Science.gov

Sample records for fusion devices including

  1. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body fusion device. (a) Identification. An intervertebral body fusion device is an implanted single or...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intervertebral body fusion device. 888.3080... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body fusion device. (a) Identification. An intervertebral body fusion device is an implanted single or...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intervertebral body fusion device. 888.3080... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body fusion device. (a) Identification. An intervertebral body fusion device is an implanted single or...

  4. Magnetic systems for fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1985-02-01

    Mirror experiments have led the way in applying superconductivity to fusion research because of unique requirements for high and steady magnetic fields. The first significant applications were Baseball II at LLNL and IMP at ORNL. More recently, the MFTF-B yin-yang coil was successfully tested and the entire tandem configuration is nearing completion. Tokamak magnets have also enjoyed recent success with the large coil project tests at ORNL, preceded by single coil tests in Japan and Germany. In the USSR, the T-7 Tokamak has been operational for many years and the T-15 Tokamak is under construction, with the TF coils nearing completion. Also the Tore Supra is being built in France.

  5. Open-ended fusion devices and reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabe, T.; Nariai, H.

    1983-12-01

    Conceptual design studies on fusion reactors based upon open-ended confinement schemes, such as the tandem mirror and rf plugged cusp, have been carried out in Japan. These studies may be classified into two categories: near-term devices (Fusion Engineering Test Facility), and long-term fusion power recators. In the first category, a two-component cusp neutron source was proposed. In the second category, the GAMMA-R, a tandem-mirror power reactor, and the RFC-R, an axisymetric mirror and cusp, reactor studies are being conducted at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of Plasma Physics. Mirror Fusion Engineering Facility parameters and a schematic are shown. The GAMMA-R central-cell design schematic is also shown.

  6. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Duval, B. P.

    2012-05-25

    For fusion, obtaining reliable measurements of basic plasma parameters like ion and electron densities and temperatures is a primary goal. For theory, measurements are needed as a function of time and space to understand plasma transport and confinement with the ultimate goal of achieving economic nuclear fusion power. Electron profile measurements and plasma spectroscopy for the plasma ions are introduced. With the advent of Neutral Beam auxiliary plasma heating, Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy provides accurate and time resolved measurements of the ions in large volume fusion devices. In acknowledgement of Nicol Peacock's role in the development of these techniques, still at the forefront of plasma fusion research, this paper describes the evolution of this diagnostic method.

  7. Planar geometry inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Daniel R.

    2015-03-01

    In the classic gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion reactor, ion bombardment of the grid leads to heating, thermionic electron emission, significant power loss, and ultimately melting of the grid. Gridless IEC devices have sought to overcome these limitations. Klein reported a gridless device in which ions are circulated as a linear beam in an electrostatic analogue of an optical resonator. To overcome limits of stored ions due to space charge effects at the turning regions, the device employed multiple overlapping traps. The work reported here seeks to further increase the turning region space in a gridless trap by employing a planar geometry. Ion trapping in the planar device was examined by simulating trajectories of 2H+ ions with SIMION 8.1 software. Simulations were carried out using multiple potentials as in Klein's device and for a single potential trap as a planar analogue of the anharmonic ion trap. Scattering by background gas was simulated using a hard sphere collision model, and the results suggested the device will require operation at low pressure with a separate ion source.

  8. Divertor for a linear fusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Yushmanov, P. N.; Barnes, D. C.; Putvinski, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Linear fusion devices can use large magnetic flux flaring in the end tanks to reduce the heat load on the end structures. In order to reduce parallel electron heat loss, one has to create conditions where the neutral gas density in the end tanks is low, as otherwise cold electrons produced by the ionization of the neutrals would cool down the core plasma electrons. The processes determining the neutral gas formation and spatial distribution are analysed for the case where neutrals are formed by the surface recombination of the outflowing plasma. The conditions under which the cooling of the core plasma is negligible are formulated.

  9. 78 FR 1247 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Tablet Computers, Media...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Tablet Computers, Media... United States after importation of certain electronic devices, including wireless communication devices... importation of certain electronic devices, including wireless communication devices, tablet computers,...

  10. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOEpatents

    Baldasaro, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  11. Tritium and workers in fusion devices-lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rodrigo, Lina; Elbez-Uzan, Joelle; Alejaldre, Carlos

    2009-09-01

    Fusion machines from all over the world have contributed to the knowledge accumulated in fusion science. This knowledge has been applied to design new experimental fusion machines and in particular ITER. Only two fusion devices based on magnetic confinement have used deuterium and tritium fuels to-date-the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, TFTR, in Princeton, USA, and JET, the European tokamak. These machines have demonstrated that the fusion reaction is achievable with these fuels, and have provided valuable lessons on radioprotection-related issues as concerns tritium and workers. Dedicated tritium installations for fusion research and development have also contributed to this knowledge base. PMID:19690360

  12. Particle simulation of transport in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J.; Birdsall, C.K.; Morse, E.C. . Electronics Research Lab.); Cohen, B.I. )

    1989-10-17

    Our research in the area of transport processes in fusion devices has recently been centered on the development of particle simulation models of transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a diverted tokamak. As part of this research, we have been involved in the development of a suitable boundary condition for the plasma current at a floating plate that allows use of long time- and space-scale implicit simulation techniques. We have also been involved in a comparison of results from our particle-in-cell (PIC) code and a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck (FP) code for the study of particle confinement in an auxiliary heated mirror plasma. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.; Micklich, B.J.

    1983-06-01

    This invention pertains to methods of controlling in the steady state, neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices, and in particular, to methods of controlling the flux and energy distribution of collided neutrons which are incident on an outboard wall of a toroidal fusion device.

  14. Measuring time of flight of fusion products in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device for spatial profiling of fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D. C.; Boris, D. R.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.; Piefer, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A new diagnostic has been developed that uses the time of flight (TOF) of the products from a nuclear fusion reaction to determine the location where the fusion reaction occurred. The TOF diagnostic uses charged particle detectors on opposing sides of the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device that are coupled to high resolution timing electronics to measure the spatial profile of fusion reactions occurring between the two charged particle detectors. This diagnostic was constructed and tested by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Group in the IEC device, HOMER, which accelerates deuterium ions to fusion relevant energies in a high voltage (˜100 kV), spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, T. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The TOF diagnostic detects the products of D(d,p)T reactions and determines where along a chord through the device the fusion event occurred. The diagnostic is also capable of using charged particle spectroscopy to determine the Doppler shift imparted to the fusion products by the center of mass energy of the fusion reactants. The TOF diagnostic is thus able to collect spatial profiles of the fusion reaction density along a chord through the device, coupled with the center of mass energy of the reactions occurring at each location. This provides levels of diagnostic detail never before achieved on an IEC device.

  15. Measuring time of flight of fusion products in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device for spatial profiling of fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, D. C.; Boris, D. R.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.; Piefer, G. R.

    2013-03-15

    A new diagnostic has been developed that uses the time of flight (TOF) of the products from a nuclear fusion reaction to determine the location where the fusion reaction occurred. The TOF diagnostic uses charged particle detectors on opposing sides of the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device that are coupled to high resolution timing electronics to measure the spatial profile of fusion reactions occurring between the two charged particle detectors. This diagnostic was constructed and tested by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Group in the IEC device, HOMER, which accelerates deuterium ions to fusion relevant energies in a high voltage ({approx}100 kV), spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, T. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The TOF diagnostic detects the products of D(d,p)T reactions and determines where along a chord through the device the fusion event occurred. The diagnostic is also capable of using charged particle spectroscopy to determine the Doppler shift imparted to the fusion products by the center of mass energy of the fusion reactants. The TOF diagnostic is thus able to collect spatial profiles of the fusion reaction density along a chord through the device, coupled with the center of mass energy of the reactions occurring at each location. This provides levels of diagnostic detail never before achieved on an IEC device.

  16. Linear optimal control of tokamak fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Firestone, M.A.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-05-01

    The control of plasma position, shape and current in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined using linear optimal control. These advanced tokamaks are characterized by non up-down symmetric coils and structure, thick structure surrounding the plasma, eddy currents, shaped plasmas, superconducting coils, vertically unstable plasmas, and hybrid function coils providing ohmic heating, vertical field, radial field, and shaping field. Models of the electromagnetic environment in a tokamak are derived and used to construct control gains that are tested in nonlinear simulations with initial perturbations. The issues of applying linear optimal control to advanced tokamaks are addressed, including complex equilibrium control, choice of cost functional weights, the coil voltage limit, discrete control, and order reduction. Results indicate that the linear optimal control is a feasible technique for controlling advanced tokamaks where the more common classical control will be severely strained or will not work. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  17. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  18. 77 FR 60720 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Commmunication Devices, Portable Music and Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Commmunication Devices, Portable Music and Data... infringing electronic devices, including wireless communication devices, portable music and data...

  19. Simulation of Carbon Production from Material Surfaces in Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, J.; Verboncoeur, J.

    2005-10-01

    Impurity production at carbon surfaces by plasma bombardment is a key issue for fusion devices as modest amounts can lead to excessive radiative power loss and/or hydrogenic D-T fuel dilution. Here results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of physical and chemical sputtering of hydrocarbons are presented for models of graphite and amorphous carbon, the latter formed by continuous D-T impingement in conditions that mimic fusion devices. The results represent more extensive simulations than we reported last year, including incident energies in the 30-300 eV range for a variety of incident angles that yield a number of different hydrocarbon molecules. The calculated low-energy yields clarify the uncertainty in the complex chemical sputtering rate since chemical bonding and hard-core repulsion are both included in the interatomic potential. Also modeled is hydrocarbon break-up by electron-impact collisions and transport near the surface. Finally, edge transport simulations illustrate the sensitivity of the edge plasma properties arising from moderate changes in the carbon content. The models will provide the impurity background for the TEMPEST kinetic edge code.

  20. 47 CFR 15.115 - TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false TV interface devices, including cable system... FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.115 TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices. (a) Measurements of the radiated emissions of a TV interface device shall be conducted with...

  1. 47 CFR 15.115 - TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false TV interface devices, including cable system... FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.115 TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices. (a) Measurements of the radiated emissions of a TV interface device shall be conducted with...

  2. 47 CFR 15.115 - TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TV interface devices, including cable system... FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.115 TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices. (a) Measurements of the radiated emissions of a TV interface device shall be conducted with...

  3. 47 CFR 15.115 - TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false TV interface devices, including cable system... FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.115 TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices. (a) Measurements of the radiated emissions of a TV interface device shall be conducted with...

  4. 47 CFR 15.115 - TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false TV interface devices, including cable system... FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.115 TV interface devices, including cable system terminal devices. (a) Measurements of the radiated emissions of a TV interface device shall be conducted with...

  5. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Micklich, Bradley J.

    1986-01-01

    An arrangement is provided for controlling neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices having inboard and outboard vacuum vessel walls for containment of the neutrons of a fusion plasma. Neutron albedo material is disposed immediately adjacent the inboard wall, and is movable, preferably in vertical directions, so as to be brought into and out of neutron modifying communication with the fusion neutrons. Neutron albedo material preferably comprises a liquid form, but may also take pebble, stringer and curtain-like forms. A neutron flux valve, rotatable about a vertical axis is also disclosed.

  6. Super-X divertors and high power density fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Valanju, P. M.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S. M.; Canik, J.

    2009-05-15

    The Super-X Divertor (SXD), a robust axisymmetric redesign of the divertor magnetic geometry that can allow a fivefold increase in the core power density of toroidal fusion devices, is presented. With small changes in poloidal coils and currents for standard divertors, the SXD allows the largest divertor plate radius inside toroidal field coils. This increases the plasma-wetted area by 2-3 times over all flux-expansion-only methods (e.g., plate near main X point, plate tilting, X divertor, and snowflake), decreases parallel heat flux and hence plasma temperature at plate, and increases connection length by 2-5 times. Examples of high-power-density fusion devices enabled by SXD are discussed; the most promising near-term device is a 100 MW modular compact fusion neutron source 'battery' small enough to fit inside a conventional fission blanket.

  7. Frontier of Fusion Research: Path to the Steady State Fusion Reactor by Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motojima, Osamu

    2006-12-01

    The ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, which will be built in Cadarache in France, has finally started this year, 2006. Since the thermal energy produced by fusion reactions divided by the external heating power, i.e., the Q value, will be larger than 10, this is a big step of the fusion research for half a century trying to tame the nuclear fusion for the 6.5 Billion people on the Earth. The source of the Sun's power is lasting steadily and safely for 8 Billion years. As a potentially safe environmentally friendly and economically competitive energy source, fusion should provide a sustainable future energy supply for all mankind for ten thousands of years. At the frontier of fusion research important milestones are recently marked on a long road toward a true prototype fusion reactor. In its own merits, research into harnessing turbulent burning plasmas and thereby controlling fusion reaction, is one of the grand challenges of complex systems science. After a brief overview of a status of world fusion projects, a focus is given on fusion research at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan, which is playing a role of the Inter University Institute, the coordinating Center of Excellence for academic fusion research and by the Large Helical Device (LHD), the world's largest superconducting heliotron device, as a National Users' facility. The current status of LHD project is presented focusing on the experimental program and the recent achievements in basic parameters and in steady state operations. Since, its start in a year 1998, a remarkable progress has presently resulted in the temperature of 140 Million degree, the highest density of 500 Thousand Billion/cc with the internal density barrier (IDB) and the highest steady average beta of 4.5% in helical plasma devices and the largest total input energy of 1.6 GJ, in all magnetic confinement fusion devices. Finally, a perspective is given of the ITER Broad Approach program

  8. Launch Lock Assemblies Including Axial Gap Amplification Devices and Spacecraft Isolation Systems Including the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Young, Ken (Inventor); Davis, Torey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of a launch lock assembly are provided, as are embodiments of a spacecraft isolation system including one or more launch lock assemblies. In one embodiment, the launch lock assembly includes first and second mount pieces, a releasable clamp device, and an axial gap amplification device. The releasable clamp device normally maintains the first and second mount pieces in clamped engagement; and, when actuated, releases the first and second mount pieces from clamped engagement to allow relative axial motion there between. The axial gap amplification device normally residing in a blocking position wherein the gap amplification device obstructs relative axial motion between the first and second mount pieces. The axial gap amplification device moves into a non-blocking position when the first and second mount pieces are released from clamped engagement to increase the range of axial motion between the first and second mount pieces.

  9. Coupling of transit time instabilities in electrostatic confinement fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwald, J. Fröhlich, M.

    2015-07-15

    A model of the behavior of transit time instabilities in an electrostatic confinement fusion reactor is presented in this letter. It is demonstrated that different modes are excited within the spherical cathode of a Farnsworth fusor. Each of these modes is dependent on the fusion products as well as the acceleration voltage applied between the two electrodes and they couple to a resulting oscillation showing non-linear beat phenomena. This type of instability is similar to the transit time instability of electrons between two resonant surfaces but the presence of ions and the occurring fusion reactions alter the physics of this instability considerably. The physics of this plasma instability is examined in detail for typical physical parameter ranges of electrostatic confinement fusion devices.

  10. Computerized device for critical flicker fusion frequency determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racene, Diana

    2003-08-01

    The critical fusion flicker frequency of the human visual system is the threshold sensitivity for a sine wave-modulated patch of monochromatic flickering light measured as a function of its temporal frequency and average luminance level. The critical flicker fusion frequency changes in different ocular and non-ocular conditions, for example: high-myopia, AMR, glaucoma, schizophrenia, after alcohol intake, fatigue. A computerized test for critical flicker fusion frequency determination was developed. Visual stimuli are two monochromatic LED light sources that are connected to a microcircuit driven by a computer program. The control of the device is realized through the parallel port of the PC. During the test a patient has to choose which one of two light sources is flickering. The critical cliker fusion frequency is determined by a psychophysical procedure, where the stimulus frequency that showed detection probability 75% is considered as threshold.

  11. Coupling of transit time instabilities in electrostatic confinement fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenwald, J.; Fröhlich, M.

    2015-07-01

    A model of the behavior of transit time instabilities in an electrostatic confinement fusion reactor is presented in this letter. It is demonstrated that different modes are excited within the spherical cathode of a Farnsworth fusor. Each of these modes is dependent on the fusion products as well as the acceleration voltage applied between the two electrodes and they couple to a resulting oscillation showing non-linear beat phenomena. This type of instability is similar to the transit time instability of electrons between two resonant surfaces but the presence of ions and the occurring fusion reactions alter the physics of this instability considerably. The physics of this plasma instability is examined in detail for typical physical parameter ranges of electrostatic confinement fusion devices.

  12. Measurements of temperature and density in magnetic confinement fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udintsev, Victor S.

    2010-11-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion can fulfil the demand of mankind to have an inexhaustible source of energy that does not cause any serious environmental pollution. The aim of fusion research is to build a continuously operating reactor in which the energy released by the fusion reactions is sufficiently high to keep the plasma hot and to produce more fusion reactions. The knowledge of the plasma temperature and density, together with the energy confinement time, is therefore very important for the effective control of the self-sustained fusion reactor. Various methods and diagnostics for measurements of the plasma temperature and density in present experimental fusion devices, as well as requirements for the future fusion reactors, will be discussed. A special attention will be given to the temperature and density diagnostics in ITER tokamak, which is presently under construction by several international partners at Cadarache in France. Development of these diagnostics is a major challenge because of severe environment, strict engineering requirements, safety issues and the need for high reliability in the measurements.

  13. RF plasma heating in toroidal fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Golant, V.E.; Fedorov, V.I. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present book is to provide, in seven chapters, a unified overview of the methods for rf heating of plasmas in toroidal fusion experiments. In Chapter 1 the problem of plasma heating in tokamaks and stellarators is formulated and the requirements for auxiliary heating techniques are described. This chapter also contains a brief review of the results of research on tokamaks and stellarators. Chapter 2 is devoted to a theoretical description of the principal physical effects involved in the rf heating of plasmas, especially the characteristics of wave propagation, of the mechanisms by which waves are absorbed and plasma heating takes place, and of the nonlinear effects that accompany heating. The primary emphasis is on a qualitative physical picture of these effects. Chapters 3-6, in turn, deal with the major rf heating techniques currently under investigation, electron cyclotron (ECH), ion cyclotron (ICH), lower hybrid (LHH), and Alfven wave heating. In each of these chapters the main schemes for heating are described, the results of theoretical analyses and numerical simulations are discussed, the technology of the heating systems is briefly described, and experimental work published through the end of 1984 is reviewed. Finally, in Chapter 7 the different rf heating techniques are compared; they are contrasted with neutral beam injection, and the feasibility of adiabatic compression as a means of heating plasmas is examined. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter of this book. 246 refs.

  14. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

    2014-04-22

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  15. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, Anson V.; Sommer, Gregory j.; Singh, Anup K.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay

    2015-12-01

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  16. Real-Time Decision Fusion for Multimodal Neural Prosthetic Devices

    PubMed Central

    White, James Robert; Levy, Todd; Bishop, William; Beaty, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The field of neural prosthetics aims to develop prosthetic limbs with a brain-computer interface (BCI) through which neural activity is decoded into movements. A natural extension of current research is the incorporation of neural activity from multiple modalities to more accurately estimate the user's intent. The challenge remains how to appropriately combine this information in real-time for a neural prosthetic device. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we propose a framework based on decision fusion, i.e., fusing predictions from several single-modality decoders to produce a more accurate device state estimate. We examine two algorithms for continuous variable decision fusion: the Kalman filter and artificial neural networks (ANNs). Using simulated cortical neural spike signals, we implemented several successful individual neural decoding algorithms, and tested the capabilities of each fusion method in the context of decoding 2-dimensional endpoint trajectories of a neural prosthetic arm. Extensively testing these methods on random trajectories, we find that on average both the Kalman filter and ANNs successfully fuse the individual decoder estimates to produce more accurate predictions. Conclusions Our results reveal that a fusion-based approach has the potential to improve prediction accuracy over individual decoders of varying quality, and we hope that this work will encourage multimodal neural prosthetics experiments in the future. PMID:20209151

  17. Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence-spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Husinsky, W.R.

    1980-08-01

    Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local, time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler - broadened absorbtion spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10/sup 6/ atoms/cm/sup 3/ with a velocity resolution of 600 m/sec (0.1 eV) have been achieved. Techniques for exciting plasma particles (H,D) will also be discussed.

  18. A laser device for fusion of nasal mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooklal, Valmiki; McClure, Jesse; Hooper, Luke; Larson, Michael

    2010-02-01

    A prototype device has been created to fuse septal tissue membranes as an alternative to sutures or staples through the controlled application of laser heating and pressure to induce protein denaturation and subsequent tissue fusion, through renaturation and intertwining, across the interface. Lasers have been used to close wounds in controlled laboratory tests over the last 15 years. Many encouraging results have been obtained; however, no commercial delivery systems are currently available. This is due primarily to two factors: requiring an inordinate amount of experience on the part of the operator, and attempting to achieve general applicability for multiple tissue systems. The present device overcomes these barriers as it is tailored for the particular application of septal laser fusion, namely for the coaptation of mucoperichondrial membranes. The important parameters involved in fusing biological tissues are identified. The development of the device followed from computational modeling based on Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport and on engineering firstprinciples. Experiments were designed and analyzed using orthogonal arrays, employing a subset of the relevant parameters, i.e., laser irradiance, dwell time and spot size, for a range of wavelengths. The in vitro fusion experiments employed 1cm by 1cm sections of equine nasal mucosa having a nominal thickness of 1mm.

  19. Understanding of Edge Plasmas in Magnetic Fusion Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T

    2004-11-01

    A limited overview is given of the theoretical understanding of edge plasmas in fusion devices. This plasma occupies the thin region between the hot core plasma and material walls in magnetically confinement configurations. The region is often formed by a change in magnetic topology from close magnetic field lines (i.e., the core region) and open field lines that contact material surfaces (i.e., the scrape-off layer [SOL]), with the most common example being magnetically diverted tokamaks. The physics of this region is determined by the interaction of plasma with neutral gas in the presence of plasma turbulence, with impurity radiation being an important component. Recent advances in modeling strong, intermittent micro-turbulent edge-plasma transport is given, and the closely coupled self-consistent evolution of the edge-plasma profiles in tokamaks. In addition, selected new results are given for the characterization of edge-plasmas behavior in the areas of edge-pedestal relaxation and SOL transport via Edge-Localize Modes (ELMs), impurity formation including dust, and magnetic field-line stochasticity in tokamaks.

  20. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  1. Some considerations of cold fusion including the calculation of fusion rates in molecules of hydrogen isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1989-11-01

    We calculate the fusion reaction rates in molecules of hydrogen isotopes. The rates are calculated analytically (for the first time) as an asymptotic expansion in the ratio of the electron mass to the reduced mass of the nucleii. The fusion rates of the P-D, D-D, and D-T reactions are given for a variable electron mass by a simple analytic formula. However, we do not know any mechanism by which a sufficiently localized electron in solid can have an effective mass' large enough to explain the result of Fleischman and Pons (FP). This calculation indicates that P-D rates should exceed D-D rates for D-D fusion rates less than approximately 10{sup {minus}23} per molecule per second. The D-D fusion rate is enhanced by a factor of 10{sup 5} at 10,000{degree}K if the excited vibrational states are populated with a Boltzmann distribution and the rotational excitations suppressed. The suggestion that experimental results could be explained by bombardment of cold deuterons by kilovolt deuterons is shown to be an unlikely from an energetic point of view. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. 77 FR 70464 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Telecommunications America, LLC of Richardson, Texas (collectively, ``Samsung''). 76 FR 45860 (Aug. 1, 2011). The... Presidential Memorandum of July 21, 2005, 70 FR 43251 (July 26, 2005). During this period, the subject articles... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and...

  3. 78 FR 16865 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... America, LLC of Richardson, Texas (collectively, ``Samsung''). 76 FR 45860 (Aug. 1, 2011). The complaint... Commission, and on the issues of remedy, the public interest, and bonding. 77 FR 70464. The Commission... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and...

  4. Conference report on the 3rd international symposium on lithium application for fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzitelli, G.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9–11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma–Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  5. Conference Report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-02-01

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  6. Conference report on the 3rd international symposium on lithium application for fusion devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mazzitelli, G.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9–11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy),more » T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma–Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.« less

  7. Conference report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzitelli, Guiseppe; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. Furthermore, this international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  8. Superconducting (radiation hardened) magnets for mirror fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Miller, J.R.; Perkins, J.R.

    1983-12-07

    Superconducting magnets for mirror fusion have evolved considerably since the Baseball II magnet in 1970. Recently, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) yin-yang has been tested to a full field of 7.7 T with radial dimensions representative of a full scale reactor. Now the emphasis has turned to the manufacture of very high field solenoids (choke coils) that are placed between the tandem mirror central cell and the yin-yang anchor-plug set. For MFTF-B the choke coil field reaches 12 T, while in future devices like the MFTF-Upgrade, Fusion Power Demonstration and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) reactor the fields are doubled. Besides developing high fields, the magnets must be radiation hardened. Otherwise, thick neutron shields increase the magnet size to an unacceptable weight and cost. Neutron fluences in superconducting magnets must be increased by an order of magnitude or more. Insulators must withstand 10/sup 10/ to 10/sup 11/ rads, while magnet stability must be retained after the copper has been exposed to fluence above 10/sup 19/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/.

  9. Study of plasma equilibrium in toroidal fusion devices using mesh-free numerical calculation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, C.; Abbasi Davani, F.; Rokrok, B.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma confinement using external magnetic field is one of the successful ways leading to the controlled nuclear fusion. Development and validation of the solution process for plasma equilibrium in the experimental toroidal fusion devices is the main subject of this work. Solution of the nonlinear 2D stationary problem as posed by the Grad-Shafranov equation gives quantitative information about plasma equilibrium inside the vacuum chamber of hot fusion devices. This study suggests solving plasma equilibrium equation which is essential in toroidal nuclear fusion devices, using a mesh-free method in a condition that the plasma boundary is unknown. The Grad-Shafranov equation has been solved numerically by the point interpolation collocation mesh-free method. Important features of this approach include truly mesh free, simple mathematical relationships between points and acceptable precision in comparison with the parametric results. The calculation process has been done by using the regular and irregular nodal distribution and support domains with different points. The relative error between numerical and analytical solution is discussed for several test examples such as small size Damavand tokamak, ITER-like equilibrium, NSTX-like equilibrium, and typical Spheromak.

  10. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

    1995-10-03

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

  11. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Gruzalski, Greg R.; Luck, Christopher F.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

  12. A thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    SciTech Connect

    Baldasaro, Paul F.

    1997-12-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential are disclosed. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  13. 77 FR 34063 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof... devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof by reason of infringement of... certain electronics devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof...

  14. 78 FR 38361 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... COMMISSION Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof... States after importation of certain portable electronic ] communications devices, including mobile phones... importation of certain portable electronic communications devices, including mobile phones and...

  15. 77 FR 27078 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof... Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones... electronic devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof. The complaint...

  16. Development of multi-purpose MW gyrotrons for fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Numakura, T.; Endo, Y.; Nakabayashi, H.; Eguchi, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Mutoh, T.; Ito, S.; Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Sakamoto, K.; Mitsunaka, Y.; the GAMMA 10 Group

    2013-06-01

    The latest development achievements in the University of Tsukuba of over-1 MW power level gyrotrons required in present-day fusion devices, GAMMA 10, Large Helical Device (LHD), QUEST, Heliotron J and NSTX, are presented. The obtained maximum outputs are 1.9 MW for 0.1 s on the 77 GHz LHD tube and 1.2 MW for 1 ms on the 28 GHz GAMMA 10 one, which are new records in these frequency ranges. In long-pulse operation, 0.3 MW for 40 min at 77 GHz and 0.54 MW for 2 s at 28 GHz are achieved. A new programme of 154 GHz 1 MW development has started for high-density plasma heating in LHD. On the first 154 GHz tube, 1.0 MW for 1 s is achieved. As a next activity of the 28 GHz gyrotron, an over-1.5 MW gyrotron is designed and fabricated to study the multi-MW oscillation. The possibility of 0.4 MW continuous wave and 2 MW level output in operations of a few seconds, after the improvements of output window and mode converter, is shown. Moreover, a new design study of dual-frequency gyrotron at 28 and 35 GHz has started, which indicates the practicability of the multi-purpose gyrotron.

  17. Conference report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mazzitelli, Guiseppe; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy),more » T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. Furthermore, this international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.« less

  18. Numerical Analysis including Pressure Drop in Oscillating Water Column Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    das Neves Gomes, Mateus; Domingues dos Santos, Elizaldo; Isoldi, Liércio André; Rocha, Luiz Alberto Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    The wave energy conversion into electricity has been increasingly studied in the last years. There are several proposed converters. Among them, the oscillatingwater column (OWC) device has been widespread evaluated in literature. In this context, the main goal of this work was to perform a comparison between two kinds of physical constraints in the chimney of the OWC device, aiming to represent numerically the pressure drop imposed by the turbine on the air flow inside the OWC. To do so, the conservation equations of mass,momentumand one equation for the transport of volumetric fraction were solved with the finite volume method (FVM). To tackle thewater-air interaction, the multiphase model volume of fluid (VOF)was used. Initially, an asymmetric constraint inserted in chimney duct was reproduced and investigated. Subsequently, a second strategywas proposed,where a symmetric physical constraint with an elliptical shapewas analyzed. Itwas thus possible to establish a strategy to reproduce the pressure drop in OWC devices caused by the presence of the turbine, as well as to generate its characteristic curve.

  19. Development progresses of radio frequency ion source for neutral beam injector in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. H.; Jeong, S. H.; Kim, T. S.; Park, M.; Lee, K. W.; In, S. R.

    2014-02-01

    A large-area RF (radio frequency)-driven ion source is being developed in Germany for the heating and current drive of an ITER device. Negative hydrogen ion sources are the major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion experiments such as ITER and DEMO. RF ion sources for the production of positive hydrogen (deuterium) ions have been successfully developed for the neutral beam heating systems at IPP (Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics) in Germany. The first long-pulse ion source has been developed successfully with a magnetic bucket plasma generator including a filament heating structure for the first NBI system of the KSTAR tokamak. There is a development plan for an RF ion source at KAERI to extract the positive ions, which can be applied for the KSTAR NBI system and to extract the negative ions for future fusion devices such as the Fusion Neutron Source and Korea-DEMO. The characteristics of RF-driven plasmas and the uniformity of the plasma parameters in the test-RF ion source were investigated initially using an electrostatic probe.

  20. Development progresses of radio frequency ion source for neutral beam injector in fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Chang, D H; Jeong, S H; Kim, T S; Park, M; Lee, K W; In, S R

    2014-02-01

    A large-area RF (radio frequency)-driven ion source is being developed in Germany for the heating and current drive of an ITER device. Negative hydrogen ion sources are the major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion experiments such as ITER and DEMO. RF ion sources for the production of positive hydrogen (deuterium) ions have been successfully developed for the neutral beam heating systems at IPP (Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics) in Germany. The first long-pulse ion source has been developed successfully with a magnetic bucket plasma generator including a filament heating structure for the first NBI system of the KSTAR tokamak. There is a development plan for an RF ion source at KAERI to extract the positive ions, which can be applied for the KSTAR NBI system and to extract the negative ions for future fusion devices such as the Fusion Neutron Source and Korea-DEMO. The characteristics of RF-driven plasmas and the uniformity of the plasma parameters in the test-RF ion source were investigated initially using an electrostatic probe. PMID:24593580

  1. 76 FR 45860 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Music and Data Processing Devices, and Tablet Computers; Notice of Institution of Investigation... communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, and tablet computers by reason of... communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, and tablet computers that infringe one...

  2. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  3. Probabilistic Multi-Sensor Fusion Based Indoor Positioning System on a Mobile Device

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang; Aloi, Daniel N.; Li, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, smart mobile devices include more and more sensors on board, such as motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer), wireless signal strength indicators (WiFi, Bluetooth, Zigbee), and visual sensors (LiDAR, camera). People have developed various indoor positioning techniques based on these sensors. In this paper, the probabilistic fusion of multiple sensors is investigated in a hidden Markov model (HMM) framework for mobile-device user-positioning. We propose a graph structure to store the model constructed by multiple sensors during the offline training phase, and a multimodal particle filter to seamlessly fuse the information during the online tracking phase. Based on our algorithm, we develop an indoor positioning system on the iOS platform. The experiments carried out in a typical indoor environment have shown promising results for our proposed algorithm and system design. PMID:26694387

  4. Probabilistic Multi-Sensor Fusion Based Indoor Positioning System on a Mobile Device.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang; Aloi, Daniel N; Li, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, smart mobile devices include more and more sensors on board, such as motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer), wireless signal strength indicators (WiFi, Bluetooth, Zigbee), and visual sensors (LiDAR, camera). People have developed various indoor positioning techniques based on these sensors. In this paper, the probabilistic fusion of multiple sensors is investigated in a hidden Markov model (HMM) framework for mobile-device user-positioning. We propose a graph structure to store the model constructed by multiple sensors during the offline training phase, and a multimodal particle filter to seamlessly fuse the information during the online tracking phase. Based on our algorithm, we develop an indoor positioning system on the iOS platform. The experiments carried out in a typical indoor environment have shown promising results for our proposed algorithm and system design. PMID:26694387

  5. 75 FR 74080 - In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... COMMISSION Inv. No. 337-TA-749 In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors... sale within the United States after importation of certain liquid crystal display devices, including... importation of certain liquid crystal display devices, including monitors, televisions, and modules,...

  6. 75 FR 20860 - Certain Display Devices, Including Digital Televisions and Monitors; Notice of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... COMMISSION Certain Display Devices, Including Digital Televisions and Monitors; Notice of Investigation... devices, including digital televisions and monitors by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S... after importation of certain display devices, including digital televisions or monitors that...

  7. 78 FR 40171 - Certain Wireless Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets; Notice Of Receipt of Complaint...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets; Notice Of Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled Certain Wireless Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets, DN 2964; the Commission is... importation of certain wireless devices, including mobile phones and tablets. The complaint names...

  8. 78 FR 47410 - Certain Wireless Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets Institution of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets Institution of Investigation AGENCY... within the United States after importation of certain wireless devices, including mobile phones and... wireless devices, including mobile phones and tablets by reason of infringement of one or more of claims...

  9. Mini-fission fusion explosive devices (mini-nukes) for nuclear pulse propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear pulse propulsion demands low-yield nuclear explosive devices. Because the critical mass of a fission explosive is rather large, this leads to extravagant fission devices with a very low fuel burn-up. For non-fission ignited pure fusion microexplosions the problem is the large ignition apparatus (laser, particle beam, etc.). Fission ignited large fusion explosive devices are for obvious reasons even less desirable. A third category (mini-nukes) are devices where the critical mass of the fission explosive is substantially reduced by its coupling to a DT fusion reaction, with the DT fusion neutrons increasing the fission rate. Whereas in pure fission devices a reduction of the critical mass is achieved by the implosive compression of the fissile core with a chemical high explosive, in the third category the implosion must at the same time heat the DT surrounding the fissile core to a temperature of ⩾107K, at which enough fusion neutrons are generated to increase the fission rate which in turn further increases the temperature and fusion neutron production rate. As has been shown by the author many years ago, such mini-nukes lead to astonishingly small critical masses. In their application to nuclear pulse propulsion the combustion products from the chemical high explosive are further heated by the neutrons and are becoming part of the propellant.

  10. Flywheel induction motor-generator for magnet power supply in small fusion device.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyma, S; Yoshino, F; Tsutsui, H; Tsuji-Iio, S

    2016-04-01

    A flywheel motor-generator (MG) for the toroidal field (TF) coils of a small fusion device was developed which utilizes a commercially available squirrel-cage induction motor. Advantages of the MG are comparably-long duration, quick power response, and easy implementation of power control compared with conventional capacitor-type power supply. A 55-kW MG was fabricated, and TF coils of a small fusion device were energized. The duration of the current flat-top was extended to 1 s which is much longer than those of conventional small devices (around 10-100 ms). PMID:27131676

  11. Flywheel induction motor-generator for magnet power supply in small fusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyma, S.; Yoshino, F.; Tsutsui, H.; Tsuji-Iio, S.

    2016-04-01

    A flywheel motor-generator (MG) for the toroidal field (TF) coils of a small fusion device was developed which utilizes a commercially available squirrel-cage induction motor. Advantages of the MG are comparably-long duration, quick power response, and easy implementation of power control compared with conventional capacitor-type power supply. A 55-kW MG was fabricated, and TF coils of a small fusion device were energized. The duration of the current flat-top was extended to 1 s which is much longer than those of conventional small devices (around 10-100 ms).

  12. JNM theme issue on models and data for plasma-material interaction and hydrogen retention in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2015-12-01

    Plasma-wall interaction in fusion devices encompasses a wide variety of processes. On a short timescale these include deposition of energetic plasma particles (primarily hydrogen and helium) into the surface, physical and chemical sputtering of surface material into the plasma, and reflection and desorption of particles from the surface. On a longer timescale the processes include diffusion of hydrogen and helium in the wall and changes in surface composition, morphology and material microstructure due to plasma bombardment and (in a reactor) neutron irradiation. Together these processes are extremely important in determining the plasma performance, the lifetime of plasma-facing components, trapping and retention of the tritium fusion fuel in the wall, and ultimately the feasibility of fusion power production.

  13. Photo-fusion reactions in a new compact device for ELI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaizis, S. D.; Auvray, P.; Hora, H.; Lalousis, P.; Larour, J.; Mourou, G.

    2012-07-01

    In the last few years significant progress on technological, experimental and numerical studies on fusion process in high density and high temperature plasmas produced by a high intensity laser pulse interaction with clusters in a high external applied magnetic field, enable us to propose a compact photo-fusion magnetic device for high neutron production. For the purpose of the project a pulsed magnetic field driver with values up to 110 Tesla has been developed which allows increasing the trapping time of the high density plasma in the device and improving the neutron yield. Numerical simulations show that the proposed device is capable of producing up to 109-1010 neutrons per laser shot with an external magnetic field of 150 Tesla. The proposed device can be used for experiments and numerical code validation concerning different conventional and (or) exotic fusion fuels.

  14. Photo-fusion reactions in a new compact device for ELI

    SciTech Connect

    Moustaizis, S. D.; Auvray, P.; Hora, H.; Lalousis, P.; Larour, J.; Mourou, G.

    2012-07-09

    In the last few years significant progress on technological, experimental and numerical studies on fusion process in high density and high temperature plasmas produced by a high intensity laser pulse interaction with clusters in a high external applied magnetic field, enable us to propose a compact photo-fusion magnetic device for high neutron production. For the purpose of the project a pulsed magnetic field driver with values up to 110 Tesla has been developed which allows increasing the trapping time of the high density plasma in the device and improving the neutron yield. Numerical simulations show that the proposed device is capable of producing up to 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} neutrons per laser shot with an external magnetic field of 150 Tesla. The proposed device can be used for experiments and numerical code validation concerning different conventional and (or) exotic fusion fuels.

  15. Simulation of RF-fields in a fusion device

    SciTech Connect

    De Witte, Dieter; Bogaert, Ignace; De Zutter, Daniel; Van Oost, Guido; Van Eester, Dirk

    2009-11-26

    In this paper the problem of scattering off a fusion plasma is approached from the point of view of integral equations. Using the volume equivalence principle an integral equation is derived which describes the electromagnetic fields in a plasma. The equation is discretized with MoM using conforming basis functions. This reduces the problem to solving a dense matrix equation. This can be done iteratively. Each iteration can be sped up using FFTs.

  16. Minority carrier device comprising a passivating layer including a Group 13 element and a chalcogenide component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barron, Andrew R. (Inventor); Hepp, Aloysius F. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip P. (Inventor); MacInnes, Andrew N. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A minority carrier device includes at least one junction of at least two dissimilar materials, at least one of which is a semiconductor, and a passivating layer on at least one surface of the device. The passivating layer includes a Group 13 element and a chalcogenide component. Embodiments of the minority carrier device include, for example, laser diodes, light emitting diodes, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and solar cells.

  17. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... application (PMA) or notice of product development protocol (PDP) is required. Devices described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... application (PMA) or notice of product development protocol (PDP) is required. Devices described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before...

  19. Developing Boundary/PMI Solutions for Next-Step Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.; Leonard, A. W.; Thomas, D. M.; Allen, S. L.; Hill, D. N.; Unterberg, Z.

    2014-10-01

    The path towards next-step fusion development requires increased emphasis on the boundary/plasma-material interface. The new DIII-D Boundary/Plasma-Material Interactions (PMI) Center has been established to address these critical issues on a timescale relevant to the design of FNSF, adopting the following transformational approaches: (1) Develop and test advanced divertor configurations on DIII-D compatible with core plasma high performance operational scenarios in FNSF; (2) Validate candidate reactor PFC materials at reactor-relevant temperatures in DIII-D high-performance plasmas, in collaboration with the broad material research/development community; (3) Integrate validated boundary-materials interface with high performance plasmas to provide viable boundary/PMI solutions for next-step fusion devices. This program leverages unique DIII-D capabilities, promotes synergistic programs within the broad PMI community, including linear material research facilities. It will also enable us to build a compelling bridge for the US research on long-pulse facilities. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC05-00OR2725.

  20. Microfluidic device for high-yield pairing and fusion of stem cells with somatic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gel, Murat; Hirano, Kunio; Oana, Hidehiro; Kotera, Hidetoshi; Tada, Takashi; Washizu, Masao

    2011-12-01

    Electro cell fusion has significant potential as a biotechnology tool with applications ranging from antibody production to cellular reprogramming. However due to low fusion efficiency of the conventional electro fusion methodology the true potential of the technique has not been reached. In this paper, we report a new method which takes cell fusion efficiency two orders magnitude higher than the conventional electro fusion method. The new method, based on one-toone pairing, fusion and selection of fused cells was developed using a microfabricated device. The device was composed of two microfluidic channels, a micro slit array and a petri dish integrated with electrodes. The electrodes positioned in each channel were used to generate electric field lines concentrating in the micro slits. Cells were introduced into channels and brought in to contact through the micro slit array using dielectrophoresis. The cells in contact were fused by applying a DC pulse to electrodes. As the electric field lines were concentrated at the micro slits the membrane potential was induced only at the vicinity of the micro slits, namely only at the cell-cell contact point. This mechanism assured the minimum damage to cells in the fusion as well as the ability to control the strength and location of induced membrane potential. We introduced mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts to the microfluidic channels and demonstrated high-yield fusion (> 80%). Post-fusion study showed the method can generate viable hybrids of stem cells and embryonic fibroblasts. Multinucleated hybrid cells adhering on the chip surface were routinely obtained by using this method and on-chip culturing.

  1. 75 FR 4583 - In the Matter of: Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of: Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players, and... electronic devices, including mobile phones, portable music players, and computers, by reason of infringement... mobile phones, portable music players, or computers that infringe one or more of claims 1-12 of...

  2. 75 FR 63856 - In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, and... sale for importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain liquid crystal... importation of certain liquid crystal display devices, including monitors, televisions, and modules,...

  3. 78 FR 34132 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof... published a notice (78 FR 12892, May 31, 2013) of receipt of complaint entitled Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof, DN 2958; the Commission...

  4. [Change of Regulatory Requirement on Cohort Grouping and Endpoint Seting for Intervertebral Fusion Device Clinical Trial].

    PubMed

    Guo Xiaolei

    2015-07-01

    Combining technical requirement from main international administration and status quo of China administration, current regulatory requirement on clinical trail of conventional intervertebral fusion devices has been simplified. Cervical, thoracic and lumbar cases can be grouped into the same cohort, and primary endpoints are mainly based on imageology rather than clinical score. This is an attempt to rationally lessen industrial burdensome. PMID:26665950

  5. Non-superconducting magnet structures for near-term, large fusion experimental devices

    SciTech Connect

    File, J.; Knutson, D.S.; Marino, R.E.; Rappe, G.H.

    1980-10-01

    This paper describes the magnet and structural design in the following American tokamak devices: the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The Joint European Torus (JET), also presented herein, has a magnet structure evolved from several European programs and, like TFTR, represents state of the art magnet and structure design.

  6. Opportunities in the Fusion Energy Sciences Program [Includes Appendix C: Topical Areas Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Recent years have brought dramatic advances in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas and in the generation of fusion power in the laboratory. Today, there is little doubt that fusion energy production is feasible. The challenge is to make fusion energy practical. As a result of the advances of the last few years, there are now exciting opportunities to optimize fusion systems so that an attractive new energy source will be available when it may be needed in the middle of the next century. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are among the reasons to pursue these opportunities.

  7. Fusion energy in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using a magnetically shielded grid

    SciTech Connect

    Hedditch, John Bowden-Reid, Richard Khachan, Joe

    2015-10-15

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented, which shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  8. 77 FR 3793 - Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, and Modules, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, and Modules, and Components Thereof; Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade...

  9. 78 FR 63492 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade...

  10. Optimization of Compact Stellarator Configuration as Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    2005-10-01

    Optimization of the stellarator configuration requires trade-offs among a large number of physics parameters and engineering constraints. An integrated study of compact stellarator power plants, ARIES-CS, aims at examining these trade-offs and defining key R&D areas. We developed configurations with A<=6 and excellent QA (both 2 and 3 field periods) while reducing α losses to ˜10% (still higher than desirable). Stability to the linear ideal MHD modes was attained but at the expense of reduced QA (and increased α losses) and increased complexity of the plasma shape. Recent experimental results indicate, however, linear MHD stability limits may not be applicable to stellarators. It appears that the plasma/coil stand-off distance is not as an important as envisioned previously. By utilizing a highly efficient shield-only region in strategic areas, we reduced the minimum stand-off by ˜20%-30%. This allows a comparable reduction in the machine size. The device configuration, assembly, and maintenance procedures appear to impose severe constraints. A cost-optimization system code has been developed and is utilized to guide the optimization process.

  11. The application of machine learning in multi sensor data fusion for activity recognition in mobile device space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marhoubi, Asmaa H.; Saravi, Sara; Edirisinghe, Eran A.

    2015-05-01

    The present generation of mobile handheld devices comes equipped with a large number of sensors. The key sensors include the Ambient Light Sensor, Proximity Sensor, Gyroscope, Compass and the Accelerometer. Many mobile applications are driven based on the readings obtained from either one or two of these sensors. However the presence of multiple-sensors will enable the determination of more detailed activities that are carried out by the user of a mobile device, thus enabling smarter mobile applications to be developed that responds more appropriately to user behavior and device usage. In the proposed research we use recent advances in machine learning to fuse together the data obtained from all key sensors of a mobile device. We investigate the possible use of single and ensemble classifier based approaches to identify a mobile device's behavior in the space it is present. Feature selection algorithms are used to remove non-discriminant features that often lead to poor classifier performance. As the sensor readings are noisy and include a significant proportion of missing values and outliers, we use machine learning based approaches to clean the raw data obtained from the sensors, before use. Based on selected practical case studies, we demonstrate the ability to accurately recognize device behavior based on multi-sensor data fusion.

  12. Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic-Fusion Devices with Lithium-Conditioned Carbon Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Krstic, Predrag S.; Allain, J. P.; Taylor, C. N.; Dadras, J.; Morokuma, K.; Jakowski, J.; Allouche, A.; Skinner, C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Lithium wall conditioning has lowered hydrogenic recycling and dramatically improved plasma performance in many magnetic-fusion devices. In this Letter, we report quantum-classical atomistic simulations and laboratory experiments that elucidate the roles of lithium and oxygen in the uptake of hydrogen in amorphous carbon. Surprisingly, we show that lithium creates a high oxygen concentration on a carbon surface when bombarded by deuterium. Furthermore, surface oxygen, rather than lithium, plays the key role in trapping hydrogen.

  13. Testing of low Z coated limiters in tokamak fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Whitely, J.B.; Mullendore, A.W.; Langley, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Extensive testing on a laboratory scale has been used to select those coatings most suitable for this environment. From this testing which included pulsed electron beam heating, low energy ion bombardment and arcing, chemical vapor deposited coating of TiB/sub 2/ and TiC on Poco graphite substrates have been selected and tested as limiters in ISX. Both limiter materials gave clean, stable, reproducible tokamak discharges the first day of operation. After one weeks exposure, the TiC limiter showed only superficial damage with no coating failure. The TiB/sub 2/ limiter had some small areas of coating failure. TiC coated graphite limiters have also been briefly tested in the tokamaks Alcator and PDX with favorable results.

  14. Surface modifications of fusion reactor relevant materials on exposure to fusion grade plasma in plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Mishra, P.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2015-11-01

    An 11.5 kJ plasma focus (PF) device was used here to irradiate materials with fusion grade plasma. The surface modifications of different materials (W, Ni, stainless steel, Mo and Cu) were investigated using various available techniques. The prominent features observed through the scanning electron microscope on the sample surfaces were erosions, cracks, blisters and craters after irradiations. The surface roughness of the samples increased multifold after exposure as measured by the surface profilometer. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the changes in the microstructures and the structural phase transformation in surface layers of the samples. We observed change in volumes of austenite and ferrite phases in the stainless steel sample. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis suggested alloying of the surface layer of the samples with elements of the PF anode. We report here the comparative analysis of the surface damages of materials with different physical, thermal and mechanical properties. The investigations will be useful to understand the behavior of the perspective materials for future fusion reactors (either in pure form or in alloy) over the long operations.

  15. Characterization of charcoals for helium cryopumping in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedgley, D. W.; Tobin, A. G.; Batzer, T. H.; Call, W. R.

    1987-07-01

    The capability of charcoal as a sorbent for helium at cryogenic temperatures depends upon charcoal characteristics that are not well understood. Previous work by the authors has indicated that the charcoals- pumping capability for helium depends as much on their source as on their particle size distributions. To develop a correlation between the physical characteristics of charcoal and helium pumping performance, different charcoals based on wood, coal, coconut, and a petroleum by-product were obtained from commercial sources. They were bonded to an aluminum substrate, and cooled to liquid-helium temperatures in a vacuum chamber. The helium pumping speed at constant throughput versus quantity of helium absorbed was measured for each charcoal grade. Porosimetry measurements on each charcoal grade using nitrogen as the sorbent gas were made that included total surface area, adsorption and desorption isotherms, and pore area and pore volume distributions. Significant differences in helium pumping performance and in pore size distribution were observed. Comparisons are made between helium pumping performance and charcoal characteristics and a possible correlation is identified.

  16. Characterization of charcoals for helium cryopumping in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Tobin, A.G.; Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1987-07-01

    The capability of charcoal as a sorbent for helium at cryogenic temperatures depends upon charcoal characteristics that are not well understood. Previous work by the authors has indicated that the charcoals' pumping capability for helium depends as much on their source as on their particle size distributions. To develop a correlation between the physical characteristics of charcoal and helium pumping performance, different charcoals based on wood, coal, coconut, and a petroleum by-product were obtained from commercial sources. They were bonded to an aluminum substrate, and cooled to liquid-helium temperatures in a vacuum chamber. The helium pumping speed at constant throughput versus quantity of helium absorbed was measured for each charcoal grade. Porosimetry measurements on each charcoal grade using nitrogen as the sorbent gas were made that included total surface area, adsorption and desorption isotherms, and pore area and pore volume distributions. Significant differences in helium pumping performance and in pore size distribution were observed. Comparisons are made between helium pumping performance and charcoal characteristics and a possible correlation is identified.

  17. Solid radiographic fusion with a nonconstrained device 5 years after cervical arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Heary, Robert F; Goldstein, Ira M; Getto, Katarzyna M; Agarwal, Nitin

    2014-12-01

    Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has been gaining popularity as a surgical alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Spontaneous fusion following a CDA is uncommon. A few anecdotal reports of heterotrophic ossification around the implant sites have been noted for the BRYAN, ProDisc-C, Mobi-C, PRESTIGE, and PCM devices. All CDA fusions reported to date have been in devices that are semiconstrained. The authors reported the case of a 56-year-old man who presented with left C-7 radiculopathy and neck pain for 10 weeks after an assault injury. There was evidence of disc herniation at the C6-7 level. He was otherwise healthy with functional scores on the visual analog scale (VAS, 4.2); neck disability index (NDI, 16); and the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36; physical component summary [PSC] score 43 and mental component summary [MCS] score 47). The patient underwent total disc replacement in which the DISCOVER Artificial Cervical Disc (DePuy Spine, Inc.) was used. The patient was seen at regular follow-up visits up to 60 months. At his 60-month follow-up visit, he had complete radiographic fusion at the C6-7 level with bridging trabecular bone and no motion at the index site on dynamic imaging. He was pain free, with a VAS score of 0, NDI score of 0, and SF-36 PCS and MCS scores of 61 and 55, respectively. Conclusions This is the first case report that identifies the phenomenon of fusion around a nonconstrained cervical prosthesis. Despite this unwanted radiographic outcome, the patient's clinical outcome was excellent. PMID:25303618

  18. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of salivary glands: a clinicopathologic and molecular study including 2 cases harboring ETV6-X fusion.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yohei; Ishibashi, Kenichiro; Masaki, Ayako; Fujii, Kana; Fujiyoshi, Yukio; Hattori, Hideo; Kawakita, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Manabu; Miyabe, Satoru; Shimozato, Kazuo; Nagao, Toshitaka; Inagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described low-grade carcinoma with morphologic and genetic similarity, including ETV6-NTRK3 fusion, to secretory carcinoma of the breast. ETV6 is frequently involved in other epithelial and nonepithelial tumors, and many fusion partners of ETV6 have been reported. In the present study, 14 Japanese MASC cases were clinicopathologically and molecularly analyzed. The median age of the patients was 39 years, and the male:female ratio was 6:8. All cases showed histopathologic findings compatible with those previously described for MASC and harbored an ETV6 split as visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Two cases showed thick fibrous septa and invasive features including vascular or perineural tumor involvement, findings that are rare in MASC. In addition, in these 2 cases, non-NTRK3 genes appeared to fuse with ETV6 (ETV6-X fusion). NTRK1 and NTRK2, both members of the NTRK family, were not involved. Of the 14 MASC cases, the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript was positive in 6 cases, and the relative expression level of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript was variable, ranging from 1 to 5.8. Results of the present study of MASC suggest that (1) ETV6 occasionally fuses with unknown non-NTRK3 genes, (2) ETV6-X cases might have an invasive histology, (3) for molecular diagnosis of MASC, fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect ETV6 splits is the method of choice, and (4) the expression level of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript is considerably variable. These findings provide a novel insight into the oncogenesis, histopathology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of this newly recognized carcinoma. PMID:25651470

  19. Design of an Ion Source for {sup 3}He Fusion in a Low Pressure IEC Device

    SciTech Connect

    Piefer, Gregory R.; Santarius, John F.; Ashley, Robert P.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2005-05-15

    Recent developments in helicon ion sources and Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device performance at UW-Madison have enabled low pressure (< 50 {mu}torr, 6.7 mPa) operating conditions that should allow the {sup 3}He-{sup 3}He fusion reaction to be observed in an IEC device. An ion source capable of delivering a {approx} 10 mA {sup 3}He ion beam into an IEC device with minimal neutral gas flow has been designed and tested. Furthermore, a new IEC device that has never been operated with deuterium has been constructed to avoid D-{sup 3}He protons from obstructing the {sup 3}He-{sup 3}He reaction product spectrum, and to minimize Penning ionization of deuterium by excited helium, which in the past is suspected to have limited the ionized density of He. These developments make it possible to study beam-background {sup 3}He-{sup 3}He fusion reactions with > 300 mA recirculating ion currents.

  20. [Nursing Care of Lumbar Spine Fusion Surgery Using a Semi-Rigid Device (ISOBAR)].

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Shan; Su, Shu-Fen

    2016-04-01

    Aging frequently induces degenerative changes in the spine. Patients who suffer from lumbar degenerative disease tend to have lower back pain, neurological claudication, and neuropathy. Furthermore, incontinence may be an increasing issue as symptoms become severe. Lumbar spine fusion surgery is necessary if clinical symptoms continue to worsen or if the patient fails to respond to medication, physical therapy, or alternative treatments. However, this surgical procedure frequently induces adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is evidenced by the appearance of pathological changes in the upper and lower sections of the spinal surgical sites. In 1997, ISOBAR TTL dynamic rod stabilization was developed for application in spinal fusion surgery to prevent ASD-related complications. The device has proven effective in reducing pain in the lower back and legs, decreasing functional disability, improving quality of life, and retarding disc degeneration. However, the effectiveness of this intervention in decreasing the incidence of ASD requires further research investigation, and relevant literature and research in Taiwan is still lacking. This article discusses lumbar degenerative disease, its indications, the contraindications of lumbar spine fusion surgery using ISOBAR, and related postoperative nursing care. We hope this article provides proper and new knowledge to clinical nurses for the care of patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion surgery with ISOBAR. PMID:27026564

  1. Photovoltaic Device Including A Boron Doping Profile In An I-Type Layer

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Liyou

    1993-10-26

    A photovoltaic cell for use in a single junction or multijunction photovoltaic device, which includes a p-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon, an i-type layer of an amorphous semiconductor compound including silicon, and an n-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon formed on the i-type layer. The i-type layer including an undoped first sublayer formed on the p-type layer, and a boron-doped second sublayer formed on the first sublayer.

  2. 78 FR 68861 - Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ..., Navigational Aids, Mapping Systems and Related Software; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to 19 U.S.C... and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids, mapping systems and related software by reason... products, including GPS devices, navigation and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids,...

  3. 76 FR 24051 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Mobile Tablets, Portable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... Music Players, and Computers, and Components Thereof; Notice of Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... tablets, portable music players, and computers, and components thereof by reason of infringement of... importation of certain electronic devices, including mobile phones, mobile tablets, portable music...

  4. 77 FR 37067 - Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, Modules, and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... France and Thomson Licensing LLC of Princeton, New Jersey (collectively ``Thomson''). 75 FR 63856 (Oct... Thomson. 75 FR 74080 (Nov. 30, 2010). The complaint alleged violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of... COMMISSION Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, Modules, and...

  5. 2 CFR 200.453 - Materials and supplies costs, including costs of computing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... costs of computing devices. 200.453 Section 200.453 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and... Provisions for Selected Items of Cost § 200.453 Materials and supplies costs, including costs of computing... performance of a Federal award may be charged as direct costs. In the specific case of computing...

  6. 78 FR 32689 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ...Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof, DN 2958; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public interest issues raised by the complaint or complainant's filing under section 210.8(b) of the Commission's Rules of Practice and......

  7. Higgs boson production via gluon fusion: Soft-gluon resummation including mass effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Timo; Spira, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We analyze soft and collinear gluon resummation effects at the N3LL level for Standard Model Higgs boson production via gluon fusion g g →H and the neutral scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric extension at the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log (N3LL ) and next-to-next-to-leading-log (NNLL) level, respectively. We introduce refinements in the treatment of quark mass effects and subleading collinear gluon effects within the resummation. Soft and collinear gluon resummation effects amount to up to about 5% beyond the fixed-order results for scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs boson production.

  8. Separating semiconductor devices from substrate by etching graded composition release layer disposed between semiconductor devices and substrate including forming protuberances that reduce stiction

    SciTech Connect

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Nielson, Gregory N; Cederberg, Jeffrey G; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2015-05-12

    A method includes etching a release layer that is coupled between a plurality of semiconductor devices and a substrate with an etch. The etching includes etching the release layer between the semiconductor devices and the substrate until the semiconductor devices are at least substantially released from the substrate. The etching also includes etching a protuberance in the release layer between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The etch is stopped while the protuberances remain between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The method also includes separating the semiconductor devices from the substrate. Other methods and apparatus are also disclosed.

  9. Development of a new two color far infrared laser interferometer for future fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahata, K.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Ito, Y.; Okajima, S.; Nakayama, K.; Wylde, R.J.

    2004-10-01

    A new two color far infrared (FIR) laser interferometer under development for future fusion devices will be presented. The laser wavelength is optimized from the consideration of the beam refraction effect due to plasma density gradient and signal-to-noise ratio for an expected phase shift due to plasmas. Laser lines of 57.2 and 47.6 {mu}m are found to be suitable for the applications to high performance plasmas of Large Helical Device and future fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The output power of 57.2 {mu}m CH{sub 3}OD laser is estimated to be {approx}1.6 W, which is the highest laser power in the FIR wavelength regime. The optical configuration of a new interferometer system using two colors will be proposed. In the system, one detector simultaneously detects the beat signals of the 57.2 and 47.6 {mu}m laser lines, and each interference signal can be separated electronically (1 MHz for 57.2 {mu}m and 0.84 MHz expected for 47.6 {mu}m). Mechanical vibration can be compensated by using the two color interferometer. The present status of the development of the system is also presented.

  10. Optimizing Neutron Production Rates from D-D Fusion in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device

    SciTech Connect

    Wehmeyer, A.L.; Radel, R.F.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    2005-05-15

    Detection of explosives has been identified as a near term commercial opportunity for using a fusion plasma. Typical explosive compositions contain low Z material (C, N, O) which are not easily detected using conventional x-rays or metal detectors. However, 2.45 MeV neutrons produced in a D-D fusion reaction can be used for detection of explosives or other clandestine materials in suitcases, packages, or shipping containers.Steady-state D-D operation is possible using an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion device. The University of Wisconsin IEC device has produced D-D neutrons at 1.8 x 10{sup 8} neutrons/second at a true cathode voltage of 166 kV and a meter current of 68 mA. These neutron production rates are approaching the levels required for the detection of explosives. In order to increase and optimize the neutron production rate in the IEC device, experiments were performed altering the cathode's size (diameter), geometry, and material composition. Preliminary results indicate that significant differences in neutron production rates are not achieved by altering the geometry or material composition of the cathode. However, the neutron production rate was found to increase approximately 20% by doubling the cathode's diameter from 10 cm to 20 cm. In addition, increasing the cathode voltage from 34 kV to 94 kV at a meter current of 30 mA increased the neutron production rate from 1.24 x 10{sup 6} n/s to 2.83 x 10{sup 7} n/s.

  11. Spatial profiling using a Time of Flight Diagnostic and applications of deuterim-deuterium fusion in Inertial Electrostatic Confinement fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, David C.

    2011-12-01

    The Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion Research Group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison utilizes IEC devices as small-scale neutron generators using D-D fusion to create 2.45 MeV neutrons for the purpose of detecting clandestine material. Detection of explosives in particular can be accomplished using thermal neutron capture methods to identify characteristic nitrogen signatures in explosive material. Research has been conducted to increase reliability of detection, decrease interrogation time, and increase the steady-state operational time. Efforts have also been made to increase the neutron production rate of the device. Optimization studies have varied the configuration and design of the electrodes and have resulted in system configurations with up to 50 percent higher neutron production rates than have previously been utilized. A new feedthrough design has been constructed that is intended to increase the maximum operating voltage from 175 kV with the previous feedthrough to 300 kV. Neutron production rates scale almost linearly with both current and voltage, so the IEC device will be capable of operation at higher neutron producing regimes than have ever before been achieved. The optimization efforts involve the use of several new diagnostic tools developed at UW, which are the Fusion Ion Doppler (FIDO) Diagnostic and the Time of Flight (TOF) Diagnostic. FIDO provides the energy spectra of the charged fusion products and reactants created in the IEC device. The FIDO Diagnostic was originally only capable of studying D-D fusion, but with recent advancements is now able to study both D-D and D-3He fusion. The TOF Diagnostic provides spatial information along with the energy resolution of where the fusion reactions are occurring in the IEC device. Development of the diagnostics has involved the implementation of timing electronics, alignment systems, data acquisition software, computational post-processing, and upgrades to the experimental

  12. Scaling, stability, and fusion mechanisms. Studies using plasma focus devices from tens of kilojoules to tenth of joules

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose; Cardenas, Miguel; Tarifeno, Ariel

    2009-01-21

    Fusion studies using plasma focus devices from tens of kilojoules to less than one joule performed at the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission are presented. The similarity of the physical behavior and the scaling observed in these machines are emphasized. Experiments on actual devices show that scaling holds at least through six order of magnitude. In particular all of these devices, from the largest to the smallest, keep the same quantity of energy per particle. Therefore, fusion reactions are possible to be obtained in ultraminiature devices (driven by generators of 0.1 J), as they are in the bigger devices (driven by generators of 1 MJ). However, the stability of the plasma depends on the size and energy of the device.

  13. Multi-feature fusion diagnosis for optoelectronic tracking devices using fuzzy measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Tianyong; Zhang, Xianming; Xiao, Jing

    2010-10-01

    With the rapid development of optoelectronic tracking and measurement technology, tracking equipments become more complex and more precise, and the system faults happen at higher probability. The fault orientation, the fault analysis and the fault exclusion change more difficult. The single information and the simple process of multi-information have many deficiencies, which need fusion to improve the reliability. The D-S theory of evidence is a way to resolve the uncertain problems, which fuses evidences to reason the decision results in the same recognition frame used at the decisional level. Using the D-S theory of evidence, a diagnosis frame of multi-feature information fusion is proposed. The deviation ranks of the fault characters is defined according to their offsets from the normal and their happening probabilities were also computed by using the statistical results and the existing knowledge. The data reasoning of rough set theory is employed to construct the key fault evidence space from the multi features. Further, Gaussian subjection function from the fuzzy theory is used to describe the distribution of the key evidences and the distribution of the test data, and the basic probabilities of the evidence are weighed by the matching degree of the two distributions. The multiperiod and space feature information are employed and fused, and the final diagnosis decision is made by some effective methods. A multi-feature information fusion diagnosis for the servo system of the tracking equipment is discussed. The test shows that the diagnosis reliability is improved and the diagnosis uncertainty is reduced, and the fault diagnosis for the precise device and other parts are also effectively resolved by using this fusion method.

  14. A lab-on-a-chip device for investigating the fusion process of olfactory ensheathing cell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Munaz, Ahmed; Vadivelu, Raja K; John, James A St; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the process of fusion of olfactory ensheathing cell spheroids will lead to improvement of cell transplantation therapies to repair spinal cord injuries. The successful fusion of transplanted spheroids will enable alternative transplantation strategies to be developed for in vivo applications. This paper describes the use of a microfluidic device to trap and fuse olfactory ensheathing cell spheroids. The velocity, the pressure distribution in the device were simulated numerically to predict the trapping location. The simulation predicted the optimum flow rates for trapping the spheroids in the later experiments. Simulated particle trajectories were verified experimentally with tracing of fluorescent micro particles. The fusion process of the spheroids was investigated over a period of 48 hours. The microfluidic platform presented here can be used for testing potential drugs that can promote the fusion process and improve the transplantation therapy. PMID:27387270

  15. Predicting hydrogen isotope inventory in plasma-facing components during normal and abnormal operations in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Alice; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen isotope behavior and inventory in plasma-facing components (PFCs) of fusion devices are key concerns for safe, reliable, and economical operation. To accurately estimate hydrogen isotope retention and recovery in tungsten (the current leading candidate as a PFC), we have developed a model that was recently benchmarked against isotope depth profile and retention level in a tungsten target under various conditions and compared with both experimental data and simulation results. In this research, we have extended the model to include details of transient events. Therefore, one can use this model to estimate hydrogen isotope retention behavior in tungsten and potential other PFC candidates during normal operational pulse, effects of edge-localized modes (ELMs), and a possible cleaning processes scenario.

  16. SELF-SIMILAR SKELETAL STRUCTURES IN FUSION AND MATERIAL TEST DEVICES: NUMERICAL MODELING AND NEW OBSERVATIONAL DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Rantsev-Kartinov, V. A.

    2009-07-26

    The hypotheses for self-assembling of a fractal condensed matter in electric discharges and the probable role of a skeletal matter in the long-lived filamentary structures in fusion devices is studied in two directions. First, we append previous collection of respective data with recent evidences for skeletal structuring in peripheral plasmas and dust deposits in fusion and material test devices. Second, we demonstrate, via numerical modelling, the possibility of coaxial tubular structuring formation in a system of electric current filaments composed of magnetized, electrically conducting thin rods (nanodust), with an accent on self-reduction of spatial dimensionality of structuring and on the role of magnetic in such systems.

  17. Summary of the 19th International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Meeting on 'Research Using Small Fusion Devices'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Oost, G.; Mank, G.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a summary of recent results reported on several topics on magnetic confinement, dense magnetized plasmas, innovative fusion technology and applications, diagnostic systems and control and data acquisition systems. The main topics covered on the magnetic confinement devices, diagnostics and data acquisition concern the tokamak KTM (Kazakhstan Tokamak for Material testing) for materials research and testing, and IAEA Joint Experiments on small tokamaks. For the dense magnetized plasmas results on development and commissioning of plasma focus devices were reported. The plasmatron VISION I for innovative plasma-wall interaction studies, a lithium divertor for KTM and compact fusion reactors as neutron sources were presented.

  18. Motion-sensor fusion-based gesture recognition and its VLSI architecture design for mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenping; Liu, Leibo; Yin, Shouyi; Hu, Siqi; Tang, Eugene Y.; Wei, Shaojun

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid proliferation of smartphones and tablets, various embedded sensors are incorporated into these platforms to enable multimodal human-computer interfaces. Gesture recognition, as an intuitive interaction approach, has been extensively explored in the mobile computing community. However, most gesture recognition implementations by now are all user-dependent and only rely on accelerometer. In order to achieve competitive accuracy, users are required to hold the devices in predefined manner during the operation. In this paper, a high-accuracy human gesture recognition system is proposed based on multiple motion sensor fusion. Furthermore, to reduce the energy overhead resulted from frequent sensor sampling and data processing, a high energy-efficient VLSI architecture implemented on a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA board is also proposed. Compared with the pure software implementation, approximately 45 times speed-up is achieved while operating at 20 MHz. The experiments show that the average accuracy for 10 gestures achieves 93.98% for user-independent case and 96.14% for user-dependent case when subjects hold the device randomly during completing the specified gestures. Although a few percent lower than the conventional best result, it still provides competitive accuracy acceptable for practical usage. Most importantly, the proposed system allows users to hold the device randomly during operating the predefined gestures, which substantially enhances the user experience.

  19. Study of the pores inside tungsten coating after thermal cycling for fusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgranges, C.; Firdaouss, M.; Hernandez, C.; Martin, C.; Ruset, C.; Grigore, E.; Missirlian, M.; Samaille, F.; Bucalossi, J.

    2016-02-01

    In the next fusion devices, all the plasma facing components will consist of bulk tungsten or tungsten coating on carbon. This paper focuses on the behaviour of tungsten coated on carbon fibre composite designed for the WEST project (Bucalossi et al 2011 Fusion Eng. Des. 86 684-688) under intensive thermal cycling delivered by an electron beam. The use of scanning electron microscope has allowed in particular, the observation of several pore lines inside the coating. These pore lines have different aspects depending on the observed zone according to the localisation of the electron beam, accentuated lines with more numerous enlarged pores in zone exposed to the electron beam. An analogous trend is also observed for JET tungsten-coated samples under similar thermal cycles despite their different properties due to an alternative manufacturing method of the substrate. A systematic and attentive comparison on the coating changes after the application of the electron beam heating is presented. The observed comportments as the formation of the pore lines or the pore shapes are assumed to be inherent to simultaneous diffusion processes. In association with the pore line formation, a migration of the carbon substrate towards the surface is presumed and discussed.

  20. Moving-Surface Plasma-Facing Components for Particle Control in Steady State Magnetic Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Yoshi; Fukushima, Hoju; Ohno, Noriyasu; Takamura, Shuichi; Nishikawa, Masahiro

    2004-01-15

    This paper will report on the proof-of-principle (POP) experiments conducted to demonstrate reduced wall recycling, using a laboratory-scale test unit, constructed based on the concept of moving-surface plasma-facing component (MS-PFC). In this concept, the moving-surface exposed to edge plasmas in steady state magnetic fusion devices is continuously deposited ex-situ with a getter material, so that particle trapping capabilities can be regenerated prior to the subsequent exposure. In our previous paper, the construction details of the MS-PFC test unit and the first results in the case of titanium gettering was reported, but in the present paper preliminary results in the case of lithium gettering will be presented for comparison. Results indicate that the H{sub {alpha}} light intensity used as the measure of hydrogen recycling is reduced by {approx}6% due to titanium gettering and by {approx}12% due to lithium gettering, both at steady state.

  1. Multiple cell photoresponsive amorphous photo voltaic devices including graded ban gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Ovshinsky, S.R.; Adler, D.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes an improved photoresponsive tandem multiple cell device. It comprises: at least first and second superimposed solar cells; the first cell being formed of an amorphous silicon alloy material; the second amorphous silicon alloy cell having an active photoresponsive region in which radiation can impinge to produce charge carriers. The amorphous silicon alloy cell body including at least one element for reducing the density of defect states to about 10{sup 16} defects per cubic centimeter and a band gap adjusting element graded through at least a portion of the photoresponsive region thereof to enhance the radiation absorption; the adjusting element being germanium, and the band gap of the cell being adjusted for a specified photoresponse wavelength threshold function different from the first cell; the second cell being a multi-layer body having deposited silicon alloy layers of opposite (p and n) conductivity type; and the first cell being formed with the second cell in substantially direct junction contact therebetween.

  2. Flexible barrier film, method of forming same, and organic electronic device including same

    DOEpatents

    Blizzard, John; Tonge, James Steven; Weidner, William Kenneth

    2013-03-26

    A flexible barrier film has a thickness of from greater than zero to less than 5,000 nanometers and a water vapor transmission rate of no more than 1.times.10.sup.-2 g/m.sup.2/day at 22.degree. C. and 47% relative humidity. The flexible barrier film is formed from a composition, which comprises a multi-functional acrylate. The composition further comprises the reaction product of an alkoxy-functional organometallic compound and an alkoxy-functional organosilicon compound. A method of forming the flexible barrier film includes the steps of disposing the composition on a substrate and curing the composition to form the flexible barrier film. The flexible barrier film may be utilized in organic electronic devices.

  3. Evidences for and the Models of Fast Nonlocal Transport of Heat in Magnetic Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Cherepanov, K. V.

    2009-07-01

    The paper gives a short survey of (i) recent evidences for fast nonlocal transport of the heat in magnetically confined plasmas (above all, the "cold/heat pulse" experiments), (ii) interpretations of such phenomena in terms of nonlocal transport formalisms, based on the dominance of long mean-free-path energy carriers, including the interpretations of "cold pulse" experiments, and gives (iii) quantitative evidence for the domination of nonlocality in the spatial profile of electron cyclotron net radiated power in fusion reactor-grade tokamak (strong toroidal magnetic field, BT>5 T, highly reflecting walls, Rwall>0.5, and hot electron plasma, >10 keV).

  4. 76 FR 42730 - In the Matter of Certain Univeral Serial Bus (“USB”) Portable Storage Devices, Including USB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Univeral Serial Bus (``USB'') Portable Storage Devices, Including USB... certain universal serial bus (``USB'') portable storage devices, including USB flash drives and components... importation, or the sale within the United States after importation of certain universal serial bus...

  5. 77 FR 35718 - Certain Universal Serial Bus (“USB”) Portable Storage Devices, Including USB Flash Drives and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ...,161. 76 FR 42730 (July 19, 2011). The notice of investigation named as respondents Imation Corporation... COMMISSION Certain Universal Serial Bus (``USB'') Portable Storage Devices, Including USB Flash Drives and... importation of certain universal serial bus (``USB'') portable storage devices, including USB flash drives...

  6. 76 FR 13432 - In the Matter of Certain Display Devices, Including Digital Televisions and Monitors II; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Display Devices, Including Digital Televisions and Monitors II; Notice of... United States after importation of certain display devices, including digital televisions and monitors by... digital televisions and monitors that infringe one or more of claims 41-44 of the `468 patent; claims...

  7. Diagnostic study of steady state advanced fuel (deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium) fusion in an IEC device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Krupakar Murali

    The ionized fusion fuels (D-D & D-3He) have been accelerated to fusion velocities using two concentric grids maintained at a high potential difference in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device. Though the gridded IEC device currently has a low efficiency (Q ≡ fusion power/input power ˜10-5), the energetic protons and neutrons generated within this device can be used for many near-term applications, such as medical isotope production, landmine detection, neutron activation analysis, etc. The present work is centered upon understanding the operation of the device and finding new ways to increase the overall efficiency. The steady state fusion of D-3He fuel in an IEC device was successfully studied. At a pressure of ˜2 mtorr the source of such reactions was identified to be principally beam-target reactions and was theoretically explained using the Monte Carlo - Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code. The first simultaneous measurement of DD and D-3He protons was accomplished during the present thesis work that confirmed that D- 3He fusion reactions indeed occur in an IEC device. A new pressure independent diagnostic was invented to measure the average ion energy. That diagnostic uses the D-D proton energy spectra from a single loop cathode grid and the SRIM code predictions. A second diagnostic called the eclipse disc was co-invented to characterize the various fusion regimes in an IEC device. This diagnostic verified that a converged core fusion source exists for the DD reactions but the D-3He reactions that are principally embedded source reactions. A third diagnostic called the chordwire was invented to study the effects of various sources of electrons---thermionic, photo and field emission electrons, that decrease the efficiency of the device. This diagnostic also helped map the ion flux into the cathode in 2D, besides helping identify the high performance grid materials (W-25%Re and pure Re). Understanding the electron current

  8. Modelling neutral beams in fusion devices: Beamlet-based model for fast particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asunta, O.; Govenius, J.; Budny, R.; Gorelenkova, M.; Tardini, G.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Salmi, A.; Sipilä, S.

    2015-03-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) will be one of the main sources of heating and non-inductive current drive in ITER. Due to high level of injected power the beam induced heat loads present a potential threat to the integrity of the first wall of the device, particularly in the presence of non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field. Neutral beam injection can also destabilize Alfvén eigenmodes and energetic particle modes, and act as a source of plasma rotation. Therefore, reliable and accurate simulation of NBI is important for making predictions for ITER, as well as for any other current or future fusion device. This paper introduces a new beamlet-based neutral beam ionization model called BBNBI. It takes into account the fine structure of the injector, follows the injected neutrals until ionization, and generates a source ensemble of ionized NBI test particles for slowing down calculations. BBNBI can be used as a stand-alone model but together with the particle following code ASCOT it forms a complete and sophisticated tool for simulating neutral beam injection. The test particle ensembles from BBNBI are found to agree well with those produced by PENCIL for JET, and those produced by NUBEAM both for JET and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas. The first comprehensive comparisons of beam slowing down profiles of interest from BBNBI + ASCOT with results from PENCIL and NUBEAM/TRANSP, for both JET and AUG, are presented. It is shown that, for an axisymmetric plasma, BBNBI + ASCOT and NUBEAM agree remarkably well. Together with earlier 3D studies, these results further validate using BBNBI + ASCOT also for studying phenomena that require particle following in a truly three-dimensional geometry.

  9. III-V/Si hybrid photonic devices by direct fusion bonding

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Katsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors on silicon is highly sought after for high-speed, low-power-consumption silicon photonics and low-cost, light-weight photovoltaics. Here we present a GaAs/Si direct fusion bonding technique to provide highly conductive and transparent heterojunctions by heterointerfacial band engineering in relation to doping concentrations. Metal- and oxide-free GaAs/Si ohmic heterojunctions have been formed at 300°C; sufficiently low to inhibit active material degradation. We have demonstrated 1.3 μm InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers on Si substrates with the lowest threshold current density of any laser on Si to date, and AlGaAs/Si dual-junction solar cells, by p-GaAs/p-Si and p-GaAs/n-Si bonding, respectively. Our direct semiconductor bonding technique opens up a new pathway for realizing ultrahigh efficiency multijunction solar cells with ideal bandgap combinations that are free from lattice-match restrictions required in conventional heteroepitaxy, as well as enabling the creation of novel high performance and practical optoelectronic devices by III-V/Si hybrid integration. PMID:22470842

  10. Energy-dependent finite-orbit treatment for plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer simulation of hot plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices and results from this model are presented. In a small, hot magnetically confined plasma, the ion orbit radius (rho/sub i/) can be comparable to the plasma radius (R/sub p/). It a mirror-confined plasma were rho/sub i//R/sub p/ > 1/25 (such as 2XII-B), a point kinetic treatment of ion interactions becomes inaccurate and a finite gyro-radius (FGR) treatment must be used to adequately describe plasma buildup processes. This is particularly true for describing losses due to cold-gas charge exchange (c-x) near the plasma surface, since a particle lost near the vacuum interface may have contributed to the density as far as 2 rho/sub i/ radially inward from the c-x point. A similar FGR effect applies to beam-deposited ions whose large orbits influence the density up to 2 rho/sub i/ from the trapping point.

  11. Properties of boron coatings used as plasma facing material of fusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, T.; Iwamoto, K.; Hirohata, Y.; Yamashina, T.; Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Inoue, N.; Kubota, Y.; Natsir, N.; Motojima, O.

    1994-12-01

    For the boron films made by a d.c. glow discharge for a gas mixture of diborane and helium, numerous surface properties were intestigated and the characteristics of the boron film as a plasma facing material in fusion devices were evaluated. The ability of the boron film to getter the oxygen was estimated as about 10(exp 21) O atoms/sq m. The gettered oxygen in the boron film was observed in the surface to a depth of less than about 30 nm. The hydrogen concentration of the boron film made at room temperature was approximately 30%. The hydrogen in the film desorbed at about 573 K. This desorption temperature was considerably lower than that of graphite. These results directly indicate that the boron film coated on the graphite wall can largely reduce the particle recycling, in addition to the reduction in the oxygen impurity level in the plasma. After the oxygen gettering, the oxygen existed in the form of B-O bonds. It is also noted that the boron film absorbed both the oxygen and the carbon after exposure to the atmosphere.

  12. III-V/Si hybrid photonic devices by direct fusion bonding.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Katsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors on silicon is highly sought after for high-speed, low-power-consumption silicon photonics and low-cost, light-weight photovoltaics. Here we present a GaAs/Si direct fusion bonding technique to provide highly conductive and transparent heterojunctions by heterointerfacial band engineering in relation to doping concentrations. Metal- and oxide-free GaAs/Si ohmic heterojunctions have been formed at 300°C; sufficiently low to inhibit active material degradation. We have demonstrated 1.3 μm InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers on Si substrates with the lowest threshold current density of any laser on Si to date, and AlGaAs/Si dual-junction solar cells, by p-GaAs/p-Si and p-GaAs/n-Si bonding, respectively. Our direct semiconductor bonding technique opens up a new pathway for realizing ultrahigh efficiency multijunction solar cells with ideal bandgap combinations that are free from lattice-match restrictions required in conventional heteroepitaxy, as well as enabling the creation of novel high performance and practical optoelectronic devices by III-V/Si hybrid integration. PMID:22470842

  13. Surface characterization of aluminum alloy 2017 as a vacuum vessel for nuclear fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohri, M.; Odagiri, H.; Satake, T.; Yamashina, T.; Oikawa, H.; Kanedo

    1984-05-01

    The surface characterization of a type 2017 aluminum alloy was performed to examine their potentials for the use of nuclear fusion devices mainly from a view point of vacuum engineering. Three different samples treated with milling (Sample A), discharging (Sample B) and chemical etching (Sample C) were examined in terms of their surface morphology by surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, and xenon adsorption. The surface roughness factor was obtained as 5.9, 42.8 and 9.0 for sample A, Sample B and Sample C, respectively. The thicknesses of surface oxide layers were measured by the sputter-AES method as 40 Å, 80 Å and 70 Å for Sample A, Sample B and Sample C, respectively. Outgassing characteristics of these surfaces were measured by a thermal desorption method. H 2O, CO and CO 2 were main outgassing components and the maximum desorption temperature was observed in the range between 110 °C and 160 °C. The surface roughness factor and the thickness of the surface oxide layer were found to be important factors for outgassing characteristics.

  14. Encoding technique for high data compaction in data bases of fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, J.; Cremy, C.; Sanchez, E.; Portas, A.

    1996-12-01

    At present, data requirements of hundreds of Mbytes/discharge are typical in devices such as JET, TFTR, DIII-D, etc., and these requirements continue to increase. With these rates, the amount of storage required to maintain discharge information is enormous. Compaction techniques are now essential to reduce storage. However, general compression techniques may distort signals, but this is undesirable for fusion diagnostics. We have developed a general technique for data compression which is described here. The technique, which is based on delta compression, does not require an examination of the data as in delayed methods. Delta values are compacted according to general encoding forms which satisfy a prefix code property and which are defined prior to data capture. Several prefix codes, which are bit oriented and which have variable code lengths, have been developed. These encoding methods are independent of the signal analog characteristics and enable one to store undistorted signals. The technique has been applied to databases of the TJ-I tokamak and the TJ-IU torsatron. Compaction rates of over 80{percent} with negligible computational effort were achieved. Computer programs were written in ANSI C, thus ensuring portability and easy maintenance. We also present an interpretation, based on information theory, of the high compression rates achieved without signal distortion. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Multi-Sensor Fusion for Enhanced Contextual Awareness of Everyday Activities with Ubiquitous Devices

    PubMed Central

    Guiry, John J.; van de Ven, Pepijn; Nelson, John

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the role that smart devices, including smartphones and smartwatches, can play in identifying activities of daily living. A feasibility study involving N = 10 participants was carried out to evaluate the devices' ability to differentiate between nine everyday activities. The activities examined include walking, running, cycling, standing, sitting, elevator ascents, elevator descents, stair ascents and stair descents. The authors also evaluated the ability of these devices to differentiate indoors from outdoors, with the aim of enhancing contextual awareness. Data from this study was used to train and test five well known machine learning algorithms: C4.5, CART, Naïve Bayes, Multi-Layer Perceptrons and finally Support Vector Machines. Both single and multi-sensor approaches were examined to better understand the role each sensor in the device can play in unobtrusive activity recognition. The authors found overall results to be promising, with some models correctly classifying up to 100% of all instances. PMID:24662406

  16. Lighted display devices for producing static or animated visual displays, including animated facial features

    DOEpatents

    Heilbron, Valerie J; Clem, Paul G; Cook, Adam Wade

    2014-02-11

    An illuminated display device with a base member with a plurality of cavities therein. Illumination devices illuminate the cavities and emit light through an opening of the cavities in a pattern, and a speaker can emit sounds in synchronization with the pattern. A panel with translucent portions can overly the base member and the cavities. An animated talking character can have an animated mouth cavity complex with multiple predetermined mouth lighting configurations simulative of human utterances. The cavities can be open, or optical waveguide material or positive members can be disposed therein. Reflective material can enhance internal reflectance and light emission.

  17. Verification of scattering parameter measurements in waveguides up to 325 GHz including highly-reflective devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, T.; Kuhlmann, K.; Dickhoff, R.; Dittmer, J.; Hiebel, M.

    2011-07-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) scattering parameters (S-parameters) play an important role to characterise RF signal transmission and reflection of active and passive devices such as transmission lines, components, and small-signal amplifiers. Vector network analysers (VNAs) are employed as instrumentation for such measurements. During the last years, the upper frequency limit of this instrumentation has been extended up to several hundreds of GHz for waveguide measurements. Calibration and verification procedures are obligatory prior to the VNA measurement to achieve accurate results and/or to obtain traceability to the International System of Units (SI). Usually, verification is performed by measuring well-matched devices with known S-parameters such as attenuators or short precision waveguide sections (shims). In waveguides, especially above 110 GHz, such devices may not exist and/or are not traceably calibrated. In some cases, e.g. filter networks, the devices under test (DUT) are partly highly reflective. This paper describes the dependency of the S-parameters a) on the calibration procedure, b) on the applied torque to the flange screws during the mating process of the single waveguide elements. It describes further c) how highly-reflective devices (HRD) can be used to verify a calibrated VNA, and d) how a measured attenuation at several hundreds of GHz can be substituted by a well-known coaxial attenuation at 279 MHz, the intermediate frequency (IF) of the VNA, to verify the linearity. This work is a contribution towards traceability and to obtain knowledge about the measurement uncertainty of VNA instrumentation in the millimetre-wave range.

  18. Material ejection and surface morphology changes during transient heat loading of tungsten as plasma-facing component in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslova, A.; El-Atwani, O.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of edge-localized mode like transient heat events on pristine samples for two different grades of deformed tungsten with ultrafine and nanocrystalline grains as potential candidates for plasma-facing components. Pulses from a laser beam with durations ∼1 ms and operating in the near infrared wavelength were used for simulating transient heat loading in fusion devices. We specifically focused on investigating and analysis of different mechanisms for material removal from the sample surface under repetitive transient heat loads. Several techniques were applied for analysing different mechanisms leading to material removal from the W surface under repetitive transient heat loads which include witness plates for collected ejected material, and subsequent analysis using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, visible imaging using fast-gated camera, and evaluating thermal emission from the particles using optical emission spectroscopy. Our results show a significantly improved performance of polycrystalline cold-rolled tungsten compared to tungsten produced using an orthogonal machining process under repetitive transient loads for a wide range of the power densities.

  19. Posterior Interspinous Fusion Device for One-Level Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease : Comparison with Pedicle Screw Fixation - Preliminary Report of at Least One Year Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Jung; Chun, Hyoung Joon; Oh, Suck Jun; Kang, Tae Hoon; Yang, Moon Sool

    2012-01-01

    Objective Transpedicular screw fixation has some disadvantages such as postoperative back pain through wide muscle dissection, long operative time, and cephalad adjacent segmental degeneration (ASD). The purposes of this study are investigation and comparison of radiological and clinical results between interspinous fusion device (IFD) and pedicle screw. Methods From Jan. 2008 to Aug. 2009, 40 patients underwent spinal fusion with IFD combined with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). In same study period, 36 patients underwent spinal fusion with pedicle screw fixation as control group. Dynamic lateral radiographs, visual analogue scale (VAS), and Korean version of the Oswestry disability index (K-ODI) scores were evaluated in both groups. Results The lumbar spine diseases in the IFD group were as followings; spinal stenosis in 26, degenerative spondylolisthesis in 12, and intervertebral disc herniation in 2. The mean follow up period was 14.24 months (range; 12 to 22 months) in the IFD group and 18.3 months (range; 12 to 28 months) in pedicle screw group. The mean VAS scores was preoperatively 7.16±2.1 and 8.03±2.3 in the IFD and pedicle screw groups, respectively, and improved postoperatively to 1.3±2.9 and 1.2±3.2 in 1-year follow ups (p<0.05). The K-ODI was decreased significantly in an equal amount in both groups one year postoperatively (p<0.05). The statistics revealed a higher incidence of ASD in pedicle screw group than the IFD group (p=0.029). Conclusion Posterior IFD has several advantages over the pedicle screw fixation in terms of skin incision, muscle dissection and short operative time and less intraoperative estimated blood loss. The IFD with PLIF may be a favorable technique to replace the pedicle screw fixation in selective case. PMID:23133725

  20. Evaluation of tungsten as a plasma-facing material for steady state magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Bourham, M.; Brooks, J. N.; Causey, R. A.; Chevalier, G.; Conn, R. W.; Eddy, W. H.; Gilligan, J.; Khandagle, M.; Ra, Y.

    1992-12-01

    Tungsten in the form of bulk-material, and relatively thick (1 mm) chemically deposited and plasma-sprayed coatings on molybdenum, has been evaluated as a plasma-facing material for near future steady state magnetic fusion devices, focusing on issues related to the divertor plate design. These issues are: (1) thermal outgassing; (2) plasma erosion; (3) deuterium retention; (4) disruption erosion; and (5) surface modifications. Total outgassing quantities from bulk tungsten and chemically deposited coatings are substantially smaller than those from graphites. Effects of redeposition and impurities on the erosion behavior due to deuterium plasma bombardment have been analyzed. Trace amounts of oxygen-containing impurities in the plasma can reduce the threshold energy for physical sputtering, affecting the overall erosion behavior of tungsten at energies below 500 eV. However, it has been found that at electron temperatures around 5 eV or lower, fragmentation of these impurities followed by positive ionization is significantly reduced, whereby plasma erosion data basically agree with sputtering theories and ion beam data. Thermal desorption measurements after plasma bombardment have indicated that the deuterium retention quantity in tungsten materials is of the order of 10 14-15 D atoms/cm 2. At simulated disruption with an energy deposition of 6 MJ/m 2, the effective heat deposition is found to be reduced to about 1%, due to a combined effect of molten layer protection and vapor shielding. Steady state plasma bombardment removes surface impurities and smooths the surface topography along with surface erosion whereas disruption causes microscopic cracking and surface melting.

  1. Thermal modeling of phase change solidification in thermal control devices including natural convection effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Natural convection effects in phase change thermal control devices were studied. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate natural convection effects in a phase change test cell undergoing solidification. Although natural convection effects are minimized in flight spacecraft, all phase change devices are ground tested. The mathematical approach to the problem was to first develop a transient two-dimensional conduction heat transfer model for the solidification of a normal paraffin of finite geometry. Next, a transient two-dimensional model was developed for the solidification of the same paraffin by a combined conduction-natural-convection heat transfer model. Throughout the study, n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) was used as the phase-change material in both the theoretical and the experimental work. The models were based on the transient two-dimensional finite difference solutions of the energy, continuity, and momentum equations.

  2. From Data Acquisition to Data Fusion: A Comprehensive Review and a Roadmap for the Identification of Activities of Daily Living Using Mobile Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Ivan Miguel; Garcia, Nuno M.; Pombo, Nuno; Flórez-Revuelta, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the research on the state of the art for sensor fusion techniques, applied to the sensors embedded in mobile devices, as a means to help identify the mobile device user’s daily activities. Sensor data fusion techniques are used to consolidate the data collected from several sensors, increasing the reliability of the algorithms for the identification of the different activities. However, mobile devices have several constraints, e.g., low memory, low battery life and low processing power, and some data fusion techniques are not suited to this scenario. The main purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the state of the art to identify examples of sensor data fusion techniques that can be applied to the sensors available in mobile devices aiming to identify activities of daily living (ADLs). PMID:26848664

  3. P and n-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including band gap widening elements, devices utilizing same

    DOEpatents

    Guha, Subhendu; Ovshinsky, Stanford R.

    1988-10-04

    An n-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including a band gap widening element; a method of fabricating p-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including a band gap widening element; and electronic and photovoltaic devices incorporating said n-type and p-type materials.

  4. Directly laser-written integrated photonics devices including diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Ramme, Mark; Richardson, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-written integrated devices involving Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) and waveguide arrays are demonstrated as built-in optical couplers. These structures were fabricated in borosilicate glass using a direct laser writing technique. The optical properties of these integrated photonic structures were investigated using CW lasers and high-resolution CCDs. For a single FZP coupled to a single waveguide, the overall coupling efficiency was 9%. A multiplexed optical coupler composed of three FZP layers was demonstrated to couple three waveguides simultaneously in a waveguide array. Structures of this type can be used as platforms for multichannel waveguide coupling elements or as microfluidic sensors that require higher light collecting efficiency.

  5. Adhesive flexible barrier film, method of forming same, and organic electronic device including same

    DOEpatents

    Blizzard, John Donald; Weidner, William Kenneth

    2013-02-05

    An adhesive flexible barrier film comprises a substrate and a barrier layer disposed on the substrate. The barrier layer is formed from a barrier composition comprising an organosilicon compound. The adhesive flexible barrier film also comprises an adhesive layer disposed on the barrier layer and formed from an adhesive composition. A method of forming the adhesive flexible barrier film comprises the steps of disposing the barrier composition on the substrate to form the barrier layer, disposing the adhesive composition on the barrier layer to form the adhesive layer, and curing the barrier layer and the adhesive layer. The adhesive flexible barrier film may be utilized in organic electronic devices.

  6. Development of laser-based techniques for in situ characterization of the first wall in ITER and future fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipps, V.; Malaquias, A.; Hakola, A.; Karhunen, J.; Maddaluno, G.; Almaviva, S.; Caneve, L.; Colao, F.; Fortuna, E.; Gasior, P.; Kubkowska, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Laan, M.; Lissovski, A.; Paris, P.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Petersson, P.; Rubel, M.; Huber, A.; Zlobinski, M.; Schweer, B.; Gierse, N.; Xiao, Q.; Sergienko, G.

    2013-09-01

    Analysis and understanding of wall erosion, material transport and fuel retention are among the most important tasks for ITER and future devices, since these questions determine largely the lifetime and availability of the fusion reactor. These data are also of extreme value to improve the understanding and validate the models of the in vessel build-up of the T inventory in ITER and future D-T devices. So far, research in these areas is largely supported by post-mortem analysis of wall tiles. However, access to samples will be very much restricted in the next-generation devices (such as ITER, JT-60SA, W7-X, etc) with actively cooled plasma-facing components (PFC) and increasing duty cycle. This has motivated the development of methods to measure the deposition of material and retention of plasma fuel on the walls of fusion devices in situ, without removal of PFC samples. For this purpose, laser-based methods are the most promising candidates. Their feasibility has been assessed in a cooperative undertaking in various European associations under EFDA coordination. Different laser techniques have been explored both under laboratory and tokamak conditions with the emphasis to develop a conceptual design for a laser-based wall diagnostic which is integrated into an ITER port plug, aiming to characterize in situ relevant parts of the inner wall, the upper region of the inner divertor, part of the dome and the upper X-point region.

  7. NaOH-based high temperature heat-of-fusion thermal energy storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. M.; Rice, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A material called Thermkeep, developed as a low-cost method for the storage of thermal energy for solar electric power generating systems is discussed. The storage device consists of an insulated cylinder containing Thermkeep in which coiled tubular heat exchangers are immersed. A one-tenth scale model of the design contains 25 heat-exchanger tubes and 1500 kg of Thermkeep. Its instrumentation includes thermocouples to measure internal Thermkeep temperatures, vessel surface, heated shroud surface, and pressure gauges to indicate heat-exchanger pressure drops. The test-circuit design is presented and experimental results are discussed.

  8. An enhanced bacterial foraging algorithm approach for optimal power flow problem including FACTS devices considering system loadability.

    PubMed

    Belwin Edward, J; Rajasekar, N; Sathiyasekar, K; Senthilnathan, N; Sarjila, R

    2013-09-01

    Obtaining optimal power flow solution is a strenuous task for any power system engineer. The inclusion of FACTS devices in the power system network adds to its complexity. The dual objective of OPF with fuel cost minimization along with FACTS device location for IEEE 30 bus is considered and solved using proposed Enhanced Bacterial Foraging algorithm (EBFA). The conventional Bacterial Foraging Algorithm (BFA) has the difficulty of optimal parameter selection. Hence, in this paper, BFA is enhanced by including Nelder-Mead (NM) algorithm for better performance. A MATLAB code for EBFA is developed and the problem of optimal power flow with inclusion of FACTS devices is solved. After several run with different initial values, it is found that the inclusion of FACTS devices such as SVC and TCSC in the network reduces the generation cost along with increased voltage stability limits. It is also observed that, the proposed algorithm requires lesser computational time compared to earlier proposed algorithms. PMID:23759251

  9. Energy star compliant voice over internet protocol (VoIP) telecommunications network including energy star compliant VoIP devices

    DOEpatents

    Kouchri, Farrokh Mohammadzadeh

    2012-11-06

    A Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) communications system, a method of managing a communications network in such a system and a program product therefore. The system/network includes an ENERGY STAR (E-star) aware softswitch and E-star compliant communications devices at system endpoints. The E-star aware softswitch allows E-star compliant communications devices to enter and remain in power saving mode. The E-star aware softswitch spools messages and forwards only selected messages (e.g., calls) to the devices in power saving mode. When the E-star compliant communications devices exit power saving mode, the E-star aware softswitch forwards spooled messages.

  10. A Simple Apparatus for the Injection of Lithium Aerosol into the Scrape-Off Layer of Fusion Research Devices

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Mansfield, A.L Roquemore, H. Schneider, J. Timberlake, H. Kugel, M.G. Bell and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-10-11

    A simple device has been developed to deposit elemental lithium onto plasma facing components in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Deposition is accomplished by dropping lithium powder into the plasma column. Once introduced, lithium particles quickly become entrained in scrape-off layer flow as an evaporating aerosol. Particles are delivered through a small central aperture in a computer-controlled resonating piezoelectric disk on which the powder is supported. The device has been used to deposit lithium both during discharges as well as prior to plasma breakdown. Clear improvements to plasma performance have been demonstrated. The use of this apparatus provides flexibility in the amount and timing of lithium deposition and, therefore, may benefit future fusion research devices.

  11. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  12. 76 FR 31983 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Nokia Corporation of Finland and Nokia Inc. of White Plains, New York (collectively, ``Nokia''). 75 FR... disapprove the Commission's action. See Presidential Memorandum of July 21, 2005, 70 FR 43251 (July 26, 2005... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players,...

  13. 76 FR 40930 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... White Plains, New York (collectively, ``Nokia''). 75 FR 4583-4 (Jan. 28, 2010). The complaint alleged... the parties on the issues under review. 76 FR 31938 (June 2, 2011). On June 9, 2011, the parties... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players,...

  14. 76 FR 57075 - In the Matter of Certain Lighting Control Devices Including Dimmer Switches and Parts Thereof (IV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    .... (``Lutron'') of Coopersburg, Pennsylvania. 76 FR 35015-16. The complaint alleges violations of section 337... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Lighting Control Devices Including Dimmer Switches and Parts Thereof (IV... sale for importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain...

  15. Air Filter Devices Including Nonwoven Meshes of Electrospun Recombinant Spider Silk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Gregor; Jokisch, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Based on the natural sequence of Araneus diadematus Fibroin 4 (ADF4), the recombinant spider silk protein eADF4(C16) has been engineered. This highly repetitive protein has a molecular weight of 48kDa and is soluble in different solvents (hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP), formic acid and aqueous buffers). eADF4(C16) provides a high potential for various technical applications when processed into morphologies such as films, capsules, particles, hydrogels, coatings, fibers and nonwoven meshes. Due to their chemical stability and controlled morphology, the latter can be used to improve filter materials. In this protocol, we present a procedure to enhance the efficiency of different air filter devices, by deposition of nonwoven meshes of electrospun recombinant spider silk proteins. Electrospinning of eADF4(C16) dissolved in HFIP results in smooth fibers. Variation of the protein concentration (5-25% w/v) results in different fiber diameters (80-1,100 nm) and thus pore sizes of the nonwoven mesh. Post-treatment of eADF4(C16) electrospun from HFIP is necessary since the protein displays a predominantly α-helical secondary structure in freshly spun fibers, and therefore the fibers are water soluble. Subsequent treatment with ethanol vapor induces formation of water resistant, stable β-sheet structures, preserving the morphology of the silk fibers and meshes. Secondary structure analysis was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and subsequent Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD). The primary goal was to improve the filter efficiency of existing filter substrates by adding silk nonwoven layers on top. To evaluate the influence of electrospinning duration and thus nonwoven layer thickness on the filter efficiency, we performed air permeability tests in combination with particle deposition measurements. The experiments were carried out according to standard protocols. PMID:23685883

  16. Quantum 1/f noise in high technology applications including ultrasmall structures and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handel, Peter H.

    1994-05-01

    The present report brings a final answer to the question on the nature of fundamental 1/f noise and its ubiquity. A sufficient criterion for a 1/f spectrum in arbitrary chaotic nonlinear systems is derived for the first time. This criterion guarantees a 1/f spectrum for nonlinear systems which also satisfy a condition of mathematical homogeneity. Briefly stated, nonlinearity + homogeneity = 1/f noise. The criterion results because the 1/f spectrum reproduces itself in a self-convolution. Among the five examples to which the criterion is applied is also quantum electrodynamics (QED), resulting in quantum 1/f noise as a fundamental form of quantum chaos. Nonlinearity of the system of a charged particle and its field, plus the basic homogeneity of physical equations causes the criterion to predict the quantum 1/f effect. The simple universal quantum 1/f formula is applied to infrared detectors and yields quantum 1/f noise in the dark current, but not in the photogenerated current. The fractal dimension of quantum 1/f noise is determined on the basis of its quantum chaos definition and is obtained theoretically as a function of bandwidth in a simple model by applying the Grassberger-Procaccia-Takens algorithm to the quantum 1/f theory. The quantum 1/f effect is successfully applied to quartz resonators and bipolar junction transistors. Finally, the quantum 1/f mobility fluctuations are calculated in silicon and the coherent quantum 1/f effect is derived for the first time from a new QED propagator with branch-point singularity. This opens the way to better bridging the gap between coherent and conventional quantum 1/f noise in small and ultrasmall devices.

  17. Prospects for High Resolution Neutron Spectroscopy on high power fusion devices in view of the recent diagnostic developments at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Ericsson, Goeran; Sunden, E. Andersson; Conroy, S.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Giacomelli, L.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ronchi, E.; Sjsoetrand, H.; Weiszflog, M.; Kaellne, J.; Gorini, G.; Ognissanto, F.; Tardocchi, M.; Angelone, M.; Popovichev, S.

    2008-03-12

    An evaluation of three different candidate techniques for a 14-MeV High Resolution Neutron Spectrometer for a high power fusion device is presented. The performance is estimated for a modelled neutron emission for ITER plasma scenario 4. As performance indicators we use the estimated time-resolution achieved in measurements of three plasma parameters, namely, the ion temperature, the intensity of neutron emission due to neutral beam--thermal plasma interactions and the intensity of the so-called alpha knock-on neutron tail. It is found that only the MPR technique can deliver results on all three parameters with reasonable time resolution.

  18. CORSICA: A comprehensive simulation of toroidal magnetic-fusion devices. Final report to the LDRD Program

    SciTech Connect

    Crotinger, J.A.; LoDestro, L.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Tarditi, A.; Casper, T.A.; Hooper, E.B.

    1997-03-21

    In 1992, our group began exploring the requirements for a comprehensive simulation code for toroidal magnetic fusion experiments. There were several motivations for taking this step. First, the new machines being designed were much larger and more expensive than current experiments. Second, these new designs called for much more sophisticated control of the plasma shape and position, as well as the distributions of energy, mass, and current within the plasma. These factors alone made it clear that a comprehensive simulation capability would be an extremely valuable tool for machine design. The final motivating factor was that the national Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) had recently received High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Grand Challenge funding to model turbulent transport in tokamaks, raising the possibility that first-principles simulations of this process might be practical in the near future. We felt that the best way to capitalize on this development was to integrate the resulting turbulence simulation codes into a comprehensive simulation. Such simulations must include the effects of many microscopic length- and time-scales. In order to do a comprehensive simulation efficiently, the length- and time- scale disparities must be exploited. We proposed to do this by coupling the average or quasistatic effects from the fast time-scales to a slow-time-scale transport code for the macroscopic plasma evolution. In FY93-FY96 we received funding to investigate algorithms for computationally coupling such disparate-scale simulations and to implement these algorithms in a prototype simulation code, dubbed CORSICA. Work on algorithms and test cases proceeded in parallel, with the algorithms being incorporated into CORSICA as they became mature. In this report we discuss the methods and algorithms, the CORSICA code, its applications, and our plans for the future.

  19. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  20. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  1. Increased hematocrit after applications of conducted energy weapons (including TASER(®) devices) to Sus scrofa.

    PubMed

    Jauchem, James R

    2011-01-01

    Conducted energy weapons (CEWs) are used by law enforcement personnel to incapacitate individuals quickly and effectively, without intending to cause lethality. CEWs have been deployed for relatively long or repeated exposures in some cases. In laboratory animal models, central venous hematocrit has increased significantly after CEW exposure. Even limited applications (e.g., three 5-sec applications) resulted in statistically significant increases in hematocrit. Preexposure hematocrit was significantly higher in nonsurvivors versus survivors after more extreme CEW applications. The purpose of this technical note is to address specific questions that may be generated when examining these results. Comparisons among results of CEW applications, other electrical muscle stimulation, and exercise/voluntary muscle contraction are included. The anesthetized swine appears to be an acceptable animal model for studying changes in hematocrit and associated red blood cell changes. Potential detrimental effects of increased hematocrit, and considerations during law enforcement use, are discussed. PMID:21198623

  2. Device configuration-management system

    SciTech Connect

    Nowell, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The Fusion Chamber System, a major component of the Magnetic Fusion Test Facility, contains several hundred devices which report status to the Supervisory Control and Diagnostic System for control and monitoring purposes. To manage the large number of diversity of devices represented, a device configuration management system was required and developed. Key components of this software tool include the MFTF Data Base; a configuration editor; and a tree structure defining the relationships between the subsystem devices. This paper will describe how the configuration system easily accomodates recognizing new devices, restructuring existing devices, and modifying device profile information.

  3. Fabrication of a heterostructure device with Au/PPani-TiO2/ITO configuration and study of device parameters including current conduction mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ara Hussain, Amreen; Ratan Pal, Arup; Bailung, Heremba; Chutia, Joyanti; Patil, Dinkar S.

    2013-08-01

    Polyaniline based composites incorporating titanium dioxide have been synthesized by an alternative pathway using reactive magnetron sputtering of titanium and plasma polymerization of aniline monomer. Structural, optical and morphological characterizations of plasma polymerized aniline (PPani) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) composites (PPani-TiO2) reveal the evidence for the incorporation of TiO2 in the PPani matrix. A hybrid heterostructure device having PPani-TiO2 composite with a top gold (Au) layer and bottom indium-tin oxide (ITO) layer is fabricated. The developed heterostructure device exhibits rectifying behaviour indicating the formation of a Schottky contact between Au and PPani-TiO2. The detailed electrical measurement of the device is performed under different temperatures. The ideality factor (n) and barrier height (φB) of the heterojunction diode at room temperature (300 K) are found to be 1.28 and 0.43 eV, respectively. Possible conduction mechanisms are examined using various plotting and curve fitting methods for space charge limited conduction mechanism (SCLC), Schottky emission mechanism and Poole-Frenkel (PF) emission mechanism. The heterostructure device shows best fit of SCLC process as compared to the other mechanisms including Schottky emission and PF emission.

  4. Cost comparison of patients with 3-level artificial total lumbar disc replacements versus 360° fusion at 3 contiguous lumbar vertebral levels: an analysis of compassionate use at 1 site of the US investigational device exemption clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Buttacavoli, Frank A.; Delamarter, Rick B.; Kanim, Linda E.A.

    2010-01-01

    Background We sought to evaluate the difference between hospital service costs of 2 treatment options for patients diagnosed with 3-level degenerative disc disease (DDD) in the lumbar spine. In this retrospective analysis, itemized billing records of hospital stay for patients with 3-level DDD treated with artificial disc replacement (ADR) were compared with those treated with circumferential fusion (standard of care). Methods Sequential 3-level DDD patients treated with either ADR (ProDisc-L; Synthes, West Chester, Pennsylvania) or circumferential fusion during the period from January 2004 to October 2005 were included. Surgeries were performed at the same hospital for all patients. The ADR-treated patients were participating in the investigational device exemption clinical trial as part of the compassionate-use arm. Patients treated with fusion at the same institution during this same time interval were evaluated. Itemized billing records were collected at least 1 year after the index surgery. Costs according to hospital service categories were compared between ADR-treated and fusion-treated patients by use of analysis of variance and multivariate statistical techniques. Results There were 43 consecutive patients treated for 3-level DDD between January 2004 and October 2005. Of these, 21 underwent 3-level ADR and 22 had a 3-level fusion procedure. There was a mean of 3 fewer hospital days for patients treated with ADR (4.77 ± 1.11 days) than for those treated with fusion (8.00 ± 1.82 days) (P < .0001). The cost of hospital services for ADR-treated patients was 49% less excluding instrumentation costs and 54% less when accounting for instrumentation. The pattern of cost was similar when workers’ compensation patients were analyzed separately. Conclusions ADR-treated 3-level patients benefited from significantly lower costs from their in-hospital stay compared with those treated by fusion. Hospital service costs were 49% (54% when instrumentation was included

  5. Operative strategy and clinical outcomes of ROI-CTM fusion device in the treatment of Hangman’s fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guijun; Meng, Chunyang; Zhang, Weihong; Kong, Xiangqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to compare the clinical outcomes of anterior fusion with ROI-CTM and titanium plate in the treatment of Hangman’s fractures. Methods: From Dec 2005 to Jan 2015, a total of 21 patients with Hangman’s fracture, who underwent anterior internal fixation with titanium plate or ROI-CTM, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent anteroposterior, lateral, and flexion-extension radiography and computed tomography of cervical spine preoperatively and postoperatively at 3 days and 3 months. Cervical visual analog scale (VAS) score, Bazaz dysphagia score, angular displacement (AD), horizontal displacement (HD), fusion rate, and blood loss were measured. Results: The VAS and Bazaz dysphagia score at postoperative 3 days were significantly lower in ROI-CTM group, as compared to titanium plate group (P<0.05). AD and HD were significantly decreased in both groups after operation (P<0.05). The postoperative rate of complete reduction of spondylolisthesis was significantly higher in ROI-CTM group than that in titanium plate group (P<0.05). The operative time and blood loss was significantly decreased in ROI-CTM group, as compared to titanium plate group (P<0.05). Conclusion: ROI-CTM device showed superiority to titanium plate in the treatment of Hangman’s fractures, suggesting that anterior operation with ROI-CTM device may be a better choice for treating Hangman’s fractures. PMID:26770480

  6. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (∼1 m), high-current (∼1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields – in between plasma shots – to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ∼5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  7. Fast Scintillation Probes For Investigation Of Pulsed Neutron Radiation From Small Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewski, Krzysztof J.

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents the design as well as laboratory/performance tests results taken by means of the fast scintillation probes. The design of each scintillation probe is based on photomultiplier tube hybrid assembly, which—besides photomultiplier itself—also includes high-voltage divider optimized for recording of fast radiation bursts. Plastic scintillators with short-time response are applied as hard X-ray and neutron radiation detectors. Heavy-duty probe's housing provides efficient shielding against electromagnetic interference and allows carrying out pulsed neutron measurements in a harsh electromagnetic environment. The crucial parameters of scintillation probes have been examined during laboratory tests in which our investigations have been aimed mainly to determine: a time response, an anode radiant sensitivity and an electron transit time dependence on high-voltage supply. During the performance tests, the relative calibration of probes set has been done. It allowed to carry out very accurate measurements of neutron emission anisotropy and investigations of neutron radiation scattering by different materials. The usefulness of presented scintillation probes—embedded in the neutron time-of-flight diagnostic system was proven during experimental campaigns conducted on the plasma-focus PF1000 device.

  8. A bioresorbable osteosynthesis device can induce an earlier sternal fusion after median sternotomy

    PubMed Central

    Tsunekawa, Tomohiro; Usui, Akihiko; Oshima, Hideki; Mizutani, Shinnichi; Araki, Yoshimori; Okada, Noritaka; Ueda, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We examined the impact of the bioresorbable osteosynthesis sternal pin (Super Fixsorb 30) on sternal healing after median sternotomy. METHODS Sixty-three patients who underwent aortic surgery through median sternotomy between January 2006 and March 2009 were analysed. Sternal pins were utilized in 36 patients in addition to the standard closure of the sternum with Ethibond sutures (Group A), and 27 patients received no pins with the standard Ethibond sternal closure (Group B). The occurrence of transverse sternal dehiscence, anterior–posterior displacement and complete fusion of the sternum were evaluated by a computed tomography scan. The cross-sectional cortical bone density area (CBDA) of the sternum was examined to evaluate the osteoconductivity of the sternal pin over a 12-month period. RESULTS There was no sternal displacement (0%) observed in Group A at discharge. Meanwhile, five displacements (18.5%) were observed in Group B (P = 0.007). The complete sternal fusion rates at 12 months postoperatively were 100% in Group A, and 21.6% in Group B (P < 0.001). A significant increase in the CBDA was observed in Group A (P < 0.001; between CBDA at discharge and 12 months postoperatively). CONCLUSIONS The Super Fixsorb 30 sternal pin reduced an anterior–posterior sternal displacement and facilitated an earlier sternal fusion. The pin may have the potential to promote osteogenesis. PMID:22623628

  9. High-speed repetitive pellet injector for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    The projected fueling requirements of future magnetic confinement devices for controlled thermonuclear research [e.g., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)] indicate that a flexible plasma fueling capability is required. This includes a mix of traditional gas puffing and low- and high-velocity deuterium-tritium pellets. Conventional pellet injectors (based on light gas guns or centrifugal accelerators) can reliably provide frozen hydrogen pellets (1- to 6-mm-diam sizes tested) up to {approximately}1.3-km/s velocity at the appropriate pellet fueling rates (1 to 10 Hz or greater). For long-pulse operation in a higher velocity regime (>2 km/s), an experiment in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ENEA Frascati is under way. This activity will be carried out in the framework of a collaborative agreement between the US Department of Energy and European Atomic Energy Community -- ENEA Association. In this experiment, an existing ORNL hydrogen extruder (equipped with a pellet chambering mechanism/gun barrel assembly) and a Frascati two-stage light gas gun driver have been combined on a test facility at ORNL. Initial testing has been carried out with single deuterium pellets accelerated up to 2.05 km/s with the two-stage driver; in addition, some preliminary repetitive testing (to commission the diagnostics) was performed at reduced speeds, including sequences at 0.5 to 1 Hz and 10 to 30 pellets. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate repetitive operation (up to {approximately}1 Hz) with speeds in the 2- to 3-km/s range. In addition, the strength of extruded hydrogen ice as opposed to that produced in situ by direct condensation in pipe guns can be investigated. The equipment and initial experimental results are described.

  10. Nanocomposites for ultra high density information storage, devices including the same, and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Shin, Junsoo

    2014-04-01

    A nanocomposite article that includes a single-crystal or single-crystal-like substrate and heteroepitaxial, phase-separated layer supported by a surface of the substrate and a method of making the same are described. The heteroepitaxial layer can include a continuous, non-magnetic, crystalline, matrix phase, and an ordered, magnetic magnetic phase disposed within the matrix phase. The ordered magnetic phase can include a plurality of self-assembled crystalline nanostructures of a magnetic material. The phase-separated layer and the single crystal substrate can be separated by a buffer layer. An electronic storage device that includes a read-write head and a nanocomposite article with a data storage density of 0.75 Tb/in.sup.2 is also described.

  11. Deuterium retention enhancement in lithiated graphite plasma-facing surfaces in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Jean Paul

    2011-10-01

    Lithium conditioning has been adopted in a number of magnetic confinement devices resulting in significant effects on plasma performance. In NSTX for example effects include: reduction of ELMs, reduced edge neutral density, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, and improved energy confinement. The main assumption conjectured for the effects observed in NSTX plasmas is the retention of hydrogen by coatings of lithium on ATJ graphite tile surfaces. The main binding channel understood to be the ionic lithium hydride bond. However, the likelihood that the dominant retention mechanism is governed by lithium-hydride bonding seems less probable based on well-known intercalation effects of lithium in graphite. The observed effects on plasma behavior in NSTX, despite the strong chemical interaction of D, Li, O and carbon, indicate an enhanced mechanism for retaining hydrogen in addition to Li-D binding. This paper summarizes the key mechanisms understood today of enhanced hydrogen retention in lithium-treated ATJ graphite surfaces. The mechanisms are elucidated by four major efforts: 1) controlled in-situ off-line experiments at Purdue,, 2) post-mortem NSTX tile analysis, 3) in-vacuo PMI probe data in NSTX, and 4) computational quantum-based atomistic simulations. Results show that a saturation limit of D pumping by lithium conditioning of ATJ graphite surfaces is reached in a few number of shots. Computational modeling using semi-empirical quantum mechanics of electrons and classical mechanics of nuclei elucidate on the polar-covalent interactions that emerge between lithium and the C-D-O system.

  12. Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1981-10-26

    In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

  13. Development of a diagnostic technique based on Cherenkov effect for measurements of fast electrons in fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Plyusnin, V V; Jakubowski, L; Zebrowski, J; Duarte, P; Malinowski, K; Fernandes, H; Silva, C; Rabinski, M; Sadowski, M J

    2012-08-01

    A diagnostic technique based on the Cherenkov effect is proposed for detection and characterization of fast (super-thermal and runaway) electrons in fusion devices. The detectors of Cherenkov radiation have been specially designed for measurements in the ISTTOK tokamak. Properties of several materials have been studied to determine the most appropriate one to be used as a radiator of Cherenkov emission in the detector. This technique has enabled the detection of energetic electrons (70 keV and higher) and the determination of their spatial and temporal variations in the ISTTOK discharges. Measurement of hard x-ray emission has also been carried out in experiments for validation of the measuring capabilities of the Cherenkov-type detector and a high correlation was found between the data of both diagnostics. A reasonable agreement was found between experimental data and the results of numerical modeling of the runaway electron generation in ISTTOK. PMID:22938292

  14. Development of finely dispersed Ti- and Zr-doped isotropic graphites for the divertor of next step fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Galilea, I.; García-Rosales, C.; Pintsuk, G.; Linke, J.

    2007-03-01

    Finely dispersed Ti- and Zr-doped isotropic graphites have been manufactured using three different starting raw materials. The aim is to obtain doped fine grain isotropic graphites with reduced chemical erosion, high thermal shock resistance and low cost, which aim to be competitive with present carbon-based candidate materials for next step fusion devices. First ITER relevant thermal shock loads were applied on test specimens of these materials. The brittle destruction behaviour of graphite is greatly improved by doping with Ti or Zr, most probably due to a significant increase of thermal conductivity related to the catalytic effect of TiC and ZrC on the graphitization. Doped graphites manufactured with the synthetic mesophase pitch 'AR' as raw material showed the best performance from the three investigated raw materials due to its higher graphitability. The eroded surfaces of doped graphites exhibit a thin solidified carbide layer, probably caused by the segregation of liquid carbide during the thermal shot.

  15. Integrated Prediction and Mitigation Methods of Materials Damage and Lifetime Assessment during Plasma Operation and Various Instabilities in Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-03-31

    This report describes implementation of comprehensive and integrated models to evaluate plasma material interactions during normal and abnormal plasma operations. The models in full3D simulations represent state-of-the art worldwide development with numerous benchmarking of various tokamak devices and plasma simulators. In addition, significant number of experimental work has been performed in our center for materials under extreme environment (CMUXE) at Purdue to benchmark the effect of intense particle and heat fluxes on plasma-facing components. This represents one-year worth of work and resulted in more than 23 Journal Publications and numerous conferences presentations. The funding has helped several students to obtain their M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and many of them are now faculty members in US and around the world teaching and conducting fusion research. Our work has also been recognized through many awards.

  16. Development of a diagnostic technique based on Cherenkov effect for measurements of fast electrons in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Plyusnin, V. V.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.

    2012-08-15

    A diagnostic technique based on the Cherenkov effect is proposed for detection and characterization of fast (super-thermal and runaway) electrons in fusion devices. The detectors of Cherenkov radiation have been specially designed for measurements in the ISTTOK tokamak. Properties of several materials have been studied to determine the most appropriate one to be used as a radiator of Cherenkov emission in the detector. This technique has enabled the detection of energetic electrons (70 keV and higher) and the determination of their spatial and temporal variations in the ISTTOK discharges. Measurement of hard x-ray emission has also been carried out in experiments for validation of the measuring capabilities of the Cherenkov-type detector and a high correlation was found between the data of both diagnostics. A reasonable agreement was found between experimental data and the results of numerical modeling of the runaway electron generation in ISTTOK.

  17. Statistical analysis of temporal and spatial evolution of in-vessel dust particles in fusion devices by using CCD images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Suk-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Rae; Nam, Yong-Un; Chung, Jinil; Grisolia, Christian; Rohde, Volker; KSTAR Team; TORE SUPRA Team; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-08-01

    Images of wide-angle visible standard CCD cameras contain information on Dust Creation Events (DCEs) that occur during plasma operations. Database on the DCEs can be built by analyzing the straight line-like dust trajectories in scrape-off layer caused by plasma-dust interaction along the vacuum vessel. The database provides short/long term temporal evolution and spatial distribution of origins of DCEs in fusion devices. We have studied DCEs of 2011 KSTAR campaign and compared with that of 2006 Tore Supra (TS) and 2007 ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) campaign. An analysis software, with which the location of dust trajectories in 3D position in the KSTAR vacuum vessel is identified, is developed and the dust velocity distribution in 2011 campaign is measured. ©2001 Elsevier Science.

  18. Evaluation of an electrostatic dust removal system with potential application in next-step fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, F. Q. L.; John, B.; Skinner, C. H.; Roquemore, A. L.; Calle, C. I.

    2011-05-15

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass, and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm{sup 3} volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 s. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

  19. Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, F. QL.

    2011-01-20

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm3 volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

  20. Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, F. Q. L.; John, B.; Skinner, C. H.; Roquemore, A. L.; Calle, C. I.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 cu mm volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales 1 s).

  1. Assessment of martensitic steels as structural materials in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, J.M.; Chen, W.Y.K.; Cheng, E.T.; Dalessandro, J.A.; Miller, P.H.; Rosenwasser, S.N.; Thompson, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    This manuscript documents the results of preliminary experiments and analyses to assess the feasibility of incorporating ferromagnetic martensitic steels in fusion reactor designs and to evaluate the possible advantages of this class of material with respect to first wall/blanket lifetime. The general class of alloys under consideration are ferritic steels containing from about 9 to 13 percent Cr with some small additions of various strengthening elements such as Mo. These steels are conventionally used in the normalized and tempered condition for high temperature applications and can compete favorably with austenitic alloys up to about 600/sup 0/C. Although the heat treatment can result in either a tempered martensite or bainite structure, depending on the alloy and thermal treatment parameters, this general class of materials will be referred to as martensitic stainless steels for simplicity.

  2. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION Nanostructures in controlled thermonuclear fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauz, V. I.; Martynenko, Yurii V.; Svechnikov, N. Yu; Smirnov, Valentin P.; Stankevich, V. G.; Khimchenko, L. N.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that the presence of nano-sized and nano-structured erosion products not only affects the operation of thermonuclear devices but also, to a large extent, determines the safety and economy of future thermonuclear reactors. The formation mechanisms and the characteristics and properties of deposited films and nano-sized dust that form in tokamaks are reviewed.

  3. Protein assembly onto patterned microfabricated devices through enzymatic activation of fusion pro-tag.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Angela T; Yi, Hyunmin; Luo, Xiaolong; Payne, Gregory F; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary W; Bentley, William E

    2008-02-15

    We report a versatile approach for covalent surface-assembly of proteins onto selected electrode patterns of pre-fabricated devices. Our approach is based on electro-assembly of the aminopolysaccharide chitosan scaffold as a stable thin film onto patterned conductive surfaces of the device, which is followed by covalent assembly of the target protein onto the scaffold surface upon enzymatic activation of the protein's "pro-tag." For our demonstration, the model target protein is green fluorescent protein (GFP) genetically fused with a pentatyrosine pro-tag at its C-terminus, which assembles onto both two-dimensional chips and within fully packaged microfluidic devices in situ and under flow. Our surface-assembly approach enables spatial selectivity and orientational control under mild experimental conditions. We believe that our integrated approach harnessing genetic manipulation, in situ enzymatic activation, and electro-assembly makes it advantageous for a wide variety of bioMEMS and biosensing applications that require facile "biofunctionalization" of microfabricated devices. PMID:17625789

  4. PREFACE: 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iván Vargas-Blanco, V.; Herrera-Velázquez, J. Julio E.

    2015-03-01

    small laboratory size fusion experiments, as compared to those of the larger laboratories, to report about their latest achievements working with medium size and small scale tokamaks, stellarators, compact tori, dense plasma focus, reversed field pinches, helical devices, linear machines, and other small plasma devices. The Technical Meeting aims at stimulating new synergies which can contribute to better streamline the research outputs to the mainstream fusion research. Previous meetings in the series were held in Budapest, Hungary (1985), Nagoya, Japan (1986), Nice, France (1988), Washington DC, USA (1990), Hefei, China (1991), Wuerzburg, Germany (1992), Campinas, Brazil (1993), Madrid, Spain (1994), Ahmedabad, India (1995), Prague, Czech Republic (1996), Cairo, Egypt (1997), Tokyo, Japan (1998) in Chengdu, China (1999), São Paulo, Brazil (2002), Vienna, Austria (2003) in Mexico City, Mexico (2005), Lisbon, Portugal (2007), in Alushta, Ukraine (2008), Kurchatov, Kazakhstan (2009) and Vienna, Austria (2011). The 1st Costa Rican Summer School on Plasma Physics was held a week before the Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st IAEA TM RUSFD, and the 2nd Latin American Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) was organized in parallel with the it. The objective of the AITP Workshop is to enhance the regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. The Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st IAEA TM RUSFD was held at the Crowne Plaza Corobici Hotel in San José from 27 to 31 January 2014. The LAWPP scientific programme, which was spread along the whole week, had 15 invited speakers, 126 participants from 20 countries around the world. It included 7 plenary talks, 8 invited talks and 12 oral contributed papers were chosen out of 92 submissions. 82 contributions in 25 topics were presented in poster sessions on Monday 27, Tuesday 28 and Thursday 30 January 2014. The 21st IAEA TM RUSFD was held along the LAWPP 2014 from 27 to 29 January

  5. Computation of stationary 3D halo currents in fusion devices with accuracy control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettini, Paolo; Specogna, Ruben

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses the calculation of the resistive distribution of halo currents in three-dimensional structures of large magnetic confinement fusion machines. A Neumann electrokinetic problem is solved on a geometry so complicated that complementarity is used to monitor the discretization error. An irrotational electric field is obtained by a geometric formulation based on the electric scalar potential, whereas three geometric formulations are compared to obtain a solenoidal current density: a formulation based on the electric vector potential and two geometric formulations inspired from mixed and mixed-hybrid Finite Elements. The electric vector potential formulation is usually considered impractical since an enormous computing power is wasted by the topological pre-processing it requires. To solve this challenging problem, we present novel algorithms based on lazy cohomology generators that enable to save orders of magnitude computational time with respect to all other state-of-the-art solutions proposed in literature. Believing that our results are useful in other fields of scientific computing, the proposed algorithm is presented as a detailed pseudocode in such a way that it can be easily implemented.

  6. Computation of stationary 3D halo currents in fusion devices with accuracy control

    SciTech Connect

    Bettini, Paolo; Specogna, Ruben

    2014-09-15

    This paper addresses the calculation of the resistive distribution of halo currents in three-dimensional structures of large magnetic confinement fusion machines. A Neumann electrokinetic problem is solved on a geometry so complicated that complementarity is used to monitor the discretization error. An irrotational electric field is obtained by a geometric formulation based on the electric scalar potential, whereas three geometric formulations are compared to obtain a solenoidal current density: a formulation based on the electric vector potential and two geometric formulations inspired from mixed and mixed-hybrid Finite Elements. The electric vector potential formulation is usually considered impractical since an enormous computing power is wasted by the topological pre-processing it requires. To solve this challenging problem, we present novel algorithms based on lazy cohomology generators that enable to save orders of magnitude computational time with respect to all other state-of-the-art solutions proposed in literature. Believing that our results are useful in other fields of scientific computing, the proposed algorithm is presented as a detailed pseudocode in such a way that it can be easily implemented.

  7. Particle and energy transport studies on TFTR and implications for helium ash in future fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Bell, R.E.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Hill, K.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1992-12-31

    Particle and energy transport in tokamak plasmas have long been subjects of vigorous investigation. Present-day measurement techniques permit radially resolved studies of the transport of electron perturbations, low- and high-Z impurities, and energy. In addition, developments in transport theory provide tools that can be brought to bear on transport issues. Here, we examine local particle transport measurements of electrons, fully-stripped thermal helium, and helium-like iron in balanced-injection L-mode and enhanced confinement deuterium plasmas on TFTR of the same plasma current, toroidal field, and auxiliary heating power. He{sup 2{plus}} and Fe{sup 24{plus}} transport has been studied with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, while electron transport has been studied by analyzing the perturbed electron flux following the same helium puff used for the He{sup 2{plus}} studies. By examining the electron and He{sup 2{plus}} responses following the same gas puff in the same plasmas, an unambiguous comparison of the transport of the two species has been made. The local energy transport has been examined with power balance analysis, allowing for comparisons to the local thermal fluxes. Some particle and energy transport results from the Supershot have been compared to a transport model based on a quasilinear picture of electrostatic toroidal drift-type microinstabilities. Finally, implications for future fusion reactors of the observed correlation between thermal transport and helium particle transport is discussed.

  8. Particle and energy transport studies on TFTR and implications for helium ash in future fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Bell, R.E.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Hill, K.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1993-03-01

    Local thermal particle and energy transport studies of balanced-injection L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power have been performed on TFTR. The particle transport of He{sup 2+} and electrons following a small helium gas puff and Fe{sup 24+} induced by laser ablation has been examined and compared to the local energy transport characteristics inferred from power balance analysis. All particle perturbation diffusivities are radially hollow and are similar in magnitude and shape to the effective thermal conductivities found by power balance analysis. All particle diffusivities are 1--2 orders of magnitude larger than neoclassical values, except near the magnetic axis. A reduction in the helium diffusivity D{sub He} in the Supershot as compared to the L-mode is accompanied by a similar reduction in the effective single fluid thermal conductivity {chi}fluid. Also, the helium core convective velocity V{sub He} is found to increase in the Supershot over the L-Mode for r/a < 0.5. A quasilinear model of electrostatic drift waves has been used to calculate ratios between particle and energy fluxes in the Supershot. The measured ratios of the helium and iron particle diffusivities are in good accord with predictions, as are predicted ratios of V{sub He}/D{sub He}. Modelling indicates that the similarity in magnitude and profile shape of D{sub He} and {chi}fluid has generally favorable implications for helium ash content in a future fusion reactor. The core convection found in the Supershot increases the helium concentration on axis but does not reduce the plasma reactivity significantly.

  9. Particle and energy transport studies on TFTR and implications for helium ash in future fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Bell, R.E.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Hill, K.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1993-03-01

    Local thermal particle and energy transport studies of balanced-injection L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power have been performed on TFTR. The particle transport of He[sup 2+] and electrons following a small helium gas puff and Fe[sup 24+] induced by laser ablation has been examined and compared to the local energy transport characteristics inferred from power balance analysis. All particle perturbation diffusivities are radially hollow and are similar in magnitude and shape to the effective thermal conductivities found by power balance analysis. All particle diffusivities are 1--2 orders of magnitude larger than neoclassical values, except near the magnetic axis. A reduction in the helium diffusivity D[sub He] in the Supershot as compared to the L-mode is accompanied by a similar reduction in the effective single fluid thermal conductivity [chi]fluid. Also, the helium core convective velocity V[sub He] is found to increase in the Supershot over the L-Mode for r/a < 0.5. A quasilinear model of electrostatic drift waves has been used to calculate ratios between particle and energy fluxes in the Supershot. The measured ratios of the helium and iron particle diffusivities are in good accord with predictions, as are predicted ratios of V[sub He]/D[sub He]. Modelling indicates that the similarity in magnitude and profile shape of D[sub He] and [chi]fluid has generally favorable implications for helium ash content in a future fusion reactor. The core convection found in the Supershot increases the helium concentration on axis but does not reduce the plasma reactivity significantly.

  10. Devices useful for vacuum ultraviolet beam characterization including a movable stage with a transmission grating and image detector

    DOEpatents

    Gessner, Oliver; Kornilov, Oleg A; Wilcox, Russell B

    2013-10-29

    The invention provides for a device comprising an apparatus comprising (a) a transmission grating capable of diffracting a photon beam into a diffracted photon output, and (b) an image detector capable of detecting the diffracted photon output. The device is useful for measuring the spatial profile and diffraction pattern of a photon beam, such as a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beam.

  11. Static and dynamic fatigue behavior of topology designed and conventional 3D printed bioresorbable PCL cervical interbody fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Ashleen R; Borkowski, Sean L; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Flanagan, Colleen L; Hollister, Scott J; Sangiorgio, Sophia N

    2015-09-01

    Recently, as an alternative to metal spinal fusion cages, 3D printed bioresorbable materials have been explored; however, the static and fatigue properties of these novel cages are not well known. Unfortunately, current ASTM testing standards used to determine these properties were designed prior to the advent of bioresorbable materials for cages. Therefore, the applicability of these standards for bioresorbable materials is unknown. In this study, an image-based topology and a conventional 3D printed bioresorbable poly(ε)-caprolactone (PCL) cervical cage design were tested in compression, compression-shear, and torsion, to establish their static and fatigue properties. Difficulties were in fact identified in establishing failure criteria and in particular determining compressive failure load. Given these limitations, under static loads, both designs withstood loads of over 650 N in compression, 395 N in compression-shear, and 0.25 Nm in torsion, prior to yielding. Under dynamic testing, both designs withstood 5 million (5M) cycles of compression at 125% of their respective yield forces. Geometry significantly affected both the static and fatigue properties of the cages. The measured compressive yield loads fall within the reported physiological ranges; consequently, these PCL bioresorbable cages would likely require supplemental fixation. Most importantly, supplemental testing methods may be necessary beyond the current ASTM standards, to provide more accurate and reliable results, ultimately improving preclinical evaluation of these devices. PMID:26072198

  12. Three-dimensional modeling of the thermoelectric MHD problem of the LIMIT liquid lithium divertor for fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreli, Davide; Xu, Wenyu; Lindquist, Kyle; Andruczyk, Daniel; Ruzic, David N.

    2012-10-01

    Flowing liquid lithium is a promising technique for the continuous heat removal from plasma-facing components in fusion devices. In ITER-like conditions, the divertor has to handle stationary fluxes of the order 10 MW/m^2; heat fluxes even bigger occur during H-mode-related instabilities and disruptions. The Lithium-Metal Infused Trenches (LIMIT) concept, proposed at University of Illinois, offers a viable and self-adaptive solution, thanks to the use of a thermoelectric MHD drive of liquid lithium inside elongated metal trenches. We present a 3D finite-element-based model for the solution of the TEMHD. The continuity of mass, momentum, energy and current are solved together with the generalized constitutive laws of thermoelectricity. The numerical results show that TE currents are generated at the interface between the two metals; under the action of the toroidal magnetic field, the resulting JxB force pushes the liquid lithium along the channels. The force acts mainly at the interface, where the Hartmann and the fluid boundary layers are present, developing early turbulence and fluid bi-shaped macrostructures on the velocity field. The stability of the method is discussed, together with further developments toward turbulent average of the convective noise.

  13. Static and Dynamic Fatigue Behavior of Topology Designed and Conventional 3D Printed Bioresorbable PCL Cervical Interbody Fusion Devices

    PubMed Central

    Knutsen, Ashleen R.; Borkowski, Sean L.; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Flanagan, Colleen L.; Hollister, Scott J.; Sangiorgio, Sophia N.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, as an alternative to metal spinal fusion cages, 3D printed bioresorbable materials have been explored; however, the static and fatigue properties of these novel cages are not well known. Unfortunately, current ASTM testing standards used to determine these properties were designed prior to the advent of bioresorbable materials for cages. Therefore, the applicability of these standards for bioresorbable materials is unknown. In this study, an image-based topology and a conventional 3D printed bioresorbable poly(ε)-caprolactone (PCL) cervical cage design were tested in compression, compression-shear, and torsion, to establish their static and fatigue properties. Difficulties were in fact identified in establishing failure criteria and in particular determining compressive failure load. Given these limitations, under static loads, both designs withstood loads of over 650N in compression, 395N in compression-shear, and 0.25Nm in torsion, prior to yielding. Under dynamic testing, both designs withstood 5 million (5M) cycles of compression at 125% of their respective yield forces. Geometry significantly affected both the static and fatigue properties of the cages. The measured compressive yield loads fall within the reported physiological ranges; consequently, these PCL bioresorbable cages would likely require supplemental fixation. Most importantly, supplemental testing methods may be necessary beyond the current ASTM standards, to provide more accurate and reliable results, ultimately improving preclinical evaluation of these devices. PMID:26072198

  14. ECR heating power modulation as a means to ease the overcoming of the radiation barrier in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, D. Kh.; Pshenov, A. A.; Mineev, A. B.

    2010-06-15

    A method is proposed to ease the overcoming of the impurity radiation barrier during current drive in tokamaks, as well as in alternative fusion and plasmochemical systems with ECR plasma heating. The method is based on the fact that the dependence of the ionization rate on the electron temperature is strongly nonlinear and the dependence of the recombination rate on the latter is weaker. The result is that, during temperature oscillations, the effective temperature for ionization-recombination processes is higher than that in a steady state, so the ionization equilibrium is shifted and strongly emitting ions are stripped more rapidly. Thereby, ECR plasma heating in the initial discharge stage can be made more efficient by modulating the heating power at a low frequency. The evolution of the electron temperature in a homogeneous hydrogen plasma with a carbon impurity and in small ISX-scale tokamaks is simulated numerically, as well as the evolution of the electron and ion temperatures and of the current during discharge startup in the ITER device. Numerical simulations of the effect of modulation of the ECR heating power on the rate of heating of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon plasmas were also carried out. The assumption of coronal equilibrium is not used. It is shown that the low-frequency modulation of the heating power can substantially ease the overcoming of the radiation barrier.

  15. Irradiation creep at temperatures of 400 {degrees}C and below for application to near-term fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T.; Mansur, L.K.

    1996-12-31

    To study irradiation creep at 400{degrees}C and below, a series of six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys was irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor; and, after an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa, the specimens were moved to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the 19 dpa accumulated. Irradiation temperatures of 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C were studied with internally pressurized tubes of type 316 stainless steel, PCA, HT 9, and a series of four laboratory heats of: Fe-13.5Cr-15Ni, Fe-13.5Cr-35Ni, Fe-1 3.5Cr-1 W-0.18Ti, and Fe-16Cr. At 330{degrees}C, irradiation creep was shown to be linear in fluence and stress. There was little or no effect of cold-work on creep under these conditions at all temperatures investigated. The HT9 demonstrated a large deviation from linearity at high stress levels, and a minimum in irradiation creep with increasing stress was observed in the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary alloys.

  16. The role and application of ion beam analysis for studies of plasma-facing components in controlled fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, Marek; Petersson, Per; Alves, Eduardo; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Coad, Joseph Paul; Heinola, Kalle; Mayer, Matej; Widdowson, Anna

    2016-03-01

    First wall materials in controlled fusion devices undergo serious modification by several physical and chemical processes arising from plasma-wall interactions. Detailed information is required for the assessment of material lifetime and accumulation of hydrogen isotopes in wall materials. The intention of this work is to give a concise overview of key issues in the characterization of plasma-facing materials and components in tokamaks, especially in JET with an ITER-Like Wall. IBA techniques play a particularly prominent role here because of their isotope selectivity in the low-Z range (1-10), high sensitivity and combination of several methods in a single run. The role of 3He-based NRA, RBS (standard and micro-size beam) and HIERDA in fuel retention and material migration studies is presented. The use of tracer techniques with rare isotopes (e.g. 15N) or marker layers on wall diagnostic components is described. Special instrumentation, development of equipment to enhance research capabilities and issues in handling of contaminated materials are addressed.

  17. Optimization of transistor design including large signal device/circuit interactions at extremely high frequencies (20-100+GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Ralph; Grubin, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    Transistor design for extremely high frequency applications requires consideration of the interaction between the device and the circuit to which it is connected. Traditional analytical transistor models are to approximate at some of these frequencies and may not account for variations of dopants and semiconductor materials (especially some of the newer materials) within the device. Physically based models of device performance are required. These are based on coupled systems of partial differential equations and typically require 20 minutes of Cray computer time for a single AC operating point. A technique is presented to extract parameters from a few partial differential equation solutions for the device to create a nonlinear equivalent circuit model which runs in approximately 1 second of personal computer time. This nonlinear equivalent circuit model accurately replicates the contact current properties of the device as computed by the partial differential solver on which it is based. Using the nonlinear equivalent circuit model of the device, optimization of systems design can be performed based on device/circuit interactions.

  18. PREFACE: 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iván Vargas-Blanco, V.; Herrera-Velázquez, J. Julio E.

    2015-03-01

    small laboratory size fusion experiments, as compared to those of the larger laboratories, to report about their latest achievements working with medium size and small scale tokamaks, stellarators, compact tori, dense plasma focus, reversed field pinches, helical devices, linear machines, and other small plasma devices. The Technical Meeting aims at stimulating new synergies which can contribute to better streamline the research outputs to the mainstream fusion research. Previous meetings in the series were held in Budapest, Hungary (1985), Nagoya, Japan (1986), Nice, France (1988), Washington DC, USA (1990), Hefei, China (1991), Wuerzburg, Germany (1992), Campinas, Brazil (1993), Madrid, Spain (1994), Ahmedabad, India (1995), Prague, Czech Republic (1996), Cairo, Egypt (1997), Tokyo, Japan (1998) in Chengdu, China (1999), São Paulo, Brazil (2002), Vienna, Austria (2003) in Mexico City, Mexico (2005), Lisbon, Portugal (2007), in Alushta, Ukraine (2008), Kurchatov, Kazakhstan (2009) and Vienna, Austria (2011). The 1st Costa Rican Summer School on Plasma Physics was held a week before the Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st IAEA TM RUSFD, and the 2nd Latin American Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) was organized in parallel with the it. The objective of the AITP Workshop is to enhance the regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. The Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st IAEA TM RUSFD was held at the Crowne Plaza Corobici Hotel in San José from 27 to 31 January 2014. The LAWPP scientific programme, which was spread along the whole week, had 15 invited speakers, 126 participants from 20 countries around the world. It included 7 plenary talks, 8 invited talks and 12 oral contributed papers were chosen out of 92 submissions. 82 contributions in 25 topics were presented in poster sessions on Monday 27, Tuesday 28 and Thursday 30 January 2014. The 21st IAEA TM RUSFD was held along the LAWPP 2014 from 27 to 29 January

  19. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-15

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  20. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  1. Do we need to establish guidelines for patients with neuromodulation implantable devices, including spinal cord stimulators undergoing nonspinal surgeries?

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramsis F.; Tverdohleb, Tatiana; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation is currently approved to treat chronic intractable pain of the trunk and limbs. However, such implantable electronic devices are vulnerable to external electrical currents and magnetic fields. Within the hospitals and modern operating rooms (ORs), there is an abundance of electrical devices and other types of equipment that could interfere with such devices. Despite the increasing number of patients with neuromodulation implantable devices, there are no written guidelines available or consensus of cautions for such patients undergoing unrelated surgery. Case Descriptions: A 60-year-old female with a permanent St. Jude's spinal cord stimulator (SCS) presented for open total abdominal hysterectomy. Both the anesthesia and gynecology staffs were aware of the device presence, but were unaware of any precautions regarding intraoperative management. The device was found to be nonmagnetic resonance imaging compatible, and bipolar cautery was used instead of monopolar cautery. A 59-year-old female with a 9-year-old permanent Medtronic SCS, presented for right total hip arthroplasty. The device was switched off prior to entering the OR, bipolar cautery was used, and grounding pads were placed away from her battery site. In each case, the manufacturer's representative was contacted preoperative. Both surgeries proceeded uneventfully. Conclusions: The Food and Drug Administration safety information manual warns about the use of diathermy, concomitant implanted stimulation devices, lithotripsy, external defibrillation, radiation therapy, ultrasonic scanning, and high-output ultrasound, all of which can lead to permanent implant damage if not turned off prior to undertaking procedures. Lack of uniform guidelines makes intraoperative management, as well as remote anesthesia care of patients with previously implanted SCSs unsafe. PMID:26958424

  2. Experimental results on the irradiation of nuclear fusion relevant materials at the dense plasma focus ‘Bora’ device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Gribkov, V. A.; Niemela, J.; Tuniz, C.; Zanolli, C.; Chernyshova, M.; Demina, E. V.; Latyshev, S. V.; Pimenov, V. N.; Talab, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    Samples of materials counted as perspective ones for use in the first-wall and construction elements in nuclear fusion reactors (FRs) with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement (W, Ti, Al, low-activated ferritic steel ‘Eurofer’ and some alloys) were irradiated in the dense plasma focus (DPF) device ‘Bora’ having a bank energy of ⩽5 kJ. The device generates hot dense (T ˜ 1 keV, n ˜ 1019 cm-3) deuterium plasma, powerful plasma streams (v ˜ 3 × 107 cm s-1) and fast (E ˜ 0.1 … 1.0 MeV) deuterons of power flux densities q up to 1010 and 1012 W cm-2 correspondingly. ‘Damage factor’ F = q × τ0.5 ensures an opportunity to simulate radiation loads (predictable for both reactors types) by the plasma/ion streams, which have the same nature and namely those parameters as expected in the FR modules. Before and after irradiation we provided investigations of our samples by means of a number of analytical techniques. Among them we used optical and scanning electron microscopy to understand character and parameters of damageability of the surface layers of the samples. Atomic force microscopy was applied to measure roughness of the surface after irradiation. These characteristics are quite important for understanding mechanisms and values of dust production in FR that may relate to tritium retention and emergency situations in FR facilities. We also applied two new techniques. For the surface we elaborated the portable x-ray diffractometer that combines x-ray single photon detection with high spectroscopic and angular resolutions. For bulk damageability investigations we applied an x-ray microCT system where x-rays were produced by a Hamamatsu microfocus source (150 kV, 500 µA, 5 µm minimum focal spot size). The detector was a Hamamatsu CMOS flat panel coupled to a fibre optic plate under the GOS scintillator. The reconstruction of three-dimensional data was run with Cobra 7.4 and DIGIX CT software while VG Studio Max 2.1, and Amira 5.3 were used for

  3. Image fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  4. QCD corrections to vector boson pair production in gluon fusion including interference effects with off-shell Higgs at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caola, Fabrizio; Dowling, Matthew; Melnikov, Kirill; Röntsch, Raoul; Tancredi, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    We compute next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the production of two massive electroweak bosons in gluon fusion. We consider both the prompt production process gg → V V and the production mediated by an exchange of an s-channel Higgs boson, gg → H ∗ → V V . We include final states with both on- and off-shell vector bosons with leptonic decays. The gluonic production of vector bosons is a loop-induced process, including both massless and massive quarks in the loop. For gg → ZZ production, we obtain the NLO QCD corrections to the massive loops through an expansion around the heavy top limit. This approximation is valid below the top production threshold, giving a broad range of invariant masses between the Higgs production and the top production thresholds in which our results are valid. We explore the NLO QCD effects in gg → ZZ focusing, in particular, on the interference between prompt and Higgs-mediated processes. We find that the QCD corrections to the interference are large and similar in size to the corrections to both the signal and the background processes. At the same time, we observe that corrections to the interference change rapidly with the four-lepton invariant mass in the region around the ZZ production threshold. We also study the interference effects in gg → W + W - production where, due to technical limitations, we only consider contributions of massless loops. We find that the QCD corrections to the interference in this case are somewhat larger than those for either the signal or the background.

  5. Tritium accountancy in fusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.; Clark, E.A.; Harvel, C.D.; Farmer, D.A.; Tovo, L.L.; Poore, A.S.; Moore, M.L.

    2015-03-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has clearly defined requirements for nuclear material control and accountability (MCA) of tritium whereas the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not since tritium is not a fissile material. MCA requirements are expected for tritium fusion machines and will be dictated by the host country or regulatory body where the machine is operated. Material Balance Areas (MBA) are defined to aid in the tracking and reporting of nuclear material movements and inventories. Material sub-accounts (MSA) are established along with key measurement points (KMP) to further subdivide a MBA to localize and minimize uncertainties in the inventory difference (ID) calculations for tritium accountancy. Fusion systems try to minimize tritium inventory which may require continuous movement of material through the MSA. The ability of making meaningful measurements of these material transfers is described in terms of establishing the MSA structure to perform and reconcile ID calculations. For fusion machines, changes to the traditional ID equation will be discussed which includes breeding, burn-up, and retention of tritium in the fusion device. The concept of 'net' tritium quantities consumed or lost in fusion devices is described in terms of inventory taking strategies and how it is used to track the accumulation of tritium in components or fusion machines. (authors)

  6. TRITIUM ACCOUNTANCY IN FUSION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Farmer, D. A.; Moore, M. L.; Tovo, L. L.; Poore, A. S.; Clark, E. A.; Harvel, C. D.

    2014-03-06

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has clearly defined requirements for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) of tritium whereas the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not since tritium is not a fissile material. MC&A requirements are expected for tritium fusion machines and will be dictated by the host country or regulatory body where the machine is operated. Material Balance Areas (MBAs) are defined to aid in the tracking and reporting of nuclear material movements and inventories. Material subaccounts (MSAs) are established along with key measurement points (KMPs) to further subdivide a MBA to localize and minimize uncertainties in the inventory difference (ID) calculations for tritium accountancy. Fusion systems try to minimize tritium inventory which may require continuous movement of material through the MSAs. The ability of making meaningful measurements of these material transfers is described in terms of establishing the MSA structure to perform and reconcile ID calculations. For fusion machines, changes to the traditional ID equation will be discussed which includes breading, burn-up, and retention of tritium in the fusion device. The concept of “net” tritium quantities consumed or lost in fusion devices is described in terms of inventory taking strategies and how it is used to track the accumulation of tritium in components or fusion machines.

  7. A comparative study of mouse embryo freeze-preservation including the examination of a thermoelectric freezing device.

    PubMed

    Schiewe, M C; Schmidt, P M; Wildt, D E

    1987-06-01

    In Study 1 over 2000 4- to 8-cell mouse embryos were randomly pooled and assigned to 1 of 12 treatment groups. A 2 X 2 X 3 factorial design was used to analyze two types of cryoprotectant/post-thaw (PT) dilutions (dimethyl sulfoxide [Me2SO]/stepwise dilution versus glycerol/sucrose dilution), two storage containers (glass ampoules versus plastic straws), and three cooling treatments. Two commercial, controlled-rate freezing machines were examined, employing either nitrogen gas (Planer) or thermoelectric (Glacier) cooling. Embryos were cooled slowly (0.5 degrees C/min) to -35 or -80 degrees C and then cooled rapidly by transfer into liquid nitrogen (LN2). Thawed embryos were cultured for 24 hr after which developmental stage, post-thaw survival (PTS), embryo degeneration rate (EDR), quality grade (QG), and fluorescein diacetate viability grade (VG) were assessed. Overall, PTS and EDR were similar (P greater than 0.05) among the three freezing unit/plunge temperature treatments. Cumulative results of container and cryoprotectant/PT dilution treatments consistently demonstrated greater PTS, QG, and VG ratings and lower EDR values when embryos were frozen in ampoules using glycerol/sucrose dilution. Embryos treated with Me2SO/stepwise dilution were particularly sensitive to freezing damage when stored in plastic straws and plunged into LN2 at -35 degrees C. Study 2 was directed at determining whether Study 1 methods for diluting Me2SO-protected embryos markedly affected PTS rates. Post-thaw culture percentages were no different (P greater than 0.05) for four- to eight-cell Me2SO-treated embryos frozen in ampoules (using the forced-LN2 device), thawed, and diluted either conventionally in reduced concentrations of Me2SO or in the sucrose treatment normally accorded glycerolated embryos.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3595167

  8. Programmed Learning: A Bibliography of Programs and Presentation Devices. Fourth Edition with Supplements Including the 1971 Release.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendershot, Carl H.

    Over 3,500 commercial programs for use in programed instruction are listed by subject and publisher. For each title or series, the following information is provided: approximate length in hours, approximate length in frames or pages, appropriate level for use, list price, and "other information," which often includes a description of the contents.…

  9. Dosimetric verification of radiation therapy including intensity modulated treatments, using an amorphous-silicon electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chytyk-Praznik, Krista Joy

    Radiation therapy is continuously increasing in complexity due to technological innovation in delivery techniques, necessitating thorough dosimetric verification. Comparing accurately predicted portal dose images to measured images obtained during patient treatment can determine if a particular treatment was delivered correctly. The goal of this thesis was to create a method to predict portal dose images that was versatile and accurate enough to use in a clinical setting. All measured images in this work were obtained with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID), but the technique is applicable to any planar imager. A detailed, physics-motivated fluence model was developed to characterize fluence exiting the linear accelerator head. The model was further refined using results from Monte Carlo simulations and schematics of the linear accelerator. The fluence incident on the EPID was converted to a portal dose image through a superposition of Monte Carlo-generated, monoenergetic dose kernels specific to the a-Si EPID. Predictions of clinical IMRT fields with no patient present agreed with measured portal dose images within 3% and 3 mm. The dose kernels were applied ignoring the geometrically divergent nature of incident fluence on the EPID. A computational investigation into this parallel dose kernel assumption determined its validity under clinically relevant situations. Introducing a patient or phantom into the beam required the portal image prediction algorithm to account for patient scatter and attenuation. Primary fluence was calculated by attenuating raylines cast through the patient CT dataset, while scatter fluence was determined through the superposition of pre-calculated scatter fluence kernels. Total dose in the EPID was calculated by convolving the total predicted incident fluence with the EPID-specific dose kernels. The algorithm was tested on water slabs with square fields, agreeing with measurement within 3% and 3 mm. The

  10. Biomechanical stability of a bioabsorbable self-retaining polylactic acid/nano-sized β-tricalcium phosphate cervical spine interbody fusion device in single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion sheep models

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Duan, Ping-Guo; Li, Xi-Lei; Yuan, Feng-Lai; Zhao, Ming-Dong; Che, Wu; Wang, Hui-Ren; Dong, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanical stability provided by a novel, polylactic acid/nano-sized, β-tricalcium phosphate, bioabsorbable, self-retaining cervical fusion cage (BCFC). Methods Quasistatic nonconstraining torques (maximum 1.5 NM) induced flexion, extension, lateral bending (±1.5 NM), and axial rotation (±1.5 NM) on 32 sheep cervical spines (C2–C5). The motion segment C3–C4 was first tested intact; the following groups were tested after complete discectomy: autologous tricortical iliac crest bone graft, Medtronic–Wego polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage, Solis PEEK cage, and BCFC. The autologous bone graft group was tested with an anterior plate. The mean range of motion (ROM) was calculated from the load-displacement curves. Results BCFC significantly decreased ROM in lateral bending and axial rotation compared to other implants, and no significant difference in ROM between two types of PEEK cages and BCFC could be observed in flexion and extension. Anterior cervical plate (ACP) significantly decreased ROM in flexion and extension, but no significant difference in ROM between BCFC and bone graft plus ACP could be determined in lateral bending and axial rotation. Conclusion The BCFC device showed better stability to autologous tricortical iliac crest bone graft and PEEK cages in single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion models and thus may be a potential alternative to the current PEEK cages. PMID:23226018

  11. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  12. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  13. Recent results obtained by use of accelerators on plasma-edge properties in controlled-fusion devices and on properties of high-power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The study of plasma-wall interactions is of primary importance in present fusion devices. Measurements of incident fuel and impurity fluxes, retention and release of fuel atoms, and erosion of internal components are of particular interest. Accelerators in the megaelectronvolt range are being used both to measure the depth profile of fuel atoms implanted in samples placed in the plasma edge by use of nuclear reactions and to measure impurities and film thicknesses by use of elastic scattering reactions. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is used to determine flux and energy distributions of fuel atoms and to measure species composition and impurities in the beams of high power neutral beam injectors. Recent results obtained with these techniques are presented and areas of future study are discussed.

  14. Fusion - A potential power source

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.H. )

    1994-10-01

    Duplicating the fusion process of the sun and the stars for energy production on earth would present many difficulties. The state of matter at such temperatures--the plasma state--may be considered a gas of electrons and nuclei, so one problem is the need to confine a hot, reacting plasma. Because the plasma is an electric conductor, it is subject to magnetic forces. Thus, one approach is to confine the hot plasma by a magnetic field. Another approach is to heat the matter so rapidly that the fusion reactions take place before the matter has had time to fly apart, that is, to use inertial confinement. At the United Nations' Atoms for Peace Conference in 1958, a remarkably cooperative, international research effort began. In spite of many difficulties, substantial progress has been made. Initially, many tokamaks were built with circular cross sections. However, shaped plasmas were shown to have clear advantages. The cross sections of some of the larger ones are illustrated here. The two largest devices in the US are the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton and the Doublet III-D (DIII-D) at General Atomics in San Diego. The TFTR device is constructed with neutron shielding and equipped to handle the superheavy hydrogen isotope tritium, which is radioactive. This makes it possible to operate the device with the optimum fuel mixture: an equal mixture of deuterium and tritium. This mixture is optimal because the cross section for the DT reaction has by far the largest cross section of the fusion reactions mentioned above. A large effort is presently under way to design the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This is a joint effort by the European Community, Japan, Russia, and the US. Goals include the production of fusion power in excess of 1,000 MW for studying the physics of igniting plasmas, and the integrated demonstration of fusion-reactor technologies.

  15. Ultrafine tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion devices: effect of high flux, high fluence low energy helium irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atwani, O.; Gonderman, Sean; Efe, Mert; De Temmerman, Gregory; Morgan, Thomas; Bystrov, Kirill; Klenosky, Daniel; Qiu, Tian; Allain, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    This work discusses the response of ultrafine-grained tungsten materials to high-flux, high-fluence, low energy pure He irradiation. Ultrafine-grained tungsten samples were exposed in the Pilot-PSI (Westerhout et al 2007 Phys. Scr. T128 18) linear plasma device at the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER) in Nieuwegein, the Netherlands. The He flux on the tungsten samples ranged from 1.0 × 1023-2.0 × 1024 ions m-2 s-1, the sample bias ranged from a negative (20-65) V, and the sample temperatures ranged from 600-1500 °C. SEM analysis of the exposed samples clearly shows that ultrafine-grained tungsten materials have a greater fluence threshold to the formation of fuzz by an order or magnitude or more, supporting the conjecture that grain boundaries play a major role in the mechanisms of radiation damage. Pre-fuzz damage analysis is addressed, as in the role of grain orientation on structure formation. Grains of (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) orientation showed only pore formation, while (0 0 1) oriented grains showed ripples (higher structures) decorated with pores. Blistering at the grain boundaries is also observed in this case. In situ TEM analysis during irradiation revealed facetted bubble formation at the grain boundaries likely responsible for blistering at this location. The results could have significant implications for future plasma-burning fusion devices given the He-induced damage could lead to macroscopic dust emission into the fusion plasma.

  16. The Anesthetic Implications of Aqueous Drainage Devices and Glaucoma: A Report of a Patient Undergoing Urgent Prone Cervical Decompression and Fusion.

    PubMed

    Blackney, Kevin A; Zavodni, Zachary J; Saddawi-Konefka, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The pathophysiology of glaucoma and perioperative visual loss is similar. A patient with glaucoma may be at increased risk of perioperative visual loss. For both, goals of management include optimizing ocular perfusion pressure and oxygen delivery. One treatment for refractory glaucoma is an aqueous drainage device; however, there is no published literature on the anesthetic management of patients with these devices. We present the case of a patient with recalcitrant glaucoma treated with an Ahmed Glaucoma Valve who underwent urgent prone surgery. Anesthetic implications of aqueous drainage devices and glaucoma are discussed, and recommendations are made. PMID:27258174

  17. Integrating theory, synthesis, spectroscopy and device efficiency to design and characterize donor materials for organic photovoltaics: a case study including 12 donors

    SciTech Connect

    Oosterhout, S. D.; Kopidakis, N.; Owczarczyk, Z. R.; Braunecker, W. A.; Larsen, R. E.; Ratcliff, E. L.; Olson, D. C.

    2015-04-07

    There have been remarkable improvements in the power conversion efficiency of solution-processable Organic Photovoltaics (OPV) have largely been driven by the development of novel narrow bandgap copolymer donors comprising an electron-donating (D) and an electron-withdrawing (A) group within the repeat unit. The large pool of potential D and A units and the laborious processes of chemical synthesis and device optimization, has made progress on new high efficiency materials slow with a few new efficient copolymers reported every year despite the large number of groups pursuing these materials. In our paper we present an integrated approach toward new narrow bandgap copolymers that uses theory to guide the selection of materials to be synthesized based on their predicted energy levels, and time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) to select the best-performing copolymer–fullerene bulk heterojunction to be incorporated into complete OPV devices. We validate our methodology by using a diverse group of 12 copolymers, including new and literature materials, to demonstrate good correlation between (a) theoretically determined energy levels of polymers and experimentally determined ionization energies and electron affinities and (b) photoconductance, measured by TRMC, and OPV device performance. The materials used here also allow us to explore whether further copolymer design rules need to be incorporated into our methodology for materials selection. For example, we explore the effect of the enthalpy change (ΔH) during exciton dissociation on the efficiency of free charge carrier generation and device efficiency and find that ΔH of -0.4 eV is sufficient for efficient charge generation.

  18. Integrating theory, synthesis, spectroscopy and device efficiency to design and characterize donor materials for organic photovoltaics: a case study including 12 donors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oosterhout, S. D.; Kopidakis, N.; Owczarczyk, Z. R.; Braunecker, W. A.; Larsen, R. E.; Ratcliff, E. L.; Olson, D. C.

    2015-04-07

    There have been remarkable improvements in the power conversion efficiency of solution-processable Organic Photovoltaics (OPV) have largely been driven by the development of novel narrow bandgap copolymer donors comprising an electron-donating (D) and an electron-withdrawing (A) group within the repeat unit. The large pool of potential D and A units and the laborious processes of chemical synthesis and device optimization, has made progress on new high efficiency materials slow with a few new efficient copolymers reported every year despite the large number of groups pursuing these materials. In our paper we present an integrated approach toward new narrow bandgap copolymersmore » that uses theory to guide the selection of materials to be synthesized based on their predicted energy levels, and time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) to select the best-performing copolymer–fullerene bulk heterojunction to be incorporated into complete OPV devices. We validate our methodology by using a diverse group of 12 copolymers, including new and literature materials, to demonstrate good correlation between (a) theoretically determined energy levels of polymers and experimentally determined ionization energies and electron affinities and (b) photoconductance, measured by TRMC, and OPV device performance. The materials used here also allow us to explore whether further copolymer design rules need to be incorporated into our methodology for materials selection. For example, we explore the effect of the enthalpy change (ΔH) during exciton dissociation on the efficiency of free charge carrier generation and device efficiency and find that ΔH of -0.4 eV is sufficient for efficient charge generation.« less

  19. Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1994-03-01

    The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

  20. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. Advanced digital subtraction angiography and MR fusion imaging protocol applied to accurate placement of flow diverter device.

    PubMed

    Faragò, Giuseppe; Caldiera, Valentina; Tempra, Giovanni; Ciceri, Elisa

    2016-02-01

    In recent years there has been a progressive increase in interventional neuroradiology procedures, partially due to improvements in devices, but also to the simultaneous development of technologies and radiological images. Cone beam CT (Dyna-CT; Siemens) is a method recently used to obtain pseudo CT images from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with a flat panel detector. Using dedicated software, it is then possible to merge Dyna-CT images with images from a different source. We report here the usefulness of advanced DSA techniques (Syngo-Dyna CT, three-dimensional DSA iPilot) for the treatment of an intracranial aneurysm with a flow diverter device. Merging MR and Dyna-CT images at the end of the procedure proved to be a simple and rapid additional method of verifying the success of the intervention. PMID:25589548

  2. The origin of convective structures in the scrape-off layer of linear magnetic fusion devices investigated by fast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Antar, G. Y.; Yu, J. H.; Tynan, G.

    2007-02-15

    A fast imaging camera is used to unveil the spatio-temporal properties of radially convective events in the CSDX linear plasma device [M. J. Burin et al., Phys. Plasmas, 12, 052320 (2005)]. The exposure time is set to 1 {mu}s and the time between frames to 10 {mu}s. The time series from a Langmuir probe and from a pixel in the 50000-frame movie are compared and cross-correlated. Excellent agreement between the two diagnostics is found for spatial scales greater than 2.5 mm. The fluctuations inside the main plasma column are found to change between different poloidal mode numbers as a function of time. Accordingly, the power spectra determined in these linear devices reflect the sum over these modes. Outside the main plasma column, avaloids are observed to remain attached to the main plasma, hence their behavior does not become independent of the dynamics inside the main plasma column. Avaloid properties, assessed from imaging, agree with Langmuir probes done on various devices, except that the radial length is found to be much larger than previously determined because the blob-shape assumption is not valid. The link between fluctuations inside and outside the main plasma column indicates that the nonlinear evolution of the m=1 poloidal mode number is responsible for the creation of avaloids.

  3. Fusion Energy Division progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.

    1995-09-01

    The report covers all elements of the ORNL Fusion Program, including those implemented outside the division. Non-fusion work within FED, much of which is based on the application of fusion technologies and techniques, is also discussed. The ORNL Fusion Program includes research and development in most areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US and international fusion efforts. The research discussed in this report includes: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices; development and testing of plasma diagnostic tools and techniques; assembly and distribution of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. The activities involving the use of fusion technologies and expertise for non-fusion applications ranged from semiconductor manufacturing to environmental management.

  4. Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wurden, G. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Intrator, T. P.; Grabowski, T. C.; Degnan, J. H.; Domonkos, M.; Turchi, P. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; et al

    2015-11-17

    In this community white paper, we describe an approach to achieving fusion which employs a hybrid of elements from the traditional magnetic and inertial fusion concepts, called magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). The status of MIF research in North America at multiple institutions is summarized including recent progress, research opportunities, and future plans.

  5. Cold fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  6. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  7. Control mechanism for attenuation of thermal energy pulses using cold circulators in the cryogenic distribution system of fusion devices in tokamak configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, R.; Sarkar, B.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N.

    2014-01-29

    Operation and control of superconducting (SC) magnets in the fusion devices having tokamak configuration opens up the domain of varying peak thermal energy environment as a function of time, commensurate with the plasma pulses. The varied thermal energy environment, thus propagated to upstream of the cooling system, is responsible for the system level instability of the overall cryogenic system. The cryogenic distribution system, the regime of first impact point, therefore, has to be tuned so as to stay at the nearly stable zone of operation. The configuration of the cryogenic distribution system, considered in the present study, involves a liquid helium (LHe) bath as a thermal buffer, LHe submerged heat exchangers and cold circulator apart from the valves for implementations of the precise controls. The cold circulator supplies the forced flow supercritical helium, used for the cooling of SC magnets. The transients of the thermal energy pulses can be attenuated in the cryogenic distribution system by various methodologies. One of the adopted methodologies in the present study is with the precise speed control of the cold circulators. The adopted methodology is applied to various configurations of arrangements of internal components in the distribution system for obtaining system responses with superior attenuation of energy pulses. The process simulation approach, assumptions, considered inputs and constraints, process modeling with different configuration as well as results to accomplish the control scheme for the attenuation of the thermal energy pulses are described.

  8. Applications and Progress of Dust Injection to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhehui; Wurden, Glen A.; Mansfield, Dennis K.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Ticos, Catalin M.

    2008-09-07

    Three regimes of dust injection are proposed for different applications to fusion energy. In the 'low-speed' regime (<5 km/s), basic dust transport study, edge plasma diagnostics, edge-localized-mode (ELM) pacing in magnetic fusion devices can be realized by injecting dust of known properties into today's fusion experiments. ELM pacing, as an alternative to mini-pellet injection, is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion devices. Different schemes are available to inject dust. In the 'intermediate-speed' regime (10-200 km/s), possible applications of dust injection include fueling of the next-step fusion devices, core-diagnostics of the next-step fusion devices, and compression of plasma and solid targets to aid fusion energy production. Promising laboratory results of dust moving at 10-50 km/s do exist. Significant advance in this regime may be expected in the near term to achieve higher dust speeds. In the 'high-speed' regime (>500 km/s), dust injection can potentially be used to directly produce fusion energy through impact. Ideas on how to achieve these extremely high speeds are mostly on paper. No plan exists today to realize them in laboratory. Some experimental results, including electrostatic, electromagnetic, gas-dragged, plasma-dragged, and laser-ablation-based acceleration, are summarized and compared. Some features and limitations of the different acceleration methods will be discussed. A necessary component of all dust injectors is the dust dropper (also known as dust dispenser). A computer-controlled piezoelectric crystals has been developed to dropped dust in a systematic and reproducible manner. Particle fluxes ranges from a few tens of particles per second up to thousands of particles per second by this simple device.

  9. 21 CFR 886.1880 - Fusion and stereoscopic target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fusion and stereoscopic target. 886.1880 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1880 Fusion and stereoscopic target. (a) Identification. A fusion and stereoscopic target is a device intended for use as a viewing...

  10. 21 CFR 886.1880 - Fusion and stereoscopic target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fusion and stereoscopic target. 886.1880 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1880 Fusion and stereoscopic target. (a) Identification. A fusion and stereoscopic target is a device intended for use as a viewing...

  11. 21 CFR 886.1880 - Fusion and stereoscopic target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fusion and stereoscopic target. 886.1880 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1880 Fusion and stereoscopic target. (a) Identification. A fusion and stereoscopic target is a device intended for use as a viewing...

  12. 21 CFR 886.1880 - Fusion and stereoscopic target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fusion and stereoscopic target. 886.1880 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1880 Fusion and stereoscopic target. (a) Identification. A fusion and stereoscopic target is a device intended for use as a viewing...

  13. 21 CFR 886.1880 - Fusion and stereoscopic target.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fusion and stereoscopic target. 886.1880 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1880 Fusion and stereoscopic target. (a) Identification. A fusion and stereoscopic target is a device intended for use as a viewing...

  14. Probing the plasma near high power wave launchers in fusion devices for static and dynamic electric fields (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C. C. Isler, R. C.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B.; Green, D. L.; Harris, J. H.; Hillis, D. L.; Martin, E. H.; Colas, L.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Panayotis, S.; Pegourié, B.; Jacquot, J.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X.; Shannon, S. C.

    2014-11-15

    An exploratory study was carried out in the long-pulse tokamak Tore Supra, to determine if electric fields in the plasma around high-power, RF wave launchers could be measured with non-intrusive, passive, optical emission spectroscopy. The focus was in particular on the use of the external electric field Stark effect. The feasibility was found to be strongly dependent on the spatial extent of the electric fields and overlap between regions of strong (>∼1 kV/cm) electric fields and regions of plasma particle recycling and plasma-induced, spectral line emission. Most amenable to the measurement was the RF electric field in edge plasma, in front of a lower hybrid heating and current drive launcher. Electric field strengths and direction, derived from fitting the acquired spectra to a model including time-dependent Stark effect and the tokamak-range magnetic field Zeeman-effect, were found to be in good agreement with full-wave modeling of the observed launcher.

  15. Probing the plasma near high power wave launchers in fusion devices for static and dynamic electric fields (invited).

    PubMed

    Klepper, C C; Martin, E H; Isler, R C; Colas, L; Goniche, M; Hillairet, J; Panayotis, S; Pegourié, B; Jacquot, J; Lotte, Ph; Colledani, G; Biewer, T M; Caughman, J B; Ekedahl, A; Green, D L; Harris, J H; Hillis, D L; Shannon, S C; Litaudon, X

    2014-11-01

    An exploratory study was carried out in the long-pulse tokamak Tore Supra, to determine if electric fields in the plasma around high-power, RF wave launchers could be measured with non-intrusive, passive, optical emission spectroscopy. The focus was in particular on the use of the external electric field Stark effect. The feasibility was found to be strongly dependent on the spatial extent of the electric fields and overlap between regions of strong (>∼1 kV/cm) electric fields and regions of plasma particle recycling and plasma-induced, spectral line emission. Most amenable to the measurement was the RF electric field in edge plasma, in front of a lower hybrid heating and current drive launcher. Electric field strengths and direction, derived from fitting the acquired spectra to a model including time-dependent Stark effect and the tokamak-range magnetic field Zeeman-effect, were found to be in good agreement with full-wave modeling of the observed launcher. PMID:25430306

  16. Probing the plasma near high power wave launchers in fusion devices for static and dynamic electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C Christopher; Martin, Elijah H; Isler, Ralph C; Colas, L.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Panayotis, Stephanie; Jacquot, Jonathan; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Biewer, Theodore M; Caughman, J. B. O.; Ekedahl, A.; Green, David L; Harris, Jeffrey H; Hillis, Donald Lee; Shannon, Prof. Steven; Litaudon, X

    2014-01-01

    An exploratory study was carried out in the long-pulse tokamak Tore Supra, to determine if electric fields in the plasma around high-power, RF wave launchers could be measured with non-intrusive, passive, optical emission spectroscopy. The focus was in particular on the use of the external electric field Stark effect. The feasibility was found to be strongly dependent on the spatial extent of the electric fields and overlap between regions of strong (> 1 kV/cm) electric fields and regions of plasma particle recycling and plasma-induced, spectral line emission. Most amenable to the measurement was the RF electric field in edge plasma, in front of a lower hybrid heating and current drive launcher. Electric field strengths and direction, derived from fitting the acquired spectra to a model including time-dependent Stark effect and the tokamak-range magnetic field Zeeman-effect, were found to be in good agreement with full-wave modeling of the observed launcher.

  17. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

    1985-01-29

    A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

  18. Five-year clinical results of cervical total disc replacement compared with anterior discectomy and fusion for treatment of 2-level symptomatic degenerative disc disease: a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter investigational device exemption clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Kris; Coric, Domagoj; Albert, Todd

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to report the outcome of a study of 2-level cervical total disc replacement (Mobi-C) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Although the long-term outcome of single-level disc replacement has been extensively described, there have not been previous reports of the 5-year outcome of 2-level cervical disc replacement. METHODS This study reports the 5-year results of a prospective, randomized US FDA investigational device exemption (IDE) study conducted at 24 centers in patients with 2-level, contiguous, cervical spondylosis. Clinical outcomes at up to 60 months were evaluated, including validated outcome measures, incidence of reoperation, and adverse events. The complete study data and methodology were critically reviewed by 3 independent surgeon authors without affiliation with the IDE study or financial or institutional bias toward the study sponsor. RESULTS A total of 225 patients received the Mobi-C cervical total disc replacement device and 105 patients received ACDF. The Mobi-C and ACDF follow-up rates were 90.7% and 86.7%, respectively (p = 0.39), at 60 months. There was significant improvement in all outcome scores relative to baseline at all time points. The Mobi-C patients had significantly more improvement than ACDF patients in terms of Neck Disability Index score, SF-12 Physical Component Summary, and overall satisfaction with treatment at 60 months. The reoperation rate was significantly lower with Mobi-C (4%) versus ACDF (16%). There were no significant differences in the adverse event rate between groups. CONCLUSIONS Both cervical total disc replacement and ACDF significantly improved general and disease-specific measures compared with baseline. However, there was significantly greater improvement in general and disease-specific outcome measures and a lower rate of reoperation in the 2-level disc replacement patients versus ACDF control patients. Clinical trial registration no. NCT00389597

  19. Multi-center, Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Investigational Device Exemption Clinical Trial Comparing Mobi-C Cervical Artificial Disc to Anterior Discectomy and Fusion in the Treatment of Symptomatic Degenerative Disc Disease in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyun W.; Davis, Reginald; Gaede, Steven; Hoffman, Greg; Kim, Kee; Nunley, Pierce D.; Peterson, Daniel; Rashbaum, Ralph; Stokes, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the gold standard for treating symptomatic cervical disc degeneration. Cervical total disc replacements (TDRs) have emerged as an alternative for some patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a new TDR device compared with ACDF for treating single-level cervical disc degeneration. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulated Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study. A total of 245 patients were treated (164 TDR: 81 ACDF). The primary outcome measure was overall success based on improvement in Neck Disability Index (NDI), no subsequent surgical interventions, and no adverse events (AEs) classified as major complications. Secondary outcome measures included SF-12, visual analog scale (VAS) assessing neck and arm pain, patient satisfaction, radiographic range of motion, and adjacent level degeneration. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. The hypothesis was that the TDR success rate was non-inferior to ACDF at 24 months. Results Overall success rates were 73.6% for TDR and 65.3% for ACDF, confirming non-inferiority (p < 0.0025). TDR demonstrated earlier improvements with significant differences in NDI scores at 6 weeks and 3 months, and VAS neck pain and SF-12 PCS scores at 6 weeks (p<0.05). Operative level range of motion in the TDR group was maintained throughout follow-up. Radiographic evidence of inferior adjacent segment degeneration was significantly greater with ACDF at 12 and 24 months (p < 0.05). AE rates were similar. Conclusions Mobi-C TDR is a safe and effective treatment for single-level disc degeneration, producing outcomes similar to ACDF with less adjacent segment degeneration. Level of Evidence: Level I. Clinical relevance: This study adds to the literature supporting cervical TDR as a viable option to ACDF in

  20. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  1. Trends in fusion reactor safety research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, J. S.; Holland, D. F.; Piet, S. J.

    Fusion has the potential to be an attractive energy source. From the safety and environmental perspective, fusion must avoid concerns about catastrophic accidents and unsolvable waste disposal. In addition, fusion must achieve an acceptable level of risk from operational accidents that result in public exposure and economic loss. Finally, fusion reactors must control routine radioactive effluent, particularly tritium. Major progress in achieving this potential rests on development of low-activation materials or alternative fuels. The safety and performance of various material choices and fuels for commercial fusion reactors can be investigated relatively inexpensively through reactor design studies. These studies bring together experts in a wide range of backgrounds and force the group to either agree on a reactor design or identify areas for further study. Fusion reactors will be complex, with distributed radioactive inventories. The next generation of experiments will be critical in demonstrating that acceptable levels of safe operation can be achieved. These machines will use materials which are available today and for which a large database exists (e.g., for 316 stainless steel). Researchers have developed a good understanding of the risks associated with operation of these devices. Specifically, consequences from coolant system failures, loss of vacuum events, tritium releases, and liquid metal reactions have been studied. Recent studies go beyond next step designs and investigate commercial reactor concerns including tritium release and liquid metal reactions.

  2. EDITORIAL: Stochasticity in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finken, K. H.

    2006-04-01

    In recent years the importance of externally imposed resonant magnetic fields on plasma has become more and more recognized. These fields will cause ergodization at well defined plasma layers and can induce large size islands at rational q-surfaces. A hope for future large scale tokamak devices is the development of a reliable method for mitigating the large ELMs of type 1 ELMy-H-modes by modifying the edge transport. Other topics of interest for fusion reactors are the option of distributing the heat to a large area and optimizing methods for heat and particle exhaust, or the understanding of the transport around tearing mode instabilities. The cluster of papers in this issue of Nuclear Fusion is a successor to the 2004 special issue (Nuclear Fusion 44 S1-122 ) intended to raise interest in the subject. The contents of this present issue are based on presentations at the Second Workshop on Stochasticity in Fusion Plasmas (SFP) held in Juelich, Germany, 15-17 March 2005. The SFP workshops have been stimulated by the installation of the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor (DED) in the TEXTOR tokamak. It has attracted colleagues working on various plasma configurations such as tokamaks, stellarators or reversed field pinches. The workshop was originally devoted to phenomena on the plasma edge but it has been broadened to transport questions over the whole plasma cross-section. It is a meeting place for experimental and theoretical working groups. The next workshop is planned for February/March 2007 in Juelich, Germany. For details see http://www.fz-juelich.de/sfp/. The content of the workshop is summarized in the following conference summary (K.H. Finken 2006 Nuclear Fusion 46 S107-112). At the workshop experimental results on the plasma transport resulting from ergodization in various devices were presented. Highlights were the results from DIII-D on the mitigation of ELMs (see also T.E. Evans et al 2005 Nuclear Fusion 45 595 ). Theoretical work was focused around the topics

  3. Research on fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryaznevich, M. P.

    2012-06-01

    The use of fusion devices as powerful neutron sources has been discussed for decades. Whereas the successful route to a commercial fusion power reactor demands steady state stable operation combined with the high efficiency required to make electricity production economic, the alternative approach to advancing the use of fusion is free of many of complications connected with the requirements for economic power generation and uses the already achieved knowledge of Fusion physics and developed Fusion technologies. "Fusion for Neutrons" (F4N), has now been re-visited, inspired by recent progress achieved on comparably compact fusion devices, based on the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept. Freed from the requirement to produce much more electricity than used to drive it, a fusion neutron source could be efficiently used for many commercial applications, and also to support the goal of producing energy by nuclear power. The possibility to use a small or medium size ST as a powerful or intense steady-state fusion neutron source (FNS) is discussed in this paper in comparison with the use of traditional high aspect ratio tokamaks. An overview of various conceptual designs of compact fusion neutron sources based on the ST concept is given and they are compared with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS), with major radius as low as 0.5 metres but still able to produce several MW of neutrons in a steady-state regime.

  4. Fusion Science Education Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, C. A.; DIII-D Education Group

    1996-11-01

    This presentation will focus on education outreach activities at General Atomics that have been expanded to include the general population on science education with a focus on fusion energy. Outreach materials are distributed upon request both nationally and internationally. These materials include a notebook containing copies of DIII--D tour panels, fusion poster, new fusion energy video, new fusion energy brochure, and the electromagnetic spectrum curriculum. The 1996 Fusion Forum (held in the House Caucus Room) included a student/ teacher lunch with Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary and a private visit to the Forum exhibits. The continuing partnership with Kearny High School includes lectures, job shadowing, internship, equipment donations and an award-winning electric car-racing program. Development of distribution by CD of the existing interactive fusion energy kiosk and a virtual reality tour of the DIII--D facility are underway. The DIII--D fusion education WWW site includes e-mail addresses to ``Ask the Wizard,'' and/or receive GA's outreach materials. Steve Rodecker, a local science teacher, aided by DIII--D fusion staff, won his second Tapestry Award; he also was named the ``1995 National Science Teacher of the Year'' and will be present to share his experiences with the DIII--D educational outreach program.

  5. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  6. Method and device for detecting impact events on a security barrier which includes a hollow rebar allowing insertion and removal of an optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Pies, Ross E.

    2016-03-29

    A method and device for the detection of impact events on a security barrier. A hollow rebar is farmed within a security barrier, whereby the hollow rebar is completely surrounded by the security barrier. An optical fiber passes through the interior of the hollow rebar. An optical transmitter and an optical receiver are both optically connected to the optical fiber and connected to optical electronics. The optical electronics are configured to provide notification upon the detection of an impact event at the security barrier based on the detection of disturbances within the optical fiber.

  7. On the fusion triple product and fusion power gain of tokamak pilot plants and reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costley, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The energy confinement time of tokamak plasmas scales positively with plasma size and so it is generally expected that the fusion triple product, nTτ E, will also increase with size, and this has been part of the motivation for building devices of increasing size including ITER. Here n, T, and τ E are the ion density, ion temperature and energy confinement time respectively. However, tokamak plasmas are subject to operational limits and two important limits are a density limit and a beta limit. We show that when these limits are taken into account, nTτ E becomes almost independent of size; rather it depends mainly on the fusion power, P fus. In consequence, the fusion power gain, Q fus, a parameter closely linked to nTτ E is also independent of size. Hence, P fus and Q fus, two parameters of critical importance in reactor design, are actually tightly coupled. Further, we find that nTτ E is inversely dependent on the normalised beta, β N; an unexpected result that tends to favour lower power reactors. Our findings imply that the minimum power to achieve fusion reactor conditions is driven mainly by physics considerations, especially energy confinement, while the minimum device size is driven by technology and engineering considerations. Through dedicated R&D and parallel developments in other fields, the technology and engineering aspects are evolving in a direction to make smaller devices feasible.

  8. Fusion power demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.

    1983-09-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment.

  9. Effect of superbanana diffusion on fusion reactivity in stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Fred L.

    2012-08-15

    Fusion reactivity is usually obtained using a Maxwellian distribution. However, energy-dependent radial diffusion can modify the energy distribution. Superbanana diffusion is energy-dependent and occurs in nonaxisymmetric magnetic confinement devices, such as stellarators, because of ripple-trapped particles which can take large steps between collisions. In this paper, the D-T fusion reactivity is calculated using a non-Maxwellian energy distribution obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation numerically, including radial superbanana diffusion as well as energy scattering. The ions in the tail of the distribution, with energies larger than thermal, which are most needed for fusion, are depleted by superbanana diffusion. In this paper, it is shown that the D-T fusion reactivity is reduced by tail ion depletion due to superbanana diffusion, by roughly a factor of 0.5 for the parameters used in the calculation.

  10. Numerical investigations on a compact magnetic fusion device for studying the effect of external applied magnetic field oscillations on the nuclear burning efficiency of D-T and p-11B fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaizis, S. D.; Lalousis, P.; Hora, H.; Larour, J.; Auvray, P.; Balcou, P.; Ducret, J.-E.; Martin, P.

    2015-05-01

    The burning process of high density (about 1018cm-3), high temperature (tens to hundreds of keV) plasma trapped by a high mirror-like magnetic field in a Compact Magnetic Fusion (CMF) device is numerically investigated.. The initial high density and high temperature plasma in the CMF device is produced by ultrashort high intensity laser beam interaction with clusters or thin foils, and two fuels, D-T and p-11B are studied. The spatio-temporal evolution of D-T and p-11B plasmas, the production of alphas, the generated electric fields and the high external applied magnetic field are described by a 1-D multifluid code. The initial values for the plasma densities, temperatures and external applied magnetic field (about 100 T) correspond to high β plasmas. The main objectives of the numerical simulations are: to study the plasma trapping, the neutron and alpha production for both fuels, and compare the effect of the external applied magnetic field on the nuclear burning efficiency for the two fuels.. The comparisons and the advantages for each fuel will be presented. The proposed CMF device and the potential operation of the device within the ELI-NP pillar will be discussed.

  11. An Assessment of Hazards Caused by Electromagnetic Interaction on Humans Present near Short-Wave Physiotherapeutic Devices of Various Types Including Hazards for Users of Electronic Active Implantable Medical Devices (AIMD)

    PubMed Central

    Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Leakage of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from short-wave radiofrequency physiotherapeutic diathermies (SWDs) may cause health and safety hazards affecting unintentionally exposed workers (W) or general public (GP) members (assisting patient exposed during treatment or presenting there for other reasons). Increasing use of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMDs), by patients, attendants, and workers, needs attention because dysfunctions of these devices may be caused by electromagnetic interactions. EMF emitted by 12 SWDs (with capacitive or inductive applicators) were assessed following international guidelines on protection against EMF exposure (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection for GP and W, new European directive 2013/35/EU for W, European Recommendation for GP, and European Standard EN 50527-1 for AIMD users). Direct EMF hazards for humans near inductive applicators were identified at a distance not exceeding 45 cm for W or 62 cm for GP, but for AIMD users up to 90 cm (twice longer than that for W and 50% longer than that for GP because EMF is pulsed modulated). Near capacitive applicators emitting continuous wave, the corresponding distances were: 120 cm for W or 150 cm for both—GP or AIMD users. This assessment does not cover patients who undergo SWD treatment (but it is usually recommended for AIMD users to be careful with EMF treatment). PMID:24089662

  12. An assessment of hazards caused by electromagnetic interaction on humans present near short-wave physiotherapeutic devices of various types including hazards for users of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMD).

    PubMed

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Leakage of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from short-wave radiofrequency physiotherapeutic diathermies (SWDs) may cause health and safety hazards affecting unintentionally exposed workers (W) or general public (GP) members (assisting patient exposed during treatment or presenting there for other reasons). Increasing use of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMDs), by patients, attendants, and workers, needs attention because dysfunctions of these devices may be caused by electromagnetic interactions. EMF emitted by 12 SWDs (with capacitive or inductive applicators) were assessed following international guidelines on protection against EMF exposure (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection for GP and W, new European directive 2013/35/EU for W, European Recommendation for GP, and European Standard EN 50527-1 for AIMD users). Direct EMF hazards for humans near inductive applicators were identified at a distance not exceeding 45 cm for W or 62 cm for GP, but for AIMD users up to 90 cm (twice longer than that for W and 50% longer than that for GP because EMF is pulsed modulated). Near capacitive applicators emitting continuous wave, the corresponding distances were: 120 cm for W or 150 cm for both-GP or AIMD users. This assessment does not cover patients who undergo SWD treatment (but it is usually recommended for AIMD users to be careful with EMF treatment). PMID:24089662

  13. Glossary of fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, M.O.

    1985-02-01

    The Glossary of Fusion Energy is an attempt to present a concise, yet comprehensive collection of terms that may be beneficial to scientists and laymen who are directly or tangentially concerned with this burgeoning energy enterprise. Included are definitions of terms in theoretical plasma physics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, and some related physics concepts. Also, short descriptions of some of the major thermonuclear experiments currently under way in the world today are included.

  14. Biological performance of a polycaprolactone-based scaffold used as fusion cage device in a large animal model of spinal reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Abbah, Sunny A; Lam, Christopher X L; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Goh, James C H; Wong, Hee-Kit

    2009-10-01

    A bioactive and bioresorbable scaffold fabricated from medical grade poly (epsilon-caprolactone) and incorporating 20% beta-tricalcium phosphate (mPCL-TCP) was recently developed for bone regeneration at load bearing sites. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate bone ingrowth into mPCL-TCP in a large animal model of lumbar interbody fusion. Six pigs underwent a 2-level (L3/4; L5/6) anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) implanted with mPCL-TCP + 0.6 mg rhBMP-2 as treatment group while four other pigs implanted with autogenous bone graft served as control. Computed tomographic scanning and histology revealed complete defect bridging in all (100%) specimen from the treatment group as early as 3 months. Histological evidence of continuing bone remodeling and maturation was observed at 6 months. In the control group, only partial bridging was observed at 3 months and only 50% of segments in this group showed complete defect bridging at 6 months. Furthermore, 25% of segments in the control group showed evidence of graft fracture, resorption and pseudoarthrosis. In contrast, no evidence of graft fractures, pseudoarthrosis or foreign body reaction was observed in the treatment group. These results reveal that mPCL-TCP scaffolds could act as bone graft substitutes by providing a suitable environment for bone regeneration in a dynamic load bearing setting such as in a porcine model of interbody spine fusion. PMID:19540586

  15. Hampton University (hu) Center for Fusion Research & Training (cfrt) Summer High School Fusion Science Workshops: 1996 Through 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punjabi, Alkesh; Ali, Halima; Rhonda, Ellis; Tucker, Vincent

    2001-10-01

    The HU CFRT has conducted Summer High School Fusion Science Energy Workshops during the summers of 1996 through 2000 - a total of five summer fusion science workshops for high school students. These workshops are one of many programs and activities of the center organized and focused around the education, motivation, retention and research experiences for young scholars especially under-represented minorities and female high schoolers in fusion science and related areas. These workshops consist of a very productive curriculum and palate of exciting activities that provides the students the opportunity to experience what scientific research in fusion science is all about. These activities include an intensive program of instructions on basics of fusion energy science, modeling of tokamaks, visualization of scientific data and on how to use computers to conduct scientific research. Through experimentation and discovery based on computer simulations of chaos and other nonlinear phenomena in tokamaks, students learn and understand what are the relevant patterns and structures to look at in fusion devices, what is the underlying scientific hypothesis, and what conclusions can be reached based on results. Here we will present the highlights and the unique successes of the five workshops conducted from the Summer of 1996 through Summer of 2000. We will also discuss the fusion science workshop model, its content and scope. These workshops are funded by DOE OFES, and NASA through its SharpPlus program administered by the Quality Education for Minority Network (QEM).

  16. Fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-04-20

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

  17. Surgical Outcome of a Zero-profile Device Comparing with Stand-alone Cage and Anterior Cervical Plate with Iliac Bone Graft in the Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Sik; Cho, Pyoung Goo

    2014-01-01

    Objective A Zero-profile device is a cervical stand-alone cage with integrated segmental fixation device. We characteristically evaluated the radiological changes as well as clinical outcomes in the application of Zero-profile devices compared with stand-alone cages and anterior cervical plates with iliac bone grafts for the cervical disease. Methods Retrospectively, total 60 patients at least more than one year follow-up were enrolled. Twenty patients were treated with Zero-profile devices (Group A), twenty patients with stand-alone cages (Group B) and twenty patients with anterior cervical plates and iliac bone grafts (Group C) for a single level cervical disease. The clinical outcomes were evaluated by Odom's criteria and Bazaz-Yoo dysphagia index. The radiologic parameters were by subsidence and the changes of the midpoint interbody height (IBH), the segmental kyphotic angle (SKA), the overall kyphotic angle (OKA) in index level. Results Although there was no significant clinical difference according to the Odom's criteria among them(p=0.766), post-operative dysphagia was significantly decreased in the Group A and B compared with the Group C (p=0.04). From the immediate postoperative to the last follow-up time, the mean change of IBH decrement and SKA increment were significant in the Group B compared with the Group A (p=0.025, p=0.033) and the Group C (p=0.001, p=0.000). The subsidence rate was not significant among all groups (p=0.338). Conclusion This Zero-profile device is a valuable alternative to the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with a low incidence of postoperative dysphagia and without segmental kyphotic change. PMID:25346764

  18. Fusion Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt

    2002-02-20

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.

  19. Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities.

  20. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  1. Photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  2. Peaceful Uses of Fusion

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Teller, E.

    1958-07-03

    Applications of thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and, when once brought under control, are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low-specific-yield formations are also suggested.

  3. Ceramics for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications.

  4. Colliding Beam Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostoker, Norman; Qerushi, Artan; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-06-01

    The recirculating power for virtually all types of fusion reactors has previously been calculated [1] with the Fokker-Planck equation. The reactors involve non-Maxwellian plasmas. The calculations are generic in that they do not relate to specific confinement devices. In all cases except for a Tokamak with D-T fuel the recirculating power was found to exceed the fusion power by a large factor. In this paper we criticize the generality claimed for this calculation. The ratio of circulating power to fusion power is calculated for the Colliding Beam Reactor with fuels D-T, D-He3 and p-B11. The results are respectively, 0.070, 0.141 and 0.493.

  5. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilan, N.; Antoni, V.; De Lorenzi, A.; Chitarin, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E.

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  6. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices.

    PubMed

    Pilan, N; Antoni, V; De Lorenzi, A; Chitarin, G; Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF6 instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming. PMID:26932053

  7. Analytical performance evaluation for autonomous sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. C.

    2008-04-01

    A distributed data fusion system consists of a network of sensors, each capable of local processing and fusion of sensor data. There has been a great deal of work in developing distributed fusion algorithms applicable to a network centric architecture. Currently there are at least a few approaches including naive fusion, cross-correlation fusion, information graph fusion, maximum a posteriori (MAP) fusion, channel filter fusion, and covariance intersection fusion. However, in general, in a distributed system such as the ad hoc sensor networks, the communication architecture is not fixed. Each node has knowledge of only its local connectivity but not the global network topology. In those cases, the distributed fusion algorithm based on information graph type of approach may not scale due to its requirements to carry long pedigree information for decorrelation. In this paper, we focus on scalable fusion algorithms and conduct analytical performance evaluation to compare their performance. The goal is to understand the performance of those algorithms under different operating conditions. Specifically, we evaluate the performance of channel filter fusion, Chernoff fusion, Shannon Fusion, and Battachayya fusion algorithms. We also compare their results to NaÃve fusion and "optimal" centralized fusion algorithms under a specific communication pattern.

  8. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interface

    SciTech Connect

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N.

    2012-05-15

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  9. Real-time sensor validation and fusion for distributed autonomous sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Li, Xiangshang; Buckles, Bill P.

    2004-04-01

    Multi-sensor data fusion has found widespread applications in industrial and research sectors. The purpose of real time multi-sensor data fusion is to dynamically estimate an improved system model from a set of different data sources, i.e., sensors. This paper presented a systematic and unified real time sensor validation and fusion framework (RTSVFF) based on distributed autonomous sensors. The RTSVFF is an open architecture which consists of four layers - the transaction layer, the process fusion layer, the control layer, and the planning layer. This paradigm facilitates distribution of intelligence to the sensor level and sharing of information among sensors, controllers, and other devices in the system. The openness of the architecture also provides a platform to test different sensor validation and fusion algorithms and thus facilitates the selection of near optimal algorithms for specific sensor fusion application. In the version of the model presented in this paper, confidence weighted averaging is employed to address the dynamic system state issue noted above. The state is computed using an adaptive estimator and dynamic validation curve for numeric data fusion and a robust diagnostic map for decision level qualitative fusion. The framework is then applied to automatic monitoring of a gas-turbine engine, including a performance comparison of the proposed real-time sensor fusion algorithms and a traditional numerical weighted average.

  10. Fusion Studies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    A new strategic energy plan decided by the Japanese Cabinet in 2014 strongly supports the steady promotion of nuclear fusion development activities, including the ITER project and the Broader Approach activities from the long-term viewpoint. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in Japan formulated the Third Phase Basic Program so as to promote an experimental fusion reactor project. In 2005 AEC has reviewed this Program, and discussed on selection and concentration among many projects of fusion reactor development. In addition to the promotion of ITER project, advanced tokamak research by JT-60SA, helical plasma experiment by LHD, FIREX project in laser fusion research and fusion engineering by IFMIF were highly prioritized. Although the basic concept is quite different between tokamak, helical and laser fusion researches, there exist a lot of common features such as plasma physics on 3-D magnetic geometry, high power heat load on plasma facing component and so on. Therefore, a synergetic scenario on fusion reactor development among various plasma confinement concepts would be important.

  11. Fusion - From science to engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenton, J.

    1981-12-01

    The principles and state of advancement in fusion energy devices are explored, along with the transition from theoretical problems to engineering difficulties. Tokamaks are noted to be the closest to actual break-even, the point where the energy extracted from the reactor is equal to the energy necessary to initiate the process, although linear, mirror fusion machines also show promise. Attention is also given to poloidal diverter systems and the ELMO bumpy torus, which has demonstrated continuous operation for the first time. The prospects for a U.S. fusion engineering facility are uncertain in the light of current budget cuts, with most funding being concentrated on military applications. Laser inertial fusion devices are reviewed, as well as particle and ion accelerators for fuel pellet implosions. Finally, the most complex engineering problem is asserted to be the development of the reactor blanket system.

  12. Integrated simulation and modeling capability for alternate magnetic fusion concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B. I.; Hooper, E.B.; Jarboe, T. R.; LoDestro, L. L.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    1998-11-03

    This document summarizes a strategic study addressing the development of a comprehensive modeling and simulation capability for magnetic fusion experiments with particular emphasis on devices that are alternatives to the mainline tokamak device. A code development project in this area supports two defined strategic thrust areas in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program: (1) comprehensive simulation and modeling of magnetic fusion experiments and (2) development, operation, and modeling of magnetic fusion alternate- concept experiment

  13. Simulation Science for Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoric, M. M.; Sudo, S.

    2008-07-01

    The world fusion effort has recently entered a new age with the construction of ITER in Cadarache, France, which will be the first magnetic confinement fusion plasma experiment dominated by the self-heating of fusion reactions. In order to operate and control burning plasmas and future demo fusion reactors, an advanced ability for comprehensive computer simulations that are fully verified and validated against experimental data will be necessary. The ultimate goal is to develop the capability to predict reliably the behavior of plasmas in toroidal magnetic confinement devices on all relevant time and space scales. In addition to developing a sophisticated integrated simulation codes, directed advanced research in fusion physics, applied mathematics and computer science is envisaged. In this talk we review the basic strategy and main research efforts at the Department of Simulation Science of the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS)- which is the Inter University Institute and the coordinating Center of Excellence for academic fusion research in Japan. We overview a simulation research at NIFS, in particular relation to experiments in the Large Helical Device (LHD), the world's largest superconducting heliotron device, as a National Users' facility (see Motojima et al. 2003). Our main goal is understanding and systemizing the rich hierarchy of physical mechanisms in fusion plasmas, supported by exploring a basic science of complexity of plasma as a highly nonlinear, non-equilibrium, open system. The aim is to establish a simulation science as a new interdisciplinary field by fostering collaborative research in utilizing the large-scale supercomputer simulators. A concept of the hierarchy-renormalized simulation modelling will be invoked en route toward the LHD numerical test reactor. Finally, a perspective role is given on the ITER Broad Approach program at Rokkasho Center, as an integrated part of ITER and Development of Fusion Energy Agreement.

  14. Fusion development and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following: superconducting magnet technology; high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies--aries; ITER physics: alpha physics and alcator R D for ITER; lower hybrid current drive and heating in the ITER device; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; ITER systems studies; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development.

  15. (Fusion energy research)

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  16. SAR and LIDAR fusion: experiments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew C.; Zaugg, Evan C.; Bradley, Joshua P.; Bowden, Ryan D.

    2013-05-01

    In recent years ARTEMIS, Inc. has developed a series of compact, versatile Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems which have been operated on a variety of small manned and unmanned aircraft. The multi-frequency-band SlimSAR has demonstrated a variety of capabilities including maritime and littoral target detection, ground moving target indication, polarimetry, interferometry, change detection, and foliage penetration. ARTEMIS also continues to build upon the radar's capabilities through fusion with other sensors, such as electro-optical and infrared camera gimbals and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) devices. In this paper we focus on experiments and applications employing SAR and LIDAR fusion. LIDAR is similar to radar in that it transmits a signal which, after being reflected or scattered by a target area, is recorded by the sensor. The differences are that a LIDAR uses a laser as a transmitter and optical sensors as a receiver, and the wavelengths used exhibit a very different scattering phenomenology than the microwaves used in radar, making SAR and LIDAR good complementary technologies. LIDAR is used in many applications including agriculture, archeology, geo-science, and surveying. Some typical data products include digital elevation maps of a target area and features and shapes extracted from the data. A set of experiments conducted to demonstrate the fusion of SAR and LIDAR data include a LIDAR DEM used in accurately processing the SAR data of a high relief area (mountainous, urban). Also, feature extraction is used in improving geolocation accuracy of the SAR and LIDAR data.

  17. HIV-1 Fusion Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cavrois, Marielle; Neidleman, Jason; Greene, Warner C.

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 fusion assay measures all steps in the HIV-1 life cycle up to and including viral fusion. It relies on the incorporation of a β-lactamase Vpr (BlaM-Vpr) protein chimera into the virion and the subsequent transfer of this chimera into the target cell by fusion (Figure 1). The transfer is monitored by the enzymatic cleavage of CCF2, a fluorescent dye substrate of β-lactamase, loaded into the target cells. Cleavage of the β-lactam ring in CCF2 by β-lactamase changes the fluorescence emission spectrum of the dye from green (520 nm) to blue (447 nm). This change reflects virion fusion and can be detected by flow cytometry (Figure 2).

  18. Modeling hydrogen isotope behavior in fusion plasma-facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Alice; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we focus on understanding hydrogen isotope retention in plasma-facing materials in fusion devices. Three common simulation methods are usually used to study this problem that includes Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics, and numerical/analytical methods. A system of partial differential equations describing deuterium behavior in tungsten under various conditions is solved numerically to explain recent data compared to other methods. The developed model of hydrogen retention in metals includes classic, intercrystalline and trapped-induced Gorsky effects. The bombardment and depth profile of 200 eV deuterium in single crystal tungsten are simulated and compared with recent work. The total deuterium retention at various temperatures and fluences are also calculated and compared with available data. The results are in reasonable agreement with data and therefore, this model can be used to estimate deuterium inventory and recovery in future fusion devices.

  19. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  20. Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Steven Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This is an exceptional moment in my career, and so I want to thank all of my teachers, colleagues and mentors who have made this possible. From my co-authors and myself, many thanks to the International Atomic Energy Agency, IOP Publishing, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, and the selection committee for the great honor of receiving this award. Also gratitude to Kikuchi-sensei, not only for the inventive and visionary creation of this award, but also for being a key mentor dating back to his efforts in producing high neutron output in JT-60U. It was also a great honor to receive the award directly from IAEA Deputy Director General Burkart during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. Receiving the award at this venue is particularly exciting as Daejeon is home to the new, next-generation KSTAR tokamak device that will lead key magnetic fusion research areas going forward. I would also like to thank the mayor of Daejeon, Dr Yum Hong-Chul, and all of the meeting organizers for giving us all a truly spectacular and singular welcoming event during which the award was presented. The research leading to the award would not have been possible without the support of the US Department of Energy, and I thank the Department for the continued funding of this research. Special mention must be made to a valuable co-author who is no longer with us, Professor A. Bondeson, who was a significant pioneer in resistive wall mode (RWM) research. I would like to thank my wife, Mary, for her infinite patience and encouragement. Finally, I would like to personally thank all of you that have approached and congratulated me directly. There are no units to measure how important your words have been in this regard. When notified that our paper had been shortlisted for the 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award, my co-authors responded echoing how I felt—honored to be included in such a fine collection of research by colleagues. It was unfathomable—would this paper follow the brilliant work

  1. OCULUS Sea Track Fusion Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotou, Stylianos C.; Rizogiannis, Constantinos; Katsoulis, Stavros; Lampropoulos, Vassilis; Kanellopoulos, Sotirios; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2015-06-01

    Oculus Sea is a complete solution regarding maritime surveillance and communications at Local as well as Central Command and Control level. It includes a robust and independent track fusion service whose main functions include: 1) Interaction with the User to suggest the fusion of two or more tracks, confirm Track ID and Vessel Metadata creation for the fused track, and suggest de-association of two tracks 2) Fusion of same vessel tracks arriving simultaneously from multiple radar sensors featuring track Association, track Fusion of associated tracks to produce a more accurate track, and Multiple tracking filters and fusion algorithms 3) Unique Track ID Generator for each fused track 4) Track Dissemination Service. Oculus Sea Track Fusion Service adopts a system architecture where each sensor is associated with a Kalman estimator/tracker that obtains an estimate of the state vector and its respective error covariance matrix. Finally, at the fusion center, association and track state estimation fusion are carried out. The expected benefits of this system include multi-sensor information fusion, enhanced spatial resolution, and improved target detection.

  2. Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is under consideration as a means of building a low mass, high specific impulse, and high thrust propulsion system for interplanetary travel. This unique combination is the result of the generation of a high temperature plasma by the nuclear fusion process. This plasma can then be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Fusion is initiated by a small traction of the energy generated in the magnetic coils due to the plasma's compression of the magnetic field. The power gain from a fusion reaction is such that inefficiencies due to thermal neutrons and coil losses can be overcome. Since the fusion reaction products are directly used for propulsion and the power to initiate the reaction is directly obtained from the thrust generation, no massive power supply for energy conversion is required. The result should be a low engine mass, high specific impulse and high thrust system. The key is to successfully initiate fusion as a proof-of-principle for this application. Currently MSFC is implementing MTF proof-of-principle experiments. This involves many technical details and ancillary investigations. Of these, selected pertinent issues include the properties, orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the target plasma's behavior under compression and the convergence and mixing of the gun plasma are under investigation. This work is to focus on the gun characterization and development as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability.

  3. Simulation science for fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Škorić, M. M.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Todo, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Miura, H.; Ishizaki, R.; Ito, A.; Ohtani, H.; Usami, S.; Nakamura, H.; Ito, Atsushi; Ishiguro, S.; Tomita, Y.; Takayama, A.; Sato, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Den, M.; Sakagami, H.; Horiuchi, R.; Okamura, S.; Nakajima, N.

    2008-10-01

    The world fusion effort has embarked into a new age with the construction of ITER in Cadarache, France, which will be the first magnetic confinement fusion plasma experiment dominated by the self-heating of fusion reactions. In order to operate and control burning plasmas and next generation demo fusion reactors, an advanced capability for comprehensive integrated computer simulations that are fully verified and validated against experimental data will be necessary. The ultimate goal is to predict reliably the behaviour of plasmas in toroidal magnetic confinement devices on all relevant scales, both in time and space. In addition to developing a sophisticated integrated simulation codes, directed advanced research in fusion physics, applied mathematics, computer science and software is envisaged. In this paper we review the basic strategy and main research efforts at the Department of Simulation Science of the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS)- which is the Inter University Institute and the coordinating Center of Excellence for academic fusion research in Japan. We overview a simulation research at NIFS, in particular relation to experiments in the Large Helical Device (LHD), the world's largest superconducting heliotron device, as a National Users' facility (see Motojima et al. [1]). Our main goal is understanding and systemizing the rich hierarchy of physical mechanisms in fusion plasmas, supported by exploring a basic science of complexity of plasma as a highly nonlinear, non-equilibrium, open system. The aim is to establish a simulation science as a new interdisciplinary field by fostering collaborative research in utilizing the large-scale supercomputer simulators. A concept of the hierarchy-renormalized simulation modelling will be invoked en route toward the LHD numerical test reactor.

  4. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  5. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  6. Data security on the national fusion grid

    SciTech Connect

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  7. Sealing device

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  8. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  9. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. EDITORIAL: The Nuclear Fusion Award The Nuclear Fusion Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Explanation of the JET n = 0 chirping mode Nucl. Fusion 46 S888-97 Urano H. et al 2006 Confinement degradation with beta for ELMy HH-mode plasmas in JT-60U tokamak Nucl. Fusion 46 781-7 Izzo V.A. et al 2006 A numerical investigation of the effects of impurity penetration depth on disruption mitigation by massive high-pressure gas jet Nucl. Fusion 46 541-7 Inagaki S. et al 2006 Comparison of transient electron heat transport in LHD helical and JT-60U tokamak plasmas Nucl. Fusion 46 133-41 Watanabe T.-H. et al 2006 Velocity-space structures of distribution function in toroidal ion temperature gradient turbulence Nucl. Fusion 46 24-32 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award nominees For the 2010 award, the papers published in the 2007 volume were assessed and the following papers were nominated, all of which are magnetic confinement experiments and theory. Rice J.E. et al 2007 Inter-machine comparison of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks Nucl. Fusion 47 1618-24 Lipschultz B. et al 2007 Plasma-surface interaction, scrape-off layer and divertor physics: implications for ITER Nucl. Fusion 47 1189-205 Loarer T. et al 2007 Gas balance and fuel retention in fusion devices Nucl. Fusion 47 1112-20 Garcia O.E et al 2007 Fluctuations and transport in the TCV scrape-off layer Nucl. Fusion 47 667-76 Zonca F. et al 2007 Electron fishbones: theory and experimental evidence Nucl. Fusion 47 1588-97 Maggi C.F. et al 2007 Characteristics of the H-mode pedestal in improved confinement scenarios in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET and JT-60U Nucl. Fusion 47 535-51 Yoshida M. et al 2007 Momentum transport and plasma rotation profile in toroidal direction in JT-60U L-mode plasmas Nucl. Fusion 47 856-63 Zohm H. et al 2007 Control of MHD instabilities by ECCD: ASDEX Upgrade results and implications for ITER Nucl. Fusion 47 228-32 Snyder P.B. et al 2007 Stability and dynamics of the edge pedestal in the low collisionality regime: physics mechanisms for steady-state ELM-free operation Nucl. Fusion 47 961-8 Urano H. et

  11. Measurement of magnetic field and velocity profiles in 3.6 kJ United Nations University/International Center For Theoretical Physics plasma focus fusion device

    SciTech Connect

    Mathuthu, M.; Zengeni, T.G.; Gholap, A.V.

    1996-12-01

    A Mather-type small plasma focus device was operated in air filling in the pressure range of 0.5 to 1.0 Torr and capacitor bank charging voltage of 13{endash}15 kV. A strong focusing action was observed in this pressure range. Magnetic probe signals at various axial positions were used to estimate velocity of current sheet and axial magnetic field distribution profiles. It was observed that under the present experimental conditions the magnetic field remains constant at 0.72 T from {ital z}=0.0 cm to {ital z}=8.0 cm but falls rapidly to 0.52 T at about {ital z}=14.5 cm at a fixed radial distance of 2.65 cm. The magnetic field and velocity measurements indicate a current shedding effect{emdash}only 68.5{percent} of the total injected current flows into the focus region. The rapid drop of the magnetic field at {ital z}=8.0 cm suggests that further (initial shedding is at the insulator) current and mass shedding in the focus tube is significant after this value of {ital z}. Experimental values of velocity of the current sheet are compared with those of the snow plough theoretical model. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Fusion welding process

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  13. Atomic data for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  14. D5S818 Typing Discrepancy Between PowerPlex(®) Fusion and Other STR Kits Including GlobalFiler(®) Caused by a One-base Deletion in 31 Nucleotides Upstream of the Repeat Region.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Koji; Iwashima, Yasuki; Watahiki, Haruhiko; Mita, Yusuke; Kitayama, Tetsushi; Nakahara, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Natsuko; Sekiguchi, Kazumasa

    2016-05-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) typing is widely used in forensic investigation. When the same DNA sample is analyzed with different STR typing kits, a typing discrepancy is occasionally observed. In this study, we examined the cause of a typing discrepancy in a sample at D5S818 locus. This sample was designated as 10, 12 using Identifiler(®) , Identifiler(®) Plus, GlobalFiler(®) , PowerPlex(®) 16HS, and PowerPlex(®) 18D, but as 9.3, 12 using PowerPlex(®) Fusion. Sequencing results indicated that the shorter allele in the sample had a deletion (U31Tdel) at 31 nucleotides upstream of the repeat region (AGAT)10 . This deletion was located in the binding site of the published D5S818 forward primer in PowerPlex(®) 16 and was only 9 and 11 nucleotides downstream of our estimated 5' end position of D5S818 forward primer in GlobalFiler(®) and PowerPlex(®) 18D, respectively. We also examined the effect of primer length on the heterozygous peak balance in this sample. PMID:27122415

  15. Applications of high-speed dust injection to magnetic fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Li, Yangfang

    2012-08-08

    It is now an established fact that a significant amount of dust is produced in magnetic fusion devices due to plasma-wall interactions. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular for the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and degrade performance. Safety concerns are due to tritium retention, dust radioactivity, toxicity, and flammability. Performance concerns include high-Z impurities carried by dust to the fusion core that can reduce plasma temperature and may even induce sudden termination of the plasma. We have recognized that dust transport, dust-plasma interactions in magnetic fusion devices can be effectively studied experimentally by injection of dust with known properties into fusion plasmas. Other applications of injected dust include diagnosis of fusion plasmas and edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. In diagnostic applications, dust can be regarded as a source of transient neutrals before complete ionization. ELM's pacing is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion machines. Different implementation schemes are available depending on applications of dust injection. One of the simplest dust injection schemes is through gravitational acceleration of dust in vacuum. Experiments at Los Alamos and Princeton will be described, both of which use piezoelectric shakers to deliver dust to plasma. In Princeton experiments, spherical particles (40 micron) have been dropped in a systematic and reproducible manner using a computer-controlled piezoelectric bending actuator operating at an acoustic (0,2) resonance. The circular actuator was constructed with a 2.5 mm diameter central hole. At resonance ({approx} 2 kHz) an applied sinusoidal voltage has been used to control the flux of particles exiting the hole. A simple screw throttle located {approx}1mm above the hole has been used to set the magnitude of the flux achieved for a given

  16. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  17. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  18. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  19. Fusion Concept Exploration Experiments at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart Zweben; Samuel Cohen; Hantao Ji; Robert Kaita; Richard Majeski; Masaaki Yamada

    1999-05-01

    Small ''concept exploration'' experiments have for many years been an important part of the fusion research program at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). this paper describes some of the present and planned fusion concept exploration experiments at PPPL. These experiments are a University-scale research level, in contrast with the larger fusion devices at PPPL such as the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), which are at ''proof-of-principle'' and ''proof-of-performance'' levels, respectively.

  20. Assistive Devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... center provides information on VA benefits for assistive technology. Medicare − Benefits may include assistive devices, such as ... a Web site that provides information about assistive technology products. Go to the “Products” section to find ...

  1. Alternative approaches to fusion. [reactor design and reactor physics for Tokamak fusion reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The limitations of the Tokamak fusion reactor concept are discussed and various other fusion reactor concepts are considered that employ the containment of thermonuclear plasmas by magnetic fields (i.e., stellarators). Progress made in the containment of plasmas in toroidal devices is reported. Reactor design concepts are illustrated. The possibility of using fusion reactors as a power source in interplanetary space travel and electric power plants is briefly examined.

  2. Comparison of Options for a Pilot Plant Fusion Nuclear Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T; Goldston, R J; El-Guebaly, L; Kessel, C; Neilson, G H; Malang, S; Menard, J E; Prager, S; Waganer, L; Titus, P; Zarnstorff, M

    2012-08-27

    A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The pilot plant mission encompassed component test and fusion nuclear science missions plus the requirement to produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. Three magnetic configuration options were developed around this mission: the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS). With the completion of the study and separate documentation of each design option a question can now be posed; how do the different designs compare with each other as candidates for meeting the pilot plant mission? In a pro/con format this paper will examine the key arguments for and against the AT, ST and CS magnetic configurations. Key topics addressed include: plasma parameters, device configurations, size and weight comparisons, diagnostic issues, maintenance schemes, availability influences and possible test cell arrangement schemes.

  3. Fusion of the ear bones

    MedlinePlus

    Fusion of the ear bones is the joining of the bones of the inner ear. These are the incus, malleus, and stapes bones. Related topics include: Chronic ear infection Otosclerosis Middle ear malformations

  4. History of Nuclear Fusion Research in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Harukazu; Matsuoka, Keisuke; Kimura, Kazue; Namba, Chusei; Matsuda, Shinzaburo

    In the late 1950s just after the atomic energy research was opened worldwide, there was a lively discussion among scientists on the strategy of nuclear fusion research in Japan. Finally, decision was made that fusion research should be started from the basic, namely, research on plasma physics and from cultivation of human resources at universities under the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (MOE). However, an endorsement was given that construction of an experimental device for fusion research would be approved sooner or later. Studies on toroidal plasma confinement started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) under the Science and Technology Agency (STA) in the mid-1960s. Dualistic fusion research framework in Japan was established. This structure has lasted until now. Fusion research activities over the last 50 years are described by the use of a flowchart, which is convenient to glance the historical development of fusion research in Japan.

  5. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  6. Multimodal options for materials research to advance the basis for fusion energy in the ITER era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Möslang, A.; Muroga, T.; Tanigawa, H.

    2013-10-01

    Well-coordinated international fusion materials research on multiple fundamental feasibility issues can serve an important role during the next ten years. Due to differences in national timelines and fusion device concepts, a parallel-track (multimodal) approach is currently being used for developing fusion energy. An overview is given of the current state-of-the-art of major candidate materials systems for next-step fusion reactors, including a summary of existing knowledge regarding operating temperature and neutron irradiation fluence limits due to high-temperature strength and radiation damage considerations, coolant compatibility information, and current industrial manufacturing capabilities. There are two inter-related overarching objectives of fusion materials research to be performed in the next decade: (1) understanding materials science phenomena in the demanding DT fusion energy environment, and (2) application of this knowledge to develop and qualify materials to provide the basis for next-step facility construction authorization by funding agencies and public safety licensing authorities. The critical issues and prospects for development of high-performance fusion materials are discussed along with recent research results and planned activities of the international materials research community.

  7. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  8. A program toward a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebut, P.-H.; Watkins, M. L.; Gambier, D. J.; Boucher, D.

    1991-08-01

    Near breakeven conditions have been attained in the JET tokamak [Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)], with beryllium as the first-wall material. A fusion triple product (nDτETi) of 8-9×1020 m-3 sec keV has been reached (within a factor of 8 of that required in a fusion reactor). However, this has only been achieved transiently. At high heating powers, an influx of impurities still limits the achievement of better performance and steady-state operation. In parallel, an improved quantitative understanding of fusion plasmas has emerged from the development of a particular plasma model. Good quantitative agreement is obtained between the model and JET data. The main predictions are also consistent with statistical scaling laws. With such a model, a predictive capability begins to emerge to define the parameters and operating conditions of a DEMO, including impurity levels. Present experimental results and model predictions suggest that impurity dilution is a major threat to a reactor. A divertor concept must be developed further to ensure impurity control before a DEMO can be constructed. A New Phase for JET is planned in which an axisymmetric pumped divertor configuration will be used to address the problems of impurity control, plasma fueling, and helium ash exhaust. It should demonstrate a concept of impurity control and the operational domain for such a device. A single Next Step facility (ITER) is a high risk strategy in terms of physics, technology, and management, since it does not provide a sufficiently sound foundation for a DEMO. A Next Step program is proposed, which could comprise several complementary facilities, each optimized with respect to specific clear objectives. In a minimum program, there could be two Next Step tokamaks, and a Materials Test Facility. Such a program would allow division of effort and sharing of risk across the various scientific and technical problems, permit cross comparison, and ensure continuity of results. It could even be

  9. Fusion reactor nucleonics: status and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.; Engholm, B.A.; Dudziak, D.J.; Haight, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The national fusion technology effort has made a good start at addressing the basic nucleonics issues, but only a start. No fundamental nucleonics issues are seen as insurmountable barriers to the development of commercial fusion power. To date the fusion nucleonics effort has relied almost exclusively on other programs for nuclear data and codes. But as we progress through and beyond ETF type design studies the fusion program will need to support a broad based nucleonics effort including code development, sensitivity studies, integral experiments, data acquisition etc. It is clear that nucleonics issues are extremely important to fusion development and that we have only scratched the surface.

  10. [Recent Advances of Biomechanical Studies on Cervical Fusion and Non-fusion Surgery].

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhenhua; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-02-01

    This article reviews the progress of biomechanical studies on anterior cervical fusion and non-fusion surgery in recent years. The similarities and differences between animal and human cervical spines as well as the major three biomechanical test methods are introduced. Major progresses of biomechanical evaluation in anterior cervical fusion and non-fusion devices, hybrid surgery, coupled motion and biomechanical parameters, such as the instant center of rotation, are classified and summarized. Future development of loading method, multilevel hybrid surgery and coupling character are also discussed. PMID:27382760

  11. Selectively detail-enhanced fusion of differently exposed images with moving objects.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengguo; Zheng, Jinghong; Zhu, Zijian; Wu, Shiqian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce an exposure fusion scheme for differently exposed images with moving objects. The proposed scheme comprises a ghost removal algorithm in a low dynamic range domain and a selectively detail-enhanced exposure fusion algorithm. The proposed ghost removal algorithm includes a bidirectional normalization-based method for the detection of nonconsistent pixels and a two-round hybrid method for the correction of nonconsistent pixels. Our detail-enhanced exposure fusion algorithm includes a content adaptive bilateral filter, which extracts fine details from all the corrected images simultaneously in gradient domain. The final image is synthesized by selectively adding the extracted fine details to an intermediate image that is generated by fusing all the corrected images via an existing multiscale algorithm. The proposed exposure fusion algorithm allows fine details to be exaggerated while existing exposure fusion algorithms do not provide such an option. The proposed scheme usually outperforms existing exposure fusion schemes when there are moving objects in real scenes. In addition, the proposed ghost removal algorithm is simpler than existing ghost removal algorithms and is suitable for mobile devices with limited computational resource. PMID:25148667

  12. Beam limiter for thermonuclear fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Kaminsky, Manfred S.

    1976-01-01

    A beam limiter circumscribes the interior surface of a vacuum vessel to inhibit collisions of contained plasma and the vessel walls. The cross section of the material making up the limiter has a flatsided or slightly concave portion of increased width towards the plasma and portions of decreased width towards the interior surface of the vessel. This configuration is designed to prevent a major fraction of the material sputtered, vaporized and blistered from the limiter from reaching the plasma. It also allows adequate heat transfer from the wider to the narrower portions. The preferred materials for the beam limiter are solids of sintered, particulate materials of low atomic number with low vapor pressure and low sputtering and blistering yields.

  13. Fusion Blanket Development in FDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. P. C.; Smith, J. P.; Stambaugh, R. D.

    2008-11-01

    To satisfy the electricity and tritium self-sufficiency missions of a Fusion Development Facility (FDF), suitable blanket designs will need to be evaluated, selected and developed. To demonstrate closure of the fusion fuel cycle, 2-3 main tritium breeding blankets will be used to cover most of the available chamber surface area in order to reach the project goal of achieving a tritium breeding ratio, TBR > 1. To demonstrate the feasibility of electricity and tritium production for subsequent devices such as the fusion demonstration power reactor (DEMO), several advanced test blankets will need to be selected and tested on the FDF to demonstrate high coolant outlet temperature necessary for efficient electricity production. Since the design goals for the main and test blankets are different, the design criteria of these blankets will also be different. The considerations in performing the evaluation of blanket and structural material options in concert with the maintenance approach for the FDF will be reported in this paper.

  14. Overview of University of Wisconsin Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, J.F.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Ashley, R.P.; Boris, D.R.; Cipiti, B.B.; Murali, S. Krupakar; Piefer, G.R.; Radel, R.F.; Radel, T.E.; Wehmeyer, A.L.

    2005-05-15

    In Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) devices, a voltage difference between concentric, nearly transparent spherical grids accelerates ions to fusion-relevant velocities. The University of Wisconsin (UW) operates two IEC devices: a cylindrical aluminum chamber and a spherical, water-cooled, stainless-steel chamber, with a power supply capable of 75 mA and 200 kV. The research program aims to generate fusion reaction products for various applications, including protons for creating radioisotopes for nuclear medicine and neutrons for detecting clandestine materials. Most IEC devices worldwide, including the UW devices, presently operate primarily in a pressure range (1-10 mtorr) that allows ions to make only a few passes through the core before they charge exchange and lose substantial energy or they collide with cathode grid wires. It is believed that fusion rates can be raised by operating at a pressure where neutral gas does not impede ion flow, and a helicon ion source has been developed to explore operation at pressures of {approx}0.05 mtorr. The UW IEC research group uses proton detectors, neutron detectors, residual gas analyzers, and spectroscopic diagnostics. New diagnostic techniques have also been developed, including eclipse disks to localize proton production and chordwires to estimate ion fluxes using power balance.

  15. Measuring D(d,p)T fusion reactant energy spectra with Doppler shifted fusion products

    SciTech Connect

    Boris, D. R.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.; Donovan, D. C.; Piefer, G. R.

    2010-06-15

    Deuterium fusion reactant energy spectra have been measured using a diagnostic that records the Doppler shift imparted to charged particle fusion products of the D(d,p)T reaction by the center-of-mass velocity of the deuterium reactants. This diagnostic, known as the fusion ion Doppler shift diagnostic (FIDO) measures fast deuterium energy spectra in the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) experiment at the University of Wisconsin-Madison {l_brace}Santarius et al. [Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]{r_brace}, a device to confine high energy light ions in a spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well. This article details the first measurements of the fusion reactant energy spectra in an IEC device as well as the design and principles of operation of the FIDO diagnostic. Scaling of reactant energy spectra with a variety of experimental parameters have been explored.

  16. Laser fusion monthly -- August 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-08-01

    This report documents the monthly progress for the laser fusion research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First it gives facilities report for both the Shiva and Argus projects. Topics discussed include; laser system for the Nova Project; the fusion experiments analysis facility; optical/x-ray streak camera; Shiva Dante System temporal response; 2{omega}{sub 0} experiment; and planning for an ICF engineering test facility.

  17. Purdue Contribution of Fusion Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Brooks

    2011-09-30

    The overall science goal of the FSP is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in research related to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical areas: 1) the plasma edge and 2) whole device modeling including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model (WDM) will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP. The FSP plan targets the needed modeling capabilities by developing Integrated Science Applications (ISAs) specific to their needs. The Pedestal-Boundary model will include boundary magnetic topology, cross-field transport of multi-species plasmas, parallel plasma transport, neutral transport, atomic physics and interactions with the plasma wall

  18. Class III viral membrane fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Backovic, Marija

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Accumulating structural studies of viral fusion glycoproteins have revealed unanticipated structural relationships between unrelated virus families and allowed the grouping of these membrane fusogens into three distinct classes. Here we review the newly identified group of class III viral fusion proteins, whose members include fusion proteins from rhabdoviruses, herpesviruses and baculoviruses. While clearly related in structure, the class III viral fusion proteins exhibit distinct structural features in their architectures as well as in their membrane-interacting fusion loops, which are likely related to their virus-specific differences in cellular entry. Further study of the similarities and differences in the class III viral fusion glycoproteins may provide greater insights into protein:membrane interactions that are key to promoting efficient bilayer fusion during virus entry. PMID:19356922

  19. Image fusion and navigation platforms for percutaneous image-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Manoj; Venkatesan, Aradhana M

    2016-04-01

    Image-guided interventional procedures, particularly image guided biopsy and ablation, serve an important role in the care of the oncology patient. The need for tumor genomic and proteomic profiling, early tumor response assessment and confirmation of early recurrence are common scenarios that may necessitate successful biopsies of targets, including those that are small, anatomically unfavorable or inconspicuous. As image-guided ablation is increasingly incorporated into interventional oncology practice, similar obstacles are posed for the ablation of technically challenging tumor targets. Navigation tools, including image fusion and device tracking, can enable abdominal interventionalists to more accurately target challenging biopsy and ablation targets. Image fusion technologies enable multimodality fusion and real-time co-displays of US, CT, MRI, and PET/CT data, with navigational technologies including electromagnetic tracking, robotic, cone beam CT, optical, and laser guidance of interventional devices. Image fusion and navigational platform technology is reviewed in this article, including the results of studies implementing their use for interventional procedures. Pre-clinical and clinical experiences to date suggest these technologies have the potential to reduce procedure risk, time, and radiation dose to both the patient and the operator, with a valuable role to play for complex image-guided interventions. PMID:26826086

  20. Basics of Fusion-Fissison Research Facility (FFRF) as a Fusion Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid E. Zakharov

    2011-06-03

    FFRF, standing for the Fusion-Fission Research Facility represents an option for the next step project of ASIPP (Hefei, China) aiming to a first fusion-fission multifunctional device [1]. FFRF strongly relies on new, Lithium Wall Fusion plasma regimes, the development of which has already started in the US and China. With R/a=4/1m/m, Ipl=5 MA, Btor=4-6 T, PDT=50- 100 MW, Pfission=80-4000MW, 1 m thick blanket, FFRF has a unique fusion mission of a stationary fusion neutron source. Its pioneering mission of merging fusion and fission consists in accumulation of design, experimental, and operational data for future hybrid applications.

  1. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the sizemore » of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.« less

  2. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the size of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.

  3. Operating large controlled thermonuclear fusion research facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Tarrh, J.M.; Post, R.S.; Thomas, P.

    1987-10-01

    The MIT Tara Tandem Mirror is a large, state of the art controlled thermonuclear fusion research facility. Over the six years of its design, implementation, and operation, every effort was made to minimize cost and maximize performance by using the best and latest hardware, software, and scientific and operational techniques. After reviewing all major DOE fusion facilities, an independent DOE review committee concluded that the Tara operation was the most automated and efficient of all DOE facilities. This paper includes a review of the key elements of the Tara design, construction, operation, management, physics milestones, and funding that led to this success. We emphasize a chronological description of how the system evolved from the proposal stage to a mature device with an emphasis on the basic philosophies behind the implementation process. This description can serve both as a qualitative and quantitative database for future large experiment planning. It includes actual final costs and manpower spent as well as actual run and maintenance schedules, number of data shots, major system failures, etc. The paper concludes with recommendations for the next generation of facilities. 13 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Concept of DT fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Anan'ev, S.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Kuteev, B.V.; Cherkez, D.I.; Shirnin, P.N.; Kazakovsky, N.T.

    2015-03-15

    A concept of DT-fusion neutron source (FNS) with the neutron yield higher than 10{sup 18} neutrons per second is under design in Russia. Such a FNS is of interest for many applications: 1) basic and applied research (neutron scattering, etc); 2) testing the structural materials for fusion reactors; 3) control of sub-critical nuclear systems and 4) nuclear waste processing (including transmutation of minor actinides). This paper describes the fuel cycle concept of a compact fusion neutron source based on a small spherical tokamak (FNS-ST) with a MW range of DT fusion power and considers the key physics issues of this device. The major and minor radii are ∼0.5 and ∼0.3 m, magnetic field ∼1.5 T, heating power less than 15 MW and plasma current 1-2 MA. The system provides the fuel mixture with equal fractions of D and T (D:T = 1:1) for all FNS technology systems. (authors)

  5. Fluid sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studenick, D. K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inlet leak is described for sampling gases, more specifically, for selectively sampling multiple fluids. This fluid sampling device includes a support frame. A plurality of fluid inlet devices extend through the support frame and each of the fluid inlet devices include a longitudinal aperture. An opening device that is responsive to a control signal selectively opens the aperture to allow fluid passage. A closing device that is responsive to another control signal selectively closes the aperture for terminating further fluid flow.

  6. Integrated Simulation and Optimization of Fusion Systems: the Fusion Simulation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Donald B.

    2004-05-01

    Advanced experimental devices for fusion energy research are very large in the $1B class, the next major step being construction of ITER, a tokamak device capable of producing several hundred megawatts of fusion power. The plasmas in such devices are extremely far from thermal equilibrium and support a vast number of physical processes that must be controlled and coordinated to successfully achieve the conditions required for fusion. Simulation is a key element in the research program needed to understand experimental results from devices and compare these results to theory, to plan and design experiments on the devices, and to invent and evaluate new, higher performing confinement concepts. There are a number of fundamental computational challenges in such simulation: extreme range of time scales - wall equilibration time/electron cyclotron time O(10^14), extreme range of space scales - machine radius/electron gyroradius O(10^4), extreme plasma anisotropy - mean free path in magnetic field parallel/perpendicular O(10^10), strong non-linear coupling, sensitivity to geometric details, and high dimensionality. To deal with this challenge, several classes of fusion physics sub-disciplines and related simulation codes have been developed. There is not at present a single code, or code set, that integrates these sub-disciplines in their generality. The talk will describe the various approaches to fusion plasma simulation and progress toward bringing together the various models so as to treat the plasma more self-consistently. In particular, the fusion community is planning a comprehensive Fusion Simulation Project (FSP) whose ultimate goal ( 15 years) is to predict reliably the behavior of plasma discharges in toroidal magnetic fusion devices on all relevant time and space scales.

  7. Experiences with a Barista Robot, FusionBot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbu, Dilip Kumar; Tan, Yeow Kee; Wong, Chern Yuen; Jiang, Ridong; Wu, Hengxin; Li, Liyuan; Kah, Eng Hoe; Yu, Xinguo; Li, Dong; Li, Haizhou

    In this paper, we describe the implemented service robot, called FusionBot. The goal of this research is to explore and demonstrate the utility of an interactive service robot in a smart home environment, thereby improving the quality of human life. The robot has four main features: 1) speech recognition, 2) object recognition, 3) object grabbing and fetching and 4) communication with a smart coffee machine. Its software architecture employs a multimodal dialogue system that integrates different components, including spoken dialog system, vision understanding, navigation and smart device gateway. In the experiments conducted during the TechFest 2008 event, the FusionBot successfully demonstrated that it could autonomously serve coffee to visitors on their request. Preliminary survey results indicate that the robot has potential to not only aid in the general robotics but also contribute towards the long term goal of intelligent service robotics in smart home environment.

  8. Distributed multi-sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffel, Peter; Fish, Robert; Knobler, Ron; Plummer, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    McQ has developed a broad based capability to fuse information in a geographic area from multiple sensors to build a better understanding of the situation. The paper will discuss the fusion architecture implemented by McQ to use many sensors and share their information. This multi sensor fusion architecture includes data sharing and analysis at the individual sensor, at communications nodes that connect many sensors together, at the system server/user interface, and across multi source information available through networked services. McQ will present a data fusion architecture that integrates a "Feature Information Base" (FIB) with McQ's well known Common Data Interchange Format (CDIF) data structure. The distributed multi sensor fusion provides enhanced situation awareness for the user.

  9. Gasdynamic mirror fusion propulsion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emrich, William J.

    2001-02-01

    Nuclear fusion appears to be the most promising concept for producing extremely high specific impulse rocket engines. One particular fusion concept which seems to be particularly well suited for fusion propulsion applications is the gasdynamic mirror (GDM). This device would operate at much higher plasma densities and with much larger L/D ratios than previous mirror machines. Several advantages accrue from such a design. First, the high L/D ratio minimizes to a large extent certain magnetic curvature effects which lead to plasma instabilities causing a loss of plasma confinement. Second, the high plasma density will result in the plasma behaving much more like a conventional fluid with a mean free path shorter than the length of the device. This characteristic helps reduce problems associated with ``loss cone'' microinstabilities. An experimental GDM device is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to provide an initial assessment of the feasibility of this type of propulsion system. Initial experiments are expected to commence in the late fall of 2000. .

  10. Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear fusion appears to be the most promising concept for producing extremely high specific impulse rocket engines. One particular fusion concept which seems to be particularly well suited for fusion propulsion applications is the gasdynamic mirror (GDM). This device would operate at much higher plasma densities and with much larger LD ratios than previous mirror machines. Several advantages accrue from such a design. First, the high LA:) ratio minimizes to a large extent certain magnetic curvature effects which lead to plasma instabilities causing a loss of plasma confinement. Second, the high plasma density will result in the plasma behaving much more Re a conventional fluid with a mean free path shorter than the length of the device. This characteristic helps reduce problems associated with "loss cone" microinstabilities. An experimental GDM device is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to provide an initial assessment of the feasibility of this type of propulsion system. Initial experiments are expected to commence in the late fall of 2000.

  11. 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    It is a great honor to receive the 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize, here at the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. On behalf of everyone involved in this work, I would like to thank the IAEA, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, the IOP, and specifically Mitsuru Kikuchi, for their support of this important award. I would also like to acknowledge the many important contributions made by the other ten papers nominated for this prize. Our paper investigates the physics of the H-mode pedestal in tokamaks, specifically the development of a predictive understanding of the pedestal structure based on electromagnetic instabilities which constrain it, and the testing of the resulting theoretical model (EPED) against detailed observations on multiple devices. In addition to making pedestal predictions for existing devices, the paper also presents predictions for ITER, including methods for optimizing its pedestal height and fusion performance. What made this work possible, and indeed a pleasure to be involved with, was an extensive set of collaborations, including theory-experiment, multi-institutional, and international collaborations. Many of these collaborations have gone on for over a decade, and have been fostered in part by the ITPA Pedestal Group. The eight authors of this paper, from five institutions, all made important contributions. Rich Groebner, Tom Osborne and Tony Leonard carried out dedicated experiments and data analysis on the DIII-D tokamak, testing the EPED model over a very wide range of parameters. Jerry Hughes led dedicated experiments on Alcator C-Mod which tested the model at high magnetic field and pedestal pressure. Marc Beurskens carried out experiments and data analysis on the JET tokamak, testing the model at large scale. Xueqiao Xu conducted two-fluid studies of diamagnetic stabilization, which enabled a more accurate treatment of this important effect. Finally, Howard Wilson and I have been working together for many years to develop analytic formalism

  12. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  13. Organotypic three-dimensional culture model of mesenchymal and epithelial cells to examine tissue fusion events.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tissue fusion during early mammalian development requires coordination of multiple cell types, the extracellular matrix, and complex signaling pathways. Fusion events during processes including heart development, neural tube closure, and palatal fusion are dependent on signaling ...

  14. Cleaning devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Horst W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Cleaning devices are described which include a vacuum cleaner nozzle with a sharp rim for directing incoming air down against the floor; a vacuum cleaner wherein electrostatically charged brushes that brush dirt off a floor, are electrically grounded to remove charges that could tend to hold dirt to the brushes; a vacuum cleaner head having slots that form a pair of counter-rotating vortices, and that includes an outlet that blows a stream of air at the floor region which lies between the vortices; a cleaning device that sweeps a group of brushes against the ground along a first direction, and then sweeps them along the same ground area but in a second direction angled from the first by an amount such as 90.degree., to sweep up particles lying in crevices extending along any direction; a device that gently cleans a surface to remove bacteria for analysis, including an inclined wall along which cleaning fluid flows onto the surface, a vacuum chamber for drawing in the cleaning fluid, and a dividing wall spaced slightly from the surface to separate the fluid source from the vacuum cleaner chamber; and a device for providing pulses of pressured air including a chamber to which pressured air is supplied, a ball that circulates around the chamber to repeatedly close an outlet, and an air source that directs air circumferentially to move the ball around the chamber.

  15. Detection device

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber, (2) a central chamber, and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  16. Detection device

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  17. Fusion breeder: its potential role and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The fusion breeder is a concept that utilizes 14 MeV neutrons from D + T ..-->.. n(14.1 MeV) + ..cap alpha..(3.5 MeV) fusion reactions to produce more fuel than the tritium (T) needed to sustain the fusion process. This excess fuel production capacity is used to produce fissile material (Pu-239 or U-233) for subsequent use in fission reactors. We are concentrating on a class of blankets we call fission suppressed. The blanket is the region surrounding the fusion plasma in which fusion neutrons interact to produce fuel and heat. The fission-suppressed blanket uses non-fission reactions (mainly (n,2n) or (n,n't)) to generate excess neutrons for the production of net fuel. This is in contrast to the fast fission class of blankets which use (n,fiss) reactions to generate excess neutrons. Fusion reactors with fast fission blankets are commony known as fusion-fission hybrids because they combine fusion and fission in the same device.

  18. Super-diffusion scalings - space versus fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Sergey; Budaev, Vyacheslav; Silin, Victor

    2016-07-01

    In the plasma kinetics, looking at the plasma waves interactions with the particles, most people use the Boltzman nonlinear approach for a variate of the waves, which could be interpreted as a "turbulence". We have now a theory for ion-sound turbulence [Silin e. a., 2011] that predicts fast heating of the ions: it can be either in fusion devices , magnetosphere or solar plasma. The ion heating could result into the power lowers for the turbulent spectra. We compare the theory predictions with the experimental data both from the fusion laboratory devices and from space plasma data, discussing their applicability to the solar plasma.

  19. Background: Energy's holy grail. [The quest for controlled fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-22

    This article presents a brief history of the pursuit and development of fusion as a power source. Starting with the 1950s through the present, the research efforts of the US and other countries is highlighted, including a chronology of hey developments. Other topics discussed include cold fusion and magnetic versus inertial fusion issues.

  20. Multiscale medical image fusion in wavelet domain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajiv; Khare, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Wavelet transforms have emerged as a powerful tool in image fusion. However, the study and analysis of medical image fusion is still a challenging area of research. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a multiscale fusion of multimodal medical images in wavelet domain. Fusion of medical images has been performed at multiple scales varying from minimum to maximum level using maximum selection rule which provides more flexibility and choice to select the relevant fused images. The experimental analysis of the proposed method has been performed with several sets of medical images. Fusion results have been evaluated subjectively and objectively with existing state-of-the-art fusion methods which include several pyramid- and wavelet-transform-based fusion methods and principal component analysis (PCA) fusion method. The comparative analysis of the fusion results has been performed with edge strength (Q), mutual information (MI), entropy (E), standard deviation (SD), blind structural similarity index metric (BSSIM), spatial frequency (SF), and average gradient (AG) metrics. The combined subjective and objective evaluations of the proposed fusion method at multiple scales showed the effectiveness and goodness of the proposed approach. PMID:24453868

  1. Fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989 to 1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R and D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R and D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  2. Fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  3. Radiation hardening of diagnostics for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, J.F.; Engholm, B.A.; Hacker, M.P.; Maya, I.; Miller, P.H.; Toffolo, W.E.; Wojtowicz, S.S.

    1981-12-01

    A list of the diagnostic systems presently used in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is compiled herein. The radiation-sensitive components are identified, and their locations in zones around the machine are indicated. A table of radiation sensitivities of components is included to indicate the data available from previous work in fission reactor, space probe, and defense-related programs. Extrapolation and application to hardening of fusion diagnostic systems requires additional data that are more specific to the fusion radiation environment and fusion components. A list is also given of present radiation-producing facilities where near-term screening tests of materials and components can be performed.

  4. A review of pulse fusion propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassenti, Brice N.

    2002-01-01

    During the last forty years there has been considerable interest in both internal and external pulse propulsion systems. Over this time the nuclear devices being considered have grown considerably smaller than those initially examined. Now pellets are normally in the range from 15 cm down to 2 cm in diameter, and fusion devices are generally preferred. High energy density triggers (such as lasers, particle beams or antiprotons) have been considered for detonating the fusion fuel. When antiprotons are considered it is more efficient to annihilate the antiprotons in a fissionable material, and then use the energy from the fission reaction to drive the fusion reaction in the pellet, than to use the annihilation energy directly. Finally, fissionable material can be used to boost the performance of a fusion system. The early concepts, which used critical mass devices, do not satisfy the ban on nuclear weapons in space, and are only rarely considered today. Concepts based on inertial confinement fusion are heavier than those that use antiprotons for the trigger since the mass associated with the lasers, or particle beams and their power supplies are considerably heavier than the traps used for antiprotons. Hence, from a performance, and even a political, point of view the antiproton-triggered approach is the most desirable, but it also requires more development. Not only is the trigger lighter but an external pulse propulsion rocket does not necessarily need radiators to reject excess heat and, hence, can be even lighter. Propulsion systems based on critical mass devices are clearly feasible, so the primary problem is to reduce the size of the explosive devices so that a critical mass is not required. If pulse nuclear fusion propulsion can become a reality then the performance is enough to complete manned missions to the inner planets in weeks and the outer planets in months. .

  5. Energetic particle physics in fusion research in preparation for burning plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Pinches, S. D.; Toi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics in fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by Heidbrink and Sadler (1994 Nucl. Fusion 34 535). That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the ‘sea’ of Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs), in particular by the toroidicity-induced AE (TAE) modes and reversed shear AEs (RSAEs). In the present paper we attempt a broad review of the progress that has been made in EP physics in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus), including stellarator/helical devices. Introductory discussions on the basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e., particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others, are given to help understanding of the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues related to the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  6. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  7. LIFE: a sustainable solution for developing safe, clean fusion power.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Susana; Dunne, Mike; Kramer, Kevin; Anklam, Tom; Havstad, Mark; Mazuecos, Antonio Lafuente; Miles, Robin; Martinez-Frias, Joel; Deri, Bob

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in California is currently in operation with the goal to demonstrate fusion energy gain for the first time in the laboratory-also referred to as "ignition." Based on these demonstration experiments, the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant is being designed at LLNL in partnership with other institutions with the goal to deliver baseload electricity from safe, secure, sustainable fusion power in a time scale that is consistent with the energy market needs. For this purpose, the LIFE design takes advantage of recent advances in diode-pumped, solid-state laser technology and adopts the paradigm of Line Replaceable Units used on the NIF to provide high levels of availability and maintainability and mitigate the need for advanced materials development. The LIFE market entry plant will demonstrate the feasibility of a closed fusion fuel cycle, including tritium breeding, extraction, processing, refueling, accountability, and safety, in a steady-state power-producing device. While many fusion plant designs require large quantities of tritium for startup and operations, a range of design choices made for the LIFE fuel cycle act to reduce the in-process tritium inventory. This paper presents an overview of the delivery plan and the preconceptual design of the LIFE facility with emphasis on the key safety design principles being adopted. In order to illustrate the favorable safety characteristics of the LIFE design, some initial accident analysis results are presented that indicate potential for a more attractive licensing regime than that of current fission reactors. PMID:23629070

  8. Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emrich, Bill

    2000-10-01

    A gasdynamic mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion experiment is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test the feasibility of this particular type of fusion device. Because of the open magnetic field line configuration of mirror fusion devices, they are particularly well suited for propulsion system applications since they allow for the easy ejection of thrust producing plasma. Currently, the MSFC GDM is constructed in three segments. The vacuum chamber mirror segment, the plasma injector mirror segment, and the main plasma chamber segment. Enough magnets are currently available to construct up to three main plasma chamber segments. The mirror segments are also segmented such that they can be expanded to accommodate new end plugging strategies without requiring the disassembly of the entire mirror segment. The plasma for the experiment is generated in a microwave cavity located between the main magnets and the mirror magnets. Ion heating is accomplished through ambipolar diffusion. The objective of the experiment is to investigate the stability characteristics of the gasdynamic mirror and to map a region of parameter space within which the plasma can be confined in a stable steady state configuration. The mirror ratio, plasma density, and plasma ``b" will be varied over a range of values and measurements subsequently taken to determine the degree of plasma stability.

  9. Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, Bill; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A gasdynamic mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion experiment is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test the feasibility of this particular type of fusion device. Because of the open magnetic field line configuration of mirror fusion devices, they are particularly well suited for propulsion system applications since they allow for the easy ejection of thrust producing plasma. Currently, the MSFC GDM is constructed in three segments. The vacuum chamber mirror segment, the plasma injector mirror segment, and the main plasma chamber segment. Enough magnets are currently available to construct up to three main plasma chamber segments. The mirror segments are also segmented such that they can be expanded to accommodate new end plugging strategies with out requiring the disassembly of the entire mirror segment. The plasma for the experiment is generated in a microwave cavity located between the main magnets and the mirror magnets. Ion heating is accomplished through ambipolar diffusion. The objective of the experiment is to investigate the stability characteristics of the gasdynamic mirror and to map a region of parameter space within which the plasma can be confined in a stable steady state configuration. The mirror ratio, plasma density, and plasma "b" will be varied over a range of values and measurements subsequently taken to determine the degree of plasma stability.

  10. Electrochromic device

    SciTech Connect

    Schwendemanm, Irina G.; Polcyn, Adam D.; Finley, James J.; Boykin, Cheri M.; Knowles, Julianna M.

    2011-03-15

    An electrochromic device includes a first substrate spaced from a second substrate. A first conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the first substrate. A first electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the first conductive member. The first electrochromic material includes an organic material. A second conductive member is formed over at least a portion of the second substrate. A second electrochromic material is formed over at least a portion of the second conductive member. The second electrochromic material includes an inorganic material. An ionic liquid is positioned between the first electrochromic material and the second electrochromic material.

  11. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  12. Plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, R. )

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings contains papers on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion. Included are the following topics: Plasma focus and Z-pinch, Review of mirror fusion research, Progress in studies of x-ray and ion-beam emission from plasma focus facilities.

  13. Working with Fusion in Lesbian Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Nicki F.

    The phenomena of fusion within a lesbian relationship is described in a six-phased model. Fusion in relationships is defined as two incomplete people coming together in an attempt to make one more complete whole, the merging of two ego boundaries. The six phases discussed include ecstacy, getting married, the routine, depression/withdrawal,…

  14. Properties of the ion-ion hybrid resonator in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, George J.

    2015-10-06

    The project developed theoretical and numerical descriptions of the properties of ion-ion hybrid Alfvén resonators that are expected to arise in the operation of a fusion reactor. The methodology and theoretical concepts were successfully compared to observations made in basic experiments in the LAPD device at UCLA. An assessment was made of the excitation of resonator modes by energetic alpha particles for burning plasma conditions expected in the ITER device. The broader impacts included the generation of basic insight useful to magnetic fusion and space science researchers, defining new avenues for exploration in basic laboratory experiments, establishing broader contacts between experimentalists and theoreticians, completion of a Ph.D. dissertation, and promotion of interest in science through community outreach events and classroom instruction.

  15. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  16. Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM) Fusion Propulsion Engine Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Gasdynamic Mirror, or GDM, is an example of a magnetic mirror-based fusion propulsion system. Its design is primarily consisting of a long slender solenoid surrounding a vacuum chamber that contains plasma. The bulk of the fusion plasma is confined by magnetic field generated by a series of toroidal-shaped magnets in the center section of the device. the purpose of the GDM Fusion Propulsion Experiment is to confirm the feasibility of the concept and to demonstrate many of the operational characteristics of a full-size plasma can be confined within the desired physical configuration and still reman stable. This image shows an engineer from Propulsion Research Technologies Division at Marshall Space Flight Center inspecting solenoid magnets-A, an integrate part of the Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Engine Experiment.

  17. Results at 24 months from the prospective, randomized, multicenter Investigational Device Exemption trial of ProDisc-C versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with 4-year follow-up and continued access patients

    PubMed Central

    Delamarter, Rick B.; Murrey, Daniel; Janssen, Michael E.; Goldstein, Jeffrey A.; Zigler, Jack; Tay, Bobby K-B; Darden, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Background Cervical total disk replacement (TDR) is intended to address pain and preserve motion between vertebral bodies in patients with symptomatic cervical disk disease. Two-year follow-up for the ProDisc-C (Synthes USA Products, LLC, West Chester, Pennsylvania) TDR clinical trial showed non-inferiority versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), showing superiority in many clinical outcomes. We present the 4-year interim follow-up results. Methods Patients were randomized (1:1) to ProDisc-C (PDC-R) or ACDF. Patients were assessed preoperatively, and postoperatively at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 48 months. After the randomized portion, continued access (CA) patients also underwent ProDisc-C implantation, with follow-up visits up to 24 months. Evaluations included Neck Disability Index (NDI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain/satisfaction, and radiographic and physical/neurologic examinations. Results Randomized patients (103 PDC-R and 106 ACDF) and 136 CA patients were treated at 13 sites. VAS pain and NDI score improvements from baseline were significant for all patients (P < .0001) but did not differ among groups. VAS satisfaction was higher at all time points for PDC-R versus ACDF patients (P = .0499 at 48 months). The percentage of patients who responded yes to surgery again was 85.6% at 24 months and 88.9% at 48 months in the PDC-R group, 80.9% at 24 months and 81.0% at 48 months in the ACDF group, and 86.3% at 24 months in the CA group. Five PDC-R patients (48 months) and no CA patients (24 months) had index-level bridging bone. By 48 months, approximately 4-fold more ACDF patients required secondary surgery (3 of 103 PDC-R patients [2.9%] vs 12 of 106 ACDF patients [11.3%], P = .0292). Of these, 6 ACDF patients (5.6%) required procedures at adjacent levels. Three CA patients required secondary procedures (24 months). Conclusions Our 4-year data support that ProDisc-C TDR and ACDF are viable surgical options for symptomatic cervical

  18. Mitochondrial Fusion Is Essential for Steroid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Mariana; Soria, Gastón; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Podestá, Ernesto J.

    2012-01-01

    Although the contribution of mitochondrial dynamics (a balance in fusion/fission events and changes in mitochondria subcellular distribution) to key biological process has been reported, the contribution of changes in mitochondrial fusion to achieve efficient steroid production has never been explored. The mitochondria are central during steroid synthesis and different enzymes are localized between the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum to produce the final steroid hormone, thus suggesting that mitochondrial fusion might be relevant for this process. In the present study, we showed that the hormonal stimulation triggers mitochondrial fusion into tubular-shaped structures and we demonstrated that mitochondrial fusion does not only correlate-with but also is an essential step of steroid production, being both events depend on PKA activity. We also demonstrated that the hormone-stimulated relocalization of ERK1/2 in the mitochondrion, a critical step during steroidogenesis, depends on mitochondrial fusion. Additionally, we showed that the SHP2 phosphatase, which is required for full steroidogenesis, simultaneously modulates mitochondrial fusion and ERK1/2 localization in the mitochondrion. Strikingly, we found that mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) expression, a central protein for mitochondrial fusion, is upregulated immediately after hormone stimulation. Moreover, Mfn2 knockdown is sufficient to impair steroid biosynthesis. Together, our findings unveil an essential role for mitochondrial fusion during steroidogenesis. These discoveries highlight the importance of organelles’ reorganization in specialized cells, prompting the exploration of the impact that organelle dynamics has on biological processes that include, but are not limited to, steroid synthesis. PMID:23029265

  19. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    1994-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement, including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; and (3) to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results obtained by the Institute contribute to the progress of nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power as a basic energy source. Close collaborative relationships have been developed with other university and national laboratory fusion groups, both in the US and abroad. In addition to its primary focus on mainstream fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in fusion-sidestream fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, space plasmas and astrophysics, statistical mechanics, fluid dynamics, and accelerator physics. Important research discoveries are briefly described.

  20. Fusion metrics for dynamic situation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik P.; Pribilski, Mike; Daughtery, Bryan; Roscoe, Brian; Gunsett, Josh

    2004-08-01

    To design information fusion systems, it is important to develop metrics as part of a test and evaluation strategy. In many cases, fusion systems are designed to (1) meet a specific set of user information needs (IN), (2) continuously validate information pedigree and updates, and (3) maintain this performance under changing conditions. A fusion system"s performance is evaluated in many ways. However, developing a consistent set of metrics is important for standardization. For example, many track and identification metrics have been proposed for fusion analysis. To evaluate a complete fusion system performance, level 4 sensor management and level 5 user refinement metrics need to be developed simultaneously to determine whether or not the fusion system is meeting information needs. To describe fusion performance, the fusion community needs to agree on a minimum set of metrics for user assessment and algorithm comparison. We suggest that such a minimum set should include feasible metrics of accuracy, confidence, throughput, timeliness, and cost. These metrics can be computed as confidence (probability), accuracy (error), timeliness (delay), throughput (amount) and cost (dollars). In this paper, we explore an aggregate set of metrics for fusion evaluation and demonstrate with information need metrics for dynamic situation analysis.

  1. Viral membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. PMID:25866377

  2. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    importance for the fusion power plant research programmes. The objective of this Technical Meeting was to examine in an integrated way all the safety aspects anticipated to be relevant to the first fusion power plant prototype expected to become operational by the middle of the century, leading to the first generation of economically viable fusion power plants with attractive S&E features. After screening by guest editors and consideration by referees, 13 (out of 28) papers were accepted for publication. They are devoted to the following safety topics: power plant safety; fusion specific operational safety approaches; test blanket modules; accident analysis; tritium safety and inventories; decommissioning and waste. The paper `Main safety issues at the transition from ITER to fusion power plants' by W. Gulden et al (EU) highlights the differences between ITER and future fusion power plants with magnetic confinement (off-site dose acceptance criteria, consequences of accidents inside and outside the design basis, occupational radiation exposure, and waste management, including recycling and/or final disposal in repositories) on the basis of the most recent European fusion power plant conceptual study. Ongoing S&E studies within the US inertial fusion energy (IFE) community are focusing on two design concepts. These are the high average power laser (HAPL) programme for development of a dry-wall, laser-driven IFE power plant, and the Z-pinch IFE programme for the production of an economically-attractive power plant using high-yield Z-pinch-driven targets. The main safety issues related to these programmes are reviewed in the paper `Status of IFE safety and environmental activities in the US' by S. Reyes et al (USA). The authors propose future directions of research in the IFE S&E area. In the paper `Recent accomplishments and future directions in the US Fusion Safety & Environmental Program' D. Petti et al (USA) state that the US fusion programme has long recognized that the S

  3. Electrospray device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmons, Nathaniel (Inventor); Martin, Roy (Inventor); Hruby, Vladimir (Inventor); Roy, Thomas (Inventor); Spence, Douglas (Inventor); Ehrbar, Eric (Inventor); Zwahlen, Jurg (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electrospray device includes an electrospray emitter adapted to receive electrospray fluid; an extractor plate spaced from the electrospray emitter and having at least one aperture; and a power supply for applying a first voltage between the extractor plate and emitter for generating at least one Taylor cone emission through the aperture to create an electrospray plume from the electrospray fluid, the extractor plate as well as accelerator and shaping plates may include a porous, conductive medium for transporting and storing excess, accumulated electrospray fluid away from the aperture.

  4. Tissue fusion over nonadhering surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nier, Vincent; Deforet, Maxime; Duclos, Guillaume; Yevick, Hannah G.; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Marcq, Philippe; Silberzan, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Tissue fusion eliminates physical voids in a tissue to form a continuous structure and is central to many processes in development and repair. Fusion events in vivo, particularly in embryonic development, often involve the purse-string contraction of a pluricellular actomyosin cable at the free edge. However, in vitro, adhesion of the cells to their substrate favors a closure mechanism mediated by lamellipodial protrusions, which has prevented a systematic study of the purse-string mechanism. Here, we show that monolayers can cover well-controlled mesoscopic nonadherent areas much larger than a cell size by purse-string closure and that active epithelial fluctuations are required for this process. We have formulated a simple stochastic model that includes purse-string contractility, tissue fluctuations, and effective friction to qualitatively and quantitatively account for the dynamics of closure. Our data suggest that, in vivo, tissue fusion adapts to the local environment by coordinating lamellipodial protrusions and purse-string contractions. PMID:26199417

  5. Fusion power for space propulsion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R.; Rayle, W.; Reinmann, J.

    1972-01-01

    Principles of operation, interplanetary orbit-to-orbit mission capabilities, technical problems, and environmental safeguards are examined for thermonuclear fusion propulsion systems. Two systems examined include (1) a fusion-electric concept in which kinetic energy of charged particles from the plasma is converted into electric power (for accelerating the propellant in an electrostatic thrustor) by the van de Graaf generator principle and (2) the direct fusion rocket in which energetic plasma lost from the reactor has a suitable amount of added propellant to obtain the optimum exhaust velocity. The deuterium-tritium and the deuterium/helium-3 reactions are considered as suitable candidates, and attention is given to problems of cryogenic refrigeration systems, magnet shielding, and high-energy particle extraction and guidance.

  6. Slow liner fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    {open_quotes}Slow{close_quotes} liner fusion ({approximately}10 ms compression time) implosions are nondestructive and make repetitive ({approximately} 1 Hz) pulsed liner fusion reactors possible. This paper summarizes a General Atomics physics-based fusion reactor study that showed slow liner feasibility, even with conservative open-line axial magnetic field confinement and Bohm radial transport.

  7. Cluster-impact fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Echenique, P.M.; Manson, J.R.; Ritchie, R.H. )

    1990-03-19

    We present a model for the cluster-impact-fusion experiments of Buehler, Friedlander, and Friedman, Calculated fusion rates as a function of bombarding energy for constant cluster size agree well with experiment. The dependence of the fusion rate on cluster size at fixed bombarding energy is explained qualitatively. The role of correlated, coherent collisions in enhanced energy loss by clusters is emphasized.

  8. COLLABORATIVE: FUSION SIMULATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Choong Seock

    2012-06-05

    New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, participated in the “Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) Planning Activities” [http://www.pppl.gov/fsp], with C.S. Chang as the institutional PI. FSP’s mission was to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. Specific institutional goal of the New York University was to participate in the planning of the edge integrated simulation, with emphasis on the usage of large scale HPCs, in connection with the SciDAC CPES project which the PI was leading. New York University successfully completed its mission by participating in the various planning activities, including the edge physics integration, the edge science drivers, and the mathematical verification. The activity resulted in the combined report that can be found in http://www.pppl.gov/fsp/Overview.html. Participation and presentations as part of this project are listed in a separation file.

  9. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    DOEpatents

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  10. The SIGN nail for knee fusion: technique and clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Duane Ray; Anderson, Lucas Aaron; Haller, Justin M.; Feyissa, Abebe Chala

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy of using the SIGN nail for instrumented knee fusion. Methods: Six consecutive patients (seven knees, three males) with an average age of 30.5 years (range, 18–50 years) underwent a knee arthrodesis with SIGN nail (mean follow-up 10.7 months; range, 8–14 months). Diagnoses included tuberculosis (two knees), congenital knee dislocation in two knees (one patient), bacterial septic arthritis (one knee), malunited spontaneous fusion (one knee), and severe gout with 90° flexion contracture (one knee). The nail was inserted through an anteromedial entry point on the femur and full weightbearing was permitted immediately. Results: All knees had clinical and radiographic evidence of fusion at final follow-up and none required further surgery. Four of six patients ambulated without assistive device, and all patients reported improved overall physical function. There were no post-operative complications. Conclusion: The technique described utilizing the SIGN nail is both safe and effective for knee arthrodesis and useful for austere environments with limited fluoroscopy and implant options. PMID:27163095

  11. Seismic data fusion anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrity, Kyle; Blasch, Erik; Alford, Mark; Ezekiel, Soundararajan; Ferris, David

    2014-06-01

    Detecting anomalies in non-stationary signals has valuable applications in many fields including medicine and meteorology. These include uses such as identifying possible heart conditions from an Electrocardiography (ECG) signals or predicting earthquakes via seismographic data. Over the many choices of anomaly detection algorithms, it is important to compare possible methods. In this paper, we examine and compare two approaches to anomaly detection and see how data fusion methods may improve performance. The first approach involves using an artificial neural network (ANN) to detect anomalies in a wavelet de-noised signal. The other method uses a perspective neural network (PNN) to analyze an arbitrary number of "perspectives" or transformations of the observed signal for anomalies. Possible perspectives may include wavelet de-noising, Fourier transform, peak-filtering, etc.. In order to evaluate these techniques via signal fusion metrics, we must apply signal preprocessing techniques such as de-noising methods to the original signal and then use a neural network to find anomalies in the generated signal. From this secondary result it is possible to use data fusion techniques that can be evaluated via existing data fusion metrics for single and multiple perspectives. The result will show which anomaly detection method, according to the metrics, is better suited overall for anomaly detection applications. The method used in this study could be applied to compare other signal processing algorithms.

  12. Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect

    Masayuki Ono

    2012-09-10

    The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (< 0.1%) of lithium fraction in main fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main

  13. Nuclear Chemistry: Include It in Your Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Charles H.; Sheline, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the topics that might be included in a nuclear chemistry section are explored. Offers radioactivity, closed shells in nuclei, energy of nuclear processes, nuclear reactions, and fission and fusion as topics of interest. Provided are ideas and examples for each. (MVL)

  14. 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: Summary Of Sessions EX/C and ICC

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Hawryluk

    2011-01-05

    An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

  15. Advanced fission and fossil plant economics-implications for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Delene, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    In order for fusion energy to be a viable option for electric power generation, it must either directly compete with future alternatives or serve as a reasonable backup if the alternatives become unacceptable. This paper discusses projected costs for the most likely competitors with fusion power for baseload electric capacity and what these costs imply for fusion economics. The competitors examined include advanced nuclear fission and advanced fossil-fired plants. The projected costs and their basis are discussed. The estimates for these technologies are compared with cost estimates for magnetic and inertial confinement fusion plants. The conclusion of the analysis is that fusion faces formidable economic competition. Although the cost level for fusion appears greater than that for fission or fossil, the costs are not so high as to preclude fusion`s potential competitiveness.

  16. Fusion processor simulation (FPSim)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnell, Mark D.; Wynne, Douglas G.; Rahn, Brian J.

    1998-07-01

    The Fusion Processor Simulation (FPSim) is being developed by Rome Laboratory to support the Discrimination Interceptor Technology (DITP) and Advanced Sensor Technology (ASTP) Programs of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization. The purpose of the FPSim is to serve as a test bed and evaluation tool for establishing the feasibility of achieving threat engagement timelines. The FPSim supports the integration, evaluation, and demonstration of different strategies, system concepts, and Acquisition Tracking & Pointing (ATP) subsystems and components. The environment comprises a simulation capability within which users can integrate and test their application software models, algorithms and databases. The FPSim must evolve as algorithm developments mature to support independent evaluation of contractor designs and the integration of a number of fusion processor subsystem technologies. To accomplish this, the simulation contains validated modules, databases, and simulations. It possesses standardized engagement scenarios, architectures and subsystem interfaces, and provides a hardware and software framework which is flexible to support growth, reconfigurration, and simulation component modification and insertion. Key user interaction features include: (1) Visualization of platform status through displays of the surveillance scene as seen by imaging sensors. (2) User-selectable data analysis and graphics display during the simulation execution as well as during post-simulation analysis. (3) Automated, graphical tools to permit the user to reconfigure the FPSim, i.e., 'Plug and Play' various model/software modules. The FPSim is capable of hosting and executing user's software algorithms of image processing, signal processing, subsystems, and functions for evaluation purposes.

  17. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  18. A commercial lunar helium 3 fusion power infrasructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sved, J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Miley, G. H.

    1995-01-01

    The potential scenario of a commercial aneutronic fusion power economy based on Helium 3 is reviewed with recent developments in fusion grade plasma containment considered. The Spherical Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device is a type of fusion reactor with immediate commercial applications as a small non-power reactor. Further development and growth to power reactor fusion reaction rates using Deuterium and Helium 3 offers the potential practical solution to fusion power. Recovery of the lunar Helium 3 inventory for export to power utility customers will require the build-up of a cis-lunar industrial infrastructure. Space transport capacity will be obliged to grow rapidly to support several thousand tons of cargo delivery to the lunar surface per year. A highly reusable, low operations cost cis-lunar transport infrastructure and lunar surface industrial activity will be made more practical by the availability of IEC fusion power units that are intrinsically low mass and compatible with space transport.

  19. The fusion breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1982-10-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the U.S. fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the U.S. fusion program and the U.S. nuclear energy program. There is wide agreement that many approaches will work and will produce fuel for five equal-sized LWRs, and some approach as many as 20 LWRs at electricity costs within 20% of those at today's price of uranium (30/lb of U3O8). The blankets designed to suppress fissioning, called symbiotes, fusion fuel factories, or just fusion breeders, will have safety characteristics more like pure fusion reactors and will support as many as 15 equal power LWRs. The blankets designed to maximize fast fission of fertile material will have safety characteristics more like fission reactors and will support 5 LWRs. This author strongly recommends development of the fission suppressed blanket type, a point of view not agreed upon by everyone. There is, however, wide agreement that, to meet the market price for uranium which would result in LWR electricity within 20% of today's cost with either blanket type, fusion components can cost severalfold more than would be allowed for pure fusion to meet the goal of making electricity alone at 20% over today's fission costs. Also widely agreed is that the critical-path-item for the fusion breeder is fusion development itself; however, development of fusion breeder specific items (blankets, fuel cycle) should be started now in order to have the fusion breeder by the time the rise in uranium prices forces other more costly choices.

  20. Ch. 37, Inertial Fusion Energy Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2010-06-09

    Nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and renewable energy (including biofuels) are the only energy sources capable of satisfying the Earth's need for power for the next century and beyond without the negative environmental impacts of fossil fuels. Substantially increasing the use of nuclear fission and renewable energy now could help reduce dependency on fossil fuels, but nuclear fusion has the potential of becoming the ultimate base-load energy source. Fusion is an attractive fuel source because it is virtually inexhaustible, widely available, and lacks proliferation concerns. It also has a greatly reduced waste impact, and no danger of runaway reactions or meltdowns. The substantial environmental, commercial, and security benefits of fusion continue to motivate the research needed to make fusion power a reality. Replicating the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars to meet Earth's energy needs has been a long-sought scientific and engineering challenge. In fact, this technological challenge is arguably the most difficult ever undertaken. Even after roughly 60 years of worldwide research, much more remains to be learned. the magnitude of the task has caused some to declare that fusion is 20 years away, and always will be. This glib criticism ignores the enormous progress that has occurred during those decades, progress inboth scientific understanding and essential technologies that has enabled experiments producing significant amounts of fusion energy. For example, more than 15 megawatts of fusion power was produced in a pulse of about half a second. Practical fusion power plants will need to produce higher powers averaged over much longer periods of time. In addition, the most efficient experiments to date have required using about 50% more energy than the resulting fusion reaction generated. That is, there was no net energy gain, which is essential if fusion energy is to be a viable source of electricity. The simplest fusion fuels, the heavy isotopes of

  1. Magnetized Target Fusion in Advanced Propulsion Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cylar, Rashad

    2003-01-01

    The Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) Propulsion lab at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama has a program in place that has adopted to attempt to create a faster, lower cost and more reliable deep space transportation system. In this deep space travel the physics and development of high velocity plasma jets must be understood. The MTF Propulsion lab is also in attempt to open up the solar system for human exploration and commercial use. Fusion, as compared to fission, is just the opposite. Fusion involves the light atomic nuclei combination to produce denser nuclei. In the process, the energy is created by destroying the mass according to the distinguished equation: E = mc2 . Fusion energy development is being pursued worldwide as a very sustainable form of energy that is environmentally friendly. For the purposes of space exploration fusion reactions considered include the isotopes of hydrogen-deuterium (D2) and tritium (T3). Nuclei have an electrostatic repulsion between them and in order for the nuclei to fuse this repulsion must be overcome. One technique to bypass repulsion is to heat the nuclei to very high temperatures. The temperatures vary according to the type of reactions. For D-D reactions, one billion degrees Celsius is required, and for D-T reactions, one hundred million degrees is sufficient. There has to be energy input for useful output to be obtained form the fusion To make fusion propulsion practical, the mass, the volume, and the cost of the equipment to produce the reactions (generally called the reactor) need to be reduced by an order of magnitude or two from the state-of-the-art fusion machines. Innovations in fusion schemes are therefore required, especially for obtaining thrust for propulsive applications. Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is one of the innovative fusion concepts that have emerged over the last several years. MSFC is working with Los Alamos National Laboratory and other research groups in studying the

  2. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  3. INTRODUCTION: Status report on fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, Werner

    2005-10-01

    A major milestone on the path to fusion energy was reached in June 2005 on the occasion of the signing of the joint declaration of all parties to the ITER negotiations, agreeing on future arrangements and on the construction site at Cadarache in France. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been promoting fusion activities since the late 1950s; it took over the auspices of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities in 1988, and of the ITER Engineering and Design Activities in 1992. The Agency continues its support to Member States through the organization of consultancies, workshops and technical meetings, the most prominent being the series of International Fusion Energy Conferences (formerly called the International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research). The meetings serve as a platform for experts from all Member States to have open discussions on their latest accomplishments as well as on their problems and eventual solutions. The papers presented at the meetings and conferences are routinely published, many being sent to the journal it Nuclear Fusion, co-published monthly by Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol, UK. The journal's reputation is reflected in the fact that it is a world-renowned publication, and the International Fusion Research Council has used it for the publication of a Status Report on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion in 1978 and 1990. This present report marks the conclusion of the preparatory phases of ITER activities. It provides background information on the progress of fusion research within the last 15 years. The International Fusion Research Council (IFRC), which initiated the report, was fully aware of the complexities of including all scientific results in just one paper, and so decided to provide an overview and extensive references for the interested reader who need not necessarily be a fusion specialist. Professor Predhiman K. Kaw, Chairman, prepared the report on behalf of the IFRC, reflecting

  4. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  5. RF accelerators for fusion and strategic defense

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    RF linacs have a place in fusion, either in an auxiliary role for materials testing or for direct drivers in heavy-ion fusion. For SDI, the particle-beam technology is an attractive candidate for discrimination missions and also for lethality missions. The free-electron laser is also a forerunner among the laser candidates. in many ways, there is less physics development required for these devices and there is an existing high-power technology. But in all of these technologies, in order to scale them up and then space-base them, there is an enormous amount of work yet to be done.

  6. Visual sensor fusion for active security in robotic industrial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robla, Sandra; Llata, Jose R.; Torre-Ferrero, Carlos; Sarabia, Esther G.; Becerra, Victor; Perez-Oria, Juan

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a method of information fusion involving data captured by both a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and a time-of-flight (ToF) camera to be used in the detection of the proximity between a manipulator robot and a human. Both cameras are assumed to be located above the work area of an industrial robot. The fusion of colour images and time-of-flight information makes it possible to know the 3D localization of objects with respect to a world coordinate system. At the same time, this allows to know their colour information. Considering that ToF information given by the range camera contains innacuracies including distance error, border error, and pixel saturation, some corrections over the ToF information are proposed and developed to improve the results. The proposed fusion method uses the calibration parameters of both cameras to reproject 3D ToF points, expressed in a common coordinate system for both cameras and a robot arm, in 2D colour images. In addition to this, using the 3D information, the motion detection in a robot industrial environment is achieved, and the fusion of information is applied to the foreground objects previously detected. This combination of information results in a matrix that links colour and 3D information, giving the possibility of characterising the object by its colour in addition to its 3D localisation. Further development of these methods will make it possible to identify objects and their position in the real world and to use this information to prevent possible collisions between the robot and such objects.

  7. Advances in data representation for hard/soft information fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimland, Jeffrey C.; Coughlin, Dan; Hall, David L.; Graham, Jacob L.

    2012-06-01

    Information fusion is becoming increasingly human-centric. While past systems typically relegated humans to the role of analyzing a finished fusion product, current systems are exploring the role of humans as integral elements in a modular and extensible distributed framework where many tasks can be accomplished by either human or machine performers. For example, "participatory sensing" campaigns give humans the role of "soft sensors" by uploading their direct observations or as "soft sensor platforms" by using mobile devices to record human-annotated, GPS-encoded high quality photographs, video, or audio. Additionally, the role of "human-in-the-loop", in which individuals or teams using advanced human computer interface (HCI) tools such as stereoscopic 3D visualization, haptic interfaces, or aural "sonification" interfaces can help to effectively engage the innate human capability to perform pattern matching, anomaly identification, and semantic-based contextual reasoning to interpret an evolving situation. The Pennsylvania State University is participating in a Multi-disciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) program funded by the U.S. Army Research Office to investigate fusion of hard and soft data in counterinsurgency (COIN) situations. In addition to the importance of this research for Intelligence Preparation of the Battlefield (IPB), many of the same challenges and techniques apply to health and medical informatics, crisis management, crowd-sourced "citizen science", and monitoring environmental concerns. One of the key challenges that we have encountered is the development of data formats, protocols, and methodologies to establish an information architecture and framework for the effective capture, representation, transmission, and storage of the vastly heterogeneous data and accompanying metadata -- including capabilities and characteristics of human observers, uncertainty of human observations, "soft" contextual data, and information pedigree

  8. Materials research for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to <2 MeV on average for fission neutrons) releases significant amounts of hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Fusion: The Energy of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, J.

    2006-05-01

    This book outlines the quest for fusion energy. It is presented in a form which is accessible to the interested layman, but which is precise and detailed for the specialist as well. The book contains 12 detailed chapters which cover the whole of the intended subject matter with copious illustrations and a balance between science and the scientific and political context. In addition, the book presents a useful glossary and a brief set of references for further non-specialist reading. Chapters 1 to 3 treat the underlying physics of nuclear energy and of the reactions in the sun and in the stars in considerable detail, including the creation of the matter in the universe. Chapter 4 presents the fusion reactions which can be harnessed on earth, and poses the fundamental problems of realising fusion energy as a source for our use, explaining the background to the Lawson criterion on the required quality of energy confinement, which 50 years later remains our fundamental milestone. Chapter 5 presents the basis for magnetic confinement, introducing some early attempts as well as some straightforward difficulties and treating linear and circular devices. The origins of the stellarator and of the tokamak are described. Chapter 6 is not essential to the mission of usefully harnessing fusion energy, but nonetheless explains to the layman the difference between fusion and fission in weapons, which should help the readers understand the differences as sources of peaceful energy as well, since this popular confusion remains a problem when proposing fusion with the `nuclear' label. Chapter 7 returns to energy sources with laser fusion, or inertial confinement fusion, which constitutes both military and civil research, depending on the country. The chapter provides a broad overview of the progress right up to today's hopes for fast ignition. The difficulty of harnessing fusion energy by magnetic or inertial confinement has created a breeding ground for what the authors call `false

  10. Fusion pumped light source

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

  11. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.

    1987-09-04

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

  12. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  13. INTRODUCTION: Status report on fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, Werner

    2005-10-01

    A major milestone on the path to fusion energy was reached in June 2005 on the occasion of the signing of the joint declaration of all parties to the ITER negotiations, agreeing on future arrangements and on the construction site at Cadarache in France. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been promoting fusion activities since the late 1950s; it took over the auspices of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities in 1988, and of the ITER Engineering and Design Activities in 1992. The Agency continues its support to Member States through the organization of consultancies, workshops and technical meetings, the most prominent being the series of International Fusion Energy Conferences (formerly called the International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research). The meetings serve as a platform for experts from all Member States to have open discussions on their latest accomplishments as well as on their problems and eventual solutions. The papers presented at the meetings and conferences are routinely published, many being sent to the journal it Nuclear Fusion, co-published monthly by Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol, UK. The journal's reputation is reflected in the fact that it is a world-renowned publication, and the International Fusion Research Council has used it for the publication of a Status Report on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion in 1978 and 1990. This present report marks the conclusion of the preparatory phases of ITER activities. It provides background information on the progress of fusion research within the last 15 years. The International Fusion Research Council (IFRC), which initiated the report, was fully aware of the complexities of including all scientific results in just one paper, and so decided to provide an overview and extensive references for the interested reader who need not necessarily be a fusion specialist. Professor Predhiman K. Kaw, Chairman, prepared the report on behalf of the IFRC, reflecting

  14. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion For Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadler, Jon

    1999-01-01

    An Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device was assembled at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) to study the possibility of using IEC technology for deep space propulsion and power. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement is capable of containing a nuclear fusion plasma in a series of virtual potential wells. These wells would substantially increase plasma confinement, possibly leading towards a high-gain, breakthrough fusion device. A one-foot in diameter IEC vessel was borrowed from the Fusion Studies Laboratory at the University of Illinois @ Urbana-Champaign for the summer. This device was used in initial parameterization studies in order to design a larger, actively cooled device for permanent use at the PRC.

  15. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadler, Jon

    1999-01-01

    An Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device was assembled at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) to study the possibility of using EEC technology for deep space propulsion and power. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement is capable of containing a nuclear fusion plasma in a series of virtual potential wells. These wells would substantially increase plasma confinement, possibly leading towards a high-gain, breakthrough fusion device. A one-foot in diameter IEC vessel was borrowed from the Fusion Studies Laboratory at the University of Illinois@Urbana-Champaign for the summer. This device was used in initial parameterization studies in order to design a larger, actively cooled device for permanent use at the PRC.

  16. Deformability-based microfluidic cell pairing and fusion.

    PubMed

    Dura, Burak; Liu, Yaoping; Voldman, Joel

    2014-08-01

    We present a microfluidic cell pairing device capable of sequential trapping and pairing of hundreds of cells using passive hydrodynamics and flow-induced deformation. We describe the design and operation principles of our device and show its applicability for cell fusion. Using our device, we achieved both homotypic and heterotypic cell pairing, demonstrating efficiencies up to 80%. The platform is compatible with fusion protocols based on biological, chemical and physical stimuli with fusion yields up to 95%. Our device further permits its disconnection from the fluidic hardware enabling its transportation for imaging and culture while maintaining cell registration on chip. Our design principles and cell trapping technique can readily be applied for different cell types and can be extended to trap and fuse multiple (>2) cell partners as demonstrated by our preliminary experiments. PMID:24898933

  17. Portable data collection device

    DOEpatents

    French, Patrick D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of a time.

  18. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  19. Portable data collection device

    DOEpatents

    French, P.D.

    1996-06-11

    The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of a time. 7 figs.

  20. Computational problems in magnetic fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.

    1981-08-31

    Numerical calculations have had an important role in fusion research since its beginning, but the application of computers to plasma physics has advanced rapidly in the last few years. One reason for this is the increasing sophistication of the mathematical models of plasma behavior, and another is the increased speed and memory of the computers which made it reasonable to consider numerical simulation of fusion devices. The behavior of a plasma is simulated by a variety of numerical models. Some models used for short times give detailed knowledge of the plasma on a microscopic scale, while other models used for much longer times compute macroscopic properties of the plasma dynamics. The computer models used in fusion research are surveyed. One of the most active areas of research is in time-dependent, three-dimensional, resistive magnetohydrodynamic models. These codes are reviewed briefly.

  1. UK fusion breakthrough revealed at last

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Roger

    2010-03-01

    Fusion-energy research is commonly associated with huge toroidal magnetic devices such as JET and ITER, surrounded by even larger diagnostic systems and power supplies, all promising cheap energy in 30 years' time. However, increasing attention is now being paid to the complementary field of inertial-confinement fusion, thanks in part to the recent opening of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the US. It seeks to focus some 2 MJ of energy from 192 powerful lasers onto a tiny sphere containing deuterium and tritium nuclei, heating them up until they fuse. Having recently announced that they had made a crucial breakthrough in achieving this "laser fusion", researchers at NIF hope to have generated the conditions for a sustained nuclear reaction by the end of the year.

  2. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  3. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  4. High efficiency photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Guha, Subhendu; Yang, Chi C.; Xu, Xi Xiang

    1999-11-02

    An N-I-P type photovoltaic device includes a multi-layered body of N-doped semiconductor material which has an amorphous, N doped layer in contact with the amorphous body of intrinsic semiconductor material, and a microcrystalline, N doped layer overlying the amorphous, N doped material. A tandem device comprising stacked N-I-P cells may further include a second amorphous, N doped layer interposed between the microcrystalline, N doped layer and a microcrystalline P doped layer. Photovoltaic devices thus configured manifest improved performance, particularly when configured as tandem devices.

  5. Prospects for bubble fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  6. Sensor fusion II: Human and machine strategies; Proceedings of the Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, Nov. 6-9, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenker, Paul S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on human and machine strategies in sensor fusion are presented. The general topics addressed include: active vision, measurement and analysis of visual motion, decision models for sensor fusion, implementation of sensor fusion algorithms, applying sensor fusion to image analysis, perceptual modules and their fusion, perceptual organization and object recognition, planning and the integration of high-level knowledge with perception, using prior knowledge and context in sensor fusion.

  7. Fusion probability in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Pal, Santanu

    2015-03-01

    Background: Fusion between two massive nuclei is a very complex process and is characterized by three stages: (a) capture inside the potential barrier, (b) formation of an equilibrated compound nucleus (CN), and (c) statistical decay of the CN leading to a cold evaporation residue (ER) or fission. The second stage is the least understood of the three and is the most crucial in predicting yield of superheavy elements (SHE) formed in complete fusion reactions. Purpose: A systematic study of average fusion probability, , is undertaken to obtain a better understanding of its dependence on various reaction parameters. The study may also help to clearly demarcate onset of non-CN fission (NCNF), which causes fusion probability, PCN, to deviate from unity. Method: ER excitation functions for 52 reactions leading to CN in the mass region 170-220, which are available in the literature, have been compared with statistical model (SM) calculations. Capture cross sections have been obtained from a coupled-channels code. In the SM, shell corrections in both the level density and the fission barrier have been included. for these reactions has been extracted by comparing experimental and theoretical ER excitation functions in the energy range ˜5 %-35% above the potential barrier, where known effects of nuclear structure are insignificant. Results: has been shown to vary with entrance channel mass asymmetry, η (or charge product, ZpZt ), as well as with fissility of the CN, χCN. No parameter has been found to be adequate as a single scaling variable to determine . Approximate boundaries have been obtained from where starts deviating from unity. Conclusions: This study quite clearly reveals the limits of applicability of the SM in interpreting experimental observables from fusion reactions involving two massive nuclei. Deviation of from unity marks the beginning of the domain of dynamical models of fusion. Availability of precise ER cross

  8. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    1992-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a center for information exchange, nationally and internationally, by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results that are obtained by the Institute contribute mainly to the progress of national and international efforts in nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power as a basic energy source. In addition to its primary focus on fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in related fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, plasma astrophysics, and accelerator physics. The work of EFS scientists continued to receive national and international recognition. Numerous invited papers were given during the past year at workshops, conferences, and scientific meetings. Last year IFS scientists published 95 scientific articles in technical journals and monographs.

  9. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1992-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a center for information exchange, nationally and internationally, by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results that are obtained by the Institute contribute mainly to the progress of national and international efforts in nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power.as a basic energy source. In addition to its primary focus on fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in related fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, plasma astrophysics, and accelerator physics. The work of EFS scientists continued to receive national and international recognition. Numerous invited papers were given during the past year at workshops, conferences, and scientific meetings. Last year IFS scientists published 95 scientific articles in technical journals and monographs.

  10. Multisensor image fusion guidelines in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, C.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing delivers multimodal and -temporal data from the Earth's surface. In order to cope with these multidimensional data sources and to make the most of them, image fusion is a valuable tool. It has developed over the past few decades into a usable image processing technique for extracting information of higher quality and reliability. As more sensors and advanced image fusion techniques have become available, researchers have conducted a vast amount of successful studies using image fusion. However, the definition of an appropriate workflow prior to processing the imagery requires knowledge in all related fields - i.e. remote sensing, image fusion and the desired image exploitation processing. From the findings of this research it can be seen that the choice of the appropriate technique, as well as the fine-tuning of the individual parameters of this technique, is crucial. There is still a lack of strategic guidelines due to the complexity and variability of data selection, processing techniques and applications. This paper gives an overview on the state-of-the-art in remote sensing image fusion including sensors and applications. Putting research results in image fusion from the past 15 years into a context provides a new view on the subject and helps other researchers to build their innovation on these findings. Recommendations of experts help to understand further needs to achieve feasible strategies in remote sensing image fusion.

  11. Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

    2010-11-30

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  12. Cognitive fusion analysis based on context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik P.; Plano, Susan

    2004-04-01

    The standard fusion model includes active and passive user interaction in level 5 - "User Refinement". User refinement is more than just details of passive automation partitioning - it is the active management of information. While a fusion system can explore many operational conditions over myopic changes, the user has the ability to reason about the hyperopic "big picture." Blasch and Plano developed cognitive-fusion models that address user constraints including: intent, attention, trust, workload, and throughput to facilitate hyperopic analysis. To enhance user-fusion performance modeling (i.e. confidence, timeliness, and accuracy); we seek to explore the nature of context. Context, the interrelated conditions of which something exists, can be modeled in many ways including geographic, sensor, object, and environmental conditioning. This paper highlights user refinement actions based on context to constrain the fusion analysis for accurately representing the trade space in the real world. As an example, we explore a target identification task in which contextual information from the user"s cognitive model is imparted to a fusion belief filter.

  13. Two Horizons of Fusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Mun Ling; Chik, Pakey Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to differentiate the internal and external horizons of "fusion." "Fusion" in the internal horizon relates to the structure and meaning of the object of learning as experienced by the learner. It clarifies the interrelationships among an object's critical features and aspects. It also illuminates the…

  14. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  15. A direct fusion drive for rocket propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razin, Yosef S.; Pajer, Gary; Breton, Mary; Ham, Eric; Mueller, Joseph; Paluszek, Michael; Glasser, Alan H.; Cohen, Samuel A.

    2014-12-01

    The Direct Fusion Drive (DFD), a compact, anuetronic fusion engine, will enable more challenging exploration missions in the solar system. The engine proposed here uses a deuterium-helium-3 reaction to produce fusion energy by employing a novel field-reversed configuration (FRC) for magnetic confinement. The FRC has a simple linear solenoid coil geometry yet generates higher plasma pressure, hence higher fusion power density, for a given magnetic field strength than other magnetic-confinement plasma devices. Waste heat generated from the plasma's Bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation is recycled to maintain the fusion temperature. The charged reaction products, augmented by additional propellant, are exhausted through a magnetic nozzle. A 1 MW DFD is presented in the context of a mission to deploy the James Webb Space Telescope (6200 kg) from GPS orbit to a Sun-Earth L2 halo orbit in 37 days using just 353 kg of propellant and about half a kilogram of 3He. The engine is designed to produce 40 N of thrust with an exhaust velocity of 56.5 km/s and has a specific power of 0.18 kW/kg.

  16. Decomposition of incomplete fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L.B.; Sarantities, D.G.; Stracener, D.W.; Majka, Z.; Abenante, V.; Semkow, T.M.; Hensley, D.C.; Beene, J.R.; Halbert, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The velocity distribution of fusion-like products formed in the reaction 701 MeV /sup 28/Si+/sup 100/Mo is decomposed into 26 incomplete fusion channels. The momentum deficit of the residue per nonevaporative mass unit is approximately equal to the beam momentum per nucleon. The yields of the incomplete fusion channels correlate with the Q-value for projectile fragmentation rather than that for incomplete fusion. The backward angle multiplicities of light particles and heavy ions increase with momentum transfer, however, the heavy ion multiplicities also depend on the extent of the fragmentation of the incomplete fusion channel. These data indicate that at fixed linear momentum transfer, increased fragmentation of the unfused component is related to a reduced transferred angular momentum. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. An FPGA-based heterogeneous image fusion system design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Le; Lin, Yu-chi; Chen, Yan-hua; Zhao, Mei-rong

    2011-08-01

    Taking the advantages of FPGA's low cost and compact structure, an FPGA-based heterogeneous image fusion platform is established in this study. Altera's Cyclone IV series FPGA is adopted as the core processor of the platform, and the visible light CCD camera and infrared thermal imager are used as the image-capturing device in order to obtain dualchannel heterogeneous video images. Tailor-made image fusion algorithms such as gray-scale weighted averaging, maximum selection and minimum selection methods are analyzed and compared. VHDL language and the synchronous design method are utilized to perform a reliable RTL-level description. Altera's Quartus II 9.0 software is applied to simulate and implement the algorithm modules. The contrast experiments of various fusion algorithms show that, preferably image quality of the heterogeneous image fusion can be obtained on top of the proposed system. The applied range of the different fusion algorithms is also discussed.

  18. Dynamical effects in fusion with exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo-Phuoc, K.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Reactions with stable beams have demonstrated strong interplay between nuclear structure and fusion. Exotic beam facilities open new perspectives to understand the impact of neutron skin, large isospin, and weak binding energies on fusion. Microscopic theories of fusion are required to guide future experiments. Purpose: To investigate new effects of exotic structures and dynamics in near-barrier fusion with exotic nuclei. Method: Microscopic approaches based on the Hartree-Fock (HF) mean-field theory are used for studying fusion barriers in -54Ca40+116Sn reactions for even isotopes. Bare potential barriers are obtained assuming frozen HF ground-state densities. Dynamical effects on the barrier are accounted for in time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations of the collisions. Vibrational couplings are studied in the coupled-channel framework and near-barrier nucleon transfer is investigated with TDHF calculations. Results: The development of a neutron skin in exotic calcium isotopes strongly lowers the bare potential barrier. However, this static effect is not apparent when dynamical effects are included. On the contrary, a fusion hindrance is observed in TDHF calculations with the most neutron-rich calcium isotopes which cannot be explained by vibrational couplings. Transfer reactions are also important in these systems due to charge equilibration processes. Conclusions: Despite its impact on the bare potential, the neutron skin is not seen as playing an important role in the fusion dynamics. However, the charge transfer with exotic projectiles could lead to an increase of the Coulomb repulsion between the fragments, suppressing fusion. The effects of transfer and dissipative mechanisms on fusion with exotic nuclei deserve further studies.

  19. Electrophoresis device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, P. H.; Snyder, R. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A device for separating cellular particles of a sample substance into fractionated streams of different cellular species includes a casing having a distribution chamber, a separation chamber, and a collection chamber. The electrode chambers are separated from the separation chamber interior by means of passages such that flow variations and membrane variations around the slotted portion of the electrode chamber do not enduce flow perturbations into the laminar buffer curtain flowing in the separation chamber. The cellular particles of the sample are separated under the influence of the electrical field and the separation chamber into streams of different cellular species. The streams of separated cells enter a partition array in the collection chamber where they are fractionated and collected.

  20. Choice of coils for a fusion reactor

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Romeo; Garabedian, Paul R.

    2007-01-01

    In a fusion reactor a hot plasma of deuterium and tritium is confined by a strong magnetic field to produce helium ions and release energetic neutrons. The 3D geometry of a stellarator provides configurations for such a device that reduce net toroidal current that might lead to disruptions. We construct smooth coils generating an external magnetic field designed to prevent the plasma from deteriorating. PMID:17640879

  1. Choice of coils for a fusion reactor.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Romeo; Garabedian, Paul R

    2007-07-24

    In a fusion reactor a hot plasma of deuterium and tritium is confined by a strong magnetic field to produce helium ions and release energetic neutrons. The 3D geometry of a stellarator provides configurations for such a device that reduce net toroidal current that might lead to disruptions. We construct smooth coils generating an external magnetic field designed to prevent the plasma from deteriorating. PMID:17640879

  2. Role of impurities in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tokar, M. Z.

    2008-10-15

    The role of impurity at the plasma edge of fusion devices is considered by analysing the influence on radiation losses and anomalous transport of particle and energy. The conditions critical for the development of radiative instabilities leading to the formation of detachment and MARFE and those necessary for the creation of a stable radiating edge, protecting the wall elements from intensive heat loads, are analyzed. Mechanisms responsible for anomalous transport suppression with impurity seeding are elucidated.

  3. A Smartphone-Based Driver Safety Monitoring System Using Data Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boon-Giin; Chung, Wan-Young

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for monitoring driver safety levels using a data fusion approach based on several discrete data types: eye features, bio-signal variation, in-vehicle temperature, and vehicle speed. The driver safety monitoring system was developed in practice in the form of an application for an Android-based smartphone device, where measuring safety-related data requires no extra monetary expenditure or equipment. Moreover, the system provides high resolution and flexibility. The safety monitoring process involves the fusion of attributes gathered from different sensors, including video, electrocardiography, photoplethysmography, temperature, and a three-axis accelerometer, that are assigned as input variables to an inference analysis framework. A Fuzzy Bayesian framework is designed to indicate the driver’s capability level and is updated continuously in real-time. The sensory data are transmitted via Bluetooth communication to the smartphone device. A fake incoming call warning service alerts the driver if his or her safety level is suspiciously compromised. Realistic testing of the system demonstrates the practical benefits of multiple features and their fusion in providing a more authentic and effective driver safety monitoring. PMID:23247416

  4. Fusion power production in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor baseline H-mode scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Kessel, C. E.; Pankin, A. Y.

    2015-04-01

    Self-consistent simulations of 15 MA ITER H-mode DT scenarios, from ramp-up through flat-top, are carried out. Electron and ion temperatures, toroidal angular frequency, and currents are evolved, in simulations carried out using the predictive TRANSPort and integrated modeling code starting with initial profiles and equilibria obtained from tokamak simulation code studies. Studies are carried out examining the dependence and sensitivity of fusion power production on electron density, argon impurity concentration, choice of radio frequency heating, pedestal temperature without and with E × B flow shear effects included, and the degree of plasma rotation. The goal of these whole-device ITER simulations is to identify dependencies that might impact ITER fusion performance.

  5. Fusion power production in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor baseline H-mode scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Kessel, C. E.; Pankin, A. Y.

    2015-04-15

    Self-consistent simulations of 15 MA ITER H-mode DT scenarios, from ramp-up through flat-top, are carried out. Electron and ion temperatures, toroidal angular frequency, and currents are evolved, in simulations carried out using the predictive TRANSPort and integrated modeling code starting with initial profiles and equilibria obtained from tokamak simulation code studies. Studies are carried out examining the dependence and sensitivity of fusion power production on electron density, argon impurity concentration, choice of radio frequency heating, pedestal temperature without and with E × B flow shear effects included, and the degree of plasma rotation. The goal of these whole-device ITER simulations is to identify dependencies that might impact ITER fusion performance.

  6. All-IP-Ethernet architecture for real-time sensor-fusion processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Kei; Inaba, Mary; Tezuka, Hiroshi; Tomari, Hisanobu; Koizumi, Kenichi; Kondo, Shuya

    2016-03-01

    Serendipter is a device that distinguishes and selects very rare particles and cells from huge amount of population. We are currently designing and constructing information processing system for a Serendipter. The information processing system for Serendipter is a kind of sensor-fusion system but with much more difficulties: To fulfill these requirements, we adopt All IP based architecture: All IP-Ethernet based data processing system consists of (1) sensor/detector directly output data as IP-Ethernet packet stream, (2) single Ethernet/TCP/IP streams by a L2 100Gbps Ethernet switch, (3) An FPGA board with 100Gbps Ethernet I/F connected to the switch and a Xeon based server. Circuits in the FPGA include 100Gbps Ethernet MAC, buffers and preprocessing, and real-time Deep learning circuits using multi-layer neural networks. Proposed All-IP architecture solves existing problem to construct large-scale sensor-fusion systems.

  7. Exhaust gas purification device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, H.; Hibi, T.; Sayo, S.; Sugiura, Y.; Ueda, K.

    1980-02-19

    The exhaust gas purification device includes an exhaust manifold , a purification cylinder connected with the exhaust manifold through a first honey-comb shaped catalyst, and a second honeycomb shaped catalyst positioned at the rear portion of the purification cylinder. Each catalyst is supported by steel wool rings including coarse and dense portions of steel wool. The purification device further includes a secondary air supplying arrangement.

  8. Mechanisms of tissue fusion during development

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Heather J.; Niswander, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Tissue fusion events during embryonic development are crucial for the correct formation and function of many organs and tissues, including the heart, neural tube, eyes, face and body wall. During tissue fusion, two opposing tissue components approach one another and integrate to form a continuous tissue; disruption of this process leads to a variety of human birth defects. Genetic studies, together with recent advances in the ability to culture developing tissues, have greatly enriched our knowledge of the mechanisms involved in tissue fusion. This review aims to bring together what is currently known about tissue fusion in several developing mammalian organs and highlights some of the questions that remain to be addressed. PMID:22510983

  9. Colliding beam fusion reactor space propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Binderbauer, Michl W.; Rostoker, Norman; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; O'Toole, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    We describe a space propulsion system based on the Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor (CBFR). The CBFR is a high-beta, field-reversed, magnetic configuration with ion energies in the range of hundreds of keV. Repetitively-pulsed ion beams sustain the plasma distribution and provide current drive. The confinement physics is based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equation, including a Fokker Planck collision operator and all sources and sinks for energy and particle flow. The mean azimuthal velocities and temperatures of the fuel ion species are equal and the plasma current is unneutralized by the electrons. The resulting distribution functions are thermal in a moving frame of reference. The ion gyro-orbit radius is comparable to the dimensions of the confinement system, hence classical transport of the particles and energy is expected and the device is scaleable. We have analyzed the design over a range of 106-109 Watts of output power (0.15-150 Newtons thrust) with a specific impulse of, Isp~106 sec. A 50 MW propulsion system might involve the following parameters: 4-meters diameter×10-meters length, magnetic field ~7 Tesla, ion beam current ~10 A, and fuels of either D-He3,P-B11,P-Li6,D-Li6, etc. .

  10. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of the theoretical science program are: To support the interpretation of present experiments and predict the outcome of future planned experiments; to improve on existing models and codes and validate against experimental results; and to conduct theoretical physics development of advanced concepts with applications for DIII-D and future devices. Major accomplishments in FY91 include the corroboration between theory and experiment on MHD behavior in the second stable regime of operation on DIII-D, and the frequency and mode structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in high beta, shaped plasmas. We have made significant advances in the development of the gyro-Landau fluid approach to turbulence simulation which more accurately models kinetic drive and damping mechanisms. Several theoretical models to explain the bifurcation phenomenon in L- to H-mode transition were proposed providing the theoretical basis for future experimental verification. The capabilities of new rf codes have been upgraded in response to the expanding needs of the rf experiments. Codes are being employed to plan for a fully non-inductive current drive experiment in a high beta, enhanced confinement regime. GA's experimental effort in Applied Physics encompasses two advanced diagnostics essential for the operation of future fusion experiments: Alpha particle diagnostic, and current and density profile diagnostics. This paper discusses research in all these topics.

  11. Visual programming environment for multisensor data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David L.; Kasmala, Gerald

    1996-06-01

    In recent years, numerous multisensor data fusion systems have been developed for a wide variety of applications. Defense related applications include; automatic target recognition systems, identification-friend-foe-neutral, automated situation assessment and threat assessment systems, and systems for smart weapons. Non-defense applications include; robotics, condition-based maintenance, environmental monitoring, and medical diagnostics. For each of these applications, multiple sensor data are combined to achieve inferences which are not generally possible using only a single sensor. Implementation of these data fusion systems often involves a significant amount of effort. In particular, software must be developed for components such as data base access, human computer interfaces and displays, communication software, and data fusion algorithms. While commercial software packages exist to assist development of data bases, communications, and human computer interfaces, there are no general purpose packages available to support the implementation of the data fusion algorithms. This paper describes a visual programming tool developed to assist in rapid prototyping of data fusion systems. This toolkit is modeled after the popular tool, Khoros, used by the image processing community. The tool described here is written in visual C, and provides the capability to rapidly implement and apply data fusion algorithms. An application to condition based maintenance is described.

  12. Superconductivity and fusion energy—the inseparable companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzone, Pierluigi

    2015-02-01

    Although superconductivity will never produce energy by itself, it plays an important role in energy-related applications both because of its saving potential (e.g., power transmission lines and generators), and its role as an enabling technology (e.g., for nuclear fusion energy). The superconducting magnet’s need for plasma confinement has been recognized since the early development of fusion devices. As long as the research and development of plasma burning was carried out on pulsed devices, the technology of superconducting fusion magnets was aimed at demonstrations of feasibility. In the latest generation of plasma devices, which are larger and have longer confinement times, the superconducting coils are a key enabling technology. The cost of a superconducting magnet system is a major portion of the overall cost of a fusion plant and deserves significant attention in the long-term planning of electricity supply; only cheap superconducting magnets will help fusion get to the energy market. In this paper, the technology challenges and design approaches for fusion magnets are briefly reviewed for past, present, and future projects, from the early superconducting tokamaks in the 1970s, to the current ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and W7-X projects and future DEMO (Demonstration Reactor) projects. The associated cryogenic technology is also reviewed: 4.2 K helium baths, superfluid baths, forced-flow supercritical helium, and helium-free designs. Open issues and risk mitigation are discussed in terms of reliability, technology, and cost.

  13. Mechanical Device Traces Parabolas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soper, Terry A.

    1989-01-01

    Mechanical device simplifies generation of parabolas of various focal lengths. Based on fundamental geometrical construction of parabola. Constancy of critical total distance enforced by maintaining cable in tension. Applications of device include design of paraboloidal antennas, approximating catenaries on drawings of powerlines or long-wire antennas, and general tracing of parabolas on drawings.

  14. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  15. Capillary interconnect device

    SciTech Connect

    Renzi, Ronald F

    2013-11-19

    An interconnecting device for connecting a plurality of first fluid-bearing conduits to a corresponding plurality of second fluid-bearing conduits thereby providing fluid communication between the first fluid-bearing conduits and the second fluid-bearing conduits. The device includes a manifold and one or two ferrule plates that are held by compressive axial forces.

  16. Negative ion source development for fusion application (invited).

    PubMed

    Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2010-02-01

    Giant negative ion sources, producing high-current of several tens amps with high energy of several hundreds keV to 1 MeV, are required for a neutral beam injector (NBI) in a fusion device. The giant negative ion sources are cesium-seeded plasma sources, in which the negative ions are produced on the cesium-covered surface. Their characteristic features are discussed with the views of large-volume plasma production, large-area beam acceleration, and high-voltage dc holding. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor NBI employs a 1 MeV-40 A of deuterium negative ion source, and intensive development programs for the rf-driven source plasma production and the multistage electrostatic acceleration are in progress, including the long pulse operation for 3600 s. Present status of the development, as well as the achievements of the giant negative ion sources in the working injectors, is also summarized. PMID:20192420

  17. Storing data from fusion experiments at the National Storage Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, D.N.; Meyer, W.H.

    1993-09-03

    The National Storage Laboratory (NSL) at the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) is a prototype facility which is developing data storage and retrieval techniques using hardware that includes a hierarchy of storage devices. The ultimate goal is to store terabytes of data and achieve rapid retrieval times compatible with the type of media where the data is stored. Files stored in the NSL are accessed directly using the Network File System (NFS); in the future, the Andrew File System (AFS) is expected to be used. System level control of files is available using the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) or a set of program-callable routines. We have experimented with storing and retrieving data from fusion experiments at LLNL and at General Atomics in San Diego, California, using computers running UNIX and VMS operating systems. We discuss some issues associated with accessing files whose names are known, but which are not immediately available, the time required for retrieval, and other pertinent parameters.

  18. The application of diagnostic equipment in the Tokamak fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bang-shuai; Chang, Jun; Gong, Xian-zu; Gan, Jia-fu; Feng, Shu-long

    2011-11-01

    This paper introduces the infrared optical system in the Tokamak fusion reaction device. In this optical system, the traditional optical structure can't meet the requirements, because the length of the infrared optical system in the Tokamak is very long. The design of optical system in the detection facility includes three parts:1.the combination of the concave aspheric mirror and flat mirror; 2.the Cassegrain system; 3.the relay group lenses. This paper describes the decrease of the modulation transfer function (MTF) when the temperature changes and how to compensate the decrease of the MTF in order to maintain the image quality in a high level. As a result, the image quality of this optical system can reach the requirements when the temperature changes.

  19. Negative ion source development for fusion application (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2010-02-15

    Giant negative ion sources, producing high-current of several tens amps with high energy of several hundreds keV to 1 MeV, are required for a neutral beam injector (NBI) in a fusion device. The giant negative ion sources are cesium-seeded plasma sources, in which the negative ions are produced on the cesium-covered surface. Their characteristic features are discussed with the views of large-volume plasma production, large-area beam acceleration, and high-voltage dc holding. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor NBI employs a 1 MeV-40 A of deuterium negative ion source, and intensive development programs for the rf-driven source plasma production and the multistage electrostatic acceleration are in progress, including the long pulse operation for 3600 s. Present status of the development, as well as the achievements of the giant negative ion sources in the working injectors, is also summarized.

  20. Joint interpretation of geophysical data using Image Fusion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamitrou, A.; Tsokas, G.; Petrou, M.

    2013-12-01

    Joint interpretation of geophysical data produced from different methods is a challenging area of research in a wide range of applications. In this work we apply several image fusion approaches to combine maps of electrical resistivity, electromagnetic conductivity, vertical gradient of the magnetic field, magnetic susceptibility, and ground penetrating radar reflections, in order to detect archaeological relics. We utilize data gathered from Arkansas University, with the support of the U.S. Department of Defense, through the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP-CS1263). The area of investigation is the Army City, situated in Riley Country of Kansas, USA. The depth of the relics is estimated about 30 cm from the surface, yet the surface indications of its existence are limited. We initially register the images from the different methods to correct from random offsets due to the use of hand-held devices during the measurement procedure. Next, we apply four different image fusion approaches to create combined images, using fusion with mean values, wavelet decomposition, curvelet transform, and curvelet transform enhancing the images along specific angles. We create seven combinations of pairs between the available geophysical datasets. The combinations are such that for every pair at least one high-resolution method (resistivity or magnetic gradiometry) is included. Our results indicate that in almost every case the method of mean values produces satisfactory fused images that corporate the majority of the features of the initial images. However, the contrast of the final image is reduced, and in some cases the averaging process nearly eliminated features that are fade in the original images. Wavelet based fusion outputs also good results, providing additional control in selecting the feature wavelength. Curvelet based fusion is proved the most effective method in most of the cases. The ability of curvelet domain to unfold the image in

  1. Benchmarking emerging logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonov, Dmitri

    2014-03-01

    As complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (CMOS FET) are being scaled to ever smaller sizes by the semiconductor industry, the demand is growing for emerging logic devices to supplement CMOS in various special functions. Research directions and concepts of such devices are overviewed. They include tunneling, graphene based, spintronic devices etc. The methodology to estimate future performance of emerging (beyond CMOS) devices and simple logic circuits based on them is explained. Results of benchmarking are used to identify more promising concepts and to map pathways for improvement of beyond CMOS computing.

  2. Ion trap device

    DOEpatents

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  3. Bumper wall for plasma device

    DOEpatents

    Coultas, Thomas A.

    1977-01-01

    Operation of a plasma device such as a reactor for controlled thermonuclear fusion is facilitated by an improved bumper wall enclosing the plasma to smooth the flow of energy from the plasma as the energy impinges upon the bumper wall. The bumper wall is flexible to withstand unequal and severe thermal shocks and it is readily replaced at less expense than the cost of replacing structural material in the first wall and blanket that surround it.

  4. Fusion Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Project Staff

    2012-02-29

    Under this project, General Atomics (GA) was tasked to develop the experimental validation plans for two high priority ISAs, Boundary and Pedestal and Whole Device Modeling in collaboration with the theory, simulation and experimental communities. The following sections have been incorporated into the final FSP Program Plan (www.pppl.gov/fsp), which was delivered to the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional deliverables by GA include guidance for validation, development of metrics to evaluate success and procedures for collaboration with experiments. These are also part of the final report.

  5. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  6. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There is little doubt that humans will attempt to explore and develop the solar system in this century. A large amount of energy will be required for accomplishing this. The need for fusion propulsion is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important thermodynamical attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion can produce exhaust velocity up to about 5 km/s. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a hydrogen propellant increases the exhaust velocity by only a factor of about two. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. The principal advantage of the fission process is that its development is relatively mature and is available right now. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. The technical priorities for developing and applying fusion for propulsion are

  7. Clinical Experiences of Non-fusion Dynamic Stabilization Surgery for Adjacent Segmental Pathology after Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-01-01

    Background As an alternative to spinal fusion, non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery has been developed, showing good clinical outcomes. In the present study, we introduce our surgical series, which involves non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery for adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after lumbar fusion surgery. Methods Fifteen patients (13 female and 2 male, mean age of 62.1 years) who underwent dynamic stabilization surgery for symptomatic ASP were included and medical records, magnetic resonance images (MRI), and plain radiographs were retrospectively evaluated. Results Twelve of the 15 patients had the fusion segment at L4-5, and the most common segment affected by ASP was L3-4. The time interval between prior fusion and later non-fusion surgery was mean 67.0 months. The Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index showed values of 7.4 and 58.5% before the non-fusion surgery and these values respectively declined to 4.2 and 41.3% postoperatively at 36 months (p=0.027 and p=0.018, respectively). During the mean 44.8 months of follow-up, medication of analgesics was also significantly reduced. The MRI grade for disc and central stenosis identified significant degeneration at L3-4, and similar disc degeneration from lateral radiographs was determined at L3-4 between before the prior fusion surgery and the later non-fusion surgery. After the non-fusion surgery, the L3-4 segment and the proximal segment of L2-3 were preserved in the disc, stenosis and facet joint whereas L1-2 showed disc degeneration on the last MRI (p=0.032). Five instances of radiologic ASP were identified, showing characteristic disc-space narrowing at the proximal segments of L1-2 and L2-3. However, no patient underwent additional surgery for ASP after non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery. Conclusion The proposed non-fusion dynamic stabilization system could be an effective surgical treatment for elderly patients with symptomatic ASP after lumbar fusion. PMID:27162710

  8. Data fusion for the detection of buried land mines

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.; Schaich, P.C.; Sherwood, R.J.; Buhl, M.R.; Hernandez, J.E.; Kane, R.J.; Barth, M.J.; Fields, D.J.; Carter, M.R.

    1993-10-01

    The authors conducted experiments to demonstrate the enhanced delectability of buried land mines using sensor fusion techniques. Multiple sensors, including imagery, infrared imagery, and ground penetrating radar, have been used to acquire data on a number of buried mines and mine surrogates. The authors present this data along with a discussion of the application of sensor fusion techniques for this particular detection problem. The authors describe the data fusion architecture and discuss some relevant results of these classification methods.

  9. Nonimaging radiant energy direction device

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1980-01-01

    A raidant energy nonimaging light direction device is provided. The device includes an energy transducer and a reflective wall whose contour is particularly determined with respect to the geometrical vector flux of a field associated with the transducer.

  10. Economics and Environmental Compatibility of Fusion Reactors —Its Analysis and Coming Issues— 4.Economic Effect of Fusion in Energy Market 4.1Economic Impact of Fusion Deployment in Energy Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Tokimatsu, Koji

    Energy model analysis estimates the significant contribution of fusion in the latter half of the century under the global environment constraints if it will be successfully developed and introduced into the market. The total possible economical impact of fusion is investigated from the aspect of energy cost savings, sales, and its effects on Gross Domestic Products. Considerable economical possibility will be found in the markets for fusion related devices, of currently developing countries, and for synthesized fuel. The value of fusion development could be evaluated from these possible economic impact in comparison with its necessary investment.

  11. Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) maintenance and disassembly considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Fusion Power Demonstration study is the development of a tandem mirror reactor design that follows the operation of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility. It is a power-producing device utilizing the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle; hence, much of its maintenance must be accomplished remotely because of neutron-induced gamma activation. This paper discusses the maintenance philosophy adopted and its impact on the device configuration and examines some of the specific requirements of scheduled and unscheduled component replacements. This work is being used for the next phase of mirror reactor concepts: the Mini-Mars reactor study.

  12. Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) maintenance and disassembly considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Sampinato, P.T.

    1985-07-01

    The Fusion Power Demonstration study is the development of a tandem mirror reactor design that follows the operation of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility. It is a power-producing device utilizing the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle; hence, much of its maintenance must be accomplished remotely because of neutroninduced gamma activation. This paper discusses the maintenance philosophy adopted and its impact on the device configuration and examines some of the specific requirements of scheduled and unscheduled component replacements. This work is being used for the next phase of mirror reactor concepts: the Mini-Mars reactor study.

  13. Aneutronic fusion on the base of asymmetrical centrifugal trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosov, V. I.

    2006-08-01

    A physical design of a device that can be a base for a direct-conversion nuclear electric power station is considered. The project considers the aneutronic reaction P-11B in the asymmetric centrifugal trap. Kinetic energy of nuclear particles (alpha particles) is converted into electrical energy inside this device; no thermal cycle is used. Heating and recuperation of energy of protons and boron ions take place in the plasma space. The presented scheme differs significantly from the conventional thermonuclear fusion. 'Fast' protons, which are the main energy component of plasma, have an almost monoenergetic spectrum. This makes it possible to realize the 'resonance' fusion.

  14. Fission fusion hybrids- recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Valanju, P.; Mahajan, S.; Covele, B.

    2012-03-01

    Fission-fusion hybrids enjoy unique advantages for addressing long standing societal acceptability issues of nuclear fission power, and can do this at a much lower level of technical development than a competitive fusion power plant- so it could be a nearer term application. For waste incineration, hybrids can burn intransigent transuranic residues (with the long lived biohazard) from light water reactors (LWRs) with far fewer hybrid reactors than a comparable system within the realm of fission alone. For fuel production, hybrids can produce fuel for ˜4 times as many LWRs with NO fuel reprocessing. For both waste incineration or fuel production, the most severe kind of nuclear accident- runaway criticality- can be excluded, unlike either fast reactors or typical accelerator based reactors. The proliferation risks for hybrid fuel production are, we strongly believe, far less than any other fuel production method, including today's gas centrifuges. US Thorium reserves could supply the entire US electricity supply for centuries. The centerpiece of the fuel cycle is a high power density Compact Fusion Neutron Source (major+minor radius ˜ 2.5-3.5 m), which is made feasible by the super-X divertor.

  15. Label fusion strategy selection.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Duchesne, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Label fusion is used in medical image segmentation to combine several different labels of the same entity into a single discrete label, potentially more accurate, with respect to the exact, sought segmentation, than the best input element. Using simulated data, we compared three existing label fusion techniques-STAPLE, Voting, and Shape-Based Averaging (SBA)-and observed that none could be considered superior depending on the dissimilarity between the input elements. We thus developed an empirical, hybrid technique called SVS, which selects the most appropriate technique to apply based on this dissimilarity. We evaluated the label fusion strategies on two- and three-dimensional simulated data and showed that SVS is superior to any of the three existing methods examined. On real data, we used SVS to perform fusions of 10 segmentations of the hippocampus and amygdala in 78 subjects from the ICBM dataset. SVS selected SBA in almost all cases, which was the most appropriate method overall. PMID:22518113

  16. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  17. Progress toward fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1981-03-11

    This paper summarizes the basis for the present optimism in the magnetic fusion program, and describes some of the remaining tasks leading to a demonstration power reactor and the primary technologies necessary for that endeavor.

  18. FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY (FNSF) BEFORE UPGRADE TO COMPONENT TEST FACILITY (CTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin; Canik, John; Diem, Stephanie J; Milora, Stanley L; Park, J. M.; Sontag, Aaron C; Fogarty, P. J.; Lumsdaine, Arnold; Murakami, Masanori; Burgess, Thomas W; Cole, Michael J; Katoh, Yutai; Korsah, Kofi; Patton, Bradley D; Wagner, John C; Yoder, III, Graydon L

    2011-01-01

    The compact (R0~1.2-1.3m) Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is aimed at providing a fully integrated, continuously driven fusion nuclear environment of copious fusion neutrons. This facility would be used to test, discover, and understand the complex challenges of fusion plasma material interactions, nuclear material interactions, tritium fuel management, and power extraction. Such a facility properly designed would provide, initially at the JET-level plasma pressure (~30%T2) and conditions (e.g., Hot-Ion H-Mode, Q<1)), an outboard fusion neutron flux of 0.25 MW/m2 while requiring a fusion power of ~19 MW. If and when this research is successful, its performance can be extended to 1 MW/m2 and ~76 MW by reaching for twice the JET plasma pressure and Q. High-safety factor q and moderate-plasmas are used to minimize or eliminate plasma-induced disruptions, to deliver reliably a neutron fluence of 1 MW-yr/m2 and a duty factor of 10% presently anticipated for the FNS research. Success of this research will depend on achieving time-efficient installation and replacement of all internal components using remote handling (RH). This in turn requires modular designs for the internal components, including the single-turn toroidal field coil center-post. These device goals would further dictate placement of support structures and vacuum weld seals behind the internal and shielding components. If these goals could be achieved, the FNSF would further provide a ready upgrade path to the Component Test Facility (CTF), which would aim to test, for 6 MW-yr/m2 and 30% duty cycle, the demanding fusion nuclear engineering and technologies for DEMO. This FNSF-CTF would thereby complement the ITER Program, and support and help mitigate the risks of an aggressive world fusion DEMO R&D Program. The key physics and technology research needed in the next decade to manage the potential risks of this FNSF are identified.

  19. Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) before Upgrade to Component Test Facility (CTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2010-01-01

    The compact (R0~1.2-1.3m) Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is aimed at providing a fully integrated, continuously driven fusion nuclear environment of copious fusion neutrons. This facility would be used to test, discover, understand, and innovate scientific and technical solutions for the challenges facing DEMO, by addressing the multi-scale synergistic interactions involving fusion plasma material interactions, tritium fuel cycle, power extraction, and the nuclear effects on materials. Such a facility properly designed would provide, initially at the JET-level plasma pressure (~30%T2) and conditions (e.g., Hot-Ion H-Mode), an outboard fusion neutron flux of 0.25 MW/m2 while requiring a fusion power of 19 MW. If and when this research operation is successful, its performance can be extended to 1 MW/m2 and 76 MW by reaching for twice the JET plasma pressure and Q. High-safety factor q and moderate- plasmas would minimize plasma-induced disruptions, helping to deliver reliably a neutron fluence of 1 MW-yr/m2 and a duty factor of 10% presently anticipated for the FNS research. Success of this research will depend on achieving time-efficient installation and replacement of all components using extensive remote handling (RH). This in turn requires modular designs for all internal components, including the single-turn toroidal field coil center-post with RH-compatible bi-directional sliding joints. Such device goals would further dictate placement of support structures and vacuum seal welds behind the internal and shielding components. If these further goals could be achieved, the FNSF would provide a ready upgrade path to the Component Test Facility (CTF), which would aim to test, at higher neutron fluence and duty cycle, the demanding fusion nuclear engineering and technologies for DEMO. This FNSF-CTF strategy would be complementary to the ITER and the Broader Approach programs, and thereby help mitigate the risks of an aggressive world fusion DEMO R&D Program

  20. Heat tube device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattar, Mukesh K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention discloses a heat tube device through which a working fluid can be circulated to transfer heat to air in a conventional air conditioning system. The heat tube device is disposable about a conventional cooling coil of the air conditioning system and includes a plurality of substantially U-shaped tubes connected to a support structure. The support structure includes members for allowing the heat tube device to be readily positioned about the cooling coil. An actuatable adjustment device is connected to the U-shaped tubes for allowing, upon actuation thereof, for the heat tubes to be simultaneously rotated relative to the cooling coil for allowing the heat transfer from the heat tube device to air in the air conditioning system to be selectively varied.

  1. Device for cutting protrusions

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2011-07-05

    An apparatus for clipping a protrusion of material is provided. The protrusion may, for example, be a bolt head, a nut, a rivet, a weld bead, or a temporary assembly alignment tab protruding from a substrate surface of assembled components. The apparatus typically includes a cleaver having a cleaving edge and a cutting blade having a cutting edge. Generally, a mounting structure configured to confine the cleaver and the cutting blade and permit a range of relative movement between the cleaving edge and the cutting edge is provided. Also typically included is a power device coupled to the cutting blade. The power device is configured to move the cutting edge toward the cleaving edge. In some embodiments the power device is activated by a momentary switch. A retraction device is also generally provided, where the retraction device is configured to move the cutting edge away from the cleaving edge.

  2. Progress in bright ion beams for industry, medicine and fusion at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2002-05-31

    Recent progresses at LBNL in developing ion beams for industry, radiation therapy and inertial fusion applications were discussed. The highlights include ion beam lithography, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), and heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers using multiple linacs.

  3. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  4. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  5. Exploring Multimodal Data Fusion Through Joint Decompositions with Flexible Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral Farias, Rodrigo; Cohen, Jeremy Emile; Comon, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    A Bayesian framework is proposed to define flexible coupling models for joint tensor decompositions of multiple data sets. Under this framework, a natural formulation of the data fusion problem is to cast it in terms of a joint maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator. Data driven scenarios of joint posterior distributions are provided, including general Gaussian priors and non Gaussian coupling priors. We present and discuss implementation issues of algorithms used to obtain the joint MAP estimator. We also show how this framework can be adapted to tackle the problem of joint decompositions of large datasets. In the case of a conditional Gaussian coupling with a linear transformation, we give theoretical bounds on the data fusion performance using the Bayesian Cramer-Rao bound. Simulations are reported for hybrid coupling models ranging from simple additive Gaussian models, to Gamma-type models with positive variables and to the coupling of data sets which are inherently of different size due to different resolution of the measurement devices.

  6. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  7. Advances in fusion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Charles C.

    2000-12-01

    The US fusion technology program is an essential element in the development of the knowledge base for an attractive fusion power source. The technology program incorporates both near and long term R&D, contributes to material and engineering sciences as well as technology development, ranges from hardware production to theory and modeling, contributes significantly to spin-off applications, and performs global systems assessments and focused design studies.

  8. Engineering the fusion reactor first wall

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, Glen; Scott, Willms

    2008-01-01

    Recently the National Academy of Engineering published a set of Grand Challenges in Engineering in which the second item listed was entitled 'Provide energy from fusion'. Clearly a key component of this challenge is the science and technology associated with creating and maintaining burning plasmas. This is being vigorously addressed with both magnetic and inertial approaches with various experiments such as ITER and NIF. Considerably less attention is being given to another key component of this challenge, namely engineering the first wall that will contain the burning plasma. This is a daunting problem requiring technologies and materials that can not only survive, but also perform multiple essential functions in this extreme environment. These functions are (1) shield the remainder of the device from radiation. (2) convert of neutron energy to useful heat and (3) breed and extract tritium to maintain the reactor fuel supply. The first wall must not contaminate the plasma with impurities. It must be infused with cooling to maintain acceptable temperatures on plasma facing and structural components. It must not degrade. It must avoid excessive build-up of tritium on surfaces, and, if surface deposits do form, must be receptive to cleaning techniques. All these functions and constraints must be met while being subjected to nuclear and thermal radiation, particle bombardment, high magnetic fields, thermal cycling and occasional impingement of plasma on the surface. And, operating in a nuclear environment, the first wall must be fully maintainable by remotely-operated manipulators. Elements of the first wall challenge have been studied since the 1970' s both in the US and internationally. Considerable foundational work has been performed on plasma facing materials and breeding blanket/shield modules. Work has included neutronics, materials fabrication and joining, fluid flow, tritium breeding, tritium recovery and containment, energy conversion, materials damage and

  9. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead's thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules. PMID:27029285

  10. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead’s thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules. PMID:27029285

  11. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead’s thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules.

  12. ITER Fusion Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. Norbert Holtkamp

    2010-01-08

    ITER (in Latin ?the way?) is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier over one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen ? deuterium and tritium ? fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q ? 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). The ITER Organization was officially established in Cadarache, France, on 24 October 2007. The seven members engaged in the project ? China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the United States ? represent more than half the world?s population. The costs for ITER are shared by the seven members. The cost for the construction will be approximately 5.5 billion Euros, a similar amount is foreseen for the twenty-year phase of operation and the subsequent decommissioning.

  13. Inverted organic photosensitive device

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Tong, Xiaoran; Lee, Jun Yeob; Cho, Yong Joo

    2015-09-08

    There is disclosed a method for preparing the surface of a metal substrate. The present disclosure also relates to an organic photovoltaic device including a metal substrate made by such method. Also disclosed herein is an inverted photosensitive device including a stainless steel foil reflective electrode, an organic donor-acceptor heterojunction over the reflective electrode, and a transparent electrode over the donor-acceptor heterojunction.

  14. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    The following chapters are included in this study: (1) fusion nuclear issues, (2) survey of experimental needs, (3) requirements of the experiments, (4) non-fusion facilities, (5) fusion facilities for nuclear experiments, and (6) fusion research and development scenarios. (MOW)

  15. Corneal seal device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A corneal seal device is provided which, when placed in an incision in the eye, permits the insertion of a surgical tool or instrument through the device into the eye. The device includes a seal chamber which opens into a tube which is adapted to be sutured to the eye and serves as an entry passage for a tool. A sealable aperture in the chamber permits passage of the tool through the chamber into the tube and hence into the eye. The chamber includes inlet ports adapted to be connected to a regulated source of irrigation fluid which provides a safe intraocular pressure.

  16. Contribution to fusion research from IAEA coordinated research projects and joint experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryaznevich, M.; Van Oost, G.; Stöckel, J.; Kamendje, R.; Kuteev, B. N.; Melnikov, A.; Popov, T.; Svoboda, V.; The IAEA CRP Teams

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents objectives and activities of IAEA Coordinated Research Projects ‘Conceptual development of steady-state compact fusion neutron sources’ and ‘Utilisation of a network of small magnetic confinement fusion devices for mainstream fusion research’. The background and main projects of the CRP on FNS are described in detail, as this is a new activity at IAEA. Recent activities of the second CRP, which continues activities of previous CRPs, are overviewed.

  17. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    importance for the fusion power plant research programmes. The objective of this Technical Meeting was to examine in an integrated way all the safety aspects anticipated to be relevant to the first fusion power plant prototype expected to become operational by the middle of the century, leading to the first generation of economically viable fusion power plants with attractive S&E features. After screening by guest editors and consideration by referees, 13 (out of 28) papers were accepted for publication. They are devoted to the following safety topics: power plant safety; fusion specific operational safety approaches; test blanket modules; accident analysis; tritium safety and inventories; decommissioning and waste. The paper `Main safety issues at the transition from ITER to fusion power plants' by W. Gulden et al (EU) highlights the differences between ITER and future fusion power plants with magnetic confinement (off-site dose acceptance criteria, consequences of accidents inside and outside the design basis, occupational radiation exposure, and waste management, including recycling and/or final disposal in repositories) on the basis of the most recent European fusion power plant conceptual study. Ongoing S&E studies within the US inertial fusion energy (IFE) community are focusing on two design concepts. These are the high average power laser (HAPL) programme for development of a dry-wall, laser-driven IFE power plant, and the Z-pinch IFE programme for the production of an economically-attractive power plant using high-yield Z-pinch-driven targets. The main safety issues related to these programmes are reviewed in the paper `Status of IFE safety and environmental activities in the US' by S. Reyes et al (USA). The authors propose future directions of research in the IFE S&E area. In the paper `Recent accomplishments and future directions in the US Fusion Safety & Environmental Program' D. Petti et al (USA) state that the US fusion programme has long recognized that the S

  18. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  19. Cryomicroscopy provides structural snapshots of influenza virus membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Calder, Lesley J; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    The lipid-enveloped influenza virus enters host cells during infection by binding cell-surface receptors and, after receptor-mediated endocytosis, fusing with the membrane of the endosome and delivering the viral genome and transcription machinery into the host cell. These events are mediated by the hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein. At the low pH of the endosome, an irreversible conformational change in the HA, including the exposure of the hydrophobic fusion peptide, activates membrane fusion. Here we used electron cryomicroscopy and cryotomography to image the fusion of influenza virus with target membranes at low pH. We visualized structural intermediates of HA and their interactions with membranes during the course of membrane fusion as well as ultrastructural changes in the virus that accompany membrane fusion. Our observations are relevant to a wide range of protein-mediated membrane-fusion processes and demonstrate how dynamic membrane events may be studied by cryomicroscopy. PMID:27501535

  20. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Indications, Outcomes, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian; Kim, David Hanwuk

    2016-02-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a minimally invasive spinal fusion technique that uses the retroperitoneal approach to the anterior spinal column. Mechanical and technical results of the technique compare favorably with those of anterior lumbar interbody fusion in regard to large graft placement, graft volumes, and early initial stability. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion uses the transpsoas approach and traverses near the lumbar plexus. It is not, however, without its unique complications. Groin pain or numbness is well tolerated and often temporary; however, quadriceps palsy can be long-lasting and debilitating. Rarer but serious complications include vascular and visceral injury. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion has been used successfully to treat common degenerative spinal conditions such as spinal instability, stenosis, scoliosis, and degenerative disk disease. While understanding of the lumbar plexus and the technical challenges of the procedure improves, lateral lumbar interbody fusion will continue to provide safe and successful clinical outcomes with less morbidity than traditional procedures. PMID:26803545

  1. Multivariate Chemical Image Fusion of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging Modalities.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Aoife A; Dorrepaal, Ronan M

    2016-01-01

    Chemical image fusion refers to the combination of chemical images from different modalities for improved characterisation of a sample. Challenges associated with existing approaches include: difficulties with imaging the same sample area or having identical pixels across microscopic modalities, lack of prior knowledge of sample composition and lack of knowledge regarding correlation between modalities for a given sample. In addition, the multivariate structure of chemical images is often overlooked when fusion is carried out. We address these challenges by proposing a framework for multivariate chemical image fusion of vibrational spectroscopic imaging modalities, demonstrating the approach for image registration, fusion and resolution enhancement of chemical images obtained with IR and Raman microscopy. PMID:27384549

  2. Fusion reactions of Ni,6458+124Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C. L.; Stefanini, A. M.; Esbensen, H.; Rehm, K. E.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Avila, M. L.; Back, B. B.; Bourgin, D.; Corradi, L.; Courtin, S.; Fioretto, E.; Galtarossa, F.; Goasduff, A.; Haas, F.; Mazzocco, M. M.; Montanari, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Mijatovic, T.; Sagaidak, R.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Scarlassara, F.; Strano, E. E.; Szilner, S.

    2015-04-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions of 58Ni+124Sn and 64Ni+124Sn are extended towards lower energy to cross sections of 1 μ b and are compared to detailed coupled-channels calculations. The calculations clearly show the importance of including transfer reactions in a coupled-channels treatment for such heavy systems. This result is different from the conclusion made in a previous article which claimed that the influence of transfer on fusion is not important for fusion reactions of Ni +Sn . In the energy region studied in this experiment no indication of fusion hindrance has been observed, which is consistent with a systematic study of this behavior.

  3. Pyrotechnic device technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, P.D.

    1989-01-01

    This talk was given at the 14th International Pyrotechnic Seminar on September 21, 1989, in Jersey, United Kingdom, as one of two plenary lectures. It briefly surveys the current technology of pyrotechnic devices and examines trends for the future. The pyrotechnic'' can have several meanings. In this talk, pyrotechnic devices'' are devices in which porous materials undergo reduction-oxidation reactions and produce useful products. The pyrotechnic materials are generally fuel-oxidizer systems without binders, in contrast to primary or secondary explosives or propellants. The word pyrotechnic'' is often used to include explosive, squib, propellant, or other ordnance type devices, especially in the European community. The major need for pyrotechnic devices has always been military and defense; however, as technology advances, the civilian uses of pyrotechnics will continue to grow. If every automobile had a pyrotechnic device to trigger its air or crash bag, that application alone would mean millions of devices per year. Applications in safety, fire fighting, law enforcement, and other commercial applications are likely to increase due to the increased capability of pyrotechnic devices and the integration of such devices in system designs. 2 refs., 56 figs.

  4. Electrochromic devices

    DOEpatents

    Allemand, Pierre M.; Grimes, Randall F.; Ingle, Andrew R.; Cronin, John P.; Kennedy, Steve R.; Agrawal, Anoop; Boulton, Jonathan M.

    2001-01-01

    An electrochromic device is disclosed having a selective ion transport layer which separates an electrochemically active material from an electrolyte containing a redox active material. The devices are particularly useful as large area architectural and automotive glazings due to there reduced back reaction.

  5. BRAKE DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    O'Donnell, T.J.

    1959-03-10

    A brake device is described for utilization in connection with a control rod. The device comprises a pair of parallelogram link mechanisms, a control rod moveable rectilinearly therebetween in opposite directions, and shoes resiliently supported by the mechanism for frictional engagement with the control rod.

  6. Graphene device and method of using graphene device

    DOEpatents

    Bouchiat, Vincent; Girit, Caglar; Kessler, Brian; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2015-08-11

    An embodiment of a graphene device includes a layered structure, first and second electrodes, and a dopant island. The layered structure includes a conductive layer, an insulating layer, and a graphene layer. The electrodes are coupled to the graphene layer. The dopant island is coupled to an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. An embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. Another embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device without the dopant island. A dopant island is placed on an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. A response of the dopant island to the voltage is observed.

  7. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  8. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  9. Progress in magnetic fusion energy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomassen, Keith I.

    1993-03-01

    Remarkable scientific progress has been made in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program since its inception 40 years ago. A key energy confinement parameter reflecting that progress has been improved 10,000,000-fold in that time. A formalized international collaborative effort of design and development for a 1000-MW experimental reactor (ITER) has been entered into by the United States, Russia, Japan, and the European Community. In the United States, a national project to build a superconducting steady-state advanced tokamak (SSAT) to improve the reactor prospects of fusion is underway. (The device has been newly renamed the Tokamak Physics Experiment.) Despite this very encouraging progress, the outlook for fusion as an energy source remains unclear, with both economic and technological attractiveness yet to be determined. However, with only limited options for long-term energy supplies, and with environmental consequences yet to play a more dominant role in our choices, the world can ill afford not to develop the potential of fusion in the decades to come.

  10. Cost Accounting System for fusion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, W.R.; Keeton, D.C.; Thomson, S.L.

    1985-12-01

    A Cost Accounting System that is applicable to all magnetic fusion reactor design studies has been developed. This system provides: (1) definitions of the elements of cost and methods for the combination of these elements to form a cost estimate; (2) a Code of Accounts that uses a functional arrangement for identification of the plant components; and (3) definitions and methods to analyze actual cost data so that the data can be directly reported into this Cost Accounting System. The purpose of the Cost Accounting System is to provide the structure for the development of a fusion cost data base and for the development of validated cost estimating procedures. This system has been developed through use at the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) and has been applied to different confinement concepts (tokamaks and tandem mirrors) and to different types of projects (experimental devices and commercial power plants). The use of this Cost Accounting System by all magnetic fusion projects will promote the development of a common cost data base, allow the direct comparison of cost estimates, and ultimately establish the cost credibility of the program.

  11. Negative Halogen Ions for Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Leung, K.N.; Westenskow, G.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, advances in hydrogen negative ion sources have extended the usable range of hydrogen isotope neutral beams to energies suitable for large magnetically confined fusion devices. Recently, drawing upon this experience, negative halogen ions have been proposed as an alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers in inertial confinement fusion, because electron accumulation would be prevented in negative ion beams, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. This paper reports the results of an experiment comparing the current density and beam emittance of Cl+ and Cl- extracted from substantially ion-ion plasmas with that of Ar+ extracted from an ordinary electron-ion plasma, all using the same source, extractor, and emittance scanner. At similar discharge conditions, the Cl- current was typically 85 – 90% of the positive chlorine current, with an e-/ Cl- ratio as low as seven without grid magnets. The Cl- was as much as 76% of the Ar+ current from a discharge with the same RF drive. The minimum normalized beam emittance and inferred ion temperatures of Cl+, Cl-, and Ar+ were all similar, so the current density and optical quality of Cl- appear as suitable for heavy ion fusion driver applications as a positive noble gas ion of similar mass. Since F, I, and Br should all behave similarly in an ion source, they should also be suitable as driver beams.

  12. 21 CFR 870.5300 - DC-defibrillator (including paddles).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. This generic type of device includes low energy... defibrillating the atria or ventricles of the heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. The device...

  13. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications.

    PubMed

    Dipoce, J; Bernheim, A; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-02-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  14. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications

    PubMed Central

    Dipoce, J; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-01-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  15. Stellarator approach to fusion plasma confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The stellarator is a toroidal fusion plasma confinement device with nested magnetic flux surfaces. The required twist of the field lines is produced by external helical coils rather than by plasma current, as in a tokamak. Stellarator devices are attractive fusion reactor candidates precisely because they offer the prospect of steady-state operation without plasma current. In the last few years the excellent results achieved with currentless stellarator plasmas of modest minor radius (10 to 20 cm) at Kyoto University (Japan) and the Max Planck Institute (West Germany) have made the stellarator second only to the tokamak in its progress toward fusion breakeven, with temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/ approx. 1 KeV, Lawson products n tau approx. 2 to 5 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/.s, and volume-averaged beta values approx. = 2%. The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), now under construction at Oak Ridge Natioal Laboratory (ORNL) and scheduled to operate in 1986, represents a significant advance in stellarator research, with a plasma major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a magnetic field of 2 T for 5 s or 1 T at steady state. ATF replaces the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B heating and diagnostic system.

  16. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There is little doubt that humans will attempt to explore and develop the solar system in this century. A large amount of energy will be required for accomplishing this. The need for fusion propulsion is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important thermodynamical attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion can produce exhaust velocity up to about 5 km/s. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a hydrogen propellant increases the exhaust velocity by only a factor of about two. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. The principal advantage of the fission process is that its development is relatively mature and is available right now. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. The technical priorities for developing and applying fusion for propulsion are

  17. Materials issues in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, A. K.; Krishnamurthy, N.; Batra, I. S.

    2010-02-01

    are steels for the first wall and other structurals, copper alloys for the heat sink, and beryllium for facing the plasma. For the TBMs, the materials that need to be developed include beryllium and/or beryllium-titanium alloys for neutron multiplication, lithium-bearing compounds for tritium generation, and the liquid metal coolants like lead-lithium eutectic in which lead acts as a neutron multiplier and lithium as a tritium breeder. The other materials that need attention of the materials scientists include superconductors made of NbTi, Nb3Sn and Nb3Al for the tokamaks, coatings or ceramic inserts to offset the effect of corrosion and the MHD in liquid metal cooled TBMs, and a host of other materials like nano-structured materials, special adhesives and numerous other alloys and compounds. Apart from this, the construction of the tokamaks would necessitate development of methodologies of joining the selected materials. This presentation would deal with the issues related to the development, characterization and qualification of both the structural as well as the functional materials required to carry forward the challenging task of harnessing fusion energy for use of mankind in engineered systems.

  18. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  19. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  20. Nuclear-data needs for inertial-confinement fusion (ICF)

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; Motz, H.T.

    1983-05-09

    Our survey was limited to ICF programs in the United States. It included researchers in laser and heavy ion fusion, target design, target diagnostics, and conceptual reactor design. We asked each of these people to read the current data needs for magnetic fusion energy and to comment on additional data that they require.