pavement by two points of view including BOF steel slag's physical and micro-properties as well as steel slag asphalt materials and pavement performances. For the former part, this paper mainly concerned the mechanochemistry and physical changes of the steel slag and studied it by performing XRD, SEM, TG and mercury porosimeter analysis and testing method. In the second part, this paper intended to use BOF steel slag as raw material, and design steel slag SMA mixture. By using traditional rutting test, soak wheel track and modified Lottman test, the high temperature stability and water resistance ability were tested. Single axes compression test and indirect tensile test were performed to evaluate the low temperature crack resistance performance and fatigue characteristic. Simultaneously, by observing steel slag SMA pavement which was paved successfully. A follow-up study to evaluate the performance of the experimental pavement confirmed that the experimental pavement was comparable with conventional asphalt pavement, even superior to the later in some aspects. All of above test results and analysis had only one main purpose that this paper validated the opinion that using BOF slag in asphalt concrete is feasible. So this paper suggested that treated and tested steel slag should be used in a more extensive range, especially in asphalt mixture paving projects in such an abundant steel slag resource region. PMID:16982138

  2. Structural evolution of an alkali sulfate activated slag cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, Neda; Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of sodium sulfate content and curing duration (from fresh paste up to 18 months) on the binder structure of sodium sulfate activated slag cements was evaluated. Isothermal calorimetry results showed an induction period spanning the first three days after mixing, followed by an acceleration-deceleration peak corresponding to the formation of bulk reaction products. Ettringite, a calcium aluminium silicate hydrate (C-A-S-H) phase, and a hydrotalcite-like Mg-Al layered double hydroxide have been identified as the main reaction products, independent of the Na2SO4 dose. No changes in the phase assemblage were detected in the samples with curing from 1 month up to 18 months, indicating a stable binder structure. The most significant changes upon curing at advanced ages observed were growth of the AFt phase and an increase in silicate chain length in the C-A-S-H, resulting in higher strength.

  3. Graphitization of Coke and Its Interaction with Slag in the Hearth of a Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kejiang; Zhang, Jianliang; Liu, Yanxiang; Barati, Mansoor; Liu, Zhengjian; Zhong, Jianbo; Su, Buxin; Wei, Mengfang; Wang, Guangwei; Yang, Tianjun

    2016-04-01

    Coke reaction behavior in the blast furnace hearth has yet to be fully understood due to limited access to the high temperature zone. The graphitization of coke and its interaction with slag in the hearth of blast furnace were investigated with samples obtained from the center of the deadman of a blast furnace during its overhaul period. All hearth coke samples from fines to lumps were confirmed to be highly graphitized, and the graphitization of coke in the high temperature zone was convinced to start from the coke surface and lead to the formation of coke fines. It will be essential to perform further comprehensive investigations on graphite formation and its evolution in a coke as well as its multi-effect on blast furnace performance. The porous hearth cokes were found to be filled up with final slag. Further research is required about the capability of coke to fill final slag and the attack of final slag on the hearth bottom refractories since this might be a new degradation mechanism of refractories located in the hearth bottom.

  4. The influence of compound admixtures on the properties of high-content slag cement

    SciTech Connect

    Dongxu, L.; Xuequan, W.; Jinlin, S.; Yujiang, W.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the activation theory of alkali and sulfate, the influence of compound admixtures on the properties of high-content slag cement was studied by testing the strength, pore structure, hydrates, and microstructure, Test results show that compound admixtures can obviously improve the properties of high-content slag cement. The emphasis of the present research is two-fold: substituting gypsum with anhydrite and calcining gypsum. These both can improve early and later performance.

  5. Effect of electric arc furnace slag on growth and physiology of maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Radić, Sandra; Crnojević, Helena; Sandev, Dubravka; Jelić, Sonja; Sedlar, Zorana; Glavaš, Katarina; Pevalek-Kozlina, Branka

    2013-12-01

    Basic slag, used in this study as a potential source of certain nutrients, is a byproduct of the production of steel in electric arc furnace (EAF). A pot experiment with two nutrient-poor substrates was conducted to investigate to compare the effect of EAF steel slag and fertilizers NPK + F e on growth and availability of specific nutrients to maize. Mineral content of both substrate and plant leaves, growth, chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic pigments were measured following six weeks of cultivation. As steel slag also contains trace amounts of heavy metals, certain oxidative parameters (antioxidative enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation) were evaluated as well. The steel slag improved soil mineral composition, increased above ground maize biomass by providing Fe, Mn, Mg, K and partly P and improved photosynthetic parameters. The potential phytotoxicity of EAF slag containing substrates was not determined as evaluated by MDA (malondialdehyde), GR (glutathione reductase) and APX (ascorbate peroxidase) levels. The obtained results show that EAF steel slag is comparable to NPK + F e in supplying nutrients for maize growth, indicating the potential of EAF steel slag as an inexpensive and non-phytotoxic nutrient supplier especially in poor soils. PMID:24275594

  6. Experimental study on sulfur removal from ladle furnace refining slag in hot state by blowing air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-hua; Lin, Lu; Wu, Qi-fan

    2016-01-01

    In view of the present problem of sulfur enrichment in the metallurgical recycling process of ladle furnace (LF) refining slag, a simple and efficient method of removing sulfur from this slag was proposed. The proposed method is compatible with current steelmaking processes. Sulfur removal from LF refining slag for SPHC steel (manufactured at a certain steel plant in China) by blowing air in the hot state was studied by using hot-state experiments in a laboratory. The FactSage software, a carbon/sulfur analyzer, and scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to test and analyze the sulfur removal effect and to investigate factors influencing sulfur removal rate. The results show that sulfur ions in LF refining slag can be oxidized into SO2 by O2 at high temperature by blowing air into molten slag; SO2 production was observed to reach a maximum with a small amount of blown O2 when the temperature exceeded 1350°C. At 1370°C and 1400°C, experimental LF refining slag is in the liquid state and exhibits good fluidity; under these conditions, the sulfur removal effect by blowing air is greater than 90wt% after 60 min. High temperature and large air flow rate are beneficial for removing sulfur from LF refining slag; compared with air flow rate, temperature has a greater strongly influences on the sulfur removal.

  7. Pre-fired, refractory block slag dams for wet bottom furnace floors

    SciTech Connect

    Vihnicka, R.S.; Meskimen, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    Slagging (wet bottom), utility boilers count on a refractory coating over the furnace floor tube structure for protection from corrosion damage from both the harsh, hot gas atmosphere from the burning fuel and the acidic coal slag. To protect and extend the life of this protective refractory coating the boiler original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) utilized a water-cooled monkey ring or slag chill ring (typically a 6--8 inch high ring of small diameter tubes) surrounding the slag tap locations on most wet bottom furnace floors (both utility and package boilers). The old water-cooled tube ring was such a high maintenance item, however, that it`s use has been discontinued in all but the most extreme environments throughout both utility and industrial applications. Where the use of the ring was discontinued, there has been a corresponding shortening of life on the protective floor refractory coatings (high maintenance cost), further aggravated by recent OSHA restrictions limiting the use of chrome oxide refractory materials in these types of boilers. This paper describes the developmental process and the final resultant product (a non-watercooled, slag dam made from pre-fired refractory shapes), undertaken by the inventors. Derived operational benefits a concept 2 project, with NO{sub x} Title 4 and Title 1 significance (which is currently underway) will also be detailed.

  8. Alkali-Activated Fly ash-slag Cement based nuclear waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W.; Wu, X.; Roy, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    This paper is based on the results of an in-progress research project on Alkali-Activated Cement System at MRL. The objective of this research is to establish the potential for large volume use of fly ash and slag as main components of the cement system. Alkali-activated Fly ash-slag Cement (AFC) was studied as a matrix for immobilization of nuclear waste. AFC is characterized by high early strength, high ultimate strength, low porosity, lower solubilities of the hydrates, and high resistance to chemical corrosion as well as to freezing and thawing. All these advanced properties are particularly favorable to the immobilization the nuclear wastes.

  9. Investigations on phosphorus recovery and reuse as soil amendment from electric arc furnace slag filters.

    PubMed

    Bird, Simon C; Drizo, Aleksandra

    2009-11-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag has been identified as an effective filter material for the removal of phosphorus (P) from both point and non-point sources. To determine the feasibility of land-applying P saturated EAF steel slag this study was undertaken to investigate (i) saturated EAF steel slag material's potential as a P fertilizer or soil amendment and (ii) P desorption and metals leachate from saturated EAF steel slag material to surface runoff. Medicago sativa (alfalfa) was planted in a nutrient depleted washed sand media. Phosphorus was added either as saturated EAF steel slag or as a standard commercial phosphate fertilizer in order to assess the plant availability of the P from saturated EAF steel slag. Four different P application levels were tested: a low (20 lbs acre furrow slice(-1) (5.5 g P m(-3))) two medium (40 and 60 lbs. acre f.s.(-1) (11 and 16.5 g P m(-3))) and a high (120 lbs. acre f.s.(-1) (33 g P m(-3))). The above-ground biomass of half of the plants was harvested after 5 weeks and the second half at 10 weeks. All treatments regardless of the P source used showed high rates of germination. At the first harvest period (5 weeks) significantly higher above-ground biomass (p < 0.01) was seen at the 3 highest P amendment rates in treatments with triple super phosphate fertilizer (TSP) than with EAF steel slag. However, by the second harvest (10 weeks) only the highest amendment rate of TSP showed a significantly higher amount of biomass (p < 0.01), suggesting that EAF steel slag might be an effective slow release P source. In a second experiment, a rain simulator was used to assess desorption of DRP, TP and metals from a saturated and semi-saturated EAF steel slag. The results revealed that the total amounts of DRP and TP released to surface runoff from EAF steel slag were negligible when compared to the total quantities of P retained by this material. Overall the results from this study demonstrated that once the EAF steel slag filter

  10. on the Structure and Viscous Behavior of Ti-Bearing Blast Furnace Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongqi; Liao, Junlin; Zheng, Kai; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2014-10-01

    This study provided a fundamental analysis of the viscous behavior and structure of Ti-bearing blast furnace slags modified by different B2O3 additions with a basicity (CaO/SiO2) range of 0.5-0.9. The viscosity of slag melts was measured by rotating cylinder method, and the results showed that both slag viscosity and apparent activation energy for viscous flow remarkably decreased with B2O3 addition. To connect the viscosity variation of slags to the melt structure, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy analysis was performed. The results indicated that B2O3 acted as a typical network forming oxide, which was introduced into the network and existed dominantly as a two-dimensional structure, BO3 triangular. With the increase of B2O3 content, the stretching vibration of BO3 triangular gradually became more pronounced, which resulted in a simpler and less complex structure and caused the decrease of slag viscosity.

  11. Cleaning of a copper matte smelting slag from a water-jacket furnace by direct reduction of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Maweja, Kasonde; Mukongo, Tshikele; Mutombo, Ilunga

    2009-05-30

    Cleaning experiments of a copper matte smelting slag from the water-jacket furnace was undertaken by direct reduction in a laboratory-scale electric furnace. The effects of coal-to-slag ratio, w, and the reduction time, t, were considered for two different coal/slag mixing procedures. In the first procedure, metallurgical coal was added to the molten slag, whereas in the second procedure, coal was premixed with the solid slag before charging into the furnace. The recovery of heavy metals (Cu, Co), and the fuming of Pb and Zn were investigated. Contamination of the metal phase by iron and the acidity index of the final slag were analysed as these may impede the economical viability of the process. The lower w value of 2.56% yielded a recovery rate of less than 60% for copper and less than 50% for cobalt, and around 70% for zinc. However, increasing w to 5% allowed the recovery of 70-90% for Cu, Co and Zn simultaneously after 30-60 min reduction of the molten slag. After reduction, the cleaned slags contained only small amounts of copper and cobalt (<0.4 wt%). Fuming of lead and zinc was efficient as the %Pb of the residual slag dropped to levels lower than 0.04% after 30 min of reduction. Ninety percent of the lead was removed from the initial slag and collected in the dusts. The zinc content of the cleaned slags quickly dropped to between 1 and 3 wt% from the initial 8.2% after 30 min reduction for w value of 5 and after 60 min reduction for w value of 2.56. The dusts contained about 60% Zn and 10% Pb. Recovery of lead from fuming of the slag was higher than 90% in all the experimental conditions considered in this study. PMID:18848396

  12. Determining the slag fraction, water/binder ratio and degree of hydration in hardened cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Yio, M.H.N. Phelan, J.C.; Wong, H.S.; Buenfeld, N.R.

    2014-02-15

    A method for determining the original mix composition of hardened slag-blended cement-based materials based on analysis of backscattered electron images combined with loss on ignition measurements is presented. The method does not require comparison to reference standards or prior knowledge of the composition of the binders used. Therefore, it is well-suited for application to real structures. The method is also able to calculate the degrees of reaction of slag and cement. Results obtained from an experimental study involving sixty samples with a wide range of water/binder (w/b) ratios (0.30 to 0.50), slag/binder ratios (0 to 0.6) and curing ages (3 days to 1 year) show that the method is very promising. The mean absolute errors for the estimated slag, water and cement contents (kg/m{sup 3}), w/b and s/b ratios were 9.1%, 1.5%, 2.5%, 4.7% and 8.7%, respectively. 91% of the estimated w/b ratios were within 0.036 of the actual values. -- Highlights: •A new method for estimating w/b ratio and slag content in cement pastes is proposed. •The method is also able to calculate the degrees of reaction of slag and cement. •Reference standards or prior knowledge of the binder composition are not required. •The method was tested on samples with varying w/b ratios and slag content.

  13. Recycling of Malaysia's electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste into heavy-duty green ceramic tile.

    PubMed

    Teo, Pao-Ter; Anasyida, Abu Seman; Basu, Projjal; Nurulakmal, Mohd Sharif

    2014-12-01

    Recently, various solid wastes from industry such as glass waste, fly ash, sewage sludge and slag have been recycled into various value-added products such as ceramic tile. The conventional solutions of dumping the wastes in landfills or incineration, including in Malaysia are getting obsolete as the annual huge amount of the solid wastes would boost-up disposal cost and may cause permanent damage to the flora and fauna. This recent waste recycling approach is much better and greener as it can resolve problems associated with over-limit storage of industrial wastes and reduce exploration of natural resources for ceramic tile to continuously sustain the nature. Therefore, in this project, an attempt was made to recycle electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste, obtained from Malaysia's steel making industry, into ceramic tile via conventional powder compaction method. The research work was divided into two stages. The first stage was to evaluate the suitability of EAF slag in ceramic tile by varying weight percentage of EAF slag (40 wt.%, 50 wt.% and 60 wt.%) and ball clay (40 wt.%, 50 wt.% and 60 wt.%), with no addition of silica and potash feldspar. In the second stage, the weight percentage of EAF slag was fixed at 40 wt.% and the percentage of ball clay (30 wt.% and 40 wt.%), feldspar (10 wt.% and 20 wt.%) and silica (10 wt.% and 20 wt.%) added was varied accordingly. Results obtained show that as weight percentage of EAF slag increased up to 60 wt.%, the percentage of apparent porosity and water absorption also rose, with a reduction in tile flexural strength and increased porosity. On the other hand, limiting the weight percentage of EAF slag to 40 wt.% while increasing the weight percentage of ball clay led to a higher total percentage of anorthite and wollastonite minerals, resulting in higher flexural strength. It was found that introduction of silica and feldspar further improved the flexural strength due to optimization of densification process. The highest

  14. Reusing pretreated desulfurization slag to improve clinkerization and clinker grindability for energy conservation in cement manufacture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Liang; Chang, Juu-En; Shih, Pai-Haung; Ko, Ming-Sheng; Chang, Yi-Kuo; Chiang, Li-Choung

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to combine the physical pretreatments of grinding, sieving, and magnetic-separation processes to reclaim iron-rich materials from the desulfurization slag, and to use the remainder for cement clinker production. The iron-rich materials can be separated out efficiently by grinding for 30 min and sieving with a 0.3 mm mesh. The non-magnetic fraction of the particles smaller than 0.3 mm was in the majority, and proved to be suitable for use as a cement raw material. The raw mixes prepared with a pretreated desulfurization slag had a relatively high reactivity, and the temperature at which alite forms was significantly reduced during the clinkerization process. The clinkers produced with 10% desulfurization slag had a high level of alite and good grindability. Generally, the improvements in clinkerization and clinker grindability are beneficial to energy conservation in cement manufacture. PMID:20493627

  15. Assessment of hexavalent chromium release in Malaysian electric arc furnace steel slag for fertilizer usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankole, L. K.; Rezan, S. A.; Sharif, N. M.

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the leaching of hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) from electric arc furnace steel slag as Cr (VI) is classified as human carcinogen. Batch leaching tests were performed for 16 days. The lixiviants used were alkaline, de-ionized and rain water. After 16 days, Cr (VI) was found to be highest in alkaline water (0.03 mg/L) and lowest in de-ionized water (0.01 mg/L). Besides the lixiviants used, slag stirring speed and liquid to solid ratio also affect Cr (VI) released. The experimental work was complimented with slag characterization using XRF, XRD and SEM/EDX analysis. The leaching process was also simulated via Factsage software to calculate isothermal pourbaix diagrams. The Cr (VI) released was low and below the threshold of 0.1 mg/L set for public water systems. Recycle the slag as fertilizer should be considered safe as it does not exceed the safety limit set for Cr (VI) dissolution.

  16. Thermodynamic Analysis of Blast Furnace Slag Waste Heat-Recovery System Integrated with Coal Gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, W. J.; Li, P.; Lei, W.; Chen, W.; Yu, Q. B.; Wang, K.; Qin, Q.

    2015-05-01

    The blast furnace (BF) slag waste heat was recovered by an integrated system stage by stage, which combined a physical and chemical method. The water and coal gasification reactions were used to recover the heat in the system. Based on the first and second law of thermodynamics, the thermodynamic analysis of the system was carried out by the enthalpy-exergy diagram. The results showed that the concept of the "recovery-temperature countercurrent, energy cascade utilization" was realized by this system to recover and use the high-quality BF slag waste heat. In this system, the high-temperature waste heat was recovered by coal gasification and the relatively low-temperature waste heat was used to produce steam. The system's exergy and thermal recycling efficiency were 52.6% and 75.4%, respectively. The exergy loss of the integrated system was only 620.0 MJ/tslag. Compared with the traditional physical recycling method producing steam, the exergy and thermal efficiencies of the integrated system were improved significantly. Meanwhile, approximately 182.0 m3/tslag syngas was produced by coal gasification. The BF slag waste heat will be used integrally and efficiently by the integrated system. The results provide the theoretical reference for recycling and using the BF slag waste heat.

  17. Mineralogy and environmental geochemistry of historical iron slag, Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, N.M.; Seal, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    The Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in southeastern Pennsylvania, which features an Fe smelter that was operational in the 18th and 19th centuries, is dominated by three slag piles. Pile 1 slag, from the Hopewell Furnace, and pile 2 slag, likely from the nearby Cornwall Furnace, were both produced in cold-blast charcoal-fired smelters. In contrast, pile 3 slag was produced in an anthracite furnace. Ore samples from the nearby Jones and Hopewell mines that fed the smelter are mainly magnetite-rich with some sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite) and accessory silicates (quartz, garnet, feldspar, and clay minerals). Slag piles 1 and 2 are similar mineralogically containing predominantly skeletal and dendritic aluminian diopside and augite, skeletal forsteritic olivine, glass, rounded blebs of metallic Fe, and exotic quartz. Olivine is a major phase in all samples from pile 2, whereas it occurs in only a few samples from pile 1. Samples of the <2mm-size fraction of surface composite slag material or crushed slag from at depth in piles 1 and 2 are mineralogically similar to the large surface slag fragments from those piles with the addition of phases such as feldspars, Fe oxides, and clay minerals that are either secondary weathering products or entrained from the underlying bedrock. Pile 3 slag contains mostly skeletal forsteritic olivine and Ti-bearing aluminian diopside, dendritic or fine-grained subhedral melilite, glass, euhedral spinel, metallic Fe, alabandite-oldhamite solid solution, as well as a sparse Ti carbonitride phase. The bulk chemistry of the slag is dominated by Al 2O 3 (8.5-16.2wt.%), CaO (8.2-26.2wt.%), MgO (4.2-24.7wt.%), and SiO 2 (36.4-59.8wt.%), constituting between 81% and 97% of the mass of the samples. Piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar; pile 1 slag overall contains the highest Fe 2O 3, K 2O and MnO, and the lowest MgO concentrations. Pile 3 slag is high in Al 2O 3, CaO and S, and low in Fe 2O 3, K 2O and SiO 2 compared to the

  18. The efficiency of quartz addition on electric arc furnace (EAF) carbon steel slag stability.

    PubMed

    Mombelli, D; Mapelli, C; Barella, S; Gruttadauria, A; Le Saout, G; Garcia-Diaz, E

    2014-08-30

    Electric arc furnace slag (EAF) has the potential to be re-utilized as an alternative to stone material, however, only if it remains chemically stable on contact with water. The presence of hydraulic phases such as larnite (2CaO SiO2) could cause dangerous elements to be released into the environment, i.e. Ba, V, Cr. Chemical treatment appears to be the only way to guarantee a completely stable structure, especially for long-term applications. This study presents the efficiency of silica addition during the deslagging period. Microstructural characterization of modified slag was performed by SEM and XRD analysis. Elution tests were performed according to the EN 12457-2 standard, with the addition of silica and without, and the obtained results were compared. These results demonstrate the efficiency of the inertization process: the added silica induces the formation of gehlenite, which, even in caustic environments, does not exhibit hydraulic behaviour. PMID:25113518

  19. Hydration of alumina cement containing ferrotitanium slag with polycarboxylate-ethers (PCE) additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechkalov, Denis; Chernogorlov, Sergey; Abyzov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The paper is discussing results of study of alumina binder containing aluminous cement and ferrotitanium slag from aluminothermic process by Kliuchevskoi Ferroalloys corp. with various additives containing polycarboxylate-ethers (PCE). Selecting ferrotitanium slag as additive is based on the fact that its content of alumina and phase composition is closest to the alumina cement. The composition of the ferrotitanium slag is displayed. In order to compensate the decrease in strength caused by addition of ferrotitanium slag having low activity, PCE additives were added. As PCE additives were used Melflux 1641F, Melflux 2651F and Melflux PP200F by BASF. The effect of additives on the hydration of the binder, depending on the amount and time of additives hardening is shown. The composition of the hydration products in the cement was studied by physico-chemical analysis: derivatography and X-ray analysis. It is found that in the early stages of hardening PCE additives have inhibitory effect on hydration processes and promote new phase amorphization. The optimal content of additives was investigated. The basic properties of the binders have been tested. It was observed that the modified binders meet the requirements of Russian National State Standard GOST 969 to the alumina cement.

  20. Investigation of urtite as an analog of waste slag from a plasma shaft furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, S.A.; Stefanovsky, S.V.

    1996-08-01

    Mineralogical-geochemical investigation of a sample of nepheline syenite (urtite) as a natural analog of final radioactive waste form has been performed. The specimen of urtite consists of nepheline, alkali feldspar, pyroxene, sphene, apatite and minor magnetite and amphibole. As a first approximation, urtite simulates the mineral composition of waste slag produced in a plasma shaft furnace at SIA Radon. Determination of chemical compositions of the minerals by electron-probe microanalysis has shown that the main phases that hosted radionuclides and their geochemical analogs are as follows: nepheline (Rb and probably Cs), feldspar (Ba), sphene (Zr, Nb, REE, and actinides) and apatite (Sr, REE, and actinides).

  1. Assessment of Pb-slag, MSWI bottom ash and boiler and fly ash for using as a fine aggregate in cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Nabajyoti; Cornelis, Geert; Mertens, Gilles; Elsen, Jan; Van Balen, Koenraad; Van Gerven, Tom; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2008-06-15

    Three types of wastes, metallurgical slag from Pb production (SLG), the sand-sized (0.1-2 mm) fraction of MSWI bottom ash from a grate furnace (SF), and boiler and fly ash from a fluidised bed incinerator (BFA), were characterized and used to replace the fine aggregate during preparation of cement mortar. The chemical and mineralogical behaviour of these wastes along with the reactivities of the wastes with lime and the hydration behaviour of ordinary Portland cement paste with and without these wastes added were evaluated by various chemical and instrumental techniques. The compressive strengths of the cement mortars containing waste as a partial substitution of fine aggregates were also assessed. Finally, leaching studies of the wastes and waste containing cement mortars were conducted. SLG addition does not show any adverse affect during the hydration of cement, or on the compressive strengths behaviours of mortars. Formation of expansive products like ettringite, aluminium hydroxide and H2 gas due to the reaction of some constituents of BFA and SF with alkali creates some cracks in the paste as well as in the cement mortars, which lower the compressive strength of the cement mortars. However, utilization of all materials in cement-based application significantly improves the leaching behaviour of the majority of the toxic elements compared to the waste as such. PMID:18068299

  2. Structure, Growth Process, and Growth Mechanism of Perovskite in High-Titanium-Bearing Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu; Hu, Meilong; Xu, Yuzhou; Bai, Chenguang; Gan, Yunhua

    2015-08-01

    The isothermal crystallization of perovskite in TiO2-CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO high-titanium-bearing blast furnace slag was observed in situ at 1698 K (1425 °C) using a confocal scanning laser microscope. The dendrite structure of perovskite (CaTiO3) thus obtained showed vividly the primary dendrite trunks and secondary dendrite arms. Furthermore, the dendritic growth of perovskite in liquid slag was clearly observed on line. The results showed that the dendrite arrays in which the primary dendrite trunks observed on slag surface were parallel with each other grew toward the same direction. The secondary dendrite arms grew in the perpendicular direction with the primary trucks and stopped growing when they encounter. The perovskite dendrites showed a linear growth at two stages. The dendrites grew faster at early stage at about 5 to 7 μm/s and grew with a lower growth rate at about 1 to 2 μm/s in later stage. Finally, the growth mechanism of perovskite in melt was analyzed with the solidification theory. Based on the theoretical calculation of equilibrium phases in slag, the initial slag could be considered as a binary component system. One component was perovskite and the other component was the sum of all the other species that did not attend the crystallization of perovskite (included SiO2, Al2O3, and MgO, as well as CaO and TiO2 that were not involved in the solid formation). The formation of perovskite required the diffusion of CaO and TiO2 to the solid/liquid interface and the rejection of the other species from the interface. The solid/liquid equilibrium schematic diagram was made based on the calculation.

  3. Chemical stabilization of chromate in blast furnace slag mixed cementitious materials.

    PubMed

    Meena, Amanda H; Kaplan, Daniel I; Powell, Brian A; Arai, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    Cement waste form (CWF) technology is among the leading approaches to disposing of metals and liquid low-level nuclear waste in the United States. One such material, saltstone, includes slag, fly ash and Portland cement to enhance the immobilization of contaminants (e.g., Cr, (99)Tc) in alkaline liquid wastes. To evaluate the stability of such redox sensitive contaminants in saltstone, the effects of slag as a source of reductant on Cr immobilization was evaluated in aged (<300 d) saltstone monoliths. Specifically, we investigated the effects of artificial cement pore waters on the Cr release and the spatially resolved Cr chemical state analysis using synchrotron based microfocused X-ray microprobe analysis. The microprobe analysis indicated the heterogeneous distribution of insoluble Cr(III)-species in saltstone. Although at most of 20% Crtotal was leached at the top few (2-3) millimeter depth, the release of Cr(VI) was small (<5%) at 5-30 mm with slight changes, indirectly suggesting that Cr is likely present as insoluble Cr(III) species throughout the depths. The study suggests that this saltstone formulation can effectively retain/immobilize Cr under the oxic field condition after ⩽300 d of aging time. PMID:26086810

  4. Utilization of flotation wastes of copper slag as raw material in cement production.

    PubMed

    Alp, I; Deveci, H; Süngün, H

    2008-11-30

    Copper slag wastes, even if treated via processes such as flotation for metal recovery, still contain heavy metals with hazardous properties posing environmental risks for disposal. This study reports the potential use of flotation waste of a copper slag (FWCS) as iron source in the production of Portland cement clinker. The FWCS appears a suitable raw material as iron source containing >59% Fe(2)O(3) mainly in the form of fayalite (Fe(2)SiO(4)) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). The clinker products obtained using the FWCS from the industrial scale trial operations over a 4-month period were characterised for the conformity of its chemical composition and the physico-mechanical performance of the resultant cement products was evaluated. The data collected for the clinker products produced using an iron ore, which is currently used as the cement raw material were also included for comparison. The results have shown that the chemical compositions of all the clinker products including those of FWCS are typical of a Portland cement clinker. The mechanical performance of the standard mortars prepared from the FWCS clinkers were found to be similar to those from the iron ore clinkers with the desired specifications for the industrial cements e.g. CEM I type cements. Furthermore, the leachability tests (TCLP and SPLP) have revealed that the mortar samples obtained from the FWCS clinkers present no environmental problems while the FWCS could act as the potential source of heavy metal contamination. These findings suggest that flotation wastes of copper slag (FWCS) can be readily utilised as cement raw material due to its availability in large quantities at low cost with the further significant benefits for waste management/environmental practices of the FWCS and the reduced production and processing costs for cement raw materials. PMID:18384950

  5. Preparation of glass-forming materials from granulated blast furnace slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, M.; Sáinz, E.; Lopez, F. A.

    1996-10-01

    Glass precursor materials, to be used for the vitrification of hazardous wastes, have been prepared from blast furnace slag powder through a sol-gel route. The slag is initially reacted with a mixture of alcohol (ethanol or methanol) and mineral acid (HNO3 or H2SO4) to give a sol principally consisting of Si, Ca, Al, and Mg alkoxides. Gelation is carried out with variable amounts of either ammonia or water. The gelation rate can be made as fast as desired by adding excess hydrolizing agent or else by distilling the excess alcohol out of the alkoxide solution. The resulting gel is first dried at low temperature and ground. The powder thus obtained is then heat treated at several temperatures. The intermediate and final materials are characterized by thermal analysis, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. From the results, the operating conditions yielding a variety of glass precursors differing in their composition are established. The method, in comparison with direct vitrification of slag, presents a number of advantages: (1) the glass precursor obtained devitrifies at higher temperatures; (2) it enables the adjustment, to a certain extent, of the chemical composition of the glass precursor; and (3) it permits recovering marketable materials at different stages of the process.

  6. Sulphate removal over barium-modified blast-furnace-slag geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Runtti, Hanna; Luukkonen, Tero; Niskanen, Mikko; Tuomikoski, Sari; Kangas, Teija; Tynjälä, Pekka; Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Sarkkinen, Minna; Kemppainen, Kimmo; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2016-11-01

    Blast-furnace slag and metakaolin were geopolymerised, modified with barium or treated with a combination of these methods in order to obtain an efficient SO4(2-) sorbent for mine water treatment. Of prepared materials, barium-modified blast-furnace slag geopolymer (Ba-BFS-GP) exhibited the highest SO4(2-) maximum sorption capacity (up to 119mgg(-1)) and it compared also favourably to materials reported in the literature. Therefore, Ba-BFS-GP was selected for further studies and the factors affecting to the sorption efficiency were assessed. Several isotherms were applied to describe the experimental results of Ba-BFS-GP and the Sips model showed the best fit. Kinetic studies showed that the sorption process follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics. In the dynamic removal experiments with columns, total SO4(2-) removal was observed initially when treating mine effluent. The novel modification method of geopolymer material proved to be technically suitable in achieving extremely low concentrations of SO4(2-) (<2mgL(-1)) in mine effluents. PMID:27318734

  7. Effect of blastfurnace slag addition to Portland cement for cationic exchange resins encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafond, E.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Gauffinet, S.; Chartier, D.; Le Bescop, P.; Stefan, L.; Nonat, A.

    2013-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, cement-based materials are extensively used to encapsulate spent ion exchange resins (IERs) before their final disposal in a repository. It is well known that the cement has to be carefully selected to prevent any deleterious expansion of the solidified waste form, but the reasons for this possible expansion are not clearly established. This work aims at filling the gap. The swelling pressure of IERs is first investigated as a function of ions exchange and ionic strength. It is shown that pressures of a few tenths of MPa can be produced by decreases in the ionic strength of the bulk solution, or by ion exchanges (2Na+ instead of Ca2+, Na+ instead of K+). Then, the chemical evolution of cationic resins initially in the Na+ form is characterized in CEM I (Portland cement) and CEM III (Portland cement + blastfurnace slag) cements at early age and an explanation is proposed for the better stability of CEM III material.

  8. A Comparison Study of the Oxygen-Rich Side Blow Furnace and the Oxygen-Rich Bottom Blow Furnace for Liquid High Lead Slag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Hao, Zhandong; Yang, Tianzu; Liu, Weifeng; Zhang, Duchao; Zhang, Li; Bin, Shu; Bin, Wanda

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the characteristics of the oxygen-rich side blow furnace (OSBF) and the oxygen-rich bottom blow furnace (OBBF) as the reductive smelting reactor for molten high lead slag. The slags were collected from different sampling points of these furnaces during a regular high lead slag reduction process and analyzed. It is disclosed that lead content of the melt in the OSBF shows dramatic fluctuations, while melt from different sampling points of the furnace behave similarly, exhibiting the characteristics of batch reactor. An obvious axial lead content gradient is detected in the OBBF, showing the characteristics of a plug flow reactor. The industrial performances of these furnaces are also compared. The results indicate that 1.38% higher lead recovery can be achieved by using the OSBF instead of the OBBF. Unit energy consumptions of the OBBF-OSBF and OBBF-OBBF processes can be reduced to 230 kgce/ t crude lead, which is 70 kgce/ t crude lead less than that of the tradition Shuikoushan (SKS) process.

  9. Effect of geothermal waste on strength and microstructure of alkali-activated slag cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Escalante-Garcia, J.I.; Gorokhovsky, A.V.; Mendoza, G.; Fuentes, A.F

    2003-10-01

    Mortars of blast furnace slag replaced with 10% of a geothermal silica waste were cured for 90 days. The binder was activated by 6 wt.% Na{sub 2}O equivalent of NaOH and water glass. The presence of the silica enhanced the formation of hydration products as shown by nonevaporable water (NEW) results. Backscattered electron images indicated that the microstructures of blended slag had less porosity than those of neat slag mortars and the interfacial zone between aggregate and hydration products was dense and of homogeneous composition similar to the matrix of hydration products. The main hydration products were C-S-H and for NaOH a hydrotalcite type phase was found as finely intermixed with the C-S-H.

  10. Removal of hexavalent chromium in carbonic acid solution by oxidizing slag discharged from steelmaking process in electric arc furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Seiji; Okazaki, Kohei; Sasano, Junji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2014-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is well-known to be a strong oxidizer, and is recognized as a carcinogen. Therefore, it is regulated for drinking water, soil, groundwater and sea by the environmental quality standards all over the world. In this study, it was attempted to remove Cr(VI) ion in a carbonic acid solution by the oxidizing slag that was discharged from the normal steelmaking process in an electric arc furnace. After the addition of the slag into the aqueous solution contained Cr(VI) ion, concentrations of Cr(VI) ion and total chromium (Cr(VI) + trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) ions decreased to lower detection limit of them. Therefore, the used slag could reduce Cr(VI) and fix Cr(III) ion on the slag. While Cr(VI) ion existed in the solution, iron did not dissolve from the slag. From the relation between predicted dissolution amount of iron(II) ion and amount of decrease in Cr(VI) ion, the Cr(VI) ion did not react with iron(II) ion dissolved from the slag. Therefore, Cr(VI) ion was removed by the reductive reaction between Cr(VI) ion and the iron(II) oxide (FeO) in the slag. This reaction progressed on the newly appeared surface of iron(II) oxide due to the dissolution of phase composed of calcium etc., which existed around iron(II) oxide grain in the slag.

  11. Slag cement-low level radioactive waste forms at Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, R.I.A.; Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1986-12-01

    A hydrated ceramic waste form, ''salt-stone,'' was designed for solidification and stabilization of Savannah River Plant (SRP) low level radioactive defense waste. This waste is a concentrated salt solution containing mainly sodium nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, sulfate, and hydroxide and has radioactivity. Ground, granulated blast furnace slag (a byproduct from the steel industry) was identified as a potential hydraulic ingredient for saltstone since its reactivity was found to be enhanced by the high alkalinity of the waste solution.

  12. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector. PMID:25261762

  13. Characterisation and treatment of roads covered with zinc ashes, muffle furnace fragments and lead slags from former non-ferrous metal industries in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Vandecasteele, C; Van den Broeck, K; Van Gerven, T; Dutré, V; Seuntjens, P; Berghmans, P; Cornelis, C; Nouwen, J

    2002-08-01

    Zinc ashes, muffle furnace fragments and lead slags from non-ferrous industries were applied to pave roads in the North of Belgium. From an inventory it appeared that there are at least 490 km of such roads. In our survey the materials on these roads were characterised. The total metal concentration, the availability and the leaching as a function of time were determined. It appeared that these materials contain high concentrations of heavy metals, some of which are readily available. The high leaching of some metals makes them as such unsuitable as secondary construction material. Methods for the application of these materials for road construction were examined where the materials replaced part of the sand and gravel fraction in lean concrete and in bituminous mixtures, or where they replaced the sand in sand-cement mixtures, all these to be used for road foundations, cycle tracks, etc. When lead slags were applied in lean concrete, a material was obtained complying with the standards for secondary construction materials and with sufficient compressive strength for road foundations. When zinc ashes or muffle fragments were used to replace sand in sand-cement mixtures, again a suitable construction material was obtained. The other combinations tried out were rather unsuccessful, because of high metal leaching and/or poor compressive strength. PMID:12363097

  14. An annular-furnace boiler for the 660-MW power unit for ultrasupercritical parameters intended for firing brown slagging coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serant, F. A.; Belorutskii, I. Yu.; Ershov, Yu. A.; Gordeev, V. V.; Stavskaya, O. I.; Katsel, T. V.

    2013-12-01

    We present the main technical solutions adopted in designing annular-furnace boilers intended for operation on brown coals of the prospective Maikubensk open-cast mine in Kazakhstan as part of 660-MW power units for ultrasupercritical steam conditions. Results from 3D modeling of combustion processes are presented, which clearly show the advantages furnaces of this kind have over a traditional furnace in burning heavily slagging brown coals. The layout of the main and boiler auxiliary equipment in the existing boiler cell of the 500-MW power unit at the Ekibastuz GRES-1 district power station is shown. Appropriate attention is paid to matters concerned with decreasing harmful emissions.

  15. Analysis of arc emission spectra of stainless steel electric arc furnace slag affected by fluctuating arc voltage.

    PubMed

    Aula, Matti; Mäkinen, Ari; Fabritius, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Control of chromium oxidation in the electric arc furnace (EAF) is a significant problem in stainless steel production due to variations of the chemical compositions in the EAF charge. One potential method to control chromium oxidation is to analyze the emission spectrum of the electric arc in order to find indicators of rising chromium content in slag. The purpose of this study was to determine if slag composition can be gained by utilizing electric arc emission spectra in the laboratory environment, despite electric arc voltage fluctuations and varying slag composition. The purpose of inducing voltage fluctuation was to simulate changes in the industrial EAF process. The slag samples were obtained from Outokumpu Stainless Oy Tornio Works, and three different arc currents were used. The correlation analysis showed that the emission spectra offer numerous peak ratios with high correlations to the X-ray fluorescence-measured slag CrO(x)/FeO(x) and MnO/SiO2 ratios. These ratios are useful in determining if the reduction agents have been depleted in the EAF. The results suggest that analysis of laboratory-scale electric arc emission spectra is suitable for indicating the high CrO(x) or MnO content of the slag despite the arc fluctuations. Reliable analysis of other slag components was not successful. PMID:24405950

  16. Kinetics of Hydrochloric Acid Leaching of Titanium from Titanium-Bearing Electric Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fuqiang; Chen, Feng; Guo, Yufeng; Jiang, Tao; Travyanov, Andrew Yakovlevich; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2016-05-01

    The hydrochloric acid leaching of titanium from titanium-bearing electric furnace slag was investigated under different experimental conditions. The results indicate that particle size, hydrochloric acid concentration and reaction temperature were of significance to the leaching kinetics. Specifically, reaction temperature was the most important factor followed by hydrochloric acid concentration and particle size. The shrinking core model was used to describe the leaching process which was controlled by surface chemical reaction. The kinetic equation was obtained and the activation energy was found to be 43.16 kJ/mol. Iron and calcium species were almost completely dissolved in the acid when the extraction degree of titanium reached 99.84%. MgO (19.34 wt.%) and Al2O3 (32.45 wt.%) in the spinel were still in the leaching residue and SiO2 (43.53 wt.%) in the form of quartz remained in the leaching residue.

  17. First high-temperature applications of anti-gas migration slag cement and settable oil-mud removal spacers in deep south Texas gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatman, R.E.; Nahm, J.J.; Loeb, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Applications of a new slag cement and spacer system have reduced the chance of gas channels forming in the cement column during cement hydration in deep, hot south Texas gas wells. These slag cements were formulated with water and conventional cement additives to prevent gas migration and to improve interfacial bonding to oil-wet surfaces. Oil-mud removal spacer fluids (OMRS) were also specially formulated to remove oily residues and improve water-wetting of the oil-wet surfaces. These OMRS can also be designed to develop compressive strength when cementing operations have been completed. Set slag cement provides a tight gas seal with shear-bond healing capacity, as demonstrated by recently developed HTHP shear-bond strength tests. The previously reported phenomenon of healing or regeneration of slag-mix bonds has been reproduced with slag cement. The rapid development of strength at the top of the long cement column and the improved bonding to oil-wet surfaces were the two major improvements provided by the slag cement. OMRS can clean oil-wet surfaces, and then set once the job has been completed. Laboratory tests and field evaluations based on cement bond logs and pressure tests indicated improved bonding and isolation of the gas zones. Field applications of slag cements and OMRS fluids have led to greater primary and plug cementing successes in south Texas gas wells, and well production economics have improved accordingly.

  18. Basic Oxygen Furnace steel slag aggregates for phosphorus treatment. Evaluation of its potential use as a substrate in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ivan; Molle, Pascal; Sáenz de Miera, Luis E; Ansola, Gemma

    2016-02-01

    Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) steel slag aggregates from NW Spain were tested in batch and column experiments to evaluate its potential use as a substrate in constructed wetlands (CWs). The objectives of this study were to identify the main P removal mechanisms of BOF steel slag and determine its P removal capacity. Also, the results were used to discuss the suitability of this material as a substrate to be used in CWs. Batch experiments with BOF slag aggregates and increasing initial phosphate concentrations showed phosphate removal efficiencies between 84 and 99% and phosphate removal capacities from 0.12 to 8.78 mg P/g slag. A continuous flow column experiment filled with BOF slag aggregates receiving an influent synthetic solution of 15 mg P/L during 213 days showed a removal efficiency greater than 99% and a phosphate removal capacity of 3.1 mg P/g slag. In both experiments the main P removal mechanism was found to be calcium phosphate precipitation which depends on Ca(2+) and OH(-) release from the BOF steel slag after dissolution of Ca(OH)2 in water. P saturation of slag was reached within the upper sections of the column which showed phosphate removal capacities between 1.7 and 2.5 mg P/g slag. Once Ca(OH)2 was completely dissolved in these column sections, removal efficiencies declined gradually from 99% until reaching stable outlet concentrations with P removal efficiencies around 7% which depended on influent Ca(2+) for limited continuous calcium phosphate precipitation. PMID:26722756

  19. Recycling municipal incinerator fly- and scrubber-ash into fused slag for the substantial replacement of cement in cement-mortars.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzen-Chin; Rao, Ming-Kang

    2009-06-01

    Fly- and scrubber-ash (weight ratio of approximately 1:3) from municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) are a major land-fill disposal problem due to their leaching of heavy metals. We uniformly mixed both types of ash with optimal amounts of waste glass frit, which was then melted into a glassy slag. The glassy slag was then pulverized to a particle size smaller than 38microm for use as a cement substitute (20-40% of total cement) and blended with sand and cement to produce slag-blended cement-mortar (SCM) specimens. The toxicity characteristics of the leaching procedure tests on the pulverized slag samples revealed that the amount of leached heavy metals was far below regulatory thresholds. The compressive strength of the 28-day cured SCM specimens was comparable to that of ordinary Portland cement mortars, while the compressive strength of specimens cured for 60 or 90 days were 3-11% greater. The observed enhanced strength is achieved by Pozzolanic reaction. Preliminary evaluation shows that the combination of MSWI fly- and scrubber-ash with waste glass yields a cost effective and environmentally friendly cement replacement in cement-mortars. PMID:19216067

  20. The hydraulic potential of high iron bearing steel slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Denisa Virginia

    The incorporation of additives to the clinker or to the raw materials stream is a common practice in cement manufacture. However, steel slag, unlike its ironmaking parent the blast furnace slag, it is not a conventional admixture for cement. Currently most steel slags are slow cooled rendering stable crystalline compounds with minor hydraulic value. Nevertheless, if steel slags would be quenched and granulated, the resulting glassy product might display increased hydration and strength development potential. The use of steel slag in cement could contribute to important savings for both cement and steelmaking industries and provide a solution for the environmental problems linked to CO2 emissions and costs of transport and disposal. The purpose of this research is to explore the thermodynamics and kinetics of steel slag hydration in an effort to produce a cement additive, or a more promising material of near Portland cement composition. An important criteria used in the assessment of slags as potential cements is the presence of a glassy phase. At present, it is not very clear why glass enhances the hydration process. However, it is known that the free energy of formation for glasses is less than for crystals so that glasses are easier to hydrate compared to crystalline materials. In the particular case of steel slag, the glassy phase would have to contain high amounts of iron. Steel slags are known to display iron levels approximately 10 times higher than Portland cement and commonly used blast furnace slags. However, the effect of high Fe2O3 levels on the setting and strengthening of cement paste is not clearly understood due to the fact that most cement additives do not present this characteristic. The present work looks at the progress made in recycling steel slag as cement additive, the complexity of the hydration process in slags, the possibilities of improving the hydration potential of slags at laboratory and industrial level, and the problems that still

  1. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shiyun; Ni, Kun; Li, Jinmei

    2012-07-01

    A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO(4)(2-) from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO(4)(2-) releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO(4)(2-) from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg·m(-2), which is lower than that from the mortar with 95% cement clinker and 5% FGD gypsum. PMID:22440404

  2. Cement advanced furnace component and system optimization. Volume 1. Final report, August 1989-April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, K.; Chatwani, A.; Litka, A.

    1994-10-01

    Research and development of the Cement Advanced Furnace (CAF) vertical shaft kiln has been performed under the sponsorship of the Gas Research Institute and Southern California Gas Co. by Textron Defense Systems and Fuller Co. The CAF represents a low cost, energy efficient, very low polluting alternative to traditional rotary kilns for the production of Portland and specialty cements. The testing program has resulted in the development of an integrated shaft furnace that has produced clinker in a pilot plant at rates up to 2200 lb/hr. The unit can be scaled to commercial sizes with the aid of a mathematical model of the equipment and process developed as part of this effort. Cement produced in this program is as strong as, but easier to grind than, cement produced in conventional rotary kilns. Polluting emissions from the CAF are lower than from conventional cement processing equipment by virtue of the use of natural gas as fuel and a low combustion temperature.

  3. Metal retention on pine bark and blast furnace slag--on-site experiment for treatment of low strength landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Nehrenheim, Emma; Waara, Sylvia; Johansson Westholm, Lena

    2008-03-01

    Treatment of landfill leachate using blast furnace slag and pine bark as reactive sorbents was studied in an in situ column experiment at the Lilla Nyby landfill site in Eskilstuna, Sweden. The columns were filled with approximately 101 of each sorbent and leachate was supplied at three different flow rates during a period of 4 months. Samples of inflow and outflow were collected three times a week and were analyzed for physical and chemical parameters, including concentrations of some metals, and toxicity. It was found that pine bark removed metals more efficiently than did the blast furnace slags; that Zn was most efficiently retained in the filters and that both retention time and initial concentration played an important role in the sorption process. It was also observed that the pine bark column did not release COD. No toxicity of the untreated or the treated leachate was found with the test organisms and test responses used. PMID:17462882

  4. Influence of the composition of cement kiln dust on its interaction with fly ash and slag

    SciTech Connect

    Chaunsali, Piyush; Peethamparan, Sulapha

    2013-12-15

    Cement kiln dust (CKD), a by-product of the cement industry, contains significant amounts of alkali, free lime, chloride and sulfate. Wide variation reported in the chemical composition of CKDs limits their potential application as a sustainable binder component in concrete. In the current study, the performance of two different CKDs as components in a novel binder is evaluated. Several binders are developed by blending CKDs with fly ash or slag. Binders with 70% CKD were prepared at a water-to-binder ratio of 0.4, and heat-cured at 75 °C to accelerate the strength development. The hydration progress was monitored using X-ray diffraction, and morphological examination was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ettringite and calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C-A-S-H) were identified as the main hydration products in the hardened binder system. Strength development of CKD-based binder was found to be significantly influenced by its free lime and sulfate contents. -- Highlights: •Interaction of cement kiln dust with fly ash and slag was explored. •CKD with higher free lime and sulfate content increased the strength of binder. •C-S-H like reaction gel with fibrillar morphology is observed in CKD-based binders.

  5. Thermal treatment of simulant plutonium contaminated materials from the Sellafield site by vitrification in a blast-furnace slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, N. C.; Schwarz, R. R.; Bingham, P. A.; Stennett, M. C.; Corkhill, C. L.; Heath, P. G.; Hand, R. J.; James, M.; Pearson, A.; Morgan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Four waste simulants, representative of Plutonium Contaminated Materials (PCMs) at the Sellafield site, were vitrified through additions of Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS). Ce (as a Pu surrogate) was effectively partitioned into the slag product, enriched in an amorphous CaO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 phase when other crystalline phases were also present. Ce L3 edge XANES data demonstrated Ce to be present as trivalent species in the slag fraction, irrespective of the waste type. Estimated volume reductions of ca. 80-95% were demonstrated, against a baseline of uncompacted 200 L PCM waste drums. The dissolution behaviour of PCM slag wasteforms was investigated at 50 °C in saturated Ca(OH)2 solution under N2 atmosphere, to simulate the hyperalkaline anoxic environment of a cementitious UK Geological Disposal Facility for Intermediate Level Waste (ILW). These experiments demonstrated the performance of the slag wasteforms to be comparable to that of other vitrified ILW materials considered potentially suitable for geological disposal.

  6. Effect of Al2O3 Addition on the Precipitated Phase Transformation in Ti-Bearing Blast Furnace Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongmin; Li, Jinfu; Sun, Yongqi; Seetharaman, Seshadri; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2016-04-01

    The present paper aims to provide a fundamental understanding on phase change of Ti-enriched crystalline phase induced by Al2O3 addition in Ti-bearing blast furnace slags with different basicities using Single Hot Thermocouple Technique and X-ray Diffraction. The results showed that an increase in the Al2O3 content led to phase change from rutile or perovskite to Mg3Al4Ti8O25 and prompted crystallization of the slags with basicity of 0.60 and 0.75, whereas only CaTiO3 was precipitated at a basicity of 0.95. Both thermodynamic and kinetic analyses were conducted to study the slag crystallization, which would throw light on phase change and enhanced crystallization. To further reveal the relationship with Al2O3 addition on slag structure and crystallization, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance were adopted, with AlO4 tetrahedra and AlO6 octahedra observed in the slag. For slags with the basicity of 0.60 and 0.75, AlO6 octahedron, which was suggested to induce the phase change from TiO2 or CaTiO3 to Mg3Al4Ti8O25, was detected at high Al2O3 content. On the other hand, in slags with the basicity of 0.95, abundant Ca2+ may be connected to TiO6 octahedra, resulting in CaTiO3 formation.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of hexavalent chromium removal by basic oxygen furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Han, Chong; Jiao, Yanan; Wu, Qianqian; Yang, Wangjin; Yang, He; Xue, Xiangxin

    2016-08-01

    Basic oxygen furnace slag (BOFS) has the potential to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from wastewater by a redox process due to the presence of minerals containing Fe(2+). The effects of the solution pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration, BOFS dosage, BOFS particle size, and temperature on the removal of Cr(VI) was investigated in detail through batch tests. The chemical and mineral compositions of fresh and reacted BOFS were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) system and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The results show that Cr(VI) in wastewater can be efficiently removed by Fe(2+) released from BOFS under appropriate acidic conditions. The removal of Cr(VI) by BOFS significantly depended on the parameters mentioned above. The reaction of Cr(VI) with BOFS followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Fe(2+) responsible for Cr(VI) removal was primarily derived from the dissolution of FeO and Fe3O4 in BOFS. When H2SO4 was used to adjust the solution acidity, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) could be formed and become an armoring precipitate layer on the BOFS surface, hindering the release of Fe(2+) and the removal of Cr(VI). Finally, the main mechanism of Cr(VI) removal by BOFS was described using several consecutive reaction steps. PMID:27521937

  8. Iron blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents for flue gas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chiung-Fang; Shih, Shin-Min

    2004-08-15

    Sorbents prepared from iron blast furnace slag (BFS) and hydrated lime (HL) through the hydration process have been studied with the aim to evaluate their reactivities toward SO2 under the conditions prevailing in dry or semidry flue gas desulfurization processes. The BFS/HL sorbents, having large surface areas and pore volumes due to the formation of products of hydration, were highly reactive toward SO2, as compared with hydrated lime alone (0.24 in Ca utilization). The sorbent reactivity increased as the slurrying temperature and time increased and as the particle size of BFS decreased; the effects of the liquid/solid ratio and the sorbent drying conditions were negligible. The structural properties and the reactivity of sorbent were markedly affected by the BFS/HL ratio; the sorbent with 30/70 ratio had the highest 1 h utilization of Ca, 0.70, and SO2 capture, 0.45 g SO2/g sorbent. The reactivity of a sorbent was related to its initial specific surface area (Sg0) and molar content of Ca (M(-1)); the 1 h utilization of Ca increased almost linearly with increasing Sg0/M. The results of this study are useful to the preparation of BFS/HL sorbents with high reactivity for use in the dry and semidry processes to remove SO2 from the flue gas. PMID:15382877

  9. Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, Michael; Sun, Shouyi; Jahanshahi, Sharif

    2014-12-01

    New measurements on solubility of copper and redox equilibria in magnesia-saturated calcium ferrite-based slags are presented. These data were obtained from equilibrium experiments at 1573 K (1300 °C) and over a range of oxygen partial pressures of 10-11 to 10-5 atm, through equilibrating the slag with metallic copper in magnesia crucibles under a flowing Ar-CO-CO2 gas mixture. At low oxygen partial pressures, copper was found to dissolve into slag as a univalent species (CuO0.5) with a linear dependence on the oxygen partial pressure (in logarithm), with a slope of 0.23. At higher oxygen partial pressures (>10-7 atm), the data suggest a divalent copper species becomes significant (CuO) and causes the dependence on oxygen partial pressure to increase. The determination of the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio in the slag was effected by the cuprous (Cu+) content, which acts to increase the apparent ferrous (Fe2+) content during acid digestion. A correction procedure was applied to the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio based on the calculated Cu+ content of the slag. The procedure assumes that the activity coefficients of CuO0.5 and CuO (and γ CuO) in these slags are independent of oxygen partial pressure. The calculated activity coefficients of CuO0.5 and CuO were 3.43 and 0.29, respectively. The corrected Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio had a linear dependence of 0.17 on the oxygen partial pressure over the entire oxygen partial pressure range. This agrees with similar data from the literature.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Investigation of Submerged Combustion Behavior in a Tuyere Blown Slag-fuming Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Nazmul; Naser, Jamal; Brooks, G. A.; Reuter, M. A.; Matusewicz, R. W.

    2012-10-01

    A thin-slice computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a conventional tuyere blown slag-fuming furnace has been developed in Eulerian multiphase flow approach by employing a three-dimensional (3-D) hybrid unstructured orthographic grid system. The model considers a thin slice of the conventional tuyere blown slag-fuming furnace to investigate details of fluid flow, submerged coal combustion dynamics, coal use behavior, jet penetration behavior, bath interaction conditions, and generation of turbulence in the bath. The model was developed by coupling the CFD with the kinetics equations developed by Richards et al. for a zinc-fuming furnace. The model integrates submerged coal combustion at the tuyere tip and chemical reactions with the heat, mass, and momentum interfacial interaction between the phases present in the system. A commercial CFD package AVL Fire 2009.2 (AVL, Graz, Austria) coupled with several user-defined subroutines in FORTRAN programming language were used to develop the model. The model predicted the velocity, temperature field of the molten slag bath, generated turbulence and vortex, and coal use behavior from the slag bath. The tuyere jet penetration length ( l P) was compared with the equation provided by Hoefele and Brimacombe from isothermal experimental work ( {{l_{{P}} }/{d_{o }} = 10.7( {N^' }_{Fr} } )^{0.46} ( {ρ_{{g}} /ρl } )^{0.35} } ) and found 2.26 times higher, which can be attributed to coal combustion and gas expansion at a high temperature. The jet expansion angle measured for the slag system studied is 85 deg for the specific inlet conditions during the simulation time studied. The highest coal penetration distance was found to be l/L = 0.2, where l is the distance from the tuyere tip along the center line and L is the total length (2.44 m) of the modeled furnace. The model also predicted that 10 pct of the injected coal bypasses the tuyere gas stream uncombusted and carried to the free surface by the tuyere gas stream, which

  11. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Shiyun; Ni Kun; Li Jinmei

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum has suitable workability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strength of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is higher than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dry shrinkage of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is lower than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The leaching of sulfate ion of mortar is studied. - Abstract: A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg

  12. Effect of TiO2 Content on the Crystallization Behavior of Titanium-Bearing Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Meilong; Wei, Ruirui; Yin, Fangqing; Liu, Lu; Deng, Qingyu

    2016-07-01

    The content of TiO2 has an important influence on both the basic structure and the crystallization behavior of titanium-bearing blast furnace (BF) slag. The results of thermodynamic calculations show that, when the mass content of TiO2 is smaller than 25%, CaTiO3 increases as the content of TiO2 increases. However, when the TiO2 content is more than 25%, the CaTiO3 content decreases and TiO2 gradually increases. The results of a confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiment show that, when the TiO2 mass content is 10%, Ca2MgSi2O7 and Ca2Al2SiO7 are the main crystallized phases resulting from the molten slag. Furthermore, when the TiO2 mass content is 20%, CaMgSi2O6, Ca(Ti,Mg,Al)(Si,Al)2O7 and dendrite CaTiO3 are the crystallized phases, while when the TiO2 mass content increases to 30%, CaTiO3 is the sole phase. The discrepancy between the CLSM results and the thermodynamic calculations occurs mainly due to the high melting point of the titanium-bearing BF slag. During the cooling process for the molten slag, CaTiO3 is crystallized first, due to its high crystallization temperature. Furthermore, the molten slag is solidified in its entirety before the other phases crystallize.

  13. HIGH-TEMPERATURE HEAT EXCHANGER TESTING IN A PILOT-SCALE SLAGGING FURNACE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Michael E. Collings; Bruce A. Dockter; Douglas R. Hajicek; Ann K. Henderson; John P. Hurley; Patty L. Kleven; Greg F. Weber

    1999-12-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract, has designed, constructed, and operated a 3.0-million Btu/hr (3.2 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) slagging furnace system (SFS). Successful operation has demonstrated that the SFS meets design objectives and is well suited for testing very high-temperature heat exchanger concepts. Test results have shown that a high-temperature radiant air heater (RAH) panel designed and constructed by UTRC and used in the SFS can produce a 2000 F (1094 C) process air stream. To support the pilot-scale work, the EERC has also constructed laboratory- and bench-scale equipment which was used to determine the corrosion resistance of refractory and structural materials and develop methods to improve corrosion resistance. DOE projects that from 1995 to 2015, worldwide use of electricity will double to approach 20 trillion kilowatt hours. This growth comes during a time of concern over global warming, thought by many policy makers to be caused primarily by increases from coal-fired boilers in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions through the use of fossil fuels. Assuming limits on CO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired boilers are imposed in the future, the most economical CO{sub 2} mitigation option may be efficiency improvements. Unless efficiency improvements are made in coal-fired power plants, utilities may be forced to turn to more expensive fuels or buy CO{sub 2} credits. One way to improve the efficiency of a coal-fired power plant is to use a combined cycle involving a typical steam cycle along with an indirectly fired turbine cycle using very high-temperature but low-pressure air as the working fluid. At the heart of an indirectly fired turbine combined-cycle power system are very high-temperature heat exchangers that can produce clean air at up to 2600 F (1427 C) and 250 psi (17 bar) to turn an

  14. Vaporization Rate of Cesium from Molten Slag in a Plasma Melting Furnace for the Treatment of Simulated Low-Level Radioactive Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Shinji; Amakawa, Tadashi

    2003-02-15

    The vaporization phenomena of cesium (Cs) from molten slag have been investigated in a plasma melting process for simulated radioactive waste materials. A direct current transfer-type plasma with a maximum output of 50 kW was used to melt carbon steel and granular oxide mixtures (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, CaO, and MgO) containing nonradioactive cesium nitrate, to measure Cs vaporization. These materials are the main components of low-level miscellaneous solid wastes. The vaporization rate of Cs from the molten slag during the plasma melting was observed and was compared with the vaporization rate obtained in an electric resistance furnace. The apparent vaporization rate of Cs was found to follow the first-order rate equation with respect to the molten slag's Cs content, and its rate constant values varied (3.5 to 21.0) x 10{sup -6} m/s varying with the chemical composition of the miscellaneous solid wastes. These rate constants were about one order larger than those obtained in the electric resistant furnace and also the diffusion coefficients of basic elements in the molten slag. These results suggest that the vaporization rate of Cs is controlled by the vaporization step from the free molten slag furnace to the gas phase and depends predominantly on the thermodynamic properties of the molten slag.

  15. Reprocessing of metallurgical slag into materials for the building industry

    SciTech Connect

    Pioro, L.S.; Pioro, I.L

    2004-07-01

    Several methods of reprocessing metallurgical (blast furnace) slag into materials for the building industry, based on melting aggregates with submerged combustion, were developed and tested. The first method involves melting hot slag with some additives directly in a slag ladle with a submerged gas-air burner, with the objective of producing stabilized slag or glass-ceramic. The second method involves direct draining of melted slag from a ladle into the slag receiver, with subsequent control of the slag draining into the converter where special charging materials are added to the melt, with the objective of producing glass-ceramic. A third method involves melting cold slag with some additives inside a melting converter with submerged gas-air burners, with the objective of producing glass-ceramic fillers for use in road construction. Specific to the melting process is the use of a gas-air mixture with direct combustion inside the melt. This feature provides melt bubbling to help achieve maximum heat transfer from combustion products to the melt, improve mixing (and therefore homogeneity of the melt), and increases the rate of chemical reactions. The experimental data for different aspects of the proposed methods are presented. The reprocessed blast-furnace slag in the form of granules can be used as fillers for concretes, asphalts, and as additives in the production of cement, bricks and other building materials. As well, reprocessed blast-furnace slag can be poured into forms for the production of glass-ceramic tiles.

  16. Reprocessing of metallurgical slag into materials for the building industry.

    PubMed

    Pioro, L S; Pioro, I L

    2004-01-01

    Several methods of reprocessing metallurgical (blast furnace) slag into materials for the building industry, based on melting aggregates with submerged combustion, were developed and tested. The first method involves melting hot slag with some additives directly in a slag ladle with a submerged gas-air burner, with the objective of producing stabilized slag or glass-ceramic. The second method involves direct draining of melted slag from a ladle into the slag receiver, with subsequent control of the slag draining into the converter where special charging materials are added to the melt, with the objective of producing glass-ceramic. A third method involves melting cold slag with some additives inside a melting converter with submerged gas-air burners, with the objective of producing glass-ceramic fillers for use in road construction. Specific to the melting process is the use of a gas-air mixture with direct combustion inside the melt. This feature provides melt bubbling to help achieve maximum heat transfer from combustion products to the melt, improve mixing (and therefore homogeneity of the melt), and increases the rate of chemical reactions. The experimental data for different aspects of the proposed methods are presented. The reprocessed blast-furnace slag in the form of granules can be used as fillers for concretes, asphalts, and as additives in the production of cement, bricks and other building materials. As well, reprocessed blast-furnace slag can be poured into forms for the production of glass-ceramic tiles. PMID:15081065

  17. Improvement of ground granulated blast furnace slag on stabilization/solidification of simulated mercury-doped wastes in chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongzhe; Qian, Guangren; Zhou, Jizhi; Li, Chuanhua; Xu, Yunfeng; Qin, Zhe

    2008-08-30

    This paper investigated the effectiveness of (ground granulated blast furnace slag) GGBFS-added chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) matrix on the stabilization/solidification (S/S) of mercury chloride and simulated mercury-bearing light bulbs (SMLB). The results showed that the maximal compressive strength was achieved when 15% and 10% ground GGBFS was added for HgCl(2)-doped and SMLB-doped CBPC matrices, respectively. The S/S performances of GGBFS-added matrices were significantly better than non-additive matrices. As pore size was reduced, the leaching concentration of Hg(2+) from GGBFS-added CBPC matrix could be reduced from 697 microg/L to about 3 microg/L when treating HgCl(2). Meanwhile, the main hydrating product of GGBFS-added matrices was still MgKPO(4).6H(2)O. The improvement of S/S effectiveness was mainly due to physical filling of fine GGBFS particles and microencapsulation of chemical cementing gel. PMID:18289781

  18. Self-degradable Slag/Class F Fly Ash-Blend Cements

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Warren, J.; Butcher, T.; Lance Brothers; Bour, D.

    2011-03-01

    Self-degradable slag/Class F fly ash blend pozzolana cements were formulated, assuming that they might serve well as alternative temporary fracture sealers in Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells operating at temperatures of {ge} 200 C. Two candidate formulas were screened based upon material criteria including an initial setting time {ge} 60 min at 85 C, compressive strength {ge} 2000 psi for a 200 C autoclaved specimen, and the extent of self-degradation of cement heated at {ge} 200 C for it was contacted with water. The first screened dry mix formula consisted of 76.5 wt% slag-19.0 wt% Class F fly ash-3.8 wt% sodium silicate as alkali activator, and 0.7 wt% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as the self-degradation promoting additive, and second formula comprised of 57.3 wt% slag, 38.2 wt% Class F fly ash, 3.8 wt% sodium silicate, and 0.7 wt% CMC. After mixing with water and autoclaving it at 200 C, the aluminum-substituted 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal phase was identified as hydrothermal reaction product responsible for the development of a compressive strength of 5983 psi. The 200 C-autoclaved cement made with the latter formula had the combined phases of tobermorite as its major reaction product and amorphous geopolymer as its minor one providing a compressive strength of 5271 psi. Sodium hydroxide derived from the hydrolysis of sodium silicate activator not only initiated the pozzolanic reaction of slag and fly ash, but also played an important role in generating in-situ exothermic heat that significantly contributed to promoting self-degradation of cementitious sealers. The source of this exothermic heat was the interactions between sodium hydroxide, and gaseous CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}COOH by-products generated from thermal decomposition of CMC at {ge} 200 C in an aqueous medium. Thus, the magnitude of this self-degradation depended on the exothermic temperature evolved in the sealer; a higher temperature led to a sever disintegration of sealer. The exothermic

  19. Determination of the Optimum Conditions for Leaching of Zinc Cathode Melting Furnace Slag in Ammonium Chloride Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnajady, Bahram; Babaeidehkordi, Amin; Moghaddam, Javad

    2014-04-01

    This research is part of a continuing effort to leach zinc from zinc cathode melting furnace slags (ZCMFSs) to produce zinc oxide. The slag with an assay of 68.05 pct Zn was used in ammonium chloride leaching for zinc extraction. In this paper, the effects of influential factors on extraction efficiency of Zn from a ZCMFS were investigated. The Taguchi's method based on orthogonal array (OA) design has been used to arrange the experimental runs in order to maximize zinc extraction from a slag. The softwares named Excel and Design-Expert 7 have been used to design experiments and subsequent analysis. OA L 25 (55) consisting of five parameters, each with five levels, was employed to evaluate the effects of reaction time ( t = 10, 30, 50, 70, 90 minutes), reaction temperature [ T = 313, 323, 333, 343, 353 (40, 50, 60, 70, 80) K (°C)], pulp density ( S/ L = 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 g/L), stirring speed ( R = 300, 400, 500, 600, 700 rpm), and ammonium chloride concentration ( C = 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 pctwt), on zinc extraction percent. Statistical analysis, ANOVA, was also employed to determine the relationship between experimental conditions and yield levels. The results showed that the significant parameters affecting leaching of slag were ammonium chloride concentration and pulp density, and increasing pulp density reduced leaching efficiency of zinc. However, increasing ammonium chloride concentration promoted the extraction of zinc. The optimum conditions for this study were found to be t 4: 70 minutes, T 5: 353 K (80 °C), ( S/ L)2: 40 g/L, R 3: 500 rpm, and C 4: 25 pctwt. Under these conditions, the dissolution percentage of Zn in ammonium chloride media was 94.61 pct.

  20. The characteristics of a wall gas layer and their influence on slagging of furnace waterwalls during the combustion of Berezovo coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, S. G.; Skuratov, A. P.

    2010-07-01

    Results from an experimental research work on studying the structure of wall gas layer at furnace waterwalls and their slagging are presented. It is established that the temperature of gases in close vicinity of waterwalls has a dominating effect on the nature and formation rate of primary deposits during the combustion of Berezovo coal.

  1. [Evaluation of the migration of contaminants from building materials produced on the base of blast-furnace slags].

    PubMed

    Pugin, K G; Vaysman, Ya I

    2014-01-01

    There is experimentally established the change of the migratory activity of pollutants from building materials produced from blast furnace slag throughout their life cycle in the form of a nonlinear wave-like nature as there are appeared newly opened surfaces of a contact with aggressive waters in the process of gradual crushing of materials as a result of destructive mechanical effects on him and corrosive waters with varying pH values. There are established regularities of the migration activity ofpollutants (on the example of heavy metals) as directly dependent on the newly opening surface of the contact of the material with water having a various pH value. There is shown an expediency of introduction of alterations in the procedure for sanitary hygienic assessment of building materials with the addition of industrial waste (Methodical Instructions 2.1.674-97), allowing to take into account the migration of contaminants from them throughout the life cycle. PMID:25842493

  2. Recycling ground granulated blast furnace slag as cold bonded artificial aggregate partially used in self-compacting concrete.

    PubMed

    Gesoğlu, Mehmet; Güneyisi, Erhan; Mahmood, Swara Fuad; Öz, Hatice Öznur; Mermerdaş, Kasım

    2012-10-15

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), a by-product from iron industry, was recycled as artificial coarse aggregate through cold bonding pelletization process. The artificial slag aggregates (ASA) replaced partially the natural coarse aggregates in production of self-compacting concrete (SCC). Moreover, as being one of the most widely used mineral admixtures in concrete industry, fly ash (FA) was incorporated as a part of total binder content to impart desired fluidity to SCCs. A total of six concrete mixtures having various ASA replacement levels (0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 100%) were designed with a water-to-binder (w/b) ratio of 0.32. Fresh properties of self-compacting concretes (SCC) were observed through slump flow time, flow diameter, V-funnel flow time, and L-box filling height ratio. Compressive strength of hardened SCCs was also determined at 28 days of curing. It was observed that increasing the replacement level of ASA resulted in decrease in the amount of superplasticizer to achieve a constant slump flow diameter. Moreover, passing ability and viscosity of SCC's enhanced with increasing the amount of ASA in the concrete. The maximum compressive strength was achieved for the SCC having 60% ASA replacement. PMID:22951223

  3. Slag-based saltstone formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    1987-08-25

    Approximately 400 x 10/sup 6/ liters of low-level alkaline salt solution will be treated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) prior to disposal in concrete vaults at SRP. Treatment involves removal of CS/sup +/ and Sr/sup +2/ followed by solidification and stabilization of potential contaminants in saltstone, a hydrated ceramic waste form. Chromium, technetium, and nitrate releases from saltstone can be significantly reduced by substituting hydraulic blast furnace slag for portland cement in the formulation designs. Slag-based mixes are also compatible with Class F fly ash used in saltstone as a functional extender to control heat of hydration and reduce permeability. A monolithic waste form is produced by the hydration of the slag and fly ash. Soluble ion release (NO/sub 3//sup -/) is controlled by the saltstone microstructure. Chromium and technetium are less leachable from slag mixes compared to cement-based waste forms because these species are chemically reduced to a lower valence state by ferrous iron in the slag and precipitated as relatively insoluble phases, such as CR(OH)/sub 3/ and TcO/sub 2/. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Enhanced humification by carbonated basic oxygen furnace steel slag--I. Characterization of humic-like acids produced from humic precursors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guangxia; Yue, Dongbei; Fukushima, Masami; Fukuchi, Shigeki; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-01-01

    Carbonated basic oxygen furnace steel slag (hereinafter referred to as "steel slag") is generated during iron and steel manufacturing and is often classified as waste. The effect of steel slag on humification process was investigated. Catechol, glycine and glucose were used as model humic precursors from degraded biowastes. To verify that humification occurred in the system, humic-like acids (HLAs) were isolated and characterized structurally by elemental analysis, FTIR spectra, solid-state CP-MAS (13)C NMR spectra, and TMAH-Py-GC/MS. Characteristics of the steel slag-HLA were compared with those of HLAs formed in the presence of zeolite and birnessite, and with that of mature compost humic acid. The results showed that steel slag-HLA, like zeolite- and birnessite-HLA, is complex organic material containing prominent aromatic structures. Steel slag substantially accelerated the humification process, which would be highly significant for accelerating the stabilization of biowastes during composting (e.g. municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, and food waste). PMID:22130079

  5. Steel foundry electric arc furnace dust management: stabilization by using lime and Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Guray; Pinarli, Vedat

    2008-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine an appropriate treatment for steel foundry electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) prior to permanent disposal. Lime and Portland cement (PC)-based stabilization was applied to treat the EAFD that contains lead and zinc above the landfilling limits, and is listed by USEPA as hazardous waste designation K061 and by EU as 10 02 07. Three types of paste samples were prepared with EAFD content varying between 0 and 90%. The first type contained the EAFD and Portland cement, the second contained the EAFD, Portland cement, and lime, and the third contained the EAFD and lime. All the samples were subjected to toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) after an air-curing period of 28 days. pH changes were monitored and acid neutralization capacity of the samples were examined. Treatment effectiveness was evaluated in terms of reducing the heavy metal leachability to the levels below the USEPA landfilling criteria. An optimum composition for the EAFD stabilization was formulated as 30% EAFD +35% lime +35% Portland cement to achieve the landfilling criteria. The pH interval, where the solubility of the heavy metals in the EAFD was minimized, was found to be between 8.2 and 9.4. PMID:17977656

  6. AIR POLLUTION IMPACTS WHEN QUENCHING BLAST FURNACE SLAG WITH CONTAMINATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an effort to determine if a potential alternative to treatment prior to discharge of coke plant wastewater will result in a significant increase in emissions to the atmosphere. The alternative is using the wastewater, untreated, to quench blast furnace...

  7. Transition of Blast Furnace Slag from Silicates-Based to Aluminates-Based: Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhiming; Lv, Xuewei; Liang, Dong; Zhang, Jie; Bai, Chenguang

    2016-05-01

    The effect of Al2O3 and the Al2O3/SiO2(A/S) ratio on the viscosity of the CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO-TiO2 slag system was studied in the present work. At a fixed CaO/SiO2(C/S) ratio of 1.20, 9 mass pct MgO, and 1 mass pct TiO2, the viscosity increases with an increase in Al2O3 content at a range of 16 to 24 mass pct due to the polymerization of the aluminosilicate structures, while it decreases when the Al2O3 is higher than 24 mass pct, which means that Al2O3 acts as a network modifier at higher content. Increasing A/S from 0.47 to 0.92 causes a slight decrease in viscosity of the slags and has an opposite effect when A/S is more than 0.92. The free running temperature increases with the Al2O3 content and appears to show a peak at an A/S ratio of 0.92. The change of the apparent activation energy is in accordance with the change of viscosity. When Al2O3 content is more than 24 mass pct with low SiO2, CaO content ranges from 35 to 45 mass pct, and the slag transform from silicates-based to aluminates-based can still get a good operation region. Four different viscosity models were employed to predict the viscosity and RIBOUD's model was found to be the best in predicting the viscosity by comparing the estimated viscosity with the measured viscosity.

  8. Principles of technological design of wasteless chemical processes based on the use of wastes for production of alkaline slag cements and concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Glukhovskii, V.D.; Chernobaev, I.P.; Emel'yanov, B.M.; Semenyuk, A.P.

    1985-05-20

    The strength characteristics of alkaline slag-cement made with the use of waste from alkaline sealing of metals are presented. The cement was prepared from granulated blast-furnance slag with average component contents in the following ranges (mass %): SiO/sub 2/ 36.0-40.2, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ 4-18.2, FeO 0.1-3.7, MnO 0.4-5.2, CaO 33.1-48.8, MgO 2.2-9.8. With the use of wastes from the descaling process in alkali melts for production of alkaline slag cements it is possible to obtain highly effective cements of type 700-900, which is 2 to 3 times the value for portland cements. Therefore, the use of wastes from alkaline descaling for production of alkaline slag cements is of great economic and conservational significance. It is possible to devise a wasteless process of scale removal from metals; this is an important advantage of the alkaline scaling method over acid pickling.

  9. Two-stage high temperature sludge gasification using the waste heat from hot blast furnace slags.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongqi; Zhang, Zuotai; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, disposal of sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants and recovery of waste heat from steel industry, become two important environmental issues and to integrate these two problems, a two-stage high temperature sludge gasification approach was investigated using the waste heat in hot slags herein. The whole process was divided into two stages, i.e., the low temperature sludge pyrolysis at ⩽ 900°C in argon agent and the high temperature char gasification at ⩾ 900°C in CO2 agent, during which the heat required was supplied by hot slags in different temperature ranges. Both the thermodynamic and kinetic mechanisms were identified and it was indicated that an Avrami-Erofeev model could best interpret the stage of char gasification. Furthermore, a schematic concept of this strategy was portrayed, based on which the potential CO yield and CO2 emission reduction achieved in China could be ∼1.92∗10(9)m(3) and 1.93∗10(6)t, respectively. PMID:26409106

  10. Properties of steel foundry electric arc furnace dust solidified/stabilized with Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Guray; Pinarli, Vedat; Salihoglu, Nezih Kamil; Karaca, Gizem

    2007-10-01

    Electric arc furnace dust from steel production is generated in considerable amounts worldwide and needs to be treated as hazardous waste. The aim of this study was to investigate the properties of electric arc furnace dust solidified/stabilized by using Portland cement. Mortar and paste samples were prepared with varying waste-to-binder ratios between 0% and 90%. A comprehensive experimental program was designed including XRF characterization, setting time, unconfined compressive strength, and toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP), synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), and acid neutralization capacity (ANC) tests. The results were evaluated in order to determine if the solidified /stabilized product can be disposed of at a landfill site with domestic waste or at a segregated landfill. The effect of using sand on S/S performance was also investigated. The results indicated that the solidification /stabilization process using PC helps the heavy metals to be bound in the cement matrix, but the TCLP leaching results exceeded the EPA landfilling limits. The SPLP leaching results conformed to the limits implying that the waste or S/S products can be disposed of at a segregated landfill; however the low ANC of the S/S products reveals that there may be leaching in the long-term. The sand used in the mortar samples adversely affected the S/S performance, causing higher heavy metal leaching levels, and lower pH levels in the leachate after the TCLP extraction than those measured in the leachate of the paste samples. PMID:17084503

  11. Simultaneous removal of Ni(II), As(III), and Sb(III) from spiked mine effluent with metakaolin and blast-furnace-slag geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Tero; Runtti, Hanna; Niskanen, Mikko; Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Sarkkinen, Minna; Kemppainen, Kimmo; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2016-01-15

    The mining industry is a major contributor of various toxic metals and metalloids to the aquatic environment. Efficient and economical water treatment methods are therefore of paramount importance. The application of natural or low-cost sorbents has attracted a great deal of interest due to the simplicity of its process and its potential effectiveness. Geopolymers represent an emerging group of sorbents. In this study, blast-furnace-slag and metakaolin geopolymers and their raw materials were tested for simultaneous removal of Ni(II), As(III) and Sb(III) from spiked mine effluent. Blast-furnace-slag geopolymer proved to be the most efficient of the studied materials: the experimental maximum sorption capacities for Ni, As and, Sb were 3.74 mg/g, 0.52 mg/g, and 0.34 mg/g, respectively. Although the capacities were relatively low due to the difficult water matrix, 90-100% removal of Ni, As, and Sb was achieved when the dose of sorbent was increased appropriately. Removal kinetics fitted well with the pseudo-second-order model. Our results indicate that geopolymer technology could offer a simple and effective way to turn blast-furnace slag to an effective sorbent with a specific utilization prospect in the mining industry. PMID:26598283

  12. A Study on the Properties of Carbon Black Mortar Using Granulated Blast Furnace Slag and Polymer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hong-Seok; Jeon, Ui-Hyeon; So, Seung-Young

    2015-11-01

    White Portland Cement (WPC) and inorganic pigment have been used in colored concrete, but there are some physical problems such as increases in efflorescence, and poor workability and low economics. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GBFS and polymer (methyl cellulose) on the physical properties of carbon black mortar. For this purpose, a flow test, compressive strength test and color evaluation and was carried out on cement mortar mixed with polymer by changing the proportion of cement and ratio of GBFS. The results show that the addition of polymer influences significantly the color value efficiency in colored mortar. This is due to the reduction of overall amount of micro pore. This polymer films prevent the transport of soluble calcium towards the surface, and decreases efflorescence. And the flow of colored mortar was increased in proportion to the addition rate of the GBFS. In addition the strength of colored mortars with GBFS at the long-term aged (after 28 days) was higher than that of the general WPC mortar, although its strength was developed slowly at the early ages. PMID:26726652

  13. Preparation of a new sorbent with hydrated lime and blast furnace slag for phosphorus removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Gong, Guozhuo; Ye, Shufeng; Tian, Yajun; Wang, Qi; Ni, Jiandi; Chen, Yunfa

    2009-07-30

    The removal of dissolvable inorganic phosphate (H(2)PO(4)(-)) by sorbents prepared from hydrated lime (HL) and blast furnace slag (BFS) was fundamentally studied by an orthogonal experiment design. Based on statistic analysis, it is revealed that the weight ratio of BFS/HL is the most significant variable, and an optimized preparation condition is figured out. With the increase of HL content, the adsorption capacity increases, suggesting that the HL plays the important role in the removal process in the gross. However, in the lower HL content, it is interesting that the adsorption capacity of as-prepared sorbents exceed the sum of the capacities of the same ratio of BFS and HL. The further analysis indicate the excess capacities linearly depend on the specific surface area of sorbents, suggesting that the removal of H(2)PO(4)(-) is closely related with the microstructure of sorbents in the lower HL content, according to the characterization with SEM, XRD and pore analysis. Additionally, an adsorption model and kinetic are discussed in this paper. PMID:19124194

  14. Slagging gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, H.

    1982-07-20

    A slagging gasifier for the gasification of coal and organic waste materials is disclosed. The gasifier includes a vertical blast furnace having a hearth section at the bottom thereof. A slag tap hole is formed in hearth section and opens into a quenching vessel. A honeycomb structure is formed on the inner surface of said hearth section in the area surrounding said slag tap hole, and the inner wall of the hearth section. A plurality of tuyeres extend into the hearth section and feed the furnace with steam and oxygen so as to permit the oxidation of coal and organic waste materials fed into the furnace. As a result of the oxidation, gas and molten slag are formed in the furnace. The slag is collected in the hearth section and exits the hearth section via the tap hole. One or more conduits are provided for recycling (Either internally or externally) the gas exiting the top of the gasifier with the tars, oils, and particulates entrained therein to the partial combustion zone of the gasifier where the tars, oils and particulates are converted to noncondensible gases. A portion of the tar-free product gas is removed from an intermediate point in the gasifier below the pyrolysis and coking zone.

  15. EFFECT OF QUARTZ/MULLITE BLEND CERAMIC ADDITIVE ON IMPROVING RESISTANCE TO ACID OF SODIUM SILICATE-ACTIVATED SLAG CEMENT. CELCIUS BRINE.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA, T.; BROTHERS, L.E.; VAN DE PUTTE, T.R.

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of manufactured quartz/mullite blend (MQMB) ceramic powder in increasing the resistance to acid of sodium silicate-activated slag (SSAS) cementitious material for geothermal wells. A 15-day exposure to 90{sup o} CO{sub 2}-laden H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed that the MQMB had high potential as an acid-resistant additive for SSAS cement. Two factors, the appropriate ratio of slag/MQMB and the autoclave temperature, contributed to better performance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement in abating its acid erosion. The most effective slag/MQMB ratio in minimizing the loss in weight by acid erosion was 70/30 by weight. For autoclave temperature, the loss in weight of 100 C autoclaved cement was a less than 2%, but at 300 C it was even lower. Before exposure to acid, the cement autoclaved at 100 C was essentially amorphous; increasing the temperature to 200 C led to the formation of crystalline analcime in the zeolitic mineral family during reactions between the mullite in MQMB and the Na from sodium silicate. In addition, at 300 C, crystal of calcium silicate hydrate (1) (CSH) was generated in reactions between the quartz in MQMB and the activated slag. These two crystalline phases (CSH and analcime) were responsible for densifying the autoclaved cement, conveying improved compressive strength and minimizing water permeability. The CSH was susceptible to reactions with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, forming two corrosion products, bassanite and ionized monosilicic acid. However, the uptake of ionized monosilicic acid by Mg dissociated from the activated slag resulted in the formation of lizardite as magnesium silicate hydrate. On the other hand, the analcime was barely susceptible to acid if at all. Thus, the excellent acid resistance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement was due to the combined phases of lizardite and analcime.

  16. Slag-based saltstone formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    1987-08-01

    Approximately 400 x 10/sup 6/ L of low-level alkaline salt solution will be treated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) prior to disposal in concrete vaults at SRP. Treatment involves removal of Cs/sup +/ and Sr/sup +2/, followed by solidification and stabilization of potential contaminants in saltstone, a hydrated ceramic wasteform. Chromium, technetium, and nitrate releases from saltstone can be significantly reduced by substituting hydraulic blast furnace slag for portland cement in the formulation designs. Slag-based mixes are also compatible with the Class F flyash used in saltstone as a functional extender to control heat of hydration and reduce permeability. (Class F flyash is also locally available at SRP.) A monolithic wasteform is produced by the hydration of the slag and flyash. Soluble ion release (NO/sup 3 -/) is controlled by the saltstone microstructure. Chromium and technetium are less leachable from slag mixes because these species are chemically reduced to a lower valence state by ferrous iron in the slag and are precipitated as relatively insoluble phases, such as Cr(OH)/sub 3/ and TcO/sub 2/. 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Influence of slag chemistry on the hydration of alkali-activated blast-furnace slag - Part I: Effect of MgO

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Haha, M.; Lothenbach, B. Le Saout, G.; Winnefeld, F.

    2011-09-15

    The hydration and the microstructure of three alkali activated slags (AAS) with MgO contents between 8 and 13 wt.% are investigated. The slags were hydrated in the presence of two different alkaline activators, NaOH and Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}.5H{sub 2}O (WG). Higher MgO content of the slag resulted in a faster reaction and higher compressive strengths during the first days. The formation of C(- A)-S-H and of a hydrotalcite-like phase was observed in all samples by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Increasing the MgO content of the slag from 8 to 13% increased the amount of hydrotalcite and lowered the Al uptake by C-S-H resulting in 9% higher volume of the hydrates and a 50 to 80% increase of the compressive strength after 28 days and longer for WG activated slag pastes. For NaOH activated slags only a slight increase of the compressive strength was measured.

  18. Study of The Maximum Uptake Capacity on Various Sizes of Electric Arc Furnace Slag in Phosphorus Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afnizan, W. M. W.; Hamdan, R.; Othman, N.

    2016-07-01

    The high content of uncontrolled phosphorus concentration in wastewater has emerged as a major problem recently. The excessive amount of phosphorus that is originated from domestic waste, unproper treated waste from septic tanks, as well as agricultural activities have led to the eutrophication problem. Therefore, a laboratory experiment was initiated to evaluate the potential of the Electric Arc Furnace Slag (EAFS), a by-product waste from steel making industry in removing phosphorus concentrations in aqueous solutions. In this work several particle sizes ranging from (9.5-12.4 mm, 12.5-15.9 mm, 16.0-19.9 mm, 20.0-24.9 mm, 25-37.4 mm) with a known weight (20±0.28 g, 40±0.27 g, 60±0.30 g, 80±0.29 g and 100±0.38 g) were used to study the effect of different particle sizes towards phosphorus removal. Each particle size of EAFS was shaken in synthetic phosphorus solutions (10 mg/l, 20 mg/l, 30 mg/l, 40 mg/l and 50 mg/l) at a contact time of 2 hours. Final concentrations of phosphorus were sampled and the measurement was made using WESTCO Discrete Analyzer equipment. Results showed that the highest of the maximum uptake capacity of each EAFS particle size distribution achieved at 0.287, 0.313, 0.266, 0.241 and 0.25 mg/g as particle size range was varied from 9.5-12.4 mm to 25-37.4 mm. In conclusion, the maximum uptake capacity of each EAFS mostly was determined to occur at adsorbent weight of 20 to 40 g in most conditions.

  19. Influence of slag chemistry on the hydration of alkali-activated blast-furnace slag - Part II: Effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Haha, M.; Lothenbach, B. Le Saout, G.; Winnefeld, F.

    2012-01-15

    The hydration and microstructural evolution of three alkali activated slags (AAS) with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents between 7 and 17% wt.% have been investigated. The slags were hydrated in the presence of two different alkaline activators, NaOH and Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O. The formation of C(-A)-S-H and hydrotalcite was observed in all samples by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of the slag decreased the Mg/Al ratio of hydrotalcite, increased the Al incorporation in the C(-A)-S-H and led to the formation of straetlingite. Increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of the slag slowed down the early hydration and a lower compressive strength during the first days was observed. At 28 days and longer, no significant effects of slag Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content on the degree of hydration, the volume of the hydrates, the coarse porosity or on the compressive strengths were observed.

  20. Characterisation of the sintering behaviour of Waelz slag from electric arc furnace (EAF) dust recycling for use in the clay ceramics industry.

    PubMed

    Quijorna, N; de Pedro, M; Romero, M; Andrés, A

    2014-01-01

    Waelz slag is an industrial by-product from the recovery of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust which is mainly sent to landfills. Despite the different chemical and mineralogical compositions of Waelz slag compared to traditional clays, previous experiments have demonstrated its potential use as a clay substitute in ceramic processes. Indeed, clayey products containing Waelz slag could improve mechanical and environmental performance, fixing most of the metallic species and moreover decreasing the release of some potential pollutants during firing. However, a deeper understanding of the complex phase transformations during its thermal treatment and the connection of this behaviour with the end properties is desirable in order to explain the role that is played by the Waelz slag and its potential contribution to the ceramic process. For this purpose, in the present study, the chemical, mineralogical, thermal and environmental behaviour of both (i) unfired powdered samples, and (ii) pressed specimen of Waelz slag fired up to different temperatures within the typical range of clay based ceramic production, has been studied. The effect of the heating temperature on the end properties of the fired samples has been assessed. In general, an increase of the firing temperature promotes sintering and densification of the products and decreases the open porosity and water absorption which also contributes to the fixation of heavy metals. On the contrary, an increase in the leaching of Pb, Cr and Mo from the fired specimens is observed. This can be attributed to the creation of Fe and Ca molybdates and chromates that are weakly retained in the alkali matrix. On the other side, at temperature above 950 °C a weight gain related to the emission of evolved gases is observed. In conclusion, the firing temperature of the ceramic process is a key parameter that affects not only the technical properties but also strongly affects the leaching behaviour and the process emissions. PMID

  1. Synthesis of TiO2 visible light catalysts with controllable crystalline phase and morphology from Ti-bearing electric arc furnace molten slag.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liu, Lulu; Guo, Min; Zhang, Mei

    2016-09-01

    TiO2 visible light catalysts with different crystalline phases and morphologies were synthesized from titanium-bearing electric arc furnace molten slag (Ti-bearing EAF slag) by using a simple acidolysis process. The effects of the pH of the HCl solution, liquid to solid ratio (RL/S, HCl solution to the residue ratio, mL/g) and acidolysis time on the micro-morphology and crystalline phase of as-prepared TiO2 photocatalysts were systematically investigated. The results indicated that with decreasing pH in the HCl solution and increasing RL/S, the crystalline phase and micro-morphology of the obtained TiO2 nanostructures tended to transform from anatase type TiO2 with spherical nanoparticle structures to rutile type TiO2 with needle-like nanorod structures. The acidolysis time had little influence on the crystalline phase but great impact on the size of the obtained TiO2. The growth mechanism of TiO2 from Ti-bearing EAF slag during the acidolysis process was also discussed. In addition, the influence of RL/S on the photocatalytic properties of the synthesized nanostructured TiO2 was studied. The results showed that the photodegradation efficiency for Rhodamine B solution could reach 91.00% in 120min when the RL/S was controlled at 50:1. PMID:27593268

  2. The influence of mineral additives on the strength and porosity of OPC mortar[Ordinary Portland Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, S.P.; Sharma, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Mercury intrusion porosimetry study was carried out on samples of ordinary Portland cement mortars made with mineral additives such as fly ash, granulated blast furnace slag, phosphorus furnace slag, limestone, and lime sludge. The total porosity and compressive strength of all the blended cement mortar samples were determined at 7, 18, and 90 days of hydration. The porosity and mean pore diameter were found to increase with the addition of fly ash and slags, although the total pore volume was almost the same. The strength was found to decrease with the increase in porosity, but the extent of decrease in strength was more closely related to slags and fly ash addition than to limestone and lime sludge. Acceleration of the strength development of ordinary Portland cement was also observed with limestone and lime sludge addition.

  3. Pulverized coal firing of aluminum melting furnaces. Final report. [Sulfide capacity of various slags in given temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.L. Jr.; Dastolfo, L.E. Jr.; DeYoung, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in the development of a desulfurizing coal combustion process by the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) in a research program funded by the United States Department of Energy. Conceptually, high sulfur coal is burned with additives in a staged cyclone combustor, such that sufficient sulfur to obviate products of combustion (POC) scrubbing is retained in the slag by-product. Bench scale studies conducted during the program have shown that 70% of the sulfur (2.65% sulfur coal) reports to the slag at equilibrium through a 25% addition of iron ore to the coal. Results obtained correlate with published data for similar slag at higher temperatures. In pilot scale combustion tests, equilibrium levels of coal sulfur were retained by the slag (11 to 14%). Equilibrium sulfur capture was limited by low particulate retention and operating temperature higher than optimal. Cost estimates for implementation of the process are included in this report. 28 references, 39 figures, 58 tables.

  4. The evolution of strength and crystalline phases for alkali-activated ground blast furnace slag and fly ash-based geopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jae Eun; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Jun, Ssang Sun; Choi, Sejin; Clark, Simon M.

    2010-02-15

    The increase in strength and evolution of crystalline phases in inorganic polymer cement, made by the alkali activation of slag, Class C and Class F fly ashes, was followed using compressive strength test and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. In order to increase the crystallinity of the product the reactions were carried out at 80 deg. C. We found that hydrotalcite formed in both the alkali-activated slag cements and the fly ash-based geopolymers. Hydroxycancrinite, one member of the ABC-6 family of zeolites, was found only in the fly ash geopolymers. Assuming that the predominantly amorphous geopolymer formed under ambient conditions relates to the crystalline phases found when the mixture is cured at high temperature, we propose that the structure of this zeolitic precursor formed in Na-based high alkaline environment can be regarded as a disordered form of the basic building unit of the ABC-6 group of zeolites which includes poly-types such as hydroxycancrinite, hydroxysodalite and chabazite-Na.

  5. 40 CFR 424.30 - Applicability; description of the slag processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... values in the furnace slag are recovered via concentration for return to the furnace, or (b) the slag is... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FERROALLOY MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Slag...

  6. Phase Equilibrium Studies of CaO-SiO2-MgO-Al2O3 System with Binary Basicity of 1.5 Related to Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Mingyin; Wu, Shengli; Ma, Xiaodong; Wang, Laixin; Chen, Mao; Cai, Qingwu; Zhao, Baojun

    2016-04-01

    Slags play an important role in blast furnace operation, and their compositions are based on the CaO-SiO2-MgO-Al2O3 quaternary system in many steel companies. The binary basicity (CaO/SiO2 weight ratio) of blast furnace slags, especially primary slag and bosh slag, can be as high as 1.5 or higher. Phase equilibria and liquidus temperatures in the CaO-SiO2-MgO-Al2O3 system with binary basicity of 1.50 are experimentally determined for temperatures in the range 1723 K to 1823 K (1450 °C to 1550 °C). High temperature equilibration, quenching, and electron probe X-ray microanalysis techniques have been used in the present study. The isotherms are obtained in the primary phase fields of Ca2SiO4, melilite, spinel, periclase, and merwinite related to blast furnace slags. Effects of Al2O3, MgO, and binary basicity on liquidus temperatures have been discussed. In addition, extensive solid solutions have been measured for different primary phases and will be used for development and optimization of the thermodynamic database.

  7. The effect of sulfate activation on the early age hydration of BFS:PC composite cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, N. C.; Li, X.; Bai, Y.; Milestone, N. B.

    2015-09-01

    Blast furnace slag/Portland cement composites are routinely used for immobilising intermediate level nuclear wastes in the UK. Using high cement replacement levels reduces hydration exotherm and lowers pH. Although a lower grout pH will be beneficial in reducing the corrosion of certain encapsulated reactive metals such as aluminium, the degree of slag reaction will also be lower which may result in the formation of less hydration products and which in turn may reduce the capacity to immobilise waste ions. Adding neutral salts such as calcium and sodium sulfate to the composite cement can potentially increase slag activation without significantly altering the pH of the cement matrix. Thus the corrosion of any encapsulated metals would not be affected. This paper describes some of the properties of a hydrated 9:1 blast furnace slag:Portland cement matrix containing added sulfates of calcium and sodium. The findings show that all additives caused an increase in the amount of slag that reacted when cured for up to 28 days. This produced more material able to chemically bind waste ions. Activation with gypsum produced the highest rate of slag reaction.

  8. Crystallization Behavior of Perovskite in the Synthesized High-Titanium-Bearing Blast Furnace Slag Using Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Meilong; Liu, Lu; Lv, Xuewei; Bai, Chenguang; Zhang, Shengfu

    2013-10-01

    The isothermal phase composition of high-titanium-bearing slag (23 mass pct TiO2) under an argon atmosphere during cooling process from 1723 K (1450 °C) was calculated by FactSage.6.3 (CRCT-ThermFact Inc., Montréal, Canada). Three main phases, which were perovskite, titania spinel, and clinopyroxene, could form during the cooling process and they precipitated at 1713 K, 1603 K, and 1498 K (1440 °C, 1330 °C, and 1225 °C), respectively. The nonisothermal crystallization process of perovskite in synthesized high-titanium-bearing slag was studied in situ by a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) with cooling rate of 30 K/min. The results showed that the primary phase was perovskite that precipitated at 1703 K (1430 °C). The whole precipitation and growth process of perovskite was obtained, whereas other phases formed as glass under the current experimental conditions. Perovskite grew along a specific growth track and finally appeared with snowflake morphology. The growing kinetics of perovskite formation from molten slag were also mentioned.

  9. Development and field testing of an alternative latrine design utilizing basic oxygen furnace slag as a treatment media for pathogen removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimson, J.; Suhogusoff, A. V.; Blowes, D. W.; Hirata, R. A.; Ptacek, C. J.; Robertson, W. D.; Emelko, M. B.

    2009-05-01

    In densely-populated communities in developing countries, appropriate setback distances for pit latrines often cannot be met. An alternative latrine was designed that incorporates two permeable reactive media to treat pathogens and nitrate from effluent. Basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag in contact with wastewater effluent elevates pH to levels (> 11) that inactivate pathogens. Saturated woodchip creates reducing conditions that encourage the growth of denitrifying bacteria which remove NO3-. The field application was constructed in Santo Antônio, a peri-urban community located 25 km south of the city of São Paulo, Brazil. A 2-m diameter pit was excavated to a depth of 4 m into the sandy-clay unsaturated zone. A geotextile liner was emplaced to create saturated conditions in the 0.5-m thick woodchip barrier. Above the woodchip barrier, a 1-m thick layer of BOF slag mixed with pea gravel and sand was emplaced. A series of filter layers, grading upward from coarse sand to fine gravel, where placed above the BOF layer, and gravel was also infilled around the outer perimeter of the excavation, to ensure O2 diffusion into the design, the formation of biofilm, and degradation of organic material. A control latrine, constructed with similar hydraulic characteristics and nonreactive materials, was constructed at a locality 100 m away, in the same geological materials. Total coliform, thermotolerant coliform, and E. coli are removed by approximately 4-5 log concentration units in less than one meter of vertical transport through the BOF slag media. In the control latrine, comparable reductions in these pathogenic indicators are observed over three meters of vertical transport. Removal of sulphur-reducing Clostridia, Clostridium perfrigens and somatic coliphage are also achieved in the alternative design, but initial concentrations in effluent are low. Some measurable concentrations of pathogen indicators are measured in lysimeters below the BOF layer, but are associated

  10. Stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes with alkali-activated cements.

    PubMed

    Shi, Caijun; Fernández-Jiménez, A

    2006-10-11

    This paper reviews progresses on the use of alkali-activated cements for stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Alkali-activated cements consist of an alkaline activator and cementing components, such as blast furnace slag, coal fly ash, phosphorus slag, steel slag, metakaolin, etc., or a combination of two or more of them. Properly designed alkali-activated cements can exhibit both higher early and later strengths than conventional portland cement. The main hydration product of alkali-activated cements is calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) with low Ca/Si ratios or aluminosilicate gel at room temperature; CSH, tobmorite, xonotlite and/or zeolites under hydrothermal condition, no metastable crystalline compounds such as Ca(OH)(2) and calcium sulphoaluminates exist. Alkali-activated cements also exhibit excellent resistance to corrosive environments. The leachability of contaminants from alkali-activated cement stabilized hazardous and radioactive wastes is lower than that from hardened portland cement stabilized wastes. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-activated cements are better matrix for solidification/stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes than Portland cement. PMID:16787699

  11. Kinetic modeling on CO₂ capture using basic oxygen furnace slag coupled with cold-rolling wastewater in a rotating packed bed.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-E; Chen, Tse-Lun; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2013-09-15

    In this study, direct and indirect carbonation of basic oxygen furnace slag (BOFS) coupled with cold-rolling wastewater (CRW) was carried out via a rotating packed bed (RPB). The solid products were qualitatively characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and quantitatively analyzed with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The leachate was analyzed with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The results indicate that the maximum achievable carbonation conversion (MACC) of BOFS was 90.7%, corresponding to a capture capacity of 0.277 g CO₂/g of BOFS, by direct carbonation with CRW under a rotation speed of 750 rpm at 30 °C for 20 min. In addition, CO₂ mass balance among the gas, liquid, and solid phases within an RPB was well-developed, with an error less than 10%, to confirm the actual CO₂ capture capacity of BOFS with precision and accuracy. Furthermore, a reaction kinetic model based on mass balance was established to determine the reaction rate constant for various liquid agents (CRW and pure water). It was concluded that co-utilization of alkaline wastes including BOFS and CRW via the RPB is a novel approach for both enhancing CO₂ capture capacity and reducing the environmental impacts of alkaline wastes. PMID:23892160

  12. The enhancement effect of pre-reduction using zero-valent iron on the solidification of chromite ore processing residue by blast furnace slag and calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinchunzi; Chen, Zhonglin; Shen, Jimin; Wang, Binyuan; Fan, Leitao

    2015-09-01

    A bench scale study was performed to assess the effectiveness of the solidification of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) by blast furnace slag and calcium hydroxide, and investigate the enhancement effect of pre-reduction using zero-valent iron (ZVI) on the solidification treatment. The degree of Cr immobilization was evaluated using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) as well as the solid waste-extraction procedure for leaching toxicity-sulfuric acid & nitric acid method (Chinese standard HJ/T299-2007). Strength tests and semi-dynamic leaching tests were implemented to investigate the potential for reusing the final treatment product as a readily available construction material. The experimental results showed that the performance of pre-reduction/solidification (S/S) was superior to that of solidification alone. After pre-reduction, all of the S/S treated COPR samples met the TCLP limit for total Cr (5 mg L(-1)), whereas the samples with a COPR content below 40% met the pollution control limit of bricks and building block products (Chinese standard HJ/T 301-2007) produced with COPR for total Cr (0.3 mg L(-1)). At the same time, all of the S/S treated specimens tested were suitable for utilization at certain levels. PMID:25929874

  13. [Solidification/Stabilization of Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) Using Zero-Valent Iron and Lime-Activated Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-lin; Li, Jin-chunzi; Wang, Bin-yuan; Fan, Lei-tao; Shen, Ji-min

    2015-08-01

    The solidification/stabilization (S/S) of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) was performed using zero-valent iron (ZVI) and lime-activated ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). The degree of Cr immobilization was evaluated using the leaching procedure, mineral composition analysis and morphology analysis. Semi-dynamic leaching tests were implemented to investigate the potential for reusing the final treatment product as a readily available construction material. The results showed that after reduction, all of the S/S treated COPR samples met the pollution control limit of bricks and building block products (Chinese standard HJ/T 301-2007) produced with COPR for total Cr (0.3 mg x L(-1)), the compressive strength of all the S/S samples could meet the compressive strength standard (15 MPa) for producing clay bricks, and Cr existed as the specie that bound to Fe/Mn oxides in the S/S samples. At the same time, all of the S/S treated specimens tested were suitable for utilization at certain levels. PMID:26592036

  14. Influence of aluminium nitride as a foaming agent on the preparation of foam glass-ceramics from high-titanium blast furnace slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huan; Feng, Ke-qin; Wang, Hai-bo; Chen, Chang-hong; Zhou, Hong-ling

    2016-05-01

    To effectively reuse high-titanium blast furnace slag (TS), foam glass-ceramics were successfully prepared by powder sintering at 1000°C. TS and waste glass were used as the main raw materials, aluminium nitride (AlN) as the foaming agent, and borax as the fluxing agent. The influence of the amount of AlN added (1wt%-5wt%) on the crystalline phases, microstructure, and properties of the produced foam glass-ceramics was studied. The results showed that the main crystal phases were perovskite, diopside, and augite. With increasing AlN content, a transformation from diopside to augite occurred and the crystallinity of the pyroxene phases slightly decreased. Initially, the average pore size and porosity of the foam glass-ceramics increased and subsequently decreased; similarly, their bulk density and compressive strength decreased and subsequently increased. The optimal properties were obtained when the foam glass-ceramics were prepared by adding 4wt% AlN.

  15. A comparative analysis of lightweight aggregate and cement kilns operated under the Boiler and Industrial Furnace Rule

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, G.P.; Jewett, J.J. III

    1994-12-31

    Eighteen lightweight aggregate (LWA) kilns at five locations currently have interim status under the BIF Rule. Two additional LWA kilns at a sixth location are burning hazardous waste fuel under an incinerator permit. Although these units comprise a significant fraction of the existing and potential commercial BIF capacity in the Eastern United States, relatively little technical literature has been generated regarding the burning of hazardous waste in LWA kilns, and both regulators and the public tend to view LWA kilns as a variant of cement kilns. However, along with similarities, there are a number of important differences between these two categories of industrial furnaces. Among the more significant are differences in typical kiln size, raw feed, operating conditions and uses of kiln dust. This paper is a comparative analysis of cement and lightweight aggregate kilns operating under BIF. It addresses design features, raw material and fuel emissions, products and residuals. Both technical and legal/regulatory of differences are analyzed. Finally, the potential impact of EPA`s Waste Combustion Strategy upon LWA kilns is evaluated.

  16. High-temperature cementing materials for completion of geothermal wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyoncu, R.S.; Snyder, M.J.

    1981-05-01

    Several portland cement types, oil well cements, and various additives and admixtures were evaluated during the course of development of a number of promising compositions suitable for geothermal applications. Among the cements and various materials considered were portland cement Types I, III, and V; oil well cement Classes G, H, and J; and additives such as silica flour, blast furnace slags, pozzolan, hydrated lime, perlite, and aluminum phosphate. Properties of interest in the study were thickening time, compressive strength, cement-to-metal bond strength, and effects of the cements on the corrosion of steel well casings. Testing procedures and property data obtained on a number of compositions are presented and discussed. Several cementing compositions comprised of Class J oil well cement, pozzolan, blast furnace slags, and silica flour were found to possess properties which appear to make them suitable for use in geothermal well completions. Five of the promising cementing compositions have been submitted to the National Bureau of Standards for additional testing.

  17. Influence of amount of oxidizing slag discharged from stainless steelmaking process of electric arc furnace on elution behavior into fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, S.; Shimomura, T.; Hisyamudin, M. N. N.; Takahashi, T.; Izaki, M.

    2012-03-01

    Fundamental study was carried out for provision for acidification of soil due to acid rain. The influence of weight of the additive slag on elution behavior of the slag into water was studied in this study. Elution experiment was carried out on a basis of JIS K 0058-1. Generally, the pH in the aqueous solution increased with an increase in weight of the additive slag. The pH converged to approximately eight. Calcium, magnesium and manganese, which were essential elements for plants, were eluted from the slag irrespective to elution condition. The eluted concentrations of Ca and Mg increased with an increase in weight of the additive slag. Silicon and zinc were also eluted depending on the conditions. Aluminum that was harmful for plants was not eluted from the used slag.

  18. Reaction of iron and steel slags with refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Anderson, M.W.

    1993-04-01

    Slag corrosion and erosion has been a major wear factor for refractories wear in contact with molten iron and steel. In blast furnace ironmaking, the slag/iron interface plays a more important role than does the slag/refractory interface. On the other hand in steelmaking, the slag in the ladles and tundish predominantly affect refractory wear. This paper presents the results of a detailed microstructural evaluation of (a) slag and slag/iron interactions with A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C refractories for ironmaking in blast furnaces, (b) basic oxygen furnace and ladle slag interactions with alumina spinel refractories for steelmaking, and (c) slag interactions with working refractory lining for continuous casting tundishes. Results will also be presented on refractory wear/failure due to simultaneous corrosion and penetration by the slag.

  19. Refinement of indicators characterizing fouling and slagging for coals with low slagging propensities as applied to the standard and zone-wise methods for thermal design of furnace chambers and to mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhnovich, A. N.; Artem'eva, N. V.; Chernetskii, M. Yu.

    2012-06-01

    Methods for estimating indicators characterizing thermal resistance of waterwall tubes with deposits in the case of using coals with low slagging propensities (i.e., coals not prone to producing strong ferrous deposits) are presented.

  20. Cements with low Clinker Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lodeiro, I.; Fernández-Jiménez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2015-11-01

    Hybrid alkaline cements are multi-component systems containing a high percentage of mineral additions (fly ash, blast furnace slag), low proportions (<30%) of Portland clinker and scarce amounts of alkaline activators. The substantially lower amount of clinker needed to manufacture these binders in comparison to ordinary Portland cement is both economically and ecologically beneficial. Their enormous versatility in terms of the raw materials used has made them the object of considerable interest. The present study explored the mechanical strength of binary blends mixes; B1= 20% clinker (CK) + 80% fly ash (FA) and B2=20% clinker + 80% blast furnace slag (BFS), both hydrated in the presence and absence of an alkaline activator specifically designed for this purpose. The use of the activator enhanced the development of early age strength considerably. All the hydrated matrices were characterised with XRD, SEM/EDX and (29Si and 27Al) NMR. The use of the alkaline activator generated reaction products consisting primarily of a mix of gels ((N,C)-A-S-H and C-A-S-H) whose respective proportions were found to depend upon system composition and initial reactivity.

  1. Corrosion of aluminium metal in OPC- and CAC-based cement matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Hajime; Swift, Paul; Utton, Claire; Carro-Mateo, Beatriz; Collier, Nick; Milestone, Neil

    2013-08-15

    Corrosion of aluminium metal in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based pastes produces hydrogen gas and expansive reaction products causing problems for the encapsulation of aluminium containing nuclear wastes. Although corrosion of aluminium in cements has been long known, the extent of aluminium corrosion in the cement matrices and effects of such reaction on the cement phases are not well established. The present study investigates the corrosion reaction of aluminium in OPC, OPC-blast furnace slag (BFS) and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) based systems. The total amount of aluminium able to corrode in an OPC and 4:1 BFS:OPC system was determined, and the correlation between the amount of calcium hydroxide in the system and the reaction of aluminium obtained. It was also shown that a CAC-based system could offer a potential matrix to incorporate aluminium metal with a further reduction of pH by introduction of phosphate, producing a calcium phosphate cement.

  2. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product

  3. Solidification/stabilization of technetium in cement-based grouts

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliam, T.M.; Bostick, W.D.; Spence, R.D.; Shoemaker, J.L.; Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, TN; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, TN )

    1990-01-01

    Mixed low-level radioactive and chemically hazardous process treatment wastes from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are stabilized by solidification in cement-based grouts. Conventional portland cement and fly ash grouts have been shown to be effective for retention of hydrolyzable metals (e.g., lead, cadmium, uranium and nickel) but are marginally acceptable for retention of radioactive Tc-99, which is present in the waste as the highly mobile pertechnate anion. Addition of ground blast furnace slag to the grout is shown to reduce the leachability of technetium by several orders of magnitude. The selective effect of slag is believed to be due to its ability to reduce Tc(VII) to the less soluble Tc(IV) species. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Constant voltage electro-slag remelting control

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, Max E.

    1996-01-01

    A system for controlling electrode gap in an electro-slag remelt furnace has a constant regulated voltage and an eletrode which is fed into the slag pool at a constant rate. The impedance of the circuit through the slag pool is directly proportional to the gap distance. Because of the constant voltage, the system current changes are inversely proportional to changes in gap. This negative feedback causes the gap to remain stable.

  5. Constant voltage electro-slag remelting control

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1996-10-22

    A system for controlling electrode gap in an electro-slag remelt furnace has a constant regulated voltage and an electrode which is fed into the slag pool at a constant rate. The impedance of the circuit through the slag pool is directly proportional to the gap distance. Because of the constant voltage, the system current changes are inversely proportional to changes in gap. This negative feedback causes the gap to remain stable. 1 fig.

  6. Characterization and modeling of major constituent equilibrium chemistry of a blended cement mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J.; Kosson, D. S.; Brown, K. G.; Garrabrants, A. C.; Meeussen, J. C. L.; van der Sloot, H. A.

    2013-07-01

    Cementitious materials containing ground granulated iron blast furnace slag and coal combustion fly ash as admixtures are being used extensively for nuclear waste containment applications. Whereas the solid phases of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) have been studied in great detail, the chemistry of cement, fly ash and slag blends has received relatively less study. Given that OPC is generally more reactive than slag and fly ash, the mineralogy of OPC provides a logical starting point for describing the major constituent chemistry of blended cement mortars. To this end, a blended cement mortar containing Portland cement, granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash and quartz sand was modeled using a set of solid phases known to form in hydrated OPC with the geochemical speciation solver LeachXS/ORCHESTRA. Comparison of modeling results to the experimentally determined pH-dependent batch leaching concentrations (USEPA Method 1313) indicates that major constituent concentrations are described reasonably well with the Portland cement mineral set; however, modeled and measured aluminum concentrations differ greatly. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the mortar reveals the presence of Al-rich phyllosilicate minerals heretofore unreported in similar cementitious blends: kaolinite and potassic phyllosilicates similar in composition to illite and muscovite. Whereas the potassic phyllosilicates are present in the quartz sand aggregate, the formation of kaolinite appears to be authigenic. The inclusion of kaolinite in speciation modeling provides a substantially improved description of the release of Al and therefore, suggests that the behavior of phyllosilicate phases may be important for predicting long-term physico-chemical behavior of such systems.

  7. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl2 accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores. PMID:22783062

  8. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-07-01

    Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl(2) accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores. PMID:22783062

  9. Immobilization of antimony waste slag by applying geopolymerization and stabilization/solidification technologies.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Güray

    2014-11-01

    During the processing of antimony ore by pyrometallurgical methods, a considerable amount of slag is formed. This antimony waste slag is listed by the European Union as absolutely hazardous waste with a European Waste Catalogue code of 10 08 08. Since the levels of antimony and arsenic in the leachate of the antimony waste slag are generally higher than the landfilling limits, it is necessary to treat the slag before landfilling. In this study, stabilization/solidification and geopolymerization technologies were both applied in order to limit the leaching potential of antimony and arsenic. Different combinations ofpastes by using Portland cement, fly ash, clay, gypsum, and blast furnace slag were prepared as stabilization/solidification or geopoljymer matrixes. Sodium silicate-sodium hydroxide solution and sodium hydroxide solution at 8 M were used as activators for geopolymer samples. Efficiencies of the combinations were evaluated in terms of leaching and unconfined compressive strength. None of the geopolymer samples prepared with the activators yielded arsenic and antimony leaching below the regulatory limit at the same time, although they yielded high unconfined compressive strength levels. On the other hand, the stabilization/solidification samples prepared by using water showed low leaching results meeting the landfilling criteria. Use of gypsum as an additive was found to be successful in immobilizing the arsenic and antimony. PMID:25509550

  10. Slag Characterization: A Necessary Tool for Modeling and Simulating Refractory Corrosion on a Pilot Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregurek, D.; Wenzl, C.; Reiter, V.; Studnicka, H. L.; Spanring, A.

    2014-09-01

    The slag in pyrometallurgical operations plays a major role affecting the life of furnace refractory. As such, comprehensive mineralogical and chemical slag examination, physical property determination including the slag melting point or liquidus, and viscosity are necessary for precise understanding of a slag. At the RHI Technology Center Leoben, Austria, the main objective of slag characterization work is to reach a better understanding of refractory corrosion. This corrosion testwork is performed at the laboratory and pilot scale. Typically, corrosion tests are performed in an induction furnace or rotary kiln, with the main purpose being the improved selection of the most suitable refractory products to improve refractory performance in operating metallurgical furnaces. This article focuses on characterization of samples of six non-ferrous, customer-provided slags. This includes slag from a copper Peirce-Smith converter, a short rotary furnace for lead smelting, a titania-processing furnace, and a Ni-Cu top blowing rotary converter (TBRC) plant.

  11. Ecological conditions of ponds situated on blast furnace slag deposits located in South Gare Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), Teesside, UK.

    PubMed

    Raper, E; Davies, S; Perkins, B; Lamb, H; Hermanson, M; Soares, A; Stephenson, T

    2015-06-01

    Slag, a by-product from the iron and steel industry, has a range of applications within construction and is used in wastewater treatment. Historically considered a waste material, little consideration was given to the environmental impacts of its disposal. South Gare (a Site of Special Scientific Interest) located at the mouth of the Tees estuary, UK, formed on slag deposits used to create a sea wall and make the land behind permanent. Over time, ponds formed in depressions with the water chemistry, being significantly impacted by the slag deposits. Calcium levels reached 504 mg/L, nitrate 49.0 mg/L and sulphate 1,698 mg/L. These levels were also reflected in the composition of the sediment. pH (5.10-9.90) and electrical conductivity (2,710-3,598 µS/cm) were variable but often notably high. Pb, Cu and Cd were not present within the water, whilst Zn ranged from 0.027 to 0.37 mg/L. Heavy metal levels were higher in surface sediments. Zinc was most dominant (174.3-1,310.2 mg/L) followed by Pb (9.9-431 mg/L), Cu (8.4-41.8 mg/L) and Cd (0.4-1.1 mg/L). A sediment core provided a historical overview of the ponds. The ponds were unfavourable for aquatic biodiversity and unsuitable for drinking water abstraction. PMID:25537165

  12. Using a porcelain furnace to debond cement-retained implant crown from the abutment after screw fracture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Paola C; Heshmati, Reza H; Lee, Damian J

    2015-04-01

    When a screw fracture occurs on a cement-retained, implant-supported restoration, the abutment and restoration are completely separated from the implant's internal connection. Traditionally, an access hole is drilled through the crown to retrieve the broken screw, and the restoration can be placed again as a screw-retained restoration. This clinical report documents a patient whose broken abutment screw was retrieved from the restoration by burning off the cement and separating from the abutment without drilling an access hole. PMID:25316610

  13. Contribution to the physical-mechanical study of cement CRS basis of dune-sand powder and other minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmani, Saci; Kriker, Abdelouahed

    2016-07-01

    The Portland cements are increasingly used for the manufacture of cement materials (mortar or concrete). Sighting the increasing demand of the cement in the field of construction, and the wealth of our country of minerals. It is time to value these local materials in construction materials and in the manufacture of cement for the manufacture of a new type of cement or for the improvement of the cement of characteristics for several reasons either technical, or ecological or economic or to improve certain properties to the State fees or hardened. The uses of mineral additions remain associated to disadvantages on the time of solidification and the development of the mechanical resistance at the young age [8]. The objective of our work is to study the effects of the incorporation of additions minerals such the pozzolan (active addition) [3], slag of blast furnace (active addition) [4] and the sand dune powder (inert addition) on the physico-mechanical properties of compositions of mortar collaborated compositions according to different binary combinations basis of these additions. This will allow selecting of optimal dosages of these combinations the more efficient, from the point of view of mechanical resistanceas well. The results of this research work confirm that the rate of 10% of pozzolan, slag or powder of dune sand contributes positively on the development of resistance in the long term, at of this proportion time,there is a decrease in the latter except for the slag (20 - 40%) [4]Seems the more effective resistors and physical properties.

  14. Slag pit practices to improve slag quality

    SciTech Connect

    Mertdogan, A.; Gambol, F.C.; Spaeth, J.R.; Zbos, J.; Batka, R.; Tolliver, D.

    1996-12-31

    Slag quality had deteriorated recently. Without the explicit approval for slag quality by the Illinois Department of Transportation, the slag would not be saleable. Disposal of slag to landfills was going to be an expensive solution and rife with environmental concerns. A slag quality control program embarked on in mid-1994 restored slag quality to desired specifications. This paper describes the changes in slag pit practice adopted following extensive tests performed on cooling slag under controlled conditions.

  15. Study of the mineral matter distribution in pulverized fuel coals with respect to slag deposit formation in boiler furnaces. Phase 1. Final report, 1 April 1976-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, L.G..; Moza, A.K.; Abbott, M.F.; Singh, S.N.; Trimarchi, T.J.

    1980-07-01

    The work reported here is aimed at understanding the initiation of upper wall slag deposits in pulverized coal fired utility boilers, and characterizing pulverized coals for the mineral elements of significance. A scanning electron microscope with x-ray fluorescence capability, under computer control, has been used to analyze individual coal particles for the elements Si, Al, Ca, Fe and S. The required software for these analyses has been developed, as have suitable sample preparation techniques. The results show many different types of particles to exist in pulverized coal, some of which are likely to be bad-acting in terms of slagging. A test has been developed to study the sticking of melted pellets of ash or mineral matter dropped onto a metal substrate held at a controlled temperature. It was found that for a given drop composition and substrate material there is a substrate temperature below which the drop will not adhere. At higher substrate temperatures the strength of adhesion increases logarithmically. Sticking appears to be a function of the oxidation of the surface or of alkalies deposited on the surface. If the drop composition is such that material absorbed from the substrate fluxes the drop-substrate interface, then the apparent contact angle is reduced and sticking is enhanced, and vice-versa. A small-scale pulverized coal furnace designed to give a uniform temperature-time history for each particle was reconstructed and tested. Water-cooled probes were found to give the most accurate control of initial probe temperature. Deposits initiate on the probe in a few minutes, and the fall of probe temperature can be used to indicate the growth of deposit. Systematic investigation of the particles initiating the deposit have not yet been performed.

  16. Phase Equilibria Studies in the System ZnO-``FeO''-Al2O3-CaO-SiO2 Relevant to Imperial Smelting Furnace Slags: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baojun; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2010-04-01

    The phase equilibria and the liquidus temperatures in the system ZnO-“FeO”-Al2O3-CaO-SiO2 have been determined experimentally in equilibrium with metallic iron. Specifically, the effects of Al2O3 concentrations in Imperial Smelting Furnace slags are identified, and the results are presented in the form of pseudo-ternary sections ZnO-“FeO”-(Al2O3 + CaO + SiO2) in which CaO/SiO2 = 0.93 and (CaO + SiO2)/Al2O3 = 5.0 and 3.5, respectively. It was found that, in the presence of Al2O3, the spinel phase is formed, the spinel primary phase field expands, and the wustite and melilite primary phase fields are reduced in size with an increasing Al2O3 concentration. The implications of the findings to industrial practice are discussed.

  17. Phase Equilibria Studies in the System ZnO-``FeO''-Al2O3-CaO-SiO2 Relevant to Imperial Smelting Furnace Slags: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baojun; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2010-04-01

    The phase equilibria and liquidus temperatures in the system ZnO-“FeO”-Al2O3-CaO-SiO2 in equilibrium with metallic iron have been determined experimentally in the temperature range of 1423 K to 1553 K. The experimental conditions were focused on the composition range relevant to Imperial Smelting Furnace slags. The results are presented in the form of a pseudo-ternary section ZnO-“FeO”-(CaO + SiO2 + Al2O3) in which CaO/SiO2 = 0.93 and (CaO + SiO2)/Al2O3 = 7.0. It was found that wustite and spinel are the major primary phases and that zincite and melilite are also present in the composition range investigated. Wustite (Fe2+,Zn)O and spinel (Fe2+,Zn)O (A1,Fe3+)2O3 solid solutions are formed in this system, and the ZnO concentration in the spinel phase is found to be much greater than in the liquid phase.

  18. Identifying improvement potentials in cement production with life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Michael Elias; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2010-12-01

    Cement production is an environmentally relevant process responsible for 5% of total anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions and 7% of industrial fuel use. In this study, life cycle assessment is used to evaluate improvement potentials in the cement production process in Europe and the USA. With a current fuel substitution rate of 18% in Europe and 11% in the USA, both regions have a substantial potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save virgin resources by further increasing the coprocessing of waste fuels. Upgrading production technology would be particularly effective in the USA where many kiln systems with very low energy efficiency are still in operation. Using best available technology and a thermal substitution rate of 50% for fuels, greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced by 9% for Europe and 18% for the USA per tonne of cement. Since clinker production is the dominant pollution producing step in cement production, the substitution of clinker with mineral components such as ground granulated blast furnace slag or fly ash is an efficient measure to reduce the environmental impact. Blended cements exhibit substantially lower environmental footprints than Portland cement, even if the substitutes feature lower grindability and require additional drying and large transport distances. The highest savings in CO(2) emissions and resource consumption are achieved with a combination of measures in clinker production and cement blending. PMID:21047057

  19. Encapsulation of caesium-loaded Ionsiv in cement

    SciTech Connect

    Jenni, A.; Hyatt, N.C.

    2010-08-15

    The microporous material Ionsiv is used for {sup 137}Cs removal from aqueous nuclear waste streams. In the UK, Cs-loaded Ionsiv is classed as an intermediate-level waste; no sentencing and disposal route is yet defined for this material and it is currently held in safe interim storage on several nuclear sites. In this study, the suitability of fly ash and blast furnace slag blended cements for encapsulation of Cs-Ionsiv in a monolithic wasteform was investigated. No evidence of reaction or dissolution of the Cs-Ionsiv in the cementitious environment was found by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. However, a small fraction ({<=} 1.6 wt.%) of the Cs inventory was released from the encapsulated Ionsiv during leaching experiments carried out on hydrated samples. Furthermore, it was evident that K and Na present in the cementitious pore water exchanged with Cs and H in the Ionsiv. Therefore, cement systems lower in K and Na, such as slag based cements, showed lower Cs release than the fly ash based cements.

  20. Modeling of a coal-fired slagging combustor: Development of a slag submodel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.H.; Zhao, D.Q.; He, L.B.; Jiang, L.Q.; He, Q.; Chen, Y.

    2007-05-15

    In a slagging combustor or furnace, the high combustion temperature makes the molten slag layer cover the wall and capture the particles. If these particles contain combustible matter, they will continue to burn on the running slag. As a result, the total amount of ash deposition will be much greater than that in dry-wall combustors and the total heat flux through the deposition surface will change greatly. Considering the limitations of existing simulation methods for slagging combustion, this paper introduces a new wall burning model and slag flow model from the analysis of particle deposition phenomena. Combined with a conventional combustion simulation program, the total computational frame is introduced. From comparisons of simulation results from several kinds of methods with experimental data, the conclusion is drawn that the conventional simulation methods are not very suitable for slagging combustion and the wall burning mechanism should be considered more thoroughly. (author)

  1. Reducing CO2-Emission by using Eco-Cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, K.; Bergmeister, K.; Janotka, I.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 concentration in the air is rising constantly. Globally, cement companies are emitting nearly two billion tonnes/year of CO2 (or around 6 to 7 % of the planet's total CO2 emissions) by producing portland cement clinker. At this pace, by 2025 the cement industry will be emitting CO2 at a rate of 3.5 billion tones/year causing enormous environmental damage (Shi et al., 2011; Janotka et al., 2012). At the dawn of the industrial revolution in the mid-eighteenth century the concentration of CO2 was at a level of ca. 280 ppm. 200 years later at the time of World War II the CO2 level had risen to 310 ppm what results in a rate of increase of 0,15 ppm per year for that period (Shi et al., 2011). In November 2011 the CO2 concentration reached a value of 391 ppm (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 2011), a rise of ca. 81 ppm in 66 years and an increased rate of around 1,2 ppm/year respectively. In the same period cement production in tons of cement has multiplied by a factor of ca. 62 (Kelly & Oss, US Geological Survey, 2010). Thus new CO2-saving eco-cement types are gaining in importance. In these cement types the energy-consuming portland cement clinker is partially replaced by latent hydraulic additives such as blast furnace slag, fly ash or zeolite. These hydraulic additives do not need to be fired in the rotary furnace. They ony need to be pulverized to the required grain size and added to the ground portland cement clinker. Hence energy is saved by skipping the engery-consuming firing process, in addition there is no CO2-degassing as there is in the case of lime burning. Therefore a research project between Austria and Slovakia, funded by the EU (Project ENVIZEO), was initiated in 2010. The main goal of this project is to develop new CEM V eco-types of cements and certificate them for common usage. CEM V is a portland clinker saving cement kind that allows the reduction of clinker to a proportion of 40-64% for CEM V/A and 20-39% for CEM V/B respectively by the

  2. WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ELECTRIC FURNACE AFTER ADDING A CHEMICAL COAGULANT TO FORCE IT TO THE SURFACE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Melting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Kinetics of the reaction of iron blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents with SO{sub 2} at low temperatures: effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.F.; Shih, S.M.

    2009-09-15

    The effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx in the flue gas on the kinetics of the sulfation of blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents at low temperatures were studied using a differential fixed-bed reactor. When O{sub 2} and NOx were not present simultaneously, the reaction kinetics was about the same as that under the gas mixtures containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and N{sub 2} only, being affected mainly by the relative humidity. The sulfation of sorbents can be described by the surface coverage model and the model equations derived for the latter case. When both O{sub 2} and NOx, were present, the sulfation of sorbents was greatly enhanced, forming a great amount of sulfate in addition to sulfite. The surface coverage model is still valid in this case, but the model equations obtained show a more marked effect of relative humidity and negligible effects of SO{sub 2} concentration and temperature on the reaction. The effect of sorbent composition on the reaction kinetics was entirely represented by the effects of the initial specific surface area (S{sub g0}) and the Ca molar content (M{sup -1}) of sorbent. The initial conversion rate of sorbent increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}, and the ultimate conversion increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}M{sup -1}. The model equations obtained in this work are applicable to describe the kinetics of the sulfation of the sorbents in the low-temperature dry and semidry fine gas desulfurization processes either with an upstream NOx, removal unit or without.111

  4. Global warming impact on the cement and aggregates industries

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, J. . Geopolymer Inst.)

    1994-06-01

    CO[sub 2] related energy taxes are focusing essentially on fuel consumption, not on actual CO[sub 2] emission measured at the chimneys. Ordinary Portland cement, used in the aggregates and industries, results from the calcination of limestone and silica. The production of 1 ton of cement directly generates 0.55 tons of chemical-CO[sub 2] and requires the combustion of carbon-fuel to yield an additional 0.40 tons of CO[sub 2]. The 1987 1 billion metric tons world production of cement accounted for 1 billion metric tons of CO[sub 2], i.e., 5% of the 1987 world CO[sub 2] emission. A world-wide freeze of CO[sub 2] emission at the 1990 level as recommended by international institutions, is incompatible with the extremely high cement development needs of less industrialized countries. Present cement production growth ranges from 5% to 16% and suggests that in 25 years from now, world cement CO[sub 2] emissions could equal 3,500 million tons. Eco-taxes when applied would have a spectacular impact on traditional Portland cement based aggregates industries. Taxation based only on fuel consumption would lead to a cement price increase of 20%, whereas taxation based on actual CO[sub 2] emission would multiply cement price by 1.5 to 2. A 25--30% minor reduction of CO[sub 2] emissions may be achieved through the blending of Portland cement with replacement materials such as coal-fly ash and iron blast furnace slag.

  5. PO43 Removal by and Permeability of Industrial Byproducts and Minerals: Granulated Blast Furnace Slag, Cement Kiln Dust, Coconut Shell Activated Carbon, Silica Sand and Zeolite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excess aqueous concentration of phosphate degrades the overall water quality of the receiving surface waters in a cumulatively damaging process referred to as eutrophication. Adsorption of excess phosphate has proven to be the most effective, and economical methods of phosphate removal from such wat...

  6. Probing the microstructure and water phases in composite cement blends

    SciTech Connect

    Gorce, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: j.gorce@sheffield.ac.uk; Milestone, Neil B.

    2007-03-15

    {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been used in combination with the more conventional techniques of mercury intrusion porosimetry, freeze-drying and thermogravimetric analysis to investigate the evolution of the microstructure and the distribution of water phases in two composite cement blends hydrating over a one year period. These two blends are composed of high substitution of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) with Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) at level of 75 wt.% (3:1 blend) and 90 wt.% (9:1 blend). After one year, the 3:1 blend microstructure is characterised by poorly interconnected gel pores filled with about 35 vol.% of water while less than 4 vol.% of water is trapped in remaining capillary pores. The 9:1 blend microstructure is characterised by a network of larger gel and capillary pores filled with about 21 and 22 vol.% of water respectively. Further hydration is ruled out for this blend.

  7. Method of operating a centrifugal plasma arc furnace

    DOEpatents

    Kujawa, Stephan T.; Battleson, Daniel M.; Rademacher, Jr., Edward L.; Cashell, Patrick V.; Filius, Krag D.; Flannery, Philip A.; Whitworth, Clarence G.

    1998-01-01

    A centrifugal plasma arc furnace is used to vitrify contaminated soils and other waste materials. An assessment of the characteristics of the waste is performed prior to introducing the waste into the furnace. Based on the assessment, a predetermined amount of iron is added to each batch of waste. The waste is melted in an oxidizing atmosphere into a slag. The added iron is oxidized into Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4. Time of exposure to oxygen is controlled so that the iron does not oxidize into Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3. Slag in the furnace remains relatively non-viscous and consequently it pours out of the furnace readily. Cooled and solidified slag produced by the furnace is very resistant to groundwater leaching. The slag can be safely buried in the earth without fear of contaminating groundwater.

  8. Method of operating a centrifugal plasma arc furnace

    DOEpatents

    Kujawa, S.T.; Battleson, D.M.; Rademacher, E.L. Jr.; Cashell, P.V.; Filius, K.D.; Flannery, P.A.; Whitworth, C.G.

    1998-03-24

    A centrifugal plasma arc furnace is used to vitrify contaminated soils and other waste materials. An assessment of the characteristics of the waste is performed prior to introducing the waste into the furnace. Based on the assessment, a predetermined amount of iron is added to each batch of waste. The waste is melted in an oxidizing atmosphere into a slag. The added iron is oxidized into Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Time of exposure to oxygen is controlled so that the iron does not oxidize into Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Slag in the furnace remains relatively non-viscous and consequently it pours out of the furnace readily. Cooled and solidified slag produced by the furnace is very resistant to groundwater leaching. The slag can be safely buried in the earth without fear of contaminating groundwater. 3 figs.

  9. COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

    2003-10-01

    carbon as well as slagging. A second phase of the project involved advanced analysis of the baseline coal along with an Australian coal fired at the plant. These analysis results were used in equilibrium thermodynamic modeling along with a coal quality model developed by the EERC to assess slagging, fouling, and opacity for the coals. Bench-scale carbon conversion testing was performed in a drop-tube furnace to assess the reactivity of the coals. The Australian coal had a higher mineral content with significantly more clay minerals present than the baseline coal. The presence of these clay minerals, which tend to melt at relatively low temperatures, indicated a higher potential for problematic slagging than the baseline coal. However, the pyritic minerals, comprising over 25% of the baseline mineral content, may form sticky iron sulfides, leading to severe slagging in the burner region if local areas with reducing conditions exist. Modeling results indicated that neither would present significant fouling problems. The Australian coal was expected to show slagging behavior much more severe than the baseline coal except at very high furnace temperatures. However, the baseline coal was predicted to exhibit opacity problems, as well as have a higher potential for problematic calcium sulfate-based low-temperature fouling. The baseline coal had a somewhat higher reactivity than the Australian coal, which was consistent with both the lower average activation energy for the baseline coal and the greater carbon conversion at a given temperature and residence time. The activation energy of the baseline coal showed some effect of oxygen on the activation energy, with E{sub a} increasing at the lower oxygen concentration, but may be due to the scatter in the baseline coal kinetic values at the higher oxygen level tested.

  10. Understanding Slag Freeze Linings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2014-09-01

    Slag freeze linings, the formation of protective deposit layers on the inner walls of furnaces and reactors, are increasingly used in industrial pyrometallurgical processes to ensure that furnace integrity is maintained in these aggressive, high-temperature environments. Most previous studies of freeze-linings have analyzed the formation of slag deposits based solely on heat transfer considerations. These thermal models have assumed that the interface between the stationary frozen layer and the agitated molten bath at steady-state deposit thickness consists of the primary phase, which stays in contact with the bulk liquid at the liquidus temperature. Recent experimental studies, however, have clearly demonstrated that the temperature of the deposit/liquid bath interface can be lower than the liquidus temperature of the bulk liquid. A conceptual framework has been proposed to explain the observations and the factors influencing the microstructure and the temperature of the interface at steady-state conditions. The observations are consistent with a dynamic steady state that is a balance between (I) the rate of nucleation and growth of solids on detached crystals in a subliquidus layer as this fluid material moves toward the stagnant deposit interface and (II) the dissolution of these detached crystals as they are transported away from the interface by turbulent eddies. It is argued that the assumption that the interface temperature is the liquidus of the bulk material represents only a limiting condition, and that the interface temperature can be between T liquidus and T solidus depending on the process conditions and bath chemistry. These findings have implications for the modeling approach and boundary conditions required to accurately describe these systems. They also indicate the opportunity to integrate considerations of heat and mass flows with the selection of melt chemistries in the design of future high temperature industrial reactors.

  11. MgO Solubility in Steelmaking Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayeb, Mohammed A.; Assis, Andre N.; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Fruehan, Richard J.

    2015-04-01

    A predominantly liquid and MgO-saturated slag is preferred in EAF and BOF steelmaking. Fully liquid slag provides a better environment for faster mass transfer due to lower bulk viscosities and larger liquid slag volume and these help dephosphorization and desulfurization. Also, an MgO-saturated slag would be preferable in order to increase the lifetime of furnace refractory lining by reducing the extent of dissolution. This article will demonstrate the factors that would influence MgO saturation, which includes FeO, CaO, P2O5, and Al2O3 contents and temperature. In addition, this paper comments on the applicability and accuracy of FactSage prediction, which are compared to laboratory experiments. The results indicate that FactSage may underestimate MgO solubility by up to 2.5 wt pct at higher basicities while there is reasonable agreement with current measurements at lower basicities.

  12. Energy effective approach for activation of metallurgical slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazov, I. N.; Khaydarov, B. B.; Mamulat, S. L.; Suvorov, D. S.; Saltikova, Y. S.; Yudin, A. G.; Kuznetsov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents results of investigation of the process of mechanical activation of metallurgical slag using different approaches - ball milling and electromagnetic vortex apparatus. Particle size distribution and structure of mechanically activated slag samples were investigated, as well as energetic parameters of the activation process. It was shown that electromagnetic vortex activation is more energy effective and allows to produce microscale milled slag-based concrete using very short treatment time. Activated slag materials can be used as clinker-free cement in civilian and road construction, providing ecology-friendly technology and recycling of high-tonnage industrial waste.

  13. Semi lightweight concretes produced by volcanic slags

    SciTech Connect

    Topcu, I.B.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the semi-lightweight concretes produced by using volcanic slags as coarse aggregate were investigated. The volcanic slags were brought from the quarry crushed and then classified according to their aggregate sizes of 0--8, 0--16, 0--31.5, 4--8, and 8--16 mm. The concrete series of five different volcanic slag sizes were produced by addition of a specific cement paste in volume fractions of 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 and 0.60. The cubic, cylindrical and prismatic specimens were made from each of the concrete series. The physical and mechanical properties of the concrete series were determined by conducting unit weight, slump, ultrasound velocity, Schmidt hardness, cylindrical and cubic compressive, bending and splitting tensile strength tests. The results indicated that the volcanic slags can be safely used in the production of semi lightweight concrete.

  14. Initial stages of coal slag interaction with high chromia sesquioxide refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, James C.; Iverson, Larissa; Collins, Wesley K.

    2002-02-01

    Slagging coal gasifiers operate at temperatures as high as 1650◦C in a reducing environment, requiring combustion chambers to be lined with refractories. The liner materials of choice are semi-porous high chromia refractories. Recently, a new series of high-chromia aluminia sesquioxide refractories have been developed. Both long term and short term tests are being conducted to evaluate the performance of these materials. In this study, the initial stage of slag-refractory interactions was analyzed. Samples of gasifier slag were compacted and placed upon the surface of these new chromia refractories and the temperature was raised consistent with start-up operating conditions of commercial gasifiers. The slag was completely molten by the time the furnace achieved a temperature consistent with gasifier operation conditions: 1350◦C. Measurement of the slag contact angle, slag spread along the slag-refractory interface, and the loss of slag due to slag infusion into the refractory were monitored by camera. Analysis suggests a single phenomenon with an activation energy of approximately 54 kcal may be the controlling factor. Cross-section analysis of the sample and analysis of slag chemistry indicate that slag infusion preceded the slag-refractory interface front movement and that the iron component of the slag was becoming concentrated at the slag-refractory interface leading to the formation of a chromium-iron spinel phase. Results of these short term tests are critical in characterizing and understanding the results long term slag-refractory interactions.

  15. Initial stages of coal slag interaction with high chromia sesquioxide refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Iverson, L.; Collins, W.K.

    2002-02-01

    Slagging coal gasifiers operate at temperatures as high as 1650°C in a reducing environment, requiring combustion chambers to be lined with refractories. The liner materials of choice are semi-porous high chromia refractories. Recently, a new series of high-chromia aluminia sesquioxide refractories have been developed. Both long term and short term tests are being conducted to evaluate the performance of these materials. In this study, the initial stage of slag-refractory interactions was analyzed. Samples of gasifier slag were compacted and placed upon the surface of these new chromia refractories and the temperature was raised consistent with start-up operating conditions of commercial gasifiers. The slag was completely molten by the time the furnace achieved a temperature consistent with gasifier operation conditions: 1350°C. Measurement of the slag contact angle, slag spread along the slag-refractory interface, and the loss of slag due to slag infusion into the refractory were monitored by camera. Analysis suggests a single phenomenon with an activation energy of approximately 54 kcal may be the controlling factor. Cross-section analysis of the sample and analysis of slag chemistry indicate that slag infusion preceded the slag-refractory interface front movement and that the iron component of the slag was becoming concentrated at the slag-refractory interface leading to the formation of a chromium-iron spinel phase. Results of these short term tests are critical in characterizing and understanding the results long term slag-refractory interactions.

  16. Get smart about removing slag

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, K.

    2005-10-01

    More often than not, sootblowing is literally a shot in the dark. Clyde Bergemann's solution to this problem: control sootblowing operations intelligently, based on the outputs of real-time weight and heat-flux sensors and the calculations of a computer model. The company's intelligent sootblowing system contains many pieces - SmartCannons to clean the furnace by water jets; SmartSensors to detect heat flux, SmartGuages to detect slag buildup, SmartLances aimed at the superheater and reheater, SmartModel to determine when and where cleaning is needed, and SmartControls to direct operations. 3 figs.

  17. Optimization of hydraulic cement admixture waste forms for sodium-bearing, high aluminum, and high zirconium wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.

    1997-08-01

    A three-way blend of portland cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash was successfully tested on simulated acidic high sodium, aluminum, and zirconium low-level wastes (LLW). Grout cubes were prepared at various waste loadings to maximize loading while meeting compressive strength and leach resistance requirements. For sodium LLW, a 21% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 3.3 and a compressive strength of 2750 pounds per square inch while meeting leach, mix, and flow requirements. It was found that the sulfur in the slag reduces the chromium leach rate below regulatory limits. For aluminum LLW, a 10% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.5 and a compressive strength of 4.50 pounds per square inch while meeting leach requirements. Likewise for zirconium LLW, a 21% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.3 and a compressive strength of 3570 pounds per square inch.

  18. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in blended cement Part 2. Mechanical strength of mortars and environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Aubert, J E; Husson, B; Sarramone, N

    2007-07-19

    This second of two articles dealing with the utilization of MSWI fly ash in blended cement studies the effects of two variants of the stabilization process on the behavior of the treated fly ash (TFA) introduced into cement-based mortars. From a technological point of view, the modifications of the process are very efficient and eliminate the swelling produced by the introduction of MSWI fly ash in cement-based mortars. TFA has a significant activity in cement-based mortars and can also advantageously replace a part of the cement in cement-based material. From an environmental point of view, the results of traditional leaching tests on monolithic and crushed mortars highlight a poor stabilization of some harmful elements such as antimony and chromium. The use of a cement rich in ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) with a view to stabilizing the chromium is not efficient. Since neither adequate tests nor quality criteria exist to evaluate the pollutant potential of a waste with a view to reusing it, it is difficult to conclude on the environmental soundness of such a practice. Further experiments are necessary to investigate the environmental impact of TFA introduced in cement-based mortars depending on the reuse scenario. PMID:17182180

  19. Comparing the Environmental Impacts of Alkali Activated Mortar and Traditional Portland Cement Mortar using Life Cycle Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheu, P. S.; Ellis, K.; Varela, B.

    2015-11-01

    Since the year 1908 there has been research into the use alkali activated materials (AAM) in order to develop cementitious materials with similar properties to Ordinary Portland Cement. AAMs are considered green materials since their production and synthesis is not energy intensive. Even though AAMs have a high compressive strength, the average cost of production among other issues limits its feasibility. Previous research by the authors yielded a low cost AAM that uses mine tailings, wollastonite and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). This mortar has an average compressive strength of 50MPa after 28 days of curing. In this paper the software SimaPro was used to create a product base cradle to gate Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). This compared the environmental impact of the AAM mortar to an Ordinary Portland Cement mortar (PCHM) with similar compressive strength. The main motivation for this research is the environmental impact of producing Ordinary Portland Cement as compared to alkali activated slag materials. The results of this LCA show that the Alkali Activated Material has a lower environmental impact than traditional Portland cement hydraulic mortar, in 10 out of 12 categories including Global Warming Potential, Ecotoxicity, and Smog. Areas of improvement and possible future work were also discovered with this analysis.

  20. Controlling the Furnace Process in Coal-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatil', A. A.; Klepikov, N. S.; Smyshlyaev, A. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    We give an outline of methods using which the furnace process in coal-fired boilers can be controlled to expand the range of loads, reduce the extent to which the furnace is contaminated with slag and the amount of harmful substances is emitted, and when a change is made to another kind of fuel.

  1. Blast furnace repairs, relines and modernizations

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.A.; Swanson, D.E; Chango, R.F. . Burns Harbor Div.)

    1994-09-01

    Bethlehem Steel's Burns Harbor Div. operates two 89,000-cu ft blast furnaces, D and C, built in 1969 and 1972. These furnaces have been in the forefront of blast furnace performance since they were blown-in. To maintain a credible operation throughout the past 25 years their performance has been improved continuously. Production was increased approximately 3%/year while fuel rate decreased 1%/year. This presentation summarizes the early repairs, relines and improvements that have sustained and enhanced the furnace's performance. The fourth reline of both furnaces will be discussed in detail. As part of the 1991 reline of D furnace its lines were improved and modern penstocks installed. The bosh, tuyere jacket, hearth jacket and both cast floors were replaced. The furnace now has a larger hearth making it easier to control and, liquid level is no longer a problem when pulling the wind to shut down. The new cast floor with its increased trough length has much improved separation of slag from iron and lowered refractory consumption. Since the cast floors on D furnace were changed, there has been a reduction in accidents and absenteeism. This may be related to the change in work practices on the new cast floors. The 1994 reline of C furnace incorporates those improvements made on D furnace in 1991. In addition, C furnace will have high-density cooling which is expected to double its campaign from 6 to 12 years, without interim repairs.

  2. Uses found for gasification slag

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    A study carried out for the Electric Power Research Institute by Praxis Engineers, Inc. has examined possible uses for the gasifier slag produced during coal gasification. After describing some of the problems foreseen to market development, seven categories of uses are listed and briefly discussed. The possible uses for slag identified are: (1) Agriculture (soil conditioner, lime substitute, low analysis fertilizer, carrier for insecticides); (2) Industrial material (abrasive grit, catalyst and adsorbent, roofing granules, industrial filler, mineral wool production, filter media); (3) Cement and Concrete (concrete aggregate, mortar/grouting material, pozzolanic admixture, raw materials for Portland cement production, masonary unit production); (4) Road Construction and Maintenance (de-icing grit, fine aggregate for bituminous pavement, base aggregate, sub-base aggregate, seal-cost aggregate); (5) Synthetic Aggregate (lightweight construction aggregate, landscaping material, sand substitute); (6) Land Fill and Soil Stabilization (soil conditioner for improving stability, structural fill, embankment material); (7) Resource Recovery (source of carbon, magnetite, iron, aluminium, and other metals). 2 tables.

  3. Assessment of strength properties of cemented paste backfill by ultrasonic pulse velocity test.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Tekin; Ercikdi, Bayram; Karaman, Kadir; Külekçi, Gökhan

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) test is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques used in the assessment of the mechanical properties of concrete or rock materials. In this study, the effects of binder type/dosage, water to cement ratio (w/c) and fines content (<20 μm) of the tailings on ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of cemented paste backfill (CPB) samples were investigated and correlated with the corresponding unconfined compressive strength (UCS) data. A total of 96 CPB samples prepared at different mixture properties were subjected to the UPV and UCS tests at 7, 14, 28 and 56-days of curing periods. UPV and UCS of CPB samples of ordinary Portland cement (CEM I 42.5 R) and sulphate resistant cement (SRC 32.5) initially increased rapidly, but, slowed down after 14 days. However, UPV and UCS of CPB samples of the blast furnace slag cement (CEM III/A 42.5 N) steadily increased between 7 and 56 days. Increasing binder dosage or reducing w/c ratio and fines content (<20 μm) increased the UCS and UPV of CPB samples. UPV was found to be particularly sensitive to fines content. UCS data were correlated with the corresponding UPV data. A linear relation appeared to exist between the UCS and UPV of CPB samples. These findings have demonstrated that the UPV test can be reliably used for the estimation of the strength of CPB samples. PMID:24602334

  4. Solidification of stainless steel slag by accelerated carbonation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D C; MacLeod, C L; Carey, P J; Hills, C D

    2003-06-01

    On exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) at a pressure of 3 bars, compacts formed from pressed ground slag, and 12.5 weight percent water, were found to react with approximately 18% of their own weight of CO2. The reaction product formed was calcium carbonate causing the slag to self-cement. Unconfined compressive strengths of 9MPa were recorded in carbonated compacts whereas strengths of < 1 MPa were recorded in non-carbonated slag compacts. As molten stainless steel slag containing dicalcium silicate (C2S) cools it can undergo several phase transitions. The final transformation from the beta-polymorph to gamma-C2S is accompanied by a volume change that causes the slag to self-pulverise or 'dust'. As a consequence of this the fine grained portion of the slag contains more of this phase whilst the coarser particles of the slag contain more of the calcium magnesium silicates that contribute the bulk of the waste. The fine fraction (< 125 microm) of the slag when ground is found to react to the same extent as the ground bulk slag and produces compacts with equivalent strength. A coarser fraction (4-8 mm) when ground to a similar grading does not react as extensively and produces a weaker product. Additions of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) at 5 and 10 percent by weight did not alter the degree of reaction during carbonation of the bulk slag or ground fine fraction, however the strength of the 4-8 mm fraction was increased by this change. PMID:12868521

  5. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, Miroslav M; Baščarević, Zvezdana; Marjanović, Nataša; Nikolić, Violeta

    2012-09-30

    This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6M NH(4)NO(3) solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si ~0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification. PMID:22818592

  6. Modeling of Manganese Ferroalloy Slag Properties and Flow During Tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Jacques; Zietsman, Johannes Hendrik; Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan

    2015-12-01

    Stable operation of submerged-arc furnaces producing high-carbon ferromanganese (HCFeMn) and silicomanganese (SiMn) requires tapping of consistent amounts of liquid slag and metal. Minimal effort to initiate and sustain tapping at reasonable rates is desired, accommodating fluctuations in especially slag chemical composition and temperature. An analytical model is presented that estimates the tapping rate of the liquid slag-metal mixture as a function of taphole dimensions, coke bed particulate properties, and slag and metal physicochemical properties with dependencies on chemical composition and temperature. This model may be used to evaluate the sensitivity to fluctuations in these parameters, and to determine the influence of converting between HCFeMn and SiMn production. The model was applied to typical HCFeMn and SiMn process conditions, using modeled slag viscosities and densities. Tapping flow rates estimated were comparable to operational data and found to be dependent mostly on slag viscosity. Slag viscosities were generally lower for typical SiMn slags due to the higher temperature used for calculating viscosity. It was predicted that flow through the taphole would mostly develop into laminar flow, with the pressure drop predominantly over the coke bed. Flow rates were found to be more dependent on the taphole diameter than on the taphole length.

  7. Early age strength enhancement of blended cement systems by CaCl{sub 2} and diethanol-isopropanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Riding, Kyle; Silva, Denise A.; Scrivener, Karen

    2010-06-15

    The enhancement of the 1 day strength of cementitious systems by a combination of calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) and diethanol-isopropanolamine (DEIPA) was studied, particularly in blended cement systems. A combination of quantitative X-ray diffraction with Rietveld refinement (QXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/backscattered electron image analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and isothermal calorimetry were used to investigate the mechanism of strength enhancement by the additives. The additives were found to increase the early age mortar strength by enhancing the cement hydration, with the DEIPA enhancing primarily the aluminate hydration. DEIPA also affected the morphology of portlandite which was formed as thin plates. In parallel, the calcium-to-silica ratio of the C-S-H was found to increase with the use of DEIPA, possibly because of the inclusion of microcrystalline portlandite. After 48 h DEIPA was found to directly enhance the rate of reaction of granulated blast-furnace slag and fly ash.

  8. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30

    The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5

  9. Slag remelt purification of irradiated vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, W.J.; Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Gorman, P.K.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes theoretical and scoping experimental efforts to investigate the decontamination potential of a slag remelting process for decontaminating irradiated vanadium alloys. Theoretical calculations, using a commercial thermochemical computer code HSC Chemistry, determined the potential slag compositions and slag-vanadium alloy ratios. The experiment determined the removal characteristics of four surrogate transmutation isotopes (Ca, Y - to simulate Sc, Mn, and Ar) from a V-5Ti-5Cr alloy with calcium fluoride slag. An electroslag remelt furnace was used in the experiment to melt and react the constituents. The process achieved about a 90 percent removal of calcium and over 99 percent removal of yttrium. Analyses indicate that about 40 percent of the manganese may have been removed. Argon analyses indicates that 99.3% of the argon was released from the vanadium alloy in the first melt increasing to 99.7% during the second melt. Powder metallurgy techniques were used to incorporate surrogate transmutation products in the vanadium. A powder mixture was prepared with the following composition: 90 wt % vanadium, 4.7 wt % titanium, 4.7 wt % chromium, 0.35 wt % manganese, 0.35 wt % CaO, and 0.35 wt % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This mixture was packed into 2.54 cm diameter stainless steel tubes. Argon was introduced into the powder mixture by evacuating and backfilling the stainless steel containers to a pressure of 20 kPa (0.2 atm). The tubes were hot isostatically pressed at 207 MPa (2000 atm) and 1473 K to consolidate the metal. An electroslag remelt furnace (crucible dimensions: 5.1 cm diameter by 15.2 cm length) was used to process the vanadium electrodes. Chemical analyses were performed on samples extracted from the slags and ingots. Ingot analyses results are shown below. Values are shown in percent removal of the four targeted elements of the initial compositions.

  10. Morphological Characterization Of Titania Slag Obtained From Red Sediment Placer Ilmenite Using Microwave Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikant, S. S.; Mukherjee, P. S.; Bhima Rao, R.

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the main objective to observe the effect of microwave heat treatment for the production of Titania rich slag and pig iron from placer ilmenite. The experiments carried out in the present investigation on the oxidized ilmenite sample for microwave heat treatment in microwave sintering furnace reveals that a product can be obtained containing Titania rich slag and metalized iron. The in-depth characterisation of these products using SEM-EDAX shows that around 75-85 % of titanium dioxide is formed in terms of titania rich slag by using microwave sintering furnace after reduction of oxidized ilmenite with proper stoichiometric graphitic carbon and silicon carbide (SiC) susceptor. The titania rich slag is considered to be better input material for production of pigment grade titanium dioxide. On the other hand, the pig iron obtained as by product from titania rich slag is also important for automobile and steel industries application.

  11. Crystallization control for remediation of an FetO-rich CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO EAF waste slag.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Suk; Sohn, Il

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the crystallization behavior of synthesized FetO-rich electric arc furnace (EAF) waste slags with a basicity range of 0.7 to 1.08 was investigated. Crystal growth in the melts was observed in situ using a confocal laser scanning microscope, and a delayed crystallization for higher-basicity samples was observed in the continuous cooling transformation and time temperature transformation diagrams. This result is likely due to the polymerization of the melt structure as a result of the increased number of network-forming FeO4 and AlO4 units, as suggested by Raman analysis. The complex incorporation of Al and Fe ions in the form of AlO4 and FeO4 tetrahedral units dominant in the melt structure at a higher basicity constrained the precipitation of a magnetic, nonstoichiometric, and Fe-rich MgAlFeO4 primary phase. The growth of this spinel phase caused a clear compositional separation from amorphous phase during isothermal cooling at 1473 K leading to a clear separation between the primary and amorphous phases, allowing an efficient magnetic separation of Fe compounds from the slag for effective remediation and recycling of synthesized EAF waste slags for use in higher value-added ordinary Portland cement. PMID:24410350

  12. Foamability of stainless steelmaking slags in an EAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, James John

    Foaming in electric furnace steelmaking is desirable to allow for a longer arc and subsequently higher power operation in order to reduce the tap to tap time and consequently increase productivity. Stainless steelmaking slags do not foam as well as carbon steelmaking slags. To produce foam, the foamability or foam index of a slag and the gas generation rate must be adequate. The possible causes for the poor foamability of stainless steelmaking slags were examined in this research. Specifically the foam index of a simulated stainless steelmaking slag containing chrome oxide was measured and the rate at which carbon reacts with Cr2O3, CrO, and FeO was also measured. The experimental results show that the foam index of stainless steelmaking slags is comparable to carbon steelmaking slags provided that the amount of solid chrome oxide particles or complexes is not excessive. This indicates the low foamability is not due to a poor foam index. Gas is normally generated by cycling carbon into the slag, which produces CO by reducing oxides in the slag. The experimental results demonstrate that the reaction rate of carbon with CrO dissolved in the slag and hence the generation of CO is significantly slower than for the reaction rate of carbon with FeO dissolved in slags. Therefore, the lack of FeO or other reducible oxides in stainless steelmaking slags is a primary reason for the poor foamability. Experimental results indicate that limestone, nickel oxide, calcium nitrate, and waste oxide briquettes generate gas at sufficient rates to induce foaming when added to the stainless steelmaking slag. Heat transfer most likely controls the rate of CO2 generated by limestone and NiO reduction is controlled by mass transfer of NiO to the carbon in the slag. WOBs generate gas very rapidly due to intimate mixing of the carbon and iron oxides at unit activity. Calcium nitrate generates gas by dissociation and heat transfer likely controls the dissociation rate. Simple models are

  13. Geological Sequestration of CO2 by Hydrous Carbonate Formation with Reclaimed Slag

    SciTech Connect

    Von L. Richards; Kent Peaslee; Jeffrey Smith

    2008-02-06

    The concept of this project is to develop a process that improves the kinetics of the hydrous carbonate formation reaction enabling steelmakers to directly remove CO2 from their furnace exhaust gas. It is proposed to bring the furnace exhaust stream containing CO2 in contact with reclaimed steelmaking slag in a reactor that has an environment near the unit activity of water resulting in the production of carbonates. The CO2 emissions from the plant would be reduced by the amount sequestered in the formation of carbonates. The main raw materials for the process are furnace exhaust gases and specially prepared slag.

  14. Secondary superheater slagging reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Larose, J.A. ); Benson, R.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Utility boilers can be modified to reduce excessive slagging on the secondary superheater lower leading edges. Reduction of the high slagging accumulation rates will increase the pendant heat absorption and reduce the required superheater cleaning and slag removal. The cause of te slagging and appropriate boiler modifications are determined with numerical modeling. Results from two utility boiler analyses showed that regions of high gas and particle temperatures and flow rates exist near the superheater lower surfaces and are the probable cause of the rapid slagging. Design modifications which redistribute the flow and reduce the temperature entering the superheater reduce the impaction of molten ash on the pendant surface; this lowers the slag accumulation rate which allows the boiler to operate longer without cleaning and at a higher capacity. This paper shows the potential improvements in the secondary superheater inlet conditions by modifying the boiler.

  15. Use of granular slag columns for lead removal.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, S V

    2002-09-01

    The use of granular blast furnace slag (GBFS)-packed columns to treat lead-containing solutions has been investigated. The results obtained indicated that the slag usage rate decreased with increasing flow velocity, particle size, initial lead concentration and decreasing with bed height. Lead removed selectively in the presence of other heavy metal ions. High concentrations of sodium and especially calcium in the solutions impeded the uptake of lead. For 20 mg l(-1) lead concentration an empty bed contact time greater of 4 min provided to efficient use of the slag bed. Column pH was an important parameter to lead removal under dynamic conditions and reflected the influence of the investigated factors. During all runs lead breakthrough coincided with an abrupt drop in effluent pH. The apparent mechanisms of lead removal in GBFS column are sorption (ion exchange and adsorption) on the slag surface and precipitation. PMID:12405409

  16. Determination of slagging behavior of various coal ash samples by using DTF

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.T.; Choi, B.C.; Park, S.W.

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate slagging behavior of various ash samples with the conjunction to the properties of ashes and original coal such as concentration of each ash components, ash slagging temperature and slag viscosity. To simulate actual ash melting condition in coal combustion as well as gasification, DTF (drop tube furnace) is utilized for the acquisition of slag sample with different reaction condition. The sampled slag is photographed for the visual inspection and the shape of the slag is evaluated with ash properties. The sampled ash slag is also analyzed with XRD for the determination of phase transition during the ash melting. Furthermore, coal ashes are processed with Ash Fusion Determinator for the fusion temperature and High-Temperature Viscometer for the slag viscosity. Such ash-related properties are also determined by empirical formulation for the refinement of the result. So far, three different coal samples, Alaska, Datong, Cyprus are investigated. For the 3 ash samples, slag formation shows similar shape in combustion as well as gasification condition and completely different shape with different coal types. Alaska slag, which represents higher fluidity, is penetrated into alumina disk so that small half-cone shape of slag is produced. However, Cyprus slag is formed with more circular shape of sphere and Datong slag represents an in-between shape. More coal samples will be studied for the determination of slag behavior. The shape data will be analyzed with ash composition, fluidity behavior and ash fusion determination of original coal. Such relationship will be the baseline to determine the operation parameter of slag removal in the 3 ton/day coal gasifier located in the Ajou University, Suwon, Korea.

  17. Leaching modelling of slurry-phase carbonated steel slag.

    PubMed

    Costa, G; Polettini, A; Pomi, R; Stramazzo, A

    2016-01-25

    In the present work the influence of accelerated mineral carbonation on the leaching behaviour of basic oxygen furnace steel slag was investigated. The environmental behaviour of the material as evaluated through the release of major elements and toxic metals under varying pH conditions was the main focus of the study. Geochemical modelling of the eluates was used to derive a theoretical description of the underlying leaching phenomena for the carbonated material as compared to the original slag. Among the investigated elements, Ca and Si were most appreciably affected by carbonation. A very clear effect of carbonation on leaching was observed for silicate phases, and lower-Ca/Si-ratio minerals were found to control leaching in carbonated slag eluates as compared to the corresponding untreated slag sample as a result of Ca depletion from the residual slag particles. Clear evidence was also gained of solubility control for Ca, Mg and Mn by a number of carbonate minerals, indicating a significant involvement of the original slag constituents in the carbonation process. The release of toxic metals (Zn, V, Cr, Mo) was found to be variously affected by carbonation, owing to different mechanisms including pH changes, dissolution/precipitation of carbonates as well as sorption onto reactive mineral surfaces. The leaching test results were used to derive further considerations on the expected metal release levels on the basis of specific assumptions on the relevant pH domains for the untreated and carbonated slag. PMID:26489916

  18. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.I.; Mishulovich, A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. Currently only about 30% of the 5 million tons of these coal combustion residues generated in Illinois each year are utilized, mainly as aggregate. These residues are composed largely Of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. The process being developed in this program will use the residues directly in the manufacture of cement products. Therefore, a much larger amount of residues can be utilized. To achieve the above objective, in the first phase (current year) samples of coal combustion residues will be blended and mixed, as needed, with a lime or cement kiln dust (CKD) to adjust the CaO composition. Six mixtures will be melted in a laboratory-scale furnace at CTL. The resulting products will then be tested for cementitious properties. Two preliminary blends have been tested. One blend used fly ash with limestone, while the other used fly ash with CKD. Each blend was melted and then quenched, and the resulting product samples were ground to a specific surface area similar to portland cement. Cementitious properties of these product samples were evaluated by compression testing of 1-inch cube specimens. The specimens were formed out of cement paste where a certain percentage of the cement paste is displaced by one of the sample products. The specimens were cured for 24 hours at 55{degrees}C and 100% relative humidity. The specimens made with the product samples obtained 84 and 89% of the strength of a pure portland cement control cube. For comparison, similar (pozzolanic) materials in standard concrete practice are required to have a compressive strength of at least 75% of that of the control.

  19. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING QBOP FURNACE IN BLOW. OXYGEN AND NATURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING Q-BOP FURNACE IN BLOW. OXYGEN AND NATURAL GAS ARE BLOWN INTO THE FURNACE THROUGH THE TUYERES TO CHARGE 460,000 LBS. OF HOT METAL, 100,000 LBS. OF SCRAP WITH 30,000 LBS. OF LIME. BLOW TIME IS 16 MINUTES. THE TIME TO BLOW AND TAP THE FURNACES OF THE RESULTING 205,000 TONS OF STEEL AND SLAG IS 35 MINUTES. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Q-Bop Furnace, North of Valley Road & West of Ensley, Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  20. UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-04-24

    The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of ''as-generated'' slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for ''as-generated'' slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for, various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases Phase I, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and

  1. UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-29

    The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of ''as-generated'' slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for ''as-generated'' slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase I, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and

  2. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-30

    The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of as-generated slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, the authors found that it would be extremely difficult for as-generated slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1,400 and 1,700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale

  3. Effect of Slag on Inclusions During Electroslag Remelting Process of Die Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yan-Wu; Jiang, Zhou-Hua; Cao, Yu-Long; Yu, Ang; Hou, Dong

    2014-08-01

    Many factors influence the non-metallic inclusions in electroslag steel including furnace atmosphere and inclusions' content in the consumable electrode, slag amount and its composition, power input, melting rate, filling ratio, and so on. Fluoride containing slag, which influences the non-metallic inclusions to a great extent, has been widely used for the electroslag remelting process. The current paper focuses on the effect of fluoride containing slag on the inclusions in electroslag ingots based on the interaction of the slag-metal interface and electroslag remelting process. In this work, die steel of CR-5A and several slags have been employed for investigating the effect of slag on inclusions in an electrical resistance furnace under argon atmosphere in order to eliminate the effect of ambient oxygen. Specimens were taken at different times for analyzing the content, dimensions, and type of non-metallic inclusions. Results of quantitative metallographic analysis indicate that a multi-component slag has better capacity for controlling the amount of inclusions; especially protective gas atmosphere has also been adopted. The findings of inclusions in electroslag steel by SEM-EDS analysis reveal that most non-metallic inclusions in electroslag steel are MgO-Al2O3 inclusions for multi-component slags, but it is Al2O3 inclusions when remelting using conventional 70 wt pct CaF2-30 wt pct Al2O3 slag. The maximal inclusions' size using multi-component slags is less than that using conventional binary slag. Small filling ratio as well as protective gas atmosphere is favorable for controlling the non-metallic inclusions in electroslag steel. All the results obtained will be compared to the original state inclusions in steel, which contribute to choice of slag for electroslag remelting.

  4. Progress in Slag Foaming in Metallurgical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tai Xi; Coley, K. S.; Irons, G. A.

    2012-08-01

    Professor Fruehan has been a pioneer in the fundamental understanding of slag foaming in ironmaking and steelmaking processes. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the phenomena, there are still unanswered questions regarding the mechanisms in industrial processes and how to control them. At McMaster University, we have been working on conditions that are relevant to foaming in electric arc furnaces (EAFs) where these phenomena are central to modern EAF practices. This work will be reviewed and put in the context of what is known from a fundamental standpoint.

  5. Foaming and the Rate of the Carbon-Iron Oxide Reaction in Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbari, Rodrigo; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Halder, Sabuj; Walker, Matthew; Fruehan, Richard J.

    2009-12-01

    Foaming in the electric arc furnace is achieved by injecting carbon into slag, where the resulting reaction of the carbon with FeO dissolved in the slag generates gas (CO) that causes the slag to foam. In this research, the rate of the reaction of FeO in slag with carbon and the resulting foam height were measured. In these experiments, the FeO content of the slag ranged from 15 to 45 mass pct, and several different types of carbon were used including graphite, coals, and chars. The rate of the slag-carbon reaction and the consequent CO generation increased with FeO content of the slag from 15 to 45 mass pct. However, the slag foam height reached a maximum at about 25 mass pct FeO and decreased at higher FeO contents. The decrease in foaming is apparently due to a decrease in the foam index or foamability caused by a decrease in viscosity and an increase in density of the slag with FeO content. The results of this work indicate that the foam height is influenced more significantly by the decrease in the foam index compared to the increase in the CO gas generation rate at higher FeO contents. The decrease in the foam index with FeO agrees with that predicted from the slag properties.

  6. Plasma furnace treatment of metallurgical by-product streams

    SciTech Connect

    Whellock, J.G.; Heanley, C.P.; Chapman, C.S.

    1997-12-31

    It is a common misconception that plasma furnace technology only has application for exotic and very high temperature processes. With the increasing importance placed on waste minimization and the environmental constraints imposed on heavy metals present in byproducts from mainstream operations, plasma technology is finding widespread application. Tetronics is a premier supplier of plasma tundish heating systems for the steel industry. More recently the company has found growing interest in electric arc furnace dust treatment, lead blast furnace slag treatment and metal recovery, copper, nickel and cobalt scavenging from primary smelter slags, dross treatment, platinum group metals (PGM) recovery from catalysts and vitrification and detoxification of heavy metal contaminated waste byproducts. The principal advantages of the plasma arc technology are the close metallurgical control of the furnace environment, minimal off-gas handling requirements and overall high energy efficiency of the processes. A number of applications in the ferrous and non-ferrous metals industry are described.

  7. Prompt gamma ray evaluation for chlorine analysis in blended cement concrete.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; Kalakada, Zameer; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2014-12-01

    Single prompt gamma ray energy has been evaluated to measure chlorine concentration in fly ash (FA), Super-Pozz (SPZ) and blast furnace slag (BFS) cement concrete specimens using a portable neutron generator-based Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNAA) setup. The gamma ray yield data from chloride concentration measurement in FA, SPZ and BFS cement concretes for 2.86-3.10, 5.72 and 6.11MeV chlorine gamma rays were analyzed to identify a gamma ray with common slope (gamma ray yield/Cl conc. wt%) for the FA, BFS and SPZ cement concretes. The gamma ray yield data for FA and SPZ cement concretes with varying chloride concentration were measured previously using a portable neutron generator-based PGNAA setup. In the current study, new data have been measured for chlorine detection in the BFS cement concrete using a portable neutron generator-based PGNAA setup for 2.86-3.10, 5.72, and 6.11MeV chlorine gamma rays. The minimum detection limit of chlorine in BFS cement concrete (MDC) was found to be 0.034±0.010, 0.032±0.010, 0.033±0.010 for 2.86-3.10, 5.72 and 6.11MeV gamma ray, respectively. The new BFS cement concrete data, along with the previous measurements for FA and SPZ cement concretes, have been utilized to identify a gamma ray with a common slope to analyze the Cl concentration in all of these blended cement concretes. It has been observed that the 6.11MeV chlorine gamma ray has a common slope of 5295±265 gamma rays/wt % Cl concentration for the portable neutron generator-based PGNAA setup. The minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of chlorine in blended cement concrete was measured to be 0.033±0.010wt % for the portable neutron generator-based PGNAA. Thus, the 6.11MeV chlorine gamma ray can be used for chlorine analysis of blended cement concretes. PMID:25063940

  8. Glassification of electric arc furnace dust

    SciTech Connect

    Ek, R.B. ); Schlobohm, J.E. )

    1993-04-01

    The Glassification process is a unique system that treats hazardous materials such as electric arc furnace dust, slag, spent refractories, etc, and produces an inert, nontoxic marketable commodity. A wide variety of end products include: colored glasses; glass-ceramics that resemble natural rocks used for architectural purposes and decorative articles; roofing granules; abrasive grit; brick and tile colorants; and fillers. This paper describes the process.

  9. Crystallization phenomena in slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrling, Carl Folke

    2000-09-01

    The crystallization of the mold slag affects both the heat transfer and the lubrication between the mold and the strand in continuous casting of steel. In order for mold slag design to become an engineering science rather than an empirical exercise, a fundamental understanding of the melting and solidification behavior of a slag must be developed. Thus it is necessary to be able to quantify the phenomena that occur under the thermal conditions that are found in the mold of a continuous caster. The double hot thermocouple technique (DHTT) and the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope used in this study are two novel techniques for investigating melting and solidification phenomena of transparent slags. Results from these techniques are useful in defining the phenomena that occur when the slag film infiltrates between the mold and the shell of the casting. TTT diagrams were obtained for various slags and indicated that the onset of crystallization is a function of cooling rate and slag chemistry. Crystal morphology was found to be dependent upon the experimental temperature and four different morphologies were classified based upon the degree of melt undercooling. Continuous cooling experiments were carried out to develop CCT diagrams and it was found that the amount and appearance of the crystalline fraction greatly depends on the cooling conditions. The DHTT can also be used to mimic the cooling profile encountered by the slag in the mold of a continuous caster. In this differential cooling mode (DCT), it was found that the details of the cooling rate determine the actual response of the slag to a thermal gradient and small changes can lead to significantly different results. Crystal growth rates were measured and found to be in the range between 0.11 mum/s to 11.73 mum/s depending on temperature and slag chemistry. Alumina particles were found to be effective innoculants in oxide melts reducing the incubation time for the onset of crystallization and also extending

  10. Tube furnace

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Kenneth G.; Frohwein, Eugene J.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bowen, David W.

    1991-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  11. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-12-31

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  12. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  13. Apparatus having inductively coupled coaxial coils for measuring buildup of slay or ash in a furnace

    DOEpatents

    Mathur, Mahendra P.; Ekmann, James M.

    1989-01-01

    The buildup of slag or ash on the interior surface of a furnace wall is monitored by disposing two coils to form a transformer which is secured adjacent to the inside surface of the furnace wall. The inductive coupling between the two coils of the transformer is affected by the presence of oxides of iron in the slag or ash which is adjacent to the transformer, and the application of a voltage to one winding produces a voltage at the other winding that is related to the thickness of the slag or ash buildup on the inside surface of the furnace wall. The output of the other winding is an electrical signal which can be used to control an alarm or the like or provide an indication of the thickness of the slag or ash buildup at a remote location.

  14. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, Nicholas F.; Green, Donald R.; Price, Larry S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  15. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, N.F.; Green, D.R.; Price, L.S.

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  16. Molten welding slag enthalpies

    SciTech Connect

    Stukalo, V.A.; Neshchimenko, N.Ya.; Batalin, G.I.; Patselii, N.V.; Galinich, V.I.

    1988-05-01

    We measured enthalpies at 1740-19970 K for four multicomponent oxide liquids. The initial materials were special-purity metal oxides, chemically pure manganese oxalate, and calcium fluoride. High-temperature calorimetry has been applied to the enthalpies of slags used in automatic constructional-steel welding. The mean specific heats have been calculated from the temperature dependence of the enthalpies. The enthalpies increase with the basicity in these slags.

  17. Making IGCC slag valuable

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, K.

    2005-12-01

    All indications are that integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology will play a major role in tomorrow's generation industry. But before it does, some by-products of the process must be dealt with, for example unburned carbon that can make IGCC slag worthless. Charah Inc.'s processing system, used at Tampa Electric's Polk Station for years, segregates the slag's constituents by size, producing fuel and building materials. 3 figs.

  18. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BABCOCK AND WILCOX CYCLONE FURNACE VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology is a treatment process for contaminated soils. he process was evaluated to determine its ability to destroy semivolatile organics and to isolate metals and simulated radionuclides into a non-leachable slag materi...

  19. Microscopic Study of Carbon Surfaces Interacting with High Carbon Ferromanganese Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Kolbeinsen, Leiv

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of carbon materials with molten slags occurs in many pyro-metallurgical processes. In the production of high carbon ferromanganese in submerged arc furnace, the carbothermic reduction of MnO-containing silicate slags yields the metal product. In order to study the interaction of carbon with MnO-containing slags, sessile drop wettability technique is employed in this study to reduce MnO from a molten slag drop by carbon substrates. The interfacial area on the carbon substrate before and after reaction with slag is studied by scanning electron microscope. It is indicated that no Mn metal particles are found at the interface through the reduction of the MnO slag. Moreover, the reduction of MnO occurs through the contribution of Boudouard reaction and it causes carbon consumption in particular active sites at the interface, which generate carbon degradation and open pore growth at the interface. It is shown that the slag is fragmented to many micro-droplets at the reaction interface, potentially due to the effect on the interfacial energies of a provisional liquid Mn thin film. The rapid reduction of these slag micro-droplets affects the carbon surface with making deep micro-pores. A mechanism for the formation of slag micro-droplets is proposed, which is based on the formation of provisional micro thin films of liquid Mn at the interface.

  20. Microscopic Study of Carbon Surfaces Interacting with High Carbon Ferromanganese Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Kolbeinsen, Leiv

    2014-09-01

    The interaction of carbon materials with molten slags occurs in many pyro-metallurgical processes. In the production of high carbon ferromanganese in submerged arc furnace, the carbothermic reduction of MnO-containing silicate slags yields the metal product. In order to study the interaction of carbon with MnO-containing slags, sessile drop wettability technique is employed in this study to reduce MnO from a molten slag drop by carbon substrates. The interfacial area on the carbon substrate before and after reaction with slag is studied by scanning electron microscope. It is indicated that no Mn metal particles are found at the interface through the reduction of the MnO slag. Moreover, the reduction of MnO occurs through the contribution of Boudouard reaction and it causes carbon consumption in particular active sites at the interface, which generate carbon degradation and open pore growth at the interface. It is shown that the slag is fragmented to many micro-droplets at the reaction interface, potentially due to the effect on the interfacial energies of a provisional liquid Mn thin film. The rapid reduction of these slag micro-droplets affects the carbon surface with making deep micro-pores. A mechanism for the formation of slag micro-droplets is proposed, which is based on the formation of provisional micro thin films of liquid Mn at the interface.

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring of cement-based structures immobilising radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Spasova, L.M.; Ojovan, M.I.; Hayes, M.; Godfrey, H.

    2007-07-01

    The long term performance of cementitious structures immobilising radioactive waste can be affected by physical and chemical processes within the encapsulating materials such as formation of new phases (e.g., vaterite, brucite), degradation of cement phases (e.g., CSH gel, portlandite), degradation of some waste components (e.g., organics), corrosion of metallic constituents (aluminium, magnesium), gas emission, further hydration etc. The corrosion of metals in the high pH cementitious environment is of especial concern as it can potentially cause wasteform cracking. One of the perspective non-destructive methods used to monitor and assess the mechanical properties of materials and structures is based on an acoustic emission (AE) technique. In this study an AE non-destructive technique was used to evaluate the mechanical performance of cementitious structures with encapsulated metallic waste such as aluminium. AE signals generated as a result of aluminium corrosion in a small-size blast furnace slag (BFS)/ordinary Portland cement (OPC) sample were detected, recorded and analysed. A procedure for AE data analysis including conventional parameter-based AE approach and signal-based analysis was applied and demonstrated to provide information on the aluminium corrosion process and its impact on the mechanical performance of the encapsulating cement matrix. (authors)

  2. Computer modeling brings slag control into the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Smyrniotis, C.

    2005-10-01

    Many power plants have switched from bituminous coals to Powder River Basin coals to comply with lower SOx emissions limits. Although this has been a successful strategy, increased slagging has led many plants to seek coals with lower sodium content. But the increased demand for these coals has raised their prices. Can anything else be done to simultaneously widen fuel options, control costs, and keep the slag devil at bay? Targeted In-Furnace Injection (TIFI), which uses CFD modeling and virtual reality visualization techniques can address all three issues. The modelling program targets areas of the radiant and convection sections of a boiler with chemicals to reduce or eliminate slagging and fouling. The article describes the two different forms of CFD modelling and the virtual reality engine used in TIFI technology. The technology has been successfully used with the same chemical attitude for three years at Hugo Station in Fort Towson, OK. 3 figs.

  3. Criteria determining the selection of slags for the melt decontamination of radioactively contaminated stainless steel by electroslag remelting

    SciTech Connect

    Buckentin, J.M.R.; Damkroger, B.K.; Shelmidine, G.J.; Atteridge, D.G.

    1997-03-01

    Electroslag remelting is an excellent process choice for the melt decontamination of radioactively contaminated metals. ESR furnaces are easily enclosed and do not make use of refractories which could complicate thermochemical interactions between molten metal and slag. A variety of cleaning mechanisms are active during melting; radionuclides may be partitioned to the slag by means of thermochemical reaction, electrochemical reaction, or mechanical entrapment. At the completion of melting, the slag is removed from the furnace in solid form. The electroslag process as a whole is greatly affected by the chemical and physical properties of the slag used. When used as a melt decontamination scheme, the ESR process may be optimized by selection of the slag. In this research, stainless steel bars were coated with non-radioactive surrogate elements in order to simulate surface contamination. These bars were electroslag remelted using slags of various chemistries. The slags investigated were ternary mixtures of calcium fluoride, calcium oxide, and alumina. The final chemistries of the stainless steel ingots were compared with those predicted by the use of a Free Energy Minimization Modeling technique. Modeling also provided insight into the chemical mechanisms by which certain elements are captured by a slag. Slag selection was also shown to have an impact on the electrical efficiency of the process as well as the surface quality of the ingots produced.

  4. Distinctive microstructural features of aged sodium silicate-activated slag concretes

    SciTech Connect

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Bernal, Susan A.; Mejía de Gutiérrez, Ruby; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van; Provis, John L.

    2014-11-15

    Electron microscopic characterisation of 7-year old alkali-activated blast-furnace slag concretes enabled the identification of distinct microstructural features, providing insight into the mechanisms by which these materials evolve over time. Backscattered electron images show the formation of Liesegang-type ring formations, suggesting that the reaction at advanced age is likely to follow an Oswald supersaturation–nucleation–depletion cycle. Segregation of Ca-rich veins, related to the formation of Ca(OH){sub 2}, is observed in microcracked regions due to the ongoing reaction between the pore solution and available calcium from remnant slag grains. A highly dense and uniform interfacial transition zone is identified between siliceous aggregate particles and the alkali activated slag binders, across the concretes assessed. Alkali-activated slag concretes retain a highly dense and stable microstructure at advanced ages, where any microcracks induced at early ages seem to be partially closing, and the remnant slag grains continue reacting.

  5. Process to eliminate hazardous components from the electric arc furnace flue dust and recovering of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lazcano-Navarro, A.

    1988-08-09

    This patent describes a method to recover metals from flue dust generated in an electric arc furnace, the method comprising: charging pelletized or powder flue dust into an electric induction furnace between induction susceptors; sealing of the furnace top to prevent entry of air; injecting natural gas through the bottom of the electric induction furnace as a solitary reducing agent; heating the charge by electromagnetic induction of the susceptors to provide reduction energy; recovering of heavy metals as a zinclead-cadmium alloy in a condenser at the top of the furnace; burning and scrubbing exiting gases in the condenser; and melting the remaining iron to produce steel and slag.

  6. Effects of Some Additives on Copper Losses to Matte Smelting Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusen, Aydin; Geveci, Ahmet; Topkaya, Yavuz Ali; Derin, Bora

    2016-02-01

    Copper is lost to slag between 0.7 and 2.3 wt.% during the industrial copper matte smelting stage. In the present study, the aim was to minimize these losses in the slag phase by adding some fluxing agents like CaO, B2O3 and calcium borate (namely colemanite—2CaO·3B2O3·5H2O). Eti Copper Inc. (EBI) flash furnace smelter slag containing 0.88 wt.%Cu and matte with the addition each of CaO, B2O3 and colemanite up to 10 wt.% of the total charge were melted in a silica crucible placed in a vertical tube furnace at 1250°C under nitrogen atmosphere for 2 h. The experimental results of matte-slag-flux mixtures showed that the addition of all additives up to 4 wt.% led to a gradual decrease of the copper content in the final slags. Beyond this value, the copper losses to slag increased markedly with the increasing CaO and B2O3 additions. On the other hand, the colemanite addition of more than 4 wt.% did not substantially affect the copper losses to slag.

  7. Horizontal tapping furnace and method of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wunsche, E.R.

    1987-07-14

    A metallurgical furnace is described including: a furnace floor and a furnace wall means extending generally upwardly about the floor, the furnace having a vertical axis and a horizontal axis, means mounting the furnace for pivotal tilting movement about the horizontal axis between a non-tilted, normal upright position, and a tilted discharge position with the furnace tilted less than 15/sup 0/ to the vertical axis; a hearth zone defined between the floor and wall means adapted to house a bath of liquid metal of predetermined volume, the hearth zone having an upper end defining a predetermined upper level for the bath and for a layer of liquid slag floating on the upper level, when the furnace is in a non-tilted, normal upright position; the hearth zone having a lower end adjacent the floor, a tapping passage extending through the wall means from a liquid metal discharge outlet at an outer end into the lower end of the hearth zone, at an inner end, the discharge outlet being defined by an outwardly facing passage wall and the passage at the outer end; the tapping passage disposed generally parallel to the horizontal axis and vertically below the predetermined upper level, when the furnace is in the non-tilted, normal, upright position; a discharge outlet closure having a closure surface and pivotally mounted externally of the passage for pivotal to and for movement towards and away from the furnace wall means between a first position. The closure surface engages the passage wall at the outer end to fully close the discharge outlet, and a second position spaced apart from the passage wall.

  8. Crystallization Behavior of Copper Smelter Slag During Molten Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yong; Shibata, Etsuro; Iizuka, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Copper slag is composed of iron silicate obtained by smelting copper concentrate and silica flux. One of the most important criteria for the utilization of this secondary resource is the recovery of iron from the slag matrix to decrease the volume of dumped slag. The molten oxidation process with crushing magnetic separation appears to be a more sustainable approach and is based on directly blowing oxidizing gas onto molten slag after the copper smelting process. In the current study, using an infrared furnace, the crystallization behavior of the slag during molten oxidation was studied to better understand the trade-off between magnetite and hematite precipitations, as assessed by X-ray diffraction (using an internal standard). Furthermore, the crystal morphology was examined using a laser microscope and Raman imaging system to understand the iron oxide transformation, and the distribution of impurities such as Cu, Zn, As, Cr, and Pb were complemented with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. In addition, the reaction mechanism was investigated with a focus on the oxidation processes.

  9. Workability and mechanical properties of alkali activated slag concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, F.G.; Sanjayan, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation on concrete containing alkali activated slag (AAS) as the binder, with emphasis on achievement of reasonable workability and equivalent one-day strength to portland cement concrete at normal curing temperatures. Two types of activators were used: sodium hydroxide in combination with sodium carbonate and sodium silicate in combination with hydrated lime. The fresh concrete properties reported include slump and slump loss, air content, and bleed. Mechanical properties of AAS concrete, including compressive strength, elastic modulus, flexural strength, drying shrinkage, and creep are contrasted with those of portland cement concrete.

  10. Enhancing performance and durability of slag made from incinerator bottom ash and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Ing-Jia; Wang, Kuen-Sheng; Tsai, Chen-Chiu

    2009-02-01

    This work presents a method capable of melting the incinerator bottom ash and fly ash in a plasma furnace. The performance of slag and the strategies for recycling of bottom ash and fly ash are improved by adjusting chemical components of bottom ash and fly ash. Ashes are separated by a magnetic process to improve the performance of slag. Analytical results indicate that the air-cooled slag (ACS) and magnetic-separated slag (MSS) have hardness levels below 590 MPa, indicating fragility. Additionally, the hardness of crystallized slag (RTS) is between 655 and 686 MPa, indicating toughness. The leached concentrations of heavy metals for these three slags are all below the regulatory limits. ACS appears to have better chemical stability than MSS, and is not significantly different from RTS. In the potential alkali-silica reactivity of slag, MSS falls on the border between the harmless zone and the potentially harmful zone. ACS and RTS fall in the harmless zone. Hence, the magnetic separation procedure of ashes does not significantly improve the quality of slag. However, RTS appears to improve its quality. PMID:18544471

  11. Molybdate adsorption from steel slag eluates by subsoils.

    PubMed

    Matern, K; Rennert, T; Mansfeldt, T

    2013-11-01

    Steel slags are industrial by-products which are generated in large amounts worldwide, e.g. 150-230×10(6) Mg in 2012, and which are partly used for construction. Molybdenum (Mo) can be added during steel processing in order to harden the steel. The objective of this study was to evaluate the adsorption behaviour of molybdate (MoO4(2-)) from slag eluates in subsoils. Molybdate batch adsorption experiments were carried out with eluates obtained from two different kinds of steel slags (i) LD slag (Linz-Donawitz operation, LDS) and (ii) electric arc furnace slag (EAF) to assess the risk that may arise from the contamination of groundwater by the leaching of molybdate. Six different subsoils were chosen in order to provide a wide range of chemical properties (pH 4.0-7.6; dithionite-extractable Fe 0.73-14.7 g kg(-1)). Molybdate adsorption experiments were carried out at the pH of the steel slag eluates (pH 11-12) as well as at pH values adjusted to the soil pH. The data were evaluated with the Freundlich equation. Molybdate adsorption exhibited a maximum near pH 4 for steel slag eluates adjusted to the soil pH, and decreased rapidly with increasing pH until adsorption was virtually zero at pH>11. Adsorption was greater for soils with high amounts of dithionite-extractable Fe oxides. The extent and behaviour of molybdate adsorption from both eluates was similar. After a reaction time of 24h, the pH of the EAF slag eluate was lower than that of the LD steel slag eluate, which was caused by different acid buffer capacities. Some soils were able to decrease the pH of the EAF slag eluates by about 4 pH units, enhancing the adsorption of molybdate. Transport simulations indicated that molybdate discharge is low in acidic soils. PMID:23973286

  12. New evidence for rejuvenation of phosphorus retention capacity in EAF steel slag.

    PubMed

    Drizo, Aleksandra; Cummings, John; Weber, David; Twohig, Eamon; Druschel, Greg; Bourke, Bill

    2008-08-15

    The purpose of this research was to investigate phosphorus (P) retention capacity and rejuvenation potential of electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag from Quebec and New Zealand (NZ) iron melter slag (IMS). Columns filled with slag materials were fed with dairy effluent and subjected to two feeding and one resting cycle(s). P retention capacities and rejuvenation potentials were determined after each feeding cycle. Elemental composition and mineralogical analysis were performed on IMS samples. Finally, chemical fractionation analysis was conducted on both NZ IMS and Quebec EAF steel slags. The results revealed that initiating a resting period in EAF steel slag filters prior to reaching their P saturation point increased the overall filter P retention capacity by 49.5 and 42.4% compared to 28% in a filter which had its resting period initiated after reaching P saturation. The rejuvenation property could play a significant role in full-scale applications by prolonging life expectancy and increasing cost efficiency. P retention and rejuvenation by NZ slag materials was negligible relative to EAF steel slag material from Quebec. Chemical fractionation analysis revealed differences between materials, indicating that the highest quantities of P were bound to Ca and Fe in EAF steel slag and to Ca and Al fractions in iron melter slag. This study also demonstrates that slag's performance is dependent on the source of the material and the steel making practices. Therefore, testing of the P adsorptive capability and, if relevant, the rejuvenation potential of individual steel mill slags, should be a prerequisite prior to their use in field applications. PMID:18767686

  13. Investigation of stabilization/solidification for treatment of electric arc furnace dust: Dynamic leaching of monolithic specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Laforest, Guylaine Duchesne, Josee

    2007-12-15

    Diffusion-controlled leaching of heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn) from electric arc furnace dust treated with ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) and with ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was evaluated. Monolithic specimens were evaluated under dynamic leaching conditions for 84 days with periodic leachant renewal. The influence of leaching time, nature of the leachant, binder type and the water/solid ratio of the monoliths were investigated. Results obtained showed both binders can immobilize heavy metals in the monoliths under dynamic leaching conditions, with cumulative quantity of leached metal under 0.138 mg (Cr). Alkaline leachant increased metal release from specimens and reducing the water/solid ratio of the monolith allowed for a decrease in the cumulative mass of metals leached. Chemical and mineralogical characterizations indicated that the metals were evenly distributed throughout the specimens for both binders. Decalcification was observed on the OPC monolith border following leaching. This decrease in Ca corresponded to an altered zone (20 {mu}m), identified by scanning electron microscopy. The GGBFS sample did not show an altered zone.

  14. Slag Penetration into Refractory Lining of Slagging Coal Gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Sundaram, S. K.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Edmondson, Autumn B.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.

    2008-10-25

    The impurities in coal are converted into molten slag typically containing SiO2, FeO, CaO, and Al2O3 when coal feedstock is burned in slagging gasifiers. The slag flows down the gasifier sidewalls, dissolves, and penetrates and reacts with the refractory lining that protects the stainless steel shell of the gasifier from elevated temperatures (1300–1600°C). Refractories composed primarily of Cr2O3 have been found most resistant to slag corrosion, but they continue to fail performance requirements because of low resistance to spalling. Post-mortem analysis of high-chromia refractory bricks collected from commercial gasifiers suggests that the spalling is affected by the depth of slag penetration that is in turn affected by the wettability and interconnected porosity of the refractory as well as the slag viscosity. Laboratory tests were conducted to measure the viscosity of slags (Wyoming Powder River Basin [PRB], Pocahontas #3, and Pittsburgh #8), their contact angle on refractories (chromia-alumina [Aurex 75SR] and high-chromia [Serv 95 and Aurex 95P]), and the apparent porosity of selected refractories. In addition, the depth of slag penetration as a function of time and temperature was determined for various refractory-slag combinations. The results of laboratory tests were used to develop a refractory material that has high resistance to penetration by molten slag and thus has a potential to have a substantially longer service life than the materials currently being used.

  15. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of ''as-generated'' slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for ''as-generated'' slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase I, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and

  16. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-30

    The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of as-generated slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, the authors found that it would be extremely difficult for as-generated slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1,400 and 1,700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale

  17. UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-24

    The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of ''as-generated'' slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for ''as-generated'' slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase I, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and

  18. Lance for fuel and oxygen injection into smelting or refining furnace

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    A furnace 10 for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron 20 is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance 40, through which a center stream of particulate coal 53 is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer 30. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon 51 enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen 52 is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream 51. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus 84 to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer 30, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace.

  19. Lance for fuel and oxygen injection into smelting or refining furnace

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, M.R.

    1994-12-20

    A furnace for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance, through which a center stream of particulate coal is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace. 7 figures.

  20. Steel slag affects pH and Si content of container substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A substrate representing a typical greenhouse potting mix was prepared using 85% sphagnum peat and 15% perlite. The substrate was filled into 10 cm wide containers. A pulverized steel slag (SS) from a basic oxygen furnace, and dolomitic limestone (DL) were amended to the base substrate at a rate o...

  1. Furnace afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Angelo, J.F. II

    1987-01-13

    An afterburner is described for the exhaust effluvia of a furnace, which exhaust contains combustible material, the afterburner comprising: a. an elongated, generally cylindrical combustion chamber having an inlet for the exhaust at or adjacent one end thereof, and an outlet at or adjacent its other end, b. means operable to induce a draft through the combustion chamber from its inlet to its outlet, c. a series of air nozzles disposed to direct jets of air into the interior of the combustion chamber. Certain nozzles are arranged to direct air jets into the combustion chamber substantially tangentially thereto in a clockwise direction, and the remainder of the nozzles and arranged to direct air jets into the chamber substantially tangentially thereto in a counter-clockwise direction, whereby to induce turbulence within the chamber to intermix the air and the exhaust thoroughly, and d. means operable to deliver air to the air nozzles.

  2. Use of cemented paste backfill in arsenic-rich tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamberg, Roger; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Gold is extracted by cyanide leaching from inclusions in arsenopyrite from a mine in the north of Sweden. The major ore mineral assemblage consists of pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite-loellingite. Effluents from the gold extraction were treated with Fe2(SO4)3, with the aim to form stable As-bearing Fe-precipitates (FEP). The use of the method called cemented paste backfill (CPB) is sometimes suggested for the management of tailings. In CPB, tailings are commonly mixed with low proportions (3 - 7 %) of cement and backfilled into underground excavated area. To reduce costs, amendments such as granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), biofuel fly ash (BFA) and cement kiln dust (CKD) are used for partial replacement of cement in CPB due to their pozzolanic and alkaline properties. The objective for this study was to evaluate the leaching behaviour of As in CPB-mixtures with low proportions (1 - 3 %) of BFA and ordinary cement and unmodified tailings. The selection of CPB-recipies was made based on technical and economical criterias to adress the demands deriving from the mining operations. Speciation of the As in ore and tailings samples revealed that mining processes have dissolved the majority of the arsenopyrite in the ore, causing secondary As phases to co-precipitate with newly formed FEP:s. Tank leaching tests (TLT) and weathering cells (WCT) were used to compare leaching behaviour in a monolithic mass contra a crushed material. Quantification of the presumed benefit of CPB was made by calculation of the cumulative leaching of As. Results from the leaching tests (TLT and WCT) showed that the inclusion of As-rich tailings into a cementitious matrix increased leaching of As. This behaviour could partially be explained by an increase of pH. The addition of alkaline binder materials to tailings increased As leaching due to the relocation of desorbed As from FEPs into less acid-tolerant species such as Ca-arsenates and cementitious As-phases. Unmodified tailings generated an

  3. Recycling of red muds with the extraction of metals and special additions to cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoveev, D. V.; Diubanov, V. G.; Shutova, A. V.; Ziniaeva, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    The liquid-phase reduction of iron oxides from red mud is experimentally studied. It is shown that, in addition to a metal, a slag suitable for utilization in the construction industry can be produced as a result of pyrometallurgical processing of red mud. Portland cement is shown to be produced from this slag with mineral additions and a high-aluminate expansion addition to cement.

  4. Vitrification of fly ash by swirling-flow furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tadashi

    1996-12-31

    According to the amendment of the Waste Disposal and Public Cleansing Law of 1992, fly ash is regulated as Specially controlled waste and wide attention is now being paid to the melting and vitrification treatment of fly ash, which can reduce overall volume, detoxify and recover sources. Kobe Steel has demonstrated its operation using a swirling-flow furnace and has perfected a vitrification technique. The demonstration test has confirmed stable melting, high decomposition ratio of dioxins and the soundness of the slag. Kobe Steel has successfully developed a new technique for heightening the quality of slag and a new process for the heavy metals recovery from collected dust.

  5. Induction slag reduction process for purifying metals

    DOEpatents

    Traut, Davis E.; Fisher, II, George T.; Hansen, Dennis A.

    1991-01-01

    A continuous method is provided for purifying and recovering transition metals such as neodymium and zirconium that become reactive at temperatures above about 500.degree. C. that comprises the steps of contacting the metal ore with an appropriate fluorinating agent such as an alkaline earth metal fluosilicate to form a fluometallic compound, and reducing the fluometallic compound with a suitable alkaline earth or alkali metal compound under molten conditions, such as provided in an induction slag metal furnace. The method of the invention is advantageous in that it is simpler and less expensive than methods used previously to recover pure metals, and it may be employed with a wide range of transition metals that were reactive with enclosures used in the prior art methods and were hard to obtain in uncontaminated form.

  6. Phosphorus removal from slow-cooled steelmaking slags: Grain size determination and liberation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fregeau-Wu, E.; Iwasaki, I.

    1995-07-01

    The major obstacle in recycling steelmaking slags to the blast furnace is their phosphorus content. Removal of the phosphorus, which is primarily associated with the silicate and phosphate phases, would allow for greater recycle of these slags for their iron, manganese, and lime contents. Calculations show that separation of the silicates from the oxide phases would remove nearly 90% of the phosphorus from the slag. The variable grain size of the as-received slag made liberation by fine grinding difficult. Therefore, slow-cooling experiments were undertaken to improve the grain size distribution. The grain size distributions were determined using in-situ image analysis. The samples were ground to their apparent liberation size and high gradient magnetic separation was used to separate the magnetic oxides from the nonmagnetic silicates and phosphates. Liberation analysis and modeling was performed on selected separation products for discussion of benefication characteristics.

  7. Simulation of past exposure in slag wool production.

    PubMed

    Fallentin, B; Kamstrup, O

    1993-08-01

    A survey of the working conditions at a Danish slag wool production factory during the early technological phase in the 1940s is presented. No exposure data, however, are available for that period. So, a full-scale simulation of the past production of slag wool has been performed. Air monitoring was carried out in the working area around the cupola furnace. The aim was to measure exposure to air pollutants other than fibres. Such exposure might have confounded a possible association between lung cancer and exposure to fibres, in the early technological phase of slag wool production. The simulation experiment demonstrated exposure to PAH, a known lung carcinogen. The effect of other concurrent exposures is difficult to assess. Time-weighted average concentrations of particulate material ranged between 12.9 and 49.1 mg m-3 at the upper decks around the cupola. Corresponding concentrations of the dominant metals zinc and lead were 4.4-22.7 mg Zn m-3 and 0.9-4.7 mg Pb m-3. Significant concentrations of PAH up to 269 micrograms PAH m-3 (4 micrograms BaP m-3) occurred during ignition of the cupola furnace. The carbon monoxide level reached 270 ppm also during ignition. PMID:8379619

  8. A novel waste form for disposal of spent-nuclear-fuel reprocessing waste: A vitrifiable cement

    SciTech Connect

    Gougar, M.L.D.; Scheetz, B.E.; Siemer, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    A cement capable of being hot isostatically pressed into a glass ceramic has been proposed as the waste form for spent-nuclear-fuel reprocessing wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This intermediate cement, with a composition based on that of common glasses, has been designed and tested. The cement formulations included mixed INEEL wastes, blast furnace slag, reactive silica, and INEEL soil or vermiculite, which were activated with potassium or sodium hydroxide. Following autoclave processing, the cements were characterized. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed three notable crystalline phases: quartz, calcite, and fluorite. Results of compressive strength testing ranged from 1452 and 4163 psi, exceeding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-suggested standard of >500 psi. From American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society 16.1-1986 leach testing, effective diffusivities for Cs were determined to be on the order of 10{sup {minus}11} to 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2}/s and for Sr were 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/s, which are four orders of magnitude less than diffusivities in some other radwaste materials. Average leach indices (LI) were 9.6 and 11.9 for Cs and Sr, respectively, meeting the NRC Standard of LI > 6. The 28-day Materials Characterization Center-1 leach testing resulted in normalized elemental mass losses between 0.63 and 28 g/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}day) for Cs and between 0.34 and 0.70 g/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}day) industry-accepted standard while Cs losses indicate a process sensitive parameter.

  9. Slag recycling of irradiated vanadium

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, P.K.

    1995-04-05

    An experimental inductoslag apparatus to recycle irradiated vanadium was fabricated and tested. An experimental electroslag apparatus was also used to test possible slags. The testing was carried out with slag materials that were fabricated along with impurity bearing vanadium samples. Results obtained include computer simulated thermochemical calculations and experimentally determined removal efficiencies of the transmutation impurities. Analyses of the samples before and after testing were carried out to determine if the slag did indeed remove the transmutation impurities from the irradiated vanadium.

  10. Visualisation and quantification of heavy metal accessibility in smelter slags: The influence of morphology on availability.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Anthony L; Swierczek, Zofia; Gulson, Brian L

    2016-03-01

    The Imperial Smelting Furnace (ISF) for producing lead and zinc simultaneously has operated on four continents and in eleven countries from the 1950's. One of the process changes that the ISF introduced was the production of a finely granulated slag waste. Although this slag contained significant amounts of residual lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn), because of its glassy nature it was considered environmentally benign. From the Cockle Creek smelter near Boolaroo at the northern end of Lake Macquarie, NSW, Australia, it is estimated that around 2.1 million tonnes of the fine slag was distributed into the community and most remains where it was originally utilised. Residual tonnages of slag of this magnitude are common worldwide wherever the ISF operated. Studies of base metal smelting slags have concluded that mineralogical and morphological characteristics of the slag play a critical role in moderating environmental release of toxic elements. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microanalysis of the ISF slags has shown that the Pb and associated elements are present as discrete nodules (∼6-22 μm) in the slag and that they are not associated with Zn which is contained in the glass slag phase. Using an automated SEM and analysis technique (QEMSCAN(®)) to "map" the mineralogical structure of the particles, it was possible to quantitatively determine the degree of access infiltrating fluids might have to the reaction surface of the Pb phases. The level of access decreases with increasing particle size, but in even the largest sized particles (-3350 + 2000 μm) nearly 80% of the Pb-containing phases were totally or partially accessible. These results provide evidence that the toxic elements in the slags are not contained by the glassy phase and will be vulnerable to leaching over time depending on their individual phase reactivity. PMID:26784748

  11. Modified Claus furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.L.

    1986-03-11

    A Claus thermal conversion furnace is described comprising a primary furnace chamber, a burner in the primary furnace chamber, an oxidant containing gas supply inlet connected to the burner, a hydrogen sulfide containing gas supply conduit connected to the burner, an outlet extending from the furnace, a secondary reaction chamber in heat but not gas exchange relationship with the primary furnace chamber, the secondary reaction chamber extending through the length of the primary furnace chamber to a point in the outlet extending from the furnace, a hydrogen sulfide decomposing catalyst in the secondary reaction chamber, a hydrogen sulfide containing gas supply conduit connected to the secondary reaction chamber.

  12. 40 CFR 270.22 - Specific part B information requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous waste. 270.22 Section 270.22 Protection of... requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous waste. When an owner or operator of a cement... production furnace becomes subject to RCRA permit requirements after October 12, 2005, or when an owner...

  13. 40 CFR 270.22 - Specific part B information requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous waste. 270.22 Section 270.22 Protection of... requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous waste. When an owner or operator of a cement... production furnace becomes subject to RCRA permit requirements after October 12, 2005, or when an owner...

  14. 40 CFR 270.22 - Specific part B information requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous waste. 270.22 Section 270.22 Protection of... requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous waste. When an owner or operator of a cement... production furnace becomes subject to RCRA permit requirements after October 12, 2005, or when an owner...

  15. 40 CFR 270.22 - Specific part B information requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous waste. 270.22 Section 270.22 Protection of... requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous waste. When an owner or operator of a cement... production furnace becomes subject to RCRA permit requirements after October 12, 2005, or when an owner...

  16. 40 CFR 270.22 - Specific part B information requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous waste. 270.22 Section 270.22 Protection of... requirements for boilers and industrial furnaces burning hazardous waste. When an owner or operator of a cement... production furnace becomes subject to RCRA permit requirements after October 12, 2005, or when an owner...

  17. Slag-Refractory Interaction in Slagging Coal Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Sundaram, S. K.; Hicks, Brent J.; Edmondson, Autumn B.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.

    2008-03-03

    The combustion chamber of slagging coal gasifiers is lined with refractories to protect the stainless steel shell of the gasifier from elevated temperatures and corrosive attack of the coal slag. Refractories composed primarily of Cr2O3 have been found most resistant to slag corrosion, but they continue to fail performance requirements. Post-mortem analysis of high-chromia refractory bricks collected from commercial gasifiers suggests that slag penetration and subsequent spalling of refractory are the cause of significantly shorter service life of gasifier refractories. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the penetration depth of three slags representative of a wide variety of coals in the United States into chromia-alumina and two high-chromia refractories. Variables tested were refractory-slag combinations and two partial pressures of O2. Slag penetration depths were measured from spliced images of each refractory. Samples heated to 1470°C for 2 hrs had maximum penetration depths ranging from 1.99±0.15 mm to at least 21.6 mm. Aurex 95P, a high-chromia refractory containing 3.3% phosphorous pentoxide (P2O5), showed the least slag penetration of all refractories tested. P2O5 likely reacts with the slags to increase their viscosity and restrict molten slag penetration. Experimental data on the slag-refractory interaction will be incorporated into mathematical model that will be used to 1) identify critical conditions at which refractory corrosion sharply increases, and 2) predict the service life of a gasifier refractory.

  18. Effects of slag composition and process variables on decontamination of metallic wastes by melt refining

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmatpour, B.; Copeland, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    Melt refining has been suggested as an alternative for decontamination and volume reduction of low-level-contaminated metallic wastes. Knowledge of metallurgical and thermochemical aspects of the process is essential for effective treatment of various metals. Variables such as slag type and composition, melting technique, and refractory materials need to be identified for each metal or alloy. Samples of contaminated metals were melted with fluxes by resistance furnace or induction heating. The resulting ingots as well as the slags were analyzed for their nuclide contents, and the corresponding partition ratios were calculated. Compatibility of slags and refractories was also investigated, and proper refractory materials were identified. Resistance furnace melting appeared to be a better melting technique for nonferrous scrap, while induction melting was more suitable for ferrous metals. In general uranium contents of the metals, except for aluminum, could be reduced to as low as 0.01 to 0.1 ppM by melt refining. Aluminum could be decontaminated to about 1 to 2 ppM U when certain fluoride slags were used. The extent of decontamination was not very sensitive to slag type and composition. However, borosilicate and basic oxidizing slags were more effective on ferrous metals and Cu; NaNO/sub 3/-NaCl-NaOH type fluxes were desirable for Zn, Pb, and Sn; and fluoride type slags were effective for decontamination of Al. Recrystallized alumina proved to be the most compatible refractory for melt refining both ferrous and nonferrous metals, while graphite was suitable for nonferrous metal processing. In conclusion, melt refining is an effective technique for volume reduction ad decontamination of contaminated metal scrap when proper slags, melting technique, and refractories are used.

  19. Effect of High Cooling Rates on the Mineralogy and Hydraulic Properties of Stainless Steel Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriskova, Lubica; Pontikes, Yiannis; Pandelaers, Lieven; Cizer, Özlem; Jones, Peter Tom; Van Balen, Koen; Blanpain, Bart

    2013-10-01

    This article investigates the effect of chemical composition and cooling rate during solidification on the mineralogy and hydraulic properties of synthetic stainless steel slags. Three synthetic slags, covering the range of typical chemical composition in industrial practice, were subjected to high cooling rates, by melt spinning granulation or quenching in water, and to low cooling rates, by cooling inside the furnace. Both methods of rapid cooling led to volumetrically stable slags unlike the slow cooling which resulted in a powder-like material. Stabilized slags consisted predominantly of lamellar β-dicalcium silicate ( β-C2S) and Mg, Ca-silicates (merwinite and bredigite); the latter form the matrix at low basicity and are segregated along the C2S grain boundaries at high basicities. Slowly cooled slags consist of the γ-C2S polymorph instead of the β-C2S and of less Mg, Ca-silicates. Isothermal conduction calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis indicate the occurrence of hydration reactions in the stabilized slags after mixing with water, while calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) of typical acicular morphology are identified by SEM. The present results demonstrate that the application of high cooling rates can result in a stable, environmental-friendly, hydraulic binder from stainless steel slags, rich in β-C2S, without the necessity of introducing any additions to arrest the β polymorph.

  20. Hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance of a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Zhao, Yazhao; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-04-01

    Calcium silicate slag is an alkali leaching waste generated during the process of extracting Al2O3 from high-alumina fly ash. In this research, a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was developed, and its mechanical and physical properties, hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance were investigated. The results show that an optimal design for the cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was determined by the specimen CFSC7 containing 30% calcium silicate slag, 5% high-alumina fly ash, 24% blast furnace slag, 35% clinker and 6% FGD gypsum. This blended system yields excellent physical and mechanical properties, confirming the usefulness of CFSC7. The hydration products of CFSC7 are mostly amorphous C-A-S-H gel, rod-like ettringite and hexagonal-sheet Ca(OH)2 with small amount of zeolite-like minerals such as CaAl2Si2O8·4H2O and Na2Al2Si2O8·H2O. As the predominant hydration products, rod-like ettringite and amorphous C-A-S-H gel play a positive role in promoting densification of the paste structure, resulting in strength development of CFSC7 in the early hydration process. The leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests results indicate that the developed cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag is environmentally acceptable. This study points out a promising direction for the proper utilization of calcium silicate slag in large quantities. PMID:26691955

  1. Kinetics of steel slag leaching: Batch tests and modeling.

    PubMed

    De Windt, Laurent; Chaurand, Perrine; Rose, Jerome

    2011-02-01

    Reusing steel slag as an aggregate for road construction requires to characterize the leaching kinetics and metal releases. In this study, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel slag were subjected to batch leaching tests at liquid to solid ratios (L/S) of 10 and 100 over 30 days; the leachate chemistry being regularly sampled in time. A geochemical model of the steel slag is developed and validated from experimental data, particularly the evolution with leaching of mineralogical composition of the slag and trace element speciation. Kinetics is necessary for modeling the primary phase leaching, whereas a simple thermodynamic equilibrium approach can be used for secondary phase precipitation. The proposed model simulates the kinetically-controlled dissolution (hydrolysis) of primary phases, the precipitation of secondary phases (C-S-H, hydroxide and spinel), the pH and redox conditions, and the progressive release of major elements as well as the metals Cr and V. Modeling indicates that the dilution effect of the L/S ratio is often coupled to solubility-controlled processes, which are sensitive to both the pH and the redox potential. A sensitivity analysis of kinetic uncertainties on the modeling of element releases is performed. PMID:20646922

  2. Effect of Slag on Titanium, Silicon, and Aluminum Contents in Superalloy During Electroslag Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhou-Hua; Hou, Dong; Dong, Yan-Wu; Cao, Yu-Long; Cao, Hai-Bo; Gong, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Many factors influence the chemical composition in electroslag remelting (ESR) steel, including atmosphere in crucible, melting rate, slag composition, deoxidation, and so on. Fluoride-based slag, which is exposed to liquid metal directly, influences the chemical composition of ESR ingots to a large extent. The present paper focuses on the effect of slag on the titanium, silicon, and aluminum contents in ingots based on the interaction of the slag and metal. In present work, superalloy of GH8825 and several slags containing different CaO contents have been employed for investigating the effect of slag on titanium, silicon, and aluminum contents in an electrical resistance furnace under argon atmosphere. Results indicate that the higher CaO content in slag has better capacity for avoiding loss of titanium caused by the reaction of titanium with silica in slag, especially in case of remelting superalloy with high titanium and low silicon content. The CaO has a great effect on the activities of TiO2, SiO2, and Al2O3. Thermodynamic analysis is applied to investigate the CaO behavior. Based on the ion and molecule coexistence theory of slag, activity model is established to calculate the activities of components containing titanium, silicon, and aluminum elements in a six-component slag consisting of CaO-CaF2-Al2O3-SiO2-TiO2-MgO. The components containing titanium, silicon, and aluminum in slag are mainly CaO·TiO2, 2CaO·SiO2, CaO·SiO2, CaO·Al2O3, and MgO·Al2O3. With the increase of CaO mass fraction in slag, the activity coefficient of SiO2 decreases significantly, whereas slightly change happens for Al2O3. As a result, the lg ({{γ_{{{{SiO}}2 }} } {/ {{{γ_{{{{SiO}}2 }} } {γ_{{{{TiO}}2 }} }}} {γ_{{{{TiO}}2 }} }}) decreases with increasing CaO content, which is better for preventing loss of titanium caused by the reaction of titanium with silica in slag. The slag with high CaO and appropriate TiO2 content is suitable for electroslag remelting of GH8825.

  3. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, June 1--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of ``as-generated`` slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for ``as-generated`` slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 17000F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot-scale, and Phase 2, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications. Accomplishments are described.

  4. A study on anticorrosion effect in high-performance concrete by the pozzolanic reaction of slag

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, W.-M.; Chang, P.-K.; Hwang, C.-L

    2004-04-01

    The study examines the pozzolanic reaction brought by the addition of slag to the cement paste using the synchrotron radiation accelerator (SRA), the mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), and scanning electron microstructural analysis. The anticorrosion effect in high-performance concrete with and without slag added is also assessed by its electrical resistivity and permeability. Results show that pozzolanic reaction due to the addition of slag can decrease the amount of calcium hydroxide, reduce the volume of capillary pores (Pc), and lower its permeability, thus making the concrete more compact and durable. As evidenced by the enhanced electrical resistivity and reduced permeability, the addition of slag to high-performance concrete can indeed strength the anticorrosion effect.

  5. Bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc. PMID:26403875

  6. Environmental impact and potential utilization of historical Cu-Fe-Co slags.

    PubMed

    Veselská, Veronika; Majzlan, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    Historical slags from the past Fe and Cu-Co production were investigated in order to evaluate either their potential for utilization or their long-term environmental risk for unsupervised old smelting areas. Here, we studied ferrous slags produced during the recovery of Fe from siderite-Cu ores in Slovakia and two different types of non-ferrous slags produced during the recovery of Cu and Co from Kupferschiefer ores in Germany. The glassy character, rare occurrence of primary silicate phases, and the lack of secondary phases in Cu slags indicate their stability for a prolonged period of time. Electron microprobe analytical work showed that the metals and metalloids (Cu, Co, Fe, Zn, Pb, As) are largely encased in droplets of matte and metal alloys and remain protected by the glassy matrix with its low weathering rate. Fe and Co slags are composed of high-temperature silicates such as wollastonite, cristobalite, as well as olivine, feldspar, quartz, leucite, pyroxene, and pyroxenoids. The presence of secondary phases attests to a certain degree metal release owing to weathering. Assuming minimal contents of metals in slags after a treatment with dilute H2SO4, slags could be used as pozzolanas for addition to cement. PMID:26681328

  7. Nondestructive Handheld Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Analysis of Spectroscopic Changes and Multivariate Modeling of Thermally Degraded Plain Portland Cement Concrete and its Slag and Fly Ash-Based Analogs.

    PubMed

    Leung Tang, Pik; Alqassim, Mohammad; Nic Daéid, Niamh; Berlouis, Leonard; Seelenbinder, John

    2016-05-01

    Concrete is by far the world's most common construction material. Modern concrete is a mixture of industrial pozzolanic cement formulations and aggregate fillers. The former acts as the glue or binder in the final inorganic composite; however, when exposed to a fire the degree of concrete damage is often difficult to evaluate nondestructively. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy through techniques such as transmission, attenuated total reflectance, and diffuse reflectance have been rarely used to evaluate thermally damaged concrete. In this paper, we report on a study assessing the thermal damage of concrete via the use of a nondestructive handheld FT-IR with a diffuse reflectance sample interface. In situ measurements can be made on actual damaged areas, without the need for sample preparation. Separate multivariate models were developed to determine the equivalent maximal temperature endured for three common industrial concrete formulations. The concrete mixtures were successfully modeled displaying high predictive power as well as good specificity. This has potential uses in forensic investigation and remediation services particularly for fires in buildings. PMID:27059444

  8. Investigation of pyrite as a contributor to slagging in Eastern bituminous coals. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    Slagging by bituminous eastern US coals in industrial furnaces results primarily from pyritic iron in the coal ash. Since it has been learned that coals of similar pyritic levels fired in furnaces of similar design do not always produce the same slagging conditions, and since segregation of pyrites from other minerals does occur when slagging is encountered, slagging must be attributed to the size and orientation of the pyrites in the coal, in addition to their concentration level. A program is underway to examine slags from coals with varying concentration levels, size distribution, and orientation of pyrite with other mineral matter, when the coals are fired in a laboratory furnace under controlled conditions simulating an industrial furnace. During Task 1 Foster Wheeler will select eight candidate coals with variations in pyrite size and distribution according to the specifications of the Research Plan. The selection will be made after reviewing the specification with such agencies as the DOE Fuel Preparation Laboratory at Bruceton, Pennsylvania; the Pennsylvania State College of Mineralogy and Coal Combustion Laboratory; the Coal Research Department of the University of Kentucky; the Indiana State Geological Survey; and the Illinois Geological Survey. Foster Wheeler will locate the source of each coal, negotiate the coal purchase, and arrange for shipment of the required amount of each coal selected. The coals will be selected to provide a suitable matrix of pyrite size distribution and concentration, permitting identification of the source of pyrite responsible for slagging.

  9. Kinetics of the zinc slag-Fuming Process: part II. mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, G. G.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1985-09-01

    A mathematical model of zinc slag fuming has been formulated based on the kinetic conception of the process developed in Part I of this paper. Each of the major reaction zones in the furnace — the slag bath where reduction of zinc oxide and ferric oxide takes place and the tuyere gas column where oxidation of coal and ferrous oxide occurs — have been characterized mathematically. The two zones and the water-jacketed furnace wall have been linked by overall heat and mass balances. Insufficient information is available, however, to characterize quantitatively two of the important kinetic processes occurring in the furnace: the division of coal between entrainment in the slag, combustion in the tuyere gas column and bypass; and oxygen utilization. To overcome this problem the model has been fitted to the data from eleven industrial fuming cycles. Consistent values have been obtained for these kinetic parameters over five different fuming operations indicating that the kinetic conception of the process is sound. The results indicate that about 33 pct of the injected coal is entrained in the slag, 55 pet combusts in the tuyere gas column, and 12 pct bypasses the bath completely. Oxygen utilization has been found to be high and can be correlated to bath depth.

  10. Investigation of pyrite as a contributor to slagging in Eastern Bituminous coals. Quarterly progress report 10, January 1-March 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Bryers, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    The objective of this program is to examine slags formed as a result of firing coals with varying concentration levels, size distribution, and orientation of pyrite with regard to mineral matter in the coal in a laboratory furnace. The program tasks are: (1) selection of eight candidate coals; (2) chemical characterization of the coal samples and identification of the pyrite size, distribution, and orientation with respect to other mineral matter and concentration levels; (3) testing of the candidate coals in a laboratory furnace; (4) chemical and physical characterization of the slag and fly ash samples created by the impurities in the coal sample; (5) influence of coal beneficiation on furnace slagging; and (6) analysis of data and identification of parameters influencing the contribution of pyrite to slagging problems. Results of analysis of two coals, Illinois No. 5 Gallatin County, Illinois and Lower Kittaning Clarion County, Pennsylvania, are presented. Examination of the morphology of furnace slag deposited in the 100 lb/hr combustor, as well as industrial furnace, revealed reocurring crystals of iron of pyrite origin on the surface of the deposit. The cubic, octahedron and cubic/octahedron crystals are similar in size and structure to pyrite crystals occasionally found in coal. To characterize the morphology of pyrites within the coal samples of Illinois No. 5 and Lower Kittaning coals were examined using SEM and EDAX analysis. Results are presented of the types of minerals found. 10 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Application of Spectroscopic Analysis Techniques to the Determination of Slag Structures and Properties: Effect of Water Vapor on Slag Chemistry Relevant to a Novel Flash Ironmaking Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohassab-Ahmed, M. Y.; Sohn, H. Y.

    2013-11-01

    Flash ironmaking technology is an ecofriendly process for producing iron from iron oxide concentrates via a flash reactor that uses gaseous fuels and reductants that reduce energy consumption and minimize greenhouse gas emissions. It has the potential to achieve steelmaking in a single, continuous process. The phase equilibria and chemistry of selected slag systems were investigated during the development of a novel flash ironmaking process. Among the proposed reductants and fuels are H2, natural gas, and coal gas. In different ironmaking processes, the molten bath (iron-slag bath) is expected to be at equilibrium with gas atmospheres of H2/H2O, CO/CO2/H2/H2O, and CO/CO2. The first two gas mixtures were used to represent the processes based on H2 or natural gas/coal gas, respectively, whereas the CO/CO2 mixture was used for a comparison. The slag composition of interest in this process was selected to resemble that of the blast furnace and is based on the CaO-MgO-SiO2-Al2O3-FeO-MnO-P2O5 system with CaO/SiO2 in the range 0.8-1.4. The temperature range was 1550-1650°C encompassing a wide range of expected ironmaking temperatures for the novel flash process. The oxygen partial pressure was maintained in the reducing range of 10-10-10-9 atm in the three gas atmospheres. It was found that H2O dramatically affects the chemistry of the slag and strongly affects the phase equilibria in the slag as well as the equilibrium distribution of elements between slag and molten metal. The effects of water vapor on the chemistry of the slag as well as the equilibrium reactions involving the slag have been studied for the first time.

  12. Study on Control of Inclusion Compositions in Tire Cord Steel by Low Basicity Top Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Cai-ping; Yue, Feng; Jiang, Chen-xu; Wu, Qi-fan

    2016-01-01

    Top slag melting experiment was conducted in a silicon molybdenum furnace with tire cord steel billet. The influence of top slag composition on the plasticity of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO inclusion and inclusion plasticization conditions was calculated by thermodynamic software FactSage. Use the thermodynamic calculation to guide the laboratory experiments to study slag compositions influence inclusions composition. Then industrial experiments were conducted based on the theoretical calculation and results of laboratory experiments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to determine the morphology and composition of inclusions in steel. All studies show that in the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-10% MgO diagram, when CaO = 8-48%, SiO2 = 35-75%, Al2O3 = 0-32%, inclusions are in the plastic area. When basicity of top slag is certain, Al2O3 content in inclusions increases with the increase of Al2O3 content in the slag, and the distribution of inclusions becomes scattered with the increase of Al2O3 content in slag. Inclusion plasticization can be achieved when the binary basicities of top slag are 0.6, 0.8-1.2, 1.4 and corresponding w(Al2O3)s are 2-15%, 2-10%, <2%. According to industrial experimental results, when top slag basicity decreases from 1.5 to 0.67-0.9 and Al2O3 content decreases below 10 wt%, the inclusion falls into plastic area. It is feasible in practice to control the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO inclusions plastic through adjusting Al2O3 content in slag.

  13. Effects of Microwave Roasting on the Kinetics of Extracting Vanadium from Vanadium Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guoquan; Zhang, Ting-an; Lü, Guozhi; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Weiguang

    2016-02-01

    The kinetics of extracting vanadium (V) from microwave-roasted (MR) vanadium slag (V-slag) with concentrated H2SO4 were investigated. The microwave irradiation experiments were performed in a modified microwave muffle furnace at temperatures ranging from 150°C to 750°C. The x-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the spinel phase of the V-slag is destroyed after 10 min of roasting. The phase composition of the V-slag was changed by the roasting process, and a new Fe2O3 phase appeared in the samples roasted at higher temperatures. Compared to the raw slag, the surface area, pore volume, and pore size of the MR slags were much lower. It was easier to leach V from the MR samples than the raw sample with the H2SO4 solution, and the leaching process was accelerated in the MR samples. When the V-slag was roasted at 150°C and 350°C (MR@150 and MR@350, respectively), the apparent activation energy was decreased from 77.65 kJ/mol to 68.42 kJ/mol and 66.68 kJ/mol, respectively. The process of leaching V from the raw and MR slags was controlled by both the surface chemical reactions and internal diffusion. The reaction orders of the raw, MR@150, and MR@350 V-slags, with respect to the H2SO4 concentration, were 1.23, 0.75, and 0.70, respectively.

  14. Accelerated ageing of an EAF black slag by carbonation and percolation for long-term behaviour assessment.

    PubMed

    Gurtubay, L; Gallastegui, G; Elias, A; Rojo, N; Barona, A

    2014-07-01

    The efficient reuse of industrial by-products, such as the electric arc furnace (EAF) black slag, is still hindered by concern over their long-term behaviour in outdoor environments. The aim of this study was to develop an accelerated ageing method to simulate the long-term natural carbonation of EAF slag exposed to the elements. The degree of carbonation achieved in a freshly produced slag after accelerated ageing and in a slag used on a fifteen-year-old unpaved road was very similar. The influence of particle size on accelerated carbonation was assessed, with it being concluded that the slag sample with a particle size bigger than 5-6 mm underwent slight carbonation over time when it was exposed to CO2. The accelerated ageing procedure based on percolating a previously carbonated water solution through the slag column allowed gradual leaching with simulated acid rain, as well as providing information about the gradual and total chemical release from the slag. Three classification groups were established according to the release rate of the determined elements. The joint use of the accelerated carbonation method and the percolation test is proposed as a useful tool for environmental risk assessment concerning the long-term air exposure of EAF black slag. PMID:24726964

  15. Recovery of Manganese Ferrite in Nanoform from the Metallurgical Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semykina, Anna; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2011-02-01

    The present work investigates the formation of manganese ferrite of nanosize by oxidation of MnO- and FeO-containing slag. A horizontal resistance furnace was used as an experimental setup. The experiment was conducted in the temperature range of 1573 K to 1673 K (1300 °C to 1400 °C) in an oxidizing atmosphere. The samples were quenched to the cold end of the furnace and were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD patterns of the products showed the presence of two phases—manganese ferrite and calcium silicate. The particle size of the manganese ferrite was estimated by the Scherrer formula to be in the range of nanometers.

  16. Effect of Selected Alternative Fuels and Raw Materials on the Cement Clinker Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strigáč, Július

    2015-11-01

    The article deals with the study of the effects of alternative fuels and raw materials on the cement clinker quality. The clinker quality was expressed by the content of two principal minerals alite C3S and belite C2S. The additions of alternative fuels ashes and raw materials, in principle, always increased the belite content and conversely reduced the amount of alite. The alternative fuels with high ash content were used such as the meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge and the used alternative raw materials were metallurgical slags - granulated blastfurnace slag, air cooled blastfurnace slag and demetallized steel slag, fluidized bed combustion fly ash and waste glass. Meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge were evaluated as moderately suitable alternative fuels which can be added in the amounts of 2.8 wt. % addition of meat-bone meals ash, 3.64 wt. % addition of sewage sludge ash and 3.8 wt. % addition of paper sludge ash to the cement raw mixture. Demetallised steel slag is suitable for production of special sulphate resistant cement clinker for CEM I -SR cement with addition up to 5 wt. %. Granulated blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4 wt. %. Air cooled blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4.2 wt. %. Waste glass is not very appropriate alternative raw material with addition only 1.16 wt. %. Fluidized bed combustion fly ash appears not to be equally appropriate alternative raw material for cement clinker burning with less potential utilization in the cement industry and with addition 3.41 wt. %, which forms undesired anhydrite CaSO4 in the cement clinker.

  17. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, June--August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700{degrees}F. These results indicated the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications.

  18. Reuse of EAF Slag as Reinforcing Filler for Polypropylene Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornacchia, G.; Agnelli, S.; Gelfi, M.; Ramorino, G.; Roberti, R.

    2015-06-01

    Electric-arc furnace (EAF) slag, the by-product of steel fabricated at the EAF, is in most cases still sent to dumps, with serious environmental consequences. This work shows an innovative, economically convenient application for EAF slag: its use as reinforcing filler for polypropylene. Composites based on polypropylene containing 10-40 wt.% of EAF slag particles were prepared by melt compounding followed by injection molding. A physical-chemical analysis of the EAF slag was performed to determine microstructural features and main component phases. Leaching tests demonstrated that, although EAF slag can release small amounts of toxic elements, such as heavy metals, incorporating such material into the polymeric matrix immobilizes the heavy metals inside that matrix. The mechanical characterization of the polymer-based composites was performed. Incorporating EAF slag particles raises the Young's modulus and the tensile strength at yield, whereas elongation at break and the impact strength of the polymer-based composite are significantly reduced only when large amounts of filler are added, i.e., 30% or more.

  19. Disposal of High-Temperature Slags: A Review of Integration of Heat Recovery and Material Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongqi; Zhang, Zuotai

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays with the continuous urbanization in China, the carbon emission and resource shortage have been serious issues, for which the disposal of blast furnace slags (BFS) and steel slags (SS) discharged from the metallurgical industry make up a significant strategy. The output of crude steel reached 823 Mt in China in 2014 and the thermal heat in these slags was equivalent to ~18 Mt of standard coal. Herein, the recent advances were systemically reviewed and analyzed, mainly from two respects, i.e., integration of heat recovery and material recycling and crystallization control of the slags. It was first found that for the heat recovery from BFS, the most intensively investigated physical method and chemical method were centrifugal granulation and gasification reaction, respectively. Furthermore, a two-step approach could contribute to a promising strategy for the treatment of slags, i.e., the liquid slags were first granulated into small particles, and then other further treatment was performed such as gasification reaction. With regard to SS, the effective disposal could be achieved using a selective crystallization and phase separation (SCPS) method, and moreover, the solid solution of 2CaO·SiO2 and the target phases could act as a promising enriched phase to extract the valuable elements.

  20. Bioleaching of metals from steel slag by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans culture supernatant.

    PubMed

    Hocheng, Hong; Su, Cheer; Jadhav, Umesh U

    2014-12-01

    The generation of 300–500 kg of slag per ton of the steel produced is a formidable amount of solid waste available for treatment. They usually contain considerable quantities of valuable metals. In this sense, they may become either important secondary resource if processed in eco-friendly manner for secured supply of contained metals or potential pollutants, if not treated properly. It is possible to recover metals from steel slag by applying bioleaching process. Electric arc furnace (EAF) slag sample was used for bioleaching of metals. In the present study, before bioleaching experiment water washing of an EAF slag was carried out. This reduced slag pH from 11.2 to 8.3. Culture supernatants of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (At. thiooxidans), Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (At. ferrooxidans), and Aspergillus niger (A. niger) were used for metal solubilization. At. thiooxidans culture supernatant containing 0.016 M sulfuric acid was found most effective for bioleaching of metals from an EAF slag. Maximum metal extraction was found for Mg (28%), while it was least for Mo (0.1%) in six days. Repeated bioleaching cycles increased metal recovery from 28% to 75%, from 14% to 60% and from 11% to 27%, for Mg, Zn and Cu respectively. PMID:25461931

  1. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1998-08-04

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag. 1 fig.

  2. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  3. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1998-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  4. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1999-10-19

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  5. Heat treatment furnace

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

    2014-10-21

    A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

  6. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  7. An Empirical Viscosity Model for Coal Slags

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Cooley, Scott K.; Sundaram, S. K.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Edmondson, Autumn B.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.

    2008-10-25

    Slags of low viscosity readily penetrate the refractory lining in slagging gasifiers, causing rapid and severe corrosion called spalling. In addition, a low-viscosity slag that flows down the gasifier wall forms a relatively thin layer of slag on the refractory surface, allowing the corrosive gases in the gasifier to participate in the chemical reactions between the refractory and the slag. In contrast, a slag viscosity of <25 Pa•s at 1400°C is necessary to minimize the possibility of plugging the slag tap. There is a need to predict and optimize slag viscosity so slagging gasifiers can operate continuously at temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1650°C. The approach adopted in this work was to statistically design and prepare simulated slags, measure the viscosity as a function of temperature, and develop a model to predict slag viscosity based on slag composition and temperature. Statistical design software was used to select compositions from a candidate set of all possible vertices that will optimally represent the composition space for 10 main components. A total of 21 slag compositions were generated, including 5 actual coal slag compositions. The Arrhenius equation was applied to measured viscosity versus temperature data of tested slags, and the Arrhenius coefficients (A and B in ln(vis) = A + B/T) were expressed as linear functions of the slag composition. The viscosity model was validated using 1) data splitting approach, and 2) viscosity/temperature data of selected slag compositions from the literature that were formulated and melted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The capability of the model to predict the viscosity of coal slags was compared with the model developed by Browning et al. because this model can predict the viscosity of slags from coal ash better than the most commonly used empirical models found in the literature.

  8. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, N. C.; Milestone, N. B.; Gordon, L. E.; Ko, S.-C.

    2014-09-01

    Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  9. Transport and removal of bacteriophages MS2 and PhiX174 in steel slag-amended soils: column experiments and transport model analyses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Ann; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Song-Bae; Yu, Seungho; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of bacteriophages MS2 and PhiX174 in soils amended with converter furnace steel slag. Column experiments were performed to examine the bacteriophage removal in slag-amended (slag content: 0%, 25%, and 50%) loam soils. For comparison, column experiments were also conducted with Escherichia coli. In addition, chloride (Cl) was used as a conservative tracer to determine transport characteristics. Results showed mass recoveries of Cl of 98.6 +/- 3.5%, indicating that the experiments were conducted successfully. The mass recovery of MS2 was 86.7% in no slag (100% soil), decreasing to 0% in slag contents of 25% and 50%. The mass recovery of PhiX174 decreased from 87.8% to 51.5% with increasing slag content from 0% to 50%. In the case of E. coli, the mass recoveries decreased from 47.0% to 10.5% with increasing slag content from 0% to 50%. In the transport models analyses, the HYDRUS-1D code was used to quantify the sorption parameters from breakthrough curves. For the 100% soil column, a one-site kinetic sorption model was fitted to the data, whereas a two-site kinetic sorption model was fitted for slag-amended (25% and 50% slag) soil data. Results demonstrate that the addition of steel slag to soil enhances the removal of bacteriophages due to the presence of FeO in the steel slag. However, CaO could not contribute to the bacteriophage removal in our experimental conditions because the effluent pH (7.7-8.9) in slag-amended (25% and 50% slag) soils was not high enough to promote the bacteriophage inactivation. PMID:24701916

  10. Cement disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, L C; Hungerford, D S

    1987-12-01

    Does "cement disease" exist? The bony environment surrounding a loosened cemented prosthesis is an abnormal pathologic condition which, if left unattended, will progress to a total failure of the joint including an inhibition of function and immobilizing pain. That biomaterial properties of the cement used for fixation also contribute to the pathologic state separates this disease from other modes of loosening. This leads inevitably to the conclusion that "cement disease" does exist. Methyl methacrylate has revolutionized the treatment of severe joint dysfunction. There can be no doubt that improving surgical technique, cement handling, and the cement itself will continue to improve the results and reduce the incidence of failure due to loosening. Cement is undoubtedly satisfactory for elderly patients with low activity levels and relatively short life expectancies. However, because of the inherent biologic and biomechanical properties of methyl methacrylate, it is unlikely that it can be rendered satisfactory in the long run for the young, the active, or the overweight patient, for whom alternatives are currently being sought. In such cases, the elimination of "cement disease" can only occur with the elimination of cement. Alternatives include the search for other grouting materials and the development of prostheses with satisfactory surfaces for either press-fit or biologic ingrowth. PMID:3315375

  11. Leaching characteristics of steel slag components and their application in cementitious property prediction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zaibo; Zhao, Sanyin; Zhao, Xuguang; He, Tusheng

    2012-01-15

    High-efficiency recovery and utilization of steel slag are important concerns for environmental protection and sustainable development. To establish a rapid method to evaluate the cementitious properties of steel slag, leaching tests were carried out on steel slag components via an evaporation-condensation method; the leaching characteristics and mechanism of the slag were also investigated. The relationship between leaching characteristics and cementitious properties, which were represented by mortar compressive strength, was analyzed. Results show that there exist significant differences among the amounts of chemically active leached components. The leaching process can be described by the shrinking unreacted core model controlled by intra-particle diffusion, and is in accordance with Kondo R hydration kinetics equation. The leaching process showed a good linear relationship between the amounts of components leached from steel slag and the mortar compressive strength of cementitious materials prepared from reference cement and steel slag with mass ratios of 50:50 and 70:30. The compressive strengths of mortars subjected to 7, 28, and 90 days of curing can be accurately predicted by the sum of leached (CaO+Al(2)O(3)) obtained after a certain length of leaching time. PMID:22088502

  12. Utilization of Illinois slags for the production of ultra-lightweight aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhry, V. ); Zimmerle, T. ); Banerjee, D.D. )

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this program is to demonstrate that solid residues (slag) from the gasification of Illinois coals can be utilized to manufacture ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA). Conventional ULWAs are made by pyroprocessing perlite ores and have unit weights in the range of 3--15 lb/ft[sup 3]. In a previous project, Praxis Engineers demonstrated at the pilot scale that lightweight aggregates with unit weights of 40--55 lb/ ft[sup 3] can be produced from Illinois coal slags, which is suitable for making lightweight cement concrete and precast blocks. These tests also indicated that a product with a unit weight of less than 25 lb/ft[sup 3] could be produced from slag. This project is aimed at testing the potential for producing ULWA from Illinois coal slags. Target applications include loose fill insulation, insulating concrete, lightweight precast products such as concrete blocks and rooftiles, and filtration media. Laboratory- and pilot-scale testing is being conducted in Phase I to identify operating conditions for the expansion of Illinois slags to produce ULWA. Following this, a large batch of expanded slag will be produced, for evaluation in various applications in Phase II.

  13. Glassy slags for minimum additive waste stabilization. Interim progress report, May 1993--February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Gong, M.; Emery, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Glassy slag waste forms are being developed to complement glass waste forms in implementing Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) for supporting DOE`s environmental restoration efforts. The glassy slag waste form is composed of various crystalline and metal oxide phases embedded in a silicate glass phase. The MAWS approach was adopted by blending multiple waste streams to achieve up to 100% waste loadings. The crystalline phases, such as spinels, are very durable and contain hazardous and radioactive elements in their lattice structures. These crystalline phases may account for up to 80% of the total volume of slags having over 80% metal loading. The structural bond strength model was used to quantify the correlation between glassy slag composition and chemical durability so that optimized slag compositions were obtained with limited crucible melting and testing. Slag compositions developed through crucible melts were also successfully generated in a pilot-scale Retech plasma centrifugal furnace at Ukiah, California. Utilization of glassy slag waste forms allows the MAWS approach to be applied to a much wider range of waste streams than glass waste forms. The initial work at ANL has indicated that glassy slags are good final waste forms because of (1) their high chemical durability; (2) their ability to incorporate large amounts of metal oxides; (3) their ability to incorporate waste streams having low contents of flux components; (4) their less stringent requirements on processing parameters, compared to glass waste forms; and (5) their low requirements for purchased additives, which means greater waste volume reduction and treatment cost savings.

  14. A Kinetic Ladle Furnace Process Simulation Model: Effective Equilibrium Reaction Zone Model Using FactSage Macro Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Ende, Marie-Aline; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-05-01

    The ladle furnace (LF) is widely used in the secondary steelmaking process in particular for the de-sulfurization, alloying, and reheating of liquid steel prior to the casting process. The Effective Equilibrium Reaction Zone model using the FactSage macro processing code was applied to develop a kinetic LF process model. The slag/metal interactions, flux additions to slag, various metallic additions to steel, and arcing in the LF process were taken into account to describe the variations of chemistry and temperature of steel and slag. The LF operation data for several steel grades from different plants were accurately described using the present kinetic model.

  15. Properties of slag concrete for low-level waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.; Wong, P.B.

    1991-12-31

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag was incorporated in the concrete mix used for construction of low-level radioactive waste disposal vaults. The vaults were constructed as six 100 {times} 100 {times} 25 ft cells with each cell sharing internal walls with the two adjacent cells. The vaults were designed to contain a low-level radioactive wasteform called saltstone and to isolate the saltstone from the environment until the landfill is closed. Closure involves backfilling with native soil, installation of clay cap, and run-off control. The design criteria for the slag-substituted concrete included compressive strength, 4000 psi after 28 days; slump, 6 inch; permeability, less than 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec; and effective nitrate, chromium and technetium diffusivities of 10{sup {minus}8}, 10{sup {minus}12} and 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/sec, respectively. The reducing capacity of the slag resulted in chemically reducing Cr{sup +6} to Cr{sup +3} and Tc{sup +7} to Tc{sup +4} and subsequent precipitation of the respective hydroxides in the alkaline pore solution. Consequently, the concrete vault enhances containment of otherwise mobile waste ions and contributes to the overall protection of the groundwater at the disposal site.

  16. Properties of slag concrete for low-level waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A. ); Wong, P.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag was incorporated in the concrete mix used for construction of low-level radioactive waste disposal vaults. The vaults were constructed as six 100 {times} 100 {times} 25 ft cells with each cell sharing internal walls with the two adjacent cells. The vaults were designed to contain a low-level radioactive wasteform called saltstone and to isolate the saltstone from the environment until the landfill is closed. Closure involves backfilling with native soil, installation of clay cap, and run-off control. The design criteria for the slag-substituted concrete included compressive strength, 4000 psi after 28 days; slump, 6 inch; permeability, less than 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec; and effective nitrate, chromium and technetium diffusivities of 10{sup {minus}8}, 10{sup {minus}12} and 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/sec, respectively. The reducing capacity of the slag resulted in chemically reducing Cr{sup +6} to Cr{sup +3} and Tc{sup +7} to Tc{sup +4} and subsequent precipitation of the respective hydroxides in the alkaline pore solution. Consequently, the concrete vault enhances containment of otherwise mobile waste ions and contributes to the overall protection of the groundwater at the disposal site.

  17. Corrosion performance of ceramic materials in slagging environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1996-10-01

    Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that use coal as feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces that can operate at temperatures much higher than in current coal-fired power plants. Combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments requires advanced ceramics. Objectives of this program are to evaluate the (a) chemistry of gaseous and condensed products arising during coal combustion, (b) corrosion behavior of candidate materials in air, slag, and salt environments, and (c)residual mechanical properties of the materials after corrosion. Temperatures in the range of 1000-1400 C for ceramics and 600-1000 C for metallic alloys are emphasized. Coal/ash chemistries developed on the basis of thermodynamic/kinetic calculations, together with slags from actual combustors, are used. Materials being evaluated include monolithic Si carbides from several sources: Si nitride, Si carbide in alumina composites, Si carbide fibers in a Si carbide-matrix composite, and some advanced Ni-base alloys. This paper presents results from an ongoing program on corrosion performance of candidate ceramic materials exposed to air, salt, and slag environments and their effect on flexural strength and energy absorbed during fracture of these materials. 10 figs, 4 tabs, 8 refs.

  18. Investigation of pyrite as a contributor to slagging in eastern bituminous coals. Quarterly progress report 9, October 1-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Bryers, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    The objective of this program is to examine slags formed as a result of firing coals with varying concentration levels, size distribution, and orientation of pyrite with regard to mineral matter in the coal in a laboratory furnace. The program tasks are: (1) selection of eight candidate coals; (2) chemical characterization of the coal samples and identification of the pyrite size, distribution, and orientation with respect to other mineral matter and concentration levels; (3) testing of the candidate coals in a laboratory furnace; (4) chemical and physical characterization of the slag and fly ash samples created by the impurities in the coal sample; (5) influence of coal beneficiation on furnace slagging; and (6) analysis of data and identification of parameters influencing the contribution of pyrite to slagging problems. Washing of the Upper Freeport coal from Indiana County, Pennsylvania, was completed by the last quarter of 1983. The washed product was characterized for mineral content, and a combustion test was performed. Kentucky No. 9 from Henderson County, Kentucky, selected as the sixth coal to be investigated, was characterized using size and gravity fractionation techniques and was combusted in the laboratory furnace to evaluate its slagging and fouling potential. The remaining two coals to be characterized and combusted were identified as Illinois No. 5 and Lower Kittanning from Clarion County, Pennsylvania. 80 figures, 27 tables.

  19. Slagging properties of coals and allowance for them in the analysis of the possibility of using out-of-design fuel

    SciTech Connect

    A.N. Alekhnovich; N.V. Artem'eva; V.V. Bogomolov

    2006-05-15

    It is shown that out-of-design coal should be used only after computational analysis of slagging of the boiler. The use of ash fusibility as a criterion for the analysis should be avoided because this property does not reflect the slagging properties of coal to an acceptable degree. Parameters characterizing the properties more appropriately are presented. It is shown that slagging of an actual furnace depends on many factors and the condition that 'the thermal stresses should be lower than the limiting value' is insufficient. An algorithm for the analysis is suggested on the basis of the slagging conditions arising upon transition from one kind of fuel to another with allowance for the actual slagging situation.

  20. Modelling of multiphase flow in ironmaking blast furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X.F.; Yu, A.B.; Burgess, J.M.; Pinson, D.; Chew, S.; Zulli, P.

    2009-01-15

    A mathematical model for the four-phase (gas, powder, liquid, and solids) flow in a two-dimensional ironmaking blast furnace is presented by extending the existing two-fluid flow models. The model describes the motion of gas, solid, and powder phases, based on the continuum approach, and implements the so-called force balance model for the flow of liquids, such as metal and slag in a blast furnace. The model results demonstrate a solid stagnant zone and dense powder hold-up region, as well as a dense liquid flow region that exists in the lower part of a blast furnace, which are consistent with the experimental observations reported in the literature. The simulation is extended to investigate the effects of packing properties and operational conditions on the flow and the volume fraction distribution of each phase in a blast furnace. It is found that solid movement has a significant effect on powder holdup distribution. Small solid particles and low porosity distribution are predicted to affect the fluid flow considerably, and this can cause deterioration in bed permeability. The dynamic powder holdup in a furnace increases significantly with the increase of powder diameter. The findings should be useful to better understand and control blast furnace operations.

  1. MECHANISMS OF PYRITE OXIDATION TO NON-SLAGGING SPECIES

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Reginald E. Mitchell

    2002-09-01

    A project was undertaken to characterize the oxidation of iron pyrite to the non-slagging species magnetite during pulverized coal combustion. The work was aimed at defining the pyrite transformations responsible for the higher slagging propensity of staged, low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal combustor burners. With such burners, coal is injected into a reducing environment. Consequently, the products of pyrite combustion become shifted from non-depositing, oxidized species such as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to highly-depositing, reduced species such as FeO and Fe{sub 1-x}S, where x ranges from 0 to 0.125. The propensity for slagging can be minimized by the judicious redistribution of furnace air to maximize the oxide formation rate. This must be accomplished with minimal degradation of other aspects of boiler performance. To effect this, an understanding of the rate-limiting mechanisms of pyrite oxidation is required. The overall objectives of this project were to characterize the various mechanisms that control overall pyrite combustion rates and to synthesize the mechanisms into a pyrite combustion model. These objectives were achieved. The model produced has the capability of being incorporated into numerical codes developed to predict phenomena occurring in coal-fired boilers and furnaces. Such comprehensive codes can be used to formulate and test strategies for enhancing pyrite transformation rates that involve the minor adjustment of firing conditions. Ultimately, the benefit of this research project is intended to be an increase in the range of coals compatible with staged, low-NO{sub x} combustor retrofits. Project activities were aimed at identifying the mechanisms of pyrite combustion and quantifying their effects on the overall oxidation rate in order to formulate a model for pyrite conversion during coal combustion. Chemical and physical processes requiring characterization included pyrite intraparticle kinetics and mass transfer, gas-phase kinetics and mass

  2. The role of alumina on performance of alkali-activated slag paste exposed to 50 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Jambunathan, N.; Sanjayan, J.G.; Pan, Z.; Li, G.; Liu, Y.; Korayem, A.H.; Duan, W.H.; Collins, F.

    2013-12-15

    The strength and microstructural evolution of two alkali-activated slags, with distinct alumina content, exposed to 50 °C have been investigated. These two slags are ground-granulated blast furnace slag (containing 13% (wt.) alumina) and phosphorous slag (containing 3% (wt.) alumina). They were hydrated in the presence of a combination of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution at different ratios. The microstructure of the resultant slag pastes was assessed by X-ray diffraction, differential thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The results obtained from these techniques reveal the presence of hexagonal hydrates: CAH{sub 10} and C{sub 4}AH{sub 13} in all alkali-activated ground-granulated blast-furnace slag pastes (AAGBS). These hydrates are not observed in pastes formed by alkali-activated ground phosphorous slag (AAGPS). Upon exposure to 50 °C, the aforementioned hydration products of AAGBS pastes convert to C{sub 3}AH{sub 6}, leading to a rapid deterioration in the strength of the paste. In contrast, no strength loss was detected in AAGPS pastes following exposure to 50 °C. -- Highlights: •Strength of alkali-activated slag (AAS) pastes after exposure to 50 °C is studied. •AAS pastes with high alumina content lose strength after the exposure. •C{sub 4}AH{sub 13} and CAH{sub 10} form in these AAS pastes. •Conversion of these calcium alumina hydrates is associated with the strength loss. •AAS pastes with low alumina content maintain its strength after the exposure.

  3. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, September 1--November 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of as-generated slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, the authors found that it would be extremely difficult for as-generated slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1,400 and 1,700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and Phase 2, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications. This document summarizes the Phase 2 accomplishments to date along with the major accomplishments from Phase 1.

  4. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, September--November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    Coal gasification technologies are finding increasing commercial applications for power generation or production of chemical feedstocks. The integrated-gasification-combined-cycle coal conversion process has been demonstrated to be a clean, efficient, and environmentally acceptable method of generating power. However, the gasfication process produces relatively large quantities of a solid waste termed slag. Regulatory trends with respect to solid waste disposal, landfill development costs, and public concern make utilization of slag a high-priority issue. Therefore, it is imperative that slag utilization methods be developed, tested, and commercialized in order to offset disposal costs. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of ``as-generated`` slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and landfill. We determined that it would be extremely difficult for ``as-generated`` slag to find acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that would meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag could be made into a lightweight material by heating it to between 1600 and 1900{degree}F in a kiln, which indicated the potential for using such materials as substitutes for lightweight aggregates. Between 1987 and 1993, the technologies to produce these materials from slag were developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute, Illinois Clean Coal Institute, and internal resources.

  5. Investigation of Freeze-Linings in Copper-Containing Slag Systems: Part I. Preliminary Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2013-06-01

    Slag freeze-linings are increasingly used in industrial pyrometallurgical processes to insure that furnace integrity is maintained in aggressive high-temperature environments. Most previous studies of freeze-linings have analyzed the formation of slag deposits based solely on heat-transfer models. The focus of the present research is to determine the impact of slag chemistry and local process conditions on the microstructures, thickness, stability, and heat-transfer characteristics of the frozen deposit at steady-state conditions. The formation of the freeze-linings is studied under controlled laboratory conditions using an air-cooled "cold-finger" technique for Cu-Fe-Si-Al-O slag at equilibrium with metallic copper relevant to the industrial copper smelting processes. The phase assemblages and microstructures of the deposits formed in the cold-finger experiments differ significantly from those expected from phase equilibrium considerations. The freeze-lining deposits have been found, in general, to consist of several layers. Starting from the cold finger, these layers consist of glass; glass with microcrystalline precipitates; closed crystalline layer; and open crystalline layer. Even at steady-state conditions, there was no primary phase sealing layer of delafossite [Cu2O · (Al, Fe)2O3] present at the deposit/liquid interface—these observations differ markedly from those expected from phase equilibrium considerations. The findings have significant practical implications, and potential for the improved design and operation of industrial metallurgical furnaces.

  6. Processing of copper converter slag for metal reclamation. Part I: Extraction and recovery of copper and cobalt.

    PubMed

    Deng, Tong; Ling, Yunhan

    2007-10-01

    Clean processing of copper converter slag to reclaim cobalt and copper could be a challenge. An innovative and environmentally sound approach for recovering valuable metals from such a slag has been developed in the present study. Curing the slag with strong sulphuric acid, without re-smelting or roasting as practiced currently in the industry, render it accessible to leaching, and more than 95% of cobalt and up to 90% of copper was extracted together with iron by water leaching, leaving silica behind in a residue. The copper in the leach liquor was recovered by cementation with iron and the dissolved iron crystallized as ferrous sulphate monohydrate. The cobalt in the mother-liquor rich in iron was recovered by either cementation or sulphide precipitation. Operation variables in the new process were also investigated and optimized. PMID:17985669

  7. A Brief Review of Viscosity Models for Slag in Coal Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wang, Ping

    2011-11-01

    Many researchers have defined the phenomenon of 'slagging' as the deposition of ash in the radiative section of a boiler, while 'fouling' refers to the deposition of ash in the convective-pass region. Among the important parameters affecting ash deposition that need to be studied are ash chemistry, its transport, deposit growth, and strength development; removability of the ash deposit; heat transfer mechanisms; and the mode of operation for boilers. The heat transfer at the walls of a combustor depends on many parameters including ash deposition. This depends on the processes or parameters controlling the impact efficiency and the sticking efficiency. For a slagging combustor or furnace, however, the temperatures are so high that much of the coal particles are melted and the molten layer, in turn, captures more particles as it flows. The main problems with ash deposition are reduced heat transfer in the boiler and corrosion of the tubes. Common ways of dealing with these issues are soot blowing and wall blowing on a routine basis; however, unexpected or uncontrolled depositions can also complicate the situation, and there are always locations inaccessible to the use of such techniques. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1300 C and 1500 C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa {center_dot} s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. In such cases the slag should be regarded as a non-Newtonian suspension, consisting of liquid silicate and crystals. A better understanding of the rheological properties of the slag, such as yield stress and shear-thinning, are critical in determining the optimum operating conditions. To develop an accurate heat transfer model in any type of coal combustion or gasification process, the heat transfer and to some extent the rheological properties of ash and slag

  8. Arsine Poisoning in a Slag-Washing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Kipling, M. D.; Fothergill, R.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation was carried out in an aluminium recovery works after the simultaneous occurrence of haemolytic anaemia in two workers in the slag disposal plant. The first worker was admitted to hospital suffering from nausea, backache, and haematuria. Jaundice developed on the next day. His urine contained protein, urobilin, haemoglobin, and methaemoglobin but no red cells. During the course of his illness the haemoglobin was reduced to 6·8 g./100 ml. There was no abnormality of the blood film and red cell fragility was normal. A fellow worker was affected at the same time and was treated at home for the same symptoms. Examination five days later showed a haemoglobin level similar to that of the first worker. He had suffered the same symptoms eight years previously, and at this time another worker had suffered from jaundice at home and a third had been investigated for neurological symptoms. Ten years previously another worker had been admitted to hospital with anaemia, jaundice, and haemoglobinuria. At this works scrap aluminium is melted with sodium chloride and fluorspar as a flux. The slag from the furnace is later broken up and dissolved in a rotating drum by a stream of water. The soluble portion is carried into a lagoon, whilst the 3% aluminium is retained in the drum and discharged weekly. Two men are employed at a time and another six have been employed in the past 10 years. Five parts per million of arsine were found to be present in the atmosphere during slag washing, but higher levels would have occurred on the occasions when slag from the making of an aluminium copper alloy from copper with an arsenic content was similarly treated. The mechanism of arsenic production is discussed and the literature on the role of aluminium reviewed. PMID:14106139

  9. EXTERIOR VIEW, BLAST FURNACE NO. 3 (JANE FURNACE) CENTER, NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW, BLAST FURNACE NO. 3 (JANE FURNACE) CENTER, NO. 3 CAST HOUSE TO THE LEFT, WEST ORE BRIDGE TO THE RIGHT. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Blast Furnace No. 3, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

  10. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

  11. Refractory failure in slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing

    2004-08-01

    Slagging gasifiers are used to produce chemicals and/or electricity from feedstocks such as coal and/or petroleum coke. A gasifier environment includes pressures from 400 to 1000 psi, temperatures from 1250-1550 C, are cyclic, reducing gases of CO and H2, and molten ash that interacts with the refractory liner materials. The high Cr2O3 refractory liners of gasifiers fail within 3 to 24 months due to slag attack at elevated temperatures. Gasifier users seek materials with increased reliability and service life. The causes of refractory failure and efforts to increase refractory service life are discussed. Mechanisms involving corrosion and slag infiltration/spalling are the main causes of refractory wear. The reduction of slag penetration can reduce hot face lining wear. The performance of high Cr2O3-Al2O3 materials with phosphate additions were evaluated. Phosphate additions were found to have comparable wear and physical properties to materials with no additions, and to have good slag penetration resistance. Field trials in a gasifier are needed to clarify the potential of the materials.

  12. Evaluation of novel reactive MgO activated slag binder for the immobilisation of lead and zinc.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fei; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2014-12-01

    Although Portland cement is the most widely used binder in the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) processes, slag-based binders have gained significant attention recently due to their economic and environmental merits. In the present study, a novel binder, reactive MgO activated slag, is compared with hydrated lime activated slag in the immobilisation of lead and zinc. A series of lead or zinc-doped pastes and mortars were prepared with metal to binder ratio from 0.25% to 1%. The hydration products and microstructure were studied by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The major hydration products were calcium silicate hydrate and hydrotalcite-like phases. The unconfined compressive strength was measured up to 160 d. Findings show that lead had a slight influence on the strength of MgO-slag paste while zinc reduced the strength significantly as its concentration increased. Leachate results using the TCLP tests revealed that the immobilisation degree was dependent on the pH and reactive MgO activated slag showed an increased pH buffering capacity, and thus improved the immobilisation efficiency compared to lime activated slag. It was proposed that zinc was mainly immobilised within the structure of the hydrotalcite-like phases or in the form of calcium zincate, while lead was primarily precipitated as the hydroxide. It is concluded, therefore, that reactive MgO activated slag can serve as clinker-free alternative binder in the S/S process. PMID:25123653

  13. Hierarchical Order of Influence of Mix Variables Affecting Compressive Strength of Sustainable Concrete Containing Fly Ash, Copper Slag, Silica Fume, and Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sakthieswaran; Karuppiah, Ganesan

    2014-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to study the effect of addition of fly ash, copper slag, and steel and polypropylene fibres on compressive strength of concrete and to determine the hierarchical order of influence of the mix variables in affecting the strength using cluster analysis experimentally. While fly ash and copper slag are used for partial replacement of cement and fine aggregate, respectively, defined quantities of steel and polypropylene fibres were added to the mixes. It is found from the experimental study that, in general, irrespective of the presence or absence of fibres, (i) for a given copper slag-fine aggregate ratio, increase in fly ash-cement ratio the concrete strength decreases and with the increase in copper slag-sand ratio also the rate of strength decrease and (ii) for a given fly ash-cement ratio, increase in copper slag-fine aggregate ratio increases the strength of the concrete. From the cluster analysis, it is found that the quantities of coarse and fine aggregate present have high influence in affecting the strength. It is also observed that the quantities of fly ash and copper slag used as substitutes have equal “influence” in affecting the strength. Marginal effect of addition of fibres in the compression strength of concrete is also revealed by the cluster analysis. PMID:24707213

  14. Hierarchical order of influence of mix variables affecting compressive strength of sustainable concrete containing fly ash, copper slag, silica fume, and fibres.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sakthieswaran; Karuppiah, Ganesan

    2014-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to study the effect of addition of fly ash, copper slag, and steel and polypropylene fibres on compressive strength of concrete and to determine the hierarchical order of influence of the mix variables in affecting the strength using cluster analysis experimentally. While fly ash and copper slag are used for partial replacement of cement and fine aggregate, respectively, defined quantities of steel and polypropylene fibres were added to the mixes. It is found from the experimental study that, in general, irrespective of the presence or absence of fibres, (i) for a given copper slag-fine aggregate ratio, increase in fly ash-cement ratio the concrete strength decreases and with the increase in copper slag-sand ratio also the rate of strength decrease and (ii) for a given fly ash-cement ratio, increase in copper slag-fine aggregate ratio increases the strength of the concrete. From the cluster analysis, it is found that the quantities of coarse and fine aggregate present have high influence in affecting the strength. It is also observed that the quantities of fly ash and copper slag used as substitutes have equal "influence" in affecting the strength. Marginal effect of addition of fibres in the compression strength of concrete is also revealed by the cluster analysis. PMID:24707213

  15. Advanced solidification system using high performance cement

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Matsuda, Masami; Nishi, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Izumida, Tatsuo

    1995-12-31

    Advanced cement solidification is proposed for the solidification of radioactive waste such as spent ion exchange resin, incineration ash and liquid waste. A new, high performance cement has been developed to raise volume reduction efficiency and lower radioactivity release into the environment. It consists of slag cement, reinforcing fiber, natural zeolite and lithium nitrate (LiNO{sub 3}). The fiber allows waste loading to be increased from 20 to 55kg-dry resin/200L. The zeolite, whose main constituent is clinoptilolite, reduces cesium leachability from the waste form to about 1/10. Lithium nitrate prevents alkaline corrosion of the aluminum, contained in ash, and reduces hydrogen gas generation. Laboratory and full-scale pilot plant experiments were performed to evaluate properties of the waste form, using simulated wastes. Emphasis was laid on improvement of solidification of spent resin and ash.

  16. Surface fractal dimension: An indicator to characterize the microstructure of cement-based porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qiang; Luo, Mingyong; Pang, Xiaoyun; Li, Le; Li, Kefei

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the surface fractal dimensions (SFDs) of pore structure of cement pastes and mortars with/without ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS) incorporated into binder. The samples were subject to water curing and sealed curing. The fractal dimensions of samples are determined by Zhang’s model (Ind Eng Chem Res, 34 (1995):1383-1386) on the basis of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) data. The results confirm the scale-dependent property of fractal dimension of pore structures and the micro-fractal, transition and macro-fractal regions are identified for all samples. The upper pore size range for micro-fractal regions is around 30 nm, the transition regions cover 0.5-2 magnitude orders of pore size and macro fractal regions cover 1.5-3 magnitude orders. Both curing conditions and GGBS in binder have impact on the fractal properties of pore structure, and samples incorporating GGBS have substantially larger values for micro-fractal regions.

  17. A Study on Suitability of EAF Oxidizing Slag in Concrete: An Eco-Friendly and Sustainable Replacement for Natural Coarse Aggregate.

    PubMed

    Sekaran, Alan; Palaniswamy, Murthi; Balaraju, Sivagnanaprakash

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and economic factors increasingly encourage higher utility of industrial by-products. The basic objective of this study was to identify alternative source for good quality aggregates which is depleting very fast due to fast pace of construction activities in India. EAF oxidizing slag as a by-product obtained during the process in steel making industry provides great opportunity to utilize it as an alternative to normally available coarse aggregates. The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the physical, mechanical, and durability properties of concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag in addition to supplementary cementing material fly ash. This study presents the experimental investigations carried out on concrete grades of M20 and M30 with three mixes: (i) Mix A, conventional concrete mix with no material substitution, (ii) Mix B, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash, and (iii) Mix C, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash and 50% replacement of coarse aggregate with EAF oxidizing slag. Tests were conducted to determine mechanical and durability properties up to the age of 90 days. The test results concluded that concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash (Mix C) had greater strength and durability characteristics when compared to Mix A and Mix B. Based on the overall observations, it could be recommended that EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash could be effectively utilized as coarse aggregate replacement and cement replacement in all concrete applications. PMID:26421315

  18. A Study on Suitability of EAF Oxidizing Slag in Concrete: An Eco-Friendly and Sustainable Replacement for Natural Coarse Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Sekaran, Alan; Palaniswamy, Murthi; Balaraju, Sivagnanaprakash

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and economic factors increasingly encourage higher utility of industrial by-products. The basic objective of this study was to identify alternative source for good quality aggregates which is depleting very fast due to fast pace of construction activities in India. EAF oxidizing slag as a by-product obtained during the process in steel making industry provides great opportunity to utilize it as an alternative to normally available coarse aggregates. The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the physical, mechanical, and durability properties of concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag in addition to supplementary cementing material fly ash. This study presents the experimental investigations carried out on concrete grades of M20 and M30 with three mixes: (i) Mix A, conventional concrete mix with no material substitution, (ii) Mix B, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash, and (iii) Mix C, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash and 50% replacement of coarse aggregate with EAF oxidizing slag. Tests were conducted to determine mechanical and durability properties up to the age of 90 days. The test results concluded that concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash (Mix C) had greater strength and durability characteristics when compared to Mix A and Mix B. Based on the overall observations, it could be recommended that EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash could be effectively utilized as coarse aggregate replacement and cement replacement in all concrete applications. PMID:26421315

  19. Steel slag carbonation in a flow-through reactor system: the role of fluid-flux.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Eleanor J; Williams-Jones, Anthony E; Migdisov, Artashes A

    2015-01-01

    Steel production is currently the largest industrial source of atmospheric CO2. As annual steel production continues to grow, the need for effective methods of reducing its carbon footprint increases correspondingly. The carbonation of the calcium-bearing phases in steel slag generated during basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel production, in particular its major constituent, larnite {Ca2SiO4}, which is a structural analogue of olivine {(MgFe)2SiO4}, the main mineral subjected to natural carbonation in peridotites, offers the potential to offset some of these emissions. However, the controls on the nature and efficiency of steel slag carbonation are yet to be completely understood. Experiments were conducted exposing steel slag grains to a CO2-H2O mixture in both batch and flow-through reactors to investigate the impact of temperature, fluid flux, and reaction gradient on the dissolution and carbonation of steel slag. The results of these experiments show that dissolution and carbonation of BOF steel slag are more efficient in a flow-through reactor than in the batch reactors used in most previous studies. Moreover, they show that fluid flux needs to be optimized in addition to grain size, pressure, and temperature, in order to maximize the efficiency of carbonation. Based on these results, a two-stage reactor consisting of a high and a low fluid-flux chamber is proposed for CO2 sequestration by steel slag carbonation, allowing dissolution of the slag and precipitation of calcium carbonate to occur within a single flow-through system. PMID:25597686

  20. Kinetics of the zinc slag-Fuming process: Part i. industrial measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, G. G.; Brimacombe, J. K.; Toop, G. W.

    1985-09-01

    A study involving industrial measurements and mathematical modeling has been conducted to eluci-date kinetic phenomena in the zinc slag fuming process. In the first part of this three-part paper, the results of industrial measurements and observations are presented. In Part II a mathematical model of the process is developed, and finally in Part III the implications of a kinetic conception of the process for process improvement are explored. The industrial work consisted primarily of slag sampling through the fuming cycles of five different fuming operations. In addition, tuyere back-pressure mea-surements, tuyere photography using a tuyerescope, and sampling of the fume product were under-taken at one operation. Analysis of the slag samples has shown that, in general, the zinc elimination curve is linear with time and that a portion of the injected coal entrains in the slag. Analysis of tuyere back-pressure fluctuations and movie photographs of the tuyere tip indicate that the coal-air mixture enters the slag in the form of discrete bubbles. From these results it can be deduced that the fuming furnace consists of two reaction zones which are created by the division of coal between the slag and the tuyere gas stream. The coal entrained in the slag reduces ZnO and Fe3O4 in a “reduction zone” which is responsible for fuming. The coal remaining in the tuyere gas stream combusts in an “oxidation zone” although a fraction passes through the bath unconsumed and reports to the solid products. The oxidation zone supplies heat to the endothermic reduction reactions and heat losses.

  1. Mechanism and Influencing Factors of Iron Nuggets Forming in Rotary Hearth Furnace Process at Lower Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hongliang; Duan, Dongping; Chen, Siming; Yuan, Peng

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of slag and iron separation, a new idea of "the separation of slag (solid state) and iron (molten state) in rotary hearth furnace process at lower temperature" is put forward. In this paper, the forming process of iron nuggets has been investigated. Based on those results, the forming mechanisms and influencing factors of iron nugget at low temperature are discussed experimentally using an electric resistance furnace simulating a rotary hearth furnace process. Results show that the reduction of iron ore, carburization of reduced iron, and the composition and quantity of slag are very important for producing iron nuggets at lower temperature. Reduction reaction of carbon-containing pellets is mainly at 1273 K and 1473 K (1000 °C and 1200 °C). When the temperature is above 1473 K (1200 °C), the metallization rate of carbon-containing pellets exceeds 93 pct, and the reduction reaction is substantially complete. Direct carburization is the main method for carburization of reduced iron. This reaction occurs above 1273 K (1000 °C), with carburization degree increasing greatly at 1473 K and 1573 K (1200 °C and 1300 °C) after particular holding times. Besides, to achieve the "slag (solid state) and iron (molten state) separation," the melting point of the slag phase should be increased. Slag (solid state) and iron (molten state) separation can be achieved below 1573 K (1300 °C), and when the holding time is 20 minutes, C/O is 0.7, basicity is less than 0.5 and a Na2CO3 level of 3 pct, the recovery rate of iron can reach 90 pct, with a proportion of iron nuggets more than 3.15 mm of nearly 90 pct. This study can provide theoretical and technical basis for iron nugget production.

  2. The flash reduction of electric arc furnace dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li; Themelis, Nickolas J.

    1992-01-01

    The flash processing of electric arc furnace (EAF) dusts is a promising method for recovering zinc and producing nontoxic slags for direct disposal. In order to reduce the zinc content of the dust particles and maintain the iron content in oxide form, a certain range of temperature and oxygen potential must be provided, as dictated by thermodynamic requirements. Experiments were conducted with EAF dusts at three levels of zinc concentration in an electrically heated flash reactor. The results showed that the CO:CO2 ratio in the process gas was the most important parameter. The effects of zinc content in dust and O2 in inlet gas on zinc recovery were secondary. Toxicity leach tests showed that the resulting slag, even at low zinc recovery, can be disposed safely as landfill.

  3. Influence of the temperature on the cement disintegration in cement-retained implant restorations.

    PubMed

    Linkevicius, Tomas; Vindasiute, Egle; Puisys, Algirdas; Linkeviciene, Laura; Svediene, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the average disintegration temperature of three dental cements used for the cementation of the implant-supported prostheses. One hundred and twenty metal frameworks were fabricated and cemented on the prosthetic abutments with different dental cements. After heat treatment in the dental furnace, the samples were set for the separation to test the integration of the cement. Results have shown that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RGIC) exhibited the lowest disintegration temperature (p<0.05), but there was no difference between zinc phosphate cement (ZPC) and dual cure resin cement (RC) (p>0.05). Average separation temperatures: RGIC - 306 ± 23 °C, RC - 363 ± 71 °C, it could not be calculated for the ZPC due to the eight unseparated specimens. Within the limitations of the study, it could be concluded that RGIC cement disintegrates at the lowest temperature and ZPC is not prone to break down after exposure to temperature. PMID:23455980

  4. Adsorption of superplasticizer admixtures on alkali-activated slag pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, M. Houst, Y.F.; Bowen, P.; Puertas, F.

    2009-08-15

    Alkali-activated slag (AAS) binders are obtained by a manufacturing process less energy-intensive than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and involves lower greenhouse gasses emission. These alkaline cements allow the production of high mechanical strength and durable concretes. In the present work, the adsorption of different superplasticizer admixtures (naphthalene-based, melamine-based and a vinyl copolymer) on the slag particles in AAS pastes using alkaline solutions with different pH values have been studied in detail. The effect of the superplasticizers on the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the AAS and OPC pastes have been also evaluated. The results obtained allowed us to conclude that the adsorption of the superplasticizers on AAS pastes is independent of the pH of the alkaline solutions used and lower than on OPC pastes. However, the effect of the admixtures on the rheological parameters depends directly on the type and dosage of the superplasticizer as well as of the binder used and, in the case of the AAS, on the pH of the alkaline activator solution. In 11.7-pH NaOH-AAS pastes the dosages of the superplasticizers required to attain similar reduction in the yield stress are ten-fold lower than for Portland cement. In this case the superplasticizers studied show a fluidizing effect considerably higher in 11.7-pH NaOH-AAS pastes than in OPC pastes. In 13.6-pH NaOH-AAS pastes, the only admixture observed to affect the rheological parameters is the naphthalene-based admixture due to its higher chemical stability in such extremely alkaline media.

  5. Potential uses for the slag from the Cool Water demonstration plant: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, D.M.; Choudhry, V.

    1987-02-01

    Coal gasification processes produce waste materials which represent a significant expense in both disposal costs and real estate requirements. Other coal combustion wastes, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, are increasingly being used in construction applications. Similarly, there is considerable potential for utilizing coal gasification wastes, but to date very little evaluation has been carried out on these wastes. Praxis Engineers, Inc. prepared this report as part of an EPRI-sponsored study investigating the utilization potential of the gasification waste (slag) produced by the Cool Water facility, which uses integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) technology. Basic chemical and physical properties of the slag were determined during this study. Its chemistry is quite similar to that of other coal combustion wastes, but its physical characteristics are considerably different due to the method of its formation, i.e., quenching of the molten mineral matter. On the basis of this work, sixteen potential applications were recommended for evaluation and show promise. The study also included evaluation of the utilization potential of the slag as a material for road construction and as a substitute for aggregate in cement concrete. However, before wider acceptance can be achieved larger-scale demonstration projects are required, both to overcome existing biases in favor of currently used materials, and to establish the economic competitiveness of the slag. 37 refs., 11 figs., 30 tabs.

  6. Construction material properties of slag from the high temperature arc gasification of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Justin G; Olivera, Fernando D; Wasman, Scott J; Townsend, Timothy G; McVay, Michael C; Ferraro, Christopher C; Blaisi, Nawaf I

    2016-06-01

    Slag from the high temperature arc gasification (HTAG) of municipal solid waste (MSW) was tested to evaluate its material properties with respect to use as a construction aggregate. These data were compared to previously compiled values for waste to energy bottom ash, the most commonly produced and beneficially used thermal treatment residue. The slag was tested using gradations representative of a base course and a course aggregate. Los Angeles (LA) abrasion testing demonstrated that the HTAG slag had a high resistance to fracture with a measured LA loss of 24%. Soundness testing indicated a low potential for reactivity and good weathering resistance with a mean soundness loss of 3.14%. The modified Proctor compaction testing found the slag to possess a maximum dry density (24.04kN/m(3)) greater than conventionally used aggregates and WTE BA. The LBR tests demonstrated a substantial bearing capacity (>200). Mineralogical analysis of the HTAG suggested the potential for self cementing character which supports the elevated LBR results. Preliminary material characterization of the HTAG slag establishes potential for beneficial use; larger and longer term studies focusing on the material's possibility for swelling and performance at the field scale level are needed. PMID:27020344

  7. General view of blast furnace plant, with blast furnace "A" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of blast furnace plant, with blast furnace "A" (built in 1907) to the left; in the foreground is the turbo-blower and blast furnace gas-powered electric generating station (built in 1919), looking northwest - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Blast Furnace "A", Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  8. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING FURNACE KEEPER OBSERVING FURNACE THROUGH BLUE GLASS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING FURNACE KEEPER OBSERVING FURNACE THROUGH BLUE GLASS EVERY TWENTY MINUTES TO DETERMINE SIZE AND TEXTURE OF BATCH AND OTHER VARIABLES. FAN IN FRONT COOLS WORKERS AS THEY CONDUCT REPAIRS. FURNACE TEMPERATURE AT 1572 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT. - Chambers-McKee Window Glass Company, Furnace No. 2, Clay Avenue Extension, Jeannette, Westmoreland County, PA

  9. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, March 1995--May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, this process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) along with some unconverted carbon, which is disposed of as solid waste. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag could be made into a lightweight material by controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700{degrees}F. These results indicated the potential for using such materials as substitutes for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project, funded by DOE`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications.

  10. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    SciTech Connect

    White, Claire E.; Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika; Page, Katharine

    2015-01-15

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO{sub 2} alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S), blended C{sub 3}S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C{sub 3}S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements.

  11. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quaterly report, March 1, 1997--May 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700{degrees}F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications.

  12. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quaterly report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    Integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700{degrees}F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications.

  13. Integrated carbon dioxide/sludge gasification using waste heat from hot slags: syngas production and sulfur dioxide fixation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongqi; Zhang, Zuotai; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong

    2015-04-01

    The integrated CO2/sludge gasification using the waste heat in hot slags, was explored with the aim of syngas production, waste heat recovery and sewage sludge disposal. The results demonstrated that hot slags presented multiple roles on sludge gasification, i.e., not only a good heat carrier (500-950 °C) but also an effective desulfurizer (800-900 °C). The total gas yields increased from 0.022 kg/kgsludge at 500 °C to 0.422 kg/kgsludge at 900 °C; meanwhile, the SO2 concentration at 900 °C remarkably reduced from 164 ppm to 114 ppm by blast furnace slags (BFS) and 93 ppm by steel slags (SS), respectively. A three-stage reaction was clarified including volatile release, char transformation and fixed carbon using Gaussian fittings and the kinetic model was analyzed. Accordingly, a decline process using the integrated method was designed and the optimum slag/sludge ratio was deduced. These deciphered results appealed potential ways of reasonable disposal of sewage sludge and efficient recovery of waste heat from hot slags. PMID:25647028

  14. High Temperature Transparent Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the use of novel techniques for heat containment that could be used to build a high temperature transparent furnace. The primary objective of the work was to experimentally demonstrate transparent furnace operation at 1200 C. Secondary objectives were to understand furnace operation and furnace component specification to enable the design and construction of a low power prototype furnace for delivery to NASA in a follow-up project. The basic approach of the research was to couple high temperature component design with simple concept demonstration experiments that modify a commercially available transparent furnace rated at lower temperature. A detailed energy balance of the operating transparent furnace was performed, calculating heat losses through the furnace components as a result of conduction, radiation, and convection. The transparent furnace shells and furnace components were redesigned to permit furnace operation at at least 1200 C. Techniques were developed that are expected to lead to significantly improved heat containment compared with current transparent furnaces. The design of a thermal profile in a multizone high temperature transparent furnace design was also addressed. Experiments were performed to verify the energy balance analysis, to demonstrate some of the major furnace improvement techniques developed, and to demonstrate the overall feasibility of a high temperature transparent furnace. The important objective of the research was achieved: to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a transparent furnace at 1200 C.

  15. Appeals court upholds electric arc furnace dust disposal restrictions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    On July 8, 1994, the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia upheld EPA`s 1991 final rule governing the land disposal of electric arc furnace dust, listed as K061 in the RCRA regulations. The Steel Manufacturers Association (SMA), believing that EPA had acted {open_quotes}arbitrarily and capriciously,{close_quotes} had petitioned for review of this rule. SMA members argued that K061 is reclaimed-not discarded-to recover metals as part of the steel production process; therefore, the petitioners contended that the agency has no right to regulate slag resulting from treatment of K061.

  16. Utilization of Illinois coal gasification slags for production of ultra-lightweight aggregates. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhry, V.; Zimmerle, T.

    1993-12-31

    This research was aimed at testing and developing the expansion potential of solid residues (slag) from gasification of Illinois coals to manufacture ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA). Conventional ULWAs are manufactured by pyroprocessing perlite or vermiculite ores and have unit weights in the 5--12 lb/ ft{sup 3} range. These materials sell for approximately $200/ton ($1.00/ft{sup 3}) and have numerous applications. The incentive for this effort was based on previous experimental results in which lightweight aggregates (LWA) with unit weights of 25--55 lb/ft{sup 3} were produced from Illinois slag using a direct-fired furnace. In this program, bench-scale expansion tests conducted with two Illinois coal slags resulted in product unit weights of 12 and 18.5 lb/ ft{sup 3}, thus confirming the feasibility of producing ULWA from Illinois slags. During initial pilot vertical shaft furnace test runs, two Illinois slags were expanded to generate products with unit weights of 12.5--26.5 and 20--52 lb/ ft{sup 3}. Further attempts to lower the product unit weights resulted in fusion of the slag. This problem could be overcome by methods including surface treatment of the slag, blending the slag with other materials, or utilization of indirect firing methods. To lower the product unit weights, an indirect-fired horizontal shaft furnace was used and products with unit weights of 12.4--52.0 lb/ft{sup 3} were generated, thus indicating that this method can be used to produce a wide range of expanded products. A large batch of expanded slag was produced using an 18-in. diameter x 12-ft long indirect-fired pilot furnace. A sample from this batch was characterized. Specimens of insulating concrete made from expanded slag had a unit weight 43.3 lb/ft{sup 3} and thermal conductivity of 1.34 Btu-in./h/ft{sup 2}/{degrees}F. This compares well with a value of 1. 2 Btu-in./h/ft{sup 2}/{degrees}F for insulating concrete of a similar weight made from perlite, as per ASTM C 332-82.

  17. Space station furnace facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Sharon D.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1996-07-01

    The Space Shuttle Furnace Facility (SSFF) is the modular, multi-user scientific instrumentation for conducting materials research in the reduced gravity environment of the International Space Station. The facility is divided into the Core System and two Instrument Racks. The core system provides the common electrical and mechanical support equipment required to operate experiment modules (EMs). The EMs are investigator unique furnaces or apparatus designed to accomplish specific science investigations. Investigations are peer selected every two years from proposals submitted in response to National Aeronautics and Space Administration Research Announcements. The SSFF Core systems are designed to accommodate an envelope of eight types of experiment modules. The first two modules to be developed for the first instrument rack include a high temperature gradient furnace with quench, and a low temperature gradient furnace. A new EM is planned to be developed every two years.

  18. Paired Straight Hearth Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goals are to design, develop, and evaluate the scalability and commercial feasibility of the PSH Paired Straight Hearth Furnace alternative ironmaking process.

  19. Space Station Furnace Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, S.D.; Lehoczky, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is the modular, multi-user scientific instrumentation for conducting materials research in the reduced gravity ({approximately}10{sup {minus}6} g) environment of the International Space Station (ISS). The facility is divided into the Core System and two Instrument Racks (IRs). The Core System provides the common electrical and mechanical support equipment required to operate Experiment Modules (EMs). The EMs are investigator unique furnaces or apparatus designed to accomplish specific science investigations. Investigations are peer selected every two years from proposals submitted in response to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Research Announcements. The SSFF Core systems are designed to accommodate an envelope of eight types of experiment modules. The first two modules to be developed for the first Instrument Rack include a High Temperature Gradient Furnace with Quench (HGFQ), and a Low Temperature Gradient Furnace (LGF). A new EM is planned to be developed every two years.

  20. High temperature furnace

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.

    1976-08-03

    A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

  1. Programmable Multizone Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Edmund Y.; Larson, David J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Moving thermal gradients created without mechanical motion. Furnace having multiple, individually programmable heating zones developed for use in experiments on directional solidification. Holds rod specimen and generates thermal gradients moving along specimen. Elimination of translation mechanism makes furnace more compact and reduces vibrations, which disturb experiment. Availability of different temperature profiles through programming makes it versatile tool for research at low thermal gradients traveling at moderate speeds.

  2. Verification of Steelmaking Slags Iron Content Final Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    J.Y. Hwang

    2006-10-04

    The steel industry in the United States generates about 30 million tons of by-products each year, including 6 million tons of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slag. The recycling of BF (blast furnace) slag has made significant progress in past years with much of the material being utilized as construction aggregate and in cementitious applications. However, the recycling of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slags still faces many technical, economic, and environmental challenges. Previous efforts have focused on in-plant recycling of the by-products, achieving only limited success. As a result, large amounts of by-products of various qualities have been stockpiled at steel mills or disposed into landfills. After more than 50 years of stockpiling and landfilling, available mill site space has diminished and environmental constraints have increased. The prospect of conventionally landfilling of the material is a high cost option, a waste of true national resources, and an eternal material liability issue. The research effort has demonstrated that major inroads have been made in establishing the viability of recycling and reuse of the steelmaking slags. The research identified key components in the slags, developed technologies to separate the iron units and produce marketable products from the separation processes. Three products are generated from the technology developed in this research, including a high grade iron product containing about 90%Fe, a medium grade iron product containing about 60% Fe, and a low grade iron product containing less than 10% Fe. The high grade iron product contains primarily metallic iron and can be marketed as a replacement of pig iron or DRI (Direct Reduced Iron) for steel mills. The medium grade iron product contains both iron oxide and metallic iron and can be utilized as a substitute for the iron ore in the blast furnace. The low grade iron product is rich in calcium, magnesium and iron oxides and silicates. It has a sufficient lime value and

  3. Thermal Spray Coatings for Blast Furnace Tuyere Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A.; Sivakumar, G.; Prusty, D.; Shalini, J.; Dutta, M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The components in an integrated steel plant are invariably exposed to harsh working environments involving exposure to high temperatures, corrosive gases, and erosion/wear conditions. One such critical component in the blast furnace is the tuyere, which is prone to thermal damage by splashing of molten metal/slag, erosive damage by falling burden material, and corrosion from the ensuing gases. All the above, collectively or independently, accelerate tuyere failure, which presents a potential explosion hazard in a blast furnace. Recently, thermal spray coatings have emerged as an effective solution to mitigate such severe operational challenges. In the present work, five different coatings deposited using detonation spray and air plasma spray techniques were comprehensively characterized. Performance evaluation involving thermal cycling, hot corrosion, and erosion tests was also carried out. Based on the studies, a coating system was suggested for possible tuyere applications and found to yield substantial improvement in service life during actual field trials.

  4. Utilization of Illinois slags for the production of ultra-lightweight aggregates. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhry, V.; Zimmerle, T.; Banerjee, D.D.

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this program is to demonstrate that solid residues (slag) from the gasification of Illinois coals can be utilized to manufacture ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA). Conventional ULWAs are made by pyroprocessing perlite ores and have unit weights in the range of 3--15 lb/ft{sup 3}. In a previous project, Praxis Engineers demonstrated at the pilot scale that lightweight aggregates with unit weights of 40--55 lb/ ft{sup 3} can be produced from Illinois coal slags, which is suitable for making lightweight cement concrete and precast blocks. These tests also indicated that a product with a unit weight of less than 25 lb/ft{sup 3} could be produced from slag. This project is aimed at testing the potential for producing ULWA from Illinois coal slags. Target applications include loose fill insulation, insulating concrete, lightweight precast products such as concrete blocks and rooftiles, and filtration media. Laboratory- and pilot-scale testing is being conducted in Phase I to identify operating conditions for the expansion of Illinois slags to produce ULWA. Following this, a large batch of expanded slag will be produced, for evaluation in various applications in Phase II.

  5. Synthetic lightweight aggregate from cool water slag: Bench-scale confirmation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhry, V.; Hadley, S.R. )

    1990-05-01

    This report analyzes the potential for production of synthetic lightweight aggregate (SLA) from a Texaco coal gasification solid residue. The objective of the project was to develop a replacement for conventional lightweight aggregates typically derived from expanded clays and shales or natural lightweight aggregates. The sequence of tests performed to develop SLA from slag began with the crushing of samples of slag, followed by either extrusion or pelletization. The level of clay binder required for sufficient aggregate strength was evaluated. Using a tube furnace, expansion characteristics were studied as a function of temperature and residence time. Next, a large batch of SLA was produced in a muffle furnace and used to form concrete test cylinders. The unit weight of the resultant concrete was 105 lb/ft{sup 3}, with a compressive strength of 3100 psi, which meets the requirements specified in ASTM C 330 for lightweight aggregate of a comparable density. When the same sequence of tests was performed using a slag from which the bulk of the char had been removed, the concrete test cylinders showed an improved relationship between strength and density. Based on the results of bench-scale tests and the similarity to conventional LWA production, the conceptual design of an SLA processing plant was formulated. A comparative estimate of operating costs was prepared by analyzing data from plants using clays and shales to produce lightweight aggregates. 24 refs., 15 figs., 17 tabs.

  6. Spontaneous Emulsification of a Metal Drop Immersed in Slag Due to Dephosphorization: Surface Area Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assis, Andre N.; Warnett, Jason; Spooner, Stephen; Fruehan, Richard J.; Williams, Mark A.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2015-04-01

    When a chemical reaction occurs between two immiscible liquids, mass transfer is continuously taking place at the liquid-liquid interface. Several studies have shown that if the species being exchanged between the two liquids are surface-active, a very pronounced decrease in interfacial tension can occur which can lead to a phenomenon called spontaneous emulsification. In steelmaking, this behavior has been observed for several reactions that involve the transfer of impurities from molten steel to a molten-oxide slag but little quantification has been made. This work focuses on spontaneous emulsification due to the dephosphorization of a Fe-P drop immersed in a basic oxygen furnace type slag. An Au-image furnace attached to a confocal scanning laser microscope was used to rapidly heat and cool the samples at different times, and X-ray computerized tomography was used to perform the surface area calculations of the samples where the slag/steel reaction was allowed to occur for distinct times. The results show that the surface area of the metal drop rapidly increases by over one order of magnitude during the first 60 seconds of the reaction while the chemical reaction is occurring at a fast rate. Once the reaction slows down, approximately after 60 seconds, the droplets start to coalesce back together minimizing the surface area and returning to a geometry close to its equilibrium shape.

  7. Steel slag: a waste industrial by-product as an alternative sustainable green building material in construction applications--an attempt for solid waste management.

    PubMed

    Pofale, Arun D; Nadeem, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    This investigation explores the possibility of utilizing granular slag as an alternative to fine aggregate (natural sand) in construction applications like masonry and plastering. Construction industry utilizes large volume of fine aggregate in all the applications which has resulted into shortage of good quality naturally available fine aggregate. Use of granular slag serves two fold purposes, i.e. waste utilisation as well as alternative eco-friendly green building material for construction. The investigation highlights comparative study of properties with partial and full replacement of fine aggregate (natural sand) by granular slag in cement mortar applications (masonry and plastering). For this purpose, cement mortar mix proportions from 1:3, 1:4, 1:5 & 1:6 by volume were selected for 0, 25, 50, 75 & 100% replacement levels with w/c ratios of 0.60, 0.65, 0.70 & 0.72 respectively. Based on the study results, it could be inferred that replacement of natural sand with granular slag from 25 to 75% increased the packing density of mortar which resulted into reduced w/c ratio, increased strength properties of all mortar mixes. Hence, it could be recommended that the granular slag could be effectively utilized as fine aggregate in masonry and plastering applications in place of conventional cement mortar mixes using natural sand. PMID:23741870

  8. Extending the practical application range of the dry-bottom furnace analysis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osintsev, K. V.

    2015-02-01

    The model of a dry-bottom furnace having different wall-mounted burner layout arrangements used for estimating the flame thermal characteristics in carrying out design and engineering works, and during boiler adjustment and investigation activities is considered. A model application procedure is proposed. By using the suggested proposals it becomes possible to achieve better reliability of the system for admitting reagent and controlled inert flows into the furnace, to minimize the fouling of heating surfaces during the combustion of slagging solid fuels, and to increase the period of boiler equipment operation between repairs.

  9. Extending the life of water-cooled copper cooling fingers for furnace refractories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia, Gabriel; Utigard, Torstein A.; Plascencia, Gabriel; Jaramillo, David

    2005-10-01

    To extend the service life of refractory linings in high-temperature furnaces, it is becoming common to embed copper cooling devices in the lining. These devices extract enough heat from the hearth of the furnace to freeze a protective thin layer of slag onto the surface of the lining. However, the cooling devices may lose their efficiency over time. It is believed that high-temperature oxidation of copper is responsible for the loss in heat-extraction capacity. To test coolers under severe conditions, immersion tests were carried out in molten matte and slag of laboratory-scale cooling elements protected by various means. A composite cooler was developed that consists of a copper core shielded by a Cu-4 wt.% Al alloy sheet. Although the rate of heat extraction is not as high as that of the un-alloyed copper, this cooler still extracts heat at a very high rate.

  10. Heat exchange investigation and modernization of furnace of P-67 boiler of 800 MW unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bely, V. V.; Porozov, S. V.; Vasiliev, V. V.; Dekterev, A. A.; Tepfer, E. S.

    2007-06-01

    For the purpose of the development and introduction of the arrangements aimed at increasing the slagless power, economy, and reliability of the P-67 boiler of the 800 MW unit of the Berezovskaya Power Plant No. 1, the variation of heat-engineering characteristics of the coal (lignite) of the open-cast mine “Berezovsky-1” and its slag properties was investigated, the aerodynamics, heat exchange, formation of nitrogen oxides, and the intensity of local slag formation for different operation regimes and variants of the reconstruction of the furnace-burner device were modelled mathematically, the thermal efficiency of furnace walls was studied experimentally during their long-term operation, including the time after their mechanical cleaning, modernization of the system of water sootblowing, under low air excess, coal dust coarsening, loading the lower rows of burners, and lower air blowing.

  11. High gradient directional solidification furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, B. R.; Whitt, W. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high gradient directional solidification furnace is disclosed which includes eight thermal zones throughout the length of the furnace. In the hot end of the furnace, furnace elements provide desired temperatures. These elements include Nichrome wire received in a grooved tube which is encapsulated y an outer alumina core. A booster heater is provided in the hot end of the furnace which includes toroidal tungsten/rhenium wire which has a capacity to put heat quickly into the furnace. An adiabatic zone is provided by an insulation barrier to separate the hot end of the furnace from the cold end. The old end of the furnace is defined by additional heating elements. A heat transfer plate provides a means by which heat may be extracted from the furnace and conducted away through liquid cooled jackets. By varying the input of heat via the booster heater and output of heat via the heat transfer plate, a desired thermal gradient profile may be provided.

  12. Effects of thin-film accelerated carbonation on steel slag leaching.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, R; Costa, G; Polettini, A; Pomi, R

    2015-04-01

    This paper discusses the effects of accelerated carbonation on the leaching behaviour of two types of stainless steel slags (electric arc furnace and argon oxygen decarburisation slag). The release of major elements and toxic metals both at the natural pH and at varying pH conditions was addressed. Geochemical modelling of the eluates was used to theoretically describe leaching and derive information about mineralogical changes induced by carbonation. Among the investigated elements, Ca and Si were most appreciably affected by carbonation. A very clear effect of carbonation on leaching was observed for silicate phases; geochemical modelling indicated that the Ca/Si ratio of Ca-controlling minerals shifted from ∼ 1 for the untreated slag to 0.5-0.67 for the carbonated samples, thus showing that the carbonation process left some residual Ca-depleted silicate phases while the extracted Ca precipitated in the form of carbonate minerals. For toxic metals the changes in leaching induced by carbonation appeared to be mainly related to the resulting pH changes, which were as high as ∼ 2 orders of magnitude upon carbonation. Depending on the specific shape of the respective solubility curves, the extent of leaching of toxic metals from the slag was differently affected by carbonation. PMID:25596552

  13. Recovery of Zinc and Lead from Electric-Furnace Steelmaking Dust at Berzelius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maczek, Helmut; Kola, Rolf

    1980-01-01

    The Waelz unit at the Berzelius Metallhütten GmbH plant in Duisburg, West Germany, was originally built to recover zinc and lead values in zinc retort residues and slags from lead shaft furnaces. The process has also proved suitable for recovering zinc and lead from steelmaking dusts. The metallurgical characteristics and information on operating costs encountered in the three decades over which this Waelz plant has been in operation at Berzelius are described and discussed.

  14. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, September 1, 1996--November 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700{degrees}F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications.

  15. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, December 1, 1997--February 28, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of as-generated slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, the authors found that it would be extremely difficult for as-generated slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1,400 and 1,700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and Phase 2, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications. This document summarizes the Phase 2 accomplishments to date along with the major accomplishments from Phase 1.

  16. Looking Northwest at Furnace Control Panels and Gas Control Furnace ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Northwest at Furnace Control Panels and Gas Control Furnace in Red Room Within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  17. Lunar cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  18. Postmortem Study of a Magnesia-Chromite Brick from a Lead Recycling Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregurek, D.; Reinharter, K.; Reiter, V.; Wenzl, C.; Spanring, A.

    2015-09-01

    This study provides an example of a detailed postmortem analysis carried out on a used silicate-bonded magnesia-chromite brick out of a lead recycling furnace. The magnesia-chromite brick suffered from a high chemical attack due to the process slag. The high CaO, BaO, and sulfur-bearing silicate slag, as well as a high Na2O supply from soda resulted not only in a deep-reaching infiltration of the brick microstructure but also in a severe corrosion of the brick components. Both the sintered magnesia and chromite were attacked chemically. The FactSage calculations showed the formation of high amounts of liquid phase in the infiltrated microstructure and the formation of various Na-Ca-Al-silicates. A detailed investigation of the wear mechanisms through "postmortem studies" is a crucial prerequisite for every refractory producer to understand the interactions between slag and refractory materials. The obtained information and insights serve as a basis for improving refractory materials (i.e., choice of refractories for individual process and new developments) and consequently furnace operations (i.e., prolonged furnace campaigns).

  19. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  20. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Behavior of Phosphorus in DRI/HBI During Electric Furnace Steelmaking

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Frueham; Christopher P. Manning cmanning@bu.edu

    2001-10-05

    Many common scrap substitutes such as direct reduced iron pellets (DRI), hot briquetted iron (HBI), iron carbide, etc., contain significantly higher levels of phosphorus steelmaking for the production of higher quality steels, control of phosphorus levels in the metal will become a concern. This study has developed a more complete understanding of the behavior of phosphorus in DRI during EAF steelmaking, through a thorough investigation of the kinetics and thermodynamics of phosphorus transfer in the EAF based upon laboratory and plant experiments and trials. Laboratory experiments have shown that phosphorus mass transfer between oxide and metallic phases within commercial direct reduced iron pellets occurs rapidly upon melting according to the local equilibrium for these phases. Laboratory kinetic experiments indicate that under certain conditions, phosphorus mass transfer between slag and metal is influenced by dynamic phenomena, which affect the mass transfer coefficient for the reaction and/or the slag metal interfacial area. Plant trials were conducted to directly evaluate the conditions of mass transfer in the electric furnace and to determine the effects of different scrap substitute materials upon the slag chemistry, the behavior of phosphorus in the steel, and upon furnace yield. The data from these trials were also used to develop empirical models for the slag chemistry and furnace temperature as functions of time during a single heat. The laboratory and plant data were used to develop a numerical process model to describe phosphorus transfer in the EAF

  1. Development of fluidized bed cement sintering technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Katsuji

    1994-12-31

    In the new system presented in this paper, the cement clinker is sintered, not in a rotary kiln, but in two different furnaces: a spouted bed kiln and a fluidized bed kiln. The heat generated in the process of cooling the cement clinker is recovered by a fluidized bed cooler and a packed bed cooler, which are more efficient than the conventional coolers. Compared with the rotary kiln system, the new technology significantly reduces NO{sub x} emissions, appreciably cuts energy consumption, and reduces CO{sub 2} emissions as well. Thus, the new system is an efficient cement sintering system that is friendly to the global environment. In this paper, we describe this new technology as one of the applied technologies at an industrial level that is being developed in the Clean Coal Technology Project, and we present the results from test operations at our pilot plant.

  2. Functional design of refractories for slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Dogan, Cynthia P.; Bennett, James P.; Chinn, Richard E.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.

    2002-09-01

    Refractories are used in coal slagging gasifiers to protect the outer steel shell from coal slag attack and to insulate it from heat. Corrosion by the aggressive coal slags and unexpected temperature shock severely shorten the service life of these refractories. Currently, the best refractories available for the slagging coal gasifiers last from 6 to 18 months. The down time for the installation of new refractory lining reduces on-line availability of the gasifier. Researchers at the Albany Research Center (ARC) have found that structural spalling by slag penetration into the refractory is responsible for the early failure of refractories in some gasifiers. The low melting point of coal slags, the low thermal gradient in the refractory, and the improper design of refractory microstructure contribute to promote slag penetration. Work at ARC has demonstrated that refractories with an improved functional design are more resistant to slag penetration. Cooperation with commercial refractory companies and gasifier designers/operators is underway to produce and test improved refractories.

  3. Sculpting with Cement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Cement offers many creative possibilities for school art programs. Instructions are given for sculpting with fiber-cement and sand-cement, as well as for finishing processes and the addition of color. Safety is stressed. (IS)

  4. CO2 sequestration by carbonation of steelmaking slags in an autoclave reactor.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-E; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chu, Hsiao-Wen; Wang, Chu-Fang; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2011-11-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) sequestration experiments using the accelerated carbonation of three types of steelmaking slags, i.e., ultra-fine (UF) slag, fly-ash (FA) slag, and blended hydraulic slag cement (BHC), were performed in an autoclave reactor. The effects of reaction time, liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S), temperature, CO(2) pressure, and initial pH on CO(2) sequestration were evaluated. Two different CO(2) pressures were chosen: the normal condition (700 psig) and the supercritical condition (1300 psig). The carbonation conversion was determined quantitatively by using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). The major factors that affected the conversion were reaction time (5 min to 12h) and temperature (40-160°C). The BHC was found to have the highest carbonation conversion of approximately 68%, corresponding to a capacity of 0.283 kg CO(2)/kg BHC, in 12h at 700 psig and 160°C. In addition, the carbonation products were confirmed to be mainly in CaCO(3), which was determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) to analyze samples before and after carbonation. Furthermore, reaction kinetics were expressed with a surface coverage model, and the carbon footprint of the developed technology in this investigation was calculated by a life cycle assessment (LCA). PMID:21889848

  5. Monitoring of sulphate attack on hardened cement paste studied by synchrotron XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, J.; Meng, B.; Emmerling, F.

    2015-10-01

    The complex matter of external sulphate attack on cement-based construction materials is still not completely understood. The concentration of sulphate is a crucial factor for the formation of secondary phases and phase transitions of cement hydrates due to sulphate ingress into the microstructure. The sulphate attack on building materials for high and low sulphate concentrations was monitored by laboratory experiments. Hardened cement paste consisting of ordinary Portland cement (CEM I) were exposed to aqueous solutions of sodium sulphate for 18 months. Three sample compositions were used for this research, including different supplementary cementitious materials (SCM). The phase composition was determined for different time spans by high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Cross sections of exposed cement prisms were investigated as a representation of the microstructural profile. Based on the data, a temporal and spatial determination of the stages of the sulphate attack and the deterioration course was possible. Cement matrices blended with slag showed the highest resistance against sulphate attack.

  6. Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of

  7. Slag-Refractory Interaction in Coal Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Williford, Ralph E.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Matyas, Josef; Fluegel, Alexander; Cooley, Scott K.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Edmondson, Autumn B.

    2007-10-13

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has taken an integrated approach to address major technical issues in conversion of coal into clean-burning liquid fuel. The approach includes: 1) modeling of gasifier and slag flow, 2) experimental characterization of slag viscoelastic behavior as a function of temperature for representative slags and refractory-slag interactions, and 3) interplay of the modeling and experimental measurements to identify critical conditions beyond which refractory corrosion tends to increase sharply. Basic heat and mass balances were considered in the gasifier and flow models. Two new refractory spalling models were developed. An experimental design that encompassed the broad range of slag chemistries that were of interest to coal gasification was developed and implemented. Selected gasifier refractories were tested in a simulated gasifier environment in our laboratory to identify refractory degradation mechanisms. Preliminary results of the effort are summarized.

  8. Ex Situ CO2 capture by carbonation of steelmaking slag coupled with metalworking wastewater in a rotating packed bed.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Yuan; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Chen, Yi-Hung; Tan, Chung-Sung; Chang, E-E

    2013-04-01

    Both basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag and cold-rolling wastewater (CRW) exhibiting highly alkaline characteristics require stabilization and neutralization prior to utilization and/or final disposal. Using CO2 from flue gases as the stabilizing and neutralizing agents could also diminish CO2 emissions. In this investigation, ex situ hot stove gas containing 30 vol% CO2 in the steelmaking process was captured by accelerated carbonation of BOF slag coupled with CRW in a rotating packed bed (RPB). The developed RPB process exhibits superior results, with significant CO2 removal efficiency (η) of 96-99% in flue gas achieved within a short reaction time of 1 min at 25 °C and 1 atm. Calcite (CaCO3) was identified as the main product according to XRD and SEM-XEDS observations. In addition, the elimination of lime and Ca(OH)2 in the BOF slag during carbonation is beneficial to its further use as construction material. Consequently, the developed RPB process could capture the CO2 from the flue gas, neutralize the CRW, and demonstrate the utilization potential for BOF slag. It was also concluded that carbonation of BOF slag coupled with CRW in an RPB is a viable method for CO2 capture due to its higher mass transfer rate and CO2 removal efficiency in a short reaction time. PMID:23458276

  9. CHARGING SIDE OF #130 ELECTRIC FURNACE CO. REHEAT FURNACE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CHARGING SIDE OF #130 ELECTRIC FURNACE CO. REHEAT FURNACE IN REROLL BAY. CAKES FROM THE CASTING SHOP ARE BROUGHT UP TO ROLLING TEMPERATURE IN ONE OF TWO (#130 AND 146) GAS-FIRED FURNACES. A RADIO-CONTROLLED OVERHEAD CRANE TRANSFERS CAKES FROM FLATCARS TO THE ROLLER LINE LEADING INTO THE FURNACE. CAKES ARE HEATED AT 900-1000 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT FOR THREE TO FOUR HOURS. RATED FURNACE CAPACITY IS 100,000 LBS.\\HOUR. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  10. Destruction of inorganic municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash in a DC arc plasma furnace.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Ni, Guohua; Jiang, Yiman; Chen, Longwei; Chen, Mingzhou; Meng, Yuedong

    2010-09-15

    Due to the toxicity of dioxins, furans and heavy metals, there is a growing environmental concern on municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash in China. The purpose of this study is directed towards the volume-reduction of fly ash without any additive by thermal plasma and recycling of vitrified slag. This process uses extremely high-temperature in an oxygen-starved environment to completely decompose complex waste into very simple molecules. For developing the proper plasma processes to treat MSWI fly ash, a new crucible-type plasma furnace was built. The melting process metamorphosed fly ash to granulated slag that was less than 1/3 of the volume of the fly ash, and about 64% of the weight of the fly ash. The safety of the vitrified slag was tested. The properties of the slag were affected by the differences in the cooling methods. Water-cooled and composite-cooled slag showed more excellent resistance against the leaching of heavy metals and can be utilized as building material without toxicity problems. PMID:20542633

  11. Effect of carbonaceous particles on slag foaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Fruehan, R. J.

    1995-08-01

    Use of carbonaceous particles such as coke or coal char in controlling slag foaming is of great practical significance for bath-smelting and other steelmaking processes. The foamability of the liquid slag in terms of the foam index has been determined with the presence of different amounts of coke and coal char particles. Different sized and shaped particles were used in the experiments. It was found that the foam index decreased significantly as the ratio of the total cross-sectional area of the particles to the liquid slag surface area increased. When the foam was generated by argon gas injection through an alumina nozzle (i.d. = 1.5 mm), a liquid slag, CaO-SiO2-CaF2-(Al2O3), depending on the alumina content, could have an initial foam index of about 2 to 4 seconds at 1500 °C without any carbonaceous particles. When the slag surface was covered only 15 ~20 pct with either coke or coal char particles, the foam was totally suppressed regardless of the initial foam index. In order to understand the mechanism of the antifoam effect of the carbonaceous particles, interactions of a coke sphere, an iron ore pellet, an alumina tube, and a coal char particle with the liquid slag foam were examined by X-ray observation. It was concluded that the antifoam effect of coke or coal char particles is primarily contributed by the nonwetting nature of the carbonaceous materials with the liquid slag. Possible mechanisms of carbonaceous particles rupturing a slag film could be (1) the rapid thinning of the liquid slag film driven by a difference between the instantaneous contact angle and the equilibrium contact angle or (2) the “dewetting” of the liquid slag from the interface when the film is “bridged” by the particle.

  12. Mineralogy and the release of trace elements from slag from the Hegeler Zinc smelter, Illinois (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, N.M.; Seal, R.R., II

    2010-01-01

    Slag from the former Hegeler Zn-smelting facility in Illinois (USA) is mainly composed of spinifex Ca-rich plagioclase, fine-grained dendritic or coarse-grained subhedral to anhedral clinopyroxenes, euhedral to subhedral spinels, spherical blebs of Fe sulfides, silicate glass, and less commonly fayalitic olivine. Mullite and quartz were also identified in one sample as representing remnants of the furnace lining. Secondary phases such as goethite, hematite and gypsum are significant in some samples and reflect surficial weathering of the dump piles or represent byproducts of roasting. A relatively rare Zn-rich material contains anhedral willemite, subhedral gahnite, massive zincite, hardystonite and a Zn sulfate (brianyoungite), among other phases, and likely represents the molten content of the smelting furnace before Zn extraction. The bulk major-element chemistry of most slag samples is dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3 and CaO. The bulk composition of the slag suggests a high viscosity of the melt and the mineralogy suggests a high silica content of the melt. Bulk slag trace-element chemistry shows that the dominant metal is Zn with >28.4 wt.% in the Zn-rich material and between 212 and 14,900 mg/kg in the other slags. The concentrations of other trace elements reach the following: 45 mg/kg As, 1170 mg/kg Ba, 191 mg/kg Cd, 242 mg/kg Co, 103 mg/kg Cr, 6360 mg/kg Cu, 107 mg/kg Ni, and 711 mg/kg Pb. Zinc, as the dominant metal in the slags, is likely the most environmentally significant metal in these samples; Cd, Cu, and Pb are also of concern and their concentrations exceed US Environmental Protection Agency preliminary remediation goals for residential soils. Spinel was found to be the dominant concentrator of Zn for samples containing significant Zn (>1 wt.%); the silicate glass also contained relatively high concentrations of Zn compared to other phases. Zinc partitioned into the silicates and oxides in these samples is generally more resistant to weathering

  13. New possibilities of Consteel furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuluevskii, Yu. N.; Zinurov, I. Yu.; Shver, V. G.

    2012-06-01

    The disadvantages of Consteel electric furnaces, which are mainly caused by the low efficiency of heating of a charged metal scrap by effluent furnace gases, are considered. A new concept of an electric-arc furnace with scrap heating on a conveyer by powerful burners, which provide fast scrap heating to 800°C, is proposed. As follows from calculations, the capacity of such a furnace increases substantially, the specific electric power consumption decreases, and the emission of toxic substances into the atmosphere decreases as compared to the existing Consteel furnaces.

  14. Silica Transport and Cementation in Quartz Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pebble, C.; Farver, J.; Onasch, C.; Winslow, D.

    2008-12-01

    Silica transport and cementation in quartz aggregates have been experimentally investigated. Starting materials include a natural quartz arenite (Pocono sandstone), sized clasts of synthetic quartz, and sized grains of disaggregated natural sandstones. Experimental charges consisted of amorphous silica powder (~25 mg), AlCl3 powder (~3 mg), 25 wt% NaCl brine solution (~20 mg), and the starting material (~150 mg). The charges were weld-sealed in gold capsules and run in cold-seal pressure vessels at 300°C to 600°C at 150 MPa confining pressure for up to 4 weeks. Detailed calibrations of the furnaces indicate the maximum temperature variation across the length of the sample charges (3-7mm) was <5°C, and typically <3°C. After the experiments, samples were vacuum impregnated with epoxy containing a blue dye and sawn in half along the long axis of the sample charge. The nature and amount of silica transport and cementation in the samples was determined by a combination of Cathodoluminescence (CL), Light Microscopy (LM), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Photomosaics of the samples were collected and the amount of cement, porosity, and average grain sizes were determined by point-counting. The cement was easily recognized from the quartz grains by the difference in luminescence. The experiments indicate that the presence of amorphous silica results in rapid silica cementation in quartz aggregates (e.g., up to 12% cement by volume in 4 weeks at 450°C). The amount of cementation is a function of substrate type, time, temperature, and ionic strength of the brine. The rate of silica transport through the length of the experimental charge appears to be limited by the silica solubility and its rapid depletion by cementation. Although most of the cement was derived from the amorphous silica, evidence for local dissolution-precipitation was observed. The experiments demonstrate that the mobility of silica, and consequent precipitation of cement, does not require a

  15. Analysis on the Oversize Blast Furnace Desulfurization and a Sulfide Capacity Prediction Model Based on Congregated Electron Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenyang, Wang; Jianliang, Zhang; Gang, An; Zhengjian, Liu; Zhengming, Cheng; Junjie, Huang; Jingwei, Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Through analyzed and regressed the actual productive desulfurization data from the oversize blast furnace (5500 m3) in north China, the relationship between the sulfur distribution parameters and the slag composition in actual production situation was investigated. As the slag and hot metal phases have their own balance sulfur content or sulfur partial pressure in gas phase, respectively, the non-equilibrium of sulfur among gas, slag, and metal phases leads to the transmission and distribution of sulfur. Combined with sulfur transmission reactions between gas, slag and metal phases, C/CO pairs equilibrium, and Wagner model, the measured sulfide capacity can be acquired using sulfur distribution ratio, sulfur activity coefficient, and oxygen activity in hot metal. Based on the theory of congregated electron phase, a new sulfide capacity prediction model (CEPM) has been developed, which has a good liner relationship with the measured sulfide capacity. Thus, using the burden structure for BF, the ironmaking slag composition can be obtained simply and can be used to reliably predict the ironmaking slag desulfurization ability a few hours later after charging under a certain temperature by CEPM.

  16. Blast furnace stove control

    SciTech Connect

    Muske, K.R.; Hansen, G.A.; Howse, J.W.; Cagliostro, D.J.; Chaubal, P.C.

    1998-12-31

    This paper outlines the process model and model-based control techniques implemented on the hot blast stoves for the No. 7 Blast Furnace at the Inland Steel facility in East Chicago, Indiana. A detailed heat transfer model of the stoves is developed. It is then used as part of a predictive control scheme to determine the minimum amount of fuel necessary to achieve the blast air requirements. The controller also considers maximum and minimum temperature constraints within the stove.

  17. High Efficiency Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K. S.; Koestler, D. J.

    1985-08-27

    Disclosed is a dwelling furnace having at least one clam-shell type primary heat exchanger in parallel orientation with a secondary heat exchanger, both the primary and secondary heat exchangers being vertically oriented relative to a furnace housing and parallel to the flow of air to be heated. The primary heat exchanger has a combustion chamber in the lower end thereof, and the lower end of the secondary heat exchanger exhausts into a tertiary heat exchanger oriented approximately perpendicular to the primary and secondary heat exchangers and horizontally relative to the housing, below the combustion chambers of the primary heat exchangers and below the exhaust outlet of the secondary heat exchanger. The tertiary heat exchanger includes a plurality of condensation tubes for retrieving the latent heat of condensation of the combustion gases. The furnace further comprises an induced draft blower for drawing combustion gases through the heat exchangers and inducting sufficient air to the combustion chamber of the primary heat exchanger for efficient combustion.

  18. High efficiency furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K. S.; Koestler, D. J.

    1985-12-31

    Disclosed is a dwelling furnace having at least one clam-shell type primary heat exchanger in parallel orientation with a secondary heat exchanger, both the primary and secondary heat exchangers being vertically oriented relative to a furnace housing and parallel to the flow of air to be heated. The primary heat exchanger has a combustion chamber in the lower end thereof, and the lower end of the secondary heat exchanger exhausts into a tertiary heat exchanger oriented approximately perpendicular to the primary and secondary heat exchangers and horizontally relative to the housing, below the combustion chambers of the primary heat exchangers and below the exhaust outlet of the secondary heat exchanger. The tertiary heat exchanger includes a plurality of condensation tubes for retrieving the latent heat of condensation of the combustion gases. The furnace further comprises an induced draft blower for drawing combustion gases through the heat exchangers and inducting sufficient air to the combustion chamber of the primary heat exchanger for efficient combustion.

  19. Sulfur Transfer via Gas Phase in Iron-making Blast Furnace under Intensive Coal Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiyuki, Matsui; Rikizou, Tadai; Kenji, Ito; Tadasu, Matsuo; Korehito, Kadoguchi; Reiji, Ono

    The steel industry will move toward more value additive products in the future. In order to support the value additive steel products, iron sources have to be secured with stable operation of furnaces and control of furnace have to be evolved. Environment consciousness including CO2 reduction leads more toward lower reducing agents ratio operation. It is common technical issue on both the more value additive products the environment consciousness to control the sulfur in the hot metal, slag and gas phase.In the present study, the amount of sulfur gasification was measured by combustion experiments with the attention on the simultaneous gasification of sulfur with carbon. By description of sulfurization from gas to burden materials based on the temperature distribution measured in actual furnace, the amount of sulfur transferred to gas was evaluated.

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  1. Bonding material containing ashes after domestic waste incineration for cementation of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, S.A.; Varlakov, A.P.; Gorbunova, O.A.; Arustamov, A.E.; Barinov, A.S.

    2007-07-01

    It is known that cement minerals hydration is accompanied with heat emission. Heat of hardening influences formation of a cement compound structure and its properties. It is important to reduce the heat quantity at continuous cementation of waste and filling of compartments of a repository or containers by a cement grout. For reduction of heating, it is necessary to use cement of mineral additives (fuel ashes, slag and hydraulic silica). Properties of ashes after domestic waste incineration can be similar to ones of fly fuel ashes. However, ash after domestic waste incineration is toxic industrial waste as it contains toxic elements (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb, Zn). Utilization of secondary waste (slag and ash) of combustion plants is an important environmental approach to solving cities' issues. Results of the research have shown that ashes of combustion plants can be used for radioactive waste conditioning. Co-processing of toxic and radioactive waste is ecologically and economically effective. At SIA 'Radon', experimental batches of cement compositions are used for cementation of oil containing waste. (authors)

  2. Blast Furnace Granulated Coal Injection

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    Production levels on each furnace exceeded 7000 NTHM/day during July. The combined production of 14,326 was a result of lower coke rates and below average delay rates on both furnaces, The combined production was at its highest level since September 1997. In August, the combined productivity declined to less than 13,500 NTHM/day. Although D furnace maintained a production rate in excess of 7000 NTHM/day, C furnace was lower because of a castfloor breakout and subsequent five day repair from August 26-30. Despite the lower productivity in August, injected coal and furnace coke rates were very good during the month. During September, the operation was difficult as a result of higher delays on both furnaces. The combined average monthly delay rate was considerably above the twenty-month average of 113 minutes per day and the combined average monthly production was less than 14,000 NTHM/day. Higher furnace coke rates at lower coal injection levels also contributed to the decrease. Additionally, the coke rate on both furnaces was increased substantially and the injected coal rate was decreased in preparation for the high volatile Colorado coal trial that started on September 28. The furnace process results for this quarter are shown in Tables 1A and 1B. In addition, the last twelve months of injected coal and coke rates for each furnace are shown in Figures 1 and 2.

  3. Co-treatment of gypsum sludge and Pb/Zn smelting slag for the solidification of sludge containing arsenic and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Cheng; Min, Xiao-Bo; Chai, Li-Yuan; Shi, Mei-Qing; Tang, Chong-Jian; Wang, Qing-Wei; Liang, Yan-Jie; Lei, Jie; Liyang, Wen-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Wastewater treatment sludge from a primary lead-zinc smelter is characterized as hazardous waste and requires treatment prior to disposal due to its significant arsenic and heavy metals contents. This study presents a method for the stabilization of arsenic sludge that uses a slag based curing agent composed of smelting slag, cement clinker and limestone. The Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) test, the China Standard Leaching Test (CSLT), and the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedures (TCLP) were used to physically and chemically characterize the solidified sludge. The binder ratio was determined according to the UCS and optimal experiments, and the optimal mass ratio of m (smelting slag): m (cement clinker): m (gypsum sludge): m (limestone) was 70:13:12:5. When the binder was mixed with arsenic sludge using a mass ratio of 1:1 and then maintained at 25 °C for 28 d, the UCS reached 9.30 MPa. The results indicated that the leached arsenic content was always less than 5 mg/L, which is a safe level, and does not contribute to recontamination of the environment. The arsenic sludge from the Zn/Pb metallurgy plant can be blended with cement clinker and smelting slag materials for manufacturing bricks and can be recycled as construction materials. PMID:27449964

  4. Detailed model for practical pulverized coal furnaces and gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.; Smoot, L.D.

    1989-08-01

    This study has been supported by a consortium of nine industrial and governmental sponsors. Work was initiated on May 1, 1985 and completed August 31, 1989. The central objective of this work was to develop, evaluate and apply a practical combustion model for utility boilers, industrial furnaces and gasifiers. Key accomplishments have included: Development of an advanced first-generation, computer model for combustion in three dimensional furnaces; development of a new first generation fouling and slagging submodel; detailed evaluation of an existing NO{sub x} submodel; development and evaluation of an improved radiation submodel; preparation and distribution of a three-volume final report: (a) Volume 1: General Technical Report; (b) Volume 2: PCGC-3 User's Manual; (c) Volume 3: Data Book for Evaluation of Three-Dimensional Combustion Models; and organization of a user's workshop on the three-dimensional code. The furnace computer model developed under this study requires further development before it can be applied generally to all applications; however, it can be used now by specialists for many specific applications, including non-combusting systems and combusting geseous systems. A new combustion center was organized and work was initiated to continue the important research effort initiated by this study. 212 refs., 72 figs., 38 tabs.

  5. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2000-12-01

    This document summarizes progress on the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2000 through September 30, 2000. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid will also be determined, as will the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NOX selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), First Energy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. This is the second reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, the first of four short-term sorbent injection tests were conducted at the First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant. This test determined the effectiveness of dolomite injection through out-of-service burners as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from this unit. The tests showed that dolomite injection could achieve up to 95% sulfuric acid removal. Balance of plant impacts on furnace slagging and fouling, air heater fouling, ash loss-on-ignition, and the flue gas desulfurization system were also determined. These results are presented and discussed in this report.

  6. Furnace veneering systems of special design help achieve energy reduction goals at Armco

    SciTech Connect

    Caspersen, L.J.

    1982-12-01

    A steel company conserves energy by veneering reheat furnaces with a ceramic fiber modular system. The furnace lining system incorporates several grades of veneering materials (modules, cements, coatings) whose application is matched to the exact conditions in the furnace. Zoned linings utilize a combination of grades of alumina-silica modules to achieve thermally efficient yet durable performance. High temperature cements exhibit good tackiness, easy module penetration and high strength retention after firing. A protective coating is sprayed in a thin layer over the modules and can be easily reapplied at a later date should it be necessary. Benefits include greater thermal control (temperature responsiveness and heating uniformity), less over-firing, less fuel use, and less heat loss. Fuel efficiency is increased by 20 to 50%.

  7. Design and Implementation of Alkali Activated Cement For Sustainable Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseson, Alexander James

    Herein, progress is presented on the design and implementation of technology for sustainable development in general and international development in particular. Necessarily interdisciplinary, the work draws upon the tools and techniques of Mechanical, Materials, and Civil Engineering; and History & Politics. The work was conducted along two paths, the first being the theory and methodology of sustainable development. A flexible design and dissemination framework was developed, Technology Seeding, defined as: development by the transfer and participatory adaptation of appropriate proven conceptual designs. The methodology was developed in part through two case studies which implemented, respectively, wood-turning lathes in Tanzania and upland rice planters in Thailand. The second path is the design and investigation of alkali-activated cements (AACs) for practical use. Those developed herein, for US markets, comprise ground granulated blast furnace slag, soda ash (sodium carbonate), and up to 68 wt.% granular limestone. Mixture Design of Experiment (DOE) was utilized to guide empirical and theoretical analysis of performance (e.g. compressive strength), economic & ecological aspects (e.g. cost, CO2 production, energy consumption), and chemistry (e.g. Rietveld analysis of x-ray diffractograms). Models were derived to understand the impact of mix design on performance and for optimization. Successful formulations are hydraulic and cure at room temperature, with strengths as high as 41 MPa at 3 days and 65 MPa at 28 days. Some of these formulations, compared to OPC, are competitive in performance, reduce cost by up to 40%, and reduce both CO2 production and energy consumption by up to 97%. Major chemical products include calcium silicate hydrates / calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (C-(A)-S-H), gaylussite, and calcite (both newly formed and remaining from limestone). Calcite/dolomite and C-(A)-S-H both contribute to strength. A fraction of the limestone is consumed

  8. Deoxidation Limits of Titanium Alloys during Pressure Electro Slag Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosinski, M.; Hassan-Pour, S.; Friedrich, B.; Ratiev, S.; Ryabtsev, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on deoxidation of titanium alloys produced by aluminothermic reduction (ATR) and subsequent homogenizing and alloying by vacuum induction melting (VIM). The main goal of the performed research work is to outline the deoxidation limit during pressure electro slag remelting (PESR) of the described material. To obtain electrodes for deoxidation, a Ti-24Al-16V masteralloy was produced by ATR and afterwards melted in a 0.5 litre calcium- zirconate (lab scale) or 14 litres high purity calcia (pilot scale) crucibles with continuous addition of Ti-sponge after reaching liquid state in order to obtain a final Ti-6Al-4V alloy. During melting, in both cases evaporation of calcium was noticed. The cast ingots were analysed for oxygen using inert gas fusion method, matrix and alloying elements were analysed by XRF. Results show oxygen levels between 0.5 and 0.95 wt.-% for the ingots which were melted in calcium-zirconate crucibles and approx. 1 - 1.2 wt.-% for the material produced by utilization of calcia crucibles. The subsequent deoxidation was carried out in lab and pilot scale electroslag remelting furnaces using a commercially pure calcium fluoride slag and metallic calcium as deoxidation agent. It could be shown, that deoxidation of the highly contaminated material is possible applying this method to a certain limit. Pilot scale trials showed a reduction of oxygen contents by 1500 - 3500 ppm. Oxygen levels in lab scale trials showed weaker deoxidation effects. In order to describe the achieved deoxidation effects in a quantitative way, the analyzed oxygen contents of the obtained ingots are compared with calculated data resulting from a mathematical kinetic model. The modelled datasets are in good agreement with experimental oxygen values.

  9. Molten Slag Would Boost Coal Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrall, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Reactor increases residence time of uncovered char. Near-100percent carbon conversion achievable in reactor incorporating moltenslag bath. Slag maintains unconverted carbon impinging on surface at high temperatures for longer period of time, enhancing conversion.

  10. Improving thermocouple service life in slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Thomas, Hugh; Krabbe, Rick

    2005-01-01

    The measurement of temperature within slagging gasifiers for long periods of time is difficult/impossible because of sensor failure or blockage of inputs used to monitor gasifier temperature. One of the most common means of temperature measurement in a gasifier is physically, through the use of thermocouples in a gasifier sidewall. These units can fail during startup, standby, or during the first 40-90 days of gasifier service. Failure can be caused by a number of issues; including thermocouple design, construction, placement in the gasifier, gasifier operation, and molten slag attack of the materials used in a thermocouple assembly. Lack of temperature control in a gasifier can lead to improper preheating, slag buildup on gasifier sidewalls, slag attack of gasifier refractories used to line a gasifier, or changes in desired gas output from a gasifier. A general outline of thermocouple failure issues and attempts by the Albany Research Center to improve the service life of thermocouples will be discussed.

  11. Seismic behavior of geogrid reinforced slag wall

    SciTech Connect

    Edincliler, Ayse; Baykal, Gokhan; Saygili, Altug

    2008-07-08

    Flexible retaining structures are known with their high performance under earthquake loads. In geogrid reinforced walls the performance of the fill material and the interface of the fill and geogrid controls the performance. Geosynthetic reinforced walls in seismic regions must be safe against not only static forces but also seismic forces. The objective of this study is to determine the behavior of a geogrid reinforced slag wall during earthquake by using shaking table experiments. This study is composed of three stages. In the first stage the physical properties of the material to be used were determined. In the second part, a case history involving the use of slag from steel industry in the construction of geogrid reinforced wall is presented. In the third stage, the results of shaking table tests conducted using model geogrid wall with slag are given. From the results, it is seen that slag can be used as fill material for geogrid reinforced walls subjected to earthquake loads.

  12. Non-carbon induction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Masters, D.R.; Pfeiler, W.A.

    1984-01-06

    The present invention is directed to an induction furnace for melting and casting highly pure metals and alloys such as uranium and uranium alloys in such a manner as to minimize contamination of the melt by carbon derived from the materials and the environment within the furnace. The subject furnace is constructed of non-carbon materials and is housed within a conventional vacuum chamber. The furnace comprises a ceramic oxide crucible for holding the charge of metal or alloys. The heating of the crucible is achieved by a plasma-sprayed tungsten susceptor surrounding the crucible which, in turn, is heated by an rf induction coil separated from the susceptor by a cylinder of inorganic insulation. The furnace of the present invention is capable of being rapidly cycled from ambient temperatures to about 1650/sup 0/C for effectively melting uranium and uranium alloys without the attendant carbon contamination problems previously encountered when using carbon-bearing furnace materials.

  13. Carbon-free induction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Masters, David R.; Pfeiler, William A.

    1985-01-01

    An induction furnace for melting and casting highly pure metals and alloys such as uranium and uranium alloys in such a manner as to minimize contamination of the melt by carbon derived from the materials and the environment within the furnace. The subject furnace is constructed of carbon free materials and is housed within a conventional vacuum chamber. The furnace comprises a ceramic oxide crucible for holding the charge of metal or alloy. The heating of the crucible is achieved by a plasma-sprayed tungsten susceptor surrounding the crucible which, in turn, is heated by an RF induction coil separated from the susceptor by a cylinder of inorganic insulation. The furnace of the present invention is capable of being rapidly cycled from ambient temperatures to about 1650.degree. C. for effectively melting uranium and uranium alloys without the attendant carbon contamination problems previously encountered when using carbon-bearing furnace materials.

  14. HIGH TEMPERATURE MICROSCOPE AND FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Olson, D.M.

    1961-01-31

    A high-temperature microscope is offered. It has a reflecting optic situated above a molten specimen in a furnace and reflecting the image of the same downward through an inert optic member in the floor of the furnace, a plurality of spaced reflecting plane mirrors defining a reflecting path around the furnace, a standard microscope supported in the path of and forming the end terminus of the light path.

  15. Effect of Lime on Mechanical and Durability Properties of Blended Cement Based Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Prasanna Kumar; Patro, Sanjaya Kumar; Moharana, Narayana C.

    2016-05-01

    This work presents the results of experimental investigations performed to evaluate the effect of lime on mechanical and durability properties of concrete mixtures made with blended cement like Portland Slag Cement (PSC) and Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC) with lime content of 0, 5, 7 and 10 %. Test result indicated that inclusion of hydraulic lime on replacement of cement up to 7 % increases compressive strength of concrete made with both PSC and PPC. Flexural strength increased with lime content. Highest flexural strength is reported at 7 % lime content for both PSC and PPC. Workability is observed to decrease with lime addition which could be compensated with introduction of super plasticizer. Acid and sulphate resistance increase slightly up to 7 % of lime addition and is found to decrease with further addition of lime. Lime addition up to 10 % does not affect the soundness of blended cements like PSC and PPC.

  16. Effect of Lime on Mechanical and Durability Properties of Blended Cement Based Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Prasanna Kumar; Patro, Sanjaya Kumar; Moharana, Narayana C.

    2016-06-01

    This work presents the results of experimental investigations performed to evaluate the effect of lime on mechanical and durability properties of concrete mixtures made with blended cement like Portland Slag Cement (PSC) and Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC) with lime content of 0, 5, 7 and 10 %. Test result indicated that inclusion of hydraulic lime on replacement of cement up to 7 % increases compressive strength of concrete made with both PSC and PPC. Flexural strength increased with lime content. Highest flexural strength is reported at 7 % lime content for both PSC and PPC. Workability is observed to decrease with lime addition which could be compensated with introduction of super plasticizer. Acid and sulphate resistance increase slightly up to 7 % of lime addition and is found to decrease with further addition of lime. Lime addition up to 10 % does not affect the soundness of blended cements like PSC and PPC.

  17. Implement proper furnace safety interlocks

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.D.; Schoenmaker, G.J.W.

    1996-07-01

    Cracking furnaces are among some of the most complex operations in chemical process industries (CPI) plants. Consider, for example, the cracking furnaces in ethylene plants. Furnace explosions can occur during the light-off process or from accumulations of unburned fuel, incomplete combustion, or introduction of flammable products into the combustion spaces of the furnace. Over half of all furnace explosions occur during the initial light-off process for the furnace. The deficiencies that cause these events can be grouped into three broad categories: (1) human error; (2) incorrect or incomplete safety controls and equipment arrangement; and (3) equipment malfunction. This article presents a safety system that helps address all three of these categories for light-off events. No system is totally foolproof, but the use of a safety system, along with strict operating discipline, will reduce the number of furnace events encountered over the lifetime of the equipment. (Note that the controls typically referred to as ``combustion control,`` which include process temperature control, fuel-gas control, oxygen trim/draft control, and the like, are not part of the control described here.) Note also that although this system was developed for cracking furnaces in ethylene plants, it is equally applicable to other types of radiant-wall multiple-burner furnaces. It can be used for both new installations and retrofit situations. This safety system is not applicable to boilers or other devices with only one or two burners.

  18. Multi-zone furnace system

    SciTech Connect

    Orbeck, G.A.

    1986-05-06

    A multi-zone furnace is described which consists of: a furnace chamber having at least one heat zone and at least one zone adjacent to the heat zone and disposed along the length of the furnace chamber; the heat zone having a hearth at a level different from the hearth level of the adjacent zone; a walking beam conveyor disposed in the furnace chamber and operative in a short stroke mode to convey a product along the hearth of the heat zone, and in a long stroke mode to convey a product from the heat zone to the adjacent zone.

  19. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Boron Removal from Metallurgical Grade Silicon by Addition of High Basic Potassium Carbonate to Calcium Silicate Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jijun; Wang, Fanmao; Ma, Wenhui; Lei, Yun; Yang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the thermodynamics and kinetics of boron removal from metallurgical grade silicon (MG-Si) using a calcium silicate slag containing a high basic potassium carbonate. The distribution of boron between slag and silicon was theoretically derived and the distribution coefficients ( L B) of boron with different compositions of CaO, SiO2, and K2CO3 in slag reagents were determined. The maximal value of L B reached 2.08 with a high basicity slag of 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 (Λ = 0.73). The boron removal rates from MG-Si using CaO-SiO2 and CaO-SiO2-K2CO3 slags at 1823 K (1550 °C) were investigated in an electromagnetic induction furnace. The results showed that the boron concentration in MG-Si can be reduced from 22 to 1.8 ppmw at 1823 K (1550 °C) with 20 pct K2CO3 addition to calcium silicate slag, where the removal efficiency of boron reached 91.8 pct. The mass transfer coefficient ( β S) of boron in binary 50 pctCaO-50 pctSiO2 slag was 3.16 × 10-6 m s-1 at 1823 K (1550 °C) and was 2.43 × 10-5 m s-1 in ternary 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 slag.

  20. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Boron Removal from Metallurgical Grade Silicon by Addition of High Basic Potassium Carbonate to Calcium Silicate Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jijun; Wang, Fanmao; Ma, Wenhui; Lei, Yun; Yang, Bin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the thermodynamics and kinetics of boron removal from metallurgical grade silicon (MG-Si) using a calcium silicate slag containing a high basic potassium carbonate. The distribution of boron between slag and silicon was theoretically derived and the distribution coefficients (L B) of boron with different compositions of CaO, SiO2, and K2CO3 in slag reagents were determined. The maximal value of L B reached 2.08 with a high basicity slag of 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 (Λ = 0.73). The boron removal rates from MG-Si using CaO-SiO2 and CaO-SiO2-K2CO3 slags at 1823 K (1550 °C) were investigated in an electromagnetic induction furnace. The results showed that the boron concentration in MG-Si can be reduced from 22 to 1.8 ppmw at 1823 K (1550 °C) with 20 pct K2CO3 addition to calcium silicate slag, where the removal efficiency of boron reached 91.8 pct. The mass transfer coefficient (β S) of boron in binary 50 pctCaO-50 pctSiO2 slag was 3.16 × 10-6 m s-1 at 1823 K (1550 °C) and was 2.43 × 10-5 m s-1 in ternary 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 slag.

  1. Magnetically Damped Furnace (MDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Magnetically Damped Furnace (MDF) breadboard is being developed in response to NASA's mission and goals to advance the scientific knowledge of microgravity research, materials science, and related technologies. The objective of the MDF is to dampen the fluid flows due to density gradients and surface tension gradients in conductive melts by introducing a magnetic field during the sample processing. The MDF breadboard will serve as a proof of concept that the MDF performance requirements can be attained within the International Space Station resource constraints.

  2. Radiantly heated furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Pargeter, J.K.

    1987-06-30

    This patent describes a travelling hearth furnace comprising at least one impermeable hearth member adapted to travel generally horizontally along a path from a first locus to a second locus, means to cause the hearth member to travel along the path. Means directs radiant hat toward the upper surface of the hearth member. Means at the first locus positions a thin layer of objects on the upper surface of the hearth member. Means at the second locus removes objects from the hearth member. Means, positioned intermediate the first locus and the second locus, positions additional objects on the thin layer of objects on the upper surface of the hearth member.

  3. Water gas furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaro, C.

    1985-12-03

    A water gas furnace comprising an outer container to provide a housing in which coke is placed into its lower part. A water container is placed within the housing. The coke is ignited and heats the water in the container converting it into steam. The steam is ejected into the coke, which together with air, produces water gas. Preferably, pumice stones are placed above the coke. The water gas is accepted into the pores of the pumice stones, where the heated pumice stones ignite the water gas, producing heat. The heat is extracted by a heat exchanger provided about the housing.

  4. Exothermic furnace module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An exothermic furnace module is disclosed for processing materials in space which includes an insulated casing and a sample support, carried within the casing which supports a sample container. An exothermic heat source includes a plurality of segments of exothermic material stacked one upon another to produce a desired temperature profile when ignited. The exothermic material segments are constructed in the form of an annular element having a recess opening which defines an open central core throughout the vertical axis of the stacked exothermic material. The sample container is arranged within the core of the stacked exothermic heating material.

  5. Electrical Conductivity and Electronic/Ionic Properties of TiO x -CaO-SiO2 Slags at Various Oxygen Potentials and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun-Hao; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Wu, Yue-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-02-01

    The electrical conductivity of molten slags is an extremely important factor in the design of electric smelting furnaces. As a fundamental study on properties of the TiO x -bearing slags, the total electrical conductivity and electronic/ionic properties of TiO x -SiO2-CaO slags were measured at different oxygen potentials and temperatures using four-electrode method. The experiment results show that for a specific composition, the temperature dependences of ionic, electronic, and total conductivity obey the Arrhenius law. The stepped potential chronoamperometry method was employed for measuring the electronic transference number, which exhibits a strong dependence on oxygen potential, but is unaffected by temperature. The total electrical, electronic, and ionic conductivities present similar increasing trends with increasing the ratio of CO/CO2, which is resulted from increasing of Ti3+.

  6. Cupola Furnace Computer Process Model

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour Katz

    2004-12-31

    The cupola furnace generates more than 50% of the liquid iron used to produce the 9+ million tons of castings annually. The cupola converts iron and steel into cast iron. The main advantages of the cupola furnace are lower energy costs than those of competing furnaces (electric) and the ability to melt less expensive metallic scrap than the competing furnaces. However the chemical and physical processes that take place in the cupola furnace are highly complex making it difficult to operate the furnace in optimal fashion. The results are low energy efficiency and poor recovery of important and expensive alloy elements due to oxidation. Between 1990 and 2004 under the auspices of the Department of Energy, the American Foundry Society and General Motors Corp. a computer simulation of the cupola furnace was developed that accurately describes the complex behavior of the furnace. When provided with the furnace input conditions the model provides accurate values of the output conditions in a matter of seconds. It also provides key diagnostics. Using clues from the diagnostics a trained specialist can infer changes in the operation that will move the system toward higher efficiency. Repeating the process in an iterative fashion leads to near optimum operating conditions with just a few iterations. More advanced uses of the program have been examined. The program is currently being combined with an ''Expert System'' to permit optimization in real time. The program has been combined with ''neural network'' programs to affect very easy scanning of a wide range of furnace operation. Rudimentary efforts were successfully made to operate the furnace using a computer. References to these more advanced systems will be found in the ''Cupola Handbook''. Chapter 27, American Foundry Society, Des Plaines, IL (1999).

  7. A Novel Kinematic Model for Molten Slag Fiberization: Prediction of Slag Fiber Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dawei; Zhang, Zuotai; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong

    2015-04-01

    The current study developed a novel kinematic model describing the molten slag fiberization process with a purpose of understanding the slag wool preparation. A reasonable predictive model to describe the diameter and length of slag fiber in commercial fiber making process is necessary because the length-to-diameter ratio has a huge impact on the thermal insulation performance, which will contribute to energy conservation. The current model was established based on melt droplet kinematics under relevant hypotheses. Through this model, changes in fiber dimensions with slag viscosity and rotational speed of spinning wheel have been systematically investigated to determine the optimized technological parameters. To verify the model, experiments were carried out and the results were in good agreement with the predicted values. Thus, the current model can serve as a useful guide for the industrial production of slag wool.

  8. Fuel stoker and furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, T.L.; Schafer, G.L.; Swett, H.D.

    1984-02-14

    A furnace having a primary heat exchange unit also providing a combustion chamber, a secondary heat exchange unit connected by an upper crossover conduit to the primary heat exchange unit, and a tertiary heat exchange unit connected by a lower V-shaped crossover conduit to the secondary heat exchange unit. A third crossover conduit connects the V-shaped crossover conduit with the primary heat exchange unit. Vibrating means are provided between the secondary and tertiary heat exchange units to vibrate the walls thereof and dislodge clinging fly ash so that it falls into the V-shaped crossover conduit for removal by the screw conveyor. A burner assembly of a furnace includes a combustion air housing carrying a circular, stationary grate with an annular valley for carrying fuel during combustion. A central opening is connected to a fuel conveyor for introduction of fuel to the grate through the lower portion of the housing. Combustion air introduction conduits on the housing are remote from the fuel introduction passages and introduce air under pressure at the lower portion of the grate. An agitator and discharge ring is provided on the grate and is rotated on the grate by a suitable drive sprocket mechanism to agitate the fuel for more complete burning thereof and to remove burned ash. A horizontal burner plate is supported by a plurality of legs connected to the agitator and discharge ring over the grate to promote more complete combustion of the fuel.

  9. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  10. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  11. Electric arc furnace dust management: A review of technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Zunkel, A.D.

    1997-03-01

    Technologies to recover and recycle values from, stabilize and dispose of, and glassify and sell electric arc furnace dust by pyrometallurgical, hydrometallurgical, and hybrid methods continue to emerge, be reduced to commercial practice, then succeed and move forward or fail and fade away. The current development and/or commercial status of the following types of processes have been reviewed and analyzed: pyrometallurgical such as kiln, flame reactor, bath smelting, and plasma and electric furnace-based processes; hydrometallurgical involving acidic or basic leaching alone or combined with electrowinning; hybrid hydrometallurgical/pyrometallurgical stabilization techniques using cement and other additives; and glassification. Comparative costs, the trend toward higher value-added products, and the prognosis for these technologies are assessed. Regulations changed significantly during 1995 regarding allowable disposal methods, toward more flexible options. These changes are affecting current and future dust producers, processors and developers of dust management technology. The impacts are discussed.

  12. Viscosity measurements and empirical predictions for coal slags

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Sundaram, S K; Rodriguez, Carmen P; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Arrigoni, Benjamin M

    2009-10-25

    Slag viscosity in slagging coal gasifier is an important factor affecting the gasification regime and operating cost. Most of the empirical viscosity models of coal slags that are available in the literature are applicable to only limited ranges of temperature and composition. To develop a reliable slag viscosity model, additional data are needed. Slag viscosity was measured under air or reducing atmosphere (calculated pO2~1.2 10-12 atm at 1400°C) at temperatures in the range of 1150-1550°C on 63 statistically designed slags, including 5 actual coal slag compositions and 4 validation slag compositions. The Arrhenius equation, with Arrhenius coefficients A = constant and B expressed as linear function of mass fractions of nine major components was used to fit the viscosity/temperature data. This Arrhenius relationship represents the viscosity–temperature relationship of tested slags reasonably well, = 0.981 (reducing atmosphere) and = 0.974 (air atmosphere). The validation of the model with four randomly selected slags (two from the SciGlass database and two from experimental design) indicated an accurately measured viscosity-temperature data and a fairly good predictive performance of slag viscosity models over designed compositions. The capability of the developed model to predict the viscosity of coal slags under reducing atmosphere was found to be a superior to a number of the most commonly used empirical models in the literature that are based on simplified oxide melts and British or Australian coal ash slags.

  13. Dissolution Kinetics of SiO2 into CaO-Fe2O3-SiO2 Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Lv, Xuewei; Xiang, Shenglin; Xu, Jian

    2016-06-01

    High-basicity sinter is the predominant Fe-bearing material used in blast furnace process in East Asia. The dissolution of SiO2 into molten calcium ferrite influences the assimilation process. In this study, a rotating cylinder method was used to explore the dissolution kinetics of SiO2 into CaO-Fe2O3-SiO2 slag. The influencing factors, including temperature, rotating time and speed, and initial composition of the slag, were considered. Results showed that the dissolution rate increased with increasing rotation speed and temperature, whereas the increase in ω(SiO2) or ω(Fe2O3)/ ω(CaO) ratio in the initial slag composition decreased the dissolution rate. The diffusion coefficient and activation energy of SiO2 during the dissolution process ranged from 2.09 × 10-6 to 6.40 × 10-6 cm2 s-1 and 106.62 to 248.20 kJ mol-1, respectively. Concentration difference between the boundary layer and bulk phase was the primary driving force of the dissolution process; however, this process was also influenced by the slag viscosity and ion diffusivity.

  14. Modelling of furnaces and combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Kahil, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents an account of the art of modelling for heat transfer and fluid flows in furnaces and combustors. After describing the different types of furnace flows, the author deals with the conservation equations. The different turbulence modelling assumptions, the more complicated problem of turbulent combustion modelling, and various types of turbulent flames are also described and reviewed, with appropriate models being assigned.

  15. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Removal of Residual Elements in The Steel Ladle by a Combination of Top Slag and Deep Injection Practice

    SciTech Connect

    S. Street; K.S. Coley; G.A. Iron

    2001-08-31

    The objective of this work was to determine if tin could be removed from liquid steel by a combination of deep injection of calcium and a reducing top-slag practice. The work was carried out in three stages: injection of Ca wire into 35 Kg heats in an induction furnace under laboratory condition; a fundamental study of the solubility of Sn in the slag as a function of oxygen potential, temperature and slag composition; and, two full-scale plant trials. During the first stage, it was found that 7 to 50% of the Sn was removed from initial Sn contents of 0.1%, using 8 to 16 Kg of calcium per tonne of steel. The Sn solubility study suggested that low oxygen potential, high basicity of the slag and lower temperature would aid Sn removal by deep injection of Ca in the bath. However, two full-scale trials at the LMF station in Dofasco's plant showed virtually no Sn removal, mainly because of very low Ca consumption rates used (0.5 to 1.1 Kg/tonne vs. 8 to 16 Kg/tonne used during the induction furnace study in the laboratory). Based on the current price of Ca, addition of 8 to 16 Kg/tonne of steel to remove Sn is too cost prohibitive, and therefore, it is not worthwhile to pursue this process further, even though it may be technically feasible.

  16. Modelling chloride diffusion in concrete: Effect of fly ash and slag

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.D.A.; Bamforth, P.B.

    1999-04-01

    The ability of concrete to resist the penetration of chloride ions is a critical parameter in determining the service life of steel-reinforced concrete structures exposed to deicing salts or marine environments. Data from long-term field and laboratory studies of concrete exposed to chloride environments were analyzed using a chloride transport model developed at the University of Toronto. The results show that the incorporation of fly ash and slag may have little impact on transport properties determined at early ages (e.g., 28 days), but can lead to order of magnitude improvements in the long term. This means that the rate of chloride penetration during the first 6 months or so of exposure is similar for concretes with and without these materials. However, after a few years of exposure, chloride ingress slows to a much-decreased rate in fly ash and slag concretes, leading to dramatic increases in the predicted service life. Predictive models and laboratory test methods for determining chloride ingress should take account of the time-dependent nature of the transport processes in concrete, especially when supplementary cementing materials, such as fly ash or slag, are used.

  17. Chemical and mechanical stability of sodium sulfate activated slag after exposure to elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rashad, A.M.; Bai, Y.; Basheer, P.A.M.; Collier, N.C.; Milestone, N.B.

    2012-02-15

    The chemical and mechanical stability of slag activated with two different concentrations of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) after exposure to elevated temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 Degree-Sign C with an increment of 200 Degree-Sign C has been examined. Compressive strengths and pH of the hardened pastes before and after the exposure were determined. The various decomposition phases formed were identified using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} activated slag has a better resistance to the degradation caused by exposure to elevated temperature up to 600 Degree-Sign C than Portland cement system as its relative strengths are superior. The finer slag and higher Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration gave better temperature resistance. Whilst the pH of the hardened pastes decreased with an increase in temperature, it still maintained a sufficiently high pH for the protection of reinforcing bar against corrosion.

  18. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  19. Steel slags in a landfill top cover--experiences from a full-scale experiment.

    PubMed

    Andreas, L; Diener, S; Lagerkvist, A

    2014-03-01

    A full scale field study has been carried out in order to test and evaluate the use of slags from high-alloy steel production as the construction materials for a final cover of an old municipal landfill. Five test areas were built using different slag mixtures within the barrier layer (liner). The cover consisted of a foundation layer, a liner with a thickness of 0.7 m, a drainage layer of 0.3 m, a protection layer of 1.5 m and a vegetation layer of 0.25 m. The infiltration varied depending on the cover design used, mainly the liner recipe but also over time and was related to seasons and precipitation intensity. The test areas with liners composed of 50% electric arc furnace (EAF) slag and 50% cementitious ladle slag (LS) on a weight basis and with a proper consistence of the protection layer were found to meet the Swedish infiltration criteria of ⩽50 l (m(2)a)(-1) for final covers for landfills for non-hazardous waste: the cumulative infiltration rates to date were 44, 19 and 0.4 l (m(2)a)(-1) for A1, A4 and A5, respectively. Compared to the precipitation, the portion of leachate was always lower after the summer despite high precipitation from June to August. The main reason for this is evapotranspiration but also the fact that the time delay in the leachate formation following a precipitation event has a stronger effect during the shorter summer sampling periods than the long winter periods. Conventional techniques and equipment can be used but close cooperation between all involved partners is crucial in order to achieve the required performance of the cover. This includes planning, method and equipment testing and quality assurance. PMID:24393476

  20. Thermal Treatment of Solid Wastes Using the Electric Arc Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

    1999-09-01

    A thermal waste treatment facility has been developed at the Albany Research Center (ARC) over the past seven years to process a wide range of heterogeneous mixed wastes, on a scale of 227 to 907 kg/h (500 to 2,000 lb/h). The current system includes a continuous feed system, a 3-phase AC, 0.8 MW graphite electrode arc furnace, and a dedicated air pollution control system (APCS) which includes a close-coupled thermal oxidizer, spray cooler, baghouse, and wet scrubber. The versatility of the complete system has been demonstrated during 5 continuous melting campaigns, ranging from 11 to 25 mt (12 to 28 st) of treated wastes per campaign, which were conducted on waste materials such as (a) municipal incinerator ash, (b) simulated low-level radioactive, high combustible-bearing mixed wastes, (c) simulated low-level radioactive liquid tank wastes, (d) heavy metal contaminated soils, and (e) organic-contaminated dredging spoils. In all cases, the glass or slag products readily passed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leachability Program (TCLP) test. Additional studies are currently under way on electric utility wastes, steel and aluminum industry wastes, as well as zinc smelter residues. Thermal treatment of these solid waste streams is intended to produce a metallic product along with nonhazardous glass or slag products.

  1. Distribution of trace metals at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Berks and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Reif, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Hopewell Furnace, located approximately 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia, was a cold-blast, charcoal iron furnace that operated for 113 years (1771 to 1883). The purpose of this study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, was to determine the distribution of trace metals released to the environment from an historical iron smelter at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site (NHS). Hopewell Furnace used iron ore from local mines that contained abundant magnetite and accessory sulfide minerals enriched in arsenic, cobalt, copper, and other metals. Ore, slag, cast iron furnace products, soil, groundwater, stream base flow, streambed sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled for this study. Soil samples analyzed in the laboratory had concentrations of trace metals low enough to meet Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection standards for non-residential use. Groundwater samples from the supply well met U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water regulations. Concentrations of metals in surface-water base flow at the five stream sampling sites were below continuous concentration criteria for protection of aquatic organisms. Concentrations of metals in sediment at the five stream sites were below probable effects level guidelines for protection of aquatic organisms except for copper at site HF-3. Arsenic, copper, lead, zinc, and possibly cobalt were incorporated into the cast iron produced by Hopewell Furnace. Manganese was concentrated in slag along with iron, nickel, and zinc. The soil near the furnace has elevated concentrations of chromium, copper, iron, lead, and zinc compared to background soil concentrations. Concentrations of toxic elements were not present at concentrations of concern in water, soil, or stream sediments, despite being elevated in ore, slag, and cast iron furnace products. The base-flow surface-water samples indicated good overall quality. The five sampled sites generally had

  2. Fixation and partitioning of heavy metals in slag after incineration of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Tao; Yan Bo

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contents and partitioning of HMs in slag of sludge incineration were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fixation rate decreases with residential time and finally keeps a constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 55% is optimal for the sediment for Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 75% is optimal for the sediment for Pb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found higher temperature versus lower non-residual fraction except that of Pb. - Abstract: Fixation of heavy metals in the slag produced during incineration of sewage sludge will reduce emission of the metals to the atmosphere and make the incineration process more environmentally friendly. The effects of incineration conditions (incineration temperature 500-1100 Degree-Sign C, furnace residence time 0-60 min, mass fraction of water in the sludge 0-75%) on the fixation rates and species partitioning of Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Mn and Ni in slag were investigated. When the incineration temperature was increased from 500 to 1100 Degree-Sign C, the fixation rate of Cd decreased from 87% to 49%, while the fixation rates of Cu and Mn were stable. The maximum fixation rates for Pb and Zn and for Ni and Cr were reached at 900 and 1100 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The fixation rates of Cu, Ni, Cd, Cr and Zn decreased as the residence time increased. With a 20 min residence time, the fixation rates of Pb and Mn were low. The maximum fixation rates of Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr were achieved when the mass fraction of water in the sludge was 55%. The fixation rate of Cd decreased as the water mass fraction increased, while the fixation rate of Pb increased. Partitioning analysis of the metals contained in the slag showed that increasing the incineration temperature and residence time promoted complete oxidation of the metals. This reduced the non-residual fractions of the metals, which would lower the bioavailability of the

  3. 44. DETAIL VIEW LOOKING EAST AT THE FOUNDATION FOR SLAG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. DETAIL VIEW LOOKING EAST AT THE FOUNDATION FOR SLAG CRUSHER, A DEVICE USED TO REMOVE HARDENED SLAG FROM STEEL LADLES. - John A. Roebling's Sons Company, Kinkora Works, Support Systems, Roebling, Burlington County, NJ

  4. Phase equilibria between iron and slag in carbon monoxide/carbon dioxide/water atmospheres relevant to a novel flash ironmaking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohassab Ahmed, Mohassab Yousef

    In an effort to develop a novel flash ironmaking process, to be called the Sohn process in this dissertation, with the potential of steelmaking in a single continuous process, the phase equilibria involved and the chemistry of selected slag systems were investigated. The Sohn process is an ecofriendly flash ironmaking process for producing iron from iron oxide concentrates in a flash reactor using fuels and reductants that help reduce energy consumption and minimize greenhouse gas emissions. Amongst the proposed reductants and fuels are H2, natural gas, and coal gas. The molten bath (iron-slag bath) is expected to equilibrate with gas atmospheres of mainly H2/H 2O, CO/CO2/H2/H2O, and CO/CO2 corresponding to H2, natural gas/coal gas (NG/CG), and coke/coal (blast furnace, BF), respectively. The latter was investigated to allow comparison with the blast-furnace conditions. The slag composition was selected to resemble that of the blast furnace, which consisted of the CaO-MgO-SiO2-Al 2O2-FeO-MnO-P2O5 system with CaO/SiO 2 in the range 0.8 to 1.4. The temperature range was 1550 to 1650°C encompassing a wide range of expected ironmaking temperatures for the Sohn process. The oxygen partial pressure was maintained in the reducing range 10-10 to 10-9 atm in the three gas atmospheres. It was found that H2O dramatically affects the chemistry of the slag and strongly affects the phase equilibria in the slag as well as the equilibrium distribution of elements between slag and molten metal. It was found that the slags under H2O-containing (H2 and NG/CG) atmospheres had a moderately higher degree of polymerization as compared to that under the blast furnace conditions. H2O in the gas atmosphere also increased the activity coefficient of FeO in the slag and accordingly lowered the FeO content. The FeO content in the slag of H 2 (FeO wt% = 10) and NG/CG (11) was significantly less than under the BF (16) conditions. On the other hand, the average MgO solubility (22 wt%) under the

  5. The improvement of slagging gasifier refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, K.-S.; Bennett, J.P.; Powell, C.A.; Krabbe, R.A.

    2006-03-01

    Refractories play a vital role in slagging gasifier on-line availability and profitability for the next clean power generation system. A recent survey of gasifier users by USDOE indicated that a longer service life of refractories is the highest need among gasifier operators. Currently, Cr2O3 based refractories, the best of commercially available materials for use in slagging gasifiers, last between 3 and 24 months. Researchers at Albany Research Center (ARC) have identified structural spalling, caused by slag penetration, as one of the major failure mechanisms of Cr2O3 refractories through postmortem analysis. New Cr2O3 refractories with phosphate additives have been developed by ARC to decrease slag penetration and thus structural spalling. Laboratory physical property tests indicated that ARC developed refractories are superior to other commercial bricks. One of the ARC developed phosphate containing refractories has been installed in a slagging gasifier. Preliminary results of the performance of this refractory in the gasifier will be reported along with research to develop non-chromia refractories.

  6. Predicting slag viscosity from coal ash composition

    SciTech Connect

    Laumb, J.; Benson, S.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; Schwalbe, R.; McCollor, D.P.

    1999-07-01

    Management of slag flow from cyclone-fired utility boilers requires accurate prediction of viscosity. Cyclones tend to build up slag when the cyclone combustion temperature is less than the temperature required to melt and tap the ash from the coal being fired. Cyclone-fired boilers designed for lignite are equipped with predry systems, which remove 6-9% of the moisture from the coal. Cyclones tend to slag when the as-received heating value of the fuel is less than 6350 Btu/lb and T250 (temperature where viscosity equals 250 poise) is greater than 2350 F. The T250 value, as well as the rest of the viscosity-temperature relationship, can be predicted using models based on coal ash composition. The focus of this work is to evaluate several models in terms of their agreement with measured viscosities. Viscosity measurements were made for ten samples, including nine lignite coals and one lignite-derived slag. Model performance is related to the SiO{sub 2}, CaO, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of the slag. The Sage and McIlroy and Kalmanovitch models worked best for high SiO{sub 2} and low Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuels. The Senior model worked best when Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content was moderate to high.

  7. Utilization of ferrochrome wastes such as ferrochrome ash and ferrochrome slag in concrete manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Prasanna K; Patro, Sanjaya K

    2016-08-01

    Solid waste management is one of the subjects essentially addressing the current interest today. Due to the scarcity of land filling area, utilization of wastes in the construction sector has become an attractive proposition for disposal. Ferrochrome ash (FA) is a dust obtained as a waste material from the gas cleaning plant of Ferro alloy industries. It possesses the chemical requirements of granulated slag material used for the manufacture of Portland cement. Ferrochrome slag (FS) is another residue that is obtained as a solid waste by the smelting process during the production of stainless steel in Ferroalloy industries. FS possesses the required engineering properties of coarse aggregates. The possibility of using FA with lime for partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and FS for total replacement of natural coarse aggregates is explored in this research. The combined effect of FA with lime and FS-addition on the properties of concrete, such as workability, compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting tensile strength and sorptivity, were studied. Results of investigation revealed improvement in strength and durability properties of concrete on inclusion of FA and FS. Concrete mix containing 40% FA with 7% lime (replacing 47% OPC) and100% of FS (replacing 100% natural coarse aggregate) achieved the properties of normal concrete or even better properties at all ages. The results were confirmed by microscopic study such as X-ray diffraction and petrography examination. Environmental compatibility of concrete containing FA and FS was verified by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test. PMID:27357563

  8. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1993-09-14

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

  9. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  10. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  11. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1992-07-14

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

  12. ENHANCEMENT OF STRUCTURAL FOAM MATERIALS BY INCORPORATION OF GASIFIER SLAG

    SciTech Connect

    Olin Perry Norton; Ronald A. Palmer; W. Gene Ramsey

    2006-03-15

    As advanced gasification technology is increasingly adopted as an energy source, disposal of the resulting slag will become a problem. We have shown that gasifier slag can be incorporated into foamed glass, which is currently being manufactured as an abrasive and as an insulating material. The slag we add to foamed glass does not simply act as filler, but improves the mechanical properties of the product. Incorporation of gasifier slag can make foamed glass stronger and more abrasion resistant.

  13. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Industrial Coal Slag Infiltration into Porous Refractory Materials in Slagging Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Tetsuya Kenneth; Bennett, James P.; Dridhar, Seetharaman

    2011-12-01

    Infiltration characteristics of industrial coal slag into alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) refractory material with a temperature gradient induced along the slag's penetration direction are compared to those obtained under near-isothermal conditions. Experiments were conducted with a hot-face temperature of 1450°C and a CO/CO{sub 2} ratio of 1.8, which corresponds to an oxygen partial pressure of ~10{sup −8} atm. The refractory under the near-isothermal temperature profile, with higher average temperatures, demonstrated a greater penetration depth than its counterpart that was under the steeper temperature gradient. Slag that did not infiltrate into the refractory due to the induced temperature gradient, pooled and solidified on the top of the sample. Within the pool, a conglomerated mass of troilite (FeS) formed separately from the surrounding slag. Microscopy of the cross-sectioned infiltrated refractories revealed that the slag preferentially corroded the matrix regions closer to the top surface. Furthermore, the formation of a thick layer of hercynite (FeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at the top of refractory/slag interface significantly depleted the slag of its iron-oxide content with respect to its virgin composition. A qualitative description of the penetration process is provided in this article.

  14. Can iron-making and steelmaking slag products be used to sequester CO2? Passive weathering and active carbonation experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, Fred; Dobrzański, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The high calcium content of iron and steel-making slags has been highlighted as providing a suitable feedstock material and medium with which to sequester CO2 into geologically stable carbonate phases. Optimisation of the natural carbonation process provides the potential for increasing the degree of carbonation above that possible via passive weathering. This study has assessed the baseline passive carbonation potential of several different slag products (graded steel slag aggregate, pellite, GBFS) within the climate of the northern UK. This baseline was then used as a comparison to the carbonation values achieved by the same products when actively reacted in a CO2-rich environment. The active carbonation phase of the project involved a factorial experimental study of materials reacted at 1MPa/10MPa CO2 pressure and 25˚C/125˚C. This study has shown: 1) That active carbonation of these products can successfully sequester additional CO2. 2) Carbonation potential in general is highly dependent upon grain size within material types, 3) There is a material-dependant cost-benefit issue when using different active carbonation conditions as well as the choice to use active vs. passive carbonation. The median sequestration potential of the slag products in this study is equivalent to the total emissions from 910 people from the UK; the CO2 emissions from 10000 tonnes of cement production; or 340000 tonnes of steel production.

  15. Improved thermocouple assemblies for slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, Richard E.; Bennett, James P.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Dogan, Cynthia P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Petty, Arthur V.

    2002-09-01

    The thermocouple devices currently employed to monitor temperatures in slagging coal gasifiers typically fail within a few weeks of exposure to the harsh operating environment. As a result, gasifier operators are often left to optimize their system’s performance without precise knowledge of the gasifier operating temperature. Engineers at the Albany Research Center are exploring ways to extend thermocouple life in gasifier environments by enhancing the thermocouple assembly’s resistance to slag penetration and attack. In this presentation, several strategies will be examined that can reduce thermocouple susceptibility to corrosive attack by coal slag, including the use of barrier coatings and improved filler materials. The relative effectiveness of these techniques in laboratory exposure tests will be discussed.

  16. Utilization of Illinois coal gasification slags for production of ultra-lightweight aggregates. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhry, V.; Zimmerle, T.

    1993-09-01

    This research is aimed at testing and developing the expansion potential of gasification solid residues (slag) to manufacture ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA). Conventional ULWAs are manufactured by pyroprocessing of perlite or vermiculite ores and have unit weights in the range of 5--15 lb/ ft3. These materials are sold for approximately $200/ton (or $1.00/ft3) and have numerous applications including loose fill insulation, insulating concrete, precast products, filtration media, and agricultural applications. In a previous project, Praxis Engineers demonstrated that lightweight aggregates (LWA) with unit weights of 25--55 lb/ ft3 can be produced from Illinois coal slags and used as substitutes for conventional LWAs. In this program, tests are being undertaken in a pilot-scale vertical shaft furnace to identify operating conditions for the expansion of Illinois slags such that the product can be substituted for ULWA. Upon completion of testing, a large batch of expanded slag will be produced for evaluation in various applications, both in this phase and in subsequent Phase II testing. During the initial pilot plant runs using two Illinois slags, expanded products with unit weights of 12.5--26.5 and 20--52 lb/ ft3, respectively, were produced. Efforts are under way to generate products with lower unit weights.

  17. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted

  18. Challenges in Melt Furnace Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt, Cynthia

    2014-09-01

    Measurement is a critical part of running a cast house. Key performance indicators such as energy intensity, production (or melt rate), downtime (or OEE), and melt loss must all be understood and monitored on a weekly or monthly basis. Continuous process variables such as bath temperature, flue temperature, and furnace pressure should be used to control the furnace systems along with storing the values in databases for later analysis. While using measurement to track furnace performance over time is important, there is also a time and place for short-term tests.

  19. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  20. Refractory liner materials used in slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, James P.

    2004-09-01

    Refractory liners are used on the working face of entrained flow slagging gasifiers that react coal, petroleum coke, or other carbon feedstock with oxygen and water. The refractory liners protect the gasifier shell from elevated temperatures, corrosive slags, and thermal cycling during gasification. Refractory failure is primarily by two means, corrosive dissolution and spalling. High chrome oxide refractory materials have evolved as the material of choice to line the hot face of gasifiers, yet the performance of these materials does not meet the service requirements of industry. A review of gasifier liner materials, their evolution, issues impacting their performance, and future research direction are discussed.

  1. The effect of operation conditions on slagging

    SciTech Connect

    Alekhnovich, A.N.; Bogomolov, V.V.

    1996-12-31

    Operation conditions have an effect on slagging properties of fly ash due to changes of the flue gas temperature and the heat flux. The effect of the same factors for various coal types and boiler zones may differ not only in degree but in opposite sign. In addition, the effect of the factors may vary depending on a combination of other factors. The experimental results confirmed the above idea. It also presents examples of a successful decrease of slagging with the change of operating conditions.

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  4. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  5. Density and water content of nanoscale solid C-S-H formed in alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste and implications for chemical shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Allen, Andrew J.; Jennings, Hamlin M.

    2012-02-15

    Alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste was analyzed using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The scattering response indicates that the microstructure consists of a uniform matrix of hydration product with a high surface area studded with unhydrated cores of slag particles. In contrast with portland cement paste, no surface fractal scattering regime was detected, and elevated temperature curing (at 60 Degree-Sign C) had no detectable effect on the microstructure at any length scale studied. The specific surface area of the AAS pastes is about 25% higher than that of a portland cement paste cured under the same conditions. The composition and mass density of the nanoscale solid C-S-H phase formed in the AAS paste was determined using a previously developed neutron scattering method, in conjunction with a hydration model. The result ((CaO){sub 0.99}-SiO{sub 2}-(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.06}-(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.97}, d = (2.73 {+-} 0.02) g/cm{sup 3}) is significantly lower in calcium and in water as compared to portland cement or pure tricalcium silicate paste. These values were used to calculate the chemical shrinkage that would result from complete hydration of the AAS paste. The result, (12.2 {+-} 1.5) cm{sup 3} of volumetric shrinkage per 100 g of unhydrated cement, is about twice the amount of chemical shrinkage exhibited by normal cement pastes.

  6. Slag processing system for direct coal-fired gas turbines

    DOEpatents

    Pillsbury, Paul W.

    1990-01-01

    Direct coal-fired gas turbine systems and methods for their operation are provided by this invention. The systems include a primary combustion compartment coupled to an impact separator for removing molten slag from hot combustion gases. Quenching means are provided for solidifying the molten slag removed by the impact separator, and processing means are provided forming a slurry from the solidified slag for facilitating removal of the solidified slag from the system. The released hot combustion gases, substantially free of molten slag, are then ducted to a lean combustion compartment and then to an expander section of a gas turbine.

  7. Simulation of slag control for the Plasma Hearth Project

    SciTech Connect

    Power, M.A.; Carney, K.P.; Peters. G.G.

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the Plasma Hearth Project is to stabilize alpha-emitting radionuclides in a vitreous slag and to reduce the effective storage volume of actinide-containing waste for long-term burial. The actinides have been shown to partition into the vitreous slag phase of the melt. The slag composition may be changed by adding glass-former elements to ensure that this removable slag has the most desired physical and chemical properties for long-term burial. A data acquisition and control system has been designed to regulate the composition of five elements in the slag.

  8. Limitation of Sulfide Capacity Concept for Molten Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, In-Ho; Moosavi-Khoonsari, Elmira

    2016-04-01

    The sulfide capacity concept has been widely used in pyrometallurgy to define sulfur removal capacities of slags. Typically, the sulfide capacity is considered to be a unique slag property depending only on temperature regardless of partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur. In the present study, it is demonstrated that sulfide capacities of slags in particular those of Na2O-containing slags can vary with partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur due to large solubility of sulfide in Na2O-containing slag systems.

  9. Glass Furnace Model Version 2

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-05-06

    GFM2.0 is a derivative of the GFM code with substantially altered and enhanced capabilities. Like its predecessor, it is a fully three-dimensional, furnace simulation model that provides a more accurate representation of the entire furnace, and specifically, the glass melting process, by coupling the combustion space directly to the glass batch and glass melt via rigorous radiation heat transport models for both the combustion space and the glass melt. No assumptions are made with regardmore » to interfacial parameters of heat, flux, temperature distribution, and batch coverage as must be done using other applicable codes available. These critical parameters are calculated. GFM2.0 contains a processor structured to facilitate use of the code, including the entry of teh furnace geometry and operating conditions, the execution of the program, and display of the computational results. Furnace simulations can therefore be created in a straightforward manner.« less

  10. Leaching of mercury-containing cement monoliths aged for one year.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Margareta; Allard, Bert

    2008-01-01

    A directive from the Swedish Government states that waste containing more than 1% of mercury shall be permanently deposited. The stabilization of mercury by conversion to a sparingly soluble compound like the sulphide is crucial to ensure long-term immobilization in a permanent storage. Immobilization by the solidification/stabilization (S/S) method and possible formation of HgS from mercury oxide or elemental mercury by reaction with a sulphur source (S or FeS) is investigated by a modified version of the NEN 7345 Dutch tank-leaching test. The diffusion of mercury during 11 months from 1-year-old mercury containing monoliths of Portland and slag cement is demonstrated. In a geologic repository under conditions representative of deep granitic bedrock (bicarbonate buffered to pH 8.6), a favourable monolith combination is slag cement with addition of the iron sulphide troilite. The apparent diffusion coefficient of mercury is estimated. PMID:17544639

  11. Fossil fuel furnace reactor

    DOEpatents

    Parkinson, William J.

    1987-01-01

    A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

  12. Characterizing coal-gasifier slag-refractory interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.; Kwong, J.; Bennett, J.

    1999-07-01

    To characterize refractory degradation and loss on commercial coal-gasifier combined cycle powder generating facilities, cup-type tests were conducted on high chromium-alumina, sinter-bonded refractories under laboratory conditions designed to simulate commercial operations of temperature, atmosphere, and slag interactions. These tests provided qualitative results from which the slag-refractory interactions can be characterized. These high chromium refractories were generally inert with respect to the coal slag components. However, this study did show (1) iron (oxide) in the slag reacted with chrome sesquioxide to produce a Cr-Fe spinel at the slag-refractory interface, and (2) chrome was soluble in the molten slag. Comparison of cup-type test results with data from operating commercial plants suggests that the principal loss of refractory material in a coal-gasifier combustion chamber is chrome dissolution into the slag. Tests are currently underway to determine if minor modifications to the combustion process might increase refractory life.

  13. THERMOCHEMICAL MODELING OF REFRACTORY CORROSION IN SLAGGING COAL GASIFIERS

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2008-01-01

    Slagging coal gasifiers suffer corrosive attack on the refractory liner and these interactions were thermochemically simulated. The slag is observed to penetrate the refractory, which complicates modeling the phase behavior of the slag-penetrated interior of the refractory. A simple strategy was adopted such that step-wise changes in composition with decreasing slag content were assumed to account for the compositional changes as slag penetrates the refractory. The thermochemical equilibrium calculations following this strategy typically yielded three solution phases as well as the stoichiometric crystalline phases AlPO4 and Ca3(PO4)2 depending on composition/penetration. Under some conditions a slag liquid miscibility gap exists such that two slag liquids co-exist.

  14. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

    1994-06-14

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

  15. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14) for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier (18) may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator (12) or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14). A second amplifier (20) is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier (18). The second amplifier (20) outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity (34). In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier (20) is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the second amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  16. Removal of Metallic Iron on Oxide Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, George N.; Fruehan, R. J.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2009-10-01

    It is possible, in some cases, for ground coal particles to react with gasifier gas during combustion, allowing the ash material in the coal to form phases besides the expected slag phase. One of these phases is metallic iron, because some gasifiers are designed to operate under a reducing atmosphere ({p_{O2}} of approximately 10-4 atm). Metallic iron can become entrained in the gas stream and deposit on, and foul, downstream equipment. To improve the understanding of the reaction between different metallic iron particles and gas, which eventually oxidizes them, and the slag that the resulting oxide dissolves in, the kinetics of iron reaction on slag were predicted using gas-phase mass-transfer limitations for the reaction and were compared with diffusion in the slag; the reaction itself was observed under confocal scanning laser microscopy. The expected rates for iron droplet removal are provided based on the size and effective partial pressure of oxygen, and it is found that decarburization occurs before iron reaction, leading to an extra 30- to 100-second delay for carbon-saturated particles vs pure iron particles. A pure metallic iron particle of 0.5 mg should be removed in about 220 seconds at 1400 °C and in 160 seconds at 1600 °C.

  17. Removal of metallic iron on oxide slags

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, G.N.; Fruehan, R.J.; Sridhar, S.

    2009-10-15

    It is possible, in some cases, for ground coal particles to react with gasifier gas during combustion, allowing the ash material in the coal to form phases besides the expected slag phase. One of these phases is metallic iron, because some gasifiers are designed to operate under a reducing atmosphere (pO{sub 2}) of approximately 10{sup -4} atm). Metallic iron can become entrained in the gas stream and deposit on, and foul, downstream equipment. To improve the understanding of the reaction between different metallic iron particles and gas, which eventually oxidizes them, and the slag that the resulting oxide dissolves in, the kinetics of iron reaction on slag were predicted using gas-phase mass-transfer limitations for the reaction and were compared with diffusion in the slag; the reaction itself was observed under confocal scanning laser microscopy. The expected rates for iron droplet removal are provided based on the size and effective partial pressure of oxygen, and it is found that decarburization occurs before iron reaction, leading to an extra 30- to 100-second delay for carbon-saturated particles vs pure iron particles. A pure metallic iron particle of 0.5 mg should be removed in about 220 seconds at 1400{sup o}C and in 160 seconds at 1600{sup o}C.

  18. Steelworks residues and the Waelz kiln treatment of electric arc furnace dust

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmeier, G.; Bonestell, J.E.

    1996-04-01

    Electric arc furnace dust with a combined zinc and lead content in excess of 20% renders the dumping of this material impossible in many countries, for both statutory and financial reasons. In the Waelz process, dust is treated in a rotary kiln where it is heated to approximately 1,200 C. lead and zinc are volatilized under reducing conditions and collected as fine dust in the off-gas dust collection system. The oxide recovered in the off-gas filters contains approximately 55% Zn and up to 10% Pb, and is ideal feedstock for the Imperial Smelting furnace for lead/zinc recovery. The remaining slag is inert and unleachable so that it can be used as a building aggregate.

  19. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode ARC furnace

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, Gerald W.

    2002-12-24

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spent aluminum pot liner is crushed iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine and CO.

  20. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode arc furnace

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, G.W.

    2002-12-24

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spend aluminum pot liner is crushed, iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine, and CO.

  1. Mechanism Research on Melting Loss of Coppery Tuyere Small Sleeve in Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Jian-Liang; Ning, Xiao-Jun; Wei, Guang-Yun; Chen, Yu-Ting

    2016-01-01

    The tuyere small sleeve in blast furnace works under poor conditions. The abnormal damage of it will severely affect the performance of the blast furnace, thus it should be replaced during the damping down period. So it is of great significance that we study and reduce the burnout of tuyere small sleeve. Melting loss is one case of its burnout. This paper studied the reasons of tuyere small sleeve's melting loss, through computational simulation and microscopic analysis of the melting section. The research shows that the temperature of coppery tuyere small sleeve is well distributed when there is no limescale in the lumen, and the temperature increases with the thickness of limescale. In addition, the interruption of circulating water does great harm to the tuyere small sleeve. The melting loss of tuyere small sleeve is caused by iron-slag erosion, with the occurrence of the melt metallurgical bonding and diffusion metallurgical combination.

  2. Description of a high temperature quenching furnace for the study of the directional solidification of nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schmale, D.T.; Kelley, J.B.; Damkroger, B.K.

    1994-06-01

    A high temperature resistance furnace has been modified for the study of directional solidification of nickel-base superalloys such as alloys 718 and 625. The furnace will be used to study segregation and solidification phenomena that occur in consumable-electrode melting processes such as vacuum arc remelting and electro-slag remelting. The system consists of a water cooled high temperature furnace (maximum temperature {approximately}2900 C), roughing vacuum,system, cooling system, cooled hearth, molten metal quenching bath, and a mechanism to lower the hearth from the furnace into the molten metal bath. The lowering mechanism is actuated by a digital stopping motor with a programmable controller. The specimen (1.9 cm dia {times} 14 cm long) is melted and contained within an alumina tube (2.54 cm dia {times} 15.24 cm long) which is seated on a copper hearth cooled with {approximately}13 C water. Directional solidification can then be accomplished by decreasing the furnace temperature while holding the specimen in position, maintaining the temperature gradient in the furnace and lowering the specimen at a controlled rate or a combination of both. At any point the specimen can be lowered rapidly into the 70 C molten metal bath to quench the specimen, preserve the solidification structure, and minimize solid state diffusion, enhancing the ability to study the localized solidification conditions.

  3. Effect of ash circulation in gasification melting system on concentration and leachability of lead in melting furnace fly ash.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Suzuki, Masaru

    2013-11-30

    In some gasification-melting plants, generated melting furnace fly ash is returned back to the melting furnace for converting the ash to slag. This study investigated the effect of such ash circulation in the gasification-melting system on the concentration and leachability of lead in the melting furnace fly ash. The ash circulation in the melting process was simulated by a thermodynamic calculation, and an elemental analysis and leaching tests were performed on a melting furnace fly ash sample collected from the gasification-melting plant with the ash circulation. It was found that by the ash circulation in the gasification-melting, lead was highly concentrated in the melting furnace fly ash to the level equal to the fly ash from the ash-melting process. The thermodynamic calculation predicted that the lead volatilization by the chlorination is promoted by the ash circulation resulting in the high lead concentration. In addition, the lead extraction from the melting furnace fly ash into a NaOH solution was also enhanced by the ash circulation, and over 90% of lead in the fly ash was extracted in 5 min when using 0.5 mol l(-1) NaOH solution with L/S ratio of 10 at 100 °C. Based on the results, a combination of the gasification-melting with the ash circulation and the NaOH leaching method is proposed for the high efficient lead recovery. PMID:24121545

  4. Influence of ferrite phase in alite-calcium sulfoaluminate cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvallet, Tristana Yvonne Francoise

    Since the energy crisis in 1970's, research on low energy cements with low CO2- emissions has been increasing. Numerous solutions have been investigated, and the goal of this original research is to create a viable hybrid cement with the components of both Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSAC), by forming a material that contains both alite and calcium sulfoaluminate clinker phases. Furthermore, this research focuses on keeping the cost of this material reasonable by reducing aluminum requirements through its substitution with iron. The aim of this work would produce a cement that can use large amounts of red mud, which is a plentiful waste material, in place of bauxite known as an expensive raw material. Modified Bogue equations were established and tested to formulate this novel cement with different amounts of ferrite, from 5% to 45% by weight. This was followed by the production of cement from reagent chemicals, and from industrial by-products as feedstocks (fly ash, red mud and slag). Hydration processes, as well as the mechanical properties, of these clinker compositions were studied, along with the addition of gypsum and the impact of a ferric iron complexing additive triisopropanolamine (TIPA). To summarize this research, the influence of the addition of 5-45% by weight of ferrite phase, was examined with the goal of introducing as much red mud as possible in the process without negatively attenuate the cement properties. Based on this PhD dissertation, the production of high-iron alite-calcium sulfoaluminateferrite cements was proven possible from the two sources of raw materials. The hydration processes and the mechanical properties seemed negatively affected by the addition of ferrite, as this phase was not hydrated entirely, even after 6 months of curing. The usage of TIPA counteracted this decline in strength by improving the ferrite hydration and increasing the optimum amount of gypsum required in each composition

  5. Abyssal seep site cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A.C.; Paull, C.K.; Commeau, R.; Commeau, J.

    1988-01-01

    The deepest submarine cements known so far occur along the 3,300-m deep base of the Florida escarpment and are associated with methane-bearing brine seeps, which emanate there. These deep Holocene carbonates, which occur as surficial and buried crusts, burrow fillings, and friable horizons, were sampled via ALVIN. The carbonates form irregular halos extending up to 20 m from seeps colonized by chemosynthetic fauna. Mussels, gastropods, and clams, the carbonate components of the community, produce a shell hash that is locally cemented by coarsely crystalline low-Mg calcite. Halos of palisade calcite are reminiscent of ancient examples of marine cements. Also present are carbonate hemipelagics cemented by micrite into crusts and burrow fillings. The degree of cementation varies from pervasive to light. Slabs of cemented crust up to 30 cm thick contrast with typical shallow crusts and exhibit irregular tops and smooth bottoms indicating different chemical gradients and pathways.

  6. Diagnostics for a waste processing plasma arc furnace (invited) (abstract)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P. P.

    1995-01-01

    Maintaining the quality of our environment has become an important goal of society. As part of this goal new technologies are being sought to clean up hazardous waste sites and to treat ongoing waste streams. A 1 MW pilot scale dc graphite electrode plasma arc furnace (Mark II) has been constructed at MIT under a joint program among Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), MIT, and Electro-Pyrolysis, Inc. (EPI)c) for the remediation of buried wastes in the DOE complex. A key part of this program is the development of new and improved diagnostics to study, monitor, and control the entire waste remediation process for the optimization of this technology and to safeguard the environment. Continuous, real time diagnostics are needed for a variety of the waste process parameters. These parameters include internal furnace temperatures, slag fill levels, trace metals content in the off-gas stream, off-gas molecular content, feed and slag characterization, and off-gas particulate size, density, and velocity distributions. Diagnostics are currently being tested at MIT for the first three parameters. An active millimeter-wave radiometer with a novel, rotatable graphite waveguide/mirror antenna system has been implemented on Mark II for the measurement of surface emission and emissivity which can be used to determine internal furnace temperatures and fill levels. A microwave torch plasma is being evaluated for use as a excitation source in the furnace off-gas stream for continuous atomic emission spectroscopy of trace metals. These diagnostics should find applicability not only to waste remediation, but also to other high temperature processes such as incinerators, power plants, and steel plants.

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  8. Study of some health physics parameters of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag shielding concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-05-01

    The Bismuth-ground granulated blastfurnace slang (Bi-GGBFS) concrete samples were prepared. The weight percentage of different elements present inBi-GGBFS Shielding concretewas evaluated by Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis (EDX). The exposure rate and absorbed dose rate characteristics were calculated theoretically for radioactive sources namely 241Am and 137Cs. Our calculations reveal that the Bi-GGBFS concretes are effective in shielding material for gamma radiations.

  9. Cements from nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Barralet, J E; Lilley, K J; Grover, L M; Farrar, D F; Ansell, C; Gbureck, U

    2004-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cements are used as bone substitute materials because they may be moulded to fill a void or defect in bone and are osteoconductive. Although apatite cements are stronger than brushite cements, they are potentially less resorbable in vivo. Brushite cements are three-component systems whereby phosphate ions and water react with a soluble calcium phosphate to form brushite (CaHPO4 x 2H2O). Previously reported brushite cement formulations set following the mixture of a calcium phosphate, such as beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), with an acidic component such as H3PO4 or monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM). Due to its low solubility, hydroxyapatite (HA) is yet to be reported as a reactive component in calcium phosphate cement systems. Here we report a new cement system setting to form a matrix consisting predominantly of brushite following the mixture of phosphoric acid with nanocrystalline HA. As a result of the relative ease with which ionic substitutions may be made in apatite this route may offer a novel way to control cement composition or setting characteristics. Since kinetic solubility is dependent on particle size and precipitation temperature is known to affect precipitated HA crystal size, the phase composition and mechanical properties of cements made from HA precipitated at temperatures between 4 and 60 degrees C were investigated. PMID:15332608

  10. Dusting control of magnesium slag produced by Pidgeon process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Laner; Yang, Qixing; Han, Fenglan; Du, Chun

    2013-06-01

    Magnesium production by Pidgeon process has been developed very fast in China since 1990's. The waste slag from magnesium production has attracted broad attention because the huge amounts of the slag. For each ton of magnesium produced, there will be 6-8 tons of the slag generated. A big part of the Mg slag exists as fine dust with particle size of D95 < 0.1mm, which may pollute air, soil and water surrounding the Mg industry. The fine particles are generated by phase transformations of dicalcium silicate C2S (2CaOṡSiO2) during the slag cooling. There is a volume expansion of more than 10% with the transformation of β-C2S to γ-C2S phase, causing a disintegration or dusting of the Mg slag. In the present study, several chemical stabilizers were used to treat the dusting Mg slag at 1200°C, including borates, phosphates and rare earth oxides, in order to obtain volume stable slag aggregates for environmental protection and recycling of the Mg slag. The volume expanding rates of the samples were measured. XRD and SEM studies were carried out to confirm effects of the stabilizers. The results show that all of the stabilizers were effective for the stabilization of Mg slag. Some differences between the stabilizers were also described and discussed.

  11. EAST (FRONT) AND NORTH SIDE OF DOUBLE FURNACE AND NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST (FRONT) AND NORTH SIDE OF DOUBLE FURNACE AND NORTH SIDE OF SINGLE FURNACE, SOUTHWEST. - Tannehill Furnace, 12632 Confederate Parkway, Tannehill Historical State Park, Bucksville, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  12. Distribution of Bi Between Slags and Liquid Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunlin; Wright, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The distribution of Bi between liquid copper and calcium ferrite slag containing 24 wt pct CaO, iron silicate slag with 25 wt pct SiO2, and calcium iron silicate slags was measured at 1573 K (1300 °C) under controlled CO-CO2 atmosphere. The experimental results showed that bismuth distribution is affected by the oxygen partial pressure, and bismuth is likely to exist in slags in the 2+ oxidation state, i.e., as BiO. The distribution ratio between calcium ferrite slag and metal was found to be close to that of iron silicate slag. The Bi distribution ratio was found to decrease with increasing SiO2 and Al2O3 content in slag. Increasing temperature was found to decrease the Bi distribution ratio between slag and metal. Using the measured equilibrium data on Bi content of the metal and slag and composition dependence of the activity of Bi in liquid copper, the activity and hence activity coefficient of BiO in the slag was calculated. The close value of activity coefficient of BiO in both slags at the same oxygen partial pressure indicates that the CaO-BiO and SiO2-BiO interactions are likely to be at the same level, or the FeO x -BiO interaction is the predominant interaction for BiO in the slag. Therefore at a constant FeO x content in the slag, the CaO-BiO and SiO2-BiO interactions doesn't affect γ_{{BiO}} significantly.

  13. Synthesis and heavy metal immobilization behaviors of slag based geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Yunsheng, Zhang; Wei, Sun; Qianli, Chen; Lin, Chen

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, two aspects of studies are carried out: (1) synthesis of geopolymer by using slag and metakaolin; (2) immobilization behaviors of slag based geopolymer in a presence of Pb and Cu ions. As for the synthesis of slag based geopolymer, four different slag content (10%, 30%, 50%, 70%) and three types of curing regimes (standard curing, steam curing and autoclave curing) are investigated to obtain the optimum synthesis condition based on the compressive and flexural strength. The testing results showed that geopolymer mortar containing 50% slag that is synthesized at steam curing (80 degrees C for 8h), exhibits higher mechanical strengths. The compressive and flexural strengths of slag based geopolymer mortar are 75.2 MPa and 10.1 MPa, respectively. Additionally, Infrared (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques are used to characterize the microstructure of the slag based geopolymer paste. IR spectra show that the absorptive band at 1086 cm(-1) shifts to lower wave number around 1007 cm(-1), and some six-coordinated Als transforms into four-coordination during the synthesis of slag based geopolymer paste. The resulting slag based geopolymeric products are X-ray amorphous materials. SEM observation shows that it is possible to have geopolymeric gel and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel forming simultaneously within slag based geopolymer paste. As for immobilization of heavy metals, the leaching tests are employed to investigate the immobilization behaviors of the slag based geopolymer mortar synthesized under the above optimum condition. The leaching tests show that slag based geopolymer mortar can effectively immobilize Cu and Pb heavy metal ions, and the immobilization efficiency reach 98.5% greater when heavy metals are incorporated in the slag geopolymeric matrix in the range of 0.1-0.3%. The Pb exhibits better immobilization efficiency than the Cu in the case of large dosages of heavy metals. PMID:17034943

  14. ISACONVERT™—Continuous converting of nickel/PGM matte with calcium ferrite slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, M. L.; Nikolic, S.; Alvear, G. R. F.

    2011-05-01

    The ISASMELT™ process is a top submerged lance (TSL) bath smelting technology which has been developed and optimized over the last 25 years. By the end of 2011, the total installed capacity of the ISASMELT technology will exceed 9,000,000 tonnes per year of feed materials in copper and lead smelters around the world. Commercial plants, operating in Belgium and Germany, are also batch converting copper materials in ISASMELT furnaces. This TSL technology is equally effective for continuous converting processes, whereupon it is called ISACONVERT™. Xstrata Technology (XT) has recently patented a new ISACONVERT process for the continuous converting of nickel/platinum group metal (PGM) mattes using the calcium ferrite slag system. This paper outlines the development of this new process and presents a conceptual flowsheet for how it can be integrated into an existing nickel/PGM smelter.

  15. Calculation and Analysis of Liquid Holdup in Lower Blast Furnace by Model Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Bi, Xue-Gong; Wang, Guo-Qiang; Yang, Fu

    2012-06-01

    A hydromechanics experiment on the countercurrent flow of gas and liquid simulating the flow conditions in the lower blast furnace was carried out. A cold model of a packed bed with various packing materials and liquids was used to study the holdup of liquid. Correlations for static holdup, dynamic holdup, and total holdup were obtained. A good agreement was found between the calculated and experimental data. A mathematical model simulating the flow fields was applied to study the effect of liquid holdup in blast furnace. The results of the model calculation show that static holdup is the determinant of the total holdup of molten materials when the blast furnace works in stable condition. The slag phase generally reaches flooding holdup ahead of the hot metal. The radial distribution of gas flow is almost not influenced by the holdup of molten materials, but it has a greater influence on the pressure drop. The size of coke has far greater influence on static holdup than liquid properties does. The study is useful for acquiring a deeper understanding of the complex phenomena in the blast furnace and for determining appropriate operational actions under different production conditions.

  16. A new gasification and melting incineration process of MSW with co-current shaft furnace.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Qi; Zou, Zongshu; Liu, Haixiao; Zheng, Hongxia; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    In all the municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal technology, incineration with gasification and melting has been taken as a environmentally sound and zero emission technology owing to avoiding second-pollution of heavy metals and dioxin. In this background, a new direct gasification and melting incineration process with co-current shaft furnace is put forward. In this process, MSW and combustion-supporting air are co-current from top to bottom in a shaft furnace. Fuel gas from pyrolysis and gasification burns completely in the bottom in order to offer energy for slag melting. The simulation experiment of the co-current shaft furnace has been done. The results of simulation experiment show that the temperature on the condition of co-current is much higher than on the condition of countercurrent at the bottom of reaction tube and so is the CO2 quantity discharged from reaction tube. It can be concluded that the co-current shaft furnace is more suitable for direct gasification and melting incineration process. PMID:25084404

  17. Effect of Slag Basicity on Phase Equilibria and Selenium and Tellurium Distribution in Magnesia-Saturated Calcium Iron Silicate Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. D.; Jahanshahi, S.; Zhang, L.; Lincoln, F. J.

    2010-06-01

    New measurements have been made on the phase equilibria of magnesia-saturated CaO-FeOx-SiO2 slags at 1573 K (1300 °C) and an oxygen partial pressure of 10-9 atm. The thermodynamic behavior of selenium (Se) and tellurium (Te) in the slag and the stability of oxide mineral phases within the slag were examined as a function of slag composition. The measured equilibrium distribution of Se and Te between the slag and the copper showed nonlinear dependence on the slag basicity, reaching maxima at CaO/(CaO + SiO2) ratios of about 0.2 and 1 and a minimum at a ratio of about 0.5. The solubility of the copper oxide in the bulk slag also passed through a minimum value at a ratio of about 0.5. Results from drop-quench experiments confirmed the stability of various oxide solid solution phases at 1573 K (1300 °C) that had virtually no solubility for Se and Te. The deduced capacity of the liquid slag for Se was found to be independent of basicity in relatively basic slags, and decreased sharply as SiO2 replaced CaO in relatively acidic slags.

  18. Quantifying the Thermal Behavior of Slags (TRP 9903)

    SciTech Connect

    Alan W. Cramb

    2003-05-30

    Successful operation of a continuous caster is based upon control of heat transfer in the mold. The mold slag is a key component in the success of continuous casting; however, the phenomena that occur in the gap between the shell and the mold are largely unknown as until recently there have been no techniques that allowed visualization and quantification of the solidification behavior of liquid slags. This has lead to slag design being an empirical science or art. Recently a new experimental technique, called Double Hot Thermocouple Technique (DHTT), was developed at Carnegie Mellon University that allowed the solidification behavior of a slag to be observed and quantified under conditions that simulate the thermal conditions that occur in steelmaking environments. This technique allows ladle, tundish and mold slags to be characterized under extreme conditions including those found between the mold wall and the growing shell of a continuous caster. Thus, a program is initiated, under this grant, to quantify and describe the phenomena that occur during the solidification of a slag in a steel mill environment. This will allow slag design to become an engineering science rather than an empirical exercise. The project deliverables were as follows: (1) The further development of a tool that will have broad use in the quantification of slag melting and solidification behavior; and (2) The development of a set of meaningful design criteria for slag application in steel mill environments. The project was broken down into a number of objectives: (a) Develop a systematic understanding of the effect of cooling rate on slag solidification; (b) Develop a systematic understanding on the effect of slag chemistry changes on slag solidification behavior; (c) Develop a method to characterize slag melting; (d) Develop an understanding of the role of the environment on slag solidification and melting; (e) Develop the ability to understand slag solidification under the conditions that

  19. Floor furnace burns to children.

    PubMed

    Berger, L R; Kalishman, S

    1983-01-01

    Three children with grid-like second-degree burns of their extremities from contact with floor furnace registers prompted an examination of this thermal hazard. Average temperature of the gratings was 294 degrees F (146 degrees C), with a range of 180 degrees to 375 degrees F (82.2 degrees to 191 degrees C). All of the furnaces tested were positioned at the entrance to bedrooms and had so little clearance that it was impossible to walk around them without contact with their surface. Infants and toddlers are at particular risk: 1 or 2 seconds of exposure would be expected to produce a serious burn. Suggestions for preventing burns from floor furnaces include turning them off when young children are at home; installing barrier gates to prevent children from coming in contact with the registers; and developing a surface coating or replacement grate with less hazardous thermal properties. PMID:6848984

  20. Accelerated carbonation of steelmaking slags in a high-gravity rotating packed bed.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-E; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Tan, Chung-Sung; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2012-08-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) sequestration using the accelerated carbonation of basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag in a high-gravity rotating packed bed (RPB) under various operational conditions was investigated. The effects of reaction time, reaction temperature, rotation speed and slurry flow rate on the CO(2) sequestration process were evaluated. The samples of reacted slurry were analyzed quantitatively using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and qualitatively using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The sequestration experiments were performed at a liquid-to-solid ratio of 20:1 with a flow rate of 2.5 L min(-1) of a pure CO(2) stream under atmospheric temperature and pressure. The results show that a maximum conversion of BOF slag was 93.5% at a reaction time of 30 min and a rotation speed of 750 rpm at 65°C. The experimental data were utilized to determine the rate-limiting mechanism based on the shrinking core model (SCM), which was validated by the observations of SEM and TEM. Accelerated carbonation in a RPB was confirmed to be a viable method due to its higher mass-transfer rate. PMID:22633879