Science.gov

Sample records for fusion inhibitory complex

  1. Analysis of serpin inhibitory function by mutagenesis of ovalbumin and generation of chimeric ovalbumin/PAI-2 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, B J; Worrall, D M

    1997-04-01

    Ovalbumin is a non-inhibitory serpin which lacks the ability to undergo the S --> R transition or conformational change. Amino acid residues in the hinge region (P11 to P14) of ovalbumin and other non-inhibitory serpins differ from the concensus sequence of this region of inhibitory serpins, and have been proposed to be responsible for lack of inhibitory properties, particularly the P14 charged residue. Site directed mutagenesis using PCR overlap extension was performed on these residues in ovalbumin to create a mutant with three amino acid changes, R340T, V342A and V343A. However analysis of the mutant recombinant ovalbumin with the consensus residues failed to show inhibitory activity or decreased stability, indicating that the hinge region alone is not responsible for lack of inhibition. A series of three fusion proteins were then constructed by replacing varying C-terminal regions of ovalbumin with the corresponding region of the inhibitory ov-serpin PAI-2 in order to further analyse serpin inhibitory function. Fusion proteins F1 and F2 contained approximately 16% and 35% PAI-2, respectively. This resulted in the replacing of structural features such as the reactive site loop, hinge region and beta sheet strands 5A and 6A. However both fusion proteins showed no inhibitory activity with the PAI-2 target protease urokinase (uPA) and no decrease in stability as analysed by transverse urea gradient (TUG) gels. The third chimeric fusion protein constructed (F3) contained 64% PAI-2 and did demonstrate inhibition of uPA, SDS-PAGE stable complex formation with uPA and increased instability on TUG gels. Structural differences between the inactive F2 and active F3 include the replacement of helix F and beta sheet strand 3A of ovalbumin with those of PAI-2, suggesting that these features may have a key role in serpin beta-sheet opening and inhibitory function. PMID:9126838

  2. Fission-fusion dynamics, behavioral flexibility, and inhibitory control in primates.

    PubMed

    Amici, Federica; Aureli, Filippo; Call, Josep

    2008-09-23

    The Machiavellian Intelligence or Social Brain Hypothesis explains the evolution of increased brain size as mainly driven by living in complex organized social systems in which individuals represent "moving targets" who can adopt multiple strategies to respond to one another. Frequently splitting and merging in subgroups of variable composition (fission-fusion or FF dynamics) has been proposed as one aspect of social complexity ( compare with) that may be associated with an enhancement of cognitive skills like inhibition, which allows the suppression of prepotent but ineffective responses in a changing social environment. We compared the performance of primates experiencing high levels of FF dynamics (chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, and spider monkeys) to that of species living in more cohesive groups (gorillas, capuchin monkeys, and long-tailed macaques) on five inhibition tasks. Testing species differing in diet, phylogenetic relatedness, and levels of FF dynamics allowed us to contrast ecological, phylogenetic, and socioecological explanations for interspecific differences. Spider monkeys performed at levels comparable to chimpanzees, bonobos, and orangutans, and better than gorillas. A two-cluster analysis grouped all species with higher levels of FF dynamics together. These findings confirmed that enhanced inhibitory skills are positively associated with FF dynamics, more than to phylogenetic relations or feeding ecology. PMID:18804375

  3. Complex inhibitory microcircuitry regulates retinal signaling near visual threshold.

    PubMed

    Grimes, William N; Zhang, Jun; Tian, Hua; Graydon, Cole W; Hoon, Mrinalini; Rieke, Fred; Diamond, Jeffrey S

    2015-07-01

    Neuronal microcircuits, small, localized signaling motifs involving two or more neurons, underlie signal processing and computation in the brain. Compartmentalized signaling within a neuron may enable it to participate in multiple, independent microcircuits. Each A17 amacrine cell in the mammalian retina contains within its dendrites hundreds of synaptic feedback microcircuits that operate independently to modulate feedforward signaling in the inner retina. Each of these microcircuits comprises a small (<1 μm) synaptic varicosity that typically receives one excitatory synapse from a presynaptic rod bipolar cell (RBC) and returns two reciprocal inhibitory synapses back onto the same RBC terminal. Feedback inhibition from the A17 sculpts the feedforward signal from the RBC to the AII, a critical component of the circuitry mediating night vision. Here, we show that the two inhibitory synapses from the A17 to the RBC express kinetically distinct populations of GABA receptors: rapidly activating GABA(A)Rs are enriched at one synapse while more slowly activating GABA(C)Rs are enriched at the other. Anatomical and electrophysiological data suggest that macromolecular complexes of voltage-gated (Cav) channels and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels help to regulate GABA release from A17 varicosities and limit GABA(C)R activation under certain conditions. Finally, we find that selective elimination of A17-mediated feedback inhibition reduces the signal to noise ratio of responses to dim flashes recorded in the feedforward pathway (i.e., the AII amacrine cell). We conclude that A17-mediated feedback inhibition improves the signal to noise ratio of RBC-AII transmission near visual threshold, thereby improving visual sensitivity at night. PMID:25972578

  4. Inhibitory Effect of mTOR Activator MHY1485 on Autophagy: Suppression of Lysosomal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeon Ja; Park, Yun Jung; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Kim, Dae Hyun; Ha, Young Mi; Kim, Ji Min; Song, Yu Min; Heo, Hyoung-Sam; Yu, Byung Pal; Chun, Pusoon; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Chung, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a major degradative process responsible for the disposal of cytoplasmic proteins and dysfunctional organelles via the lysosomal pathway. During the autophagic process, cells form double-membraned vesicles called autophagosomes that sequester disposable materials in the cytoplasm and finally fuse with lysosomes. In the present study, we investigated the inhibition of autophagy by a synthesized compound, MHY1485, in a culture system by using Ac2F rat hepatocytes. Autophagic flux was measured to evaluate the autophagic activity. Autophagosomes were visualized in Ac2F cells transfected with AdGFP-LC3 by live-cell confocal microscopy. In addition, activity of mTOR, a major regulatory protein of autophagy, was assessed by western blot and docking simulation using AutoDock 4.2. In the result, treatment with MHY1485 suppressed the basal autophagic flux, and this inhibitory effect was clearly confirmed in cells under starvation, a strong physiological inducer of autophagy. The levels of p62 and beclin-1 did not show significant change after treatment with MHY1485. Decreased co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes in confocal microscopic images revealed the inhibitory effect of MHY1485 on lysosomal fusion during starvation-induced autophagy. These effects of MHY1485 led to the accumulation of LC3II and enlargement of the autophagosomes in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Furthermore, MHY1485 induced mTOR activation and correspondingly showed a higher docking score than PP242, a well-known ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, in docking simulation. In conclusion, MHY1485 has an inhibitory effect on the autophagic process by inhibition of fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes leading to the accumulation of LC3II protein and enlarged autophagosomes. MHY1485 also induces mTOR activity, providing a possibility for another regulatory mechanism of autophagy by the MHY compound. The significance of this study is the finding of a novel inhibitor of autophagy

  5. DNA Triplex-Based Complexes Display Anti-HIV-1-Cell Fusion Activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Xiaoyu; Chong, Huihui; Lai, Wenqing; Jiang, Xifeng; Wang, Chao; He, Yuxian; Liu, Keliang

    2015-08-01

    DNA triplexes with hydrophobic modifications were designed and evaluated for their activity as inhibitors of the cell fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Triplex inhibitors displayed low micromolar activities in the cell-cell fusion assay and nanomolar activities in the anti-HIV-1 pseudovirus test. Helix structure and the presence of sufficient numbers of hydrophobic regions were essential for the antifusion activity. Results from native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based inhibitory assay indicated that these triplexes may interact with the primary pocket at the glycoprotein 41 (gp41) N-heptad repeat, thereby inhibiting formation of the HIV-1 gp41 6-helical bundle. Triplex-based complexes may represent a novel category of HIV-1 inhibitors in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery. PMID:26192705

  6. Biochemical and Functional Studies of Cortical Vesicle Fusion: The SNARE Complex and Ca2+ Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Coorssen, Jens R.; Blank, Paul S.; Tahara, Masahiro; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    1998-01-01

    Cortical vesicles (CV) possess components critical to the mechanism of exocytosis. The homotypic fusion of CV centrifuged or settled into contact has a sigmoidal Ca2+ activity curve comparable to exocytosis (CV–PM fusion). Here we show that Sr2+ and Ba2+ also trigger CV–CV fusion, and agents affecting different steps of exocytotic fusion block Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+-triggered CV–CV fusion. The maximal number of active fusion complexes per vesicle, Max, was quantified by NEM inhibition of fusion, showing that CV–CV fusion satisfies many criteria of a mathematical analysis developed for exocytosis. Both Max and the Ca2+ sensitivity of fusion complex activation were comparable to that determined for CV–PM fusion. Using Ca2+-induced SNARE complex disruption, we have analyzed the relationship between membrane fusion (CV–CV and CV–PM) and the SNARE complex. Fusion and complex disruption have different sensitivities to Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+, the complex remains Ca2+- sensitive on fusion-incompetent CV, and disruption does not correlate with the quantified activation of fusion complexes. Under conditions which disrupt the SNARE complex, CV on the PM remain docked and fusion competent, and isolated CV still dock and fuse, but with a markedly reduced Ca2+ sensitivity. Thus, in this system, neither the formation, presence, nor disruption of the SNARE complex is essential to the Ca2+-triggered fusion of exocytotic membranes. Therefore the SNARE complex alone cannot be the universal minimal fusion machine for intracellular fusion. We suggest that this complex modulates the Ca2+ sensitivity of fusion. PMID:9864359

  7. Deep Fusion of Multiple Semantic Cues for Complex Event Recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xishan; Zhang, Hanwang; Zhang, Yongdong; Yang, Yang; Wang, Meng; Luan, Huanbo; Li, Jintao; Chua, Tat-Seng

    2016-03-01

    We present a deep learning strategy to fuse multiple semantic cues for complex event recognition. In particular, we tackle the recognition task by answering how to jointly analyze human actions (who is doing what), objects (what), and scenes (where). First, each type of semantic features (e.g., human action trajectories) is fed into a corresponding multi-layer feature abstraction pathway, followed by a fusion layer connecting all the different pathways. Second, the correlations of how the semantic cues interacting with each other are learned in an unsupervised cross-modality autoencoder fashion. Finally, by fine-tuning a large-margin objective deployed on this deep architecture, we are able to answer the question on how the semantic cues of who, what, and where compose a complex event. As compared with the traditional feature fusion methods (e.g., various early or late strategies), our method jointly learns the essential higher level features that are most effective for fusion and recognition. We perform extensive experiments on two real-world complex event video benchmarks, MED'11 and CCV, and demonstrate that our method outperforms the best published results by 21% and 11%, respectively, on an event recognition task. PMID:26780785

  8. Complexity versus availability for fusion: The potential advantages of inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.,

    1996-09-05

    Probably the single largest advantage of the inertial route to fusion energy (IFE) is the perception that its power plant embodiments could achieve acceptable capacity factors. This is a result of its relative simplicity, the decoupling of the driver and reactor chamber, and the potential to employ thick liquid walls. We examine these issues in terms of the complexity, reliability, maintainability and, therefore, availability of both magnetic and inertial fusion power plants and compare these factors with corresponding scheduled and unscheduled outage data from present day fission experience. We stress that, given the simple nature of a fission core, the vast majority of unplanned outages in fission plants are due to failures outside the reactor vessel itself Given we must be prepared for similar outages in the analogous plant external to a fusion power core, this puts severe demands on the reliability required of the fusion core itself. We indicate that such requirements can probably be met for IFE plants. We recommend that this advantage be promoted by performing a quantitative reliability and availability study for a representative IFE power plant and suggest that databases are probably adequate for this task.

  9. Inhibitory factors associated with anaphase-promoting complex/cylosome in mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Ilana; Miniowitz, Shirly; Moshe, Yakir; Hershko, Avram

    2007-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system ensures accurate chromosome segregation by preventing anaphase initiation until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. It affects the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets inhibitors of anaphase initiation for degradation. The mechanisms by which this system regulates APC/C remain obscure. Some models propose that the system promotes sequestration of the APC/C activator Cdc20 by binding to the checkpoint proteins Mad2 and BubR1. A different model suggests that a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of BubR1, Bub3, Cdc20, and Mad2 inhibits APC/C in mitotic checkpoint [Sudakin V, Chan GKT, Yen TJ (2001) J Cell Biol 154:925–936]. We examined this problem by using extracts from nocodazole-arrested cells that reproduce some downstream events of the mitotic checkpoint system, such as lag kinetics of the degradation of APC/C substrate. Incubation of extracts with adenosine-5′-(γ-thio)triphosphate (ATP[γS]) stabilized the checkpoint-arrested state, apparently by stable thiophosphorylation of some proteins. By immunoprecipitation of APC/C from stably checkpoint-arrested extracts, followed by elution with increased salt concentration, we isolated inhibitory factors associated with APC/C. A part of the inhibitory material consists of Cdc20 associated with BubR1 and Mad2, and is thus similar to MCC. Contrary to the original MCC hypothesis, we find that MCC disassembles upon exit from the mitotic checkpoint. Thus, the requirement of the mitotic checkpoint system for the binding of Mad2 and BubR1 to Cdc20 may be for the assembly of the inhibitory complex rather than for Cdc20 sequestration. PMID:17360335

  10. Synthesis, structures and urease inhibitory activity of cobalt(III) complexes with Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Jing, Changling; Wang, Cunfang; Yan, Kai; Zhao, Kedong; Sheng, Guihua; Qu, Dan; Niu, Fang; Zhu, Hailiang; You, Zhonglu

    2016-01-15

    A series of new cobalt(III) complexes were prepared. They are [CoL(1)(py)3]·NO3 (1), [CoL(2)(bipy)(N3)]·CH3OH (2), [CoL(3)(HL(3))(N3)]·NO3 (3), and [CoL(4)(MeOH)(N3)] (4), where L(1), L(2), L(3) and L(4) are the deprotonated form of N'-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzylidene)-3-methylbenzohydrazide, N'-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-3-hydroxylbenzohydrazide, 2-[(2-dimethylaminoethylimino)methyl]-4-methylphenol, and N,N'-bis(5-methylsalicylidene)-o-phenylenediamine, respectively, py is pyridine, and bipy is 2,2'-bipyridine. The complexes were characterized by infrared and UV-Vis spectra, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The Co atoms in the complexes are in octahedral coordination. Complexes 1 and 4 show effective urease inhibitory activities, with IC50 values of 4.27 and 0.35 μmol L(-1), respectively. Complex 2 has medium activity against urease, with IC50 value of 68.7 μmol L(-1). While complex 3 has no activity against urease. Molecular docking study of the complexes with Helicobacter pylori urease was performed. PMID:26712097

  11. The MARVEL domain protein, Singles Bar, is required for progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Beatriz; Maeland, Anne D.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Bloor, James W.; Brown, Nicholas H.; Michelson, Alan M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Multinucleated myotubes develop by the sequential fusion of individual myoblasts. Using a convergence of genomic and classical genetic approaches, we have discovered a novel gene, singles bar (sing), that is essential for myoblast fusion. sing encodes a small multipass transmembrane protein containing a MARVEL domain, which is found in vertebrate proteins involved in processes such as tight junction formation and vesicle trafficking where—as in myoblast fusion—membrane apposition occurs. sing is expressed in both founder cells and fusion competent myoblasts preceding and during myoblast fusion. Examination of embryos injected with double-stranded sing RNA or embryos homozygous for ethane methyl sulfonate-induced sing alleles revealed an identical phenotype: replacement of multinucleated myofibers by groups of single, myosin-expressing myoblasts at a stage when formation of the mature muscle pattern is complete in wild-type embryos. Unfused sing mutant myoblasts form clusters, suggesting that early recognition and adhesion of these cells is unimpaired. To further investigate this phenotype, we undertook electron microscopic ultrastructural studies of fusing myoblasts in both sing and wild-type embryos. These experiments revealed that more sing mutant myoblasts than wild-type contain pre-fusion complexes, which are characterized by electron-dense vesicles paired on either side of the fusing plasma membranes. In contrast, embryos mutant for another muscle fusion gene, blown fuse (blow), have a normal number of such complexes. Together, these results lead to the hypothesis that sing acts at a step distinct from that of blow, and that sing is required on both founder cell and fusion-competent myoblast membranes to allow progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion, possibly by mediating fusion of the electron-dense vesicles to the plasma membrane. PMID:17537424

  12. An image fusion method based region segmentation and complex wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junju; Yuan, Yihui; Chang, Benkang; Han, Yiyong; Liu, Lei; Qiu, Yafeng

    2009-07-01

    A fusion algorithm for infrared and visible light images based on region segmentation and the dual-tree complex wavelet transform. Before image segmentation, morphological top-hat filtering is firstly performed on the IR image and visual images respectively and the details of the luminous area are eliminated. Morphological bottom-hat filtering is then performed on the two kinds of images respectively and the details of the dark area are eliminated. Make the top-hat filtered image subtract the bottom-hat filtered image and obtain the enhanced images. Then the threshold method is used to segment the enhanced images. After image segmentation, the DTCWT coefficients from different regions are merged separately. Finally the fused image is obtained by performing inverse DTCWT. The evaluation results show the validity of the presented algorithm.

  13. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Lincan; Shen, Hongmei; Zhao, Guangqiang; Yang, Runxiang; Cai, Xinyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Jin, Congguo; Huang, Yunchao

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  14. Inhibitory Effects of Amorphigenin on the Mitochondrial Complex I of Culex pipiens pallens Coquillett (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Mingshan; Liang, Yaping; Gu, Zumin; Li, Xiuwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory found that the extract from seeds of Amorpha fruticosa in the Leguminosae family had lethal effects against mosquito larvae, and an insecticidal compound amorphigenin was isolated. In this study, the inhibitory effects of amorphigenin against the mitochondrial complex I of Culex pipiens pallens (Diptera: Culicidae) were investigated and compared with that of rotenone. The results showed that amorphigenin and rotenone can decrease the mitochondrial complex I activity both in vivo and in vitro as the in vivo IC50 values (the inhibitor concentrations leading to 50% of the enzyme activity lost) were determined to be 2.4329 and 2.5232 μmol/L, respectively, while the in vitro IC50 values were 2.8592 and 3.1375 μmol/L, respectively. Both amorphigenin and rotenone were shown to be reversible and mixed-I type inhibitors of the mitochondrial complex I of Cx. pipiens pallens, indicating that amorphigenin and rotenone inhibited the enzyme activity not only by binding with the free enzyme but also with the enzyme-substrate complex, and the values of KI and KIS for amorphigenin were determined to be 20.58 and 87.55 μM, respectively, while the values for rotenone were 14.04 and 69.23 μM, respectively. PMID:26307964

  15. Preparation and crystallization of the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, N; Okada, K; Hirotsu, S; Hatakeyama, K; Hakoshima, T

    2001-08-01

    Mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decameric enzyme in the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, which is an essential cofactor for enzymes producing neurotransmitters such as catecholamines and for nitric oxide synthases. The enzyme is dually regulated by its feedback regulatory protein GFRP in the presence of its stimulatory effector phenylalanine and its inhibitory effector biopterin. Here, both the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I bound to GFRP were crystallized by vapour diffusion. Diffraction data sets at resolutions of 3.0 and 2.64 A were collected for the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes, respectively. Each complex consists of two GTPCHI pentamer rings and two GFRP pentamer rings, with pseudo-52 point-group symmetry. PMID:11468403

  16. Differential inhibitory effects of methylmalonic acid on respiratory chain complex activities in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Pettenuzzo, Leticia F; Ferreira, Gustavo da C; Schmidt, Anna Laura; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wajner, Moacir

    2006-02-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of methylmalonic acid (MMA) and clinically by progressive neurological deterioration and kidney failure, whose pathophysiology is so far poorly established. Previous studies have shown that MMA inhibits complex II of the respiratory chain in rat cerebral cortex, although no inhibition of complexes I-V was found in bovine heart. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the in vitro effect of 2.5mM MMA on the activity of complexes I-III, II, II-III and IV in striatum, hippocampus, heart, liver and kidney homogenates from young rats. We observed that MMA caused a significant inhibition of complex II activity in striatum and hippocampus (15-20%) at low concentrations of succinate in the medium, but not in the peripheral tissues. We also verified that the inhibitory property of MMA only occurred after exposing brain homogenates for at least 10 min with the acid, suggesting that this inhibition was mediated by indirect mechanisms. Simultaneous preincubation with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and catalase (CAT) plus superoxide dismutase (SOD) did not prevent MMA-induced inhibition of complex II, suggesting that common reactive oxygen (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical) and nitric (nitric oxide) species were not involved in this effect. In addition, complex II-III (20-35%) was also inhibited by MMA in all tissues tested, and complex I-III only in the kidney (53%) and liver (38%). In contrast, complex IV activity was not changed by MMA in all tissues studied. These results indicate that MMA differentially affects the activity of the respiratory chain pending on the tissues studied, being striatum and hippocampus more vulnerable to its effect. In case our in vitro data are confirmed in vivo in tissues from methylmalonic acidemic patients, it is feasible that that the present findings may be

  17. Atmospheric turbulence mitigation using complex wavelet-based fusion.

    PubMed

    Anantrasirichai, Nantheera; Achim, Alin; Kingsbury, Nick G; Bull, David R

    2013-06-01

    Restoring a scene distorted by atmospheric turbulence is a challenging problem in video surveillance. The effect, caused by random, spatially varying, perturbations, makes a model-based solution difficult and in most cases, impractical. In this paper, we propose a novel method for mitigating the effects of atmospheric distortion on observed images, particularly airborne turbulence which can severely degrade a region of interest (ROI). In order to extract accurate detail about objects behind the distorting layer, a simple and efficient frame selection method is proposed to select informative ROIs only from good-quality frames. The ROIs in each frame are then registered to further reduce offsets and distortions. We solve the space-varying distortion problem using region-level fusion based on the dual tree complex wavelet transform. Finally, contrast enhancement is applied. We further propose a learning-based metric specifically for image quality assessment in the presence of atmospheric distortion. This is capable of estimating quality in both full- and no-reference scenarios. The proposed method is shown to significantly outperform existing methods, providing enhanced situational awareness in a range of surveillance scenarios. PMID:23475359

  18. Structure of the Malaria Antigen AMA1 in Complex with a Growth-Inhibitory Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Kim, Hanna; Anders, Robin F; Foley, Michael; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2007-01-01

    Identifying functionally critical regions of the malaria antigen AMA1 (apical membrane antigen 1) is necessary to understand the significance of the polymorphisms within this antigen for vaccine development. The crystal structure of AMA1 in complex with the Fab fragment of inhibitory monoclonal antibody 1F9 reveals that 1F9 binds to the AMA1 solvent-exposed hydrophobic trough, confirming its importance. 1F9 uses the heavy and light chain complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) to wrap around the polymorphic loops adjacent to the trough, but uses a ridge of framework residues to bind to the hydrophobic trough. The resulting 1F9-AMA1–combined buried surface of 2,470 Å2 is considerably larger than previously reported Fab–antigen interfaces. Mutations of polymorphic AMA1 residues within the 1F9 epitope disrupt 1F9 binding and dramatically reduce the binding of affinity-purified human antibodies. Moreover, 1F9 binding to AMA1 is competed by naturally acquired human antibodies, confirming that the 1F9 epitope is a frequent target of immunological attack. PMID:17907804

  19. Optogenetic perturbation of preBötzinger Complex inhibitory neurons modulates respiratory pattern

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, David; Worrell, Jason W.; Cui, Yan; Feldman, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons make up a significant fraction of the neurons within the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC), a site critical for mammalian eupneic breathing. The role of glycinergic preBötC neurons in respiratory rhythmogenesis in mice was investigated by optogenetically-targeted excitation or inhibition. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) or Archaerhodopsin (Arch) was expressed in glycinergic preBötC neurons of glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2)-Cre mice. In ChR2-transfected mice, brief inspiratory-phase bilateral photostimulation targeting the preBötC prematurely terminated inspiration, whereas expiratory-phase photostimulation delayed the onset of the next inspiration. Prolonged photostimulation produced apneas lasting as long as the light pulse. Inspiratory-phase photoinhibition in Arch-transfected mice during inspiration increased tidal volume without altering inspiratory duration, whereas expiratory-phase photoinhibition shortened the latency until the next inspiration. During persistent apneas, prolonged photoinhibition restored rhythmic breathing. We conclude that glycinergic preBötC neurons modulate inspiratory pattern and are important for reflex apneas but that the rhythm can persist after significant dampening of their activity. PMID:25643296

  20. Growth inhibitory effect of the ternary complex factor Net on human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Baiwen; Ni, Peihua; Zhu, Qi; Cao, Haixia; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Su; Au, Chris; Zhang, Yongping

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies and carries the most dismal prognoses of all cancers. A better understanding of the genes involving in tumor development may allow us to tackle this rapidly progressive disease. The Net gene belongs to the ternary complex transcription factor (TCF) family and is regulated by the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase-signaling pathway. Under basal conditions, Net shows strong repressing function on transcription of proto-oncogene gene c-fos. Moreover, the lower expression of Net has been noted in some carcinoma cells, such as cervical cancer. To study the effect of Net on c-fos expression and its potential role in the growth of pancreatic carcinoma, we developed a recombinant plasmid, a pEGFP-N1-Net, which codes for Net-EGFP fusion proteins, and stably transfected it into BxPC-3 human pancreatic carcinoma cells. Using stable transformants, we were able to show that overexpression of Net decreased the expression of c-fos and inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that Net overexpression inhibited cell cycle progression. These findings suggested that loss of Net repression could augment c-fos expression and further trigger neoplastic cell proliferation, which was involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, Net might be a potential target for the treatment of c-fos-positive pancreatic cancer. PMID:18832796

  1. Nonlinear Dynamics and Complex Behaviors in Magnetized Plasmas of Fusion Interest

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, F.; Chen, L.

    2008-10-15

    Complexity and self-organization in burning plasmas are consequence of the interaction of energetic ions with plasma instabilities and turbulence; of the strong nonlinear coupling that will take place between fusion reactivity profiles, pressure driven currents, MHD stability, transport and plasma boundary interactions, mediated by the energetic particle population; and finally of the long time scale nonlinear (complex) behaviors that may affect the overall fusion performance and eventually pose issues for the stability and control of the fusion burn. These issues are briefly discussed in this work, with a view on their potential applications to other research areas.

  2. Nanoluciferase as a novel quantitative protein fusion tag: Application for overexpression and bioluminescent receptor-binding assays of human leukemia inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    He, Sheng-Xiang; Song, Ge; Shi, Jia-Ping; Guo, Yu-Qi; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2014-11-01

    Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) is a newly developed small luciferase reporter with the brightest bioluminescence reported to date. In the present work, we developed NanoLuc as a novel quantitative protein fusion tag for efficient overexpression in Escherichia coli and ultrasensitive bioluminescent assays using human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) as a model protein. LIF is an interleukin 6 family cytokine that elicits pleiotropic effects on a diverse range of cells by activating a heterodimeric LIFR/gp130 receptor. Recombinant preparation of the biologically active LIF protein is quite difficult due to its hydrophobic nature and three disulfide bonds. Using the novel NanoLuc-fusion approach, soluble 6×His-NanoLuc-LIF fusion protein was efficiently overexpressed in E. coli and enzymatically converted to monomeric mature LIF. Both the mature LIF and the NanoLuc-fused LIF had high biological activities in a leukemia M1 cell proliferation inhibition assay and in a STAT3 signaling activation assay. The NanoLuc-fused LIF retained high binding affinities with the overexpressed LIFR (Kd = 1.4 ± 0.4 nM, n = 3), the overexpressed LIFR/gp130 (Kd = 115 ± 8 pM, n = 3), and the endogenously expressed LIFR/gp130 (Kd = 33.1 ± 3.2 pM, n = 3), with a detection limit of less than 10 receptors per cell. Thus, the novel NanoLuc-fusion strategy not only provided an efficient approach for preparation of recombinant LIF protein but also provided a novel ultrasensitive bioluminescent tracer for ligand-receptor interaction studies. The novel NanoLuc-fusion approach could be extended to other proteins for both efficient sample preparation and various bioluminescent quantitative assays in future studies. PMID:25179300

  3. Identification of a Potent and Broad-Spectrum Hepatitis C Virus Fusion Inhibitory Peptide from the E2 Stem Domain

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Xiaojing; Niu, Yuqiang; Cheng, Min; Liu, Xiuying; Feng, Yetong; Zheng, Fuxiang; Fan, Jingjing; Li, Xiang; Jin, Qi; Zhong, Jin; Li, Yi-Ping; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins E1 and E2 play an essential role in virus entry. However, the fusion mechanisms of HCV remain largely unclear, hampering the development of efficient fusion inhibitors. Here, we developed two cell-based membrane fusion models that allow for screening a peptide library covering the full-length E1 and E2 amino acid sequences. A peptide from the E2 stem domain, named E27, was found to possess the ability to block E1E2-mediated cell-cell fusion and inhibit cell entry of HCV pseudoparticles and infection of cell culture-derived HCV at nanomolar concentrations. E27 demonstrated broad-spectrum inhibition of the major genotypes 1 to 6. A time-of-addition experiment revealed that E27 predominantly functions in the late steps during HCV entry, without influencing the expression and localization of HCV co-receptors. Moreover, we demonstrated that E27 interfered with hetero-dimerization of ectopically expressed E1E2 in cells, and mutational analysis suggested that E27 might target a conserved region in E1. Taken together, our findings provide a novel candidate as well as a strategy for developing potent and broad-spectrum HCV fusion inhibitors, which may complement the current direct-acting antiviral medications for chronic hepatitis C, and shed light on the mechanism of HCV membrane fusion. PMID:27121372

  4. Structure of the Human Factor VIII C2 Domain in Complex with the 3E6 Inhibitory Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Wuerth, Michelle E.; Cragerud, Rebecca K.; Clint Spiegel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Blood coagulation factor VIII is a glycoprotein cofactor that is essential for the intrinsic pathway of the blood coagulation cascade. Inhibitory antibodies arise either spontaneously or in response to therapeutic infusion of functional factor VIII into hemophilia A patients, many of which are specific to the factor VIII C2 domain. The immune response is largely parsed into “classical” and “non-classical” inhibitory antibodies, which bind to opposing faces cooperatively. In this study, the 2.61 Å resolution structure of the C2 domain in complex with the antigen-binding fragment of the 3E6 classical inhibitory antibody is reported. The binding interface is largely conserved when aligned with the previously determined structure of the C2 domain in complex with two antibodies simultaneously. Further inspection of the B factors for the C2 domain in various X-ray crystal structures indicates that 3E6 antibody binding decreases the thermal motion behavior of surface loops in the C2 domain on the opposing face, thereby suggesting that cooperative antibody binding is a dynamic effect. Understanding the structural nature of the immune response to factor VIII following hemophilia A treatment will help lead to the development of better therapeutic reagents. PMID:26598467

  5. Structure of the human factor VIII C2 domain in complex with the 3E6 inhibitory antibody

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wuerth, Michelle E.; Cragerud, Rebecca K.; Spiegel, P. Clint

    2015-11-24

    Blood coagulation factor VIII is a glycoprotein cofactor that is essential for the intrinsic pathway of the blood coagulation cascade. Inhibitory antibodies arise either spontaneously or in response to therapeutic infusion of functional factor VIII into hemophilia A patients, many of which are specific to the factor VIII C2 domain. The immune response is largely parsed into “classical” and “non-classical” inhibitory antibodies, which bind to opposing faces cooperatively. In this study, the 2.61 Å resolution structure of the C2 domain in complex with the antigen-binding fragment of the 3E6 classical inhibitory antibody is reported. The binding interface is largely conservedmore » when aligned with the previously determined structure of the C2 domain in complex with two antibodies simultaneously. Further inspection of the B factors for the C2 domain in various X-ray crystal structures indicates that 3E6 antibody binding decreases the thermal motion behavior of surface loops in the C2 domain on the opposing face, thereby suggesting that cooperative antibody binding is a dynamic effect. Furthermore, understanding the structural nature of the immune response to factor VIII following hemophilia A treatment will help lead to the development of better therapeutic reagents.« less

  6. Structure of the human factor VIII C2 domain in complex with the 3E6 inhibitory antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wuerth, Michelle E.; Cragerud, Rebecca K.; Spiegel, P. Clint

    2015-11-24

    Blood coagulation factor VIII is a glycoprotein cofactor that is essential for the intrinsic pathway of the blood coagulation cascade. Inhibitory antibodies arise either spontaneously or in response to therapeutic infusion of functional factor VIII into hemophilia A patients, many of which are specific to the factor VIII C2 domain. The immune response is largely parsed into “classical” and “non-classical” inhibitory antibodies, which bind to opposing faces cooperatively. In this study, the 2.61 Å resolution structure of the C2 domain in complex with the antigen-binding fragment of the 3E6 classical inhibitory antibody is reported. The binding interface is largely conserved when aligned with the previously determined structure of the C2 domain in complex with two antibodies simultaneously. Further inspection of the B factors for the C2 domain in various X-ray crystal structures indicates that 3E6 antibody binding decreases the thermal motion behavior of surface loops in the C2 domain on the opposing face, thereby suggesting that cooperative antibody binding is a dynamic effect. Furthermore, understanding the structural nature of the immune response to factor VIII following hemophilia A treatment will help lead to the development of better therapeutic reagents.

  7. Synthesis, structures and Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitory activity of copper(II) complexes with tridentate aroylhydrazone ligands.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lin; Wang, Cunfang; Yan, Kai; Zhao, Kedong; Sheng, Guihua; Zhu, Hailiang; Zhao, Xinlu; Qu, Dan; Niu, Fang; You, Zhonglu

    2016-06-01

    A series of new copper(II) complexes were prepared. They are [CuL(1)(NCS)] (1), [CuClL(1)]·CH3OH (2), [CuClL(2)]·CH3OH (3), [CuL(3)(NCS)]·CH3OH (4), [CuL(4)(NCS)]·0.4H2O (5), and [CuL(5)(bipy)] (6), where L(1), L(2), L(3) and L(4) are the deprotonated form of N'-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-3-methylbenzohydrazide, 4-bromo-N'-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzylidene)benzohydrazide, N'-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzylidene)-3-methylbenzohydrazide and 2-chloro-N'-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzylidene)benzohydrazide, respectively, L(5) is the dianionic form of N'-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-3-methylbenzohydrazide, and bipy is 2,2'-bipyridine. The complexes were characterized by infrared and UV-Vis spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The Cu atoms in complexes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 are coordinated by the NOO donor set of the aroylhydrazone ligands, and one Cl or thiocyanate N atom, forming square planar coordination. The Cu atom in complex 6 is in a square pyramidal coordination, with the NOO donor set of L(1), and one N atom of bipy defining the basal plane, and with the other N atom of bipy occupying the apical position. Complexes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 show effective urease inhibitory activities, with IC50 values of 5.14, 0.20, 4.06, 5.52 and 0.26μM, respectively. Complex 6 has very weak activity against urease, with IC50 value over 100μM. Molecular docking study of the complexes with the Helicobacter pylori urease was performed. The relationship between structures and urease inhibitory activities indicated that copper complexes with square planar coordination are better models for urease inhibition. PMID:26908284

  8. NKG2A Complexed with CD94 Defines a Novel Inhibitory Natural Killer Cell Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Andrew G.; Posch, Phillip E.; Scorzelli, Christopher J.; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E.

    1997-01-01

    CD94 is a C-type lectin expressed by natural killer (NK) cells and a subset of T cells. Blocking studies using anti-CD94 mAbs have suggested that it is a receptor for human leukocyte antigen class I molecules. CD94 has recently been shown to be a 26-kD protein covalently associated with an unidentified 43-kD protein(s). This report shows that NKG2A, a 43-kD protein, is covalently associated with CD94 on the surface of NK cells. Cell surface expression of NKG2A is dependent on the association with CD94 as glycosylation patterns characteristic of mature proteins are found only in NKG2A that is associated with CD94. Analysis of NK cell clones showed that NKG2A was expressed in all NK cell clones whose CD16-dependent killing was inhibited by cross-linking CD94. The induction of an inhibitory signal is consistent with the presence of two immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (V/LXYXXL) on the cytoplasmic domain of NKG2A. Similar motifs are found on Ly49 and killer cell inhibitory receptors, which also transmit negative signals to NK cells. PMID:9034158

  9. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  10. A mitofusin-dependent docking ring complex triggers mitochondrial fusion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Tobias; Cavellini, Laetitia; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Cohen, Mickaël M

    2016-01-01

    Fusion of mitochondrial outer membranes is crucial for proper organelle function and involves large GTPases called mitofusins. The discrete steps that allow mitochondria to attach to one another and merge their outer membranes are unknown. By combining an in vitro mitochondrial fusion assay with electron cryo-tomography (cryo-ET), we visualize the junction between attached mitochondria isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and observe complexes that mediate this attachment. We find that cycles of GTP hydrolysis induce progressive formation of a docking ring structure around extended areas of contact. Further GTP hydrolysis triggers local outer membrane fusion at the periphery of the contact region. These findings unravel key features of mitofusin-dependent fusion of outer membranes and constitute an important advance in our understanding of how mitochondria connect and merge. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14618.001 PMID:27253069

  11. Cleaved thioredoxin fusion protein enables the crystallization of poorly soluble ERα in complex with synthetic ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Cura, Vincent; Gangloff, Monique; Eiler, Sylvia; Moras, Dino; Ruff, Marc

    2008-01-01

    A new crystallization strategy: the presence of cleaved thioredoxin fusion is critical for crystallization of the estrogen nuclear receptor ligand binding domain in complex with synthetic ligands. This novel technique should be regarded as an interesting alternative for crystallization of difficult proteins. The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human oestrogen receptor α was produced in Escherichia coli as a cleavable thioredoxin (Trx) fusion in order to improve solubility. Crystallization trials with either cleaved and purified LBD or with the purified fusion protein both failed to produce crystals. In another attempt, Trx was not removed from the LBD after endoproteolytic cleavage and its presence promoted nucleation and subsequent crystal growth, which allowed the structure determination of two different LBD–ligand–coactivator peptide complexes at 2.3 Å resolution. This technique is likely to be applicable to other low-solubility proteins.

  12. PLEKHM1 regulates autophagosome-lysosome fusion through HOPS complex and LC3/GABARAP proteins.

    PubMed

    McEwan, David G; Popovic, Doris; Gubas, Andrea; Terawaki, Seigo; Suzuki, Hironori; Stadel, Daniela; Coxon, Fraser P; Miranda de Stegmann, Diana; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Maddi, Karthik; Kirchof, Anja; Gatti, Evelina; Helfrich, Miep H; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Behrends, Christian; Pierre, Philippe; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The lysosome is the final destination for degradation of endocytic cargo, plasma membrane constituents, and intracellular components sequestered by macroautophagy. Fusion of endosomes and autophagosomes with the lysosome depends on the GTPase Rab7 and the homotypic fusion and protein sorting (HOPS) complex, but adaptor proteins that link endocytic and autophagy pathways with lysosomes are poorly characterized. Herein, we show that Pleckstrin homology domain containing protein family member 1 (PLEKHM1) directly interacts with HOPS complex and contains a LC3-interacting region (LIR) that mediates its binding to autophagosomal membranes. Depletion of PLEKHM1 blocks lysosomal degradation of endocytic (EGFR) cargo and enhances presentation of MHC class I molecules. Moreover, genetic loss of PLEKHM1 impedes autophagy flux upon mTOR inhibition and PLEKHM1 regulates clearance of protein aggregates in an autophagy- and LIR-dependent manner. PLEKHM1 is thus a multivalent endocytic adaptor involved in the lysosome fusion events controlling selective and nonselective autophagy pathways. PMID:25498145

  13. Oscillations, complex spatiotemporal behavior, and information transport in networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Destexhe, A. )

    1994-08-01

    Various types of spatiotemporal behavior are described for two-dimensional networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons with time delayed interactions. It is described how the network behaves as several structural parameters are varied, such as the number of neurons, the connectivity, and the values of synaptic weights. A transition from spatially uniform oscillations to spatiotemporal chaos via intermittentlike behavior is observed. The properties of spatiotemporally chaotic solutions are investigated by evaluating the largest positive Lyapunov exponent and the loss of correlation with distance. Finally, properties of information transport are evaluated during uniform oscillations and spatiotemporal chaos. It is shown that the diffusion coefficient increases significantly in the spatiotemporal phase similar to the increase of transport coefficients at the onset of fluid turbulence. It is proposed that such a property should be seen in other media, such as chemical turbulence or networks of oscillators. The possibility of measuring information transport from appropriate experiments is also discussed.

  14. Cleaved thioredoxin fusion protein enables the crystallization of poorly soluble ERα in complex with synthetic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Cura, Vincent; Gangloff, Monique; Eiler, Sylvia; Moras, Dino; Ruff, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human oestrogen receptor α was produced in Escherichia coli as a cleavable thioredoxin (Trx) fusion in order to improve solubility. Crystallization trials with either cleaved and purified LBD or with the purified fusion protein both failed to produce crystals. In another attempt, Trx was not removed from the LBD after endoproteolytic cleavage and its presence promoted nucleation and subsequent crystal growth, which allowed the structure determination of two different LBD–ligand–coactivator peptide complexes at 2.3 Å resolution. This technique is likely to be applicable to other low-solubility proteins. PMID:18097104

  15. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor anti-thrombin III complexes are decreased in bladder cancer patient serum: complex formation as a mechanism of inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Siegler, Katherine L.; Cox, Jacob; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Vera, Pedro L.

    2009-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) may serve as an important link between chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis as evidenced by the increase in serum MIF found in patients with various cancers. The present study identifies anti-thrombin III (ATIII) as an endogenous MIF binding protein, which reduces MIF biological activity. Serum MIF in bladder cancer patients (TCC stage II, n=50) was increased when compared to normal patients (n=50), while ATIII-MIF complexes were decreased in bladder cancer patient serum. These data suggest that increased circulating levels of bioactive MIF are present in bladder cancer patient serum. PMID:19762145

  16. Medical image fusion scheme using complex contourlet transform based on PCA.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzawi, Nemir; Sakim, Harsa Amylia Mat; Abdullah, Ahmed K Wan; Ibrahim, Haidi

    2009-01-01

    We present an efficient method for the fusion of medical captured images using different modalities that enhances the original images and combines the complementary information of the various modalities. The contourlet transform has mainly been employed as a fusion technique for images obtained from equal or different modalities. The limitation of directional information of dual-tree complex wavelet (DT-CWT) is rectified in dual-tree complex contourlet transform (DT-CCT) by incorporating directional filter banks (DFB) into the DT-CWT. The DT-CCT produces images with improved contours and textures, while the property of shift invariance is retained. To improve the fused image quality, we propose a new method for fusion rules based on principle component analysis (PCA) which depend on frequency component of DT-CCT coefficients (contourlet domain). For low frequency components, PCA method is adopted and for high frequency components, the salient features are picked up based on local energy. The final fusion image is obtained by directly applying inverse dual tree complex contourlet transform (IDT-CCT) to the fused low and high frequency components. The experimental results showed that the proposed method produces fixed image with extensive features on multimodality. PMID:19965249

  17. The Atg17-Atg31-Atg29 complex and Atg11 regulate autophagosome-vacuole fusion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    The macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) process involves de novo formation of double-membrane autophagosomes; after sequestering cytoplasm these transient organelles fuse with the vacuole/lysosome. Genetic studies in yeasts have characterized more than 40 autophagy-related (Atg) proteins required for autophagy, and the majority of these proteins play roles in autophagosome formation. The fusion of autophagosomes with the vacuole is mediated by the Rab GTPase Ypt7, its guanine nucleotide exchange factor Mon1-Ccz1, and soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. However, these factors are not autophagosome-vacuole fusion specific. We recently showed that 2 autophagy scaffold proteins, the Atg17-Atg31-Atg29 complex and Atg11, regulate autophagosome-vacuole fusion by recruiting the vacuolar SNARE Vam7 to the phagophore assembly site (PAS), where an autophagosome forms in yeast. PMID:26986547

  18. Novel Findings from CNVs Implicate Inhibitory and Excitatory Signaling Complexes in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pocklington, Andrew J.; Rees, Elliott; Walters, James T.R.; Han, Jun; Kavanagh, David H.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Holmans, Peter; Moran, Jennifer L.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Kirov, George; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Owen, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We sought to obtain novel insights into schizophrenia pathogenesis by exploiting the association between the disorder and chromosomal copy number (CNV) burden. We combined data from 5,745 cases and 10,675 controls with other published datasets containing genome-wide CNV data. In this much-enlarged sample of 11,355 cases and 16,416 controls, we show for the first time that case CNVs are enriched for genes involved in GABAergic neurotransmission. Consistent with non-genetic reports of GABAergic deficits in schizophrenia, our findings now show disrupted GABAergic signaling is of direct causal relevance, rather than a secondary effect or due to confounding. Additionally, we independently replicate and greatly extend previous findings of CNV enrichment among genes involved in glutamatergic signaling. Given the strong functional links between the major inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic systems, our findings converge on a broad, coherent set of pathogenic processes, providing firm foundations for studies aimed at dissecting disease mechanisms. PMID:26050040

  19. Improving image classification in a complex wetland ecosystem through image fusion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Lalit; Sinha, Priyakant; Taylor, Subhashni

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of image fusion techniques on vegetation classification accuracies in a complex wetland system. Fusion of panchromatic (PAN) and multispectral (MS) Quickbird satellite imagery was undertaken using four image fusion techniques: Brovey, hue-saturation-value (HSV), principal components (PC), and Gram-Schmidt (GS) spectral sharpening. These four fusion techniques were compared in terms of their mapping accuracy to a normal MS image using maximum-likelihood classification (MLC) and support vector machine (SVM) methods. Gram-Schmidt fusion technique yielded the highest overall accuracy and kappa value with both MLC (67.5% and 0.63, respectively) and SVM methods (73.3% and 0.68, respectively). This compared favorably with the accuracies achieved using the MS image. Overall, improvements of 4.1%, 3.6%, 5.8%, 5.4%, and 7.2% in overall accuracies were obtained in case of SVM over MLC for Brovey, HSV, GS, PC, and MS images, respectively. Visual and statistical analyses of the fused images showed that the Gram-Schmidt spectral sharpening technique preserved spectral quality much better than the principal component, Brovey, and HSV fused images. Other factors, such as the growth stage of species and the presence of extensive background water in many parts of the study area, had an impact on classification accuracies.

  20. Reversibility of the inhibitory effect of atrazine and lindane on cytosol 5. alpha. -dihydrotestosterone receptor complex formation in rat prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Simic, B.; Kniewald, Z.; Kniewald, J. ); Davies, J.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Once entering the bloodstream, most toxic substances, including pesticides, can reach organs involved in the reproductive system. They can cross the placenta, as well as the brain barrier, posing various risks to the reproductive processes. The organochlorine insecticide lindane and the s-triazine herbicide atrazine produce changes in hormone-dependent reactions in the rat hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, and prostate. Lindane also causes histological and biochemical alterations in the rat testis. In vivo treatment with atrazine produces a markedly inhibitory influence of 5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone - receptor complex formation in rat prostate cytosol. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether such changes in the crucial step in the reproductive process are reversible. A parallel investigation using lindane was also undertaken.

  1. HOPS prevents the disassembly of trans-SNARE complexes by Sec17p/Sec18p during membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Jun, Youngsoo; Thompson, James; Yates, John; Wickner, William

    2010-01-01

    SNARE-dependent membrane fusion requires the disassembly of cis-SNARE complexes (formed by SNAREs anchored to one membrane) followed by the assembly of trans-SNARE complexes (SNAREs anchored to two apposed membranes). Although SNARE complex disassembly and assembly might be thought to be opposing reactions, the proteins promoting disassembly (Sec17p/Sec18p) and assembly (the HOPS complex) work synergistically to support fusion. We now report that trans-SNARE complexes formed during vacuole fusion are largely associated with Sec17p. Using a reconstituted proteoliposome fusion system, we show that trans-SNARE complex, like cis-SNARE complex, is sensitive to Sec17p/Sec18p mediated disassembly. Strikingly, HOPS inhibits the disassembly of SNARE complexes in the trans-, but not in the cis-, configuration. This selective HOPS preservation of trans-SNARE complexes requires HOPS:SNARE recognition and is lost when the apposed bilayers are dissolved in Triton X-100; it is also observed during fusion of isolated vacuoles. HOPS thus directs the Sec17p/Sec18p chaperone system to maximize functional trans-SNARE complex for membrane fusion, a new role of tethering factors during membrane traffic. PMID:20473271

  2. Thiosemicarbazone-Pt(II) Complex Causes a Growth Inhibitory Effect on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ruiz, Josefa Predestinacion; Matesanz Garcia, Ana Isabel; Souza, Ana Perez; Castelo, Pilar Souza

    2015-01-01

    We showed di[3,5-diacetyl-1,2,4-triazolbis(4-cyclohexylthiosemicarbazonato) platinum(II)] complex, (W8), endowed with important antitumor properties. Here, we analysed whether W8 can affect human bone marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells, (hMSCs), involved in tissue repair, immunomodulatory properties and also capacity for homing to injure-tumor sites in ovarian cancer. Specifically, we analysed the effect of W8 on cell proliferation, response to scratch, and whether copper-derived cellular mechanism is used by this platinum(II) complex being studied. Results showed that W8 causes a significant inhibition of cell proliferation at µM concentration. This effect is directly related to the alteration of cytoskeletal proteins and inhibition of the response to scratch induced by the presence of foetal bovine serum. This strongly supports the notion of W8 triggers the energetic metabolism of hMSCs and adds an extra support by the results showing W8 relationship with the cellular copper ions. W8, acting in hMSCs, regulates in addition the inhibition of cell proliferation, the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:25974080

  3. Structural analysis of the TKB domain of ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b complexed with its small inhibitory peptide, Cblin.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Ayako; Ochi, Arisa; Maita, Nobuo; Ueji, Tatsuya; Bando, Aki; Nakao, Reiko; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Abe, Tomoki; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Nemoto, Hisao; Okumura, Yuushi; Higashibata, Akira; Yano, Sachiko; Tochio, Hidehito; Nikawa, Takeshi

    2016-03-15

    Cbl-b is a RING-type ubiquitin ligase. Previously, we showed that Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation of IRS-1 contribute to muscle atrophy caused by unloading stress. The phospho-pentapeptide DGpYMP (Cblin) mimics Tyr612-phosphorylated IRS-1 and inhibits the Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we confirmed the direct interaction between Cblin and the TKB domain of Cbl-b using NMR. Moreover, we showed that the shortened tripeptide GpYM also binds to the TKB domain. To elucidate the inhibitory mechanism of Cblin, we solved the crystal structure of the TKB-Cblin complex at a resolution of 2.5 Å. The pY in Cblin inserts into a positively charged pocket in the TKB domain via hydrogen-bond networks and hydrophobic interactions. Within this complex, the Cblin structure closely resembles the TKB-bound form of another substrate-derived phosphopeptide, Zap-70-derived phosphopeptide. These peptides lack the conserved intrapeptidyl hydrogen bond between pY and a conserved residue involved in TKB-domain binding. Instead of the conserved interaction, these peptides specifically interact with the TKB domain. Based on this binding mode of Cblin to the TKB domain, we can design drugs against unloading-mediated muscle atrophy. PMID:26874193

  4. Data fusion for QRS complex detection in multi-lead electrocardiogram recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledezma, Carlos A.; Perpiñan, Gilberto; Severeyn, Erika; Altuve, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Heart diseases are the main cause of death worldwide. The first step in the diagnose of these diseases is the analysis of the electrocardiographic (ECG) signal. In turn, the ECG analysis begins with the detection of the QRS complex, which is the one with the most energy in the cardiac cycle. Numerous methods have been proposed in the bibliography for QRS complex detection, but few authors have analyzed the possibility of taking advantage of the information redundancy present in multiple ECG leads (simultaneously acquired) to produce accurate QRS detection. In our previous work we presented such an approach, proposing various data fusion techniques to combine the detections made by an algorithm on multiple ECG leads. In this paper we present further studies that show the advantages of this multi-lead detection approach, analyzing how many leads are necessary in order to observe an improvement in the detection performance. A well known QRS detection algorithm was used to test the fusion techniques on the St. Petersburg Institute of Cardiological Technics database. Results show improvement in the detection performance with as little as three leads, but the reliability of these results becomes interesting only after using seven or more leads. Results were evaluated using the detection error rate (DER). The multi-lead detection approach allows an improvement from DER = 3:04% to DER = 1:88%. Further works are to be made in order to improve the detection performance by implementing further fusion steps.

  5. Crystal structure of the conserved herpesvirus fusion regulator complex gH—gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, Tirumala K.; Cairns, Tina M.; Atanasiu, Doina; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2015-02-09

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH–gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH–gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH–gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB–gH–gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB–gH–gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  6. Crystal structure of the conserved herpes virus fusion regulator complex gH-gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, Tirumala K; Cairns, Tina M; Atanasiu, Doina; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Heldwein, Ekaterina E

    2010-09-13

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH-gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH-gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH-gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB-gH-gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB-gH-gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Conserved Herpes Virus Fusion Regulator Complex gH–gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, T.; Cairns, T; Atanasiu, D; Cohen, G; Eisenberg, R; Heldwein, E

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH-gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH-gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH-gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB-gH-gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB-gH-gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  8. Catalytic Features of the Botulinum Neurotoxin A Light Chain Revealed by High Resolution Structure of an Inhibitory Peptide Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Silvaggi,N.; Wilson, D.; Tzipori, S.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain (BoNT/A-LC) is a Zn(II)-dependent metalloprotease that blocks the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction by cleaving SNAP-25, one of the SNARE proteins required for exocytosis. Because of the potential for use of the toxin in bioterrorism and the increasingly widespread application of the toxin in the medical field, there is significant interest in the development of small-molecule inhibitors of the metalloprotease. Efforts to design such inhibitors have not benefited from knowledge of how peptides bind to the active site since the enzyme-peptide structures available previously either were not occupied in the vicinity of the catalytic Zn(II) ion or did not represent the product of SNAP-25 substrate cleavage. Herein we report the 1.4 Angstroms-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a complex between the BoNT/A-LC and the inhibitory peptide N-Ac-CRATKML, the first structure of the light chain with an inhibitory peptide bound at the catalytic Zn(II) ion. The peptide is bound with the Cys S? atom coordinating the metal ion. Surprisingly, the cysteine sulfur is oxidized to the sulfenic acid form. Given the unstable nature of this species in solution, is it likely that oxidation occurs on the enzyme. In addition to the peptide-bound structure, we report two structures of the unliganded light chain with and without the Zn(II) cofactor bound at 1.25 and 1.20 Angstroms resolution, respectively. The two structures are nearly identical, confirming that the Zn(II) ion plays a purely catalytic role. Additionally, the structure of the Zn(II)-bound uncomplexed enzyme allows identification of the catalytic water molecule and a second water molecule that occupies the same position as the peptidic oxygen in the tetrahedral intermediate. This observation suggests that the enzyme active site is prearranged to stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate of the protease reaction.

  9. Dendritic-Tumor Fusion Cells Derived Heat Shock Protein70-Peptide Complex Has Enhanced Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Liu, Yunyan; Luo, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-derived heat shock protein70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Tu) have shown great promise in tumor immunotherapy due to numerous advantages. However, large-scale phase III clinical trials showed that the limited immunogenicity remained to be enhanced. In previous research, we demonstrated that heat shock protein 70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Fc) derived from dendritic cell (DC)-tumor fusions exhibit enhanced immunogenicity compared with HSP70.PCs from tumor cells. However, the DCs used in our previous research were obtained from healthy donors and not from the patient population. In order to promote the clinical application of these complexes, HSP70.PC-Fc was prepared from patient-derived DC fused directly with patient-derived tumor cells in the current study. Our results showed that compared with HSP70.PC-Tu, HSP70.PC-Fc elicited much more powerful immune responses against the tumor from which the HSP70 was derived, including enhanced T cell activation, and CTL responses that were shown to be antigen specific and HLA restricted. Our results further indicated that the enhanced immunogenicity is related to the activation of CD4+ T cells and increased association with other heat shock proteins, such as HSP90. Therefore, the current study confirms the enhanced immunogenicity of HSP70.PC derived from DC-tumor fusions and may provide direct evidence promoting their future clinical use. PMID:25961716

  10. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Jeong-Jun; Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan; Won, Hye-Sung

    2014-09-01

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. PMID:24687619

  11. Use of a Proximal Humeral Locking Plate for Complex Ankle and Hindfoot Fusion.

    PubMed

    Shearman, Alexander D; Eleftheriou, Kyriacos Iordanis; Patel, Akash; Pradhan, Rajib; Rosenfeld, Peter Francis

    2016-01-01

    Arthrodesis of the ankle and hindfoot in the setting of major deformity is challenging and associated with substantial risks. Patients often have significant comorbidities that lead to unforgiving soft tissues, poor vascularity, and poor bone quality. This creates the high-risk scenario of poor wound healing and poor implant fixation. Complications can be devastating, leading to loss of the limb and sepsis. The use of locking plate technology might provide biomechanical and operative technique advantages in such patients. We retrospectively assessed the results of the modified use of the PHILOS(™) (Synthes(®), Zuchwil, Switzerland) proximal humeral locking plate in 21 patients (11 males, 10 females; mean age 56.1 years, range 25 to 74 years) who had undergone complex fusions, including tibiotalar (n = 4), tibiocalcaneal (n = 7), or tibiotalocalcaneal (n =10) fusions. The average follow-up period was 14.6 (median 10, range 6 to 49) months. Of the 21 fusions, 18 achieved union (85.7%) at an average period of 4.8 (median 4.3, range 3 to 12) months. The overall deep infection rate was 14.3%. Overall, 17 of the 21 patients (81%) were satisfied with the result (good to excellent), 1 reported the result was fair (4.8%), and 3 patients developed nonunion and were dissatisfied with the procedure (14.3%). The present study is the largest series to date of patients undergoing complex ankle and hindfoot arthrodesis with the use of a proximal humeral locking plate and confirms previous findings that the technique is reliable with union, satisfaction, and complication rates comparable to those of other techniques. PMID:26875767

  12. Crystal Structure of Plasmodium knowlesi Apical Membrane Antigen 1 and Its Complex with an Invasion-Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    van der Eijk, Marjolein; Thomas, Alan W.; Singh, Balbir; Kocken, Clemens H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi, previously associated only with infection of macaques, is now known to infect humans as well and has become a significant public health problem in Southeast Asia. This species should therefore be targeted in vaccine and therapeutic strategies against human malaria. Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1), which plays a role in Plasmodium merozoite invasion of the erythrocyte, is currently being pursued in human vaccine trials against P. falciparum. Recent vaccine trials in macaques using the P. knowlesi orthologue PkAMA1 have shown that it protects against infection by this parasite species and thus should be developed for human vaccination as well. Here, we present the crystal structure of Domains 1 and 2 of the PkAMA1 ectodomain, and of its complex with the invasion-inhibitory monoclonal antibody R31C2. The Domain 2 (D2) loop, which is displaced upon binding the Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2) receptor, makes significant contacts with the antibody. R31C2 inhibits binding of the Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2) receptor by steric blocking of the hydrophobic groove and by preventing the displacement of the D2 loop which is essential for exposing the complete binding site on AMA1. R31C2 recognizes a non-polymorphic epitope and should thus be cross-strain reactive. PkAMA1 is much less polymorphic than the P. falciparum and P. vivax orthologues. Unlike these two latter species, there are no polymorphic sites close to the RON2-binding site of PkAMA1, suggesting that P. knowlesi has not developed a mechanism of immune escape from the host’s humoral response to AMA1. PMID:25886591

  13. Comprehensive tire-road friction coefficient estimation based on signal fusion method under complex maneuvering operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Yang, K.; Jia, G.; Ran, X.; Song, J.; Han, Z.-Q.

    2015-05-01

    The accurate estimation of the tire-road friction coefficient plays a significant role in the vehicle dynamics control. The estimation method should be timely and reliable for the controlling requirements, which means the contact friction characteristics between the tire and the road should be recognized before the interference to ensure the safety of the driver and passengers from drifting and losing control. In addition, the estimation method should be stable and feasible for complex maneuvering operations to guarantee the control performance as well. A signal fusion method combining the available signals to estimate the road friction is suggested in this paper on the basis of the estimated ones of braking, driving and steering conditions individually. Through the input characteristics and the states of the vehicle and tires from sensors the maneuvering condition may be recognized, by which the certainty factors of the friction of the three conditions mentioned above may be obtained correspondingly, and then the comprehensive road friction may be calculated. Experimental vehicle tests validate the effectiveness of the proposed method through complex maneuvering operations; the estimated road friction coefficient based on the signal fusion method is relatively timely and accurate to satisfy the control demands.

  14. Prognostics and Health Management for Complex system Based on Fusion of Model-based approach and Data-driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong-feng, Wang

    Prognostics and Health Management has been becoming an effective technology to increasing efficiency and reducing cost for complex system. As for the two major categories methods, both model-based approaches and datadriven approaches have merits and drawbacks. A kind of fusion approaches that integrate model-based approaches and data-driven approaches is presented in this paper and fusion structure is detailed to make full use of their advantages and overcome their limitations.

  15. Control systems for membrane fusion in the ancestral eukaryote; evolution of tethering complexes and SM proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koumandou, V Lila; Dacks, Joel B; Coulson, Richard MR; Field, Mark C

    2007-01-01

    Background In membrane trafficking, the mechanisms ensuring vesicle fusion specificity remain to be fully elucidated. Early models proposed that specificity was encoded entirely by SNARE proteins; more recent models include contributions from Rab proteins, Syntaxin-binding (SM) proteins and tethering factors. Most information on membrane trafficking derives from an evolutionarily narrow sampling of model organisms. However, considering factors from a wider diversity of eukaryotes can provide both functional information on core systems and insight into the evolutionary history of the trafficking machinery. For example, the major Qa/syntaxin SNARE families are present in most eukaryotic genomes and likely each evolved via gene duplication from a single ancestral syntaxin before the existing eukaryotic groups diversified. This pattern is also likely for Rabs and various other components of the membrane trafficking machinery. Results We performed comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses, when relevant, on the SM proteins and components of the tethering complexes, both thought to contribute to vesicle fusion specificity. Despite evidence suggestive of secondary losses amongst many lineages, the tethering complexes are well represented across the eukaryotes, suggesting an origin predating the radiation of eukaryotic lineages. Further, whilst we detect distant sequence relations between GARP, COG, exocyst and DSL1 components, these similarities most likely reflect convergent evolution of similar secondary structural elements. No similarity is found between the TRAPP and HOPS complexes and the other tethering factors. Overall, our data favour independent origins for the various tethering complexes. The taxa examined possess at least one homologue of each of the four SM protein families; since the four monophyletic families each encompass a wide diversity of eukaryotes, the SM protein families very likely evolved before the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LCEA

  16. Advances and challenges in deformable image registration: From image fusion to complex motion modelling.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Julia A; Heinrich, Mattias P; Papież, Bartłomiej W; Brady, Sir J Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 20 years, the field of medical image registration has significantly advanced from multi-modal image fusion to highly non-linear, deformable image registration for a wide range of medical applications and imaging modalities, involving the compensation and analysis of physiological organ motion or of tissue changes due to growth or disease patterns. While the original focus of image registration has predominantly been on correcting for rigid-body motion of brain image volumes acquired at different scanning sessions, often with different modalities, the advent of dedicated longitudinal and cross-sectional brain studies soon necessitated the development of more sophisticated methods that are able to detect and measure local structural or functional changes, or group differences. Moving outside of the brain, cine imaging and dynamic imaging required the development of deformable image registration to directly measure or compensate for local tissue motion. Since then, deformable image registration has become a general enabling technology. In this work we will present our own contributions to the state-of-the-art in deformable multi-modal fusion and complex motion modelling, and then discuss remaining challenges and provide future perspectives to the field. PMID:27364430

  17. Activation of Mitofusin2 by Smad2-RIN1 Complex during Mitochondrial Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Pan, Christopher C; Shah, Nirav; Wheeler, Sarah E; Hoyt, Kari R; Hempel, Nadine; Mythreye, Karthikeyan; Lee, Nam Y

    2016-05-19

    Smads are nuclear-shuttling transcriptional mediators of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. Although their essential nuclear roles in gene regulation during development and carcinogenesis are well established, whether they have important cytoplasmic functions remains unclear. Here we report that Smad2 is a critical determinant of mitochondrial dynamics. We identified mitofusin2 (MFN2) and Rab and Ras Interactor 1 (RIN1) as new Smad2 binding partners required for mitochondrial fusion. Unlike TGF-β-induced Smad2/3 transcriptional responses underlying mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, inactive cytoplasmic Smad2 rapidly promotes mitochondrial fusion by recruiting RIN1 into a complex with MFN2. We demonstrate that Smad2 is a key scaffold, allowing RIN1 to act as a GTP exchange factor for MFN2-GTPase activation to promote mitochondrial ATP synthesis and suppress superoxide production. These results reveal functional implications between Smads and mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer and metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27184078

  18. Represent and fuse bimodal biometric images at the feature level: complex-matrix-based fusion scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Zhang, David

    2010-03-01

    Multibiometrics can obtain a higher accuracy than the single biometrics by simultaneously using multiple biometric traits of the subject. We note that biometric traits are usually in the form of images. Thus, how to properly fuse the information of multiple biometric images of the subject for authentication is crucial for multibiometrics. We propose a novel image-based linear discriminant analysis (IBLDA) approach to fuse two biometric traits (i.e., bimodal biometric images) of the same subject in the form of matrix at the feature level. IBLDA first integrates two biometric traits of one subject into a complex matrix and then directly extracts low-dimensional features for the integrated biometric traits. IBLDA also enables more information to be exploited than the matching score level fusion and the decision level fusion. Compared to linear discriminant analysis (LDA), IBLDA has the following advantages: First, it can overcome the small sample size problem that conventional LDA usually suffers from. Second, IBLDA solves the eigenequation at a low computational cost. Third, when storing the scatter matrices IBLDA will not bring as heavy a memory burden as conventional LDA. We also clearly show the theoretical foundation of the proposed method. The experiment result shows that the proposed method can obtain a high classification accuracy.

  19. Structure of a Major Antigenic Site on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in Complex with Neutralizing Antibody 101F

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Chang, Jung-San; Yang, Yongping; Kim, Albert; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-11-19

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and elderly people. Currently there is no effective vaccine against RSV, but passive prophylaxis with neutralizing antibodies reduces hospitalizations. To investigate the mechanism of antibody-mediated RSV neutralization, we undertook structure-function studies of monoclonal antibody 101F, which binds a linear epitope in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Crystal structures of the 101F antigen-binding fragment in complex with peptides from the fusion glycoprotein defined both the extent of the linear epitope and the interactions of residues that are mutated in antibody escape variants. The structure allowed for modeling of 101F in complex with trimers of the fusion glycoprotein, and the resulting models suggested that 101F may contact additional surfaces located outside the linear epitope. This hypothesis was supported by surface plasmon resonance experiments that demonstrated 101F bound the peptide epitope {approx}16,000-fold more weakly than the fusion glycoprotein. The modeling also showed no substantial clashes between 101F and the fusion glycoprotein in either the pre- or postfusion state, and cell-based assays indicated that 101F neutralization was not associated with blocking virus attachment. Collectively, these results provide a structural basis for RSV neutralization by antibodies that target a major antigenic site on the fusion glycoprotein.

  20. The Habc Domain of the SNARE Vam3 Interacts with the HOPS Tethering Complex to Facilitate Vacuole Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lürick, Anna; Kuhlee, Anne; Bröcker, Cornelia; Kümmel, Daniel; Raunser, Stefan; Ungermann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion at vacuoles requires a consecutive action of the HOPS tethering complex, which is recruited by the Rab GTPase Ypt7, and vacuolar SNAREs to drive membrane fusion. It is assumed that the Sec1/Munc18-like Vps33 within the HOPS complex is largely responsible for SNARE chaperoning. Here, we present direct evidence for HOPS binding to SNAREs and the Habc domain of the Vam3 SNARE protein, which may explain its function during fusion. We show that HOPS interacts strongly with the Vam3 Habc domain, assembled Q-SNAREs, and the R-SNARE Ykt6, but not the Q-SNARE Vti1 or the Vam3 SNARE domain. Electron microscopy combined with Nanogold labeling reveals that the binding sites for vacuolar SNAREs and the Habc domain are located in the large head of the HOPS complex, where Vps16 and Vps33 have been identified before. Competition experiments suggest that HOPS bound to the Habc domain can still interact with assembled Q-SNAREs, whereas Q-SNARE binding prevents recognition of the Habc domain. In agreement, membranes carrying Vam3ΔHabc fuse poorly unless an excess of HOPS is provided. These data suggest that the Habc domain of Vam3 facilitates the assembly of the HOPS/SNARE machinery at fusion sites and thus supports efficient membrane fusion. PMID:25564619

  1. Copper(II) complexes with cyanoguanidine and o-phenanthroline: Theoretical studies, in vitro antimicrobial activity and alkaline phosphatase inhibitory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Medina, Juan J.; Islas, María S.; López Tévez, Libertad L.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Okulik, Nora B.; Williams, Patricia A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Calculations based on density functional methods are carried out for two Cu(II) complexes with cyanoguanidine (cnge) and o-phenanthroline (o-phen): [Cu(o-phen)2(cnge)](NO3)2ṡ2H2O (1) and [Cu(o-phen)(cnge)(H2O)(NO3)2] (2). The calculated geometrical parameters are in agreement with the experimental values. The results of Atoms in Molecules (AIM) topological analysis of the electron density indicate that the Cu-N(phen) bonds in complex (1) have lower electron density, suggesting that those bonds are stronger in complex (2). Moreover, the ionic character of the Cu-N bond in the complex (1) is slightly stronger than that in the complex (2) and this situation would explain the fact that only complex (2) was stable in water solution. For this reason, the antimicrobial and enzymatic assays were performed using complex (2). It is well known that the increased use of antibiotics has resulted in the development of resistant bacterial and fungal strains. In this context, the study of novel antimicrobial agents has an enormous importance and metal complexes represent an interesting alternative for the treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this work is to prove the modification of some biological properties like antimicrobial activity or alkaline phosphatase inhibitory activity upon copper complexation.

  2. A reduced-complexity data-fusion algorithm using belief propagation for location tracking in heterogeneous observations.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Yih-Shyh; Tsai, Fuan

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a low-complexity and high-accuracy algorithm to reduce the computational load of the traditional data-fusion algorithm with heterogeneous observations for location tracking. For the location-estimation technique with the data fusion of radio-based ranging measurement and speed-based sensing measurement, the proposed tracking scheme, based on the Bayesian filtering concept, is handled by a state space model. The location tracking problem is divided into many mutual-interaction local constraints with the inherent message- passing features of factor graphs. During each iteration cycle, the messages with reliable information are passed efficiently between the prediction phase and the correction phase to simplify the data-fusion implementation for tracking the location of the mobile terminal. Numerical simulations show that the proposed forward and one-step backward refining tracking approach that combines radio ranging with speed sensing measurements for data fusion not only can achieve an accurate location close to that of the traditional Kalman filtering data-fusion algorithm, but also has much lower computational complexity. PMID:24013831

  3. Human Cytomegalovirus gH/gL Forms a Stable Complex with the Fusion Protein gB in Virions

    PubMed Central

    Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Howard, Paul W.; Wisner, Todd W.; Johnson, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that is a major pathogen in newborns and immunocompromised or immunosuppressed patients. HCMV infects a wide variety of cell types using distinct entry pathways that involve different forms of the gH/gL glycoprotein: gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128-131 as well as the viral fusion glycoprotein, gB. However, the minimal or core fusion machinery (sufficient for cell-cell fusion) is just gH/gL and gB. Here, we demonstrate that HCMV gB and gH/gL form a stable complex early after their synthesis and in the absence of other viral proteins. gH/gL can interact with gB mutants that are unable to mediate cell-cell fusion. gB-gH/gL complexes included as much as 16–50% of the total gH/gL in HCMV virus particles. In contrast, only small amounts of gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128-131 complexes were found associated with gB. All herpesviruses express gB and gH/gL molecules and most models describing herpesvirus entry suggest that gH/gL interacts with gB to mediate membrane fusion, although there is no direct evidence for this. For herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) it has been suggested that after receptor binding gH/gL binds to gB either just before, or coincident with membrane fusion. Therefore, our results have major implications for these models, demonstrating that HCMV gB and gH/gL forms stable gB-gH/gL complexes that are incorporated virions without receptor binding or membrane fusion. Moreover, our data is the best support to date for the proposal that gH/gL interacts with gB. PMID:27082872

  4. Complex-I Alteration and Enhanced Mitochondrial Fusion Are Associated With Prostate Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Philley, Julie V; Kannan, Anbarasu; Qin, Wenyi; Sauter, Edward R; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Hertweck, Kate L; Troyer, Dean A; Semmes, Oliver J; Dasgupta, Santanu

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria (mt) encoded respiratory complex-I (RCI) mutations and their pathogenicity remain largely unknown in prostate cancer (PCa). Little is known about the role of mtDNA loss on mt integrity in PCa. We determined mtDNA mutation in human and mice PCa and assessed the impact of mtDNA depletion on mt integrity. We also examined whether the circulating exosomes from PCa patients are transported to mt and carry mtDNA or mt proteins. We have employed next generation sequencing of the whole mt genome in human and Hi-myc PCa. The impact of mtDNA depletion on mt integrity, presence of mtDNA, and protein in sera exosomes was determined. A co-culture of human PCa cells and the circulating exosomes followed by confocal imaging determined co-localization of exosomes and mt. We observed frequent RCI mutations in human and Hi-myc PCa which disrupted corresponding complex protein expression. Depletion of mtDNA in PCa cells influenced mt integrity, increased expression of MFN1, MFN2, PINK1, and decreased expression of MT-TFA. Increased mt fusion and expression of PINK1 and DNM1L were also evident in the Hi-myc tumors. RCI-mtDNA, MFN2, and IMMT proteins were detected in the circulating exosomes of men with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and progressive PCa. Circulating exosomes and mt co-localized in PCa cells. Our study identified new pathogenic RCI mutations in PCa and defined the impact of mtDNA loss on mt integrity. Presence of mtDNA and mt proteins in the circulating exosomes implicated their usefulness for biomarker development. PMID:26530043

  5. DNA binding and topoisomerase II inhibitory activity of water-soluble ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Joshi, Shweta; Singh, Alok Ranjan; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar; Pandey, Daya Shankar

    2007-12-10

    Water-soluble piano-stool arene ruthenium complexes based on 1-(4-cyanophenyl)imidazole (CPI) and 4-cyanopyridine (CNPy) with the formulas [(eta6-arene)RuCl2(L)] (L = CPI, eta6-arene = benzene (1), p-cymene (2), hexamethylbenzene (3); L = CNPy, eta6-arene = benzene (4), p-cymene (5), hexamethylbenzene (6)) have been prepared by our earlier methods. The molecular structure of [(eta6-C6Me6)RuCl2(CNPy)] (6) has been determined crystallographically. Analogous rhodium(III) complex [(eta5-C5Me5)RhCl2(CPI)] (7) has also been prepared and characterized. DNA interaction with the arene ruthenium complexes and the rhodium complex has been examined by spectroscopic and gel mobility shift assay; condensation of DNA and B-->Z transition have also been described. Arene ruthenium(II) and EPh3 (E = P, As)-containing arene ruthenium(II) complexes exhibited strong binding behavior, however, rhodium(III) complexes were found to be Topo II inhibitors with an inhibition percentage of 70% (7) and 30% (7a). Furthermore, arene ruthenium complexes containing polypyridyl ligands also act as mild Topo II inhibitors (10%, 3c and 40%, 3d) in contrast to their precursor complexes. Complexes 4-6 also show significant inhibition of beta-hematin/hemozoin formation activity. PMID:18001110

  6. Phosphorylation of residues inside the SNARE complex suppresses secretory vesicle fusion.

    PubMed

    Malmersjö, Seth; Di Palma, Serena; Diao, Jiajie; Lai, Ying; Pfuetzner, Richard A; Wang, Austin L; McMahon, Moira A; Hayer, Arnold; Porteus, Matthew; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Brunger, Axel T; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-08-15

    Membrane fusion is essential for eukaryotic life, requiring SNARE proteins to zipper up in an α-helical bundle to pull two membranes together. Here, we show that vesicle fusion can be suppressed by phosphorylation of core conserved residues inside the SNARE domain. We took a proteomics approach using a PKCB knockout mast cell model and found that the key mast cell secretory protein VAMP8 becomes phosphorylated by PKC at multiple residues in the SNARE domain. Our data suggest that VAMP8 phosphorylation reduces vesicle fusion in vitro and suppresses secretion in living cells, allowing vesicles to dock but preventing fusion with the plasma membrane. Markedly, we show that the phosphorylation motif is absent in all eukaryotic neuronal VAMPs, but present in all other VAMPs. Thus, phosphorylation of SNARE domains is a general mechanism to restrict how much cells secrete, opening the door for new therapeutic strategies for suppression of secretion. PMID:27402227

  7. Bioassay-guided preparative separation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory C-flavone glycosides from Desmodium styracifolium by recycling complexation high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Qi; Luo, Jian-Guang; Han, Chao; Xu, Jin-Fang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-01-01

    A new strategy of the convergence of high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) and bioactive assay technique was developed for rapidly screening and separating the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from the aerial parts of Desmodium styracifolium. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the crude extract was first established to target the bioactive fractions based on HSCCC coupled with in vitro ACE inhibitory assay. Subsequently, the bioactive fractions were further separated by the recycling complexation HSCCC respectively, using 0.10 mol/L copper sulfate in the lower phase of two-phase solvent system composed of n-butanol/water (1:1, v/v). Five C-glycosylflavones, vicenin 2 (1), carlinoside (2), vicenin 1 (3), schaftoside (4) and vicenin 3 (5), were successfully obtained. Their chemical structures were identified using ESI-MS and NMR. All the isolates showed in vitro ACE inhibitory activity with the IC50 values between 33.62 and 58.37 μM. The results demonstrated that the established method was proposed as an excellent strategy to systematically screen and purify active compounds from traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:25459924

  8. A Fluorescence Polarization Assay for Binding to Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Crystal Structures for Complexes of Two Potent Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is both a keto–enol tautomerase and a cytokine associated with numerous inflammatory diseases and cancer. Consistent with observed correlations between inhibition of the enzymatic and biological activities, discovery of MIF inhibitors has focused on monitoring the tautomerase activity using l-dopachrome methyl ester or 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvic acid as substrates. The accuracy of these assays is compromised by several issues including substrate instability, spectral interference, and short linear periods for product formation. In this work, we report the syntheses of fluorescently labeled MIF inhibitors and their use in the first fluorescence polarization-based assay to measure the direct binding of inhibitors to the active site. The assay allows the accurate and efficient identification of competitive, noncompetitive, and covalent inhibitors of MIF in a manner that can be scaled for high-throughput screening. The results for 22 compounds show that the most potent MIF inhibitors bind with Kd values of ca. 50 nM; two are from our laboratory, and the other is a compound from the patent literature. X-ray crystal structures for two of the most potent compounds bound to MIF are also reported here. Striking combinations of protein–ligand hydrogen bonding, aryl–aryl, and cation−π interactions are responsible for the high affinities. A new chemical series was then designed using this knowledge to yield two more strong MIF inhibitors/binders. PMID:27299179

  9. A Fluorescence Polarization Assay for Binding to Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Crystal Structures for Complexes of Two Potent Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, José A; Robertson, Michael J; Valhondo, Margarita; Jorgensen, William L

    2016-07-13

    Human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is both a keto-enol tautomerase and a cytokine associated with numerous inflammatory diseases and cancer. Consistent with observed correlations between inhibition of the enzymatic and biological activities, discovery of MIF inhibitors has focused on monitoring the tautomerase activity using l-dopachrome methyl ester or 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvic acid as substrates. The accuracy of these assays is compromised by several issues including substrate instability, spectral interference, and short linear periods for product formation. In this work, we report the syntheses of fluorescently labeled MIF inhibitors and their use in the first fluorescence polarization-based assay to measure the direct binding of inhibitors to the active site. The assay allows the accurate and efficient identification of competitive, noncompetitive, and covalent inhibitors of MIF in a manner that can be scaled for high-throughput screening. The results for 22 compounds show that the most potent MIF inhibitors bind with Kd values of ca. 50 nM; two are from our laboratory, and the other is a compound from the patent literature. X-ray crystal structures for two of the most potent compounds bound to MIF are also reported here. Striking combinations of protein-ligand hydrogen bonding, aryl-aryl, and cation-π interactions are responsible for the high affinities. A new chemical series was then designed using this knowledge to yield two more strong MIF inhibitors/binders. PMID:27299179

  10. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial fusion and increases expression of mitochondrial complexes I and III in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chiu, Shih-Che; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Hsiang, I-Chou; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2015-01-01

    High energy ionizing radiation can cause DNA damage and cell death. During clinical radiation therapy, the radiation dose could range from 15 to 60 Gy depending on targets. While 2 Gy radiation has been shown to cause cancer cell death, studies also suggest a protective potential by low dose radiation. In this study, we examined the effect of 0.2-2 Gy radiation on hippocampal neurons. Low dose 0.2 Gy radiation treatment increased the levels of MTT. Since hippocampal neurons are post-mitotic, this result reveals a possibility that 0.2 Gy irradiation may increase mitochondrial activity to cope with stimuli. Maintaining neural plasticity is an energy-demanding process that requires high efficient mitochondrial function. We thus hypothesized that low dose radiation may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function to ensure survival of neurons. Our results showed that five days after 0.2 Gy irradiation, no obvious changes on neuronal survival, neuronal synapses, membrane potential of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species levels, and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Interestingly, 0.2 Gy irradiation promoted the mitochondria fusion, resulting in part from the increased level of a mitochondrial fusion protein, Mfn2, and inhibition of Drp1 fission protein trafficking to the mitochondria. Accompanying with the increased mitochondrial fusion, the expressions of complexes I and III of the electron transport chain were also increased. These findings suggest that, hippocampal neurons undergo increased mitochondrial fusion to modulate cellular activity as an adaptive mechanism in response to low dose radiation. PMID:26415228

  11. Simulations of the fusion of necklace-ring pattern in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation by lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianying; Yan, Guangwu

    2016-04-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for solving the (2+1) dimensional cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CQCGLE) is proposed. Different from the classic lattice Boltzmann models, this lattice Boltzmann model is based on uniformly distributed lattice points in a two-dimensional space, and the evolution of the model is about a spatial axis rather than time. The algorithm provides advantages similar to the lattice Boltzmann method in that it is easily adapted to complex Ginzburg-Landau equations. Numerical results reproduce the phenomena of the fusion of necklace-ring pattern and the effect of non-linearity on the soliton in the CQCGLE.

  12. Bulged residues promote the progression of a loop–loop interaction to a stable and inhibitory antisense–target RNA complex

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Fabrice A.; Westhof, Eric; Ehresmann, Chantal; Ehresmann, Bernard; Wagner, E. Gerhart H.; Romby, Pascale

    2001-01-01

    In several groups of bacterial plasmids, antisense RNAs regulate copy number through inhibition of replication initiator protein synthesis. These RNAs are characterized by a long hairpin structure interrupted by several unpaired residues or bulged loops. In plasmid R1, the inhibitory complex between the antisense RNA (CopA) and its target mRNA (CopT) is characterized by a four-way junction structure and a side-by-side helical alignment. This topology facilitates the formation of a stabilizer intermolecular helix between distal regions of both RNAs, essential for in vivo control. The bulged residues in CopA/CopT were shown to be required for high in vitro binding rate and in vivo activity. This study addresses the question of why removal of bulged nucleotides blocks stable complex formation. Structure mapping, modification interference, and molecular modeling of bulged-less mutant CopA–CopT complexes suggests that, subsequent to loop–loop contact, helix propagation is prevented. Instead, a fully base paired loop–loop interaction is formed, inducing a continuous stacking of three helices. Consequently, the stabilizer helix cannot be formed, and stable complex formation is blocked. In contrast to the four-way junction topology, the loop–loop interaction alone failed to prevent ribosome binding at its loading site and, thus, inhibition of RepA translation was alleviated. PMID:11470871

  13. Inhibitory effect of palmitate on the mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) as related to the active–de-active enzyme transition

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Palmitate rapidly and reversibly inhibits the uncoupled NADH oxidase activity catalysed by activated complex I in inside-out bovine heart submitochondrial particles (IC50 extrapolated to zero enzyme concentration is equal to 9 μM at 25 °C, pH 8.0). The NADH:hexa-ammineruthenium reductase activity of complex I is insensitive to palmitate. Partial (∼50%) inhibition of the NADH:external quinone reductase activity is seen at saturating palmitate concentration and the residual activity is fully sensitive to piericidin. The uncoupled succinate oxidase activity is considerably less sensitive to palmitate. Only a slight stimulation of tightly coupled respiration with NADH as the substrate is seen at optimal palmitate concentrations, whereas complete relief of the respiratory control is observed with succinate as the substrate. Palmitate prevents the turnover-induced activation of the de-activated complex I (IC50 extrapolated to zero enzyme concentration is equal to 3 μM at 25 °C, pH 8.0). The mode of action of palmitate on the NADH oxidase is qualitatively temperature-dependent. Rapid and reversible inhibition of the complex I catalytic activity and its de-active to active state transition are seen at 25 °C, whereas the time-dependent irreversible inactivation of the NADH oxidase proceeds at 37 °C. Palmitate drastically increases the rate of spontaneous de-activation of complex I in the absence of NADH. Taken together, these results suggest that free fatty acids act as specific complex I-directed inhibitors; at a physiologically relevant temperature (37 °C), their inhibitory effects on mitochondrial NADH oxidation is due to perturbation of the pseudo-reversible active–de-active complex I transition. PMID:15571492

  14. Modern spectroscopic technique in the characterization of biosensitive macrocyclic Schiff base ligand and its complexes: Inhibitory activity against plantpathogenic fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Monika; Chandra, Sulekh; Akhtar, Jameel; Chand, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of the type [M(L)Cl2], where M = Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) have been synthesized with a macrocyclic Schiff base ligand (1,4,5,7,10,11,12,15-octaaza,5,11,16,18-tetraphenyl, 3,4,12,13-tetramethyl cyclo-octadecane) derived from Schiff base (obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine and dibenzoyl methane) and ethylenediamine. The ligand was characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, EI Mass and molecular modeling studies while the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies. All the complexes are non-electrolyte in nature. The covalency factor (β) and coefficient factor (α) suggest the covalent nature of the complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes have shown antifungal activity with their LD50 values determined by probit analysis against two economically important fungal plant pathogens i.e. Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium solani.

  15. The Structure of Herpesvirus Fusion Glycoprotein B-Bilayer Complex Reveals the Protein-Membrane and Lateral Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Ulrike E.; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Pandurangan, Arun Prasad; Cairns, Tina M.; Hannah, Brian P.; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Topf, Maya; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Grünewald, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glycoprotein B (gB) is a key component of the complex herpesvirus fusion machinery. We studied membrane interaction of two gB ectodomain forms and present an electron cryotomography structure of the gB-bilayer complex. The two forms differed in presence or absence of the membrane proximal region (MPR) but showed an overall similar trimeric shape. The presence of the MPR impeded interaction with liposomes. In contrast, the MPR-lacking form interacted efficiently with liposomes. Lateral interaction resulted in coat formation on the membranes. The structure revealed that interaction of gB with membranes was mediated by the fusion loops and limited to the outer membrane leaflet. The observed intrinsic propensity of gB to cluster on membranes indicates an additional role of gB in driving the fusion process forward beyond the transient fusion pore opening and subsequently leading to fusion pore expansion. PMID:23850455

  16. Complex wavelets for extended depth-of-field: a new method for the fusion of multichannel microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Forster, Brigitte; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Berent, Jesse; Sage, Daniel; Unser, Michael

    2004-09-01

    Microscopy imaging often suffers from limited depth-of-field. However, the specimen can be "optically sectioned" by moving the object along the optical axis. Then different areas appear in focus in different images. Extended depth-of-field is a fusion algorithm that combines those images into one single sharp composite. One promising method is based on the wavelet transform. Here, we show how the wavelet-based image fusion technique can be improved and easily extended to multichannel data. First, we propose the use of complex-valued wavelet bases, which seem to outperform traditional real-valued wavelet transforms. Second, we introduce a way to apply this technique for multichannel images that suppresses artifacts and does not introduce false colors, an important requirement for multichannel optical microscopy imaging. We evaluate our method on simulated image stacks and give results relevant to biological imaging. PMID:15570586

  17. Inhibitory motor control based on complex stopping goals relies on the same brain network as simple stopping

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Jan R.; Aron, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Much research has modeled action-stopping using the stop-signal task (SST), in which an impending response has to be stopped when an explicit stop-signal occurs. A limitation of the SST is that real-world action-stopping rarely involves explicit stop-signals. Instead, the stopping-system engages when environmental features match more complex stopping goals. For example, when stepping into the street, one monitors path, velocity, size, and types of objects; and only stops if there is a vehicle approaching. Here, we developed a task in which participants compared the visual features of a multidimensional go-stimulus to a complex stopping-template, and stopped their go-response if all features matched the template. We used independent component analysis of EEG data to show that the same motor inhibition brain network that explains action-stopping in the SST also implements motor inhibition in the complex-stopping task. Furthermore, we found that partial feature overlap between go-stimulus and stopping-template lead to motor slowing, which also corresponded with greater stopping-network activity. This shows that the same brain system for action-stopping to explicit stop-signals is recruited to slow or stop behavior when stimuli match a complex stopping goal. The results imply a generalizability of the brain’s network for simple action-stopping to more ecologically valid scenarios. PMID:25270603

  18. Ligand binding to the inhibitory and stimulatory GTP cyclohydrolase I/GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Hatakeyama, K

    2001-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) mediates feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by 6R-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), which is an essential cofactor for key enzymes producing catecholamines, serotonin, and nitric oxide as well as phenylalanine hydroxylase. GFRP also mediates feed-forward stimulation of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by phenylalanine at subsaturating GTP levels. These ligands, BH4 and phenylalanine, induce complex formation between one molecule of GTP cyclohydrolase I and two molecules of GFRP. Here, we report the analysis of ligand binding using the gel filtration method of Hummel and Dreyer. BH4 binds to the GTP cyclohydrolase I/GFRP complex with a Kd of 4 microM, and phenylalanine binds to the protein complex with a Kd of 94 microM. The binding of BH4 is enhanced by dGTP. The binding stoichiometrics of BH4 and phenylalanine were estimated to be 10 molecules of each per protein complex, in other words, one molecule per subunit of protein, because GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decamer and GFRP is a pentamer. These findings were corroborated by data from equilibrium dialysis experiments. Regarding ligand binding to free proteins, BH4 binds weakly to GTP cyclohydrolase I but not to GFRP, and phenylalanine binds weakly to GFRP but not to GTP cyclohydrolase I. These results suggest that the overall structure of the protein complex contributes to binding of BH4 and phenylalanine but also that each binding site of BH4 and phenylalanine may be primarily composed of residues of GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP, respectively. PMID:11274478

  19. Fusion of liposomones and chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata: effect on photosynthetic energy transfer between B875 and reaction center complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Takemoto, J.Y.; Schonhardt, T.; Golecki, J.R.; Drews, G.

    1985-06-01

    The photosynthetic chromatophore membranes of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata were fused with liposomes to investigate the effects of lipid dilution on energy transfer between the bacteriochlorophyll-protein complexes of this membrane. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed that the fractions contained closed vesicles formed by the fusion of liposomes to chromatophores. Particles with 9-nm diameters on the P fracture faces did not appear to change in size with increasing lipid content, but the number of particles per membrane area decreased proportionally with increases in the lipid-to-protein ratio. The bacteriochlorophyll-to-protein ratios, electrophoretic polypeptide profiles on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, and light-induced absorbance changes at 595 nm caused by photosynthetic reaction centers were not altered by fusion. The relative fluorescence emission intensities due to the B875 light-harvesting complex increased significantly with increasing lipid content, but no increases in fluorescence due to the B800-B850 light-harvesting complex were observed. Electron transport rates, measured as succinate-cytochrome c reductase activities, decreased with increased lipid content. The results indicate an uncoupling of energy transfer between the B875 light-harvesting and reaction center complexes with lipid dilution of the chromatophore membrane.

  20. A Cholesterol Tag at the N Terminus of the Relatively Broad-Spectrum Fusion Inhibitory Peptide Targets an Earlier Stage of Fusion Glycoprotein Activation and Increases the Peptide's Antiviral Potency In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan-Gen; Tang, Wang; Chi, Xiao-Jing; Dong, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Xi-Xi

    2013-01-01

    In previous work, we designed peptides that showed potent inhibition of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) infections in chicken embryos. In this study, we demonstrate that peptides modified with cholesterol or 3 U of polyethylene glycol (PEG3) conjugated to the peptides' N termini showed even more promising antiviral activities when tested in animal models. Both cholesterol- and cholesterol-PEG3-tagged peptides were able to protect chicken embryos from infection with different serotypes of NDV and IBV when administered 12 h prior to virus inoculation. In comparison, the untagged peptides required intervention closer to the time of viral inoculation to achieve a similar level of protection. Intramuscular injection of cholesterol-tagged peptide at 1.6 mg/kg 1 day before virus infection and then three times at 3-day intervals after viral inoculation protected 70% of the chickens from NDV infection. We further demonstrate that the cholesterol-tagged peptide has an in vivo half-life greater than that of untagged peptides. It also has the potential to cross the blood-brain barrier to enter the avian central nervous system (CNS). Finally, we show that the cholesterol-tagged peptide could play a role before the viral fusion peptide's insertion into the host cell and thereby target an earlier stage of fusion glycoprotein activation. Our findings are of importance for the further development of antivirals with broad-spectrum protective effects. PMID:23804636

  1. The cytotoxic and growth inhibitory effects of palladium(II) complexes on MDA-MB-435 cells

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Nathália Cristina; da Silva Demartini, Mariana; Torres, Claudia; de Almeida, Eduardo Tonon; Gouvêa, Cibele Marli Cação Paiva

    2012-01-01

    The antitumorigenic potential of two palladium(II) complexes, [Pd(ca2-o-phen)Cl2] – C1 and [Pd(dmba)(dppp)Cl] – C2, was evaluated, using MDA-MB-435 cells, a human breast adenocarcinoma cell-line that does not express the estrogen receptor α (ER−). Growth inhibition and induced alterations in cell-morphology were analyzed. The sulforhodamine B test showed that, compared to control cells, both C1 and C2 significantly inhibited (p < 0.5) cell growth. The maximum effect with both was achieved with 1 μM complexes, after 24 h of treatment. No further cell-growth inhibition was achieved by increasing concentration or incubation time. Cell morphology was analyzed after staining with hematoxylin-eosin (HE). The morphological changes noted in the treated cells were cell rounding-up, shrinkage, nuclear condensation and reduction of cell length (p < 0.05), thereby indicating that both C1 and C2 are cytotoxic to breast adenocarcinoma cells. All together, there was every indication that, by decreasing cell growth and inducing morphological changes, the tested complexes are cytotoxic, hence their potentiality as promising candidates for antineoplastic drug development. PMID:22481890

  2. Oncoprotein E7 from Beta Human Papillomavirus 38 Induces Formation of an Inhibitory Complex for a Subset of p53-Regulated Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Saidj, Djamel; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector; Guarino, Francesca; Sylla, Bakary S.; Tommasino, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies on cutaneous beta human papillomavirus 38 (HPV38) E6 and E7 oncoproteins highlighted a novel activity of IκB kinase beta (IKKβ) in the nucleus of human keratinocytes, where it phosphorylates and stabilizes ΔNp73α, an antagonist of p53/p73 functions. Here, we further characterize the role of the IKKβ nuclear form. We show that IKKβ nuclear translocation and ΔNp73α accumulation are mediated mainly by HPV38 E7 oncoprotein. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)/Re-ChIP experiments showed that ΔNp73α and IKKβ are part, together with two epigenetic enzymes DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and the enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), of a transcriptional regulatory complex that inhibits the expression of some p53-regulated genes, such as PIG3. Recruitment to the PIG3 promoter of EZH2 and DNMT1 resulted in trimethylation of histone 3 on lysine 27 and in DNA methylation, respectively, both events associated with gene expression silencing. Decreases in the intracellular levels of HPV38 E7 or ΔNp73α strongly affected the recruitment of the inhibitory transcriptional complex to the PIG3 promoter, with consequent restoration of p53-regulated gene expression. Finally, the ΔNp73α/IKKβ/DNMT1/EZH2 complex appears to bind a subset of p53-regulated promoters. In fact, the complex is efficiently recruited to several promoters of genes encoding proteins involved in DNA repair and apoptosis, whereas it does not influence the expression of the prosurvival factor Survivin. In summary, our data show that HPV38 via E7 protein promotes the formation of a multiprotein complex that negatively regulates the expression of several p53-regulated genes. PMID:24006445

  3. Chemotropism and Cell Fusion in Neurospora crassa Relies on the Formation of Distinct Protein Complexes by HAM-5 and a Novel Protein HAM-14.

    PubMed

    Jonkers, Wilfried; Fischer, Monika S; Do, Hung P; Starr, Trevor L; Glass, N Louise

    2016-05-01

    In filamentous fungi, communication is essential for the formation of an interconnected, multinucleate, syncytial network, which is constructed via hyphal fusion or fusion of germinated asexual spores (germlings). Anastomosis in filamentous fungi is comparable to other somatic cell fusion events resulting in syncytia, including myoblast fusion during muscle differentiation, macrophage fusion, and fusion of trophoblasts during placental development. In Neurospora crassa, fusion of genetically identical germlings is a highly dynamic and regulated process that requires components of a MAP kinase signal transduction pathway. The kinase pathway components (NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2) and the scaffold protein HAM-5 are recruited to hyphae and germling tips undergoing chemotropic interactions. The MAK-2/HAM-5 protein complex shows dynamic oscillation to hyphae/germling tips during chemotropic interactions, and which is out-of-phase to the dynamic localization of SOFT, which is a scaffold protein for components of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase pathway. In this study, we functionally characterize HAM-5 by generating ham-5 truncation constructs and show that the N-terminal half of HAM-5 was essential for function. This region is required for MAK-2 and MEK-2 interaction and for correct cellular localization of HAM-5 to "fusion puncta." The localization of HAM-5 to puncta was not perturbed in 21 different fusion mutants, nor did these puncta colocalize with components of the secretory pathway. We also identified HAM-14 as a novel member of the HAM-5/MAK-2 pathway by mining MAK-2 phosphoproteomics data. HAM-14 was essential for germling fusion, but not for hyphal fusion. Colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation data indicate that HAM-14 interacts with MAK-2 and MEK-2 and may be involved in recruiting MAK-2 (and MEK-2) to complexes containing HAM-5. PMID:27029735

  4. Multi-sensor data fusion for measurement of complex freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M. J.; Liu, M. Y.; Cheung, C. F.; Yin, Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Along with the rapid development of the science and technology in fields such as space optics, multi-scale enriched freeform surfaces are widely used to enhance the performance of the optical systems in both functionality and size reduction. Multi-sensor technology is considered as one of the promising methods to measure and characterize these surfaces at multiple scales. This paper presents a multi-sensor data fusion based measurement method to purposely extract the geometric information of the components with different scales which is used to establish a holistic geometry of the surface via data fusion. To address the key problems of multi-sensor data fusion, an intrinsic feature pattern based surface registration method is developed to transform the measured datasets to a common coordinate frame. Gaussian zero-order regression filter is then used to separate each measured data in different scales, and the datasets are fused based on an edge intensity data fusion algorithm within the same wavelength. The fused data at different scales is then merged to form a new surface with holistic multiscale information. Experimental study is presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Dual-tree complex wavelet transform and image block residual-based multi-focus image fusion in visual sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Tong, Song; Huang, Shuying; Lin, Pan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for the fusion of multi-focus images explicitly designed for visual sensor network (VSN) environments. Multi-scale based fusion methods can often obtain fused images with good visual effect. However, because of the defects of the fusion rules, it is almost impossible to completely avoid the loss of useful information in the thus obtained fused images. The proposed fusion scheme can be divided into two processes: initial fusion and final fusion. The initial fusion is based on a dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT). The Sum-Modified-Laplacian (SML)-based visual contrast and SML are employed to fuse the low- and high-frequency coefficients, respectively, and an initial composited image is obtained. In the final fusion process, the image block residuals technique and consistency verification are used to detect the focusing areas and then a decision map is obtained. The map is used to guide how to achieve the final fused image. The performance of the proposed method was extensively tested on a number of multi-focus images, including no-referenced images, referenced images, and images with different noise levels. The experimental results clearly indicate that the proposed method outperformed various state-of-the-art fusion methods, in terms of both subjective and objective evaluations, and is more suitable for VSNs. PMID:25587878

  6. Dual-Tree Complex Wavelet Transform and Image Block Residual-Based Multi-Focus Image Fusion in Visual Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Tong, Song; Huang, Shuying; Lin, Pan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for the fusion of multi-focus images explicitly designed for visual sensor network (VSN) environments. Multi-scale based fusion methods can often obtain fused images with good visual effect. However, because of the defects of the fusion rules, it is almost impossible to completely avoid the loss of useful information in the thus obtained fused images. The proposed fusion scheme can be divided into two processes: initial fusion and final fusion. The initial fusion is based on a dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT). The Sum-Modified-Laplacian (SML)-based visual contrast and SML are employed to fuse the low- and high-frequency coefficients, respectively, and an initial composited image is obtained. In the final fusion process, the image block residuals technique and consistency verification are used to detect the focusing areas and then a decision map is obtained. The map is used to guide how to achieve the final fused image. The performance of the proposed method was extensively tested on a number of multi-focus images, including no-referenced images, referenced images, and images with different noise levels. The experimental results clearly indicate that the proposed method outperformed various state-of-the-art fusion methods, in terms of both subjective and objective evaluations, and is more suitable for VSNs. PMID:25587878

  7. Studies on Inhibition of Respiratory Cytochrome bc1 Complex by the Fungicide Pyrimorph Suggest a Novel Inhibitory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yu-Mei; Esser, Lothar; Zhou, Fei; Li, Chang; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Yu, Chang-An; Qin, Zhao-Hai; Xia, Di

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory chain cytochrome bc1 complex (cyt bc1) is a major target of numerous antibiotics and fungicides. All cyt bc1 inhibitors act on either the ubiquinol oxidation (QP) or ubiquinone reduction (QN) site. The primary cause of resistance to bc1 inhibitors is target site mutations, creating a need for novel agents that act on alternative sites within the cyt bc1 to overcome resistance. Pyrimorph, a synthetic fungicide, inhibits the growth of a broad range of plant pathogenic fungi, though little is known concerning its mechanism of action. In this study, using isolated mitochondria from pathogenic fungus Phytophthora capsici, we show that pyrimorph blocks mitochondrial electron transport by affecting the function of cyt bc1. Indeed, pyrimorph inhibits the activities of both purified 11-subunit mitochondrial and 4-subunit bacterial bc1 with IC50 values of 85.0 μM and 69.2 μM, respectively, indicating that it targets the essential subunits of cyt bc1 complexes. Using an array of biochemical and spectral methods, we show that pyrimorph acts on an area near the QP site and falls into the category of a mixed-type, noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate ubiquinol. In silico molecular docking of pyrimorph to cyt b from mammalian and bacterial sources also suggests that pyrimorph binds in the vicinity of the quinol oxidation site. PMID:24699450

  8. Prefusion structure of syntaxin-1A suggests pathway for folding into neuronal trans-SNARE complex fusion intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Binyong; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of the three neuronal soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptor (SNARE) proteins synaptobrevin 2, syntaxin-1A, and SNAP-25 is the key step that leads to exocytotic fusion of synaptic vesicles. In the fully assembled SNARE complex, these three proteins form a coiled-coil four-helix bundle structure by interaction of their respective SNARE motifs. Although biochemical and mutational analyses strongly suggest that the heptad-repeat SNARE motifs zipper into the final structure, little is known about the prefusion state of individual membrane-bound SNAREs and how they change conformation from the unzippered prefusion to the zippered postfusion state in a membrane environment. We have solved the solution NMR structure of micelle-bound syntaxin-1A in its prefusion conformation. In addition to the transmembrane helix, the SNARE motif consists of two well-ordered, membrane-bound helices separated by the “0-layer” residue Gln226. This unexpected structural order of the N- and C-terminal halves of the uncomplexed SNARE motif suggests the formation of partially zippered SNARE complex intermediates, with the 0-layer serving as a proofreading site for correct SNARE assembly. Interferometric fluorescence measurements in lipid bilayers confirm that the open SNARE motif helices of syntaxin interact with lipid bilayers and that association with the other target-membrane SNARE SNAP-25 lifts the SNARE motif off the membrane as a critical prerequisite for SNARE complex assembly and membrane fusion. PMID:24218570

  9. Novel class of Bi(iii) hydroxamato complexes: synthesis, urease inhibitory activity and activity against H. pylori.

    PubMed

    Keogan, D M; Twamley, B; Fitzgerald-Hughes, D; Griffith, D M

    2016-07-01

    Reaction of Bi(NO3)3 with benzohydroxamic acid (Bha) and salicylhydroxamic acid (Sha) gives the novel Bi(iii) complexes [Bi2(Bha-1H)2(μ-Bha-1H)2(η(2)-NO3)2] () and [Bi6(CH3OH)2(η(1)-NO3)2(η(2)-NO3)(OH2)2(Sha-1H)12](NO3)2 (). X-ray crystal structure of reveals two hydroxamato coordination modes; bidentate bridging (O, O') and bidentate non-bridging (O, O') and of reveals one coordination mode; bidentate bridging (O, O'). , specifically designed to and demonstrated to inhibit the activity of urease, exhibits excellent antibacterial activity against three strains of Helicobacter pylori with MIC ≥ 16 μg mL(-1). PMID:27314129

  10. Crystal Structure of Snake Venom Acetylcholinesterase in Complex with Inhibitory Antibody Fragment Fab410 Bound at the Peripheral Site

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Yves; Renault, Ludovic; Marchot, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    The acetylcholinesterase found in the venom of Bungarus fasciatus (BfAChE) is produced as a soluble, non-amphiphilic monomer with a canonical catalytic domain but a distinct C terminus compared with the other vertebrate enzymes. Moreover, the peripheral anionic site of BfAChE, a surface site located at the active site gorge entrance, bears two substitutions altering sensitivity to cationic inhibitors. Antibody Elec410, generated against Electrophorus electricus acetylcholinesterase (EeAChE), inhibits EeAChE and BfAChE by binding to their peripheral sites. However, both complexes retain significant residual catalytic activity, suggesting incomplete gorge occlusion by bound antibody and/or high frequency back door opening. To explore a novel acetylcholinesterase species, ascertain the molecular bases of inhibition by Elec410, and document the determinants and mechanisms for back door opening, we solved a 2.7-Å resolution crystal structure of natural BfAChE in complex with antibody fragment Fab410. Crystalline BfAChE forms the canonical dimer found in all acetylcholinesterase structures. Equally represented open and closed states of a back door channel, associated with alternate positions of a tyrosine phenol ring at the active site base, coexist in each subunit. At the BfAChE molecular surface, Fab410 is seated on the long Ω-loop between two N-glycan chains and partially occludes the gorge entrance, a position that fully reflects the available mutagenesis and biochemical data. Experimentally based flexible molecular docking supports a similar Fab410 binding mode onto the EeAChE antigen. These data document the molecular and dynamic peculiarities of BfAChE with high frequency back door opening, and the mode of action of Elec410 as one of the largest peptidic inhibitors targeting the acetylcholinesterase peripheral site. PMID:25411244

  11. In vitro inhibitory activity of terpenic derivatives against clinical and environmental strains of the Sporothrix schenkii complex.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Silva, Natalya Fechine; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; de Lima, Rita Amanda Chaves; Malaquias, Angela Donato Maia; Caetano, Erica Pacheco; Barbosa, Giovanna Riello; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Monteiro, André Jalles; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2015-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic subcutaneous infection, caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenkii complex, occurring in human and animal tissues. Potassium iodide and itraconazole have been used as effective therapy for first-choice treatment, while amphotericin B may be indicated for disseminated infection. However, the adverse effects of potassium iodide and amphotericin B or the long duration of therapy with itraconazole often weigh against their use, leading to the search for alternatives for the treatment of severe infections. Terpinen-4-ol and farnesol are components of essential oils present in many plant species and have been described to have antifungal activity against microorganisms. In this study, 40 strains of Sporothrix spp. were tested for the susceptibility to terpinen-4-ol and farnesol. Changes in cytoplasmic membrane permeability were also investigated. Terpenes inhibited all Sporothrix strains with MIC values ranging from 87.9 to 1,429.8 μg/ml for terpinen-4-ol and from 0.003 to 0.222 μg/ml for farnesol. The MFC values ranged from 177.8 to 5,722.6 μg/ml and from 0.027 to 0.88 μg/ml, respectively, for terpinen-4-ol and farnesol. Farnesol was the most active compound for the Sporothrix strains. Significant loss of 260 and 280 nm-absorbing material did not occur after treatment with concentrations equivalent to the MIC and sub-MIC of the tested terpenes, when compared to corresponding untreated samples. The failure of terpenes to lyse Sporothrix cells suggests that their primary mechanism of action is not by causing irreversible cell membrane damage. Thus, new studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms involved in the antifungal activity. PMID:25541558

  12. Nuclear behavior in triple-conjugant fusion complexes of the ciliate Stylonychia pustulata: Inhibition of meiosis and retention of the macronucleus.

    PubMed

    Yano, J; Suhama, M

    1990-06-29

    The relationship between temporary conjugation and the conjugant fusion of the hypotrich ciliate Stylonychia pustulata was examined by use of singlet cells of stocks HH1 and TK1, and back-to-back doublet cells of stock NM2 with two attachment sites. The TK1 cells caused conjugant fusion in cell pairing. Triple-conjugant fusion (TCF) complexes composed of an HH1 cell, an NM2 doublet and a TK1 cell were obtained by mixing cells from three stocks. Multiple-conjugant fusion complexes composed of a TK1 cell and three or four NM2 doublets were also found. Initiation of meiosis in TCF complexes was not disturbed by the union of a TK1 cell and a component of the doublet member, but meiosis was blocked at the parachute stage. Thereafter, many micronuclei underwent mitosis. These results suggest that a meiosis blocking factor is present in the cytoplasm of the TK1 cell and migrates to both the doublet and the HH1 members. The macronuclei in doublet and HH1 members changed from elongated and fragmented shapes to spheres. The HH1 and doublet members shifted from conjugation to conjugant fusion. The doublet and HH1 members split from TCF complexes within an hour of the onset of pairing underwent either autogamy or cell division. PMID:23196046

  13. Heterologous Expression of Mycobacterial Esx Complexes in Escherichia coli for Structural Studies Is Facilitated by the Use of Maltose Binding Protein Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Liam; Kuo, Emmeline; Zhou, Tina T.; Ahn, Christine J.; Nguyen, Lin; He, Qixin; Lu, Jamie; Menchavez, Phuong T.; Shin, Annie; Holton, Thomas; Sawaya, Michael R.; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David

    2013-01-01

    The expression of heteroligomeric protein complexes for structural studies often requires a special coexpression strategy. The reason is that the solubility and proper folding of each subunit of the complex requires physical association with other subunits of the complex. The genomes of pathogenic mycobacteria encode many small protein complexes, implicated in bacterial fitness and pathogenicity, whose characterization may be further complicated by insolubility upon expression in Escherichia coli, the most common heterologous protein expression host. As protein fusions have been shown to dramatically affect the solubility of the proteins to which they are fused, we evaluated the ability of maltose binding protein fusions to produce mycobacterial Esx protein complexes. A single plasmid expression strategy using an N-terminal maltose binding protein fusion to the CFP-10 homolog proved effective in producing soluble Esx protein complexes, as determined by a small-scale expression and affinity purification screen, and coupled with intracellular proteolytic cleavage of the maltose binding protein moiety produced protein complexes of sufficient purity for structural studies. In comparison, the expression of complexes with hexahistidine affinity tags alone on the CFP-10 subunits failed to express in amounts sufficient for biochemical characterization. Using this strategy, six mycobacterial Esx complexes were expressed, purified to homogeneity, and subjected to crystallization screening and the crystal structures of the Mycobacterium abscessus EsxEF, M. smegmatis EsxGH, and M. tuberculosis EsxOP complexes were determined. Maltose binding protein fusions are thus an effective method for production of Esx complexes and this strategy may be applicable for production of other protein complexes. PMID:24312350

  14. Interaction between the G3 and L5 proteins of the vaccinia virus entry-fusion complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Cindy L.; Moss, Bernard

    2011-04-10

    The vaccinia virus entry-fusion complex (EFC) consists of 10 to 12 proteins that are embedded in the viral membrane and individually required for fusion with the cell and entry of the core into the cytoplasm. The architecture of the EFC is unknown except for information regarding two pair-wise interactions: A28 with H2 and A16 with G9. Here we used a technique to destabilize the EFC by repressing the expression of individual components and identified a third pair-wise interaction: G3 with L5. These two proteins remained associated under several different EFC destabilization conditions and in each case were immunopurified together as demonstrated by Western blotting. Further evidence for the specific interaction of G3 and L5 was obtained by mass spectrometry. This interaction also occurred when G3 and L5 were expressed in uninfected cells, indicating that no other viral proteins were required. Thus, the present study extends our knowledge of the protein interactions important for EFC assembly and stability.

  15. Role of angular momentum in the production of complex fragments in fusion and quasifission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2011-05-15

    The influence of angular momentum on the competition between complete fusion followed by the decay of compound nucleus and quasifission channels is treated within the dinuclear system model. The charge distributions of the products in the reactions {sup 28}Si+{sup 96}Zr, {sup 4}He+{sup 130}Te, and {sup 40}Ca+{sup 82}Kr are predicted at bombarding energies above the Coulomb barrier. The results of calculations for the reactions {sup 93}Nb+{sup 9}Be,{sup 12}C,{sup 27}Al; {sup 84}Kr+{sup 27}Al; {sup 86}Kr+{sup 63}Cu; {sup 139}La+{sup 12}C,{sup 27}Al; and {sup 45}Sc+{sup 65}Cu are compared with the available experimental data.

  16. Crystal structure of macrophage migration inhibitory factor complexed with (E)-2-fluoro-p-hydroxycinnamate at 1.8 A resolution: implications for enzymatic catalysis and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A B; Johnson, W H; Czerwinski, R M; Li, H S; Hackert, M L; Whitman, C P

    1999-06-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) exhibits dual activities. It acts as an immunoregulatory protein as well as a phenylpyruvate tautomerase. To understand better the relationship between these two activities and to elucidate the structural basis for the enzymatic activity, a crystal structure of a complex between murine MIF and (E)-2-fluoro-p-hydroxycinnamate, a competitive inhibitor of the tautomerase activity, has been determined to 1.8 A resolution. The structure is nearly superimposable on that of the free protein indicating that the presence of the inhibitor does not result in any major structural changes. The inhibitor also confirms the location of the active site in a hydrophobic cavity containing the amino-terminal proline. Within this cavity, the inhibitor interacts with residues from adjacent subunits. At the back of the cavity, the side-chain carbonyl oxygen of Asn-97' interacts with the phenolic hydroxyl group of the inhibitor while at the mouth of the cavity the ammonium group of Lys-32 interacts with a carboxylate oxygen. The other carboxylate oxygen of the inhibitor interacts with Pro-1. The hydroxyl group of Tyr-95' interacts weakly with the fluoro group on the inhibitor. The hydrophobic side chains of five active-site residues (Met-2, Ile-64, Met-101, Val-106, and Phe-113) and the phenyl moiety of Tyr-95' are responsible for the binding of the phenyl group. Further insight into the enzymatic activity of MIF was obtained by carrying out kinetic studies using the enol isomers of phenylpyruvate and (p-hydroxyphenyl)pyruvate. The results demonstrate that MIF processes the enol isomers more efficiently than the keto isomers primarily because of a decrease in Km. On the basis of these results, a mechanism is proposed for the MIF-catalyzed tautomerization reaction. PMID:10360941

  17. The tail domain of tomosyn controls membrane fusion through tomosyn displacement by VAMP2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Fujikura, Kohei; Sakaue, Mio; Okimura, Kenjiro; Kobayashi, Yuta; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Sakisaka, Toshiaki

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} The tail domain of tomosyn has no effect on the tomosyn-SNARE complex formation. {yields} The tail domain binding to the VAMP-like domain allows VAMP2 to displace tomosyn. {yields} Tomosyn displacement by VAMP2 leads to SNARE complex formation. {yields} The SNARE complex formation drives membrane fusion. -- Abstract: Neurotransmitter release is regulated by SNARE complex-mediated synaptic vesicle fusion. Tomosyn sequesters target SNAREs (t-SNAREs) through its C-terminal VAMP-like domain (VLD). Cumulative biochemical results suggest that the tomosyn-SNARE complex is so tight that VAMP2 cannot displace tomosyn. Based on these results, the tomosyn-SNARE complex has been believed to be a dead-end complex to inhibit neurotransmitter release. On the other hand, some studies using siRNA depletion of tomosyn suggest that tomosyn positively regulates exocytosis. Therefore, it is still controversial whether tomosyn is a simple inhibitor for neurotransmitter release. We recently reported that the inhibitory activity of tomosyn is regulated by the tail domain binding to the VLD. In this study, we employed the liposome fusion assay in order to further understand modes of action of tomosyn in detail. The tail domain unexpectedly had no effect on binding of the VLD to t-SNARE-bearing liposomes. Nonetheless, the tail domain decreased the inhibitory activity of the VLD on the SNARE complex-mediated liposome fusion. These results indicate that the tail domain controls membrane fusion through tomosyn displacement by VAMP2. Deletion of the tail domain-binding region in the VLD retained the binding to t-SNAREs and promoted the liposome fusion. Together, we propose here a novel mechanism of tomosyn that controls synaptic vesicle fusion positively by serving as a placeholder for VAMP2.

  18. Inhibitory effect of a copper-dipeptide complex on the establishment of a Clostridium perenne strain in the intestinal tract of gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dubos, F; Pelissier, J P; Andrieux, C; Ducluzeau, R; Raibaud, P

    1985-01-01

    A semisynthetic diet fed to axenic mice was found to prevent the establishment of a Clostridium perenne strain in their intestinal tract. This inhibitory effect did not occur when axenic mice were preinoculated with a strain of Clostridium difficile. The inhibitory effect was related to the presence in the intestinal contents of axenic mice of both dietary copper and a dipeptide, aspartic-epsilon-lysine. When C. difficile was inoculated into axenic mice, the dipeptide disappeared from the digesta, and C. perenne became established even in the presence of high concentrations of copper. PMID:4091557

  19. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  20. Pseudorabies Virus Glycoprotein M Inhibits Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, Barbara G.; Nixdorf, Ralf; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    A transient transfection-fusion assay was established to investigate membrane fusion mediated by pseudorabies virus (PrV) glycoproteins. Plasmids expressing PrV glycoproteins under control of the immediate-early 1 promoter-enhancer of human cytomegalovirus were transfected into rabbit kidney cells, and the extent of cell fusion was quantitated 27 to 42 h after transfection. Cotransfection of plasmids encoding PrV glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH, and gL resulted in formation of polykaryocytes, as has been shown for homologous proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) (A. Turner, B. Bruun, T. Minson, and H. Browne, J. Virol. 72:873–875, 1998). However, in contrast to HSV-1, fusion was also observed when the gD-encoding plasmid was omitted, which indicates that PrV gB, gH, and gL are sufficient to mediate fusion. Fusogenic activity was enhanced when a carboxy-terminally truncated version of gB (gB-008) lacking the C-terminal 29 amino acids was used instead of wild-type gB. With gB-008, only gH was required in addition for fusion. A very rapid and extended fusion was observed after cotransfection of plasmids encoding gB-008 and gDH, a hybrid protein consisting of the N-terminal 271 amino acids of gD fused to the 590 C-terminal amino acids of gH. This protein has been shown to substitute for gH, gD, and gL function in the respective viral mutants (B. G. Klupp and T. C. Mettenleiter, J. Virol. 73:3014–3022, 1999). Cotransfection of plasmids encoding PrV gC, gE, gI, gK, and UL20 with gB-008 and gDH had no effect on fusion. However, inclusion of a gM-expressing plasmid strongly reduced the extent of fusion. An inhibitory effect was also observed after inclusion of plasmids encoding gM homologs of equine herpesvirus 1 or infectious laryngotracheitis virus but only in conjunction with expression of the gM complex partner, the gN homolog. Inhibition by PrV gM was not limited to PrV glycoprotein-mediated fusion but also affected fusion induced by the F protein of bovine

  1. Anticipatory Monitoring and Control of Complex Systems using a Fuzzy based Fusion of Support Vector Regressors

    SciTech Connect

    Miltiadis Alamaniotis; Vivek Agarwal

    2014-10-01

    This paper places itself in the realm of anticipatory systems and envisions monitoring and control methods being capable of making predictions over system critical parameters. Anticipatory systems allow intelligent control of complex systems by predicting their future state. In the current work, an intelligent model aimed at implementing anticipatory monitoring and control in energy industry is presented and tested. More particularly, a set of support vector regressors (SVRs) are trained using both historical and observed data. The trained SVRs are used to predict the future value of the system based on current operational system parameter. The predicted values are then inputted to a fuzzy logic based module where the values are fused to obtain a single value, i.e., final system output prediction. The methodology is tested on real turbine degradation datasets. The outcome of the approach presented in this paper highlights the superiority over single support vector regressors. In addition, it is shown that appropriate selection of fuzzy sets and fuzzy rules plays an important role in improving system performance.

  2. Vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex subunit A28 is a target of neutralizing and protective antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Gretchen E.; Sisler, Jerry R.; Chandran, Dev; Moss, Bernard

    2008-10-25

    The vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex (EFC) is comprised of at least eight transmembrane proteins that are conserved in all poxviruses. However, neither the physical structure of the EFC nor the immunogenicity of the individual components has been determined. We prepared soluble forms of two EFC components, A28 and H2, by replacing the transmembrane domain with a signal peptide and adding a polyhistidine tail. The proteins were expressed by baculoviruses, secreted from insect cells, purified by affinity chromatography and used to raise antibodies in rabbits. The antibodies recognized the viral proteins but only the antibody to recombinant A28 bound intact virions and neutralized infectivity. Analyses with a set of overlapping peptides revealed a neutralizing epitope between residues 73 and 92 of A28. Passive immunization of mice with IgG purified from the anti-A28 serum provided partial protection against a vaccinia virus intranasal challenge, whereas IgG from the anti-H2 serum did not.

  3. Protection against lethal measles virus infection in mice by immune-stimulating complexes containing the hemagglutinin or fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Varsanyi, T M; Morein, B; Löve, A; Norrby, E

    1987-01-01

    The importance of each of the two surface glycoproteins of measles virus in active and passive immunization was examined in mice. Infected-cell lysates were depleted of either the hemagglutinin (H) or fusion (F) glycoprotein by using multiple cycles of immunoaffinity chromatography. The products were used to prepare immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms) containing either F or H glycoprotein. Such complexes are highly immunogenic, possibly as a result of effective presentation of viral proteins to the immune system [B. Morein, B. Sundquist, S. Höglund, K. Dalsgaard, and A. Osterhaus, Nature (London) 308:457-460, 1984]. Groups of 3-week-old BALB/c mice were inoculated with the iscom preparations. All animals developed hemolysis-inhibiting antibodies, whereas only sera of animals immunized with the iscoms containing the H glycoprotein had hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies. Sera from animals immunized with the H or F preparation only precipitated the homologous glycoprotein in radioimmune precipitation assays. The immunized animals were challenged with a lethal dose of the hamster neurotropic variant of measles virus. Of the 7-week-old animals in the nonimmunized control group, 50% died within 10 days after challenge. No animals in the immunized groups showed symptoms of disease throughout the observation period of 3 months. Passive administration of anti-H monoclonal antibodies gave full protection against the 100% lethal acute infection with the hamster neurotropic variant of measles virus in newborn mice, whereas anti-F monoclonal antibodies failed to protect the animals. This study emphasizes that both H and F glycoproteins need to be considered in the development of measles virus subunit vaccines. Images PMID:2960833

  4. Reconfiguring the connectivity of a multiprotein complex: fusions of yeast TATA-binding protein with Brf1, and the function of transcription factor IIIB.

    PubMed

    Kassavetis, George A; Soragni, Elisabetta; Driscoll, Robert; Geiduschek, E Peter

    2005-10-25

    Transcription factor (TF) IIIB, the central transcription initiation factor of RNA polymerase III (pol III), is composed of three subunits, Bdp1, Brf1 and TATA-binding protein (TBP), all essential for normal function in vivo and in vitro. Brf1 is a modular protein: Its N-proximal half is related to TFIIB and binds similarly to the C-terminal stirrup of TBP; its C-proximal one-third provides most of the affinity for TBP by binding along the entire length of the convex surface and N-terminal lateral face of TBP. A structure-informed triple fusion protein, with TBP core placed between the N- and C-proximal domains of Brf1, has been constructed. The Brf1-TBP triple fusion protein effectively replaces both Brf1 and TBP in TFIIIC-dependent and -independent transcription in vitro, and forms extremely stable TFIIIB-DNA complexes that are indistinguishable from wild-type TFIIIB-DNA complexes by chemical nuclease footprinting. Unlike Brf1 and TBP, the triple fusion protein is able to recruit pol III for TATA box-directed transcription of linear and supercoiled DNA in the absence of Bdp1. The Brf1-TBP triple fusion protein also effectively replaces Brf1 function in vivo as the intact protein, creating a TBP paralogue in yeast that is privatized for pol III transcription. PMID:16227432

  5. Characterization of the telomere complex, TERF1 and TERF2 genes in muntjac species with fusion karyotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, Nils; Scherthan, Harry . E-mail: scherth@web.de

    2005-05-15

    The telomere binding proteins TRF1 and TRF2 maintain and protect chromosome ends and confer karyotypic stability. Chromosome evolution in the genus Muntiacus is characterized by numerous tandem (end-to-end) fusions. To study TRF1 and TRF2 telomere binding proteins in Muntiacus species, we isolated and characterized the TERF1 and -2 genes from Indian muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak vaginalis; 2n = 6 female) and from Chinese muntjac (Muntiacus reveesi; 2n = 46). Expression analysis revealed that both genes are ubiquitously expressed and sequence analysis identified several transcript variants of both TERF genes. Control experiments disclosed a novel testis-specific splice variant of TERF1 in human testes. Amino acid sequence comparisons demonstrate that Muntiacus TRF1 and in particular TRF2 are highly conserved between muntjac and human. In vivo TRF2-GFP and immuno-staining studies in muntjac cell lines revealed telomeric TRF2 localization, while deletion of the DNA binding domain abrogated this localization, suggesting muntjac TRF2 represents a functional telomere protein. Finally, expression analysis of a set of telomere-related genes revealed their presence in muntjac fibroblasts and testis tissue, which suggests the presence of a conserved telomere complex in muntjacs. However, a deviation from the common theme was noted for the TERT gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of telomerase; TERT expression could not be detected in Indian or Chinese muntjac cDNA or genomic DNA using a series of conserved primers, while TRAP assay revealed functional telomerase in Chinese muntjac testis tissues. This suggests muntjacs may harbor a diverged telomerase sequence.

  6. Functional NifD-K fusion protein in Azotobacter vinelandii is a homodimeric complex equivalent to the native heterotetrameric MoFe protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Gavini, Nara . E-mail: gavini@biology.msstate.edu

    2005-11-18

    The MoFe protein of the complex metalloenzyme nitrogenase folds as a heterotetramer containing two copies each of the homologous {alpha} and {beta} subunits, encoded by the nifD and the nifK genes respectively. Recently, the functional expression of a fusion NifD-K protein of nitrogenase was demonstrated in Azotobacter vinelandii, strongly implying that the MoFe protein is flexible as it could accommodate major structural changes, yet remain functional [M.H. Suh, L. Pulakat, N. Gavini, J. Biol. Chem. 278 (2003) 5353-5360]. This finding led us to further explore the type of interaction between the fused MoFe protein units. We aimed to determine whether an interaction exists between the two fusion MoFe proteins to form a homodimer that is equivalent to native heterotetrameric MoFe protein. Using the Bacteriomatch Two-Hybrid System, translationally fused constructs of NifD-K (fusion) with the full-length {lambda}CI of the pBT bait vector and also NifD-K (fusion) with the N-terminal {alpha}-RNAP of the pTRG target vector were made. To compare the extent of interaction between the fused NifD-K proteins to that of the {beta}-{beta} interactions in the native MoFe protein, we proceeded to generate translationally fused constructs of NifK with the {alpha}-RNAP of the pTRG vector and {lambda}CI protein of the pBT vector. The strength of the interaction between the proteins in study was determined by measuring the {beta}-galactosidase activity and extent of ampicillin resistance of the colonies expressing these proteins. This analysis demonstrated that direct protein-protein interaction exists between NifD-K fusion proteins, suggesting that they exist as homodimers. As the interaction takes place at the {beta}-interfaces of the NifD-K fusion proteins, we propose that these homodimers of NifD-K fusion protein may function in a similar manner as that of the heterotetrameric native MoFe protein. The observation that the extent of protein-protein interaction between the {beta

  7. Studies on DNA binding behaviour of biologically active transition metal complexes of new tetradentate N2O2 donor Schiff bases: Inhibitory activity against bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobha, S.; Mahalakshmi, R.; Raman, N.

    A series of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of the type ML have been synthesized with Schiff bases derived from o-acetoacetotoluidide, 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine/1,4-diaminobutane. The complexes are insoluble in common organic solvents but soluble in DMF and DMSO. The measured molar conductance values in DMSO indicate that the complexes are non-electrolytic in nature. All the six metal complexes have been fully characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductance values, magnetic moments and spectroscopic data. The analytical data helped to elucidate the structure of the metal complexes. The Schiff bases are found to act as tetradentate ligands using N2O2 donor set of atoms leading to a square-planar geometry for the complexes around all the metal ions. The binding properties of metal complexes with DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. Detailed analysis reveals that the metal complexes intercalate into the DNA base stack as intercalators. All the metal complexes cleave the pUC19 DNA in presence of H2O2. The Schiff bases and their complexes have been screened for their antibacterial activity against five bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae) by disk diffusion method. All the metal complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  8. Coordination of autophagosome-lysosome fusion and transport by a Klp98A-Rab14 complex in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mauvezin, Caroline; Neisch, Amanda L; Ayala, Carlos I; Kim, Jung; Beltrame, Abigail; Braden, Christopher R; Gardner, Melissa K; Hays, Thomas S; Neufeld, Thomas P

    2016-03-01

    Degradation of cellular material by autophagy is essential for cell survival and homeostasis, and requires intracellular transport of autophagosomes to encounter acidic lysosomes through unknown mechanisms. Here, we identify the PX-domain-containing kinesin Klp98A as a new regulator of autophagosome formation, transport and maturation in Drosophila. Depletion of Klp98A caused abnormal clustering of autophagosomes and lysosomes at the cell center and reduced the formation of starvation-induced autophagic vesicles. Reciprocally, overexpression of Klp98A redistributed autophagic vesicles towards the cell periphery. These effects were accompanied by reduced autophagosome-lysosome fusion and autophagic degradation. In contrast, depletion of the conventional kinesin heavy chain caused a similar mislocalization of autophagosomes without perturbing their fusion with lysosomes, indicating that vesicle fusion and localization are separable and independent events. Klp98A-mediated fusion required the endolysosomal GTPase Rab14, which interacted and colocalized with Klp98A, and required Klp98A for normal localization. Thus, Klp98A coordinates the movement and fusion of autophagic vesicles by regulating their positioning and interaction with the endolysosomal compartment. PMID:26763909

  9. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Karube, Fuyuki; Nomura, Masaki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) size is not uniform. Thus, cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit. PMID:27199670

  10. Direct measurement via phage titre of the dissociation constants in solution of fusion phage-substrate complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, M R; Germaschewski, V; Murray, K

    1995-01-01

    Studies of interactions between filamentous fusion phage particles and protein or nucleic acid molecules have gained increasing importance with recent successes of screening techniques based upon random phage display libraries (biopanning). Since a number of different phage are usually obtained by biopanning, it is useful to compare quantitatively the binding affinities of individual phage for the substrate used for selection. A procedure is described for determination of relative dissociation constants (KdRel) between filamentous phage carrying peptide fusions to the coat protein gpIII and substrates in solution. This novel method is based on the measurement of phage titres. Phage selected from a random fusion phage library for binding to a monoclonal antibody or a viral structural protein exhibited KdRel values in the nanomolar and micromolar ranges for their respective substrates, thus validating the method over a wide range of binding affinities. PMID:7784206

  11. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies and inhibitory activity against bactria and fungi of acyclic and macrocyclic transition metal complexes containing a triamine coumarine Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Hussein, A. A.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Two series of new mono and binuclear complexes with a Schiff base ligand derived from the condensation of 3-acetylcoumarine and diethylenetriamine, in the molar ratio 2:1 have been prepared. The ligand was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-visible, 1H-NMR and mass spectra. The reaction of the Schiff base ligand with cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and oxovanadium(IV) lead to mono or binuclear species of cyclic or macrocyclic complexes, depending on the mole ratio of metal to ligand and as well as on the method of preparation. The Schiff base ligand behaves as a cyclic bidentate, tetradendate or pentaentadentae ligand. The formation of macrocyclic complexes depends significantly on the dimension of the internal cavity, the rigidity of the macrocycles, the nature of its donor atoms and on the complexing properties of the anion involved in the coordination. Electronic spectra and magnetic moments of the complexes indicate that the geometries of the metal centers are either square pyramidal or octahedral for acyclic or macro-cyclic complexes. The structures are consistent with the IR, UV-visible, ESR, 1H-NMR, mass spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic moment measurements. The Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes were tested against two pathogenic bacteria as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as one kind of fungi. Most of the complexes exhibit mild antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms.

  12. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF).

    PubMed

    Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is the most pleiotropic member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. It utilises a receptor that consists of the LIF receptor β and gp130 and this receptor complex is also used by ciliary neurotrophic growth factor (CNTF), oncostatin M, cardiotrophin1 (CT1) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC). Despite common signal transduction mechanisms (JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K) LIF can have paradoxically opposite effects in different cell types including stimulating or inhibiting each of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While LIF can act on a wide range of cell types, LIF knockout mice have revealed that many of these actions are not apparent during ordinary development and that they may be the result of induced LIF expression during tissue damage or injury. Nevertheless LIF does appear to have non-redundant actions in maternal receptivity to blastocyst implantation, placental formation and in the development of the nervous system. LIF has also found practical use in the maintenance of self-renewal and totipotency of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26187859

  13. Spectroscopic Elucidation of the Inhibitory Mechanism of Cys2His2 Zinc Finger Transcription Factors by CobaltIII Schiff Base Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Heffern, Marie C.; Kurutz, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulators in both normal and pathological cell processes. Affecting the activity of these proteins is a promising strategy for understanding gene regulation and developing effective therapeutics. CoIII Schiff base complexes ([Co(acacen)(L)2]+ where L = labile axial ligands) have been shown to be potent inhibitors of a number of zinc metalloproteins including Cys2His2 zinc finger transcription factors. Inhibition by [Co(acacen)(L)2]+ of the target protein is believed to occur through a dissociative exchange of the labile axial ligands for histidine (His) residues essential for function. Here, we report a series of spectroscopic investigations with model peptides of zinc fingers that elucidate the interaction between [Co(acacen)(L)2]+ complexes and zinc finger transcription factors. Observed changes in NMR chemical shifts and 2D 1H-1H NOESY NMR spectra demonstrate the preference of [Co(acacen)(L)2]+ complexes to coordinate His residues over other amino acids. The conformation of [Co(acacen)(L)2]+ upon His-coordination was characterized by 1H NMR, near-UV circular dichroism, and electronic absorption. These studies reveal that the resulting His-coordinated [Co(acacen)(L)2]+ complex possesses an octahedral structure. The effects of [Co(acacen)(L)2]+ complexes on the zinc finger structure were assessed by the degree of hydrogen bonding (probed by 2D NMR) and secondary structure profiles measured by far-UV circular dichroism. These structural studies demonstrate the ability of [Co(acacen)(L)2]+ complexes to disrupt the ββα structure of zinc fingers, resulting in primarily random coil conformations. A mechanism is described wherein [Co(acacen)(L)2]+ complexes inhibit zinc finger transcription factor activity through selectively coordinating His residues in the zinc finger via dissociative ligand exchange and disrupting the ββα structural motif required for gene regulation. PMID:24203451

  14. Kinetically coupled folding of a single HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 complex in viral membrane fusion and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Junyi; Rebane, Aleksander A.; Ma, Lu; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 (gp41) mediates viral entry into host cells by coupling its folding energy to membrane fusion. Gp41 folding is blocked by fusion inhibitors, including the commercial drug T20, to treat HIV/AIDS. However, gp41 folding intermediates, energy, and kinetics are poorly understood. Here, we identified the folding intermediates of a single gp41 trimer-of-hairpins and measured their associated energy and kinetics using high-resolution optical tweezers. We found that folding of gp41 hairpins was energetically independent but kinetically coupled: Each hairpin contributed a folding energy of ∼−23 kBT, but folding of one hairpin successively accelerated the folding rate of the next one by ∼20-fold. Membrane-mimicking micelles slowed down gp41 folding and reduced the stability of the six-helix bundle. However, the stability was restored by cooperative folding of the membrane-proximal external region. Surprisingly, T20 strongly inhibited gp41 folding by actively displacing the C-terminal hairpin strand in a force-dependent manner. The inhibition was abolished by a T20-resistant gp41 mutation. The energetics and kinetics of gp41 folding established by us provides a basis to understand viral membrane fusion, infection, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26038562

  15. Doubly end-on azido bridged mixed-valence cobalt trinuclear complex: Spectral study, VTM, inhibitory effect and antimycobacterial activity on human carcinoma and tuberculosis cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Amitabha; Das, Kuheli; Sen, Chandana; Karan, Nirmal Kumar; Huang, Jui-Hsien; Lin, Chia-Her; Garribba, Eugenio; Sinha, Chittaranjan; Askun, Tulin; Celikboyun, Pinar; Mane, Sandeep B.

    2015-09-01

    Doubly end-on azido-bridged mixed-valence trinuclear cobalt complex, [Co3(L)2(N3)6(CH3OH)2] (1) is afforded by employing a potential monoanionic tetradentate-N2O2 Schiff base precursor (2-[{[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]imino}methyl]-6-methoxyphenol; HL). Single crystal X-ray structure reveals that in 1, the adjacent CoII and CoIII ions are linked by double end-on azido bridges and thus the full molecule is generated by the site symmetry of a crystallographic twofold rotation axis. Complex 1 is subjected on different spectral analysis such as IR, UV-vis, emission and EPR spectroscopy. On variable temperature magnetic study, we observe that during cooling, the χMT values decrease smoothly until 15 K and then reaches to the value 1.56 cm3 K mol-1 at 2 K. Complex 1 inhibits the cell growth on human lung carcinoma (A549 cells), human colorectal (COLO 205 and HT-29 cells), and human heptacellular (PLC5 cells) carcinoma cells. Complex 1 exhibits anti-mycobacterial activity and considerable efficacy on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv ATCC 27294 and H37Ra ATCC 25177 strains.

  16. The separation of platinum, palladium and gold from silicate rocks by the anion exchange separation of chloro complexes after a sodium peroxide fusion: an investigation of low recoveries.

    PubMed

    Enzweiler, J; Potts, P J

    1995-10-01

    A series of experiments was undertaken to measure the recovery efficiency of platinum, palladium and gold from silicate rocks using a sodium peroxide fusion followed by anion exchange separation of the analytes as chloro complexes. Results obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of standard solutions prepared in dilute HCl or HCl-acidified sodium peroxide solution showed that recoveries were near quantitative. However, when standard solutions were added to an alkaline sodium peroxide solution, which was then acidified, low results were obtained for platinum and gold (46% and 76% respectively). Low and variable results were also obtained when standard solutions were added to a peridotite sample that had been dissolved by the state procedure, and in the analysis of the South African Bureau of Standards certified reference material, SARM 7. Various experiments were undertaken to investigate these low recoveries, but the reason proposed here is the formation of hydroxychloro compounds in alkaline solution which are not, on acidification with HCl, converted quantitatively to the chloro complex necessary for quantitative anion exchange separation. It is concluded that a sodium peroxide fusion followed by an anion-exchange separation does not appear to form the basis of a successful technique for the determination of platinum, palladium and gold in silicate rocks. PMID:18966370

  17. Multi-targeted antifolates aimed at avoiding drug resistance form covalent closed inhibitory complexes with human and Escherichia coli thymidylate synthases.

    PubMed

    Sayre, P H; Finer-Moore, J S; Fritz, T A; Biermann, D; Gates, S B; MacKellar, W C; Patel, V F; Stroud, R M

    2001-11-01

    Crystal structures of four pyrrolo(2,3-d)pyrimidine-based antifolate compounds, developed as inhibitors of thymidylate synthase (TS) in a strategy to circumvent drug-resistance, have been determined in complexes with their in vivo target, human thymidylate synthase, and with the structurally best-characterized Escherichia coli enzyme, to resolutions of 2.2-3.0 A. The 2.9 A crystal structure of a complex of human TS with one of the inhibitors, the multi-targeted antifolate LY231514, demonstrates that this compound induces a "closed" enzyme conformation and leads to formation of a covalent bond between enzyme and substrate. This structure is one of the first liganded human TS structures, and its solution was aided by mutation to facilitate crystallization. Structures of three other pyrrolo(2,3-d)pyrimidine-based antifolates in complex with Escherichia coli TS confirm the orientation of this class of inhibitors in the active site. Specific interactions between the polyglutamyl moiety and a positively charged groove on the enzyme surface explain the marked increase in affinity of the pyrrolo(2,3-d)pyrimidine inhibitors once they are polyglutamylated, as mediated in vivo by the cellular enzyme folyl polyglutamate synthetase. PMID:11697906

  18. Crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase core domain in complex with sucrose reveals details of an allosteric inhibitory binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Rhodes, David I.; Deadman, John; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Parker, Michael W.

    2010-04-19

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in HIV replication and an important target for drug design. IN has been shown to interact with a number of cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Disruption of these important interactions could provide a mechanism for allosteric inhibition of IN. We present the highest resolution crystal structure of the IN core domain to date. We also present a crystal structure of the IN core domain in complex with sucrose which is bound at the dimer interface in a region that has previously been reported to bind integrase inhibitors.

  19. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  20. The structure of the inhibitory complex of alloxanthine (1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-4,6-diol) with the molybdenum centre of xanthine oxidase from electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, T R; George, G N; Bray, R C

    1984-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the inhibitory complex of alloxanthine (1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-4,5-diol) with xanthine oxidase, in extension of the work of Williams & Bray [Biochem. J. (1981) 195, 753-760]. By suitable regulation of the reaction conditions, up to 10% of the functional enzyme could be converted into the complex in the Mo(V) oxidation state. The e.p.r. spectrum of the complex was investigated in detail with the help of computer simulation and substitution with stable isotopes. Close structural analogy of the signal-giving species to that of the Very Rapid intermediate in enzyme turnover is shown by g-values (2.0279, 1.9593 and 1.9442) and by coupling to 33S in the cyanide-labile site of the enzyme [A(33S) 0.30, 3.10 and 0.70mT]. However, whereas in the Very Rapid signal there is strong coupling to 17O [Gutteridge & Bray, Biochem. J. (1980) 189, 615-623], instead, in the Alloxanthine signal there is strong coupling to a single nitrogen atom [A(14N) 0.35, 0.35, 0.32 mT]. This is presumed to originate from the 2-position of the heterocyclic ring system. From this work and from earlier kinetic studies it is concluded that alloxanthine, after being bound reversibly at the active centre, reacts slowly with it, in a specific manner, distinct from that in the normal catalytic reaction with substrates. This reaction involves elimination of an oxygen ligand of molybdenum and co-ordination, in this site, of alloxanthine via the N-2 nitrogen atom, to give a complex that is structurally but not chemically closely analogous to that of the Very Rapid species. PMID:6326752

  1. Membrane attack complex (MAC)-mediated damage to spermatozoa: protection of the cells by the presence on their membranes of MAC inhibitory proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, I A; Davies, A; Morgan, B P

    1992-01-01

    Although antibody and complement are known to cause immobilization and killing of spermatozoa in vitro the components of the complement system mediating these effects remain undefined. Here we have examined the effects of the membrane attack complex (MAC) on spermatozoa and demonstrate that spermatotoxic effects are dependent on assembly of the complete MAC. We subsequently examined the presence and functional significance of the complement regulatory proteins decay accelerating factor (DAF), MAC-inhibiting protein (MIP) and CD59 antigen on spermatozoa. Both DAF and CD59 antigen were present on the membranes of these cells. Neutralization of CD59 antigen with specific antibodies increased the susceptibility of the cells to MAC-mediated damage, suggesting a role for this molecule in the protection of spermatozoa from complement-mediated damage in the female reproductive tract. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1374057

  2. Inhibitory effect of 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation through suppression of IκB kinase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Je, In-Gyu; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Hui-Hun; Lee, Soyoung; Choi, Jin Kyeong; Kim, Sung-Wan; Kim, Duk-Sil; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Park, Pil-Hoon; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    As the importance of allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis and allergic asthma, research on potential drug candidates becomes more necessary. Mast cells play an important role as initiators of allergic responses through the release of histamine; therefore, they should be the target of pharmaceutical development for the management of allergic inflammation. In our previous study, anti-allergic effect of extracts of Amomum xanthioides was demonstrated. To further investigate improved candidates, 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene (TMB) was isolated from methanol extracts of A. xanthioides. TMB dose-dependently attenuated the degranulation of mast cells without cytotoxicity by inhibiting calcium influx. TMB decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-4 at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Increased expression of these cytokines was caused by translocation of nuclear factor-κB into the nucleus, and it was hindered by suppressing activation of IκB kinase complex. To confirm the effect of TMB in vivo, the ovalbumin (OVA)-induced active systemic anaphylaxis (ASA) and IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) models were used. In the ASA model, hypothermia was decreased by oral administration of TMB, which attenuated serum histamine, OVA-specific IgE, and IL-4 levels. Increased pigmentation of Evans blue was reduced by TMB in a dose-dependent manner in the PCA model. Our results suggest that TMB is a possible therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory diseases that acts through the inhibition of mast cell degranulation and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. - Highlights: • TMB reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • TMB inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • TMB suppressed both active and passive anaphylaxis. • Anti-allergic inflammatory effects of TMB might be due to the blocking IKK complex. • TMB might be a candidate for the treatment of

  3. Screening assay of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity from complex natural colourants and foods using high-throughput LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koichi; Kitade, Marie; Hino, Tomoaki; Oka, Hisao

    2011-06-15

    Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) by various foods decreases the blood pressure. ACE inhibitors derived from natural components may be of therapeutic value in preventive medicine. In this study, we report a novel screening assay of ACE inhibitors from complex natural colourants and foods that employ solid phase extraction (SPE), high-throughput liquid chromatography (LC) separation, and stable isotope dilution electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (SID-ESI-MS/MS). When a target sample was subjected to N-Hippuryl-His-Leu (HHL) and ACE in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), generated hippuric acid (HA) was extracted by SPE. LC/SID-ESI-MS/MS detection of HA allowed us to accurately identify the effects of complex substances such natural colourants and foods that inhibit the ACE of HHL. The major HA and HA-d5 fragment ions at m/z 180→105 and 185→110 in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode can quantify levels that are lower than other methods. The LC/SID-ESI-MS/MS method described here is a rapid, selective, sensitive, and highly reproducible method for the determination of HA in various samples. Based on the assay developed, all samples such as natural colourants, infant formula, soy paste, ketchup, mayonnaise, wheat flour, orange juice, supplement drink, tea, and coffee could be accurately measured for ACE inhibition in various matrices. High-throughput LC/SID-ESI-MS/MS assay has no limitations in the evaluation of inhibition activity in various natural samples such as colour, high-matrix, and processed foods. PMID:25213976

  4. An inhibitory corticostriatal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Crystal; Zurita, Hector; Wilson, Charles; Apicella, Alfonso junior

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical and physiological studies have led to the assumption that the dorsal striatum receives exclusively excitatory afferents from the cortex. Here we test the hypothesis that the dorsal striatum receives also GABAergic projections from the cortex. We addressed this fundamental question by taking advantage of optogenetics and directly examining the functional effects of cortical GABAergic inputs to spiny projection neurons (SPNs) of the mouse auditory and motor cortex. We found that the cortex, via corticostriatal somatostatin neurons (CS-SOM), has a direct inhibitory influence on the output of the striatum SPNs. Our results describe a corticostriatal long-range inhibitory circuit (CS-SOM inhibitory projections → striatal SPNs) underlying the control of spike timing/generation in SPNs and attributes a specific function to a genetically defined type of cortical interneuron in corticostriatal communication. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15890.001 PMID:27159237

  5. A complex MLL rearrangement identified five years after initial MDS diagnosis results in out-of-frame fusions without progression to acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Claus; Kowarz, Eric; Yip, Sze-Fai; Wan, Thomas Shek-Kong; Chan, Tai-Kwong; Dingermann, Theo; Chan, Li-Chong; Marschalek, Rolf

    2011-10-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the MLL gene are uncommon in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), and few studies of their molecular structures and oncogenic mechanisms exist. Here, we present a case of de novo MDS with a normal karyotype at initial diagnosis and a mild clinical course. Five years after the initial diagnosis, investigators identified a complex rearrangement of the MLL gene without progression to acute leukemia. The 5' part of the MLL gene is fused out of frame with the LOC100131626 gene, and the 3' part of the MLL gene out of frame with the TCF12 gene. Rapid amplification of complementary DNA 3' ends yielded two main fusion transcripts, which is in concordance with the two described isoforms of the LOC100131626 gene. For both isoform-fusion transcripts, the open reading frame terminates shortly after the breakpoint that is predicted to form two de facto truncated MLL proteins and disrupts the open reading frame of the LOC100131626, TCF12, and UBE4A genes. Neither dimerization nor a transcriptional activation domain, each of which is causally linked to MLL protein-mediated transformation, is present. This and other unusual MLL rearrangements probably represent a subclass of MLL gene abnormalities that have intrinsically no ability or only a weak ability to transform hematopoeitic cells and are identified only in the context of other hematopoetic malignancies. PMID:22137486

  6. Characterization of fusion genes and the significantly expressed fusion isoforms in breast cancer by hybrid sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Weirather, Jason L.; Afshar, Pegah Tootoonchi; Clark, Tyson A.; Tseng, Elizabeth; Powers, Linda S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Zabner, Joseph; Korlach, Jonas; Wong, Wing Hung; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-01-01

    We developed an innovative hybrid sequencing approach, IDP-fusion, to detect fusion genes, determine fusion sites and identify and quantify fusion isoforms. IDP-fusion is the first method to study gene fusion events by integrating Third Generation Sequencing long reads and Second Generation Sequencing short reads. We applied IDP-fusion to PacBio data and Illumina data from the MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Compared with the existing tools, IDP-fusion detects fusion genes at higher precision and a very low false positive rate. The results show that IDP-fusion will be useful for unraveling the complexity of multiple fusion splices and fusion isoforms within tumorigenesis-relevant fusion genes. PMID:26040699

  7. Inhibitory function of adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit in the process of nuclear translocation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genome

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, Yukiko; Kameoka, Masanori Shoji-Kawata, Sanae; Iwabu, Yukie; Mizuta, Hiroyuki; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Fujino, Masato; Natori, Yukikazu; Yura, Yoshiaki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2008-03-30

    The transfection of human cells with siRNA against adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit (AP2{alpha}) was revealed to significantly up-regulate the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This effect was confirmed by cell infection with vesicular stomatitis virus G protein-pseudotyped HIV-1 as well as CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic HIV-1. Viral adsorption, viral entry and reverse transcription processes were not affected by cell transfection with siRNA against AP2{alpha}. In contrast, viral nuclear translocation as well as the integration process was significantly up-regulated in cells transfected with siRNA against AP2{alpha}. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that a subpopulation of AP2{alpha} was not only localized in the cytoplasm but was also partly co-localized with lamin B, importin {beta} and Nup153, implying that AP2{alpha} negatively regulates HIV-1 replication in the process of nuclear translocation of viral DNA in the cytoplasm or the perinuclear region. We propose that AP2{alpha} may be a novel target for disrupting HIV-1 replication in the early stage of the viral life cycle.

  8. The problems associated with the monitoring of complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities.

    PubMed

    Bilski, P; Blomgren, J; d'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2007-01-01

    The European Commission is funding within its Sixth Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organisational framework for this project is provided by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. One task within the CONRAD project, Work Package 6 (WP6), was to provide a report outlining research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterisation of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators, but also at the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities. The paper provides an overview of the report, which will be available as CERN Yellow Report. PMID:17496292

  9. Inhibitory effects of inhaled complex traditional Chinese medicine on early and late asthmatic responses induced by ovalbumin in sensitized guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many formulae of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have been used for antiasthma treatment dating back many centuries. There is evidence to suggest that TCMs are effective as a cure for this allergenic disease administered via gastric tubes in animal studies; however, their efficacy, safety and side effects as an asthmatic therapy are still unclear. Methods In this study, guinea pigs sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) were used as an animal model for asthma challenge, and the sensitization of animals by bronchial reactivity to methacholine (Mch) and the IgE concentration in the serum after OVA challenge were estimated. Complex traditional Chinese herbs (CTCM) were administered to the animals by nebulization, and the leukocytes were evaluated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Results The results showed that inhalation of CTCM could abolish the increased lung resistance (13-fold increase) induced by challenge with OVA in the early asthmatic response (EAR), reducing to as low as baseline (1-fold). Moreover, our results indicated higher IgE levels (range, 78-83 ng/ml) in the serum of sensitized guinea pigs than in the unsensitized controls (0.9 ± 0.256 ng/ml). In addition, increased total leukocytes and higher levels of eosinophils and neutrophils were seen 6 hours after challenge, and the increased inflammatory cells were reduced by treatment with CTCM inhalation. The interleukin-5 (IL-5) level in BALF was also reduced by CTCM. Conclusion Our findings indicate a novel method of administering traditional Chinese medicines for asthma treatment in an animal model that may be more effective than traditional methods. PMID:21943157

  10. Separating Fusion from Rivalry

    PubMed Central

    Dechent, Peter; Forster, Clemens; von Steinbüchel, Nicole; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Strasburger, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Visual fusion is the process in which differing but compatible binocular information is transformed into a unified percept. Even though this is at the basis of binocular vision, the underlying neural processes are, as yet, poorly understood. In our study we therefore aimed to investigate neural correlates of visual fusion. To this end, we presented binocularly compatible, fusible (BF), and incompatible, rivaling (BR) stimuli, as well as an intermediate stimulus type containing both binocularly fusible and monocular, incompatible elements (BFR). Comparing BFR stimuli with BF and BR stimuli, respectively, we were able to disentangle brain responses associated with either visual fusion or rivalry. By means of functional magnetic resonance imaging, we measured brain responses to these stimulus classes in the visual cortex, and investigated them in detail at various retinal eccentricities. Compared with BF stimuli, the response to BFR stimuli was elevated in visual cortical areas V1 and V2, but not in V3 and V4 – implying that the response to monocular stimulus features decreased from V1 to V4. Compared to BR stimuli, the response to BFR stimuli decreased with increasing eccentricity, specifically within V3 and V4. Taken together, it seems that although the processing of exclusively monocular information decreases from V1 to V4, the processing of binocularly fused information increases from earlier to later visual areas. Our findings suggest the presence of an inhibitory neural mechanism which, depending on the presence of fusion, acts differently on the processing of monocular information. PMID:25054904

  11. NUP98 fusion oncoproteins interact with the APC/C(Cdc20) as a pseudosubstrate and prevent mitotic checkpoint complex binding.

    PubMed

    Salsi, Valentina; Fantini, Sebastian; Zappavigna, Vincenzo

    2016-09-01

    NUP98 is a recurrent partner gene in translocations causing acute myeloid leukemias and myelodisplastic syndrome. The expression of NUP98 fusion oncoproteins has been shown to induce mitotic spindle defects and chromosome missegregation, which correlate with the capability of NUP98 fusions to cause mitotic checkpoint attenuation. We show that NUP98 oncoproteins physically interact with the APC/C(Cdc20) in the absence of the NUP98 partner protein RAE1, and prevent the binding of the mitotic checkpoint complex to the APC/C(Cdc20). NUP98 oncoproteins require the GLEBS-like domain present in their NUP98 moiety to bind the APC/C(Cdc20). We found that NUP98 wild-type is a substrate of APC/C(Cdc20) prior to mitotic entry, and that its binding to APC/C(Cdc20) is controlled via phosphorylation of a PEST sequence located within its C-terminal portion. We identify S606, within the PEST sequence, as a key target site, whose phosphorylation modulates the capability of NUP98 to interact with APC/C(Cdc20). We finally provide evidence for an involvement of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase PIN1 in modulating the possible conformational changes within NUP98 that lead to its dissociation from the APC/C(Cdc20) during mitosis. Our results provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying the aberrant capability of NUP98 oncoproteins to interact with APC/C(Cdc20) and to interfere with its function. PMID:27097363

  12. Acquired spondylolysis after spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Brunet, J A; Wiley, J J

    1984-11-01

    Spondylolysis occurring after a spinal fusion is considered to result from operative damage to the pars interarticularis on both sides. Fourteen cases are reported, and compared with the 23 cases which have previously been published. The defects are usually recognised within five years of fusion, and usually occur immediately above the fusion mass. Other contributory causes may be: fatigue fracture from concentration of stress; damage and altered function of the posterior ligament complex; and degenerative disc disease immediately above or below the fusion. Fusion technique is critical, since virtually all cases occurred after posterior interlaminar fusions. This complication is easily overlooked in patients with recurrent back pain after an originally successful posterior spinal fusion. PMID:6501368

  13. Negative Regulation of Syntaxin4/SNAP-23/VAMP2-Mediated Membrane Fusion by Munc18c In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Avani; McNew, James A.; Bryant, Nia J.; Gould, Gwyn W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Translocation of the facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 from an intracellular store to the plasma membrane is responsible for the increased rate of glucose transport into fat and muscle cells in response to insulin. This represents a specialised form of regulated membrane trafficking. Intracellular membrane traffic is subject to multiple levels of regulation by conserved families of proteins in all eukaryotic cells. Notably, all intracellular fusion events require SNARE proteins and Sec1p/Munc18 family members. Fusion of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane of insulin-sensitive cells involves the SM protein Munc18c, and is regulated by the formation of syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complexes. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we have used biochemical approaches to characterise the interaction(s) of Munc18c with its cognate SNARE proteins and to examine the role of Munc18c in regulating liposome fusion catalysed by syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complex formation. We demonstrate that Munc18c makes contacts with both t- and v-SNARE proteins of this complex, and directly inhibits bilayer fusion mediated by the syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complex. Conclusion/Significance Our reductionist approach has enabled us to ascertain a direct inhibitory role for Munc18c in regulating membrane fusion mediated by syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complex formation. It is important to note that two different SM proteins have recently been shown to stimulate liposome fusion mediated by their cognate SNARE complexes. Given the structural similarities between SM proteins, it seems unlikely that different members of this family perform opposing regulatory functions. Hence, our findings indicate that Munc18c requires a further level of regulation in order to stimulate SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. PMID:19116655

  14. Ubiquitin fusion constructs allow the expression and purification of multi-KOW domain complexes of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription elongation factor Spt4/5.

    PubMed

    Blythe, Amanda; Gunasekara, Sanjika; Walshe, James; Mackay, Joel P; Hartzog, Grant A; Vrielink, Alice

    2014-08-01

    Spt4/5 is a hetero-dimeric transcription elongation factor that can both inhibit and promote transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). However, Spt4/5's mechanism of action remains elusive. Spt5 is an essential protein and the only universally-conserved RNAP-associated transcription elongation factor. The protein contains multiple Kyrpides, Ouzounis and Woese (KOW) domains. These domains, in other proteins, are thought to bind RNA although there is little direct evidence in the literature to support such a function in Spt5. This could be due, at least in part, to difficulties in expressing and purifying recombinant Spt5. When expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), Spt5 is innately insoluble. Here we report a new approach for the successful expression and purification of milligram quantities of three different multi-KOW domain complexes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spt4/5 for use in future functional studies. Using the E. coli strain Rosetta2 (DE3) we have developed strategies for co-expression of Spt4 and multi-KOW domain Spt5 complexes from the bi-cistronic pET-Duet vector. In a second strategy, Spt4/5 was expressed via co-transformation of Spt4 in the vector pET-M11 with Spt5 ubiquitin fusion constructs in the vector pHUE. We characterized the multi-KOW domain Spt4/5 complexes by Western blot, limited proteolysis, circular dichroism, SDS-PAGE and size exclusion chromatography-multiangle light scattering and found that the proteins are folded with a Spt4:Spt5 hetero-dimeric stoichiometry of 1:1. These expression constructs encompass a larger region of Spt5 than has previously been reported, and will provide the opportunity to elucidate the biological function of the multi-KOW containing Spt5. PMID:24859675

  15. Image Guidance for Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Comparison of Two-dimensional and Three-dimensional Angiography and Image Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Tacher, Vania; Lin, MingDe; Desgranges, Pascal; Deux, Jean-Francois; Grünhagen, Thijs; Becquemin, Jean-Pierre; Luciani, Alain; Rahmouni, Alain; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of image fusion (IF) of preprocedural arterial-phase computed tomography with intraprocedural fluoroscopy for roadmapping in endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms, and to compare this approach versus current roadmapping methods (ie, two-dimensional [2D] and three-dimensional [3D] angiography). Materials and Methods Thirty-seven consecutive patients with complex aortic aneurysms treated with endovascular techniques were retrospectively reviewed; these included aneurysms of digestive and/or renal arteries and pararenal and juxtarenal aortic aneurysms. All interventions were performed with the same angiographic system. According to the availability of different roadmapping software, patients were successively placed into three intraprocedural image guidance groups: (i) 2D angiography (n = 9), (ii) 3D rotational angiography (n = 14), and (iii) IF (n = 14). X-ray exposure (dose–area product [DAP]), injected contrast medium volume, and procedure time were recorded. Results Patient characteristics were similar among groups, with no statistically significant differences (P ≥ .05). There was no statistical difference in endograft deployment success between groups (2D angiography, eight of nine patients [89%]; 3D angiography and IF, 14 of 14 patients each [100%]). The IF group showed significant reduction (P < .0001) in injected contrast medium volume versus other groups (2D, 235 mL ± 145; 3D, 225 mL ± 119; IF, 65 mL ± 28). Mean DAP values showed no significant difference between groups (2D, 1,188 Gy · cm2 ± 1,067; 3D, 984 Gy · cm2 ± 581; IF, 655 Gy · cm2 ± 457; P = .18); nor did procedure times (2D, 233 min ± 123; 3D, 181 min ± 53; IF, 189 min ± 60; P = .59). Conclusions The use of IF-based roadmapping is a feasible technique for endovascular complex aneurysm repair associated with significant reduction of injected contrast agent volume and similar x-ray exposure and procedure time. PMID:24035418

  16. Complex rearrangement of chromosomes 19, 21, and 22 in Ewing sarcoma involving a novel reciprocal inversion-insertion mechanism of EWS-ERG fusion gene formation: a case analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Maire, Georges; Brown, Christopher W; Bayani, Jane; Pereira, Carlos; Gravel, Denis H; Bell, John C; Zielenska, Maria; Squire, Jeremy A

    2008-03-01

    EWS-ERG Ewing sarcoma (ES) gene fusions often result from complex chromosomal rearrangements. We report an unusually aggressive case of ES with an EWS-ERG fusion gene that appeared to be a result of a simple balanced and reciprocal translocation, t(19;22)(q13.2;q12.2). Subsequent molecular investigation of the primary tumor, the metastasis, and a cell line generated from this ES permitted reconstruction of each genomic step in the evolution of this complex EWS-ERG fusion. We elucidated a new mechanism of reciprocal insertion inversion between chromosome 21 and 22, involving cryptic alterations to both the ERG and EWS genes. Molecular cytogenetic investigation, using systematic analysis with locus-specific probes, identified the cognate genomic breakpoints within chromosome 21 and 22, mandatory for the excision and exchange of both 3'ERG and 3'EWS, resulting in the formation of the EWS-ERG fusion gene present on the der(22). Array comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies of the ES cell line derived from this tumor identified additional acquired chromosomal and genomic abnormalities, likely associated with establishment and adaptation to in vitro growth. Notably, the cell line had lost one copy of the RB1 gene within the 13q13.1 approximately q14.2 region, and also had a near-tetraploid karyotype. The significance of these findings and their relationship to other reports of variant and complex ES translocations involving the ERG gene are reviewed. PMID:18295659

  17. Effects of palladacycle complex on hematopoietic progenitor cells proliferation in vivo and in vitro and its relation with the inhibitory properties of this compound on the angiotensin-I converting enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Caires, Antonio C F; Oliveira, Carlos R; Smith, Mickaela C M; Hemerly, Jefferson P; Juliano, Maria A; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we introduce a new class of organometallic compound, the Biphosphinic Palladacycle Complex [Pd (C2, N-S(-)(dmpa)(dppf)] Cl (BPC), as an angiotensin-I converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) with hematological regulation properties. When BPC was assayed as a competitive inhibitor over the hydrolysis of Abz-YRK (Dnp)-P-OH (Km = 7.0 microM), it showed a Kiapp = 0.2259 ng and a Ki value of 94.12 pg. Using murine long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMCs) and clonal culture techniques, we also evaluated the capacity of this drug (1.18 microM) to module haematopoietic progenitor cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated that BPC produces no toxicity to bone marrow cells, as determined by the unchanged cell number in the non-adherent layer at weeks 1, 2, and 8 and the increased number of adherent cells present in the BPC-treated LTBMCs. However, the proportion of CFU-Cs in the non-adherent cell layer was reduced at weeks 5, 6, 8, and 9. In vivo studies using the dose of 1 mg/kg of BPC, administered by subcutaneous route, presented similar result as those found in vitro, in the number of CFU-Cs. This latter finding may be explained by the inhibitory effects of this drug on the ACE activity, which probably result in increased levels of its substrate AcSDKP, a negative regulator of hematopoiesis. PMID:15658600

  18. Fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-04-20

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

  19. Fusion Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt

    2002-02-20

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.

  20. The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, Stewart

    2011-05-04

    When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

  1. Myostatin inhibitory region of fish (Paralichthys olivaceus) myostatin-1 propeptide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Beum; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Jin, Deuk-Hee; Jin, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth, and its activity is suppressed by MSTN propeptide (MSTNpro), the N-terminal part of MSTN precursor cleaved during post-translational MSTN processing. The current study examined which region of flatfish (Paralichthys olivaceus) MSTN-1 propeptide (MSTN1pro) is critical for MSTN inhibition. Six different truncated forms of MSTN1pro containing N-terminal maltose binding protein (MBP) as a fusion partner were expressed in Escherichia coli, and partially purified by an affinity chromatography for MSTN-inhibitory activity examination. Peptides covering different regions of flatfish MSTN1pro were also synthesized for MSTN-inhibitory activity examination. A MBP-fused MSTN1pro region consisting of residues 45-100 had the same MSTN-inhibitory potency as the full sequence flatfish MSTN1pro (residues 23-265), indicating that the region of flatfish MSTN1pro consisting of residues 45-100 is sufficient to maintain the full MSTN-inhibitory capacity. A MBP-fused MSTN1pro region consisting of residues 45-80 (Pro45-80) also showed MSTN-inhibitory activity with a lower potency, and the Pro45-80 demonstrated its MSTN binding capacity in a pull-down assay, indicating that the MSTN-inhibitory capacity of Pro45-80 is due to its binding to MSTN. Flatfish MSTN1pro synthetic peptides covering residues 45-65, 45-70, and 45-80 demonstrated MSTN-inhibitory activities, but not the synthetic peptide covering residues 45-54, indicating that residues 45-65 of flatfish MSTN1pro are essential for MSTN inhibition. In conclusion, current study show that like the mammalian MSTNpro, the MSTN-inhibitory region of flatfish MSTN1pro resides near its N-terminus, and imply that smaller sizes of MSTNpro can be effectively used in various applications designed for MSTN inhibition. PMID:26827850

  2. Image fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  3. Inhibitory effects of antimicrobial agents against Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hideaki; Inuzuka, Hiroko; Hori, Nobuhide; Takahashi, Nobumichi; Ishida, Kyoko; Mochizuki, Kiyofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Muraosa, Yasunori; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents against Fusarium spp. Seven Fusarium spp: four F. falciforme (Fusarium solani species complex), one Fusarium spp, one Fusarium spp. (Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex), and one F. napiforme (Gibberella fujikuroi species complex), isolated from eyes with fungal keratitis were used in this study. Their susceptibility to antibacterial agents: flomoxef, imipenem, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and Tobracin® (contained 3,000 μg/ml of tobramycin and 25 μg/ml of benzalkonium chloride (BAK), a biocidal agent: BAK, and antifungal agents: amphotericin B, pimaricin (natamycin), fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, voriconazole, and micafungin, was determined by broth microdilution tests. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50), 100% inhibitory concentration (IC100), and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the Fusarium isolates were determined. BAK had the highest activity against the Fusarium spp. except for the antifungal agents. Three fluoroquinolones and two aminoglycosides had inhibitory effects against the Fusarium spp. at relatively high concentrations. Tobracin® had a higher inhibitory effect against Fusarium spp. than tobramycin alone. Amphotericin B had the highest inhibitory effect against the Fusarium spp, although it had different degrees of activity against each isolate. Our findings showed that fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and BAK had some degree of inhibitory effect against the seven Fusarium isolates, although these agents had considerably lower effect than amphotericin B. However, the inhibitory effects of amphotericin B against the Fusarium spp. varied for the different isolates. Further studies for more effective medications against Fusarium, such as different combinations of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents are needed. PMID:25841054

  4. Calcium-dependent Regulation of SNARE-mediated Membrane Fusion by Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Iborra, Cécile; Maulet, Yves; Lévêque, Christian; El Far, Oussama; Seagar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Neuroexocytosis requires SNARE proteins, which assemble into trans complexes at the synaptic vesicle/plasma membrane interface and mediate bilayer fusion. Ca2+ sensitivity is thought to be conferred by synaptotagmin, although the ubiquitous Ca2+-effector calmodulin has also been implicated in SNARE-dependent membrane fusion. To examine the molecular mechanisms involved, we examined the direct action of calmodulin and synaptotagmin in vitro, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer to assay lipid mixing between target- and vesicle-SNARE liposomes. Ca2+/calmodulin inhibited SNARE assembly and membrane fusion by binding to two distinct motifs located in the membrane-proximal regions of VAMP2 (KD = 500 nm) and syntaxin 1 (KD = 2 μm). In contrast, fusion was increased by full-length synaptotagmin 1 anchored in vesicle-SNARE liposomes. When synaptotagmin and calmodulin were combined, synaptotagmin overcame the inhibitory effects of calmodulin. Furthermore, synaptotagmin displaced calmodulin binding to target-SNAREs. These findings suggest that two distinct Ca2+ sensors act antagonistically in SNARE-mediated fusion. PMID:20519509

  5. Modulation of membrane fusion by calcium-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, K; Düzgüneş, N; Papahadjopoulos, D

    1982-01-01

    The effects of several Ca2+-binding proteins (calmodulin, prothrombin, and synexin) on the kinetics of Ca2+-induced membrane fusion were examined. Membrane fusion was assayed by following the mixing of aqueous contents of phospholipid vesicles. Calmodulin inhibited slightly the fusion of phospholipid vesicles. Bovine prothrombin and its proteolytic fragment 1 had a strong inhibitory effect on fusion. Depending on the phospholipid composition, synexin could either facilitate or inhibit Ca2+-induced fusion of vesicles. The effects of synexin were Ca2+ specific. 10 microM Ca2+ was sufficient to induce fusion of vesicles composed of phosphatidic acid/phosphatidylethanolamine (1:3) in the presence of synexin and 1 mM Mg2+. We propose that synexin may be involved in intracellular membrane fusion events mediated by Ca2+, such as exocytosis, and discuss possible mechanisms facilitating fusion. PMID:6459804

  6. Dense inhibitory connectivity in neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fino, Elodie; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Summary The connectivity diagram of neocortical circuits is still unknown, and there are conflicting data as to whether cortical neurons are wired specifically or not. To investigate the basic structure of cortical microcircuits, we use a novel two-photon photostimulation technique that enables the systematic mapping of synaptic connections with single-cell resolution. We map the inhibitory connectivity between upper layers somatostatin-positive GABAergic interneurons and pyramidal cells in mouse frontal cortex. Most, and sometimes all, inhibitory neurons are locally connected to every sampled pyramidal cell. This dense inhibitory connectivity is found at both young and mature developmental ages. Inhibitory innervation of neighboring pyramidal cells is similar, regardless of whether they are connected among themselves or not. We conclude that local inhibitory connectivity is promiscuous, does not form subnetworks and can approach the theoretical limit of a completely connected synaptic matrix. PMID:21435562

  7. Synaptic vesicle fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rizo, Josep; Rosenmund, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The core of the neurotransmitter release machinery is formed by SNARE complexes, which bring the vesicle and plasma membranes together and are key for fusion, and by Munc18-1, which controls SNARE-complex formation and may also have a direct role in fusion. In addition, SNARE complex assembly is likely orchestrated by Munc13s and RIMs, active-zone proteins that function in vesicle priming and diverse forms of presynaptic plasticity. Synaptotagmin-1 mediates triggering of release by Ca2+, probably through interactions with SNAREs and both membranes, as well as through a tight interplay with complexins. Elucidation of the release mechanism will require a full understanding of the network of interactions among all these proteins and the membranes. PMID:18618940

  8. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  9. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  10. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  11. Function approximation in inhibitory networks.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Bryan; Eliasmith, Chris

    2016-05-01

    In performance-optimized artificial neural networks, such as convolutional networks, each neuron makes excitatory connections with some of its targets and inhibitory connections with others. In contrast, physiological neurons are typically either excitatory or inhibitory, not both. This is a puzzle, because it seems to constrain computation, and because there are several counter-examples that suggest that it may not be a physiological necessity. Parisien et al. (2008) showed that any mixture of excitatory and inhibitory functional connections could be realized by a purely excitatory projection in parallel with a two-synapse projection through an inhibitory population. They showed that this works well with ratios of excitatory and inhibitory neurons that are realistic for the neocortex, suggesting that perhaps the cortex efficiently works around this apparent computational constraint. Extending this work, we show here that mixed excitatory and inhibitory functional connections can also be realized in networks that are dominated by inhibition, such as those of the basal ganglia. Further, we show that the function-approximation capacity of such connections is comparable to that of idealized mixed-weight connections. We also study whether such connections are viable in recurrent networks, and find that such recurrent networks can flexibly exhibit a wide range of dynamics. These results offer a new perspective on computation in the basal ganglia, and also perhaps on inhibitory networks within the cortex. PMID:26963256

  12. Inhibitory mechanisms of glabridin on tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianmin; Yu, Xiaojing; Huang, Yufeng

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosinase is an oxidase that is the rate-limiting enzyme for controlling the production of melanin in the human body. Overproduction of melanin could lead to a variety of skin disorders. Glabridin, an isoflavan, isolated from the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn, has exhibited several pharmacological activities, including excellent inhibitory effects on tyrosinase. In this paper, the inhibitory kinetics of glabridin on tyrosinase and their binding mechanisms were determined using spectroscopic, zebrafish model and molecular docking techniques. The results indicate that glabridin reversibly inhibits tyrosinase in a noncompetitive manner through a multiphase kinetic process with the IC50 of 0.43μmol/L. It has been shown that glabridin had a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of tyrosinase mainly through a static quenching procedure, suggesting a stable glabridin-tyrosinase complex may be generated. The results of molecular docking suggest that glabridin did not directly bind to the active site of tyrosinase. Moreover, according to the results of zebrafish model system, glabridin shows no effects on melanin synthesis in zebrafish but presents toxicity to zebrafish embryo. The possible inhibitory mechanisms, which will help to design and search for tyrosinase inhibitors especially for glabridin analogues, were proposed. PMID:27288962

  13. Excitement about inhibitory presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed

    Vandael, David H F; Espinoza, Claudia; Jonas, Peter

    2015-03-18

    Based on extrapolation from excitatory synapses, it is often assumed that depletion of the releasable pool of synaptic vesicles is the main factor underlying depression at inhibitory synapses. In this issue of Neuron, using subcellular patch-clamp recording from inhibitory presynaptic terminals, Kawaguchi and Sakaba (2015) show that at Purkinje cell-deep cerebellar nuclei neuron synapses, changes in presynaptic action potential waveform substantially contribute to synaptic depression. PMID:25789750

  14. The biochemical anatomy of cortical inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Heller, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Wenzhu; Selimi, Fekrije; Earnheart, John C; Ślimak, Marta A; Santos-Torres, Julio; Ibañez-Tallon, Ines; Aoki, Chiye; Chait, Brian T; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Classical electron microscopic studies of the mammalian brain revealed two major classes of synapses, distinguished by the presence of a large postsynaptic density (PSD) exclusively at type 1, excitatory synapses. Biochemical studies of the PSD have established the paradigm of the synapse as a complex signal-processing machine that controls synaptic plasticity. We report here the results of a proteomic analysis of type 2, inhibitory synaptic complexes isolated by affinity purification from the cerebral cortex. We show that these synaptic complexes contain a variety of neurotransmitter receptors, neural cell-scaffolding and adhesion molecules, but that they are entirely lacking in cell signaling proteins. This fundamental distinction between the functions of type 1 and type 2 synapses in the nervous system has far reaching implications for models of synaptic plasticity, rapid adaptations in neural circuits, and homeostatic mechanisms controlling the balance of excitation and inhibition in the mature brain. PMID:22768092

  15. The Biochemical Anatomy of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Elizabeth A.; Zhang, Wenzhu; Selimi, Fekrije; Earnheart, John C.; Ślimak, Marta A.; Santos-Torres, Julio; Ibañez-Tallon, Ines; Aoki, Chiye; Chait, Brian T.; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Classical electron microscopic studies of the mammalian brain revealed two major classes of synapses, distinguished by the presence of a large postsynaptic density (PSD) exclusively at type 1, excitatory synapses. Biochemical studies of the PSD have established the paradigm of the synapse as a complex signal-processing machine that controls synaptic plasticity. We report here the results of a proteomic analysis of type 2, inhibitory synaptic complexes isolated by affinity purification from the cerebral cortex. We show that these synaptic complexes contain a variety of neurotransmitter receptors, neural cell-scaffolding and adhesion molecules, but that they are entirely lacking in cell signaling proteins. This fundamental distinction between the functions of type 1 and type 2 synapses in the nervous system has far reaching implications for models of synaptic plasticity, rapid adaptations in neural circuits, and homeostatic mechanisms controlling the balance of excitation and inhibition in the mature brain. PMID:22768092

  16. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  17. Organotypic three-dimensional culture model of mesenchymal and epithelial cells to examine tissue fusion events.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tissue fusion during early mammalian development requires coordination of multiple cell types, the extracellular matrix, and complex signaling pathways. Fusion events during processes including heart development, neural tube closure, and palatal fusion are dependent on signaling ...

  18. Mixed ligand complexes of Cu(II)/Zn(II) ions containing (m-)/(p-) carboxylato phenyl azo pentane 2,4-dione and 2,2‧-bipyridine/1,10 phenanthroline: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, nuclease and topoisomerase I inhibitory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Amin; Kumari, Niraj; Singh, Kanhaiya; Singh, Kiran; Mishra, Lallan

    2016-01-01

    Metal complexes of type [Cu(L1H)2(bpy)] (1), [Zn(L1H)2(bpy)] (2), [Cu(L2H)2(bpy)] (3) and [Cu(L2H)2(Phen)] (4) (L1H2 = 3-[N‧-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, L2H2 = 4-[N‧-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine, Phen = 1,10 phenanthroline) are synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, electronic absorption and emission) and elemental analysis data. The assembly of the complexes involving intramolecular H-bonding is displayed using corresponding crystal structure. Binding of the complexes separately with Calf Thymus DNA is monitored using UV-vis spectral titrations. The displacement of ethidium bromide (EB) bound to DNA by the complexes, in phosphate buffer solution (pH ∼ 7.2) is monitored using fluorescence spectral titrations. Nuclease activity of the complexes follow the order 4 > 3 > 1 > 2. The gel electrophoretic mobility assay measurement in presence of minor groove binder 4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), suggests that complexes preferably bind with the minor groove of DNA. Topoisomerase I inhibitory activity of the complexes 3 and 4 inhibit topoisomerase I activity with IC50 values of 112 and 87 μM respectively.

  19. Optimal percentage of inhibitory synapses in multi-task learning.

    PubMed

    Capano, Vittorio; Herrmann, Hans J; de Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2015-01-01

    Performing more tasks in parallel is a typical feature of complex brains. These are characterized by the coexistence of excitatory and inhibitory synapses, whose percentage in mammals is measured to have a typical value of 20-30%. Here we investigate parallel learning of more Boolean rules in neuronal networks. We find that multi-task learning results from the alternation of learning and forgetting of the individual rules. Interestingly, a fraction of 30% inhibitory synapses optimizes the overall performance, carving a complex backbone supporting information transmission with a minimal shortest path length. We show that 30% inhibitory synapses is the percentage maximizing the learning performance since it guarantees, at the same time, the network excitability necessary to express the response and the variability required to confine the employment of resources. PMID:25898781

  20. Brain stimulation and inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Juan, Chi-Hung; Muggleton, Neil G

    2012-04-01

    Inhibitory control mechanisms are important in a range of behaviours to prevent execution of motor acts which, having been planned, are no longer necessary or appropriate. Examples of this can be seen in a range of sports, such as cricket and baseball, where the choice between execution and inhibition of a bat swing must be made in a very brief time window. Deficits in inhibitory control have been associated with problems in behavioural regulation in impulsive violence as well as a range of clinical disorders. The roles of various areas, including the frontal eye fields (FEF), the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the inferior frontal gyrus, in inhibitory control have been investigated using an inhibitory control task and both transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Typically effects on response inhibition but no effects on response generation have been seen. The contributions of these areas to performance seem to differ with, for example, pre-SMA being involved when the task is relatively novel whereas this is not the case for FEF. The findings from brain stimulation studies offer both insight into which areas are necessary for effective inhibitory control and recent extension of findings for the role of the inferior frontal gyrus illustrate how the specific functions by which these areas contribute may be further clarified. Future work, including making use of the temporal specificity of TMS and combination of TMS/tDCS with other neuroimaging techniques, may further clarify the nature and functions played by the network of areas involved in inhibitory control. PMID:22494830

  1. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  2. Inhibitory Control Predicts Grammatical Ability

    PubMed Central

    Ibbotson, Paul; Kearvell-White, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that individual variation in grammatical ability can be predicted by individual variation in inhibitory control. We tested 81 5-year-olds using two classic tests from linguistics and psychology (Past Tense and the Stroop). Inhibitory control was a better predicator of grammatical ability than either vocabulary or age. Our explanation is that giving the correct response in both tests requires using a common cognitive capacity to inhibit unwanted competition. The implications are that understanding the developmental trajectory of language acquisition can benefit from integrating the developmental trajectory of non-linguistic faculties, such as executive control. PMID:26659926

  3. Fusion - From science to engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenton, J.

    1981-12-01

    The principles and state of advancement in fusion energy devices are explored, along with the transition from theoretical problems to engineering difficulties. Tokamaks are noted to be the closest to actual break-even, the point where the energy extracted from the reactor is equal to the energy necessary to initiate the process, although linear, mirror fusion machines also show promise. Attention is also given to poloidal diverter systems and the ELMO bumpy torus, which has demonstrated continuous operation for the first time. The prospects for a U.S. fusion engineering facility are uncertain in the light of current budget cuts, with most funding being concentrated on military applications. Laser inertial fusion devices are reviewed, as well as particle and ion accelerators for fuel pellet implosions. Finally, the most complex engineering problem is asserted to be the development of the reactor blanket system.

  4. Inhibitory Control in Childhood Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggers, Kurt; De Nil, Luc F.; Van den Bergh, Bea R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether previously reported parental questionnaire-based differences in inhibitory control (IC; Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2010) would be supported by direct measurement of IC using a computer task. Method: Participants were 30 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 7;05 years) and 30…

  5. Simulation Science for Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoric, M. M.; Sudo, S.

    2008-07-01

    The world fusion effort has recently entered a new age with the construction of ITER in Cadarache, France, which will be the first magnetic confinement fusion plasma experiment dominated by the self-heating of fusion reactions. In order to operate and control burning plasmas and future demo fusion reactors, an advanced ability for comprehensive computer simulations that are fully verified and validated against experimental data will be necessary. The ultimate goal is to develop the capability to predict reliably the behavior of plasmas in toroidal magnetic confinement devices on all relevant time and space scales. In addition to developing a sophisticated integrated simulation codes, directed advanced research in fusion physics, applied mathematics and computer science is envisaged. In this talk we review the basic strategy and main research efforts at the Department of Simulation Science of the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS)- which is the Inter University Institute and the coordinating Center of Excellence for academic fusion research in Japan. We overview a simulation research at NIFS, in particular relation to experiments in the Large Helical Device (LHD), the world's largest superconducting heliotron device, as a National Users' facility (see Motojima et al. 2003). Our main goal is understanding and systemizing the rich hierarchy of physical mechanisms in fusion plasmas, supported by exploring a basic science of complexity of plasma as a highly nonlinear, non-equilibrium, open system. The aim is to establish a simulation science as a new interdisciplinary field by fostering collaborative research in utilizing the large-scale supercomputer simulators. A concept of the hierarchy-renormalized simulation modelling will be invoked en route toward the LHD numerical test reactor. Finally, a perspective role is given on the ITER Broad Approach program at Rokkasho Center, as an integrated part of ITER and Development of Fusion Energy Agreement.

  6. Variant complex translocations involving chromosomes 1, 9, 9, 15 and 17 in acute promyelocytic leukemia without RAR alpha/PML gene fusion rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Gogineni, S K; Shah, H O; Chester, M; Lin, J H; Garrison, M; Alidina, A; Bayani, E; Verma, R S

    1997-04-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL;M3) is specifically characterized by a predominance of malignant promyelocytes having atypical reciprocal translocation involving chromosome 15 and 17 [t(15;17)(q22;q11)] resulting in the fusion of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) on chromosome 17 and the putative transcription factor gene PML, ie the translocation generates two fusion transcripts, PML/RAR alpha and RAR alpha/PML. We describe a patient with clinical and morphologic characteristics of atypical APL but with a previously undescribed variant translocation. A 35-year-old Hispanic having atypical APL was referred for cytogenetic evaluation. The cytogenetic findings with GTG-banding coupled with FISH analysis revealed the following karyotype: 46,XX,der(9)t(1;9)(q25;q34)der(9)t(9;?)(q34;?), t(15;17)(q22;q11)ish. der(9)t(1;9)(q25;q34)(WCP1+,WCP9+),t(9;17;15)(q34;q11;q22) (WCP9+,WCP15+,PML+;WCP17+,RAR alpha +;WCP15+,WCP17+,PML-)[20]/46,XX[5]. The chromosome 17q was translocated to the chromosome 15q. However, chromosome 15q including the PML gene normally translocating to 17q and creating the RAR alpha/PML fusion gene, translocated to chromosome 9q. Does this patient have another subset of APL? Or is the genetics of APL different in cases with variant translocations as opposed to those with atypical t(15;17) translocation, though in the majority of the cases their clinical presentation remains the same. PMID:9096691

  7. Net (ERP/SAP2) one of the Ras-inducible TCFs, has a novel inhibitory domain with resemblance to the helix-loop-helix motif.

    PubMed

    Maira, S M; Wurtz, J M; Wasylyk, B

    1996-11-01

    The three ternary complex factors (TCFs), Net (ERP/ SAP-2), ELK-1 and SAP-1, are highly related ets oncogene family members that participate in the response of the cell to Ras and growth signals. Understanding the different roles of these factors will provide insights into how the signals result in coordinate regulation of the cell. We show that Net inhibits transcription under basal conditions, in which SAP-1a is inactive and ELK-1 stimulates. Repression is mediated by the NID, the Net Inhibitory Domain of about 50 amino acids, which autoregulates the Net protein and also inhibits when it is isolated in a heterologous fusion protein. Net is particularly sensitive to Ras activation. Ras activates Net through the C-domain, which is conserved between the three TCFs, and the NID is an efficient inhibitor of Ras activation. The NID, as well as more C-terminal sequences, inhibit DNA binding. Net is more refractory to DNA binding than the other TCFs, possibly due to the presence of multiple inhibitory elements. The NID may adopt a helix-loop-helix (HLH) structure, as evidenced by homology to other HLH motifs, structure predictions, model building and mutagenesis of critical residues. The sequence resemblance with myogenic factors suggested that Net may form complexes with the same partners. Indeed, we found that Net can interact in vivo with the basic HLH factor, E47. We propose that Net is regulated at the level of its latent DNA-binding activity by protein interactions and/or phosphorylation. Net may form complexes with HLH proteins as well as SRF on specific promotor sequences. The identification of the novel inhibitory domain provides a new inroad into exploring the different roles of the ternary complex factors in growth control and transformation. PMID:8918463

  8. Multifocus image fusion using phase congruency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Kun; Li, Qiaoqiao; Teng, Jicai; Wang, Mingying; Shi, Jinhui

    2015-05-01

    We address the problem of fusing multifocus images based on the phase congruency (PC). PC provides a sharpness feature of a natural image. The focus measure (FM) is identified as strong PC near a distinctive image feature evaluated by the complex Gabor wavelet. The PC is more robust against noise than other FMs. The fusion image is obtained by a new fusion rule (FR), and the focused region is selected by the FR from one of the input images. Experimental results show that the proposed fusion scheme achieves the fusion performance of the state-of-the-art methods in terms of visual quality and quantitative evaluations.

  9. Mixed-mode synchronization between two inhibitory neurons with post-inhibitory rebound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Roman; Osipov, Grigory; Komarov, Maxim; Pikovsky, Arkady; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    We study an array of activity rhythms generated by a half-center oscillator (HCO), represented by a pair of reciprocally coupled neurons with post-inhibitory rebounds (PIR). Such coupling-induced bursting possesses two time scales, one for fast spiking and another for slow quiescent periods, is shown to exhibit an array of synchronization properties. We discuss several HCO configurations constituted by two endogenous bursters, by tonic-spiking and quiescent neurons, as well as mixed-mode configurations composed of neurons of different type. We demonstrate that burst synchronization can be accompanied by complex, often chaotic, interactions of fast spikes within synchronized bursts.

  10. Modeling Inhibitory Interneurons in Efficient Sensory Coding Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mengchen; Rozell, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    There is still much unknown regarding the computational role of inhibitory cells in the sensory cortex. While modeling studies could potentially shed light on the critical role played by inhibition in cortical computation, there is a gap between the simplicity of many models of sensory coding and the biological complexity of the inhibitory subpopulation. In particular, many models do not respect that inhibition must be implemented in a separate subpopulation, with those inhibitory interneurons having a diversity of tuning properties and characteristic E/I cell ratios. In this study we demonstrate a computational framework for implementing inhibition in dynamical systems models that better respects these biophysical observations about inhibitory interneurons. The main approach leverages recent work related to decomposing matrices into low-rank and sparse components via convex optimization, and explicitly exploits the fact that models and input statistics often have low-dimensional structure that can be exploited for efficient implementations. While this approach is applicable to a wide range of sensory coding models (including a family of models based on Bayesian inference in a linear generative model), for concreteness we demonstrate the approach on a network implementing sparse coding. We show that the resulting implementation stays faithful to the original coding goals while using inhibitory interneurons that are much more biophysically plausible. PMID:26172289

  11. Modeling Inhibitory Interneurons in Efficient Sensory Coding Models.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengchen; Rozell, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    There is still much unknown regarding the computational role of inhibitory cells in the sensory cortex. While modeling studies could potentially shed light on the critical role played by inhibition in cortical computation, there is a gap between the simplicity of many models of sensory coding and the biological complexity of the inhibitory subpopulation. In particular, many models do not respect that inhibition must be implemented in a separate subpopulation, with those inhibitory interneurons having a diversity of tuning properties and characteristic E/I cell ratios. In this study we demonstrate a computational framework for implementing inhibition in dynamical systems models that better respects these biophysical observations about inhibitory interneurons. The main approach leverages recent work related to decomposing matrices into low-rank and sparse components via convex optimization, and explicitly exploits the fact that models and input statistics often have low-dimensional structure that can be exploited for efficient implementations. While this approach is applicable to a wide range of sensory coding models (including a family of models based on Bayesian inference in a linear generative model), for concreteness we demonstrate the approach on a network implementing sparse coding. We show that the resulting implementation stays faithful to the original coding goals while using inhibitory interneurons that are much more biophysically plausible. PMID:26172289

  12. Inhibitory effects of respiration inhibitors on aflatoxin production.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Shohei; Prabowo, Diyan Febri; Takagi, Keiko; Shiomi, Kazuro; Mori, Mihoko; Ōmura, Satoshi; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2014-04-01

    Aflatoxin production inhibitors, which do not inhibit the growth of aflatoxigenic fungi, may be used to control aflatoxin without incurring a rapid spread of resistant strains. A respiration inhibitor that inhibits aflatoxin production was identified during a screening process for natural, aflatoxin-production inhibitors. This prompted us to evaluate respiration inhibitors as potential aflatoxin control agents. The inhibitory activities of four natural inhibitors, seven synthetic miticides, and nine synthetic fungicides were evaluated on aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus. All of the natural inhibitors (rotenone, siccanin, aptenin A5, and antimycin A) inhibited fungal aflatoxin production with IC50 values around 10 µM. Among the synthetic miticides, pyridaben, fluacrypyrim, and tolfenpyrad exhibited strong inhibitory activities with IC50 values less than 0.2 µM, whereas cyflumetofen did not show significant inhibitory activity. Of the synthetic fungicides, boscalid, pyribencarb, azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, and kresoxim-methyl demonstrated strong inhibitory activities, with IC50 values less than 0.5 µM. Fungal growth was not significantly affected by any of the inhibitors tested at concentrations used. There was no correlation observed between the targets of respiration inhibitors (complexes I, II, and III) and their IC50 values for aflatoxin-production inhibitory activity. This study suggests that respiration inhibitors, including commonly used pesticides, are useful for aflatoxin control. PMID:24674936

  13. Inhibitory Effects of Respiration Inhibitors on Aflatoxin Production

    PubMed Central

    Sakuda, Shohei; Prabowo, Diyan Febri; Takagi, Keiko; Shiomi, Kazuro; Mori, Mihoko; Ōmura, Satoshi; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin production inhibitors, which do not inhibit the growth of aflatoxigenic fungi, may be used to control aflatoxin without incurring a rapid spread of resistant strains. A respiration inhibitor that inhibits aflatoxin production was identified during a screening process for natural, aflatoxin-production inhibitors. This prompted us to evaluate respiration inhibitors as potential aflatoxin control agents. The inhibitory activities of four natural inhibitors, seven synthetic miticides, and nine synthetic fungicides were evaluated on aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus. All of the natural inhibitors (rotenone, siccanin, aptenin A5, and antimycin A) inhibited fungal aflatoxin production with IC50 values around 10 µM. Among the synthetic miticides, pyridaben, fluacrypyrim, and tolfenpyrad exhibited strong inhibitory activities with IC50 values less than 0.2 µM, whereas cyflumetofen did not show significant inhibitory activity. Of the synthetic fungicides, boscalid, pyribencarb, azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, and kresoxim-methyl demonstrated strong inhibitory activities, with IC50 values less than 0.5 µM. Fungal growth was not significantly affected by any of the inhibitors tested at concentrations used. There was no correlation observed between the targets of respiration inhibitors (complexes I, II, and III) and their IC50 values for aflatoxin-production inhibitory activity. This study suggests that respiration inhibitors, including commonly used pesticides, are useful for aflatoxin control. PMID:24674936

  14. Simulation science for fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Škorić, M. M.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Todo, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Miura, H.; Ishizaki, R.; Ito, A.; Ohtani, H.; Usami, S.; Nakamura, H.; Ito, Atsushi; Ishiguro, S.; Tomita, Y.; Takayama, A.; Sato, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Den, M.; Sakagami, H.; Horiuchi, R.; Okamura, S.; Nakajima, N.

    2008-10-01

    The world fusion effort has embarked into a new age with the construction of ITER in Cadarache, France, which will be the first magnetic confinement fusion plasma experiment dominated by the self-heating of fusion reactions. In order to operate and control burning plasmas and next generation demo fusion reactors, an advanced capability for comprehensive integrated computer simulations that are fully verified and validated against experimental data will be necessary. The ultimate goal is to predict reliably the behaviour of plasmas in toroidal magnetic confinement devices on all relevant scales, both in time and space. In addition to developing a sophisticated integrated simulation codes, directed advanced research in fusion physics, applied mathematics, computer science and software is envisaged. In this paper we review the basic strategy and main research efforts at the Department of Simulation Science of the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS)- which is the Inter University Institute and the coordinating Center of Excellence for academic fusion research in Japan. We overview a simulation research at NIFS, in particular relation to experiments in the Large Helical Device (LHD), the world's largest superconducting heliotron device, as a National Users' facility (see Motojima et al. [1]). Our main goal is understanding and systemizing the rich hierarchy of physical mechanisms in fusion plasmas, supported by exploring a basic science of complexity of plasma as a highly nonlinear, non-equilibrium, open system. The aim is to establish a simulation science as a new interdisciplinary field by fostering collaborative research in utilizing the large-scale supercomputer simulators. A concept of the hierarchy-renormalized simulation modelling will be invoked en route toward the LHD numerical test reactor.

  15. Engineered staphylococcal protein A's IgG-binding domain with cathepsin L inhibitory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovic, Tomaz . E-mail: tomaz.bratkovic@ffa.uni-lj.si; Berlec, Ales; Popovic, Tatjana; Lunder, Mojca; Kreft, Samo; Urleb, Uros; Strukelj, Borut

    2006-10-13

    Inhibitory peptide of papain-like cysteine proteases, affinity selected from a random disulfide constrained phage-displayed peptide library, was grafted to staphylococcal protein A's B domain. Scaffold protein was additionally modified in order to allow solvent exposed display of peptide loop. Correct folding of fusion proteins was confirmed by CD-spectroscopy and by the ability to bind the Fc-region of rabbit IgG, a characteristic of parent domain. The recombinant constructs inhibited cathepsin L with inhibitory constants in the low-micromolar range.

  16. A new in vitro hemagglutinin inhibitor screening system based on a single-vesicle fusion assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanki; Jin, Wook; Jeong, Byeong-Chul; Suh, Joo-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) from the influenza virus plays a pivotal role in the infection of host mammalian cells and is, therefore, a druggable target, similar to neuraminidase. However, research involving the influenza virus must be conducted in facilities certified at or above Biosafety Level 2 because of the potential threat of the contagiousness of this virus. To develop a new HA inhibitor screening system without intact influenza virus, we conceived a single-vesicle fusion assay using full-length recombinant HA. In this study, we first showed that full-length recombinant HA can mediate membrane fusion in ensemble and single-vesicle fusion assays. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) frequency pattern of single-vesicle complexes completely differed when the inhibitors targeted the HA1 or HA2 domain of HA. This result indicates that analysing the FRET patterns in this assay can provide information regarding the domains of HA inhibited by compounds and compounds' inhibitory activities. Therefore, our results suggest that the assay developed here is a promising tool for the discovery of anti-influenza virus drug candidates as a new in vitro inhibitor screening system against HA from the influenza virus. PMID:27469068

  17. A new in vitro hemagglutinin inhibitor screening system based on a single-vesicle fusion assay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hanki; Jin, Wook; Jeong, Byeong-Chul; Suh, Joo-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) from the influenza virus plays a pivotal role in the infection of host mammalian cells and is, therefore, a druggable target, similar to neuraminidase. However, research involving the influenza virus must be conducted in facilities certified at or above Biosafety Level 2 because of the potential threat of the contagiousness of this virus. To develop a new HA inhibitor screening system without intact influenza virus, we conceived a single-vesicle fusion assay using full-length recombinant HA. In this study, we first showed that full-length recombinant HA can mediate membrane fusion in ensemble and single-vesicle fusion assays. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) frequency pattern of single-vesicle complexes completely differed when the inhibitors targeted the HA1 or HA2 domain of HA. This result indicates that analysing the FRET patterns in this assay can provide information regarding the domains of HA inhibited by compounds and compounds’ inhibitory activities. Therefore, our results suggest that the assay developed here is a promising tool for the discovery of anti-influenza virus drug candidates as a new in vitro inhibitor screening system against HA from the influenza virus. PMID:27469068

  18. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Paula M; Speranza, Mario; Hampshire, Adam; Bekinschtein, Tristán A

    2014-01-01

    The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioral inhibition, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioral inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioral inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/NoGo and Stop Signal Tasks (SSTs). Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on performance in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory tasks are scarce and little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and inhibitory control. Here we probed the effect of reward magnitude and context on behavioral inhibition with three modified versions of the widely used SST. The pilot study compared inhibition performance during six blocks alternating neutral feedback, low, medium, and high monetary rewards. Study One compared increasing vs. decreasing rewards, with low, high rewards, and neutral feedback; whilst Study Two compared low and high reward magnitudes alone also in an increasing and decreasing reward design. The reward magnitude effect was not demonstrated in the pilot study, probably due to a learning effect induced by practice in this lengthy task. The reward effect per se was weak but the context (order of reward) was clearly suggested in Study One, and was particularly strongly confirmed in study two. In addition, these findings revealed a "kick start effect" over global performance measures. Specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the

  19. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Paula M.; Speranza, Mario; Hampshire, Adam; Bekinschtein, Tristán A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioral inhibition, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioral inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioral inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/NoGo and Stop Signal Tasks (SSTs). Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on performance in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory tasks are scarce and little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and inhibitory control. Here we probed the effect of reward magnitude and context on behavioral inhibition with three modified versions of the widely used SST. The pilot study compared inhibition performance during six blocks alternating neutral feedback, low, medium, and high monetary rewards. Study One compared increasing vs. decreasing rewards, with low, high rewards, and neutral feedback; whilst Study Two compared low and high reward magnitudes alone also in an increasing and decreasing reward design. The reward magnitude effect was not demonstrated in the pilot study, probably due to a learning effect induced by practice in this lengthy task. The reward effect per se was weak but the context (order of reward) was clearly suggested in Study One, and was particularly strongly confirmed in study two. In addition, these findings revealed a “kick start effect” over global performance measures. Specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the

  20. Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing: Physics of complex melt flow and formation mechanisms of pores, spatter, and denudation zones

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khairallah, Saad A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Rubenchik, Alexander; King, Wayne E.

    2016-02-23

    Our study demonstrates the significant effect of the recoil pressure and Marangoni convection in laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) of 316L stainless steel. A three-dimensional high fidelity powder-scale model reveals how the strong dynamical melt flow generates pore defects, material spattering (sparking), and denudation zones. The melt track is divided into three sections: a topological depression, a transition and a tail region, each being the location of specific physical effects. The inclusion of laser ray-tracing energy deposition in the powder-scale model improves over traditional volumetric energy deposition. It enables partial particle melting, which impacts pore defects in the denudation zone.more » Different pore formation mechanisms are observed at the edge of a scan track, at the melt pool bottom (during collapse of the pool depression), and at the end of the melt track (during laser power ramp down). Finally, we discuss remedies to these undesirable pores are discussed. The results are validated against the experiments and the sensitivity to laser absorptivity.« less

  1. Spatially Addressable Chemoselective C-terminal Ligation of an Intein Fusion Protein from a Complex Mixture to a Hydrazine-Terminated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Marinakos, Stella M.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2011-01-01

    Protein immobilization on surfaces is useful in many areas of research, including biological characterization, antibody purification, and clinical diagnostics. A critical limitation in the development of protein microarrays and heterogeneous protein-based assays is the enormous work and associated costs in the purification of proteins prior to their immobilization on a surface; methods to address this problem would simplify the development of interfacial diagnostics that use a protein as the recognition element. Herein, we describe an approach for the facile, site-specific immobilization of proteins on a surface without any preprocessing or sample purification steps that ligates an intein fusion protein at its C-terminus by reaction with a hydrazine group presented by a surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology can directly immobilize a protein directly from cell lysate on to a protein-resistant surface. This methodology is also compatible with soft lithography and inkjet printing, so that one or more proteins can be patterned on a surface without need for purification. PMID:21142101

  2. Cell fusion in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Stephanie; Schumann, Marcel R; Fleißner, André

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa has advanced as a model organism for studying eukaryotic cell-cell communication and fusion. Cell merger in this fungus employs an unusual mode of communication, in which the fusion partners appear to switch between signal sending and receiving. Many molecular factors mediating this intriguing mechanism and the subsequent membrane merger have been identified. It has become apparent that conserved factors, such as MAP kinases, NADPH oxidases and the STRIPAK complex, together with fungal specific proteins are wired into an intricate signaling network. Here, we will present an overview of recent findings on the molecular mechanism mediating fusion in N. crassa and will discuss the current working model. PMID:26340439

  3. Fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989 to 1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R and D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R and D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  4. Fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  5. Antitransferrin receptor antibody-RNase fusion protein expressed in the mammary gland of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Newton, D L; Pollock, D; DiTullio, P; Echelard, Y; Harvey, M; Wilburn, B; Williams, J; Hoogenboom, H R; Raus, J C; Meade, H M; Rybak, S M

    1999-12-10

    Antibodies fused to human enzymes offer an alternative to specifically targeting tumors with antibodies linked to plant or bacterial toxins. Since large amounts of these reagents can be administered without eliciting non-specific toxicities, efficient methods of production are needed. The goal of this work was to express a complex immunoenzyme fusion protein (immunotoxin) in the mammary gland of transgenic mice. A chimeric mouse/human antibody directed against the human transferrin receptor (E6) was fused at its CH2 domain to the gene for a human angiogenic ribonuclease, angiogenin (Ang). It was expressed in the mammary gland of mice and secreted into mouse milk. Expression levels in milk were approximately 0.8 g/l. The chimeric protein retained antibody binding activity and protein synthesis inhibitory activity equivalent to that of free Ang. It was specifically cytotoxic to human tumor cells in vitro. PMID:10648935

  6. The estrogen receptor fusion system in mouse models: a reversible switch.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Jonathan; Littlewood, Trevor; Evan, Gerard I; Soucek, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Reversible regulatory mouse models have significantly contributed to our understanding of normal tissue and cancer biology, providing the opportunity to temporally control initiation, progression, and evolution of physiological and pathological events. The tamoxifen inducible system, one of the best-characterized "reversible switch" models, has a number of beneficial features. In this system, the hormone-binding domain of the mammalian estrogen receptor is used as a heterologous regulatory domain. Upon ligand binding, the receptor is released from its inhibitory complex and the fusion protein becomes functional. We summarize the advantages and drawbacks of the system, describe several mouse models that rely on it, and discuss potential improvements that could render it even more useful and versatile. PMID:25734072

  7. FcγRIIB-Independent Mechanisms Controlling Membrane Localization of the Inhibitory Phosphatase SHIP in Human B Cells.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Samantha D; Ray, Arnab; Hou, Sen; Vaughan, Andrew T; Cragg, Mark S; Marshall, Aaron J

    2016-09-01

    SHIP is an important regulator of immune cell signaling that functions to dephosphorylate the phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate at the plasma membrane and mediate protein-protein interactions. One established paradigm for SHIP activation involves its recruitment to the phospho-ITIM motif of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB. Although SHIP is essential for the inhibitory function of FcγRIIB, it also has critical modulating functions in signaling initiated from activating immunoreceptors such as B cell Ag receptor. In this study, we found that SHIP is indistinguishably recruited to the plasma membrane after BCR stimulation with or without FcγRIIB coligation in human cell lines and primary cells. Interestingly, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis reveals differential mobility of SHIP-enhanced GFP depending on the mode of stimulation, suggesting that although BCR and FcγRIIB can both recruit SHIP, this occurs via distinct molecular complexes. Mutagenesis of a SHIP-enhanced GFP fusion protein reveals that the SHIP-Src homology 2 domain is essential in both cases whereas the C terminus is required for recruitment via BCR stimulation, but is less important with FcγRIIB coligation. Experiments with pharmacological inhibitors reveal that Syk activity is required for optimal stimulation-induced membrane localization of SHIP, whereas neither PI3K or Src kinase activity is essential. BCR-induced association of SHIP with binding partner Shc1 is dependent on Syk, as is tyrosine phosphorylation of both partners. Our results indicate that FcγRIIB is not uniquely able to promote membrane recruitment of SHIP, but rather modulates its function via formation of distinct signaling complexes. Membrane recruitment of SHIP via Syk-dependent mechanisms may be an important factor modulating immunoreceptor signaling. PMID:27456487

  8. Electrical properties and fusion dynamics of in vitro membrane vesicles derived from separate parts of the contractile vacuole complex of Paramecium multimicronucleatum.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Kazuyuki; Tominaga, Takashi; Allen, Richard D; Naitoh, Yutaka

    2005-10-01

    The contractile vacuole complex of Paramecium multimicronucleatum transforms into membrane-bound vesicles on excision from the cell. The I-V relationship was linear in a voltage range of -80 to +80 mV in all vesicles, despite being derived from different parts of the contractile vacuole complex. No voltage-gated unit currents were observed in membrane patches from the vesicles. Vesicles derived from the radial arm showed a membrane potential of >10 mV, positive with reference to the cytosol, while those derived from the contractile vacuole showed a residual (<5 mV) membrane potential. The electrogenic V-ATPases in the decorated spongiome are responsible for the positive potential, and Cl- leakage channels are responsible for the residual potential. The specific resistance of the vesicle membrane (approximately 6 kOmega cm2) increased, while the membrane potential shifted in a negative direction when the vesicle rounded. An increase in the membrane tension (to approximately 5 x 10(-3) N m(-1)) is assumed to reduce the Cl- leakage conductance. It is concluded that neither voltage- nor mechano-sensitive ion channels are involved in the control of the fluid segregation and membrane dynamics that govern fluid discharge cycles in the contractile vacuole complex. The membrane vesicles shrank when the external osmolarity was increased, and swelled when the osmolarity was decreased, implying that the contractile vacuole complex membrane is water permeable. The water permeability of the membrane was 4-20 x 10(-7) microm s(-1) Pa(-1). The vesicles containing radial arm membrane swelled after initially shrinking when exposed to higher external osmolarity, implying that the V-ATPases energize osmolyte transport mechanisms that remain functional in the vesicle membrane. The vesicles showed an abrupt (<30 ms), slight, slackening after rounding to the maximum extent. Similar slackening was also observed in the contractile vacuoles in situ before the opening of the contractile

  9. Tilting the balance between facilitatory and inhibitory functions of mammalian and Drosophila Complexins orchestrates synaptic vesicle exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mingshan; Lin, Yong Qi; Pan, Hongling; Reim, Kerstin; Deng, Hui; Bellen, Hugo J.; Rosenmund, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Summary SNARE-mediated synaptic exocytosis is orchestrated by facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms. Genetic ablations of Complexins, a family of SNARE complex–binding proteins, in mice and Drosophila cause apparently opposite effects on neurotransmitter release, leading to contradictory hypotheses of Complexin function. Reconstitution experiments with different fusion assays and Complexins also yield conflicting results. We therefore performed cross-species rescue experiments to compare the functions of murine and Drosophila Complexins in both mouse and fly synapses. We found that murine and Drosophila Complexins employ conserved mechanisms to regulate exocytosis despite their strikingly different overall effects on neurotransmitter release. Both Complexins contain distinct domains that facilitate or inhibit synaptic vesicle fusion, and the strength of each facilitatory or inhibitory function differs significantly between murine and Drosophila Complexins. Our results show that a relative shift in the balance of facilitatory and inhibitory functions results in differential regulation of neurotransmitter release by murine and Drosophila Complexins in vivo, reconciling previous incompatible findings. PMID:19914185

  10. Physiological Awareness Is Negatively Related to Inhibitory Functioning in Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Clare M; Rickards, Hugh E; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-03-01

    In Tourette syndrome (TS), tics are characteristically preceded by subjective bodily experiences referred to as premonitory sensations. Premonitory sensory phenomena play a key role in behavior therapy for tics, the success of which has also been suggested to be related to inhibitory functioning. We investigated whether TS was associated with altered internal physiological awareness and how this may interact with the neuropsychological characteristics of TS. We compared the awareness of bodily sensations and inhibitory functioning in 18 adult patients with uncomplicated TS and 18 healthy controls. We also explored relationships between these factors, tic severity, and premonitory sensations. Patients with TS exhibited significantly higher scores on the Private Body Consciousness (PBC) scale and inhibitory deficits on traditional and emotional Stroop tests. PBC scores were not correlated with premonitory sensations or tic severity. However, inhibitory functioning was negatively related to PBC scores and premonitory sensations. Relationships between inhibitory performance and tic severity were complex. In conclusion, patients with TS exhibit increased PBC in addition to inhibitory deficits. Aspects of inhibitory functioning are related to PBC, premonitory sensations, and tic severity. Complex interplay between neuropsychological and neurophysiological mechanisms could therefore determine tic severity and the success of behavioral treatments. PMID:24048775

  11. Autoinhibition of SNARE complex assembly by a conformational switch represents a conserved feature of syntaxins.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Chris; Munson, Mary; Bryant, Nia J

    2010-02-01

    Regulation and specificity of membrane trafficking are required to maintain organelle integrity while performing essential cellular transport. Membrane fusion events in all eukaryotic cells are facilitated by the formation of specific SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor) complexes between proteins on opposing lipid bilayers. Although regulation of SNARE complex assembly is not well understood, it is clear that two conserved protein families, the Sx (syntaxin) and the SM (Sec1p/Munc18) proteins, are central to this process. Sxs are a subfamily of SNARE proteins; in addition to the coiled-coil SNARE motif, Sxs possess an N-terminal, autonomously folded, triple-helical (Habc) domain. For some Sxs, it has been demonstrated that this Habc domain exerts an autoinhibitory effect on SNARE complex assembly by making intramolecular contacts with the SNARE motif. SM proteins regulate membrane fusion through interactions with their cognate Sxs. One hypothesis for SM protein function is that they facilitate a switch of the Sx from a closed to an open conformation, thus lifting the inhibitory action of the Habc domain and freeing the SNARE motif to participate in SNARE complexes. However, whether these regulatory mechanisms are conserved throughout the Sx/SM protein families remains contentious as it is not clear whether the closed conformation represents a universal feature of Sxs. PMID:20074061

  12. Fusion and reactions of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, I.; Aguilera, E. F.; Acosta, L.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Wolski, R.

    2011-10-01

    Close to the drip lines, the scattering cross sections of halo nuclei show a different behaviour as compared to the tightly bound projectiles of the stability line. Several experiments carried out in the last decade have been dedicated to investigate the competition between transfer, breakup and fusion channels at energies around and below the Coulomb barrier. The rather complex scenario gives rise to conflicting conclusions concerning the effect of breakup and transfer on reaction dynamics and the sub-barrier fusion process. In this work we discuss recent experimental findings in fusion and reactions of 6He halo nucleus at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  13. Viral membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. PMID:25866377

  14. Plasticity of Cortical Excitatory-Inhibitory Balance

    PubMed Central

    Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses are highly plastic and are modified by changes in patterns of neural activity or sensory experience. Plasticity of cortical excitatory synapses is thought to be important for learning and memory, leading to alterations in sensory representations and cognitive maps. However, these changes must be coordinated across other synapses within local circuits to preserve neural coding schemes and the organization of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, i.e., excitatory-inhibitory balance. Recent studies indicate that inhibitory synapses are also plastic and are controlled directly by a large number of neuromodulators, particularly during episodes of learning. Many modulators transiently alter excitatory-inhibitory balance by decreasing inhibition, and thus disinhibition has emerged as a major mechanism by which neuromodulation might enable long-term synaptic modifications naturally. This review examines the relationships between neuromodulation and synaptic plasticity, focusing on the induction of long-term changes that collectively enhance cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance for improving perception and behavior. PMID:25897875

  15. Molecular inhibitory mechanism of tricin on tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yan; Li, Lin; Hu, Song-Qing

    2013-04-15

    Tricin was evaluated as a type of tyrosinase inhibitor with good efficacy compared to arbutin. Tricin functioned as a non-competitive inhibitor of tyrosinase, with an equilibrium constant of 2.30 mmol/L. The molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of tyrosinase by tricin were investigated by means of circular dichroism spectra, fluorescence quenching and molecular docking. These assays demonstrated that the interactions between tricin and tyrosinase did not change the secondary structure. The interaction of tricin with residues in the hydrophobic pocket of tyrosinase was revealed by fluorescence quenching; the complex was stabilized by hydrophobic associations and hydrogen bonding (with residues Asn80 and Arg267). Docking results implied that the possible inhibitory mechanisms may be attributed to the stereospecific blockade effects of tricin on substrates or products and flexible conformation alterations in the tyrosinase active center caused by weak interactions between tyrosinase and tricin. The application of this type of flavonoid as a tyrosinase inhibitor will lead to significant advances in the field of depigmentation. PMID:23434549

  16. Molecular inhibitory mechanism of tricin on tyrosinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yan; Li, Lin; Hu, Song-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Tricin was evaluated as a type of tyrosinase inhibitor with good efficacy compared to arbutin. Tricin functioned as a non-competitive inhibitor of tyrosinase, with an equilibrium constant of 2.30 mmol/L. The molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of tyrosinase by tricin were investigated by means of circular dichroism spectra, fluorescence quenching and molecular docking. These assays demonstrated that the interactions between tricin and tyrosinase did not change the secondary structure. The interaction of tricin with residues in the hydrophobic pocket of tyrosinase was revealed by fluorescence quenching; the complex was stabilized by hydrophobic associations and hydrogen bonding (with residues Asn80 and Arg267). Docking results implied that the possible inhibitory mechanisms may be attributed to the stereospecific blockade effects of tricin on substrates or products and flexible conformation alterations in the tyrosinase active center caused by weak interactions between tyrosinase and tricin. The application of this type of flavonoid as a tyrosinase inhibitor will lead to significant advances in the field of depigmentation.

  17. Identification of Candidate Angiogenic Inhibitors Processed by Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) in Cell-Based Proteomic Screens: Disruption of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)/Heparin Affin Regulatory Peptide (Pleiotrophin) and VEGF/Connective Tissue Growth Factor Angiogenic Inhibitory Complexes by MMP-2 Proteolysis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Richard A.; Butler, Georgina S.; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina; Delbé, Jean; Brigstock, David R.; Courty, José; Overall, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) exert both pro- and antiangiogenic functions by the release of cytokines or proteolytically generated angiogenic inhibitors from extracellular matrix and basement membrane remodeling. In the Mmp2−/− mouse neovascularization is greatly reduced, but the mechanistic aspects of this remain unclear. Using isotope-coded affinity tag labeling of proteins analyzed by multidimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry we explored proteome differences between Mmp2−/− cells and those rescued by MMP-2 transfection. Proteome signatures that are hallmarks of proteolysis revealed cleavage of many known MMP-2 substrates in the cellular context. Proteomic evidence of MMP-2 processing of novel substrates was found. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6, follistatin-like 1, and cystatin C protein cleavage by MMP-2 was biochemically confirmed, and the cleavage sites in heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP; pleiotrophin) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. MMP-2 processing of HARP and CTGF released vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from angiogenic inhibitory complexes. The cleaved HARP N-terminal domain increased HARP-induced cell proliferation, whereas the HARP C-terminal domain was antagonistic and decreased cell proliferation and migration. Hence the unmasking of cytokines, such as VEGF, by metalloproteinase processing of their binding proteins is a new mechanism in the control of cytokine activation and angiogenesis. PMID:17908800

  18. Slow liner fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    {open_quotes}Slow{close_quotes} liner fusion ({approximately}10 ms compression time) implosions are nondestructive and make repetitive ({approximately} 1 Hz) pulsed liner fusion reactors possible. This paper summarizes a General Atomics physics-based fusion reactor study that showed slow liner feasibility, even with conservative open-line axial magnetic field confinement and Bohm radial transport.

  19. Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wurden, G. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Intrator, T. P.; Grabowski, T. C.; Degnan, J. H.; Domonkos, M.; Turchi, P. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; et al

    2015-11-17

    In this community white paper, we describe an approach to achieving fusion which employs a hybrid of elements from the traditional magnetic and inertial fusion concepts, called magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). The status of MIF research in North America at multiple institutions is summarized including recent progress, research opportunities, and future plans.

  20. Cold fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  1. Cluster-impact fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Echenique, P.M.; Manson, J.R.; Ritchie, R.H. )

    1990-03-19

    We present a model for the cluster-impact-fusion experiments of Buehler, Friedlander, and Friedman, Calculated fusion rates as a function of bombarding energy for constant cluster size agree well with experiment. The dependence of the fusion rate on cluster size at fixed bombarding energy is explained qualitatively. The role of correlated, coherent collisions in enhanced energy loss by clusters is emphasized.

  2. Individual Vesicle Fusion Events Mediated by Lipid-Anchored DNA

    PubMed Central

    van Lengerich, Bettina; Rawle, Robert J.; Bendix, Poul Martin; Boxer, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion consists of a complex rearrangement of lipids and proteins that results in the merger of two lipid bilayers. We have developed a model system that employs synthetic DNA-lipid conjugates as a surrogate for the membrane proteins involved in the biological fusion reaction. We previously showed that complementary DNA-lipids, inserted into small unilamellar vesicles, can mediate membrane fusion in bulk. Here, we use a model membrane architecture developed in our lab to directly observe single-vesicle fusion events using fluorescence microscopy. In this system, a planar tethered membrane patch serves as the target membrane for incoming vesicles. This allows us to quantify the kinetics and characteristics of individual fusion events from the perspective of the lipids or the DNA-lipids involved in the process. We find that the fusion pathways are heterogeneous, with an arrested hemi-fusion state predominating, and we quantitate the outcome and rate of fusion events to construct a mechanistic model of DNA-mediated vesicle fusion. The waiting times between docking and fusion are distributed exponentially, suggesting that fusion occurs in a single step. Our analysis indicates that when two lipid bilayers are brought into close proximity, fusion occurs spontaneously, with little or no dependence on the number of DNA hybrids formed. PMID:23870262

  3. Congenital Bilateral Zygomatico-Maxillo-Mandibular Fusion Associated With Gum Fusion.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahdi, Akmam H; Koppel, David A; Al-Jumaily, Hassanien A; Mohammed, Ali Abdul Hameed; Boyd, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    A congenial syngnathia is very rare condition. It can be simple mucosal fusion (synechiae), or complete bony fusion (synostosis) between the maxilla or zygoma and the mandible. Fusion of the ascending ramus of mandible to maxilla and zygoma is less common than fusions of the alveolar ridges of the mandible to the maxilla. Bony syngnathia is either isolated or complex in form. There are 59 cases of congenital bony syngnathia reported in the literature: the first report was by Burket in 1936. There are 16 reported cases of zygomatico-maxillo-mandibular fusion. In the reported cases, women expressed the isolated form more commonly whereas men demonstrated a more complex pattern of disease. The authors present another patient of bony syngnathia involving bilateral fusion of the ascending ramus and body of the mandible with the maxillary complex in a young man. Early surgery was performed to release the bony and soft tissue fusion on the eighth day from the baby's birth. A second operation was performed for recurrence when the baby was 2.5 months old. A customized splint, an intense postoperative program of mouth exercises, and close follow-up aims to prevent further refusion. PMID:26703053

  4. Fusion research: the past is prologue

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F

    1998-10-14

    At this juncture fusion research can be viewed as being at a turning point, a time to review its past and to imagine its future. Today, almost 50 years since the first serious attempts to address the daunting problem of achieving controlled fusion, we have both an opportunity and a challenge. Some predictions place fusion research today at a point midway between its first inception and its eventual maturation - in the middle of the 21st century - when fusion would become a major source of energy. Our opportunity therefore is to assess what we have learned from 50 years of hard work and use that knowledge as a starting point for new and better approaches to solving the fusion problem. Our challenge is to prove the "50 more years" prophesy wrong, by finding ways to shorten the time when fusion power becomes a reality. The thesis will be advanced that in the magnetic confinement approach to fusion open-ended magnetic confinement geometries offer much in responding to the challenge. A major advantage of open systems is that, owing to their theoretically and experimentally demonstrated ability to suppress plasma instabilities of both the MHD and the high-frequency wave-particle variety, the confinement becomes predictable from "classical," i.e., Fokker-Planck-type analysis. In a time of straitened budgetary circumstances for magnetic fusion research now being faced in the United States, the theoretical tractability of mirror-based systems is a substantial asset. In pursuing this avenue it is also necessary to keep an open mind as to the forms that mirror-based fusion power plants might take. For example, one can look to the high-energy physics community for a possible model: This community has shown the feasibility of constructing large and complex particle accelerators using superconducting magnets, vacuum chambers and complicated particle-handling technology, housed in underground tunnels that are 20 or more kilometers long. In the paper examples of mirror

  5. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  6. The fusion breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1982-10-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the U.S. fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the U.S. fusion program and the U.S. nuclear energy program. There is wide agreement that many approaches will work and will produce fuel for five equal-sized LWRs, and some approach as many as 20 LWRs at electricity costs within 20% of those at today's price of uranium (30/lb of U3O8). The blankets designed to suppress fissioning, called symbiotes, fusion fuel factories, or just fusion breeders, will have safety characteristics more like pure fusion reactors and will support as many as 15 equal power LWRs. The blankets designed to maximize fast fission of fertile material will have safety characteristics more like fission reactors and will support 5 LWRs. This author strongly recommends development of the fission suppressed blanket type, a point of view not agreed upon by everyone. There is, however, wide agreement that, to meet the market price for uranium which would result in LWR electricity within 20% of today's cost with either blanket type, fusion components can cost severalfold more than would be allowed for pure fusion to meet the goal of making electricity alone at 20% over today's fission costs. Also widely agreed is that the critical-path-item for the fusion breeder is fusion development itself; however, development of fusion breeder specific items (blankets, fuel cycle) should be started now in order to have the fusion breeder by the time the rise in uranium prices forces other more costly choices.

  7. Statistical label fusion with hierarchical performance models

    PubMed Central

    Asman, Andrew J.; Dagley, Alexander S.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-01-01

    Label fusion is a critical step in many image segmentation frameworks (e.g., multi-atlas segmentation) as it provides a mechanism for generalizing a collection of labeled examples into a single estimate of the underlying segmentation. In the multi-label case, typical label fusion algorithms treat all labels equally – fully neglecting the known, yet complex, anatomical relationships exhibited in the data. To address this problem, we propose a generalized statistical fusion framework using hierarchical models of rater performance. Building on the seminal work in statistical fusion, we reformulate the traditional rater performance model from a multi-tiered hierarchical perspective. This new approach provides a natural framework for leveraging known anatomical relationships and accurately modeling the types of errors that raters (or atlases) make within a hierarchically consistent formulation. Herein, we describe several contributions. First, we derive a theoretical advancement to the statistical fusion framework that enables the simultaneous estimation of multiple (hierarchical) performance models within the statistical fusion context. Second, we demonstrate that the proposed hierarchical formulation is highly amenable to the state-of-the-art advancements that have been made to the statistical fusion framework. Lastly, in an empirical whole-brain segmentation task we demonstrate substantial qualitative and significant quantitative improvement in overall segmentation accuracy. PMID:24817809

  8. Multisensor image fusion guidelines in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, C.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing delivers multimodal and -temporal data from the Earth's surface. In order to cope with these multidimensional data sources and to make the most of them, image fusion is a valuable tool. It has developed over the past few decades into a usable image processing technique for extracting information of higher quality and reliability. As more sensors and advanced image fusion techniques have become available, researchers have conducted a vast amount of successful studies using image fusion. However, the definition of an appropriate workflow prior to processing the imagery requires knowledge in all related fields - i.e. remote sensing, image fusion and the desired image exploitation processing. From the findings of this research it can be seen that the choice of the appropriate technique, as well as the fine-tuning of the individual parameters of this technique, is crucial. There is still a lack of strategic guidelines due to the complexity and variability of data selection, processing techniques and applications. This paper gives an overview on the state-of-the-art in remote sensing image fusion including sensors and applications. Putting research results in image fusion from the past 15 years into a context provides a new view on the subject and helps other researchers to build their innovation on these findings. Recommendations of experts help to understand further needs to achieve feasible strategies in remote sensing image fusion.

  9. INTRODUCTION: Status report on fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, Werner

    2005-10-01

    A major milestone on the path to fusion energy was reached in June 2005 on the occasion of the signing of the joint declaration of all parties to the ITER negotiations, agreeing on future arrangements and on the construction site at Cadarache in France. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been promoting fusion activities since the late 1950s; it took over the auspices of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities in 1988, and of the ITER Engineering and Design Activities in 1992. The Agency continues its support to Member States through the organization of consultancies, workshops and technical meetings, the most prominent being the series of International Fusion Energy Conferences (formerly called the International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research). The meetings serve as a platform for experts from all Member States to have open discussions on their latest accomplishments as well as on their problems and eventual solutions. The papers presented at the meetings and conferences are routinely published, many being sent to the journal it Nuclear Fusion, co-published monthly by Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol, UK. The journal's reputation is reflected in the fact that it is a world-renowned publication, and the International Fusion Research Council has used it for the publication of a Status Report on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion in 1978 and 1990. This present report marks the conclusion of the preparatory phases of ITER activities. It provides background information on the progress of fusion research within the last 15 years. The International Fusion Research Council (IFRC), which initiated the report, was fully aware of the complexities of including all scientific results in just one paper, and so decided to provide an overview and extensive references for the interested reader who need not necessarily be a fusion specialist. Professor Predhiman K. Kaw, Chairman, prepared the report on behalf of the IFRC, reflecting

  10. Magnetic mirror fusion: status and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1980-02-11

    Two improved mirror systems, the tandem mirror (TM) and the field-reversed mirror (FRM) are being intensively studied. The twin practical aims of these studies: to improve the economic prospects for mirror fusion power plants and to reduce the size and/or complexity of such plants relative to earlier approaches to magnetic fusion. While at the present time the program emphasis is still strongly oriented toward answering scientific questions, the emphasis is shifting as the data accumulates and as larger facilities - ones with a heavy technological and engineering orientation - are being prepared. The experimental and theoretical progress that led to the new look in mirror fusion research is briefly reviewed, the new TM and the FRM ideas are outlined, and the projected future course of mirror fusion research is discussed.

  11. Fusion probability in heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Pal, Santanu

    2015-03-01

    Background: Fusion between two massive nuclei is a very complex process and is characterized by three stages: (a) capture inside the potential barrier, (b) formation of an equilibrated compound nucleus (CN), and (c) statistical decay of the CN leading to a cold evaporation residue (ER) or fission. The second stage is the least understood of the three and is the most crucial in predicting yield of superheavy elements (SHE) formed in complete fusion reactions. Purpose: A systematic study of average fusion probability, , is undertaken to obtain a better understanding of its dependence on various reaction parameters. The study may also help to clearly demarcate onset of non-CN fission (NCNF), which causes fusion probability, PCN, to deviate from unity. Method: ER excitation functions for 52 reactions leading to CN in the mass region 170-220, which are available in the literature, have been compared with statistical model (SM) calculations. Capture cross sections have been obtained from a coupled-channels code. In the SM, shell corrections in both the level density and the fission barrier have been included. for these reactions has been extracted by comparing experimental and theoretical ER excitation functions in the energy range ˜5 %-35% above the potential barrier, where known effects of nuclear structure are insignificant. Results: has been shown to vary with entrance channel mass asymmetry, η (or charge product, ZpZt ), as well as with fissility of the CN, χCN. No parameter has been found to be adequate as a single scaling variable to determine . Approximate boundaries have been obtained from where starts deviating from unity. Conclusions: This study quite clearly reveals the limits of applicability of the SM in interpreting experimental observables from fusion reactions involving two massive nuclei. Deviation of from unity marks the beginning of the domain of dynamical models of fusion. Availability of precise ER cross

  12. Inhibitory Circuits in Cortical Layer 5

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Alexander; Adesnik, Hillel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons play a fundamental role in cortical computation and behavior. Recent technological advances, such as two photon imaging, targeted in vivo recording, and molecular profiling, have improved our understanding of the function and diversity of cortical interneurons, but for technical reasons most work has been directed towards inhibitory neurons in the superficial cortical layers. Here we review current knowledge specifically on layer 5 (L5) inhibitory microcircuits, which play a critical role in controlling cortical output. We focus on recent work from the well-studied rodent barrel cortex, but also draw on evidence from studies in primary visual cortex and other cortical areas. The diversity of both deep inhibitory neurons and their pyramidal cell targets make this a challenging but essential area of study in cortical computation and sensory processing. PMID:27199675

  13. Inhibitory Circuits in Cortical Layer 5.

    PubMed

    Naka, Alexander; Adesnik, Hillel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons play a fundamental role in cortical computation and behavior. Recent technological advances, such as two photon imaging, targeted in vivo recording, and molecular profiling, have improved our understanding of the function and diversity of cortical interneurons, but for technical reasons most work has been directed towards inhibitory neurons in the superficial cortical layers. Here we review current knowledge specifically on layer 5 (L5) inhibitory microcircuits, which play a critical role in controlling cortical output. We focus on recent work from the well-studied rodent barrel cortex, but also draw on evidence from studies in primary visual cortex and other cortical areas. The diversity of both deep inhibitory neurons and their pyramidal cell targets make this a challenging but essential area of study in cortical computation and sensory processing. PMID:27199675

  14. Materials research for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to <2 MeV on average for fission neutrons) releases significant amounts of hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  15. FusionAnalyser: a new graphical, event-driven tool for fusion rearrangements discovery.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Rocco; Pirola, Alessandra; Spinelli, Roberta; Valletta, Simona; Redaelli, Sara; Magistroni, Vera; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2012-09-01

    Gene fusions are common driver events in leukaemias and solid tumours; here we present FusionAnalyser, a tool dedicated to the identification of driver fusion rearrangements in human cancer through the analysis of paired-end high-throughput transcriptome sequencing data. We initially tested FusionAnalyser by using a set of in silico randomly generated sequencing data from 20 known human translocations occurring in cancer and subsequently using transcriptome data from three chronic and three acute myeloid leukaemia samples. in all the cases our tool was invariably able to detect the presence of the correct driver fusion event(s) with high specificity. In one of the acute myeloid leukaemia samples, FusionAnalyser identified a novel, cryptic, in-frame ETS2-ERG fusion. A fully event-driven graphical interface and a flexible filtering system allow complex analyses to be run in the absence of any a priori programming or scripting knowledge. Therefore, we propose FusionAnalyser as an efficient and robust graphical tool for the identification of functional rearrangements in the context of high-throughput transcriptome sequencing data. PMID:22570408

  16. A Fusion-Inhibiting Peptide against Rift Valley Fever Virus Inhibits Multiple, Diverse Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Jeffrey W.; Smith, Jeffrey M.; Ripoll, Daniel R.; Spik, Kristin W.; Taylor, Shannon L.; Badger, Catherine V.; Grant, Rebecca J.; Ogg, Monica M.; Wallqvist, Anders; Guttieri, Mary C.; Garry, Robert F.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2013-01-01

    For enveloped viruses, fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is critical for a productive infection to occur. This fusion process is mediated by at least three classes of fusion proteins (Class I, II, and III) based on the protein sequence and structure. For Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), the glycoprotein Gc (Class II fusion protein) mediates this fusion event following entry into the endocytic pathway, allowing the viral genome access to the cell cytoplasm. Here, we show that peptides analogous to the RVFV Gc stem region inhibited RVFV infectivity in cell culture by inhibiting the fusion process. Further, we show that infectivity can be inhibited for diverse, unrelated RNA viruses that have Class I (Ebola virus), Class II (Andes virus), or Class III (vesicular stomatitis virus) fusion proteins using this single peptide. Our findings are consistent with an inhibition mechanism similar to that proposed for stem peptide fusion inhibitors of dengue virus in which the RVFV inhibitory peptide first binds to both the virion and cell membranes, allowing it to traffic with the virus into the endocytic pathway. Upon acidification and rearrangement of Gc, the peptide is then able to specifically bind to Gc and prevent fusion of the viral and endocytic membranes, thus inhibiting viral infection. These results could provide novel insights into conserved features among the three classes of viral fusion proteins and offer direction for the future development of broadly active fusion inhibitors. PMID:24069485

  17. INTRODUCTION: Status report on fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, Werner

    2005-10-01

    A major milestone on the path to fusion energy was reached in June 2005 on the occasion of the signing of the joint declaration of all parties to the ITER negotiations, agreeing on future arrangements and on the construction site at Cadarache in France. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been promoting fusion activities since the late 1950s; it took over the auspices of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities in 1988, and of the ITER Engineering and Design Activities in 1992. The Agency continues its support to Member States through the organization of consultancies, workshops and technical meetings, the most prominent being the series of International Fusion Energy Conferences (formerly called the International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research). The meetings serve as a platform for experts from all Member States to have open discussions on their latest accomplishments as well as on their problems and eventual solutions. The papers presented at the meetings and conferences are routinely published, many being sent to the journal it Nuclear Fusion, co-published monthly by Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol, UK. The journal's reputation is reflected in the fact that it is a world-renowned publication, and the International Fusion Research Council has used it for the publication of a Status Report on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion in 1978 and 1990. This present report marks the conclusion of the preparatory phases of ITER activities. It provides background information on the progress of fusion research within the last 15 years. The International Fusion Research Council (IFRC), which initiated the report, was fully aware of the complexities of including all scientific results in just one paper, and so decided to provide an overview and extensive references for the interested reader who need not necessarily be a fusion specialist. Professor Predhiman K. Kaw, Chairman, prepared the report on behalf of the IFRC, reflecting

  18. Impaired Inhibitory Force Feedback in Fixed Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mugge, Winfred; Schouten, Alfred C; van Hilten, Jacobus J; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2016-04-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial disorder associated with an aberrant host response to tissue injury. About 25% of CRPS patients suffer poorly understood involuntary sustained muscle contractions associated with dysfunctional reflexes that result in abnormal postures (fixed dystonia). A recent modeling study simulated fixed dystonia (FD) caused by aberrant force feedback. The current study aims to validate this hypothesis by experimentally recording the modulation of reflexive force feedback in patients with FD. CRPS patients with and without FD, patients with FD but without CRPS, as well as healthy controls participated in the experiment. Three task instructions and three perturbation characteristics were used to evoke a wide range of responses to force perturbations. During position tasks ("maintain posture"), healthy subjects as well as patients resisted the perturbations, becoming more stiff than when being relaxed (i.e., the relax task). Healthy subjects and CRPS patients without FD were both more compliant during force tasks ("maintain force") than during relax tasks, meaning they actively gave way to the imposed forces. Remarkably, the patients with FD failed to do so. A neuromuscular model was fitted to the experimental data to separate the distinct contributions of position, velocity and force feedback, as well as co-contraction to the motor behavior. The neuromuscular modeling indicated that inhibitory force feedback is deregulated in patients with FD, for both CRPS and non-CRPS patients. From previously published simulation results and the present experimental study, it is concluded that aberrant force feedback plays a role in fixed dystonia. PMID:25955788

  19. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  20. HSV-1 infection through inhibitory receptor, PILRalpha.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takeshi; Arase, Hisashi

    2008-06-01

    Paired receptors that consist of highly related activating and inhibitory receptors are widely involved in the regulation of immune response. Several viruses that persistently infect hosts possess genes that encode ligands for inhibitory receptors in order to escape from host immune system. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is one of the viruses that cause persistent infection. Here, we found that HSV-1-infected cells express a ligand for paired immunoglobulin like-type 2 receptor (PILR)alpha, one of paired inhibitory receptors mainly expressed on myeloid cells such as monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Furthermore, we have identified that glycoprotein B (gB), an envelope protein of HSV-1, is a ligand for PILRalpha by mass spectrometry analysis. Because gB is essential for HSV-1 to infect cells, we analyzed function of PILRalpha in HSV-1 infection. When PILRalpha was transfected into CHO-K1 cells, which is resistant to HSV-1 infection, the PILRalpha-transfected CHO-K1 cells became permissive to HSV-1 infection. We further addressed weather PILRalpha is involved in the HSV-1 infection of primary human cells. CD14-positive monocytes that express both PILRalpha and HVEM, a glycoprotein D receptor, were susceptible to HSV-1 infection. In contrast, HSV-1 did not infect CD14-negative lymphocytes that express HVEM but not PILRalpha. Furthermore, HSV-1 infection of monocyte was blocked by both anti-PILRalpha mAb and anti-HVEM antiserum. These findings indicated that both gB and gD receptors play an important role in HSV-1 infection. We have shown, for the first time, that viruses use an inhibitory immune receptor to enter a cell. Invasion into hematopoietic cells by using inhibitory receptors should be beneficial to the virus because binding to inhibitory receptors may not only provide entry, but also trigger the inhibitory receptor to suppress the immune functions of the infected cell. PMID:19122386

  1. Trends in fusion reactor safety research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, J. S.; Holland, D. F.; Piet, S. J.

    Fusion has the potential to be an attractive energy source. From the safety and environmental perspective, fusion must avoid concerns about catastrophic accidents and unsolvable waste disposal. In addition, fusion must achieve an acceptable level of risk from operational accidents that result in public exposure and economic loss. Finally, fusion reactors must control routine radioactive effluent, particularly tritium. Major progress in achieving this potential rests on development of low-activation materials or alternative fuels. The safety and performance of various material choices and fuels for commercial fusion reactors can be investigated relatively inexpensively through reactor design studies. These studies bring together experts in a wide range of backgrounds and force the group to either agree on a reactor design or identify areas for further study. Fusion reactors will be complex, with distributed radioactive inventories. The next generation of experiments will be critical in demonstrating that acceptable levels of safe operation can be achieved. These machines will use materials which are available today and for which a large database exists (e.g., for 316 stainless steel). Researchers have developed a good understanding of the risks associated with operation of these devices. Specifically, consequences from coolant system failures, loss of vacuum events, tritium releases, and liquid metal reactions have been studied. Recent studies go beyond next step designs and investigate commercial reactor concerns including tritium release and liquid metal reactions.

  2. Structural characterization of Mumps virus fusion protein core

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueyong; Xu Yanhui; Lou Zhiyong; Zhu Jieqing; Hu Xuebo; Gao, George F.; Qiu Bingsheng . E-mail: Qiubs@sun.im.ac.cn; Rao Zihe . E-mail: raozh@xtal.tsinghua.edu.cn; Tien, Po . E-mail: tienpo@sun.im.ac.cn

    2006-09-29

    The fusion proteins of enveloped viruses mediating the fusion between the viral and cellular membranes comprise two discontinuous heptad repeat (HR) domains located at the ectodomain of the enveloped glycoproteins. The crystal structure of the fusion protein core of Mumps virus (MuV) was determined at 2.2 A resolution. The complex is a six-helix bundle in which three HR1 peptides form a central highly hydrophobic coiled-coil and three HR2 peptides pack against the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of central coiled-coil in an oblique antiparallel manner. Fusion core of MuV, like those of simian virus 5 and human respiratory syncytium virus, forms typical 3-4-4-4-3 spacing. The similar charecterization in HR1 regions, as well as the existence of O-X-O motif in extended regions of HR2 helix, suggests a basic rule for the formation of the fusion core of viral fusion proteins.

  3. Flexible brain network reconfiguration supporting inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Miller, Gregory A; Heller, Wendy; Banich, Marie T

    2015-08-11

    The ability to inhibit distracting stimuli from interfering with goal-directed behavior is crucial for success in most spheres of life. Despite an abundance of studies examining regional brain activation, knowledge of the brain networks involved in inhibitory control remains quite limited. To address this critical gap, we applied graph theory tools to functional magnetic resonance imaging data collected while a large sample of adults (n = 101) performed a color-word Stroop task. Higher demand for inhibitory control was associated with restructuring of the global network into a configuration that was more optimized for specialized processing (functional segregation), more efficient at communicating the output of such processing across the network (functional integration), and more resilient to potential interruption (resilience). In addition, there were regional changes with right inferior frontal sulcus and right anterior insula occupying more central positions as network hubs, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex becoming more tightly coupled with its regional subnetwork. Given the crucial role of inhibitory control in goal-directed behavior, present findings identifying functional network organization supporting inhibitory control have the potential to provide additional insights into how inhibitory control may break down in a wide variety of individuals with neurological or psychiatric difficulties. PMID:26216985

  4. Inhibitory control and the frontal eye fields.

    PubMed

    Muggleton, Neil G; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Tzeng, Ovid J L; Hung, Daisy L; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2010-12-01

    Inhibitory control mechanisms are important in a range of behaviors to prevent execution of motor acts which, having been planned, are no longer necessary. Ready examples of this can be seen in a range of sports, such as cricket and baseball, where the choice between execution or inhibition of a bat swing must be made in a brief time interval. The role of the FEFs, an area typically described in relation to eye movement functions but also involved in visual processes, was investigated in an inhibitory control task using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). A stop signal task with manual responses was used, providing measures of impulsivity and inhibitory control. TMS over FEF had no effect on response generation (impulsivity, indexed by go signal RT) but disrupted inhibitory control (indexed by stop signal RT). This is the first demonstration of a role for FEF in this type of task in normal subjects in a task which did not require eye movements and complements previous TMS findings of roles for pre-SMA and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in inhibitory control. PMID:20044887

  5. An analysis of inhibitory pseudo-interconnections in unsupervised neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Minh-Triet; Le, Nam Do-Hoang

    2013-12-01

    Lateral connection is a fundamental element of human neural networks which enables sparse learning and topographical order in feature maps. Due to high complexity and computational cost, computer scientists tend to simplify it in practical implementations. To utilize the simplicity of traditional networks while preserving the effects of interconnections, the authors employ numerical filters in unsupervised learning networks. These filters suppress low activations and decorrelate high ones, which are similar to how inhibitory lateral connections behave. Inhibitory networks outperform conventional approach in both standard datasets CIFAR-10 and STL-10. Our method also yields competitive results in comparison with other single-layer unsupervised networks. Furthermore, it is promising to apply inhibitory networks into deep learning systems for complex recognition problem.

  6. Neural networks with excitatory and inhibitory components: Direct and inverse problems by a mean-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Volo, Matteo; Burioni, Raffaella; Casartelli, Mario; Livi, Roberto; Vezzani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of networks with inhibitory and excitatory leak-integrate-and-fire neurons with short-term synaptic plasticity in the presence of depressive and facilitating mechanisms. The dynamics is analyzed by a heterogeneous mean-field approximation, which allows us to keep track of the effects of structural disorder in the network. We describe the complex behavior of different classes of excitatory and inhibitory components, which give rise to a rich dynamical phase diagram as a function of the fraction of inhibitory neurons. Using the same mean-field approach, we study and solve a global inverse problem: reconstructing the degree probability distributions of the inhibitory and excitatory components and the fraction of inhibitory neurons from the knowledge of the average synaptic activity field. This approach unveils new perspectives on the numerical study of neural network dynamics and the possibility of using these models as a test bed for the analysis of experimental data.

  7. Fusion Science Education Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, C. A.; DIII-D Education Group

    1996-11-01

    This presentation will focus on education outreach activities at General Atomics that have been expanded to include the general population on science education with a focus on fusion energy. Outreach materials are distributed upon request both nationally and internationally. These materials include a notebook containing copies of DIII--D tour panels, fusion poster, new fusion energy video, new fusion energy brochure, and the electromagnetic spectrum curriculum. The 1996 Fusion Forum (held in the House Caucus Room) included a student/ teacher lunch with Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary and a private visit to the Forum exhibits. The continuing partnership with Kearny High School includes lectures, job shadowing, internship, equipment donations and an award-winning electric car-racing program. Development of distribution by CD of the existing interactive fusion energy kiosk and a virtual reality tour of the DIII--D facility are underway. The DIII--D fusion education WWW site includes e-mail addresses to ``Ask the Wizard,'' and/or receive GA's outreach materials. Steve Rodecker, a local science teacher, aided by DIII--D fusion staff, won his second Tapestry Award; he also was named the ``1995 National Science Teacher of the Year'' and will be present to share his experiences with the DIII--D educational outreach program.

  8. Two Horizons of Fusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Mun Ling; Chik, Pakey Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to differentiate the internal and external horizons of "fusion." "Fusion" in the internal horizon relates to the structure and meaning of the object of learning as experienced by the learner. It clarifies the interrelationships among an object's critical features and aspects. It also illuminates the…

  9. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  10. The inhibitory spillover effect: Controlling the bladder makes better liars *

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Elise; Blandón-Gitlin, Iris; Coons, Jennifer; Pineda, Catherine; Echon, Reinalyn

    2015-01-01

    The Inhibitory-Spillover-Effect (ISE) on a deception task was investigated. The ISE occurs when performance in one self-control task facilitates performance in another (simultaneously conducted) self-control task. Deceiving requires increased access to inhibitory control. We hypothesized that inducing liars to control urination urgency (physical inhibition) would facilitate control during deceptive interviews (cognitive inhibition). Participants drank small (low-control) or large (high-control) amounts of water. Next, they lied or told the truth to an interviewer. Third-party observers assessed the presence of behavioral cues and made true/lie judgments. In the high-control, but not the low-control condition, liars displayed significantly fewer behavioral cues to deception, more behavioral cues signaling truth, and provided longer and more complex accounts than truth-tellers. Accuracy detecting liars in the high-control condition was significantly impaired; observers revealed bias toward perceiving liars as truth-tellers. The ISE can operate in complex behaviors. Acts of deception can be facilitated by covert manipulations of self-control. PMID:26366466

  11. Decomposition of incomplete fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L.B.; Sarantities, D.G.; Stracener, D.W.; Majka, Z.; Abenante, V.; Semkow, T.M.; Hensley, D.C.; Beene, J.R.; Halbert, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The velocity distribution of fusion-like products formed in the reaction 701 MeV /sup 28/Si+/sup 100/Mo is decomposed into 26 incomplete fusion channels. The momentum deficit of the residue per nonevaporative mass unit is approximately equal to the beam momentum per nucleon. The yields of the incomplete fusion channels correlate with the Q-value for projectile fragmentation rather than that for incomplete fusion. The backward angle multiplicities of light particles and heavy ions increase with momentum transfer, however, the heavy ion multiplicities also depend on the extent of the fragmentation of the incomplete fusion channel. These data indicate that at fixed linear momentum transfer, increased fragmentation of the unfused component is related to a reduced transferred angular momentum. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. How Could SNARE Proteins Open a Fusion Pore?

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    The SNARE (Soluble NSF Attachment protein REceptor) complex, which in mammalian neurosecretory cells is composed of the proteins synaptobrevin 2 (also called VAMP2), syntaxin, and SNAP-25, plays a key role in vesicle fusion. In this review, we discuss the hypothesis that, in neurosecretory cells, fusion pore formation is directly accomplished by a conformational change in the SNARE complex via movement of the transmembrane domains. PMID:24985331

  13. COG lobe B sub-complex engages v-SNARE GS15 and functions via regulated interaction with lobe A sub-complex

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Rose; Blackburn, Jessica Bailey; Climer, Leslie; Pokrovskaya, Irina; Kudlyk, Tetyana; Wang, Wei; Lupashin, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is a peripheral membrane protein complex which orchestrates tethering of intra-Golgi vesicles. We found that COG1-4 (lobe A) and 5–8 (lobe B) protein assemblies are present as independent sub-complexes on cell membranes. Super-resolution microscopy demonstrates that COG sub-complexes are spatially separated on the Golgi with lobe A preferential localization on Golgi stacks and the presence of lobe B on vesicle-like structures, where it physically interacts with v-SNARE GS15. The localization and specific interaction of the COG sub-complexes with the components of vesicle tethering/fusion machinery suggests their different roles in the vesicle tethering cycle. We propose and test a novel model that employs association/disassociation of COG sub-complexes as a mechanism that directs vesicle tethering at Golgi membranes. We demonstrate that defective COG assembly or restriction of tethering complex disassembly by a covalent COG1-COG8 linkage is inhibitory to COG complex activity, supporting the model. PMID:27385402

  14. COG lobe B sub-complex engages v-SNARE GS15 and functions via regulated interaction with lobe A sub-complex.

    PubMed

    Willett, Rose; Blackburn, Jessica Bailey; Climer, Leslie; Pokrovskaya, Irina; Kudlyk, Tetyana; Wang, Wei; Lupashin, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is a peripheral membrane protein complex which orchestrates tethering of intra-Golgi vesicles. We found that COG1-4 (lobe A) and 5-8 (lobe B) protein assemblies are present as independent sub-complexes on cell membranes. Super-resolution microscopy demonstrates that COG sub-complexes are spatially separated on the Golgi with lobe A preferential localization on Golgi stacks and the presence of lobe B on vesicle-like structures, where it physically interacts with v-SNARE GS15. The localization and specific interaction of the COG sub-complexes with the components of vesicle tethering/fusion machinery suggests their different roles in the vesicle tethering cycle. We propose and test a novel model that employs association/disassociation of COG sub-complexes as a mechanism that directs vesicle tethering at Golgi membranes. We demonstrate that defective COG assembly or restriction of tethering complex disassembly by a covalent COG1-COG8 linkage is inhibitory to COG complex activity, supporting the model. PMID:27385402

  15. Identification and Characterization of a Small Inhibitory Peptide That Can Target DNA-PKcs Autophosphorylation and Increase Tumor Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xiaonan; Yang Chunying; Liu Hai; Wang Qi; Wu Shixiu; Li Xia; Xie Tian; Brinkman, Kathryn L.; Teh, Bin S.; Butler, E. Brian; Xu Bo; Zheng, Shu

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is one of the critical elements involved in the DNA damage repair process. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR); therefore, this approach has been explored to develop molecular targeted radiosensitizers. Here, we aimed to develop small inhibitory peptides that could specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation, a critical step for the enzymatic activation of the kinase in response to IR. Methods and Materials: We generated several small fusion peptides consisting of 2 functional domains, 1 an internalization domain and the other a DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation inhibitory domain. We characterized the internalization, toxicity, and radiosensitization activities of the fusion peptides. Furthermore, we studied the mechanisms of the inhibitory peptides on DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and DNA repair. Results: We found that among several peptides, the biotin-labeled peptide 3 (BTW3) peptide, which targets DNA-PKcs threonine 2647 autophosphorylation, can abrogate IR-induced DNA-PKcs activation and cause prolonged {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. We demonstrated that BTW3 exposure led to hypersensitivity to IR in DNA-PKcs-proficient cells but not in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. Conclusions: The small inhibitory peptide BTW3 can specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and enhance radiosensitivity; therefore, it can be further developed as a novel class of radiosensitizer.

  16. [Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex].

    PubMed

    Yin, Shuhui; Zhao, Ke

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RAIR) is progressing for the latest 100 years. From the discovery of its important role in diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease to all aspects of its development, reflex pathways, neural regulation and physiological functions, there have been more in-depth explorations. It is now recognized that a number of other diseases also have a more specific performance of RAIR. It has become an important and indispensable part to anorectal manometry. Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex is reviewed in this article. PMID:26704013

  17. Presentation of antagonist peptides to naive CD4+ T cells abrogates spatial reorganization of class II MHC peptide complexes on the surface of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chmielowski, Bartosz; Pacholczyk, Rafal; Kraj, Piotr; Kisielow, Pawel; Ignatowicz, Leszek

    2002-01-01

    By using dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with retroviruses encoding covalent Abβ/peptide fusion proteins tagged with fluorescent proteins, we followed the relocation of class II MHC molecules loaded with agonist or null peptides during the onset of activation of naive and effector CD4+ T cells. Clusters of T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex formed in parallel with clusters of agonist class II MHC/peptide complexes on the surface of DCs. However, activation of naive but not effector T cells was accompanied by expulsion of the null class II MHC/peptide complexes from the T cell–DC interface. These effects were perturbed in the presence of exogenously supplied antagonist peptide. These results suggest that interference with selective relocation of agonist and null MHC/peptide complexes in the immunological synapse contributes to the inhibitory effect of antagonist peptides on the response of naive CD4+ T cells to agonist ligands. PMID:12411579

  18. Inhibitory Activities of Alkyl Syringates and Related Compounds on Aflatoxin Production.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Iimura, Kurin; Kimura, Taichi; Yamamoto, Toshiyoshi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of aflatoxin production of aflatoxigenic fungi are useful for preventing aflatoxin contamination in crops. As methyl syringate weakly inhibits aflatoxin production, aflatoxin production inhibitory activities of additional alkyl syringates with alkyl chains from ethyl to octyl were examined. Inhibitory activity toward aflatoxin production of Aspergillus flavus became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains on the esters became longer. Pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, and octyl syringates showed strong activity at 0.05 mM. Heptyl and octyl parabens, and octyl gallate also inhibited aflatoxin production as strongly as octyl syringate. Alkyl parabens and alkyl gallates inhibit the complex II activity of the mitochondrial respiration chain; thus, whether alkyl syringates inhibit complex II activity was examined. Inhibitory activities of alkyl syringates toward complex II also became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains increased. The complex II inhibitory activity of octyl syringate was comparable to that of octyl paraben and octyl gallate. These results suggest that alkyl syringates, alkyl parabens, and alkyl gallates, including commonly used food additives, are useful for aflatoxin control. PMID:27338472

  19. Inhibitory Activities of Alkyl Syringates and Related Compounds on Aflatoxin Production

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Iimura, Kurin; Kimura, Taichi; Yamamoto, Toshiyoshi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of aflatoxin production of aflatoxigenic fungi are useful for preventing aflatoxin contamination in crops. As methyl syringate weakly inhibits aflatoxin production, aflatoxin production inhibitory activities of additional alkyl syringates with alkyl chains from ethyl to octyl were examined. Inhibitory activity toward aflatoxin production of Aspergillus flavus became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains on the esters became longer. Pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, and octyl syringates showed strong activity at 0.05 mM. Heptyl and octyl parabens, and octyl gallate also inhibited aflatoxin production as strongly as octyl syringate. Alkyl parabens and alkyl gallates inhibit the complex II activity of the mitochondrial respiration chain; thus, whether alkyl syringates inhibit complex II activity was examined. Inhibitory activities of alkyl syringates toward complex II also became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains increased. The complex II inhibitory activity of octyl syringate was comparable to that of octyl paraben and octyl gallate. These results suggest that alkyl syringates, alkyl parabens, and alkyl gallates, including commonly used food additives, are useful for aflatoxin control. PMID:27338472

  20. Frontier of Fusion Research: Path to the Steady State Fusion Reactor by Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motojima, Osamu

    2006-12-01

    The ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, which will be built in Cadarache in France, has finally started this year, 2006. Since the thermal energy produced by fusion reactions divided by the external heating power, i.e., the Q value, will be larger than 10, this is a big step of the fusion research for half a century trying to tame the nuclear fusion for the 6.5 Billion people on the Earth. The source of the Sun's power is lasting steadily and safely for 8 Billion years. As a potentially safe environmentally friendly and economically competitive energy source, fusion should provide a sustainable future energy supply for all mankind for ten thousands of years. At the frontier of fusion research important milestones are recently marked on a long road toward a true prototype fusion reactor. In its own merits, research into harnessing turbulent burning plasmas and thereby controlling fusion reaction, is one of the grand challenges of complex systems science. After a brief overview of a status of world fusion projects, a focus is given on fusion research at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan, which is playing a role of the Inter University Institute, the coordinating Center of Excellence for academic fusion research and by the Large Helical Device (LHD), the world's largest superconducting heliotron device, as a National Users' facility. The current status of LHD project is presented focusing on the experimental program and the recent achievements in basic parameters and in steady state operations. Since, its start in a year 1998, a remarkable progress has presently resulted in the temperature of 140 Million degree, the highest density of 500 Thousand Billion/cc with the internal density barrier (IDB) and the highest steady average beta of 4.5% in helical plasma devices and the largest total input energy of 1.6 GJ, in all magnetic confinement fusion devices. Finally, a perspective is given of the ITER Broad Approach program

  1. Fusion Studies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    A new strategic energy plan decided by the Japanese Cabinet in 2014 strongly supports the steady promotion of nuclear fusion development activities, including the ITER project and the Broader Approach activities from the long-term viewpoint. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in Japan formulated the Third Phase Basic Program so as to promote an experimental fusion reactor project. In 2005 AEC has reviewed this Program, and discussed on selection and concentration among many projects of fusion reactor development. In addition to the promotion of ITER project, advanced tokamak research by JT-60SA, helical plasma experiment by LHD, FIREX project in laser fusion research and fusion engineering by IFMIF were highly prioritized. Although the basic concept is quite different between tokamak, helical and laser fusion researches, there exist a lot of common features such as plasma physics on 3-D magnetic geometry, high power heat load on plasma facing component and so on. Therefore, a synergetic scenario on fusion reactor development among various plasma confinement concepts would be important.

  2. Gene Fusion: A Genome Wide Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Ping; Riley, Monica

    2001-01-01

    As a well known fact, organisms form larger and complex multimodular (composite or chimeric) and mostly multi-functional proteins through gene fusion of two or more individual genes which have independent evolution histories and functions. We call each of these components a module. The existence of multimodular proteins may improves the efficiency in gene regulation and in cellular functions, and thus may give the host organism advantages in adaptation to environments. Analysis of all gene fusions in present-day organisms should allow us to examine the patterns of gene fusion in context with cellular functions, to trace back the evolution processes from the ancient smaller and uni-functional proteins to the present-day larger and complex multi-functional proteins, and to estimate the minimal number of ancestor proteins that existed in the last common ancestor for all life on earth. Although many multimodular proteins have been experimentally known, identification of gene fusion events systematically at genome scale had not been possible until recently when large number of completed genome sequences have been becoming available. In addition, technical difficulties for such analysis also exist due to the complexity of this biological and evolutionary process. We report from this study a new strategy to computationally identify multimodular proteins using completed genome sequences and the results surveyed from 22 organisms with the data from over 40 organisms to be presented during the meeting. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Paired inhibitory and activating receptor signals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L S; Paul, S P; McVicar, D W

    2000-01-01

    The immunological literature has become inundated with reports regarding paired inhibitory receptors. Paired inhibitory receptor systems are highly conserved families that contain receptors involved in either cellular inhibition or activation. In most cases the paired putative biochemical antagonists are co-expressed on a given cell and thought to bind similar, if not identical, ligands making their biological role difficult to understand. Examples of these systems include immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptors (Killer Ig Receptors, Immunoglobulin-like Transcripts/Leukocyte Ig-like Receptors/Monocyte Macrophage Ig Receptors, and Paired Ig-like Receptors), and type II lectin-like receptor systems (NKG2 and Ly49). General characteristics of these inhibitory receptors include a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM). The ITIM is phosphorylated upon engagement and recruits protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate cellular substrates that would otherwise mediate activation. In contrast, the activating receptors of these pairs use charged residues within their transmembrane domains to associate with various signal transduction chains including the gamma chain of the receptor for the Fc portion of IgE, DAP12 or DAP10. Once phosphorylated, these chains direct the signal transduction cascade resulting in cellular activation. Here we review the signaling of several paired systems and present the current models for their signal transduction cascades. PMID:11258418

  4. Inhibitory Control in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krikorian, Robert; Zimmerman, Molly E.; Fleck, David E.

    2004-01-01

    The clinical features of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) suggest that a fundamental deficit of inhibitory control is intrinsic to the disorder. In this preliminary study, we sought to examine cognitive disinhibition in OCD by using an established laboratory technique. The stop signal task was administered to a higher functioning, untreated…

  5. Minimum inhibitory concentration testing of flavobacterium columnare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, accurate and reliable microdilution method has been developed to test the susceptibility of Flavobacterium columnare to antibiotics. The method has been used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 23 F. columnare isolates. The developed method conducted at 28 °C for 4...

  6. Bilingualism Influences Inhibitory Control in Auditory Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenfeld, Henrike K.; Marian, Viorica

    2011-01-01

    Bilinguals have been shown to outperform monolinguals at suppressing task-irrelevant information. The present study aimed to identify how processing linguistic ambiguity during auditory comprehension may be associated with inhibitory control. Monolinguals and bilinguals listened to words in their native language (English) and identified them among…

  7. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  8. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There is little doubt that humans will attempt to explore and develop the solar system in this century. A large amount of energy will be required for accomplishing this. The need for fusion propulsion is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important thermodynamical attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion can produce exhaust velocity up to about 5 km/s. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a hydrogen propellant increases the exhaust velocity by only a factor of about two. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. The principal advantage of the fission process is that its development is relatively mature and is available right now. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. The technical priorities for developing and applying fusion for propulsion are

  9. Development of lung adenocarcinomas with exclusive dependence on oncogene fusions.

    PubMed

    Saito, Motonobu; Shimada, Yoko; Shiraishi, Kouya; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Tsuta, Koji; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Chiku, Suenori; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Kato, Mamoru; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    This report delivers a comprehensive genetic alteration profile of lung adenocarcinomas (LADC) driven by ALK, RET, and ROS1 oncogene fusions. These tumors are difficult to study because of their rarity. Each drives only a low percentage of LADCs. Whole-exome sequencing and copy-number variation analyses were performed on a Japanese LADC cohort (n = 200) enriched in patients with fusions (n = 31, 15.5%), followed by deep resequencing for validation. The driver fusion cases showed a distinct profile with smaller numbers of nonsynonymous mutations in cancer-related genes or truncating mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex genes than in other LADCs (P < 0.0001). This lower mutation rate was independent of age, gender, smoking status, pathologic stage, and tumor differentiation (P < 0.0001) and was validated in nine fusion-positive cases from a U.S. LADCs cohort (n = 230). In conclusion, our findings indicate that LADCs with ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions develop exclusively via their dependence on these oncogene fusions. The presence of such few alterations beyond the fusions supports the use of monotherapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the fusion products in fusion-positive LADCs. PMID:25855381

  10. Cellular response to micropatterned growth promoting and inhibitory substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Normal development and the response to injury both require cell growth, migration and morphological remodeling, guided by a complex local landscape of permissive and inhibitory cues. A standard approach for studying by such cues is to culture cells on uniform substrates containing known concentrations of these molecules, however this method fails to represent the molecular complexity of the natural growth environment. Results To mimic the local complexity of environmental conditions in vitro, we used a contact micropatterning technique to examine cell growth and differentiation on patterned substrates printed with the commonly studied growth permissive and inhibitory substrates, poly-L-lysine (PLL) and myelin, respectively. We show that micropatterning of PLL can be used to direct adherence and axonal outgrowth of hippocampal and cortical neurons as well as other cells with diverse morphologies like Oli-neu oligodendrocyte progenitor cell lines and fibroblast-like COS7 cells in culture. Surprisingly, COS7 cells exhibited a preference for low concentration (1 pg/mL) PLL zones over adjacent zones printed with high concentrations (1 mg/mL). We demonstrate that micropatterning is also useful for studying factors that inhibit growth as it can direct cells to grow along straight lines that are easy to quantify. Furthermore, we provide the first demonstration of microcontact printing of myelin-associated proteins and show that they impair process outgrowth from Oli-neu oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Conclusion We conclude that microcontact printing is an efficient and reproducible method for patterning proteins and brain-derived myelin on glass surfaces in order to study the effects of the microenvironment on cell growth and morphogenesis. PMID:24119185