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Sample records for fusion-mediated plant immunity

  1. Plant Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are faced with defending themselves against a multitude of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, etc. Immunity is multi-layered and complex. Plants can induce defenses when they recognize small peptides, proteins or double-stranded RNA associated with pathogens. Recognitio...

  2. Innate immune memory in plants.

    PubMed

    Reimer-Michalski, Eva-Maria; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    The plant innate immune system comprises local and systemic immune responses. Systemic plant immunity develops after foliar infection by microbial pathogens, upon root colonization by certain microbes, or in response to physical injury. The systemic plant immune response to localized foliar infection is associated with elevated levels of pattern-recognition receptors, accumulation of dormant signaling enzymes, and alterations in chromatin state. Together, these systemic responses provide a memory to the initial infection by priming the remote leaves for enhanced defense and immunity to reinfection. The plant innate immune system thus builds immunological memory by utilizing mechanisms and components that are similar to those employed in the trained innate immune response of jawed vertebrates. Therefore, there seems to be conservation, or convergence, in the evolution of innate immune memory in plants and vertebrates. PMID:27264335

  3. Plant Innate Immunity Multicomponent Model.

    PubMed

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ercolano, Maria R

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of plant-pathogen interactions is making rapid advances in order to address issues of global importance such as improving agricultural productivity and sustainable food security. Innate immunity has evolved in plants, resulting in a wide diversity of defense mechanisms adapted to specific threats. The postulated PTI/ETI model describes two perception layers of plant innate immune system, which belong to a first immunity component of defense response activation. To better describe the sophisticated defense system of plants, we propose a new model of plant immunity. This model considers the plant's ability to distinguish the feeding behavior of their many foes, such as a second component that modulates innate immunity. This hypothesis provides a new viewpoint highlighting the relevance of hormone crosstalk and primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against the different behaviors of pathogens with the intention to stimulate further interest in this research area. PMID:26617626

  4. Plant Innate Immunity Multicomponent Model

    PubMed Central

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ercolano, Maria R.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of plant–pathogen interactions is making rapid advances in order to address issues of global importance such as improving agricultural productivity and sustainable food security. Innate immunity has evolved in plants, resulting in a wide diversity of defense mechanisms adapted to specific threats. The postulated PTI/ETI model describes two perception layers of plant innate immune system, which belong to a first immunity component of defense response activation. To better describe the sophisticated defense system of plants, we propose a new model of plant immunity. This model considers the plant’s ability to distinguish the feeding behavior of their many foes, such as a second component that modulates innate immunity. This hypothesis provides a new viewpoint highlighting the relevance of hormone crosstalk and primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against the different behaviors of pathogens with the intention to stimulate further interest in this research area. PMID:26617626

  5. [Signal systems of plant immunity].

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, A P

    2002-01-01

    Plants can recognise the penetrating pathogen and respond to the attack with an array of defense reactions. Signal transduction from receptor in plasma membrane to genome is necessary to activate these reactions. Plant cell signaling systems which take part in signal transduction were discovered and identified recently. The obtained results suggest that plant cells have complex and well coordinated signal network which regulates their immune potential. PMID:12187855

  6. Priming in Systemic Plant Immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wang, Lin; Glazebrook, Jane; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2009-01-01

    Upon local infection, plants possess inducible systemic defense responses against their natural enemies. Bacterial infection results in the accumulation to high levels of the mobile metabolite C9-dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid in the vascular sap of Arabidopsis. Azelaic acid confers local and systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae. The compound primes plants to strongly accumulate salicylic acid (SA), a known defense signal, upon infection. Mutation of a gene induced by azelaic acid (AZI1) results in the specific loss in plants of systemic immunity triggered by pathogen or azelaic acid and of the priming of SA induction. AZI1, a predicted secreted protein, is also important for generating vascular sap that confers disease resistance. Thus, azelaic acid and AZI1 comprise novel components of plant systemic immunity involved in priming defenses.

  7. Membrane-triggered plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su-Jin; Lee, Hong Gil; Seo, Pil Joon

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved sophisticated defense mechanisms to resist pathogen invasion. Upon the pathogen recognition, the host plants activate a variety of signal transduction pathways, and one of representative defense responses is systemic acquired resistance (SAR) that provides strong immunity against secondary infections in systemic tissues. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that modulation of membrane composition contributes to establishing SAR and disease resistance in Arabidopsis, but underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that a membrane-bound transcription factor (MTF) is associated with plant responses to pathogen attack. The MTF is responsive to microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered membrane rigidification at the levels of transcription and proteolytic processing. The processed nuclear transcription factor possibly regulates pathogen resistance by directly regulating PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR) genes. Taken together, our results suggest that pathogenic microorganisms trigger changes in physico-chemical properties of cellular membrane in plants, and the MTF conveys the membrane information to the nucleus to ensure prompt establishment of plant immunity. PMID:25763708

  8. JASMONATE-TRIGGERED PLANT IMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Marcelo L.; Kang, Jin-Ho; Howe, Gregg A.

    2014-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) exerts direct control over the production of chemical defense compounds that confer resistance to a remarkable spectrum of plant-associated organisms, ranging from microbial pathogens to vertebrate herbivores. The underlying mechanism of JA-triggered immunity (JATI) can be conceptualized as a multi-stage signal transduction cascade involving: i) pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that couple the perception of danger signals to rapid synthesis of bioactive JA; ii) an evolutionarily conserved JA signaling module that links fluctuating JA levels to changes in the abundance of transcriptional repressor proteins; and iii) activation (de-repression) of transcription factors that orchestrate the expression of myriad chemical and morphological defense traits. Multiple negative feedback loops act in concert to restrain the duration and amplitude of defense responses, presumably to mitigate potential fitness costs of JATI. The convergence of diverse plant- and non-plant-derived signals on the core JA module indicates that JATI is a general response to perceived danger. However, the modular structure of JATI may accommodate attacker-specific defense responses through evolutionary innovation of PRRs (inputs) and defense traits (outputs). The efficacy of JATI as a defense strategy is highlighted by its capacity to shape natural populations of plant attackers, as well as the propensity of plant-associated organisms to subvert or otherwise manipulate JA signaling. As both a cellular hub for integrating informational cues from the environment and a common target of pathogen effectors, the core JA module provides a focal point for understanding immune system networks and the evolution of chemical diversity in the plant kingdom. PMID:24973116

  9. DNA Methylation and Demethylation in Plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Deleris, A; Halter, T; Navarro, L

    2016-08-01

    Detection of plant and animal pathogens triggers a massive transcriptional reprogramming, which is directed by chromatin-based processes, and ultimately results in antimicrobial immunity. Although the implication of histone modifications in orchestrating biotic stress-induced transcriptional reprogramming has been well characterized, very little was known, until recently, about the role of DNA methylation and demethylation in this process. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the dynamics and biological relevance of DNA methylation and demethylation in plant immunity against nonviral pathogens. In particular, we report the implications of these epigenetic regulatory processes in the transcriptional and co-transcriptional control of immune-responsive genes and discuss their relevance in fine-tuning antimicrobial immune responses. Finally, we discuss the possible yet elusive role of DNA methylation and demethylation in systemic immune responses, transgenerational immune priming, and de novo epiallelism, which could be adaptive. PMID:27491436

  10. Plant Immune Responses: Aphids Strike Back.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Philippe; Calandra, Thierry

    2015-07-20

    To survive and complete their life cycle, herbivorous insects face the difficult challenge of coping with the arsenal of plant defences. A new study reports that aphids secrete evolutionarily conserved cytokines in their saliva to suppress host immune responses. PMID:26196486

  11. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. PMID:26475190

  12. Plant immunity in plant–aphid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jaouannet, Maëlle; Rodriguez, Patricia A.; Lenoir, Camille J. G.; MacLeod, Ruari; Escudero-Martinez, Carmen; Bos, Jorunn I.B.

    2014-01-01

    Aphids are economically important pests that cause extensive feeding damage and transmit viruses. While some species have a broad host range and cause damage to a variety of crops, others are restricted to only closely related plant species. While probing and feeding aphids secrete saliva, containing effectors, into their hosts to manipulate host cell processes and promote infestation. Aphid effector discovery studies pointed out parallels between infection and infestation strategies of plant pathogens and aphids. Interestingly, resistance to some aphid species is known to involve plant resistance proteins with a typical NB-LRR domain structure. Whether these resistance proteins indeed recognize aphid effectors to trigger ETI remains to be elucidated. In addition, it was recently shown that unknown aphid derived elicitors can initiate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and callose deposition and that these responses were dependent on BAK1 (BRASSINOSTERIOD INSENSITIVE 1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE 1) which is a key component of the plant immune system. In addition, BAK-1 contributes to non-host resistance to aphids pointing to another parallel between plant-pathogen and – aphid interactions. Understanding the role of plant immunity and non-host resistance to aphids is essential to generate durable and sustainable aphid control strategies. Although insect behavior plays a role in host selection and non-host resistance, an important observation is that aphids interact with non-host plants by probing the leaf surface, but are unable to feed or establish colonization. Therefore, we hypothesize that aphids interact with non-host plants at the molecular level, but are potentially not successful in suppressing plant defenses and/or releasing nutrients. PMID:25520727

  13. Chloroplasts at work during plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Irene; Audran, Corinne; Rivas, Susana

    2016-06-01

    The major role played by chloroplasts during light harvesting, energy production, redox homeostasis, and retrograde signalling processes has been extensively characterized. Beyond the obvious link between chloroplast functions in primary metabolism and as providers of photosynthesis-derived carbon sources and energy, a growing body of evidence supports a central role for chloroplasts as integrators of environmental signals and, more particularly, as key defence organelles. Here, we review the importance of these organelles as primary sites for the biosynthesis and transmission of pro-defence signals during plant immune responses. In addition, we highlight interorganellar communication as a crucial process for amplification of the immune response. Finally, molecular strategies used by microbes to manipulate, directly or indirectly, the production/function of defence-related signalling molecules and subvert chloroplast-based defences are also discussed. PMID:26994477

  14. Hemipteran and dipteran pests: Effectors and plant host immune regulators.

    PubMed

    Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Walling, Linda L

    2016-04-01

    Hemipteran and dipteran insects have behavioral, cellular and chemical strategies for evading or coping with the host plant defenses making these insects particularly destructive pests worldwide. A critical component of a host plant's defense to herbivory is innate immunity. Here we review the status of our understanding of the receptors that contribute to perception of hemipteran and dipteran pests and highlight the gaps in our knowledge in these early events in immune signaling. We also highlight recent advances in identification of the effectors that activate pattern-triggered immunity and those involved in effector-triggered immunity. PMID:26467026

  15. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    PubMed Central

    García, Ana V.; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity. PMID:24772109

  16. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system

    PubMed Central

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-01-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms. PMID:21475301

  17. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions. PMID:26926999

  18. MAMP (microbe-associated molecular pattern) triggered immunity in plants

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Mari-Anne; Sundelin, Thomas; Nielsen, Jon T.; Erbs, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that are under constant attack from microbes. They rely on both preformed defenses, and their innate immune system to ward of the microbial pathogens. Preformed defences include for example the cell wall and cuticle, which act as physical barriers to microbial colonization. The plant immune system is composed of surveillance systems that perceive several general microbe elicitors, which allow plants to switch from growth and development into a defense mode, rejecting most potentially harmful microbes. The elicitors are essential structures for pathogen survival and are conserved among pathogens. The conserved microbe-specific molecules, referred to as microbe- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs or PAMPs), are recognized by the plant innate immune systems pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). General elicitors like flagellin (Flg), elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), peptidoglycan (PGN), lipopolysaccharides (LPS), Ax21 (Activator of XA21-mediated immunity in rice), fungal chitin, and β-glucans from oomycetes are recognized by plant surface localized PRRs. Several of the MAMPs and their corresponding PRRs have, in recent years, been identified. This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding important MAMPs from bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes, their structure, the plant PRRs that recognizes them, and how they induce MAMP-triggered immunity (MTI) in plants. PMID:23720666

  19. Plant innate immunity against human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Melotto, Maeli; Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana

    2014-01-01

    Certain human bacterial pathogens such as the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are not proven to be plant pathogens yet. Nonetheless, under certain conditions they can survive on, penetrate into, and colonize internal plant tissues causing serious food borne disease outbreaks. In this review, we highlight current understanding on the molecular mechanisms of plant responses against human bacterial pathogens and discuss salient common and contrasting themes of plant interactions with phytopathogens or human pathogens. PMID:25157245

  20. Structure-informed insights for NLR functioning in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Sukarta, Octavina C A; Slootweg, Erik J; Goverse, Aska

    2016-08-01

    To respond to foreign invaders, plants have evolved a cell autonomous multilayered immune system consisting of extra- and intracellular immune receptors. Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) mediate recognition of pathogen effectors inside the cell and trigger a host specific defense response, often involving controlled cell death. NLRs consist of a central nucleotide-binding domain, which is flanked by an N-terminal CC or TIR domain and a C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain (LRR). These multidomain proteins function as a molecular switch and their activity is tightly controlled by intra and inter-molecular interactions. In contrast to metazoan NLRs, the structural basis underlying NLR functioning as a pathogen sensor and activator of immune responses in plants is largely unknown. However, the first crystal structures of a number of plant NLR domains were recently obtained. In addition, biochemical and structure-informed analyses revealed novel insights in the cooperation between NLR domains and the formation of pre- and post activation complexes, including the coordinated activity of NLR pairs as pathogen sensor and executor of immune responses. Moreover, the discovery of novel integrated domains underscores the structural diversity of NLRs and provides alternative models for how these immune receptors function in plants. In this review, we will highlight these recent advances to provide novel insights in the structural, biochemical and molecular aspects involved in plant NLR functioning. PMID:27208725

  1. Pathogenicity of and plant immunity to soft rot pectobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Davidsson, Pär R.; Kariola, Tarja; Niemi, Outi; Palva, E. T.

    2013-01-01

    Soft rot pectobacteria are broad host range enterobacterial pathogens that cause disease on a variety of plant species including the major crop potato. Pectobacteria are aggressive necrotrophs that harbor a large arsenal of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes as their primary virulence determinants. These enzymes together with additional virulence factors are employed to macerate the host tissue and promote host cell death to provide nutrients for the pathogens. In contrast to (hemi)biotrophs such as Pseudomonas, type III secretion systems (T3SS) and T3 effectors do not appear central to pathogenesis of pectobacteria. Indeed, recent genomic analysis of several Pectobacterium species including the emerging pathogen Pectobacterium wasabiae has shown that many strains lack the entire T3SS as well as the T3 effectors. Instead, this analysis has indicated the presence of novel virulence determinants. Resistance to broad host range pectobacteria is complex and does not appear to involve single resistance genes. Instead, activation of plant innate immunity systems including both SA (salicylic acid) and JA (jasmonic acid)/ET (ethylene)-mediated defenses appears to play a central role in attenuation of Pectobacterium virulence. These defenses are triggered by detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or recognition of modified-self such as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in enhancement of basal immunity (PAMP/DAMP-triggered immunity or pattern-triggered immunity, PTI). In particular plant cell wall fragments released by the action of the degradative enzymes secreted by pectobacteria are major players in enhanced immunity toward these pathogens. Most notably bacterial pectin-degrading enzymes release oligogalacturonide (OG) fragments recognized as DAMPs activating innate immune responses. Recent progress in understanding OG recognition and signaling allows novel genetic screens for OG-insensitive mutants and will provide new insights

  2. Immunization against Rabies with Plant-Derived Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modelska, Anna; Dietzschold, Bernard; Sleysh, N.; Fu, Zhen Fang; Steplewski, Klaudia; Hooper, D. Craig; Koprowski, Hilary; Yusibov, Vidadi

    1998-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that recombinant plant virus particles containing a chimeric peptide representing two rabies virus epitopes stimulate virus neutralizing antibody synthesis in immunized mice. We show here that mice immunized intraperitoneally or orally (by gastric intubation or by feeding on virus-infected spinach leaves) with engineered plant virus particles containing rabies antigen mount a local and systemic immune response. After the third dose of antigen, given intraperitoneally, 40% of the mice were protected against challenge infection with a lethal dose of rabies virus. Oral administration of the antigen stimulated serum IgG and IgA synthesis and ameliorated the clinical signs caused by intranasal infection with an attenuated rabies virus strain.

  3. Immunization against rabies with plant-derived antigen

    PubMed Central

    Modelska, Anna; Dietzschold, Bernard; Sleysh, N.; Fu, Zhen Fang; Steplewski, Klaudia; Hooper, D. Craig; Koprowski, Hilary; Yusibov, Vidadi

    1998-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that recombinant plant virus particles containing a chimeric peptide representing two rabies virus epitopes stimulate virus neutralizing antibody synthesis in immunized mice. We show here that mice immunized intraperitoneally or orally (by gastric intubation or by feeding on virus-infected spinach leaves) with engineered plant virus particles containing rabies antigen mount a local and systemic immune response. After the third dose of antigen, given intraperitoneally, 40% of the mice were protected against challenge infection with a lethal dose of rabies virus. Oral administration of the antigen stimulated serum IgG and IgA synthesis and ameliorated the clinical signs caused by intranasal infection with an attenuated rabies virus strain. PMID:9482911

  4. Transcriptional Regulation of Pattern-Triggered Immunity in Plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Meng, Xiangzong; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2016-05-11

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) by cell-surface-resident pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) induces rapid, robust, and selective transcriptional reprogramming, which is central for launching effective pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) in plants. Signal relay from PRR complexes to the nuclear transcriptional machinery via intracellular kinase cascades rapidly activates primary immune response genes. The coordinated action of gene-specific transcription factors and the general transcriptional machinery contribute to the selectivity of immune gene activation. In addition, PRR complexes and signaling components are often transcriptionally upregulated upon MAMP perception to ensure the robustness and sustainability of PTI outputs. In this review, we discuss recent advances in deciphering the signaling pathways and regulatory mechanisms that coordinately lead to timely and accurate MAMP-induced gene expression in plants. PMID:27173932

  5. Pathogen-Secreted Proteases Activate a Novel Plant Immune Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhenyu; Li, Jian-Feng; Niu, Yajie; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Woody, Owen Z.; Xiong, Yan; Djonović, Slavica; Millet, Yves; Bush, Jenifer; McConkey, Brendan J.; Sheen, Jen; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) cascades play central roles in innate immune signaling networks in plants and animals1,2. In plants, however, the molecular mechanisms of how signal perception is transduced to MAPK activation remain elusive1. We report that pathogen-secreted proteases activate a previously unknown signaling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana involving the Gα, Gβ and Gγ subunits of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes, which function upstream of a MAPK cascade. In this pathway, Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) functions as a novel scaffold that binds to the Gβ subunit as well as to all three tiers of the MAPK cascade, thereby linking upstream G protein signaling to downstream activation of a MAPK cascade. The protease-G protein-RACK1-MAPK cascade modules identified in these studies are distinct from previously described plant immune signaling pathways such as the one elicited by bacterial flagellin, in which G proteins function downstream of or in parallel to a MAPK cascade without the involvement of the RACK1 scaffolding protein. The discovery of the novel protease-mediated immune signaling pathway described here was facilitated by the use of the broad host range, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ability of P. aeruginosa to infect both plants and animals makes it an excellent model to identify novel types of immunoregulatory strategies that account for its niche adaptation to diverse host tissues and immune systems. PMID:25731164

  6. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides in plant and mammalian innate immunity.

    PubMed

    De Castro, Cristina; Holst, Otto; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Molinaro, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    This mini-review gives a structural view on the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), the endotoxin from Gram negative bacteria, paying attention on the features that are relevant for their activity as elicitors of the innate immune system of humans, animals and plants. PMID:22533617

  7. Discovery of oxidative burst in the field of plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Bouteau, François

    2008-01-01

    This article is introductory to the series of works presented in this special issue on the homeostasis and the signaling roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. Upper half of this article briefly describes the history of the ROS study in the field of plant immunity research initiated by the observation that the attacks by pathogenic microorganisms possibly stimulate the burst of ROS production in the plant tissues. The topics covered in the series of works presented here include the plants' responses to abiotic oxidative stress (atmospheric ozone), regulation of seed germination, chemical interaction between parasitic and host plants and the draught tolerance, all controlled through homeostasis of ROS at biochemical and molecular biological levels. Lastly a discussion forum was proposed to further deepen our understanding of ROS behaviors in plants. PMID:19513209

  8. Evaluating plant immunity using mass spectrometry-based metabolomics workflows

    PubMed Central

    Heuberger, Adam L.; Robison, Faith M.; Lyons, Sarah Marie A.; Broeckling, Corey D.; Prenni, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic processes in plants are key components of physiological and biochemical disease resistance. Metabolomics, the analysis of a broad range of small molecule compounds in a biological system, has been used to provide a systems-wide overview of plant metabolism associated with defense responses. Plant immunity has been examined using multiple metabolomics workflows that vary in methods of detection, annotation, and interpretation, and the choice of workflow can significantly impact the conclusions inferred from a metabolomics investigation. The broad range of metabolites involved in plant defense often requires multiple chemical detection platforms and implementation of a non-targeted approach. A review of the current literature reveals a wide range of workflows that are currently used in plant metabolomics, and new methods for analyzing and reporting mass spectrometry (MS) data can improve the ability to translate investigative findings among different plant-pathogen systems. PMID:25009545

  9. Pivoting the plant immune system from dissection to deployment.

    PubMed

    Dangl, Jeffery L; Horvath, Diana M; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2013-08-16

    Diverse and rapidly evolving pathogens cause plant diseases and epidemics that threaten crop yield and food security around the world. Research over the last 25 years has led to an increasingly clear conceptual understanding of the molecular components of the plant immune system. Combined with ever-cheaper DNA-sequencing technology and the rich diversity of germ plasm manipulated for over a century by plant breeders, we now have the means to begin development of durable (long-lasting) disease resistance beyond the limits imposed by conventional breeding and in a manner that will replace costly and unsustainable chemical controls. PMID:23950531

  10. Towards reconstitution of membrane fusion mediated by SNAREs and other synaptic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brunger, Axel T.; Cipriano, Daniel J.; Diao, Jiajie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Proteoliposomes have been widely used for in vitro studies of membrane fusion mediated by synaptic proteins. Initially, such studies were made with large unsynchronized ensembles of vesicles. Such ensemble assays limited the insights into the SNARE-mediated fusion mechanism that could be obtained from them. Single particle microscopy experiments can alleviate many of these limitations but they pose significant technical challenges. Here we summarize various approaches that have enabled studies of fusion mediated by SNAREs and other synaptic proteins at a single-particle level. Currently available methods are described and their advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:25788028

  11. Carbohydrates in plant immunity and plant protection: roles and potential application as foliar sprays.

    PubMed

    Trouvelot, Sophie; Héloir, Marie-Claire; Poinssot, Benoît; Gauthier, Adrien; Paris, Franck; Guillier, Christelle; Combier, Maud; Trdá, Lucie; Daire, Xavier; Adrian, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Increasing interest is devoted to carbohydrates for their roles in plant immunity. Some of them are elicitors of plant defenses whereas other ones act as signaling molecules in a manner similar to phytohormones. This review first describes the main classes of carbohydrates associated to plant immunity, their role and mode of action. More precisely, the state of the art about perception of "PAMP, MAMP, and DAMP (Pathogen-, Microbe-, Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns) type" oligosaccharides is presented and examples of induced defense events are provided. A particular attention is paid to the structure/activity relationships of these compounds. The role of sugars as signaling molecules, especially in plant microbe interactions, is also presented. Secondly, the potentialities and limits of foliar sprays of carbohydrates to stimulate plant immunity for crop protection against diseases are discussed, with focus on the roles of the leaf cuticle and phyllosphere microflora. PMID:25408694

  12. Carbohydrates in plant immunity and plant protection: roles and potential application as foliar sprays

    PubMed Central

    Trouvelot, Sophie; Héloir, Marie-Claire; Poinssot, Benoît; Gauthier, Adrien; Paris, Franck; Guillier, Christelle; Combier, Maud; Trdá, Lucie; Daire, Xavier; Adrian, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Increasing interest is devoted to carbohydrates for their roles in plant immunity. Some of them are elicitors of plant defenses whereas other ones act as signaling molecules in a manner similar to phytohormones. This review first describes the main classes of carbohydrates associated to plant immunity, their role and mode of action. More precisely, the state of the art about perception of “PAMP, MAMP, and DAMP (Pathogen-, Microbe-, Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns) type” oligosaccharides is presented and examples of induced defense events are provided. A particular attention is paid to the structure/activity relationships of these compounds. The role of sugars as signaling molecules, especially in plant microbe interactions, is also presented. Secondly, the potentialities and limits of foliar sprays of carbohydrates to stimulate plant immunity for crop protection against diseases are discussed, with focus on the roles of the leaf cuticle and phyllosphere microflora. PMID:25408694

  13. Cis- and trans-zeatin differentially modulate plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Großkinsky, Dominik; Edelsbrunner, Kerstin; Pfeifhofer, Hartwig; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Phytohormones are essential regulators of various processes in plant growth and development. Several phytohormones are also known to regulate plant responses to environmental stress and pathogens. Only recently, cytokinins have been demonstrated to play an important role in plant immunity. Increased levels of cytokinins such as trans-zeatin, which are considered highly active, induced resistance against mainly (hemi)biotrophic pathogens in different plant species. In contrast, cis-zeatin is commonly regarded as a cytokinin exhibiting low or no activity. Here we comparatively study the impact of both zeatin isomers on the infection of Nicotiana tabacum by the (hemi)biotrophic microbial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. We demonstrate a biological effect of cis-zeatin and a differential effect of the two zeatin isomers on symptom development, defense responses and bacterial multiplication. PMID:23656869

  14. Plant TRAF Proteins Regulate NLR Immune Receptor Turnover.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuai; Chen, Xuejin; Zhong, Xionghui; Li, Meng; Ao, Kevin; Huang, Jianhua; Li, Xin

    2016-02-10

    In animals, Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) proteins are molecular adaptors that regulate innate and adaptive immunity, development, and abiotic stress responses. Although gene families encoding TRAF domain-containing proteins exhibit enriched diversity in higher plants, their biological roles are poorly defined. Here, we report the identification of two redundant TRAF proteins, Mutant, snc1-enhancing 13 (MUSE13) and MUSE14, that contribute to the turnover of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) immune receptors SNC1 and RPS2. Loss of both MUSE13 and MUSE14 leads to enhanced pathogen resistance, NLR accumulation, and autoimmunity, while MUSE13 overexpression results in reduced NLR levels and activity. In planta, MUSE13 associates with SNC1, RPS2, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF(CPR1). Taken together, we speculate that MUSE13 and MUSE14 associate with the SCF E3 ligase complex to form a plant-type TRAFasome, which modulates ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of NLR immune sensors to maintain their homeostasis. PMID:26867179

  15. Proteomics of effector-triggered immunity (ETI) in plants

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Brenden; Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Guttman, David S; Desveaux, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) was originally termed gene-for-gene resistance and dates back to fundamental observations of flax resistance to rust fungi by Harold Henry Flor in the 1940s. Since then, genetic and biochemical approaches have defined our current understanding of how plant “resistance” proteins recognize microbial effectors. More recently, proteomic approaches have expanded our view of the protein landscape during ETI and contributed significant advances to our mechanistic understanding of ETI signaling. Here we provide an overview of proteomic techniques that have been used to study plant ETI including both global and targeted approaches. We discuss the challenges associated with ETI proteomics and highlight specific examples from the literature, which demonstrate how proteomics is advancing the ETI research field. PMID:25513776

  16. The role of the cell wall in plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Malinovsky, Frederikke G.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Willats, William G. T.

    2014-01-01

    The battle between plants and microbes is evolutionarily ancient, highly complex, and often co-dependent. A primary challenge for microbes is to breach the physical barrier of host cell walls whilst avoiding detection by the plant’s immune receptors. While some receptors sense conserved microbial features, others monitor physical changes caused by an infection attempt. Detection of microbes leads to activation of appropriate defense responses that then challenge the attack. Plant cell walls are formidable and dynamic barriers. They are constructed primarily of complex carbohydrates joined by numerous distinct connection types, and are subject to extensive post-synthetic modification to suit prevailing local requirements. Multiple changes can be triggered in cell walls in response to microbial attack. Some of these are well described, but many remain obscure. The study of the myriad of subtle processes underlying cell wall modification poses special challenges for plant glycobiology. In this review we describe the major molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the roles of cell walls in plant defense against pathogen attack. In so doing, we also highlight some of the challenges inherent in studying these interactions, and briefly describe the analytical potential of molecular probes used in conjunction with carbohydrate microarray technology. PMID:24834069

  17. The Fundamental Role of NOX Family Proteins in Plant Immunity and Their Regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Jing; Wei, Xiao-Yong; Jing, Xiu-Qing; Chang, Yan-Li; Hu, Chun-Hong; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Kun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOXs), also known as respiratory burst oxidase homologs (RBOHs), are the major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are involved in many important processes in plants such as regulation of acclimatory signaling and programmed cell death (PCD). Increasing evidence shows that NOXs play crucial roles in plant immunity and their functions in plant immune responses are not as separate individuals but with other signal molecules such as kinases, Rac/Rop small GTPases and hormones, mediating a series of signal transmissions. In a similar way, NOX-mediated signaling also participates in abiotic stress response of plants. We summarized here the complex role and regulation mechanism of NOXs in mediating plant immune response, and the viewpoint that abiotic stress response of plants may be a kind of special plant immunity is also proposed. PMID:27240354

  18. The Fundamental Role of NOX Family Proteins in Plant Immunity and Their Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Jing; Wei, Xiao-Yong; Jing, Xiu-Qing; Chang, Yan-Li; Hu, Chun-Hong; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Kun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOXs), also known as respiratory burst oxidase homologs (RBOHs), are the major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are involved in many important processes in plants such as regulation of acclimatory signaling and programmed cell death (PCD). Increasing evidence shows that NOXs play crucial roles in plant immunity and their functions in plant immune responses are not as separate individuals but with other signal molecules such as kinases, Rac/Rop small GTPases and hormones, mediating a series of signal transmissions. In a similar way, NOX-mediated signaling also participates in abiotic stress response of plants. We summarized here the complex role and regulation mechanism of NOXs in mediating plant immune response, and the viewpoint that abiotic stress response of plants may be a kind of special plant immunity is also proposed. PMID:27240354

  19. Influences of Plant Traits on Immune Responses of Specialist and Generalist Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Evan

    2012-01-01

    Specialist and generalist insect herbivore species often differ in how they respond to host plant traits, particularly defensive traits, and these responses can include weakened or strengthened immune responses to pathogens and parasites. Accurate methods to measure immune response in the presence and absence of pathogens and parasites are necessary to determine whether susceptibility to these natural enemies is reduced or increased by host plant traits. Plant chemical traits are particularly important in that host plant metabolites may function as antioxidants beneficial to the immune response, or interfere with the immune response of both specialist and generalist herbivores. Specialist herbivores that are adapted to process and sometimes accumulate specific plant compounds may experience high metabolic demands that may decrease immune response, whereas the metabolic demands of generalist species differ due to more broad-substrate enzyme systems. However, the direct deleterious effects of plant compounds on generalist herbivores may weaken their immune responses. Further research in this area is important given that the ecological relevance of plant traits to herbivore immune responses is equally important in natural systems and agroecosystems, due to potential incompatibility of some host plant species and cultivars with biological control agents of herbivorous pests. PMID:26466545

  20. Trade-Offs for Viruses in Overcoming Innate Immunities in Plants.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Yuri; Atsumi, Go; Nakahara, Kenji S

    2016-08-01

    Plants recognize viral infection via an immune receptor, i.e., nucleotide-binding site (NB)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins. Another immune receptor, receptor-like kinase proteins, which share an LRR domain with NB-LRRs, perceive conserved molecules of pathogens called pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns, but NB-LRRs generally perceive particular viral proteins. As viruses can evolve more rapidly than the host immune system, how do plant immune systems, which rely on the perception of proteins, remain effective? Viral adaptive evolution may be controlled by penalties that result from mutations in viral proteins that are perceived by NB-LRRs. Our recent studies in pea (Pisum sativum) suggest a penalty of increased susceptibility to another immune system. When a viral protein mutates to evade one immune system, the virus with the mutated protein becomes more susceptible to another. Such antagonistic pleiotropy of a viral protein by two independent plant immune systems may have precedents. Plants may rely on pairs of immune systems to constrain adaptive evolution by viruses and thereby maintain durable antiviral immunity. PMID:27294885

  1. The activation and suppression of plant innate immunity by parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Goverse, Aska; Smant, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes engage in prolonged and intimate relationships with their host plants, often involving complex alterations in host cell morphology and function. It is puzzling how nematodes can achieve this, seemingly without activating the innate immune system of their hosts. Secretions released by infective juvenile nematodes are thought to be crucial for host invasion, for nematode migration inside plants, and for feeding on host cells. In the past, much of the research focused on the manipulation of developmental pathways in host plants by plant-parasitic nematodes. However, recent findings demonstrate that plant-parasitic nematodes also deliver effectors into the apoplast and cytoplasm of host cells to suppress plant defense responses. In this review, we describe the current insights in the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the activation and suppression of host innate immunity by plant-parasitic nematodes along seven critical evolutionary and developmental transitions in plant parasitism. PMID:24906126

  2. Soil immune responses: Soil microbiomes may be harnessed for plant health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The best examples of microbiome-mediated protection of plants against root pathogens are disease suppressive soils. The characteristics of general and specific disease suppressiveness of soils are strikingly comparable to innate and adaptive immunity in animals. Innate immunity and general soil su...

  3. Plant Immune Responses Against Viruses: How Does a Virus Cause Disease?[OA

    PubMed Central

    Mandadi, Kranthi K.; Scholthof, Karen-Beth G.

    2013-01-01

    Plants respond to pathogens using elaborate networks of genetic interactions. Recently, significant progress has been made in understanding RNA silencing and how viruses counter this apparently ubiquitous antiviral defense. In addition, plants also induce hypersensitive and systemic acquired resistance responses, which together limit the virus to infected cells and impart resistance to the noninfected tissues. Molecular processes such as the ubiquitin proteasome system and DNA methylation are also critical to antiviral defenses. Here, we provide a summary and update of advances in plant antiviral immune responses, beyond RNA silencing mechanisms—advances that went relatively unnoticed in the realm of RNA silencing and nonviral immune responses. We also document the rise of Brachypodium and Setaria species as model grasses to study antiviral responses in Poaceae, aspects that have been relatively understudied, despite grasses being the primary source of our calories, as well as animal feed, forage, recreation, and biofuel needs in the 21st century. Finally, we outline critical gaps, future prospects, and considerations central to studying plant antiviral immunity. To promote an integrated model of plant immunity, we discuss analogous viral and nonviral immune concepts and propose working definitions of viral effectors, effector-triggered immunity, and viral pathogen-triggered immunity. PMID:23709626

  4. 99th Dahlem conference on infection, inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders: innate immune responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Lefert, P

    2010-04-01

    Plants rely exclusively upon mechanisms of innate immunity. Current concepts of the plant innate immune system are based largely on two forms of immunity that engage distinct classes of immune receptors. These receptors enable the recognition of non-self structures that are either conserved between members of a microbial class or specific to individual strains of a microbe. One type of receptor comprises membrane-resident pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that detect widely conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) on the cell surface. A second type of mainly intracellular immune sensors, designated resistance (R) proteins, recognizes either the structure or function of strain-specific pathogen effectors that are delivered inside host cells. Phytopathogenic microorganisms have evolved a repertoire of effectors, some of which are delivered into plant cells to sabotage MAMP-triggered immune responses. Plants appear to have also evolved receptors that sense cellular injury by the release and perception of endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). It is possible that the integration of MAMP and DAMP responses is critical to mount robust MAMP-triggered immunity. This signal integration might help to explain why plants are colonized in nature by remarkably diverse and seemingly asymptomatic microbial communities. PMID:20415853

  5. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  6. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  7. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  8. Functions of Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases in Plant Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiquan; Cox, Kevin L.; He, Ping

    2014-01-01

    An increase of cytosolic Ca2+ is generated by diverse physiological stimuli and stresses, including pathogen attack. Plants have evolved two branches of the immune system to defend against pathogen infections. The primary innate immune response is triggered by the detection of evolutionarily conserved pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP), which is called PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). The second branch of plant innate immunity is triggered by the recognition of specific pathogen effector proteins and known as effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Calcium (Ca2+) signaling is essential in both plant PTI and ETI responses. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have emerged as important Ca2+ sensor proteins in transducing differential Ca2+ signatures, triggered by PAMPs or effectors and activating complex downstream responses. CDPKs directly transmit calcium signals by calcium binding to the elongation factor (EF)-hand domain at the C-terminus and substrate phosphorylation by the catalytic kinase domain at the N-terminus. Emerging evidence suggests that specific and overlapping CDPKs phosphorylate distinct substrates in PTI and ETI to regulate diverse plant immune responses, including production of reactive oxygen species, transcriptional reprogramming of immune genes, and the hypersensitive response. PMID:27135498

  9. The Evolutionarily Conserved E3 Ubiquitin Ligase AtCHIP Contributes to Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Charles; Ao, Kevin; Huang, Yan; Tong, Meixuizi; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Plants possess a sophisticated immune system to recognize and respond to microbial threats in their environment. The level of immune signaling must be tightly regulated so that immune responses can be quickly activated in the presence of pathogens, while avoiding autoimmunity. HSP90s, along with their diverse array of co-chaperones, forms chaperone complexes that have been shown to play both positive and negative roles in regulating the accumulation of immune receptors and regulators. In this study, we examined the role of AtCHIP, an evolutionarily conserved E3 ligase that was known to interact with chaperones including HSP90s in multicellular organisms including fruit fly, Caenorhabditis elegans, plants and human. Atchip knockout mutants display enhanced disease susceptibility to a virulent oomycete pathogen, and overexpression of AtCHIP causes enhanced disease resistance at low temperature. Although CHIP was reported to target HSP90 for ubiquitination and degradation, accumulation of HSP90.3 was not affected in Atchip plants. In addition, protein accumulation of nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat domain immune receptor (NLR) SNC1 is not altered in Atchip mutant. Thus, while AtCHIP plays a role in immunity, it does not seem to regulate the turnover of HSP90 or SNC1. Further investigation is needed in order to determine the exact mechanism behind AtCHIP’s role in regulating plant immune responses. PMID:27014328

  10. The Evolutionarily Conserved E3 Ubiquitin Ligase AtCHIP Contributes to Plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Charles; Ao, Kevin; Huang, Yan; Tong, Meixuizi; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Plants possess a sophisticated immune system to recognize and respond to microbial threats in their environment. The level of immune signaling must be tightly regulated so that immune responses can be quickly activated in the presence of pathogens, while avoiding autoimmunity. HSP90s, along with their diverse array of co-chaperones, forms chaperone complexes that have been shown to play both positive and negative roles in regulating the accumulation of immune receptors and regulators. In this study, we examined the role of AtCHIP, an evolutionarily conserved E3 ligase that was known to interact with chaperones including HSP90s in multicellular organisms including fruit fly, Caenorhabditis elegans, plants and human. Atchip knockout mutants display enhanced disease susceptibility to a virulent oomycete pathogen, and overexpression of AtCHIP causes enhanced disease resistance at low temperature. Although CHIP was reported to target HSP90 for ubiquitination and degradation, accumulation of HSP90.3 was not affected in Atchip plants. In addition, protein accumulation of nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat domain immune receptor (NLR) SNC1 is not altered in Atchip mutant. Thus, while AtCHIP plays a role in immunity, it does not seem to regulate the turnover of HSP90 or SNC1. Further investigation is needed in order to determine the exact mechanism behind AtCHIP's role in regulating plant immune responses. PMID:27014328

  11. A regulon conserved in monocot and dicot plants defines a functional module in antifungal plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Humphry, Matt; Bednarek, Paweł; Kemmerling, Birgit; Koh, Serry; Stein, Mónica; Göbel, Ulrike; Stüber, Kurt; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Loraine, Ann; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Somerville, Shauna; Panstruga, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    At least two components that modulate plant resistance against the fungal powdery mildew disease are ancient and have been conserved since the time of the monocot–dicot split (≈200 Mya). These components are the seven transmembrane domain containing MLO/MLO2 protein and the syntaxin ROR2/PEN1, which act antagonistically and have been identified in the monocot barley (Hordeum vulgare) and the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. Additionally, syntaxin-interacting N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor adaptor protein receptor proteins (VAMP721/722 and SNAP33/34) as well as a myrosinase (PEN2) and an ABC transporter (PEN3) contribute to antifungal resistance in both barley and/or Arabidopsis. Here, we show that these genetically defined defense components share a similar set of coexpressed genes in the two plant species, comprising a statistically significant overrepresentation of gene products involved in regulation of transcription, posttranslational modification, and signaling. Most of the coexpressed Arabidopsis genes possess a common cis-regulatory element that may dictate their coordinated expression. We exploited gene coexpression to uncover numerous components in Arabidopsis involved in antifungal defense. Together, our data provide evidence for an evolutionarily conserved regulon composed of core components and clade/species-specific innovations that functions as a module in plant innate immunity. PMID:21098265

  12. A Secreted MIF Cytokine Enables Aphid Feeding and Represses Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Naessens, Elodie; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giordanengo, Philippe; Baron, Olga Lucia; Minet-Kebdani, Naïma; Keller, Harald; Coustau, Christine

    2015-07-20

    Aphids attack virtually all plant species and cause serious crop damages in agriculture. Despite their dramatic impact on food production, little is known about the molecular processes that allow aphids to exploit their host plants. To date, few aphid salivary proteins have been identified that are essential for aphid feeding, and their nature and function remain largely unknown. Here, we show that a macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is secreted in aphid saliva. In vertebrates, MIFs are important pro-inflammatory cytokines regulating immune responses. MIF proteins are also secreted by parasites of vertebrates, including nematodes, ticks, and protozoa, and participate in the modulation of host immune responses. The finding that a plant parasite secretes a MIF protein prompted us to question the role of the cytokine in the plant-aphid interaction. We show here that expression of MIF genes is crucial for aphid survival, fecundity, and feeding on a host plant. The ectopic expression of aphid MIFs in leaf tissues inhibits major plant immune responses, such as the expression of defense-related genes, callose deposition, and hypersensitive cell death. Functional complementation analyses in vivo allowed demonstrating that MIF1 is the member of the MIF protein family that allows aphids to exploit their host plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a cytokine that is secreted by a parasite to modulate plant immune responses. Our findings suggest a so-far unsuspected conservation of infection strategies among parasites of animal and plant species. PMID:26119751

  13. A novel nematode effector suppresses plant immunity by activating host reactuve oxygen species-scavenging system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative burst is a hallmark event of the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered immunity (PTI), which is the first line of plant defense mechanisms, but it remains unclear how nematodes can overcome this defense mechanism. In this study, we show that plant-parasitic nematode Meloid...

  14. Glycerol-3-phosphate is a critical mobile inducer of systemic immunity in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is an important metabolite that contributes to the growth and disease-related physiologies of prokaryotes, plants, animals and humans alike. Here we show that G3P serves as the inducer of an important form of broad-spectrum immunity in plants, termed systemic acquired resi...

  15. Lipid Transfer Proteins As Components of the Plant Innate Immune System: Structure, Functions, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Finkina, E. I.; Melnikova, D. N.; Bogdanov, I. V.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of molecular factors of the plant innate immune system, small proteins that transfer lipids and exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities are of particular interest. These are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are interesting to researchers for three main features. The first feature is the ability of plant LTPs to bind and transfer lipids, whereby these proteins got their name and were combined into one class. The second feature is that LTPs are defense proteins that are components of plant innate immunity. The third feature is that LTPs constitute one of the most clinically important classes of plant allergens. In this review, we summarize the available data on the plant LTP structure, biological properties, diversity of functions, mechanisms of action, and practical applications, emphasizing their role in plant physiology and their significance in human life. PMID:27437139

  16. Stem-cell-triggered immunity safeguards cytokinin enriched plant shoot apexes from pathogen infection

    PubMed Central

    Naseem, Muhammad; Srivastava, Mugdha; Dandekar, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Intricate mechanisms discriminate between friends and foes in plants. Plant organs deploy overlapping and distinct protection strategies. Despite vulnerability to a plethora of pathogens, the growing tips of plants grow bacteria free. The shoot apical meristem (SAM) is among three stem cells niches, a self-renewable reservoir for the future organogenesis of leaf, stem, and flowers. How plants safeguard this high value growth target from infections was not known until now. Recent reports find the stem cell secreted 12-amino acid peptide CLV3p (CLAVATA3 peptide) is perceived by FLS2 (FLAGELLIN SENSING 2) receptor and activates the transcription of immunity and defense marker genes. No infection in the SAM of wild type plants and bacterial infection in clv3 and fls2 mutants illustrate this natural protection against infections. Cytokinins (CKs) are enriched in the SAM and regulate meristem activities by their involvement in stem cell signaling networks. Auxin mediates plant susceptibility to pathogen infections while CKs boost plant immunity. Here, in addition to the stem-cell-triggered immunity we also highlight a potential link between CK signaling and CLV3p mediated immune response in the SAM. PMID:25400652

  17. Oral immunization with hepatitis B surface antigen expressed in transgenic plants

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qingxian; Richter, Liz; Yang, Yu Fang; Arntzen, Charles J.; Mason, Hugh S.; Thanavala, Yasmin

    2001-01-01

    Oral immunogenicity of recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) derived from yeast (purified product) or in transgenic potatoes (uncooked unprocessed sample) was compared. An oral adjuvant, cholera toxin, was used to increase immune responses. Transgenic plant material containing HBsAg was the superior means of both inducing a primary immune response and priming the mice to respond to a subsequent parenteral injection of HBsAg. Electron microscopy of transgenic plant samples revealed evidence that the HBsAg accumulated intracellularly; we conclude that natural bioencapsulation of the antigen may provide protection from degradation in the digestive tract until plant cell degradation occurs near an immune effector site in the gut. The correlate of protection from hepatitis B virus infection is serum antibody titers induced by vaccination; the protective level in humans is 10 milliunits/ml or greater. Mice fed HBsAg-transgenic potatoes produced HBsAg-specific serum antibodies that exceeded the protective level and, on parenteral boosting, generated a strong long-lasting secondary antibody response. We have also shown the effectiveness of oral delivery by using a parenteral prime-oral boost immunization schedule. The demonstrated success of oral immunization for hepatitis B virus with an “edible vaccine” provides a strategy for contributing a means to achieve global immunization for hepatitis B prevention and eradication. PMID:11553782

  18. Incompatibility between plant-derived defensive chemistry and immune response of two sphingid herbivores.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Evan C; Bowers, M Deane

    2015-01-01

    Herbivorous insects use several different defenses against predators and parasites, and tradeoffs among defensive traits may occur if these traits are energetically demanding. Chemical defense and immune response potentially can interact, and both can be influenced by host plant chemistry. Two closely related caterpillars in the lepidopteran family Sphingidae are both attacked by the same specialist endoparasitoid species but have mostly non-overlapping host plant ranges that differ in secondary chemistry. Ceratomia catalpae is a specialist on Catalpa and also will feed on Chilopsis, which both produce iridoid glycosides. Ceratomia undulosa consumes members of the Oleaceae, which produce seco-iridoid glycosides. Immune response of the two species on a typical host plant species (Catalpa bignonioides for C. catalpa; Fraxinus americana for C. undulosa) was compared using a melanization assay, and did not differ. In a second experiment, the iridoid glycoside catalpol was added to the diets of both insects, and growth rate, mass, chemical defense, and immune response were evaluated. Increased dietary catalpol weakened the immune response of C. undulosa and altered the development rate of C. catalpae by prolonging the third instar and accelerating the fourth instar. Catalpol sequestration was negatively correlated with immune response of C. catalpae, while C. undulosa was unable to sequester catalpol. These results show that immune response can be negatively influenced by increasing concentrations of sequestered defensive compounds. PMID:25516226

  19. Productive infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in dendritic cells requires fusion-mediated viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Janas, Alicia M.; Dong, Chunsheng; Wang Jianhua; Wu Li

    2008-06-05

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters dendritic cells (DCs) through endocytosis and viral receptor-mediated fusion. Although endocytosis-mediated HIV-1 entry can generate productive infection in certain cell types, including human monocyte-derived macrophages, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs appears to be dependent on fusion-mediated viral entry. It remains to be defined whether endocytosed HIV-1 in DCs can initiate productive infection. Using HIV-1 infection and cellular fractionation assays to measure productive viral infection and entry, here we show that HIV-1 enters monocyte-derived DCs predominately through endocytosis; however, endocytosed HIV-1 cannot initiate productive HIV-1 infection in DCs. In contrast, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs requires fusion-mediated viral entry. Together, these results provide functional evidence in understanding HIV-1 cis-infection of DCs, suggesting that different pathways of HIV-1 entry into DCs determine the outcome of viral infection.

  20. Getting to PTI of bacterial RNAs: Triggering plant innate immunity by extracellular RNAs from bacteria.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Soon; Lee, Boyoung; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-07-01

    Defense against diverse biotic and abiotic stresses requires the plant to distinguish between self and non-self signaling molecules. Pathogen/microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs) are pivotal for triggering innate immunity in plants. Unlike in animals and humans, the precise roles of nucleic acids in plant innate immunity are unclear. We therefore investigated the effects of infiltration of total Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto DC3000) RNAs into Arabidopsis plants. The pathogen population was 10-fold lower in bacterial RNAs pre-treated Arabidopsis plants than in the control. Bacterial RNAs purity was confirmed by physical (sonication) and chemical (RNase A and proteinase K digestion) methods. The perception of bacterial RNAs, especially rRNAs, positively regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and induced a reactive oxygen species burst, callose deposition, salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling, and defense-related genes. Therefore, bacterial RNAs function as a new MAMP that activates plant innate immunity, providing a new paradigm for plant-microbe interactions. PMID:27301792

  1. Low cost delivery of proteins bioencapsulated in plant cells to human non-immune or immune modulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuhong; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Hoffman, Brad E; Kamesh, Aditya; Jones, Noah T; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2016-02-01

    Targeted oral delivery of GFP fused with a GM1 receptor binding protein (CTB) or human cell penetrating peptide (PTD) or dendritic cell peptide (DCpep) was investigated. Presence of GFP(+) intact plant cells between villi of ileum confirm their protection in the digestive system from acids/enzymes. Efficient delivery of GFP to gut-epithelial cells by PTD or CTB and to M cells by all these fusion tags confirm uptake of GFP in the small intestine. PTD fusion delivered GFP more efficiently to most tissues or organs than the other two tags. GFP was efficiently delivered to the liver by all fusion tags, likely through the gut-liver axis. In confocal imaging studies of human cell lines using purified GFP fused with different tags, GFP signal of DCpep-GFP was only detected within dendritic cells. PTD-GFP was only detected within kidney or pancreatic cells but not in immune modulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic, T, B, or mast cells). In contrast, CTB-GFP was detected in all tested cell types, confirming ubiquitous presence of GM1 receptors. Such low-cost oral delivery of protein drugs to sera, immune system or non-immune cells should dramatically lower their cost by elimination of prohibitively expensive fermentation, protein purification cold storage/transportation and increase patient compliance. PMID:26706477

  2. Circadian Redox Signaling in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Spoel, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Plant crops are critically important to provide quality food and bio-energy to sustain a growing human population. Circadian clocks have been shown to deliver an adaptive advantage to plants, vastly increasing biomass production by efficient anticipation to the solar cycle. Plant stress, on the other hand, whether biotic or abiotic, prevents crops from reaching maximum productivity. Recent Advances: Stress is associated with fluctuations in cellular redox and increased phytohormone signaling. Recently, direct links between circadian timekeeping, redox fluctuations, and hormone signaling have been identified. A direct implication is that circadian control of cellular redox homeostasis influences how plants negate stress to ensure growth and reproduction. Critical Issues: Complex cellular biochemistry leads from perception of stress via hormone signals and formation of reactive oxygen intermediates to a physiological response. Circadian clocks and metabolic pathways intertwine to form a confusing biochemical labyrinth. Here, we aim to find order in this complex matter by reviewing current advances in our understanding of the interface between these networks. Future Directions: Although the link is now clearly defined, at present a key question remains as to what extent the circadian clock modulates redox, and vice versa. Furthermore, the mechanistic basis by which the circadian clock gates redox- and hormone-mediated stress responses remains largely elusive. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 3024–3039. PMID:23941583

  3. Trapping the intruder - immune receptor domain fusions provide new molecular leads for improving disease resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Krattinger, Simon G; Keller, Beat

    2016-01-01

    A new study uses genomics to show that fusions of plant immune receptors and other protein domains occur in significant numbers. This finding will generate many new research hypotheses and provide new opportunities for breeding resistant plant varieties. PMID:26891689

  4. Role of plant expression systems in antibody production for passive immunization.

    PubMed

    Virdi, Vikram; Depicker, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunization is a method to achieve immediate protection against infectious agents by administering pathogen-specific antibodies. It has proven to be lifesaving for many acute infections, and it is now also used for cancer treatment. Passive immunization therapies, however, are extremely expensive because they require large amounts of specific antibodies that are produced predominantly in mammalian expression systems. The cost for manufacturing plant-made antibodies is estimated to be comparatively low since plant production systems require relatively less capital investments. In addition, they are not prone to mammalian pathogens, which also eases downstream processing along with making it a safe expression system. Moreover, some of the recent developments in transient expression have enabled rapid, cGMP (current Good Manufacturing Practices) compliant manufacturing of antibodies. Whether lower production costs will be reflected in a lower market price for purified antibodies will be known when more plant-produced antibodies come to the market. Promisingly, the current molecular techniques in the field of in planta expression have enabled high-level production of a variety of antibodies in different plant organs, like roots/tubers/fruits, leaves and seeds, of a variety of plants, like potato, tobacco, maize, rice, tomato and pea, providing a very wide range of possible plant-based passive immunization therapies. For instance, the production of antibodies in edible tissues would allow for a unique, convenient, needle-less, oral passive immunization at the gastric mucosal surface. The technological advances, together with the innate capacity of plant tissues to assemble complex antibodies, will enable carving a niche in the antibody market. This non-exhaustive review aims to shed light on the role of plants as a flexible expression system for passive immunotherapy, which we envisage to progress alongside the conventional production platforms to manufacture

  5. Fungal small RNAs suppress plant immunity by hijacking host RNA interference pathways.

    PubMed

    Weiberg, Arne; Wang, Ming; Lin, Feng-Mao; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhihong; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Huang, Hsien-Da; Jin, Hailing

    2013-10-01

    Botrytis cinerea, the causative agent of gray mold disease, is an aggressive fungal pathogen that infects more than 200 plant species. Here, we show that some B. cinerea small RNAs (Bc-sRNAs) can silence Arabidopsis and tomato genes involved in immunity. These Bc-sRNAs hijack the host RNA interference (RNAi) machinery by binding to Arabidopsis Argonaute 1 (AGO1) and selectively silencing host immunity genes. The Arabidopsis ago1 mutant exhibits reduced susceptibility to B. cinerea, and the B. cinerea dcl1 dcl2 double mutant that can no longer produce these Bc-sRNAs displays reduced pathogenicity on Arabidopsis and tomato. Thus, this fungal pathogen transfers "virulent" sRNA effectors into host plant cells to suppress host immunity and achieve infection, which demonstrates a naturally occurring cross-kingdom RNAi as an advanced virulence mechanism. PMID:24092744

  6. NIK1, a host factor specialized in antiviral defense or a novel general regulator of plant immunity?

    PubMed

    Machado, Joao P B; Brustolini, Otavio J B; Mendes, Giselle C; Santos, Anésia A; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2015-11-01

    NIK1 is a receptor-like kinase involved in plant antiviral immunity. Although NIK1 is structurally similar to the plant immune factor BAK1, which is a key regulator in plant immunity to bacterial pathogens, the NIK1-mediated defenses do not resemble BAK1 signaling cascades. The underlying mechanism for NIK1 antiviral immunity has recently been uncovered. NIK1 activation mediates the translocation of RPL10 to the nucleus, where it interacts with LIMYB to fully down-regulate translational machinery genes, resulting in translation inhibition of host and viral mRNAs and enhanced tolerance to begomovirus. Therefore, the NIK1 antiviral immunity response culminates in global translation suppression, which represents a new paradigm for plant antiviral defenses. Interestingly, transcriptomic analyses in nik1 mutant suggest that NIK1 may suppress antibacterial immune responses, indicating a possible opposite effect of NIK1 in bacterial and viral infections. PMID:26335701

  7. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Induces Stronger Plant Immunity than Salmonella enterica Typhimurium SL1344

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debanjana; Panchal, Shweta; Rosa, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of fresh produce contaminated with bacterial human pathogens has resulted in various, sometimes deadly, disease outbreaks. In this study, we assessed plant defense responses induced by the fully pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 in both Arabidopsis thaliana and lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Unlike SL1344, O157:H7 induced strong plant immunity at both pre-invasion and post-invasion steps of infection. For instance, O157:H7 triggered stomatal closure even under high relative humidity (RH); an environmental condition that generally weakens plant defenses against bacteria in the field and laboratory conditions. SL1344 instead induced a transient stomatal immunity. We also observed that PR1 gene expression was significantly higher in Arabidopsis leaves infected with O157:H7 as compared to SL1344. These results suggest that plants may recognize and respond to some human pathogens more effectively than others. Furthermore, stomatal immunity can diminish the penetration of human pathogens through the leaf epidermis resulting in low bacterial titers in the plant apoplast suggesting that additional control measures can be employed to prevent food contamination. The understanding of how plant responses can diminish bacterial contamination is paramount in preventing outbreaks and improving the safety of food supplies. PMID:23301812

  8. Light acclimation, retrograde signalling, cell death and immune defences in plants.

    PubMed

    Karpiński, Stanisław; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wituszyńska, Weronika; Burdiak, Paweł

    2013-04-01

    This review confronts the classical view of plant immune defence and light acclimation with recently published data. Earlier findings have linked plant immune defences to nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-dependent recognition of pathogen effectors and to the role of plasma membrane-localized NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase (AtRbohD), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA). However, recent results suggest that plant immune defence also depends on the absorption of excessive light energy and photorespiration. Rapid changes in light intensity and quality often cause the absorption of energy, which is in excess of that required for photosynthesis. Such excessive light energy is considered to be a factor triggering photoinhibition and disturbance in ROS/hormonal homeostasis, which leads to cell death in foliar tissues. We highlight here the tight crosstalk between ROS- and SA-dependent pathways leading to light acclimation, and defence responses leading to pathogen resistance. We also show that LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1) regulates and integrates these processes. Moreover, we discuss the role of plastid-nucleus signal transduction, photorespiration, photoelectrochemical signalling and 'light memory' in the regulation of acclimation and immune defence responses. All of these results suggest that plants have evolved a genetic system that simultaneously regulates systemic acquired resistance (SAR), cell death and systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). PMID:23046215

  9. Structural basis of pathogen recognition by an integrated HMA domain in a plant NLR immune receptor

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, A; Saitoh, H; Franceschetti, M; Stevenson, CEM; Uemura, A; Kanzaki, H; Kamoun, S; Terauchi, R; Banfield, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved intracellular immune receptors to detect pathogen proteins known as effectors. How these immune receptors detect effectors remains poorly understood. Here we describe the structural basis for direct recognition of AVR-Pik, an effector from the rice blast pathogen, by the rice intracellular NLR immune receptor Pik. AVR-PikD binds a dimer of the Pikp-1 HMA integrated domain with nanomolar affinity. The crystal structure of the Pikp-HMA/AVR-PikD complex enabled design of mutations to alter protein interaction in yeast and in vitro, and perturb effector-mediated response both in a rice cultivar containing Pikp and upon expression of AVR-PikD and Pikp in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. These data reveal the molecular details of a recognition event, mediated by a novel integrated domain in an NLR, which initiates a plant immune response and resistance to rice blast disease. Such studies underpin novel opportunities for engineering disease resistance to plant pathogens in staple food crops. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08709.001 PMID:26304198

  10. Synthesis of the Caeliferins, elicitors of plant immune responses: accessing Lipophilic natural products via cross metathesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report a cross metathesis- (CM-) based syn-thesis of the caeliferins, a family of sulfooxy fatty acids that elicit plant immune responses. Unexpectedly, detailed NMR-spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analyses of CM reaction mixtures revealed extensive isomerization and homologation of starting...

  11. Scavenging iron: a novel mechanism of plant immunity activation by microbial siderophores.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-04-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H₂O₂ staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity. PMID:24501001

  12. Scavenging Iron: A Novel Mechanism of Plant Immunity Activation by Microbial Siderophores1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W.G.; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-01-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H2O2 staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity. PMID:24501001

  13. Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Christopher A; Jong, Elaine C

    2016-03-01

    Vaccinations are a cornerstone of the pretravel consultation. The pretravel provider should assess a traveler's past medical history, planned itinerary, activities, mode of travel, and duration of stay and make appropriate vaccine recommendations. Given that domestic vaccine-preventable illnesses are more common in international travelers than are exotic or low-income nation-associated vaccine-preventable illnesses, clinicians should first ensure that travelers are current regarding routine immunizations. Additional immunizations may be indicated in some travelers. Familiarity with geographic distribution and seasonality of infectious diseases is essential. Clinicians should be cognizant of which vaccines are live, as there exist contraindications for live vaccines. PMID:26900111

  14. Cross-Regulation between N Metabolism and Nitric Oxide (NO) Signaling during Plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Thalineau, Elise; Truong, Hoai-Nam; Berger, Antoine; Fournier, Carine; Boscari, Alexandre; Wendehenne, David; Jeandroz, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that have evolved a complex immune system which helps them cope with pathogen attacks. However, the capacity of a plant to mobilize different defense responses is strongly affected by its physiological status. Nitrogen (N) is a major nutrient that can play an important role in plant immunity by increasing or decreasing plant resistance to pathogens. Although no general rule can be drawn about the effect of N availability and quality on the fate of plant/pathogen interactions, plants' capacity to acquire, assimilate, allocate N, and maintain amino acid homeostasis appears to partly mediate the effects of N on plant defense. Nitric oxide (NO), one of the products of N metabolism, plays an important role in plant immunity signaling. NO is generated in part through Nitrate Reductase (NR), a key enzyme involved in nitrate assimilation, and its production depends on levels of nitrate/nitrite, NR substrate/product, as well as on L-arginine and polyamine levels. Cross-regulation between NO signaling and N supply/metabolism has been evidenced. NO production can be affected by N supply, and conversely NO appears to regulate nitrate transport and assimilation. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that N availability partly controls plant resistance to pathogens by controlling NO homeostasis. Using the Medicago truncatula/Aphanomyces euteiches pathosystem, we showed that NO homeostasis is important for resistance to this oomycete and that N availability impacts NO homeostasis by affecting S-nitrosothiol (SNO) levels and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase activity in roots. These results could therefore explain the increased resistance we noted in N-deprived as compared to N-replete M. truncatula seedlings. They open onto new perspectives for the studies of N/plant defense interactions. PMID:27092169

  15. NIK1-mediated translation suppression functions as a plant antiviral immunity mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zorzatto, Cristiane; Machado, João Paulo B.; Lopes, Kênia V. G.; Nascimento, Kelly J. T.; Pereira, Welison A.; Brustolini, Otávio J. B.; Reis, Pedro A. B.; Calil, Iara P.; Deguchi, Michihito; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto; Gouveia, Bianca C.; Loriato, Virgílio A. P.; Silva, Marcos A. C.; Silva, Fabyano F.; Santos, Anésia A.; Chory, Joanne; Fontes, Elizabeth P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Plants and plant pathogens are subject to continuous co-evolutionary pressure for dominance, and the outcomes of these interactions can substantially impact agriculture and food security1–3. In virus– plant interactions, one of the major mechanisms for plant antiviral immunity relies on RNA silencing, which is often suppressed by co-evolving virus suppressors, thus enhancing viral pathogenicity in susceptible hosts1. In addition, plants use the nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) domain-containing resistance proteins, which recognize viral effectors to activate effector-triggered immunity in a defence mechanism similar to that employed in non-viral infections2,3. Unlike most eukaryotic organisms, plants are not known to activate mechanisms of host global translation suppression to fight viruses1,2. Here we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that the constitutive activation of NIK1, a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK) identified as a virulence target of the begomovirus nuclear shuttle protein (NSP)4–6, leads to global translation suppression and translocation of the downstream component RPL10 to the nucleus, where it interacts with a newly identified MYB-like protein, L10-INTERACTING MYB DOMAIN-CONTAINING PROTEIN (LIMYB), to downregulate translational machinery genes fully. LIMYB overexpression represses ribosomal protein genes at the transcriptional level, resulting in protein synthesis inhibition, decreased viral messenger RNA association with polysome fractions and enhanced tolerance to begomovirus. By contrast, the loss of LIMYB function releases the repression of translation-related genes and increases susceptibility to virus infection. Therefore, LIMYB links immune receptor LRR-RLK activation to global translation suppression as an antiviral immunity strategy in plants. PMID:25707794

  16. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  17. Cross-Regulation between N Metabolism and Nitric Oxide (NO) Signaling during Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Thalineau, Elise; Truong, Hoai-Nam; Berger, Antoine; Fournier, Carine; Boscari, Alexandre; Wendehenne, David; Jeandroz, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that have evolved a complex immune system which helps them cope with pathogen attacks. However, the capacity of a plant to mobilize different defense responses is strongly affected by its physiological status. Nitrogen (N) is a major nutrient that can play an important role in plant immunity by increasing or decreasing plant resistance to pathogens. Although no general rule can be drawn about the effect of N availability and quality on the fate of plant/pathogen interactions, plants’ capacity to acquire, assimilate, allocate N, and maintain amino acid homeostasis appears to partly mediate the effects of N on plant defense. Nitric oxide (NO), one of the products of N metabolism, plays an important role in plant immunity signaling. NO is generated in part through Nitrate Reductase (NR), a key enzyme involved in nitrate assimilation, and its production depends on levels of nitrate/nitrite, NR substrate/product, as well as on L-arginine and polyamine levels. Cross-regulation between NO signaling and N supply/metabolism has been evidenced. NO production can be affected by N supply, and conversely NO appears to regulate nitrate transport and assimilation. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that N availability partly controls plant resistance to pathogens by controlling NO homeostasis. Using the Medicago truncatula/Aphanomyces euteiches pathosystem, we showed that NO homeostasis is important for resistance to this oomycete and that N availability impacts NO homeostasis by affecting S-nitrosothiol (SNO) levels and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase activity in roots. These results could therefore explain the increased resistance we noted in N-deprived as compared to N-replete M. truncatula seedlings. They open onto new perspectives for the studies of N/plant defense interactions. PMID:27092169

  18. Chitosan nanoparticles: A positive modulator of innate immune responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Swarnendu; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Dasgupta, Adhiraj; Sarkar, Joy; Panda, Koustubh; Acharya, Krishnendu

    2015-01-01

    The immunomodulatory role of the natural biopolymer, chitosan, has already been demonstrated in plants, whilst its nanoparticles have only been examined for biomedical applications. In our present study, we have investigated the possible ability and mechanism of chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) to induce and augment immune responses in plants. CNP-treatment of leaves produced significant improvement in the plant's innate immune response through induction of defense enzyme activity, upregulation of defense related genes including that of several antioxidant enzymes as well as elevation of the levels of total phenolics. It is also possible that the extracellular localization of CNP may also play a role in the observed upregulation of defense response in plants. Nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule in plant defense, was also observed to increase following CNP treatment. However, such CNP-mediated immuno-stimulation was significantly mitigated when NO production was inhibited, indicating a possible role of NO in such immune induction. Taken together, our results suggest that CNP may be used as a more effective phytosanitary or disease control agent compared to natural chitosan for sustainable organic cultivation. PMID:26471771

  19. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang-Jin; Seo, Young-Su

    2015-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) functioning as molecular chaperones are the key components responsible for protein folding, assembly, translocation, and degradation under stress conditions and in many normal cellular processes. Plants respond to pathogen invasion using two different innate immune responses mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) or resistance (R) proteins. HSPs play an indispensable role as molecular chaperones in the quality control of plasma membrane-resident PRRs and intracellular R proteins against potential invaders. Here, we specifically discuss the functional involvement of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) HSPs/chaperones in plant immunity to obtain an integrated understanding of the immune responses in plant cells. PMID:26676169

  20. Self/nonself perception in plants in innate immunity and defense

    PubMed Central

    Sanabria, Natasha M; Huang, Ju-Chi

    2010-01-01

    The ability to distinguish ‘self’ from ‘nonself’ is the most fundamental aspect of any immune system. The evolutionary solution in plants to the problems of perceiving and responding to pathogens involves surveillance of nonself, damaged-self and altered-self as danger signals. This is reflected in basal resistance or non-host resistance, which is the innate immune response that protects plants against the majority of pathogens. In the case of surveillance of nonself, plants utilize receptor-like proteins or -kinases (RLP/Ks) as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which can detect conserved pathogen/microbe-associated molecular pattern (P/MAMP) molecules. P/MAMP detection serves as an early warning system for the presence of a wide range of potential pathogens and the timely activation of plant defense mechanisms. However, adapted microbes express a suite of effector proteins that often interfere or act as suppressors of these defenses. In response, plants have evolved a second line of defense that includes intracellular nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR)-containing resistance proteins, which recognize isolate-specific pathogen effectors once the cell wall has been compromised. This host-immunity acts within the species level and is controlled by polymorphic host genes, where resistance protein-mediated activation of defense is based on an ‘altered-self’ recognition mechanism. PMID:21559176

  1. Assessment of Some Immune Parameters in Occupationally Exposed Nuclear Power Plant Workers

    PubMed Central

    Penkova, Kalina Ivanova; Rupova, Ivanka Tankova; Panova, Delyana Yonkova; Djounova, Jana Nikolaeva

    2015-01-01

    A 10-year survey of immune status of nuclear power plant (NPP) workers was assessed by cellular and humoral immune parameters. The cumulative doses of NPP workers were in the range of 0.06 to 766.36 mSv. The results did not show significant deviations in the studied parameters of cellular and humoral immunity, but a tendency of elevated values in CD3+4+ helper inducers cells, especially its CD4+62L+ subpopulation, regulatory CD4+25+ cells, CD8+28+ cytotoxic subpopulation, and immunoglobulin M, was established. The observed trend of the above-mentioned parameters could be interpreted by assumption that while the adaptation processes are dominated with low prevalence of T-helper (Th) 1 immune response to cumulative doses less than 100 mSv, a switch to Th-2 response occurred at doses above 100 mSv. The impact of a number of other confounding factors on the immune system does not allow definitive conclusions about the direct radiation-induced changes in immune parameters. PMID:26740807

  2. High levels of cyclic-di-GMP in plant-associated Pseudomonas correlate with evasion of plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Pfeilmeier, Sebastian; Saur, Isabel Marie-Luise; Rathjen, John Paul; Zipfel, Cyril; Malone, Jacob George

    2016-05-01

    The plant innate immune system employs plasma membrane-localized receptors that specifically perceive pathogen/microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs). This induces a defence response called pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) to fend off pathogen attack. Commensal bacteria are also exposed to potential immune recognition and must employ strategies to evade and/or suppress PTI to successfully colonize the plant. During plant infection, the flagellum has an ambiguous role, acting as both a virulence factor and also as a potent immunogen as a result of the recognition of its main building block, flagellin, by the plant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2). Therefore, strict control of flagella synthesis is especially important for plant-associated bacteria. Here, we show that cyclic-di-GMP [bis-(3'-5')-cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate], a central regulator of bacterial lifestyle, is involved in the evasion of PTI. Elevated cyclic-di-GMP levels in the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000, the opportunist P. aeruginosa PAO1 and the commensal P. protegens Pf-5 inhibit flagellin synthesis and help the bacteria to evade FLS2-mediated signalling in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana. Despite this, high cellular cyclic-di-GMP concentrations were shown to drastically reduce the virulence of Pto DC3000 during plant infection. We propose that this is a result of reduced flagellar motility and/or additional pleiotropic effects of cyclic-di-GMP signalling on bacterial behaviour. PMID:26202381

  3. Plant immunity triggered by engineered in vivo release of oligogalacturonides, damage-associated molecular patterns.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Manuel; Pontiggia, Daniela; Raggi, Sara; Cheng, Zhenyu; Scaloni, Flavio; Ferrari, Simone; Ausubel, Frederick M; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2015-04-28

    Oligogalacturonides (OGs) are fragments of pectin that activate plant innate immunity by functioning as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). We set out to test the hypothesis that OGs are generated in planta by partial inhibition of pathogen-encoded polygalacturonases (PGs). A gene encoding a fungal PG was fused with a gene encoding a plant polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) and expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. We show that expression of the PGIP-PG chimera results in the in vivo production of OGs that can be detected by mass spectrometric analysis. Transgenic plants expressing the chimera under control of a pathogen-inducible promoter are more resistant to the phytopathogens Botrytis cinerea, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Pseudomonas syringae. These data provide strong evidence for the hypothesis that OGs released in vivo act as a DAMP signal to trigger plant immunity and suggest that controlled release of these molecules upon infection may be a valuable tool to protect plants against infectious diseases. On the other hand, elevated levels of expression of the chimera cause the accumulation of salicylic acid, reduced growth, and eventually lead to plant death, consistent with the current notion that trade-off occurs between growth and defense. PMID:25870275

  4. Plant immunity triggered by engineered in vivo release of oligogalacturonides, damage-associated molecular patterns

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Manuel; Pontiggia, Daniela; Raggi, Sara; Cheng, Zhenyu; Scaloni, Flavio; Ferrari, Simone; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides (OGs) are fragments of pectin that activate plant innate immunity by functioning as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). We set out to test the hypothesis that OGs are generated in planta by partial inhibition of pathogen-encoded polygalacturonases (PGs). A gene encoding a fungal PG was fused with a gene encoding a plant polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) and expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. We show that expression of the PGIP–PG chimera results in the in vivo production of OGs that can be detected by mass spectrometric analysis. Transgenic plants expressing the chimera under control of a pathogen-inducible promoter are more resistant to the phytopathogens Botrytis cinerea, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Pseudomonas syringae. These data provide strong evidence for the hypothesis that OGs released in vivo act as a DAMP signal to trigger plant immunity and suggest that controlled release of these molecules upon infection may be a valuable tool to protect plants against infectious diseases. On the other hand, elevated levels of expression of the chimera cause the accumulation of salicylic acid, reduced growth, and eventually lead to plant death, consistent with the current notion that trade-off occurs between growth and defense. PMID:25870275

  5. Phytophthora infestans effector AVRblb2 prevents secretion of a plant immune protease at the haustorial interface

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Schornack, Sebastian; Win, Joe; Shindo, Takayuki; Ilyas, Muhammad; Oliva, Ricardo; Cano, Liliana M.; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Huitema, Edgar; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2011-01-01

    In response to pathogen attack, plant cells secrete antimicrobial molecules at the site of infection. However, how plant pathogens interfere with defense-related focal secretion remains poorly known. Here we show that the host-translocated RXLR-type effector protein AVRblb2 of the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans focally accumulates around haustoria, specialized infection structures that form inside plant cells, and promotes virulence by interfering with the execution of host defenses. AVRblb2 significantly enhances susceptibility of host plants to P. infestans by targeting the host papain-like cysteine protease C14 and specifically preventing its secretion into the apoplast. Plants altered in C14 expression were significantly affected in susceptibility to P. infestans in a manner consistent with a positive role of C14 in plant immunity. Our findings point to a unique counterdefense strategy that plant pathogens use to neutralize secreted host defense proteases. Effectors, such as AVRblb2, can be used as molecular probes to dissect focal immune responses at pathogen penetration sites. PMID:22143776

  6. Regulation of plant immunity through modulation of phytoalexin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zernova, Olga V; Lygin, Anatoli V; Pawlowski, Michelle L; Hill, Curtis B; Hartman, Glen L; Widholm, Jack M; Lozovaya, Vera V

    2014-01-01

    Soybean hairy roots transformed with the resveratrol synthase and resveratrol oxymethyl transferase genes driven by constitutive Arabidopsis actin and CsVMV promoters were characterized. Transformed hairy roots accumulated glycoside conjugates of the stilbenic compound resveratrol and the related compound pterostilbene, which are normally not synthesized by soybean plants. Expression of the non-native stilbenic phytoalexin synthesis in soybean hairy roots increased their resistance to the soybean pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. The expression of the AhRS3 gene resulted in 20% to 50% decreased root necrosis compared to that of untransformed hairy roots. The expression of two genes, the AhRS3 and ROMT, required for pterostilbene synthesis in soybean, resulted in significantly lower root necrosis (ranging from 0% to 7%) in transgenic roots than in untransformed hairy roots that had about 84% necrosis. Overexpression of the soybean prenyltransferase (dimethylallyltransferase) G4DT gene in soybean hairy roots increased accumulation of the native phytoalexin glyceollin resulting in decreased root necrosis. PMID:24914895

  7. Chitosan nanoparticles: A positive modulator of innate immune responses in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Swarnendu; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Dasgupta, Adhiraj; Sarkar, Joy; Panda, Koustubh; Acharya, Krishnendu

    2015-10-01

    The immunomodulatory role of the natural biopolymer, chitosan, has already been demonstrated in plants, whilst its nanoparticles have only been examined for biomedical applications. In our present study, we have investigated the possible ability and mechanism of chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) to induce and augment immune responses in plants. CNP-treatment of leaves produced significant improvement in the plant’s innate immune response through induction of defense enzyme activity, upregulation of defense related genes including that of several antioxidant enzymes as well as elevation of the levels of total phenolics. It is also possible that the extracellular localization of CNP may also play a role in the observed upregulation of defense response in plants. Nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule in plant defense, was also observed to increase following CNP treatment. However, such CNP-mediated immuno-stimulation was significantly mitigated when NO production was inhibited, indicating a possible role of NO in such immune induction. Taken together, our results suggest that CNP may be used as a more effective phytosanitary or disease control agent compared to natural chitosan for sustainable organic cultivation.

  8. Chitosan nanoparticles: A positive modulator of innate immune responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Swarnendu; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Dasgupta, Adhiraj; Sarkar, Joy; Panda, Koustubh; Acharya, Krishnendu

    2015-01-01

    The immunomodulatory role of the natural biopolymer, chitosan, has already been demonstrated in plants, whilst its nanoparticles have only been examined for biomedical applications. In our present study, we have investigated the possible ability and mechanism of chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) to induce and augment immune responses in plants. CNP-treatment of leaves produced significant improvement in the plant’s innate immune response through induction of defense enzyme activity, upregulation of defense related genes including that of several antioxidant enzymes as well as elevation of the levels of total phenolics. It is also possible that the extracellular localization of CNP may also play a role in the observed upregulation of defense response in plants. Nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule in plant defense, was also observed to increase following CNP treatment. However, such CNP-mediated immuno-stimulation was significantly mitigated when NO production was inhibited, indicating a possible role of NO in such immune induction. Taken together, our results suggest that CNP may be used as a more effective phytosanitary or disease control agent compared to natural chitosan for sustainable organic cultivation. PMID:26471771

  9. Ternary WD40 Repeat-Containing Protein Complexes: Evolution, Composition and Roles in Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jimi C.; Chezem, William R.; Clay, Nicole K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants, like mammals, rely on their innate immune system to perceive and discriminate among the majority of their microbial pathogens. Unlike mammals, plants respond to this molecular dialog by unleashing a complex chemical arsenal of defense metabolites to resist or evade pathogen infection. In basal or non-host resistance, plants utilize signal transduction pathways to detect “non-self,” “damaged-self,” and “altered-self”- associated molecular patterns and translate these “danger” signals into largely inducible chemical defenses. The WD40 repeat (WDR)-containing proteins Gβ and TTG1 are constituents of two independent ternary protein complexes functioning at opposite ends of a plant immune signaling pathway. They are also encoded by single-copy genes that are ubiquitous in higher plants, implying the limited diversity and functional conservation of their respective complexes. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about the evolutionary history of these WDR-containing ternary complexes, their repertoire and combinatorial interactions, and their downstream effectors and pathways in plant defense. PMID:26779203

  10. Interaction between viral RNA silencing suppressors and host factors in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Kenji S; Masuta, Chikara

    2014-08-01

    To elucidate events in the molecular arms race between the host and pathogen in evaluating plant immunity, a zigzag model is useful for uncovering aspects common to different host-pathogen interactions. By analogy of the steps in virus-host interactions with the steps in the standard zigzag model outlined in recent papers, we may regard RNA silencing as pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) against viruses, RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) as effectors to overcome host RNA silencing and resistance gene (R-gene)-mediated defense as effector-triggered immunity (ETI) recognizing RSSs as avirulence proteins. However, because the standard zigzag model does not fully apply to some unique aspects in the interactions between a plant host and virus, we here defined a model especially designed for viruses. Although we simplified the phenomena involved in the virus-host interactions in the model, certain specific interactive steps can be explained by integrating additional host factors into the model. These host factors are thought to play an important role in maintaining the efficacy of the various steps in the main pathway of defense against viruses in this model for virus-plant interactions. For example, we propose candidates that may interact with viral RSSs to induce the resistance response. PMID:24875766

  11. Role of stomata in plant innate immunity and foliar bacterial diseases.

    PubMed

    Melotto, Maeli; Underwood, William; He, Sheng Yang

    2008-01-01

    Pathogen entry into host tissue is a critical first step in causing infection. For foliar bacterial plant pathogens, natural surface openings, such as stomata, are important entry sites. Historically, these surface openings have been considered as passive portals of entry for plant pathogenic bacteria. However, recent studies have shown that stomata can play an active role in limiting bacterial invasion as part of the plant innate immune system. As a counter-defense, the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 uses the virulence factor coronatine to actively open stomata. In nature, many foliar bacterial disease outbreaks require high humidity, rain, or storms, which could favor stomatal opening and/or bypass stomatal defense by creating wounds as alternative entry sites. Further studies on microbial and environmental regulation of stomatal closure and opening could fill gaps in our understanding of bacterial pathogenesis, disease epidemiology, and microbiology of the phyllosphere. PMID:18422426

  12. Immune modulation enables a specialist insect to benefit from antibacterial withanolides in its host plant

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Andrea; Vogel, Heiko; Pauchet, Yannick; Pauls, Gerhard; Kunert, Grit; Groot, Astrid T.; Boland, Wilhelm; Heckel, David G.; Heidel-Fischer, Hanna M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel plant chemical defenses and counter adaptations by herbivorous insect could continually drive speciation, producing more insect specialists than generalists. One approach to test this hypothesis is to compare closely related generalist and specialist species to reveal the associated costs and benefits of these different adaptive strategies. We use the specialized moth Heliothis subflexa, which feeds exclusively on plants in the genus Physalis, and its close generalist relative H. virescens. Specialization on Physalis plants necessitates the ability to tolerate withanolides, the secondary metabolites of Physalis species that are known to have feeding deterrent and immune inhibiting properties for other insects. Here we find that only H. subflexa benefits from the antibacterial properties of withanolides, and thereby gains a higher tolerance of the pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis. We argue that the specialization in H. subflexa has been guided to a large extent by a unique role of plant chemistry on ecological immunology. PMID:27561781

  13. Immune modulation enables a specialist insect to benefit from antibacterial withanolides in its host plant.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Andrea; Vogel, Heiko; Pauchet, Yannick; Pauls, Gerhard; Kunert, Grit; Groot, Astrid T; Boland, Wilhelm; Heckel, David G; Heidel-Fischer, Hanna M

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel plant chemical defenses and counter adaptations by herbivorous insect could continually drive speciation, producing more insect specialists than generalists. One approach to test this hypothesis is to compare closely related generalist and specialist species to reveal the associated costs and benefits of these different adaptive strategies. We use the specialized moth Heliothis subflexa, which feeds exclusively on plants in the genus Physalis, and its close generalist relative H. virescens. Specialization on Physalis plants necessitates the ability to tolerate withanolides, the secondary metabolites of Physalis species that are known to have feeding deterrent and immune inhibiting properties for other insects. Here we find that only H. subflexa benefits from the antibacterial properties of withanolides, and thereby gains a higher tolerance of the pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis. We argue that the specialization in H. subflexa has been guided to a large extent by a unique role of plant chemistry on ecological immunology. PMID:27561781

  14. Next-Generation Genetics in Plants: Evolutionary Trade-off, Immunity and Speciation (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Wiegel, Detlef

    2011-04-25

    Detlef Wiegel from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology on "Next-generation genetics in plants: Evolutionary tradeoffs, immunity and speciation" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  15. Next-Generation Genetics in Plants: Evolutionary Trade-off, Immunity and Speciation (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, Detlef

    2010-03-25

    Detlef Wiegel from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology on "Next-generation genetics in plants: Evolutionary tradeoffs, immunity and speciation" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  16. Plant Hormone Salicylic Acid Produced by a Malaria Parasite Controls Host Immunity and Cerebral Malaria Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Ryuma; Aonuma, Hiroka; Kojima, Mikiko; Tahara, Michiru; Andrabi, Syed Bilal Ahmad; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Nagamune, Kisaburo

    2015-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii produces the plant hormone abscisic acid, but it is unclear if phytohormones are produced by the malaria parasite Plasmodium spp., the most important parasite of this phylum. Here, we report detection of salicylic acid, an immune-related phytohormone of land plants, in P. berghei ANKA and T. gondii cell lysates. However, addition of salicylic acid to P. falciparum and T. gondii culture had no effect. We transfected P. falciparum 3D7 with the nahG gene, which encodes a salicylic acid-degrading enzyme isolated from plant-infecting Pseudomonas sp., and established a salicylic acid-deficient mutant. The mutant had a significantly decreased concentration of parasite-synthesized prostaglandin E2, which potentially modulates host immunity as an adaptive evolution of Plasmodium spp. To investigate the function of salicylic acid and prostaglandin E2 on host immunity, we established P. berghei ANKA mutants expressing nahG. C57BL/6 mice infected with nahG transfectants developed enhanced cerebral malaria, as assessed by Evans blue leakage and brain histological observation. The nahG-transfectant also significantly increased the mortality rate of mice. Prostaglandin E2 reduced the brain symptoms by induction of T helper-2 cytokines. As expected, T helper-1 cytokines including interferon-γ and interleukin-2 were significantly elevated by infection with the nahG transfectant. Thus, salicylic acid of Plasmodium spp. may be a new pathogenic factor of this threatening parasite and may modulate immune function via parasite-produced prostaglandin E2. PMID:26466097

  17. A Vavilovian approach to discovering crop-associated microbes with potential to enhance plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Iago L.; Broders, Kirk; Iriarte, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Through active associations with a diverse community of largely non-pathogenic microbes, a plant may be thought of as possessing an “extended genotype,” an interactive cross-organismal genome with potential, exploitable implications for plant immunity. The successful enrichment of plant microbiomes with beneficial species has led to numerous commercial applications, and the hunt for new biocontrol organisms continues. Increasingly flexible and affordable sequencing technologies, supported by increasingly comprehensive taxonomic databases, make the characterization of non-model crop-associated microbiomes a widely accessible research method toward this end; and such studies are becoming more frequent. A summary of this emerging literature reveals, however, the need for a more systematic research lens in the face of what is already a metagenomics data deluge. Considering the processes and consequences of crop evolution and domestication, we assert that the judicious integration of in situ crop wild relatives into phytobiome research efforts presents a singularly powerful tool for separating signal from noise, thereby facilitating a more efficient means of identifying candidate plant-associated microbes with the potential for enhancing the immunity and fitness of crop species. PMID:25278956

  18. WRKY Transcription Factors Phosphorylated by MAPK Regulate a Plant Immune NADPH Oxidase in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Nakano, Takaaki; Miyagawa, Noriko; Ishihama, Nobuaki; Yoshioka, Miki; Katou, Yuri; Yaeno, Takashi; Shirasu, Ken; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2015-09-01

    Pathogen attack sequentially confers pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) after sensing of pathogen patterns and effectors by plant immune receptors, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play pivotal roles in PTI and ETI as signaling molecules. Nicotiana benthamiana RBOHB, an NADPH oxidase, is responsible for both the transient PTI ROS burst and the robust ETI ROS burst. Here, we show that RBOHB transactivation mediated by MAPK contributes to R3a/AVR3a-triggered ETI (AVR3a-ETI) ROS burst. RBOHB is markedly induced during the ETI and INF1-triggered PTI (INF1-PTI), but not flg22-tiggered PTI (flg22-PTI). We found that the RBOHB promoter contains a functional W-box in the R3a/AVR3a and INF1 signal-responsive cis-element. Ectopic expression of four phospho-mimicking mutants of WRKY transcription factors, which are MAPK substrates, induced RBOHB, and yeast one-hybrid analysis indicated that these mutants bind to the cis-element. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated direct binding of the WRKY to the cis-element in plants. Silencing of multiple WRKY genes compromised the upregulation of RBOHB, resulting in impairment of AVR3a-ETI and INF1-PTI ROS bursts, but not the flg22-PTI ROS burst. These results suggest that the MAPK-WRKY pathway is required for AVR3a-ETI and INF1-PTI ROS bursts by activation of RBOHB. PMID:26373453

  19. ESCRT-I Mediates FLS2 Endosomal Sorting and Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Spallek, Thomas; Beck, Martina; Ben Khaled, Sara; Salomon, Susanne; Bourdais, Gildas; Schellmann, Swen; Robatzek, Silke

    2013-01-01

    The plant immune receptor FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) is present at the plasma membrane and is internalized following activation of its ligand flagellin (flg22). We show that ENDOSOMAL SORTING COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT)-I subunits play roles in FLS2 endocytosis in Arabidopsis. VPS37-1 co-localizes with FLS2 at endosomes and immunoprecipitates with the receptor upon flg22 elicitation. Vps37-1 mutants are reduced in flg22-induced FLS2 endosomes but not in endosomes labeled by Rab5 GTPases suggesting a defect in FLS2 trafficking rather than formation of endosomes. FLS2 localizes to the lumen of multivesicular bodies, but this is altered in vps37-1 mutants indicating compromised endosomal sorting of FLS2 by ESCRT-I loss-of-function. VPS37-1 and VPS28-2 are critical for immunity against bacterial infection through a role in stomatal closure. Our findings identify that VPS37-1, and likewise VPS28-2, regulate late FLS2 endosomal sorting and reveals that ESCRT-I is critical for flg22-activated stomatal defenses involved in plant immunity. PMID:24385929

  20. Photosynthetic light reactions--an adjustable hub in basic production and plant immunity signaling.

    PubMed

    Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Tikkanen, Mikko; Durian, Guido; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-08-01

    Photosynthetic efficiency is a key trait that influences the sustainable utilization of plants for energy and nutrition. By now, extensive research on photosynthetic processes has underscored important structural and functional relationships among photosynthetic thylakoid membrane protein complexes, and their roles in determining the productivity and stress resistance of plants. Photosystem II photoinhibition-repair cycle, for example, has arisen vital in protecting also Photosystem I against light-induced damage. Availability of highly sophisticated genetic, biochemical and biophysical tools has greatly expanded the catalog of components that carry out photoprotective functions in plants. On thylakoid membranes, these components encompass a network of overlapping systems that allow delicate regulation of linear and cyclic electron transfer pathways, balancing of excitation energy distribution between the two photosystems and dissipation of excess light energy in the antenna system as heat. An increasing number of reports indicate that the above mentioned mechanisms also mediate important functions in the regulation of biotic stress responses in plants. Particularly the handling of excitation energy in the light harvesting II antenna complexes appears central to plant immunity signaling. Comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms and regulatory cross-talk, however, still remain elusive. This review highlights the current understanding of components that regulate the function of photosynthetic light reactions and directly or indirectly also modulate disease resistance in higher plants. PMID:24361390

  1. Sweet scents from good bacteria: Case studies on bacterial volatile compounds for plant growth and immunity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joon-hui; Song, Geun Cheol; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-04-01

    Beneficial bacteria produce diverse chemical compounds that affect the behavior of other organisms including plants. Bacterial volatile compounds (BVCs) contribute to triggering plant immunity and promoting plant growth. Previous studies investigated changes in plant physiology caused by in vitro application of the identified volatile compounds or the BVC-emitting bacteria. This review collates new information on BVC-mediated plant-bacteria airborne interactions, addresses unresolved questions about the biological relevance of BVCs, and summarizes data on recently identified BVCs that improve plant growth or protection. Recent explorations of bacterial metabolic engineering to alter BVC production using heterologous or endogenous genes are introduced. Molecular genetic approaches can expand the BVC repertoire of beneficial bacteria to target additional beneficial effects, or simply boost the production level of naturally occurring BVCs. The effects of direct BVC application in soil are reviewed and evaluated for potential large-scale field and agricultural applications. Our review of recent BVC data indicates that BVCs have great potential to serve as effective biostimulants and bioprotectants even under open-field conditions. PMID:26177913

  2. Multiple Classes of Immune-Related Proteases Associated with the Cell Death Response in Pepper Plants

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Chungyun; Kim, Su-min; Lee, Dong Ju; Choi, Doil

    2013-01-01

    Proteases regulate a large number of biological processes in plants, such as metabolism, physiology, growth, and defense. In this study, we carried out virus-induced gene silencing assays with pepper cDNA clones to elucidate the biological roles of protease superfamilies. A total of 153 representative protease genes from pepper cDNA were selected and cloned into a Tobacco rattle virus-ligation independent cloning vector in a loss-of-function study. Silencing of 61 proteases resulted in altered phenotypes, such as the inhibition of shoot growth, abnormal leaf shape, leaf color change, and lethality. Furthermore, the silencing experiments revealed that multiple proteases play a role in cell death and immune response against avirulent and virulent pathogens. Among these 153 proteases, 34 modulated the hypersensitive cell death response caused by infection with an avirulent pathogen, and 16 proteases affected disease symptom development caused by a virulent pathogen. Specifically, we provide experimental evidence for the roles of multiple protease genes in plant development and immune defense following pathogen infection. With these results, we created a broad sketch of each protease function. This information will provide basic information for further understanding the roles of the protease superfamily in plant growth, development, and defense. PMID:23696830

  3. The Arabidopsis Elongator Complex Subunit2 Epigenetically Regulates Plant Immune Responses[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongsheng; An, Chuanfu; Zhang, Xudong; Yao, Jiqiang; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Yu, Fahong; Amador, David Moraga; Mou, Zhonglin

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana Elongator complex subunit2 (ELP2) genetically interacts with NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (NPR1), a key transcription coactivator of plant immunity, and regulates the induction kinetics of defense genes. However, the mechanistic relationship between ELP2 and NPR1 and how ELP2 regulates the kinetics of defense gene induction are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that ELP2 is an epigenetic regulator required for pathogen-induced rapid transcriptome reprogramming. We show that ELP2 functions in a transcriptional feed-forward loop regulating both NPR1 and its target genes. An elp2 mutation increases the total methylcytosine number, reduces the average methylation levels of methylcytosines, and alters (increases or decreases) methylation levels of specific methylcytosines. Interestingly, infection of plants with the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000/avrRpt2 induces biphasic changes in DNA methylation levels of NPR1 and PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4), which encodes another key regulator of plant immunity. These dynamic changes are blocked by the elp2 mutation, which is correlated with delayed induction of NPR1 and PAD4. The elp2 mutation also reduces basal histone acetylation levels in the coding regions of several defense genes. Together, our data demonstrate a new role for Elongator in somatic DNA demethylation/methylation and suggest a function for Elongator-mediated chromatin regulation in pathogen-induced transcriptome reprogramming. PMID:23435660

  4. A novel elicitor protein from Phytophthora parasitica induces plant basal immunity and systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Hsuan; Yan, Hao-Zhi; Liou, Ruey-Fen

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between Phytophthora pathogens and host plants involves the exchange of complex molecular signals from both sides. Recent studies of Phytophthora have led to the identification of various apoplastic elicitors known to trigger plant immunity. Here, we provide evidence that the protein encoded by OPEL of Phytophthora parasitica is a novel elicitor. Homologues of OPEL were identified only in oomycetes, but not in fungi and other organisms. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that OPEL is expressed throughout the development of P. parasitica and is especially highly induced after plant infection. Infiltration of OPEL recombinant protein from Escherichia coli into leaves of Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Samsun NN) resulted in cell death, callose deposition, the production of reactive oxygen species and induced expression of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity markers and salicylic acid-responsive defence genes. Moreover, the infiltration conferred systemic resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, including Tobacco mosaic virus, the bacteria wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and P. parasitica. In addition to the signal peptide, OPEL contains three conserved domains: a thaumatin-like domain, a glycine-rich protein domain and a glycosyl hydrolase (GH) domain. Intriguingly, mutation of a putative laminarinase active site motif in the predicted GH domain abolished its elicitor activity, which suggests enzymatic activity of OPEL in triggering the defence response. PMID:24965864

  5. Loss of a Conserved tRNA Anticodon Modification Perturbs Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    López, Ana; Castelló, María José; Gil, María José; Zheng, Bo; Chen, Peng; Vera, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    tRNA is the most highly modified class of RNA species, and modifications are found in tRNAs from all organisms that have been examined. Despite their vastly different chemical structures and their presence in different tRNAs, occurring in different locations in tRNA, the biosynthetic pathways of the majority of tRNA modifications include a methylation step(s). Recent discoveries have revealed unprecedented complexity in the modification patterns of tRNA, their regulation and function, suggesting that each modified nucleoside in tRNA may have its own specific function. However, in plants, our knowledge on the role of individual tRNA modifications and how they are regulated is very limited. In a genetic screen designed to identify factors regulating disease resistance and activation of defenses in Arabidopsis, we identified SUPPRESSOR OF CSB3 9 (SCS9). Our results reveal SCS9 encodes a tRNA methyltransferase that mediates the 2´-O-ribose methylation of selected tRNA species in the anticodon loop. These SCS9-mediated tRNA modifications enhance during the course of infection with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000, and lack of such tRNA modification, as observed in scs9 mutants, severely compromise plant immunity against the same pathogen without affecting the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway which regulates plant immune responses. Our results support a model that gives importance to the control of certain tRNA modifications for mounting an effective immune response in Arabidopsis, and therefore expands the repertoire of molecular components essential for an efficient disease resistance response. PMID:26492405

  6. Loss of a Conserved tRNA Anticodon Modification Perturbs Plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Vicente; Gonzalez, Beatriz; López, Ana; Castelló, María José; Gil, María José; Etherington, Graham J; Zheng, Bo; Chen, Peng; Vera, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    tRNA is the most highly modified class of RNA species, and modifications are found in tRNAs from all organisms that have been examined. Despite their vastly different chemical structures and their presence in different tRNAs, occurring in different locations in tRNA, the biosynthetic pathways of the majority of tRNA modifications include a methylation step(s). Recent discoveries have revealed unprecedented complexity in the modification patterns of tRNA, their regulation and function, suggesting that each modified nucleoside in tRNA may have its own specific function. However, in plants, our knowledge on the role of individual tRNA modifications and how they are regulated is very limited. In a genetic screen designed to identify factors regulating disease resistance and activation of defenses in Arabidopsis, we identified SUPPRESSOR OF CSB3 9 (SCS9). Our results reveal SCS9 encodes a tRNA methyltransferase that mediates the 2´-O-ribose methylation of selected tRNA species in the anticodon loop. These SCS9-mediated tRNA modifications enhance during the course of infection with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000, and lack of such tRNA modification, as observed in scs9 mutants, severely compromise plant immunity against the same pathogen without affecting the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway which regulates plant immune responses. Our results support a model that gives importance to the control of certain tRNA modifications for mounting an effective immune response in Arabidopsis, and therefore expands the repertoire of molecular components essential for an efficient disease resistance response. PMID:26492405

  7. Establishing a CRISPR-Cas-like immune system conferring DNA virus resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiang; Zhang, Huawei; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yanpeng; Gao, Caixia

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) is an adaptive immune system in many archaea and bacteria that cleaves foreign DNA on the basis of sequence complementarity. Here, using the geminivirus, beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV), transient assays performed in Nicotiana benthamiana demonstrate that the sgRNA-Cas9 constructs inhibit virus accumulation and introduce mutations at the target sequences. Further, transgenic Arabidopsis and N. benthamiana plants overexpressing sgRNA-Cas9 are highly resistant to virus infection. PMID:27251395

  8. Msp40 effector of root-knot nematode manipulates plant immunity to facilitate parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Junhai; Liu, Pei; Liu, Qian; Chen, Changlong; Guo, Quanxin; Yin, Junmei; Yang, Guangsui; Jian, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) are obligate biotrophic parasites that invade plant roots and engage in prolonged and intimate relationships with their hosts. Nematode secretions, some of which have immunosuppressing activity, play essential roles in successful parasitism; however, their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the RKN-specific gene MiMsp40, cloned from Meloidogyne incognita, is expressed exclusively in subventral oesophageal gland cells and is strongly upregulated during early parasitic stages. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing MiMsp40 were more susceptible to nematode infection than were wild type plants. Conversely, the host-derived MiMsp40 RNAi suppressed nematode parasitism and/or reproduction. Moreover, overexpression of MiMsp40 in plants suppressed the deposition of callose and the expression of marker genes for bacterial elicitor elf18-triggered immunity. Transient expression of MiMsp40 prevented Bax-triggered defence-related programmed cell death. Co-agroinfiltration assays indicated that MiMsp40 also suppressed macroscopic cell death triggered by MAPK cascades or by the ETI cognate elicitors R3a/Avr3a. Together, these results demonstrate that MiMsp40 is a novel Meloidogyne-specific effector that is injected into plant cells by early parasitic stages of the nematode and that plays a role in suppressing PTI and/or ETI signals to facilitate RKN parasitism. PMID:26797310

  9. Tomato receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING 3 binds flgII-28 and activates the plant immune system.

    PubMed

    Hind, Sarah R; Strickler, Susan R; Boyle, Patrick C; Dunham, Diane M; Bao, Zhilong; O'Doherty, Inish M; Baccile, Joshua A; Hoki, Jason S; Viox, Elise G; Clarke, Christopher R; Vinatzer, Boris A; Schroeder, Frank C; Martin, Gregory B

    2016-01-01

    Plants and animals detect the presence of potential pathogens through the perception of conserved microbial patterns by cell surface receptors. Certain solanaceous plants, including tomato, potato and pepper, detect flgII-28, a region of bacterial flagellin that is distinct from that perceived by the well-characterized FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 receptor. Here we identify and characterize the receptor responsible for this recognition in tomato, called FLAGELLIN-SENSING 3. This receptor binds flgII-28 and enhances immune responses leading to a reduction in bacterial colonization of leaf tissues. Further characterization of FLS3 and its signalling pathway could provide new insights into the plant immune system and transfer of the receptor to other crop plants offers the potential of enhancing resistance to bacterial pathogens that have evolved to evade FLS2-mediated immunity. PMID:27548463

  10. Assessment of Some Immune Parameters in Occupationally Exposed Nuclear Power Plants Workers

    PubMed Central

    Panova, Delyana; Djounova, Jana; Rupova, Ivanka; Penkova, Kalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the results of a 10-year survey of the radiation effects of some immune parameters of occupationally exposed personnel from the Nuclear Power Plant “Kozloduy”, Bulgaria. 438 persons working in NPP with cumulative doses between 0.06 mSv and 766.36mSv and a control group with 65 persons were studied. Flow cytometry measurements of T, B, natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cell lymphocyte populations were performed. Data were interpreted with regard to cumulative doses, length of service and age. The average values of the studied parameters of cellular immunity were in the reference range relative to age and for most of the workers were not significantly different from the control values. Low doses of ionizing radiation showed some trends of change in the number of CD3+CD4+ helper-inducer lymphocytes, CD3+ CD8+ and NKT cell counts. The observed changes in some of the studied parameters could be interpreted in terms of adaptation processes at low doses. At doses above 100–200 mSv, compensatory mechanisms might be involved to balance deviations in lymphocyte subsets. The observed variations in some cases could not be attributed only to the radiation exposure because of the impact of a number of other exogenous and endogenous factors on the immune system. PMID:26675014

  11. Spatial and temporal regulation of biosynthesis of the plant immune signal salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-yu; Zhou, Mian; Yoo, Heejin; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L.; Spivey, Natalie Weaver; Kay, Steve A.; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) is essential for local defense and systemic acquired resistance (SAR). When plants, such as Arabidopsis, are challenged by different pathogens, an increase in SA biosynthesis generally occurs through transcriptional induction of the key synthetic enzyme isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1). However, the regulatory mechanism for this induction is poorly understood. Using a yeast one-hybrid screen, we identified two transcription factors (TFs), NTM1-LIKE 9 (NTL9) and CCA1 HIKING EXPEDITION (CHE), as activators of ICS1 during specific immune responses. NTL9 is essential for inducing ICS1 and two other SA synthesis-related genes, PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4) and ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1), in guard cells that form stomata. Stomata can quickly close upon challenge to block pathogen entry. This stomatal immunity requires ICS1 and the SA signaling pathway. In the ntl9 mutant, this response is defective and can be rescued by exogenous application of SA, indicating that NTL9-mediated SA synthesis is essential for stomatal immunity. CHE, the second identified TF, is a central circadian clock oscillator and is required not only for the daily oscillation in SA levels but also for the pathogen-induced SA synthesis in systemic tissues during SAR. CHE may also regulate ICS1 through the known transcription activators CALMODULIN BINDING PROTEIN 60g (CBP60g) and SYSTEMIC ACQUIRED RESISTANCE DEFICIENT 1 (SARD1) because induction of these TF genes is compromised in the che-2 mutant. Our study shows that SA biosynthesis is regulated by multiple TFs in a spatial and temporal manner and therefore fills a gap in the signal transduction pathway between pathogen recognition and SA production. PMID:26139525

  12. A family of conserved bacterial effectors inhibits salicylic acid-mediated basal immunity and promotes disease necrosis in plants.

    PubMed

    DebRoy, Sruti; Thilmony, Roger; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Nomura, Kinya; He, Sheng Yang

    2004-06-29

    Salicylic acid (SA)-mediated host immunity plays a central role in combating microbial pathogens in plants. Inactivation of SA-mediated immunity, therefore, would be a critical step in the evolution of a successful plant pathogen. It is known that mutations in conserved effector loci (CEL) in the plant pathogens Pseudomonas syringae (the Delta CEL mutation), Erwinia amylovora (the dspA/E mutation), and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (the wtsE mutation) exert particularly strong negative effects on bacterial virulence in their host plants by unknown mechanisms. We found that the loss of virulence in Delta CEL and dspA/E mutants was linked to their inability to suppress cell wall-based defenses and to cause normal disease necrosis in Arabidopsis and apple host plants. The Delta CEL mutant activated SA-dependent callose deposition in wild-type Arabidopsis but failed to elicit high levels of callose-associated defense in Arabidopsis plants blocked in SA accumulation or synthesis. This mutant also multiplied more aggressively in SA-deficient plants than in wild-type plants. The hopPtoM and avrE genes in the CEL of P. syringae were found to encode suppressors of this SA-dependent basal defense. The widespread conservation of the HopPtoM and AvrE families of effectors in various bacteria suggests that suppression of SA-dependent basal immunity and promotion of host cell death are important virulence strategies for bacterial infection of plants. PMID:15210989

  13. Dual Effect of the Cubic Ag3PO4 Crystal on Pseudomonas syringae Growth and Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Yeo, Byul-Ee; Park, Heonyong; Huh, Young-Duk; Kwon, Chian; Yun, Hye Sup

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that the antibacterial activity of silver phosphate crystals on Escherichia coli depends on their structure. We here show that the cubic form of silver phosphate crystal (SPC) can also be applied to inhibit the growth of a plant-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae bacterium. SPC pretreatment resulted in reduced in planta multiplication of P. syringae. Induced expression of a plant defense marker gene PR1 by SPC alone is suggestive of its additional plant immunity-stimulating activity. Since SPC can simultaneously inhibit P. syringae growth and induce plant defense responses, it might be used as a more effective plant disease-controlling agent. PMID:27147937

  14. Elongator subunit 3 positively regulates plant immunity through its histone acetyltransferase and radical S-adenosylmethionine domains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathogen infection triggers a large-scale transcriptional reprogramming in plants, and the speed of this reprogramming affects the outcome of the infection. Our understanding of this process has significantly benefited from mutants that display either delayed or accelerated defense gene induction. In our previous work we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Elongator complex subunit 2 (AtELP2) plays an important role in both basal immunity and effector-triggered immunity (ETI), and more recently showed that AtELP2 is involved in dynamic changes in histone acetylation and DNA methylation at several defense genes. However, the function of other Elongator subunits in plant immunity has not been characterized. Results In the same genetic screen used to identify Atelp2, we found another Elongator mutant, Atelp3-10, which mimics Atelp2 in that it exhibits a delay in defense gene induction following salicylic acid treatment or pathogen infection. Similarly to AtELP2, AtELP3 is required for basal immunity and ETI, but not for systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Furthermore, we demonstrate that both the histone acetyltransferase and radical S-adenosylmethionine domains of AtELP3 are essential for its function in plant immunity. Conclusion Our results indicate that the entire Elongator complex is involved in basal immunity and ETI, but not in SAR, and support that Elongator may play a role in facilitating the transcriptional induction of defense genes through alterations to their chromatin. PMID:23856002

  15. Double-stranded RNAs induce a pattern-triggered immune signaling pathway in plants.

    PubMed

    Niehl, Annette; Wyrsch, Ines; Boller, Thomas; Heinlein, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) is a plant defense response that relies on the perception of conserved microbe- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs or PAMPs, respectively). Recently, it has been recognized that PTI restricts virus infection in plants; however, the nature of the viral or infection-induced PTI elicitors and the underlying signaling pathways are still unknown. As double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) are conserved molecular patterns associated with virus replication, we applied dsRNAs or synthetic dsRNA analogs to Arabidopsis thaliana and investigated PTI responses. We show that in vitro-generated dsRNAs, dsRNAs purified from virus-infected plants and the dsRNA analog polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) induce typical PTI responses dependent on the co-receptor SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE 1 (SERK1), but independent of dicer-like (DCL) proteins in Arabidopsis. Moreover, dsRNA treatment of Arabidopsis induces SERK1-dependent antiviral resistance. Screening of Arabidopsis wild accessions demonstrates natural variability in dsRNA sensitivity. Our findings suggest that dsRNAs represent genuine PAMPs in plants, which induce a signaling cascade involving SERK1 and a specific dsRNA receptor. The dependence of dsRNA-mediated PTI on SERK1, but not on DCLs, implies that dsRNA-mediated PTI involves membrane-associated processes and operates independently of RNA silencing. dsRNA sensitivity may represent a useful trait to increase antiviral resistance in cultivated plants. PMID:27030513

  16. Burkholderia cenocepacia Lipopolysaccharide Modification and Flagellin Glycosylation Affect Virulence but Not Innate Immune Recognition in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Khodai-Kalaki, Maryam; Andrade, Angel; Fathy Mohamed, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia cenocepacia causes opportunistic infections in plants, insects, animals, and humans, suggesting that “virulence” depends on the host and its innate susceptibility to infection. We hypothesized that modifications in key bacterial molecules recognized by the innate immune system modulate host responses to B. cenocepacia. Indeed, modification of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and flagellin glycosylation attenuates B. cenocepacia infection in Arabidopsis thaliana and Galleria mellonella insect larvae. However, B. cenocepacia LPS and flagellin triggered rapid bursts of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in A. thaliana leading to activation of the PR-1 defense gene. These responses were drastically reduced in plants with fls2 (flagellin FLS2 host receptor kinase), Atnoa1 (nitric oxide-associated protein 1), and dnd1-1 (reduced production of nitric oxide) null mutations. Together, our results indicate that LPS modification and flagellin glycosylation do not affect recognition by plant receptors but are required for bacteria to establish overt infection. PMID:26045541

  17. Tight regulation of plant immune responses by combining promoter and suicide exon elements.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Tania L; Liang, Yan; Nguyen, Bao N; Staskawicz, Brian J; Loqué, Dominique; Hammond, Ming C

    2015-08-18

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is activated when plant disease resistance (R) proteins recognize the presence of pathogen effector proteins delivered into host cells. The ETI response generally encompasses a defensive 'hypersensitive response' (HR) that involves programmed cell death at the site of pathogen recognition. While many R protein and effector protein pairs are known to trigger HR, other components of the ETI signaling pathway remain elusive. Effector genes regulated by inducible promoters cause background HR due to leaky protein expression, preventing the generation of relevant transgenic plant lines. By employing the HyP5SM suicide exon, we have developed a strategy to tightly regulate effector proteins such that HR is chemically inducible and non-leaky. This alternative splicing-based gene regulation system was shown to successfully control Bs2/AvrBs2-dependent and RPP1/ATR1Δ51-dependent HR in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum, respectively. It was also used to generate viable and healthy transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that inducibly initiate HR. Beyond enabling studies on the ETI pathway, our regulatory strategy is generally applicable to reduce or eliminate undesired background expression of transgenes. PMID:26138488

  18. Plant immunity induced by COS-OGA elicitor is a cumulative process that involves salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    van Aubel, Géraldine; Cambier, Pierre; Dieu, Marc; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Plant innate immunity offers considerable opportunities for plant protection but beside flagellin and chitin, not many molecules and their receptors have been extensively characterized and very few have successfully reached the field. COS-OGA, an elicitor that combines cationic chitosan oligomers (COS) with anionic pectin oligomers (OGA), efficiently protected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) grown in greenhouse against powdery mildew (Leveillula taurica). Leaf proteomic analysis of plants sprayed with COS-OGA showed accumulation of Pathogenesis-Related proteins (PR), especially subtilisin-like proteases. qRT-PCR confirmed upregulation of PR-proteins and salicylic acid (SA)-related genes while expression of jasmonic acid/ethylene-associated genes was not modified. SA concentration and class III peroxidase activity were increased in leaves and appeared to be a cumulative process dependent on the number of sprayings with the elicitor. These results suggest a systemic acquired resistance (SAR) mechanism of action of the COS-OGA elicitor and highlight the importance of repeated applications to ensure efficient protection against disease. PMID:27095400

  19. Integration of evolutionary and desolvation energy analysis identifies functional sites in a plant immunity protein

    PubMed Central

    Casasoli, Manuela; Federici, Luca; Spinelli, Francesco; Di Matteo, Adele; Vella, Nicoletta; Scaloni, Flavio; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2009-01-01

    Plant immune responses often depend on leucine-rich repeat receptors that recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns or pathogen-specific virulence proteins, either directly or indirectly. When the recognition is direct, a molecular arms race takes place where plant receptors continually and rapidly evolve in response to virulence factor evolution. A useful model system to study ligand-receptor coevolution dynamics at the protein level is represented by the interaction between pathogen-derived polygalacturonases (PGs) and plant polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs). We have applied codon substitution models to PGIP sequences of different eudicotyledonous families to identify putative positively selected sites and then compared these sites with the propensity of protein surface residues to interact with protein partners, based on desolvation energy calculations. The 2 approaches remarkably correlated in pinpointing several residues in the concave face of the leucine-rich repeat domain. These residues were mutated into alanine and their effect on the recognition of several PGs was tested, leading to the identification of unique hotspots for the PGIP-PG interaction. The combined approach used in this work can be of general utility in cases where structural information about a pattern-recognition receptor or resistance-gene product is available. PMID:19372373

  20. Tight regulation of plant immune responses by combining promoter and suicide exon elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Tania L.; Liang, Yan; Nguyen, Bao N.; Staskawicz, Brian J.; Loqué, Dominique; Hammond, Ming C.

    2015-07-02

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is activated when plant disease resistance (R) proteins recognize the presence of pathogen effector proteins delivered into host cells. The ETI response generally encompasses a defensive ‘hypersensitive response’ (HR) that involves programmed cell death at the site of pathogen recognition. While many R protein and effector protein pairs are known to trigger HR, other components of the ETI signaling pathway remain elusive. Effector genes regulated by inducible promoters cause background HR due to leaky protein expression, preventing the generation of relevant transgenic plant lines. By employing the HyP5SM suicide exon, we have developed a strategy to tightly regulate effector proteins such that HR is chemically inducible and non-leaky. This alternative splicing-based gene regulation system was shown to successfully control Bs2/AvrBs2-dependent and RPP1/ATR1Δ51-dependent HR in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum, respectively. It was also used to generate viable and healthy transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that inducibly initiate HR. In conclusion, beyond enabling studies on the ETI pathway, our regulatory strategy is generally applicable to reduce or eliminate undesired background expression of transgenes.

  1. Tight regulation of plant immune responses by combining promoter and suicide exon elements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gonzalez, Tania L.; Liang, Yan; Nguyen, Bao N.; Staskawicz, Brian J.; Loqué, Dominique; Hammond, Ming C.

    2015-07-02

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is activated when plant disease resistance (R) proteins recognize the presence of pathogen effector proteins delivered into host cells. The ETI response generally encompasses a defensive ‘hypersensitive response’ (HR) that involves programmed cell death at the site of pathogen recognition. While many R protein and effector protein pairs are known to trigger HR, other components of the ETI signaling pathway remain elusive. Effector genes regulated by inducible promoters cause background HR due to leaky protein expression, preventing the generation of relevant transgenic plant lines. By employing the HyP5SM suicide exon, we have developed a strategy to tightlymore » regulate effector proteins such that HR is chemically inducible and non-leaky. This alternative splicing-based gene regulation system was shown to successfully control Bs2/AvrBs2-dependent and RPP1/ATR1Δ51-dependent HR in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum, respectively. It was also used to generate viable and healthy transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that inducibly initiate HR. In conclusion, beyond enabling studies on the ETI pathway, our regulatory strategy is generally applicable to reduce or eliminate undesired background expression of transgenes.« less

  2. Nitric oxide and S-nitrosoglutathione function additively during plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Yun, Byung-Wook; Skelly, Michael J; Yin, Minghui; Yu, Manda; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Lee, Sang-Uk; Hussain, Adil; Spoel, Steven H; Loake, Gary J

    2016-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as a key regulator of diverse plant cellular processes. A major route for the transfer of NO bioactivity is S-nitrosylation, the addition of an NO moiety to a protein cysteine thiol forming an S-nitrosothiol (SNO). Total cellular levels of protein S-nitrosylation are controlled predominantly by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase 1 (GSNOR1) which turns over the natural NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). In the absence of GSNOR1 function, GSNO accumulates, leading to dysregulation of total cellular S-nitrosylation. Here we show that endogenous NO accumulation in Arabidopsis, resulting from loss-of-function mutations in NO Overexpression 1 (NOX1), led to disabled Resistance (R) gene-mediated protection, basal resistance and defence against nonadapted pathogens. In nox1 plants both salicylic acid (SA) synthesis and signalling were suppressed, reducing SA-dependent defence gene expression. Significantly, expression of a GSNOR1 transgene complemented the SNO-dependent phenotypes of paraquat resistant 2-1 (par2-1) plants but not the NO-related characters of the nox1-1 line. Furthermore, atgsnor1-3 nox1-1 double mutants supported greater bacterial titres than either of the corresponding single mutants. Our findings imply that GSNO and NO, two pivotal redox signalling molecules, exhibit additive functions and, by extension, may have distinct or overlapping molecular targets during both immunity and development. PMID:26916092

  3. Tight regulation of plant immune responses by combining promoter and suicide exon elements

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tania L.; Liang, Yan; Nguyen, Bao N.; Staskawicz, Brian J.; Loqué, Dominique; Hammond, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is activated when plant disease resistance (R) proteins recognize the presence of pathogen effector proteins delivered into host cells. The ETI response generally encompasses a defensive ‘hypersensitive response’ (HR) that involves programmed cell death at the site of pathogen recognition. While many R protein and effector protein pairs are known to trigger HR, other components of the ETI signaling pathway remain elusive. Effector genes regulated by inducible promoters cause background HR due to leaky protein expression, preventing the generation of relevant transgenic plant lines. By employing the HyP5SM suicide exon, we have developed a strategy to tightly regulate effector proteins such that HR is chemically inducible and non-leaky. This alternative splicing-based gene regulation system was shown to successfully control Bs2/AvrBs2-dependent and RPP1/ATR1Δ51-dependent HR in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum, respectively. It was also used to generate viable and healthy transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that inducibly initiate HR. Beyond enabling studies on the ETI pathway, our regulatory strategy is generally applicable to reduce or eliminate undesired background expression of transgenes. PMID:26138488

  4. The GHKL ATPase MORC1 Modulates Species-Specific Plant Immunity in Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Kang, Hong-Gu; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-08-01

    The microrchidia (MORC) proteins, a subset of the GHKL ATPase superfamily, were recently described as components involved in transcriptional gene silencing and plant immunity in Arabidopsis. To assess the role of MORC1 during resistance to Phytophthora infestans in solanaceous species, we altered the expression of the corresponding MORC1 homologs in potato, tomato, and Nicotiana benthamiana. Basal resistance to P. infestans was compromised in StMORC1-silenced potato and enhanced in overexpressing lines, indicating that StMORC1 positively affects immunity. By contrast, silencing SlMORC1 expression in tomato or NbMORC1 expression in N. benthamiana enhanced basal resistance to this oomycete pathogen. In addition, silencing SlMORC1 further enhanced resistance conferred by two resistance genes in tomato. Transient expression of StMORC1 in N. benthamiana accelerated cell death induced by infestin1 (INF1), whereas SlMORC1 or NbMORC1 suppressed it. Domain-swapping and mutational analyses indicated that the C-terminal region dictates the species-specific effects of the solanaceous MORC1 proteins on INF1-induced cell death. This C-terminal region also was required for homodimerization and phosphorylation of recombinant StMORC1 and SlMORC1, and its transient expression induced spontaneous cell death in N. benthamiana. Thus, this C-terminal region likely plays important roles in both determining and modulating the biological activity of MORC1 proteins. PMID:25822715

  5. Beyond glycolysis: GAPDHs are multi-functional enzymes involved in regulation of ROS, autophagy, and plant immune responses.

    PubMed

    Henry, Elizabeth; Fung, Nicholas; Liu, Jun; Drakakaki, Georgia; Coaker, Gitta

    2015-04-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an important enzyme in energy metabolism with diverse cellular regulatory roles in vertebrates, but few reports have investigated the importance of plant GAPDH isoforms outside of their role in glycolysis. While animals possess one GAPDH isoform, plants possess multiple isoforms. In this study, cell biological and genetic approaches were used to investigate the role of GAPDHs during plant immune responses. Individual Arabidopsis GAPDH knockouts (KO lines) exhibited enhanced disease resistance phenotypes upon inoculation with the bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. KO lines exhibited accelerated programmed cell death and increased electrolyte leakage in response to effector triggered immunity. Furthermore, KO lines displayed increased basal ROS accumulation as visualized using the fluorescent probe H2DCFDA. The gapa1-2 and gapc1 KOs exhibited constitutive autophagy phenotypes in the absence of nutrient starvation. Due to the high sequence conservation between vertebrate and plant cytosolic GAPDH, our experiments focused on cytosolic GAPC1 cellular dynamics using a complemented GAPC1-GFP line. Confocal imaging coupled with an endocytic membrane marker (FM4-64) and endosomal trafficking inhibitors (BFA, Wortmannin) demonstrated cytosolic GAPC1 is localized to the plasma membrane and the endomembrane system, in addition to the cytosol and nucleus. After perception of bacterial flagellin, GAPC1 dynamically responded with a significant increase in size of fluorescent puncta and enhanced nuclear accumulation. Taken together, these results indicate that plant GAPDHs can affect multiple aspects of plant immunity in diverse sub-cellular compartments. PMID:25918875

  6. Beyond Glycolysis: GAPDHs Are Multi-functional Enzymes Involved in Regulation of ROS, Autophagy, and Plant Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Elizabeth; Fung, Nicholas; Liu, Jun; Drakakaki, Georgia; Coaker, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an important enzyme in energy metabolism with diverse cellular regulatory roles in vertebrates, but few reports have investigated the importance of plant GAPDH isoforms outside of their role in glycolysis. While animals possess one GAPDH isoform, plants possess multiple isoforms. In this study, cell biological and genetic approaches were used to investigate the role of GAPDHs during plant immune responses. Individual Arabidopsis GAPDH knockouts (KO lines) exhibited enhanced disease resistance phenotypes upon inoculation with the bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. KO lines exhibited accelerated programmed cell death and increased electrolyte leakage in response to effector triggered immunity. Furthermore, KO lines displayed increased basal ROS accumulation as visualized using the fluorescent probe H2DCFDA. The gapa1-2 and gapc1 KOs exhibited constitutive autophagy phenotypes in the absence of nutrient starvation. Due to the high sequence conservation between vertebrate and plant cytosolic GAPDH, our experiments focused on cytosolic GAPC1 cellular dynamics using a complemented GAPC1-GFP line. Confocal imaging coupled with an endocytic membrane marker (FM4-64) and endosomal trafficking inhibitors (BFA, Wortmannin) demonstrated cytosolic GAPC1 is localized to the plasma membrane and the endomembrane system, in addition to the cytosol and nucleus. After perception of bacterial flagellin, GAPC1 dynamically responded with a significant increase in size of fluorescent puncta and enhanced nuclear accumulation. Taken together, these results indicate that plant GAPDHs can affect multiple aspects of plant immunity in diverse sub-cellular compartments. PMID:25918875

  7. ER bodies in plants of the Brassicales order: biogenesis and association with innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Ryohei T.; Yamada, Kenji; Bednarek, Paweł; Nishimura, Mikio; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) forms highly organized network structures composed of tubules and cisternae. Many plant species develop additional ER-derived structures, most of which are specific for certain groups of species. In particular, a rod-shaped structure designated as the ER body is produced by plants of the Brassicales order, which includes Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic analyses and characterization of A. thaliana mutants possessing a disorganized ER morphology or lacking ER bodies have provided insights into the highly organized mechanisms responsible for the formation of these unique ER structures. The accumulation of proteins specific for the ER body within the ER plays an important role in the formation of ER bodies. However, a mutant that exhibits morphological defects of both the ER and ER bodies has not been identified. This suggests that plants in the Brassicales order have evolved novel mechanisms for the development of this unique organelle, which are distinct from those used to maintain generic ER structures. In A. thaliana, ER bodies are ubiquitous in seedlings and roots, but rare in rosette leaves. Wounding of rosette leaves induces de novo formation of ER bodies, suggesting that these structures are associated with resistance against pathogens and/or herbivores. ER bodies accumulate a large amount of β-glucosidases, which can produce substances that potentially protect against invading pests. Biochemical studies have determined that the enzymatic activities of these β-glucosidases are enhanced during cell collapse. These results suggest that ER bodies are involved in plant immunity, although there is no direct evidence of this. In this review, we provide recent perspectives of ER and ER body formation in A. thaliana, and discuss clues for the functions of ER bodies. We highlight defense strategies against biotic stress that are unique for the Brassicales order, and discuss how ER structures could contribute to these strategies. PMID

  8. Regulation of plant immunity through ubiquitin-mediated modulation of Ca(2+) -calmodulin-AtSR1/CAMTA3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Du, Liqun; Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun; Poovaiah, B W

    2014-04-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration are essential signals for activation of plant immunity. It has also been reported that Ca(2+) signals suppress salicylic acid-mediated plant defense through AtSR1/CAMTA3, a member of the Ca(2+) /calmodulin-regulated transcription factor family that is conserved in multicellular eukaryotes. How plants overcome this negative regulation to mount an effective defense response during a stage of intracellular Ca(2+) surge is unclear. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of an important component of ubiquitin ligase, and the associated AtSR1 turnover. The AtSR1 interaction protein 1 (SR1IP1) was identified by CytoTrap two-hybrid screening. The loss-of-function mutant of SR1IP1 is more susceptible to bacterial pathogens, and over-expression of SR1IP1 confers enhanced resistance, indicating that SR1IP1 acts as a positive regulator of plant defense. SR1IP1 and AtSR1 act in the same signaling pathway to regulate plant immunity. SR1IP1 contains the structural features of a substrate adaptor in cullin 3-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, and was shown to serve as a substrate adaptor that recruits AtSR1 for ubiquitination and degradation when plants are challenged with pathogens. Hence, SR1IP1 positively regulates plant immunity by removing the defense suppressor AtSR1. These findings provide a mechanistic insight into how Ca(2+) -mediated actions are coordinated to achieve effective plant immunity. PMID:24528504

  9. RAR1, a Central Player in Plant Immunity, is Targeted by Pseudomonas syringae Effector AvrB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic bacterial effectors suppress Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP)-triggered host immunity, thereby promoting parasitism. In the presence of cognate resistance genes, it is proposed that plants detect the virulence activity of bacterial effectors and trigger a defense response, ref...

  10. Studying the Mechanism of Plasmopara viticola RxLR Effectors on Suppressing Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jiang; Li, Xinlong; Wu, Jiao; Yin, Ling; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The RxLR effector family, produced by oomycete pathogens, may manipulate host physiological and biochemical events inside host cells. A group of putative RxLR effectors from Plasmopara viticola have been recently identified by RNA-Seq analysis in our lab. However, their roles in pathogenesis are poorly understood. In this study, we attempted to characterize 23 PvRxLR effector candidates identified from a P. viticola isolate “ZJ-1-1.” During host infection stages, expression patterns of the effector genes were varied and could be categorized into four different groups. By using transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana, we found that 17 of these effector candidates fully suppressed programmed cell death elicited by a range of cell death-inducing proteins, including BAX, INF1, PsCRN63, PsojNIP, PvRxLR16 and R3a/Avr3a. We also discovered that all these PvRxLRs could target the plant cell nucleus, except for PvRxLR55 that localized to the membrane. Furthermore, we identified a single effector, PvRxLR28, that showed the highest expression level at 6 hpi. Functional analysis revealed that PvRxLR28 could significantly enhance susceptibilities of grapevine and tobacco to pathogens. These results suggest that most P. viticola effectors tested in this study may act as broad suppressors of cell death to manipulate immunity in plant. PMID:27242731

  11. Dietary medicinal plant extracts improve growth, immune activity and survival of tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus.

    PubMed

    Immanuel, G; Uma, R P; Iyapparaj, P; Citarasu, T; Peter, S M Punitha; Babu, M Michael; Palavesam, A

    2009-05-01

    The effects of supplementing diets with acetone extract (1% w/w) from four medicinal plants (Bermuda grass Cynodon dactylon, H(1), beal Aegle marmelos, H(2), winter cherry Withania somnifera, H(3) and ginger Zingiber officinale, H(4)) on growth, the non-specific immune response and ability to resist pathogen infection in tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus were assessed. In addition, the antimicrobial properties of the extract were assessed against Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrioparahaemolyticus, Vibrio mimicus, Vibrio campbelli, Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio harveyi and Photobacterium damselae. Oreochromis mossambicus were fed 5% of their body mass per day for 45 days, and those fed the experimental diets showed a greater increase in mass (111-139%) over the 45 days compared to those that received the control diet (98%). The specific growth rate of O. mossambicus fed the four diets was also significantly greater (1.66-1.93%) than control (1.52%) diet-fed fish. The blood plasma chemistry analysis revealed that protein, albumin, globulin, cholesterol, glucose and triglyceride levels of experimental fish were significantly higher than that of control fish. Packed cell volume of the blood samples of experimental diet-fed fish was also significantly higher (34.16-37.95%) than control fish (33.0%). Leucocrit value, phagocytic index and lysozyme activity were enhanced in fish fed the plant extract-supplemented diets. The acetone extract of the plants inhibited growth of Vibrio spp. and P. damselae with extracts from W. somnifera showing maximum growth inhibition. A challenge test with V. vulnificus showed 100% mortality in O. mossambicus fed the control diet by day 15, whereas the fish fed the experimental diets registered only 63-80% mortality at the end of challenge experiment (30 days). The cumulative mortality index for the control group was 12,000, which was equated to 1.0% mortality, and accordingly, the lowest mortality of 0.35% was registered in H(4)-diet-fed group. PMID

  12. Inter-organ defense networking: Leaf whitefly sucking elicits plant immunity to crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Soon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Plants have elaborate defensive machinery to protect against numerous pathogens and insects. Plant hormones function as modulators of defensive mechanisms to maintain plant resistance to natural enemies. Our recent study suggests that salicylic acid (SA) is the primary phytohormone regulating plant responses to Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection. Tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana Domin.) immune responses against Agrobacterium-mediated crown gall disease were activated by exposure to the sucking insect whitefly, which stimulated SA biosynthesis in aerial tissues; in turn, SA synthesized in aboveground tissues systemically modulated SA secretion in root tissues. Further investigation revealed that endogenous SA biosynthesis negatively modulated Agrobacterium-mediated plant genetic transformation. Our study provides novel evidence that activation of the SA-signaling pathway mediated by a sucking insect infestation has a pivotal role in subsequently attenuating Agrobacterium infection. These results demonstrate new insights into interspecies cross-talking among insects, plants, and soil bacteria. PMID:26357873

  13. Inter-organ defense networking: Leaf whitefly sucking elicits plant immunity to crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Soon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Plants have elaborate defensive machinery to protect against numerous pathogens and insects. Plant hormones function as modulators of defensive mechanisms to maintain plant resistance to natural enemies. Our recent study suggests that salicylic acid (SA) is the primary phytohormone regulating plant responses to Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection. Tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana Domin.) immune responses against Agrobacterium-mediated crown gall disease were activated by exposure to the sucking insect whitefly, which stimulated SA biosynthesis in aerial tissues; in turn, SA synthesized in aboveground tissues systemically modulated SA secretion in root tissues. Further investigation revealed that endogenous SA biosynthesis negatively modulated Agrobacterium-mediated plant genetic transformation. Our study provides novel evidence that activation of the SA-signaling pathway mediated by a sucking insect infestation has a pivotal role in subsequently attenuating Agrobacterium infection. These results demonstrate new insights into interspecies cross-talking among insects, plants, and soil bacteria. PMID:26357873

  14. Consequences of constitutive and induced variation in plant nutritional quality for immune defence of a herbivore against parasitism.

    PubMed

    Bukovinszky, Tibor; Poelman, Erik H; Gols, Rieta; Prekatsakis, Georgios; Vet, Louise E M; Harvey, Jeffrey A; Dicke, Marcel

    2009-05-01

    The mechanisms through which trophic interactions between species are indirectly mediated by distant members in a food web have received increasing attention in the field of ecology of multitrophic interactions. Scarcely studied aspects include the effects of varying plant chemistry on herbivore immune defences against parasitoids. We investigated the effects of constitutive and herbivore-induced variation in the nutritional quality of wild and cultivated populations of cabbage (Brassica oleracea) on the ability of small cabbage white Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera, Pieridae) larvae to encapsulate eggs of the parasitoid Cotesia glomerata (Hymenoptera, Braconidae). Average encapsulation rates in caterpillars parasitised as first instars were low and did not differ among plant populations, with caterpillar weight positively correlating with the rates of encapsulation. When caterpillars were parasitised as second instar larvae, encapsulation of eggs increased. Caterpillars were larger on the cultivated Brussels sprouts plants and exhibited higher levels of encapsulation compared with caterpillars on plants of either of the wild cabbage populations. Observed differences in encapsulation rates between plant populations could not be explained exclusively by differences in host growth on the different Brassica populations. Previous herbivore damage resulted in a reduction in the larval weight of subsequent herbivores with a concomitant reduction in encapsulation responses on both Brussels sprouts and wild cabbage plants. To our knowledge this is the first study demonstrating that constitutive and herbivore-induced changes in plant chemistry act in concert, affecting the immune response of herbivores to parasitism. We argue that plant-mediated immune responses of herbivores may be important in the evaluation of fitness costs and benefits of herbivore diet on the third trophic level. PMID:19271243

  15. Ralstonia solanacearum Type III Effector RipAY Is a Glutathione-Degrading Enzyme That Is Activated by Plant Cytosolic Thioredoxins and Suppresses Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Tadashi; Nakano, Masahito; Oda, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum uses a large repertoire of type III effector proteins to succeed in infection. To clarify the function of effector proteins in host eukaryote cells, we expressed effectors in yeast cells and identified seven effector proteins that interfere with yeast growth. One of the effector proteins, RipAY, was found to share homology with the ChaC family proteins that function as γ-glutamyl cyclotransferases, which degrade glutathione (GSH), a tripeptide that plays important roles in the plant immune system. RipAY significantly inhibited yeast growth and simultaneously induced rapid GSH depletion when expressed in yeast cells. The in vitro GSH degradation activity of RipAY is specifically activated by eukaryotic factors in the yeast and plant extracts. Biochemical purification of the yeast protein identified that RipAY is activated by thioredoxin TRX2. On the other hand, RipAY was not activated by bacterial thioredoxins. Interestingly, RipAY was activated by plant h-type thioredoxins that exist in large amounts in the plant cytosol, but not by chloroplastic m-, f-, x-, y- and z-type thioredoxins, in a thiol-independent manner. The transient expression of RipAY decreased the GSH level in plant cells and affected the flg22-triggered production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and expression of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) marker genes in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These results indicate that RipAY is activated by host cytosolic thioredoxins and degrades GSH specifically in plant cells to suppress plant immunity. PMID:27073091

  16. IRE1/bZIP60-Mediated Unfolded Protein Response Plays Distinct Roles in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Francisca; Boatwright, Jon Lucas; Moreno, Ignacio; Jordan, Melissa R.; Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated protein secretion and quality control have been shown to play an important role in immune responses in both animals and plants. In mammals, the ER membrane-located IRE1 kinase/endoribonuclease, a key regulator of unfolded protein response (UPR), is required for plasma cell development to accommodate massive secretion of immunoglobulins. Plant cells can secrete the so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins with antimicrobial activities upon pathogen challenge. However, whether IRE1 plays any role in plant immunity is not known. Arabidopsis thaliana has two copies of IRE1, IRE1a and IRE1b. Here, we show that both IRE1a and IRE1b are transcriptionally induced during chemically-induced ER stress, bacterial pathogen infection and treatment with the immune signal salicylic acid (SA). However, we found that IRE1a plays a predominant role in the secretion of PR proteins upon SA treatment. Consequently, the ire1a mutant plants show enhanced susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen and are deficient in establishing systemic acquired resistance (SAR), whereas ire1b is unaffected in these responses. We further demonstrate that the immune deficiency in ire1a is due to a defect in SA- and pathogen-triggered, IRE1-mediated cytoplasmic splicing of the bZIP60 mRNA, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the expression of UPR-responsive genes. Consistently, IRE1a is preferentially required for bZIP60 splicing upon pathogen infection, while IRE1b plays a major role in bZIP60 processing upon Tunicamycin (Tm)-induced stress. We also show that SA-dependent induction of UPR-responsive genes is altered in the bzip60 mutant resulting in a moderate susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen. These results indicate that the IRE1/bZIP60 branch of UPR is a part of the plant response to pathogens for which the two Arabidopsis IRE1 isoforms play only partially overlapping roles and that IRE1 has both bZIP60-dependent and bZIP60-independent functions in

  17. Immunostimulating complexes incorporating Eimeria tenella antigens and plant saponins as effective delivery system for coccidia vaccine immunization.

    PubMed

    Berezin, V E; Bogoyavlenskiy, A P; Tolmacheva, V P; Makhmudova, N R; Khudyakova, S S; Levandovskaya, S V; Omirtaeva, E S; Zaitceva, I A; Tustikbaeva, G B; Ermakova, O S; Aleksyuk, P G; Barfield, R C; Danforth, H D; Fetterer, R H

    2008-04-01

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique, multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids, and triterpene saponins of plant origin, and are an effective delivery system for various kinds of antigens. The uses of ISCOMs formulated with saponins from plants collected in Kazakhstan, with antigens from the poultry coccidian parasite Eimeria tenella, were evaluated for their potential use in developing a vaccine for control of avian coccidiosis. Saponins isolated from the plants Aesculus hippocastanum and Glycyrrhiza glabra were partially purified by HPLC. The saponin fractions obtained from HPLC were evaluated for toxicity in chickens and chicken embryos. The HPLC saponin fractions with the least toxicity, compared to a commercial saponin Quil A, were used to assemble ISCOMs. When chicks were immunized with ISCOMs prepared with saponins from Kazakhstan plants and E. tenella antigens, and then challenged with E. tenella oocysts, significant protection was conveyed compared to immunization with antigen alone. The results of this study indicate that ISCOMs formulated with saponins isolated from plants indigenous to Kazakhstan are an effective antigen delivery system which may be successfully used, with low toxicity, for preparation of highly immunogenic coccidia vaccine. PMID:18564738

  18. Induction of protective immunity in chickens immunized with plant-made chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus particles expressing very virulent Infectious bursal disease virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsung-Hsien; Chen, Ten-Hong; Hu, Chung-Chi; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Chin-Wei; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lin, Maw-Yeong; Liu, Hung-Jen; Wang, Min-Ying; Lin, Na-Sheng; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2012-06-01

    Very virulent Infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) causes a highly contagious disease in young chickens and leads to significant economic loss in the poultry industry. Effective new vaccines are urgently needed. Autonomously replicating plant virus-based vector provides attractive means for producing chimeric virus particles (CVPs) in plants that can be developed into vaccines. In this study, we demonstrate the potential for vaccine development of Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) epitope-presentation system, where the antigen from vvIBDV VP2 was fused to the N-terminus of BaMV coat protein. Accordingly, an infections plasmid, pBIBD2, was constructed. Inoculation of the recombinant BaMV clone pBIBD2 enabled the generation of chimeric virus, BIBD2, and stable expression of IBDV VP2 antigen on its coat protein. After intramuscular immunization with BIBD2 CVPs, chickens produced antibodies against IBDV and were protected from vvIBDV (V263/TW strain) challenges. These results corroborate the feasibility of BaMV-based CVP platform in plants for the development and production of vaccines against IBDV. PMID:22406128

  19. Surface α-1,3-Glucan Facilitates Fungal Stealth Infection by Interfering with Innate Immunity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Takashi; Kouzai, Yusuke; Minami, Eiichi; Yano, Shigekazu; Koga, Hironori; Meshi, Tetsuo; Nishimura, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Plants evoke innate immunity against microbial challenges upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as fungal cell wall chitin. Nevertheless, pathogens may circumvent the host PAMP-triggered immunity. We previously reported that the ascomycete Magnaporthe oryzae, a famine-causing rice pathogen, masks cell wall surfaces with α-1,3-glucan during invasion. Here, we show that the surface α-1,3-glucan is indispensable for the successful infection of the fungus by interfering with the plant's defense mechanisms. The α-1,3-glucan synthase gene MgAGS1 was not essential for infectious structure development but was required for infection in M. oryzae. Lack or degradation of surface α-1,3-glucan increased fungal susceptibility towards chitinase, suggesting the protective role of α-1,3-glucan against plants' antifungal enzymes during infection. Furthermore, rice plants secreting bacterial α-1,3-glucanase (AGL-rice) showed strong resistance not only to M. oryzae but also to the phylogenetically distant ascomycete Cochlioborus miyabeanus and the polyphagous basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani; the histocytochemical analysis of the latter two revealed that α-1,3-glucan also concealed cell wall chitin in an infection-specific manner. Treatment with α-1,3-glucanase in vitro caused fragmentation of infectious hyphae in R. solani but not in M. oryzae or C. miyabeanus, indicating that α-1,3-glucan is also involved in maintaining infectious structures in some fungi. Importantly, rapid defense responses were evoked (a few hours after inoculation) in the AGL-rice inoculated with M. oryzae, C. miyabeanus and R. solani as well as in non-transgenic rice inoculated with the ags1 mutant. Taken together, our results suggest that α-1,3-glucan protected the fungal cell wall from degradative enzymes secreted by plants even from the pre-penetration stage and interfered with the release of PAMPs to delay innate immune defense responses. Because α-1,3-glucan is

  20. Surface α-1,3-glucan facilitates fungal stealth infection by interfering with innate immunity in plants.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Ayumu; Nishizawa, Yoko; Kouzai, Yusuke; Minami, Eiichi; Yano, Shigekazu; Koga, Hironori; Meshi, Tetsuo; Nishimura, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Plants evoke innate immunity against microbial challenges upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as fungal cell wall chitin. Nevertheless, pathogens may circumvent the host PAMP-triggered immunity. We previously reported that the ascomycete Magnaporthe oryzae, a famine-causing rice pathogen, masks cell wall surfaces with α-1,3-glucan during invasion. Here, we show that the surface α-1,3-glucan is indispensable for the successful infection of the fungus by interfering with the plant's defense mechanisms. The α-1,3-glucan synthase gene MgAGS1 was not essential for infectious structure development but was required for infection in M. oryzae. Lack or degradation of surface α-1,3-glucan increased fungal susceptibility towards chitinase, suggesting the protective role of α-1,3-glucan against plants' antifungal enzymes during infection. Furthermore, rice plants secreting bacterial α-1,3-glucanase (AGL-rice) showed strong resistance not only to M. oryzae but also to the phylogenetically distant ascomycete Cochlioborus miyabeanus and the polyphagous basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani; the histocytochemical analysis of the latter two revealed that α-1,3-glucan also concealed cell wall chitin in an infection-specific manner. Treatment with α-1,3-glucanase in vitro caused fragmentation of infectious hyphae in R. solani but not in M. oryzae or C. miyabeanus, indicating that α-1,3-glucan is also involved in maintaining infectious structures in some fungi. Importantly, rapid defense responses were evoked (a few hours after inoculation) in the AGL-rice inoculated with M. oryzae, C. miyabeanus and R. solani as well as in non-transgenic rice inoculated with the ags1 mutant. Taken together, our results suggest that α-1,3-glucan protected the fungal cell wall from degradative enzymes secreted by plants even from the pre-penetration stage and interfered with the release of PAMPs to delay innate immune defense responses. Because α-1,3-glucan is

  1. High levels of cyclic‐di‐GMP in plant‐associated P seudomonas correlate with evasion of plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pfeilmeier, Sebastian; Saur, Isabel Marie‐Luise; Rathjen, John Paul; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Summary The plant innate immune system employs plasma membrane‐localized receptors that specifically perceive pathogen/microbe‐associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs). This induces a defence response called pattern‐triggered immunity (PTI) to fend off pathogen attack. Commensal bacteria are also exposed to potential immune recognition and must employ strategies to evade and/or suppress PTI to successfully colonize the plant. During plant infection, the flagellum has an ambiguous role, acting as both a virulence factor and also as a potent immunogen as a result of the recognition of its main building block, flagellin, by the plant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2). Therefore, strict control of flagella synthesis is especially important for plant‐associated bacteria. Here, we show that cyclic‐di‐GMP [bis‐(3′‐5′)‐cyclic di‐guanosine monophosphate], a central regulator of bacterial lifestyle, is involved in the evasion of PTI. Elevated cyclic‐di‐GMP levels in the pathogen P seudomonas syringae pv. tomato (P to) DC3000, the opportunist P . aeruginosa  PAO1 and the commensal P . protegens  Pf‐5 inhibit flagellin synthesis and help the bacteria to evade FLS2‐mediated signalling in N icotiana benthamiana and A rabidopsis thaliana. Despite this, high cellular cyclic‐di‐GMP concentrations were shown to drastically reduce the virulence of P to  DC3000 during plant infection. We propose that this is a result of reduced flagellar motility and/or additional pleiotropic effects of cyclic‐di‐GMP signalling on bacterial behaviour. PMID:26202381

  2. Biochemical characterization of the tomato phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) family and its role in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Haliem, Ahmed M; Vossen, Jack H; van Zeijl, Arjan; Dezhsetan, Sara; Testerink, Christa; Seidl, Michael F; Beck, Martina; Strutt, James; Robatzek, Silke; Joosten, Matthieu H A J

    2016-09-01

    Plants possess effective mechanisms to quickly respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. The rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes occurs early after the stimulation of plant immune-receptors. Genomes of different plant species encode multiple PLC homologs belonging to one class, PLCζ. Here we determined whether all tomato homologs encode active enzymes and whether they can generate signals that are distinct from one another. We searched the recently completed tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) genome sequence and identified a total of seven PLCs. Recombinant proteins were produced for all tomato PLCs, except for SlPLC7. The purified proteins showed typical PLC activity, as different PLC substrates were hydrolysed to produce diacylglycerol. We studied SlPLC2, SlPLC4 and SlPLC5 enzymes in more detail and observed distinct requirements for Ca(2+) ions and pH, for both their optimum activity and substrate preference. This indicates that each enzyme could be differentially and specifically regulated in vivo, leading to the generation of PLC homolog-specific signals in response to different stimuli. PLC overexpression and specific inhibition of PLC activity revealed that PLC is required for both specific effector- and more general "pattern"-triggered immunity. For the latter, we found that both the flagellin-triggered response and the internalization of the corresponding receptor, Flagellin Sensing 2 (FLS2) of Arabidopsis thaliana, are suppressed by inhibition of PLC activity. Altogether, our data support an important role for PLC enzymes in plant defence signalling downstream of immune receptors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:26825689

  3. Phosphorylation of the Plant Immune Regulator RPM1-INTERACTING PROTEIN4 Enhances Plant Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase Activity and Inhibits Flagellin-Triggered Immune Responses in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lee, DongHyuk; Bourdais, Gildas; Yu, Gang; Robatzek, Silke; Coaker, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae effector AvrB targets multiple host proteins during infection, including the plant immune regulator RPM1-INTERACTING PROTEIN4 (RIN4) and RPM1-INDUCED PROTEIN KINASE (RIPK). In the presence of AvrB, RIPK phosphorylates RIN4 at Thr-21, Ser-160, and Thr-166, leading to activation of the immune receptor RPM1. Here, we investigated the role of RIN4 phosphorylation in susceptible Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy, we show that RIN4 is a disordered protein and phosphorylation affects protein flexibility. RIN4 T21D/S160D/T166D phosphomimetic mutants exhibited enhanced disease susceptibility upon surface inoculation with P. syringae, wider stomatal apertures, and enhanced plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity. The plasma membrane H+-ATPase AHA1 is highly expressed in guard cells, and its activation can induce stomatal opening. The ripk knockout also exhibited a strong defect in pathogen-induced stomatal opening. The basal level of RIN4 Thr-166 phosphorylation decreased in response to immune perception of bacterial flagellin. RIN4 Thr166D lines exhibited reduced flagellin-triggered immune responses. Flagellin perception did not lower RIN4 Thr-166 phosphorylation in the presence of strong ectopic expression of AvrB. Taken together, these results indicate that the AvrB effector targets RIN4 in order to enhance pathogen entry on the leaf surface as well as dampen responses to conserved microbial features. PMID:26198070

  4. Phosphorylation of the Plant Immune Regulator RPM1-INTERACTING PROTEIN4 Enhances Plant Plasma Membrane H⁺-ATPase Activity and Inhibits Flagellin-Triggered Immune Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, DongHyuk; Bourdais, Gildas; Yu, Gang; Robatzek, Silke; Coaker, Gitta

    2015-07-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae effector AvrB targets multiple host proteins during infection, including the plant immune regulator RPM1-INTERACTING PROTEIN4 (RIN4) and RPM1-INDUCED PROTEIN KINASE (RIPK). In the presence of AvrB, RIPK phosphorylates RIN4 at Thr-21, Ser-160, and Thr-166, leading to activation of the immune receptor RPM1. Here, we investigated the role of RIN4 phosphorylation in susceptible Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy, we show that RIN4 is a disordered protein and phosphorylation affects protein flexibility. RIN4 T21D/S160D/T166D phosphomimetic mutants exhibited enhanced disease susceptibility upon surface inoculation with P. syringae, wider stomatal apertures, and enhanced plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity. The plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase AHA1 is highly expressed in guard cells, and its activation can induce stomatal opening. The ripk knockout also exhibited a strong defect in pathogen-induced stomatal opening. The basal level of RIN4 Thr-166 phosphorylation decreased in response to immune perception of bacterial flagellin. RIN4 Thr166D lines exhibited reduced flagellin-triggered immune responses. Flagellin perception did not lower RIN4 Thr-166 phosphorylation in the presence of strong ectopic expression of AvrB. Taken together, these results indicate that the AvrB effector targets RIN4 in order to enhance pathogen entry on the leaf surface as well as dampen responses to conserved microbial features. PMID:26198070

  5. Modulation of Root Microbiome Community Assembly by the Plant Immune Response (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Lebeis, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    Sarah Lebeis of University of North Carolina on "Modulation of root microbiome community assembly by the plant immune response" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  6. WRKY Transcription Factors Phosphorylated by MAPK Regulate a Plant Immune NADPH Oxidase in Nicotiana benthamiana[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Nakano, Takaaki; Miyagawa, Noriko; Ishihama, Nobuaki; Yoshioka, Miki; Katou, Yuri; Yaeno, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen attack sequentially confers pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) after sensing of pathogen patterns and effectors by plant immune receptors, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play pivotal roles in PTI and ETI as signaling molecules. Nicotiana benthamiana RBOHB, an NADPH oxidase, is responsible for both the transient PTI ROS burst and the robust ETI ROS burst. Here, we show that RBOHB transactivation mediated by MAPK contributes to R3a/AVR3a-triggered ETI (AVR3a-ETI) ROS burst. RBOHB is markedly induced during the ETI and INF1-triggered PTI (INF1-PTI), but not flg22-tiggered PTI (flg22-PTI). We found that the RBOHB promoter contains a functional W-box in the R3a/AVR3a and INF1 signal-responsive cis-element. Ectopic expression of four phospho-mimicking mutants of WRKY transcription factors, which are MAPK substrates, induced RBOHB, and yeast one-hybrid analysis indicated that these mutants bind to the cis-element. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated direct binding of the WRKY to the cis-element in plants. Silencing of multiple WRKY genes compromised the upregulation of RBOHB, resulting in impairment of AVR3a-ETI and INF1-PTI ROS bursts, but not the flg22-PTI ROS burst. These results suggest that the MAPK-WRKY pathway is required for AVR3a-ETI and INF1-PTI ROS bursts by activation of RBOHB. PMID:26373453

  7. Direct ubiquitination of pattern recognition receptor FLS2 attenuates plant innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dongping; Lin, Wenwei; Gao, Xiquan; Wu, Shujing; Cheng, Cheng; Avila, Julian; Heese, Antje; Devarenne, Timothy P.; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2011-01-01

    Innate immune responses are triggered by the activation of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs). The Arabidopsis PRR FLS2 senses bacterial flagellin and initiates immune signaling by association with BAK1. The molecular mechanisms underlying the attenuation of FLS2 activation are largely unknown. We report that flagellin induces recruitment of two closely related U-box E3 ubiquitin ligases PUB12 and PUB13 to FLS2 receptor complex in Arabidopsis. BAK1 phosphorylates PUB12/13 and is required for FLS2-PUB12/13 association. PUB12/13 polyubiquitinate FLS2 and promote flagellin-induced FLS2 degradation, and the pub12 and pub13 mutants displayed elevated immune responses to flagellin treatment. Our study has revealed a unique regulatory circuit of direct ubiquitination and turnover of FLS2 by BAK1-mediated phosphorylation and recruitment of specific E3 ligases for attenuation of immune signaling. PMID:21680842

  8. Linking ligand perception by PEPR pattern recognition receptors to cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and downstream immune signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robin K.; Zhao, Yichen; Berkowitz, Gerald A.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about molecular steps linking perception of pathogen invasion by cell surface sentry proteins acting as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to downstream cytosolic Ca2+ elevation, a critical step in plant immune signaling cascades. Some PRRs recognize molecules (such as flagellin) associated with microbial pathogens (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs), whereas others bind endogenous plant compounds (damage-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs) such as peptides released from cells upon attack. This work focuses on the Arabidopsis DAMPs plant elicitor peptides (Peps) and their receptors, PEPR1 and PEPR2. Pep application causes in vivo cGMP generation and downstream signaling that is lost when the predicted PEPR receptor guanylyl cyclase (GC) active site is mutated. Pep-induced Ca2+ elevation is attributable to cGMP activation of a Ca2+ channel. Some differences were identified between Pep/PEPR signaling and the Ca2+-dependent immune signaling initiated by the flagellin peptide flg22 and its cognate receptor Flagellin-sensing 2 (FLS2). FLS2 signaling may have a greater requirement for intracellular Ca2+ stores and inositol phosphate signaling, whereas Pep/PEPR signaling requires extracellular Ca2+. Maximal FLS2 signaling requires a functional Pep/PEPR system. This dependence was evidenced as a requirement for functional PEPR receptors for maximal flg22-dependent Ca2+ elevation, H2O2 generation, defense gene [WRKY33 and Plant Defensin 1.2 (PDF1.2)] expression, and flg22/FLS2-dependent impairment of pathogen growth. In a corresponding fashion, FLS2 loss of function impaired Pep signaling. In addition, a role for PAMP and DAMP perception in bolstering effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is reported; loss of function of either FLS2 or PEPR receptors impaired the hypersensitive response (HR) to an avirulent pathogen. PMID:23150556

  9. Transcriptomics-based screen for genes induced by flagellin and repressed by pathogen effectors identifies a cell wall-associated kinase involved in plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microbe-associated molecular patterns, such as those present in bacterial flagellin, are powerful inducers of the innate immune response in plants. Successful pathogens deliver virulence proteins, termed effectors, into the plant cell where they can interfere with the immune response and promote disease. Engineering the plant immune system to enhance disease resistance requires a thorough understanding of its components. Results We describe a high-throughput screen, using RNA sequencing and virus-induced gene silencing, to identify tomato genes whose expression is enhanced by the flagellin microbe-associated molecular pattern flgII-28, but reduced by activities of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) type III effectors AvrPto and AvrPtoB. Gene ontology terms for this category of Flagellin-induced repressed by effectors (FIRE) genes showed enrichment for genes encoding certain subfamilies of protein kinases and transcription factors. At least 25 of the FIRE genes have been implicated previously in plant immunity. Of the 92 protein kinase-encoding FIRE genes, 33 were subjected to virus-induced gene silencing and their involvement in pattern-triggered immunity was tested with a leaf-based assay. Silencing of one FIRE gene, which encodes the cell wall-associated kinase SlWAK1, compromised the plant immune response resulting in increased growth of Pst and enhanced disease symptoms. Conclusions Our transcriptomic approach identifies FIRE genes that represent a pathogen-defined core set of immune-related genes. The analysis of this set of candidate genes led to the discovery of a cell wall-associated kinase that participates in plant defense. The FIRE genes will be useful for further elucidation of the plant immune system. PMID:24359686

  10. SEC14 Phospholipid Transfer Protein Is Involved in Lipid Signaling-Mediated Plant Immune Responses in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Kiba, Akinori; Galis, Ivan; Hojo, Yuko; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a gene related to the SEC14-gene phospholipid transfer protein superfamily that is induced in Nicotiana benthamiana (NbSEC14) in response to infection with Ralstonia solanacearum. We here report that NbSEC14 plays a role in plant immune responses via phospholipid-turnover. NbSEC14-silencing compromised expression of defense–related PR-4 and accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivative JA-Ile. Transient expression of NbSEC14 induced PR-4 gene expression. Activities of diacylglycerol kinase, phospholipase C and D, and the synthesis of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid elicited by avirulent R. solanacearum were reduced in NbSEC14-silenced plants. Accumulation of signaling lipids and activation of diacylglycerol kinase and phospholipases were enhanced by transient expression of NbSEC14. These results suggest that the NbSEC14 protein plays a role at the interface between lipid signaling-metabolism and plant innate immune responses. PMID:24845602

  11. Allelic variation in two distinct Pseudomonas syringae flagellin epitopes modulates the strength of plant immune responses but not bacterial motility

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Christopher R.; Chinchilla, Delphine; Hind, Sarah R.; Taguchi, Fumiko; Miki, Ryuji; Ichinose, Yuki; Martin, Gregory B.; Leman, Scotland; Felix, Georg; Vinatzer, Boris A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The bacterial flagellin (FliC) epitopes flg22 and flgII-28 are microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). While flg22 is recognized by many plant species via the pattern recognition receptor FLS2, neither the flgII-28 receptor nor the extent of flgII-28 recognition by different plant families is known.Here we tested the significance of flgII-28 as a MAMP and the importance of allelic diversity in flg22 and flgII-28 in plant–pathogen interactions using purified peptides and a Pseudomonas syringae ΔfliC mutant complemented with different fliC alleles.Plant genotype and allelic diversity in flg22 and flgII-28 were found to significantly affect the plant immune response but not bacterial motility. Recognition of flgII-28 is restricted to a number of Solanaceous species. While the flgII-28 peptide does not trigger any immune response in Arabidopsis, mutations in both flg22 and flgII-28 have FLS2-dependent effects on virulence. However, expression of a tomato allele of FLS2 does not confer to Nicotiana benthamiana the ability to detect flgII-28 and tomato plants silenced for FLS2 are not altered in flgII-28 recognition.Therefore, MAMP diversification is an effective pathogen virulence strategy and flgII-28 appears to be perceived by a yet unidentified receptor in the Solanaceae although it has an FLS2-dependent virulence effect in Arabidopsis. PMID:23865782

  12. Liver Fibrosis and Mechanisms of the Protective Action of Medicinal Plants Targeting Inflammation and the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge E.; González-Garza, María Teresa; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen; Cruz-Vega, Delia Elva

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a central feature of liver fibrosis as suggested by its role in the activation of hepatic stellate cells leading to extracellular matrix deposition. During liver injury, inflammatory cells are recruited in the injurious site through chemokines attraction. Thus, inflammation could be a target to reduce liver fibrosis. The pandemic trend of obesity, combined with the high incidence of alcohol intake and viral hepatitis infections, highlights the urgent need to find accessible antifibrotic therapies. Medicinal plants are achieving popularity as antifibrotic agents, supported by their safety, cost-effectiveness, and versatility. The aim of this review is to describe the role of inflammation and the immune response in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis and detail the mechanisms of inhibition of both events by medicinal plants in order to reduce liver fibrosis. PMID:25954568

  13. The Arabidopsis NADPH oxidases RbohD and RbohF display differential expression patterns and contributions during plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jorge; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Zipfel, Cyril; Molina, Antonio; Torres, Miguel-Angel

    2016-03-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases, also known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues (RBOHs), produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that perform a wide range of functions. RbohD and RbohF, two of the 10 Rboh genes present in Arabidopsis, are pleiotropic and mediate diverse physiological processes including the response to pathogens. We hypothesized that the spatio-temporal control of RbohD and RbohF gene expression might be critical in determining their multiplicity of functions. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants with RbohD and RbohF promoter fusions to β-glucuronidase and Luciferase reporter genes were generated. Analysis of these plants revealed a differential expression pattern for RbohD and RbohF throughout plant development and during immune responses. RbohD and RbohF gene expression was differentially modulated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Histochemical stains and in vivo expression analysis showed a correlation between the level of RbohD and RbohF promoter activity, H2O2 accumulation and the amount of cell death in response to the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. A promoter-swap strategy revealed that the promoter region of RbohD was required to drive production of ROS by this gene in response to pathogens. Moreover, RbohD promoter was activated during Arabidopsis interaction with a non-virulent P. cucumerina isolate, and susceptibility tests with the double mutant rbohD rbohF uncovered a new function for these oxidases in basal resistance. Altogether, our results suggest that differential spatio-temporal expression of the Rboh genes contributes to fine-tune RBOH/NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production and signaling in Arabidopsis immunity. PMID:26798024

  14. The pepper phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase CaPEPCK1 is involved in plant immunity against bacterial and oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-09-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a member of the lyase family, is involved in the metabolic pathway of gluconeogenesis in organisms. Although the major function of PEPCK in gluconeogenesis is well established, it is unclear whether this enzyme is involved in plant immunity. Here, we isolated and identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) PEPCK (CaPEPCK1) gene from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaPEPCK1 was strongly expressed in pepper leaves during the incompatible interaction with avirulent Xcv and in response to environmental stresses, especially salicylic acid (SA) treatment. PEPCK activity was low in healthy leaves but dramatically increased in avirulent Xcv-infected leaves. Knock-down expression of CaPEPCK1 by virus-induced gene silencing resulted in high levels of susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Xcv infection. CaPEPCK1 silencing in pepper compromised induction of the basal defense-marker genes CaPR1 (pathogenesis-related 1 protein), CaPR10 (pathogenesis-related 10 protein) and CaDEF1 (defensin) during Xcv infection. SA accumulation was also significantly suppressed in the CaPEPCK1-silenced pepper leaves infected with Xcv. CaPEPCK1 in an Arabidopsis overexpression (OX) line inhibited the proliferation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa). CaPEPCK1-OX plants developed more rapidly, with enlarged leaves, compared to wild-type plants. The T-DNA insertion Arabidopsis orthologous mutants pck1-3 and pck1-4 were more susceptible to the bacterial Pst and oomycete Hpa pathogens than the wild type. Taken together, these results suggest that CaPEPCK positively contributes to plant innate immunity against hemibiotrophic bacterial and obligate biotrophic oomycete pathogens. PMID:26233534

  15. NLR-Associating Transcription Factor bHLH84 and Its Paralogs Function Redundantly in Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fang; Kapos, Paul; Cheng, Yu Ti; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yuelin; Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    In plants and animals, nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat domain containing (NLR) immune receptors are utilized to detect the presence or activities of pathogen-derived molecules. However, the mechanisms by which NLR proteins induce defense responses remain unclear. Here, we report the characterization of one basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) type transcription factor (TF), bHLH84, identified from a reverse genetic screen. It functions as a transcriptional activator that enhances the autoimmunity of NLR mutant snc1 (suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1) and confers enhanced immunity in wild-type backgrounds when overexpressed. Simultaneously knocking out three closely related bHLH paralogs attenuates RPS4-mediated immunity and partially suppresses the autoimmune phenotypes of snc1, while overexpression of the other two close paralogs also renders strong autoimmunity, suggesting functional redundancy in the gene family. Intriguingly, the autoimmunity conferred by bHLH84 overexpression can be largely suppressed by the loss-of-function snc1-r1 mutation, suggesting that SNC1 is required for its proper function. In planta co-immunoprecipitation revealed interactions between not only bHLH84 and SNC1, but also bHLH84 and RPS4, indicating that bHLH84 associates with these NLRs. Together with previous finding that SNC1 associates with repressor TPR1 to repress negative regulators, we hypothesize that nuclear NLR proteins may interact with both transcriptional repressors and activators during immune responses, enabling potentially faster and more robust transcriptional reprogramming upon pathogen recognition. PMID:25144198

  16. Asynchrony between Host Plant and Insects-Defoliator within a Tritrophic System: The Role of Herbivore Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Martemyanov, Vyacheslav V; Pavlushin, Sergey V; Dubovskiy, Ivan M; Yushkova, Yuliya V; Morosov, Sergey V; Chernyak, Elena I; Efimov, Vadim M; Ruuhola, Teija; Glupov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    The effects of asynchrony in the phenology of spring-feeding insect-defoliators and their host plants on insects' fitness, as well as the importance of this effect for the population dynamics of outbreaking species of insects, is a widespread and well-documented phenomenon. However, the spreading of this phenomenon through the food chain, and especially those mechanisms operating this spreading, are still unclear. In this paper, we study the effect of seasonally declined leafquality (estimated in terms of phenolics and nitrogen content) on herbivore fitness, immune parameters and resistance against pathogen by using the silver birch Betula pendula--gypsy moth Lymantria dispar--nucleopolyhedrovirus as the tritrophic system. We show that a phenological mismatch induced by the delay in the emergence of gypsy moth larvae and following feeding on mature leaves has negative effects on the female pupal weight, on the rate of larval development and on the activity of phenoloxidase in the plasma of haemolymph. In addition, the larval susceptibility to exogenous nucleopolyhydrovirus infection as well as covert virus activation were both enhanced due to the phenological mismatch. The observed effects of phenological mismatch on insect-baculovirus interaction may partially explain the strong and fast fluctuations in the population dynamics of the gypsy moth that is often observed in the studied part of the defoliator area. This study also reveals some indirect mechanisms of effect related to host plant quality, which operate through the insect innate immune status and affect resistance to both exogenous and endogenous virus. PMID:26115118

  17. Activation of Plant Innate Immunity by Extracellular High Mobility Group Box 3 and Its Inhibition by Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Manohar, Murli; Manosalva, Patricia; Tian, Miaoying; Moreau, Magali; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) signal the presence of tissue damage to induce immune responses in plants and animals. Here, we report that High Mobility Group Box 3 (HMGB3) is a novel plant DAMP. Extracellular HMGB3, through receptor-like kinases BAK1 and BKK1, induced hallmark innate immune responses, including i) MAPK activation, ii) defense-related gene expression, iii) callose deposition, and iv) enhanced resistance to Botrytis cinerea. Infection by necrotrophic B. cinerea released HMGB3 into the extracellular space (apoplast). Silencing HMGBs enhanced susceptibility to B. cinerea, while HMGB3 injection into apoplast restored resistance. Like its human counterpart, HMGB3 binds salicylic acid (SA), which results in inhibition of its DAMP activity. An SA-binding site mutant of HMGB3 retained its DAMP activity, which was no longer inhibited by SA, consistent with its reduced SA-binding activity. These results provide cross-kingdom evidence that HMGB proteins function as DAMPs and that SA is their conserved inhibitor. PMID:27007252

  18. Asynchrony between Host Plant and Insects-Defoliator within a Tritrophic System: The Role of Herbivore Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Martemyanov, Vyacheslav V.; Pavlushin, Sergey V.; Dubovskiy, Ivan M.; Yushkova, Yuliya V.; Morosov, Sergey V.; Chernyak, Elena I.; Efimov, Vadim M.; Ruuhola, Teija; Glupov, Victor V.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of asynchrony in the phenology of spring-feeding insect-defoliators and their host plants on insects’ fitness, as well as the importance of this effect for the population dynamics of outbreaking species of insects, is a widespread and well-documented phenomenon. However, the spreading of this phenomenon through the food chain, and especially those mechanisms operating this spreading, are still unclear. In this paper, we study the effect of seasonally declined leafquality (estimated in terms of phenolics and nitrogen content) on herbivore fitness, immune parameters and resistance against pathogen by using the silver birch Betula pendula—gypsy moth Lymantria dispar—nucleopolyhedrovirus as the tritrophic system. We show that a phenological mismatch induced by the delay in the emergence of gypsy moth larvae and following feeding on mature leaves has negative effects on the female pupal weight, on the rate of larval development and on the activity of phenoloxidase in the plasma of haemolymph. In addition, the larval susceptibility to exogenous nucleopolyhydrovirus infection as well as covert virus activation were both enhanced due to the phenological mismatch. The observed effects of phenological mismatch on insect-baculovirus interaction may partially explain the strong and fast fluctuations in the population dynamics of the gypsy moth that is often observed in the studied part of the defoliator area. This study also reveals some indirect mechanisms of effect related to host plant quality, which operate through the insect innate immune status and affect resistance to both exogenous and endogenous virus. PMID:26115118

  19. Arabidopsis BRCA2 and RAD51 proteins are specifically involved in defense gene transcription during plant immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shui; Durrant, Wendy E; Song, Junqi; Spivey, Natalie W; Dong, Xinnian

    2010-12-28

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant immune response associated with both transcriptional reprogramming and increased homologous DNA recombination (HR). SNI1 is a negative regulator of SAR and HR, as indicated by the increased basal expression of defense genes and HR in sni1. We found that the sni1 phenotypes are rescued by mutations in BREAST CANCER 2 (BRCA2). In humans, BRCA2 is a mediator of RAD51 in pairing of homologous DNA. Mutations in BRCA2 cause predisposition to breast/ovarian cancers; however, the role of the BRCA2-RAD51 complex in transcriptional regulation remains unclear. In Arabidopsis, both brca2 and rad51 were found to be hypersusceptible not only to genotoxic substances, but also to pathogen infections. A whole-genome microarray analysis showed that downstream of NPR1, BRCA2A is a major regulator of defense-related gene transcription. ChIP demonstrated that RAD51 is specifically recruited to the promoters of defense genes during SAR. This recruitment is dependent on the SAR signal salicylic acid (SA) and on the function of BRCA2. This study provides the molecular evidence showing that the BRCA2-RAD51 complex, known for its function in HR, also plays a direct and specific role in transcription regulation during plant immune responses. PMID:21149701

  20. Innate immune response, intestinal morphology and microbiota changes in Senegalese sole fed plant protein diets with probiotics or autolysed yeast.

    PubMed

    Batista, S; Medina, A; Pires, M A; Moriñigo, M A; Sansuwan, K; Fernandes, J M O; Valente, L M P; Ozório, R O A

    2016-08-01

    The effects of using plant ingredients in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) diet on immune competence and intestine morphology and microbial ecology are still controversial. Probiotics or immunostimulants can potentially alter the intestinal microbiota in a way that protects fish against pathogens. The current study aimed to examine the intestine histology and microbiota and humoral innate immune response in juvenile sole fed diets with low (35 %) or high (72 %) content of plant protein (PP) ingredients supplemented with a multispecies probiotic bacteria or autolysed yeast. Fish fed the probiotic diet had lower growth performance. Lysozyme and complement activities were significantly higher in fish fed PP72 diets than in their counterparts fed PP35 diets after 17 and 38 days of feeding. At 2 days of feeding, fish fed unsupplemented PP72 showed larger intestine section area and longer villus than fish fed unsupplemented PP35. At 17 days of feeding, fish fed unsupplemented PP72 showed more goblet cells than the other dietary groups, except the group fed yeast supplemented PP35 diet. High dietary PP level, acutely stimulate fish innate immune defence of the fish after 2 and 17 days of feeding. However, this effect does not occur after 73 days of feeding, suggesting a habituation to dietary treatments and/or immunosuppression, with a reduction in the number of the goblet cells. Fish fed for 38 days with diets supplemented with autolysed yeast showed longer intestinal villus. The predominant bacteria found in sole intestine were Vibrio sp. and dietary probiotic supplementation caused a reduction in Vibrio content, regardless of the PP level. PMID:27183997

  1. Photosystem II Repair and Plant Immunity: Lessons Learned from Arabidopsis Mutant Lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3

    PubMed Central

    Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415–425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light. PMID:27064270

  2. An acute intake of plant stanol esters alters immune-related pathways in the jejunum of healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Els; Mensink, Ronald P; Boekschoten, Mark V; de Ridder, Rogier; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; Wolfs, Tim G A M; Plat, Jogchum

    2015-03-14

    Plant sterols and stanols inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption and consequently lower serum LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations. The underlying mechanisms are not yet known. In vitro and animal studies have suggested that changes in intestinal sterol metabolism are attributed to the LDL-C-lowering effects of plant stanol esters. However, similar studies in human subjects are lacking. Therefore, we examined the effects of an acute intake of plant stanol esters on gene expression profiles of the upper small intestine in healthy volunteers. In a double-blind cross-over design, fourteen healthy subjects (eight female and six male; age 21-55 years), with a BMI ranging from 21 to 29 kg/m², received in random order a shake with or without plant stanol esters (4 g). At 5 h after consumption of the shake, biopsies were taken from the duodenum (around the papilla of Vater) and from the jejunum (20 cm distal from the papilla of Vater). Microarray analysis showed that the expression profiles of genes involved in sterol metabolism were not altered. Surprisingly, the pathways involved in T-cell functions were down-regulated in the jejunum. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis showed that the number of CD3 (cluster of differentiation number 3), CD4 (cluster of differentiation number 4) and Foxp3⁺ (forkhead box P3-positive) cells was reduced in the plant stanol ester condition compared with the control condition, which is in line with the microarray data. The physiological and functional consequences of the plant stanol ester-induced reduction of intestinal T-cell-based immune activity in healthy subjects deserve further investigation. PMID:25683704

  3. Photosystem II Repair and Plant Immunity: Lessons Learned from Arabidopsis Mutant Lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3.

    PubMed

    Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415-425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light. PMID:27064270

  4. Chp8, a Diguanylate Cyclase from Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000, Suppresses the Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Flagellin, Increases Extracellular Polysaccharides, and Promotes Plant Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Christopher J.; McKenna, Joseph F.; Bennett, Mark H.; Hamann, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae causes disease in a wide range of plants. The associated decrease in crop yields results in economic losses and threatens global food security. Competition exists between the plant immune system and the pathogen, the basic principles of which can be applied to animal infection pathways. P. syringae uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence factors into the plant that promote survival of the bacterium. The P. syringae T3SS is a product of the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) and hypersensitive response and conserved (hrc) gene cluster, which is strictly controlled by the codependent enhancer-binding proteins HrpR and HrpS. Through a combination of bacterial gene regulation and phenotypic studies, plant infection assays, and plant hormone quantifications, we now report that Chp8 (i) is embedded in the Hrp regulon and expressed in response to plant signals and HrpRS, (ii) is a functional diguanylate cyclase, (iii) decreases the expression of the major pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flagellin and increases extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), and (iv) impacts the salicylic acid/jasmonic acid hormonal immune response and disease progression. We propose that Chp8 expression dampens PAMP-triggered immunity during early plant infection. PMID:24846383

  5. Bacterial cyclic beta-(1,2)-glucan acts in systemic suppression of plant immune responses.

    PubMed

    Rigano, Luciano Ariel; Payette, Caroline; Brouillard, Geneviève; Marano, Maria Rosa; Abramowicz, Laura; Torres, Pablo Sebastián; Yun, Maximina; Castagnaro, Atilio Pedro; Oirdi, Mohamed El; Dufour, Vanessa; Malamud, Florencia; Dow, John Maxwell; Bouarab, Kamal; Vojnov, Adrian Alberto

    2007-06-01

    Although cyclic glucans have been shown to be important for a number of symbiotic and pathogenic bacterium-plant interactions, their precise roles are unclear. Here, we examined the role of cyclic beta-(1,2)-glucan in the virulence of the black rot pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc). Disruption of the Xcc nodule development B (ndvB) gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase required for cyclic glucan synthesis, generated a mutant that failed to synthesize extracellular cyclic beta-(1,2)-glucan and was compromised in virulence in the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana. Infection of the mutant bacterium in N. benthamiana was associated with enhanced callose deposition and earlier expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Application of purified cyclic beta-(1,2)-glucan prior to inoculation of the ndvB mutant suppressed the accumulation of callose deposition and the expression of PR-1 in N. benthamiana and restored virulence in both N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis plants. These effects were seen when cyclic glucan and bacteria were applied either to the same or to different leaves. Cyclic beta-(1,2)-glucan-induced systemic suppression was associated with the transport of the molecule throughout the plant. Systemic suppression is a novel counterdefensive strategy that may facilitate pathogen spread in plants and may have important implications for the understanding of plant-pathogen coevolution and for the development of phytoprotection measures. PMID:17601826

  6. The plant immunity inducer pipecolic acid accumulates in the xylem sap and leaves of soybean seedlings following Fusarium virguliforme infection.

    PubMed

    Abeysekara, Nilwala S; Swaminathan, Sivakumar; Desai, Nalini; Guo, Lining; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2016-02-01

    The causal agent of the soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS), Fusarium virguliforme, remains in infected roots and secretes toxins to cause foliar SDS. In this study we investigated the xylem sap, roots, and leaves of F. virguliforme-infected and -uninfected soybean seedlings for any changes in a set of over 3,000 metabolites following pathogen infection by conducting GC/MS and LC/MS/MS, and detected 273 biochemicals. Levels of many intermediates of the TCA cycle were reduced suggesting suppression of this metabolic pathway by the pathogen. There was an increased accumulation of peroxidated lipids in leaves of F. virguliforme-infected plants suggesting possible involvement of free radicals and lipoxygenases in foliar SDS development. Levels of both isoflavone conjugates and isoflavonoid phytoalexins were decreased in infected roots suggesting degradation of these metabolites by the pathogen to promote root necrosis. The levels of the plant immunity inducer pipecolic acid (Pip) and the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) were significantly increased in xylem sap (in case of Pip) and leaves (in case of both Pip and SA) of F. virguliforme-infected soybean plants compared to the control plants. This suggests a major signaling role of Pip in inducing host defense responses in above ground parts of the F. virguliforme-infected soybean. Increased accumulation of pipecolic acid in foliar tissues was associated with the induction of GmALD1, the soybean homolog of Arabidopsis ALD1. This metabolomics study generated several novel hypotheses for studying the mechanisms of SDS development in soybean. PMID:26795155

  7. Gaseous 3-pentanol primes plant immunity against a bacterial speck pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato via salicylic acid and jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Geun C.; Choi, Hye K.; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    3-Pentanol is an active organic compound produced by plants and is a component of emitted insect sex pheromones. A previous study reported that drench application of 3-pentanol elicited plant immunity against microbial pathogens and an insect pest in crop plants. Here, we evaluated whether 3-pentanol and the derivatives 1-pentanol and 2-pentanol induced plant systemic resistance using the in vitro I-plate system. Exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings to 10 μM and 100 nM 3-pentanol evaporate elicited an immune response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. We performed quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the 3-pentanol-mediated Arabidopsis immune responses by determining Pathogenesis-Related (PR) gene expression levels associated with defense signaling through salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene signaling pathways. The results show that exposure to 3-pentanol and subsequent pathogen challenge upregulated PDF1.2 and PR1 expression. Selected Arabidopsis mutants confirmed that the 3-pentanol-mediated immune response involved SA and JA signaling pathways and the NPR1 gene. Taken together, this study indicates that gaseous 3-pentanol triggers induced resistance in Arabidopsis by priming SA and JA signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a volatile compound of an insect sex pheromone triggers plant systemic resistance against a bacterial pathogen. PMID:26500665

  8. Korean traditional natural herbs and plants as immune enhancing, antidiabetic, chemopreventive, and antioxidative agents: a narrative review and perspective.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2014-01-01

    The world is becoming increasingly interested in Korean food and its ingredients. The attention goes beyond the typical examples, such as kimchi and fermented sauces; peculiar food ingredients that are widely consumed in Korea are now entering the world's functional food markets. This trend was supported by scientific research, and this review seeks to combine and summarize the findings of the past 10 years. The results are organized into four groups depending on whether the ingredient strengthens the immune system, has antidiabetic effects, has chemopreventive effects, or has an antioxidative effects. We would also like to point out that this review only covers the topic of Korean traditional plants and herbs. After the summary of research findings, we discuss challenges and opportunities, exploring the direction of future research and the potential of Korean traditional food ingredients in food industry and markets. PMID:24456351

  9. A Phytophthora sojae effector suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated immunity by stabilizing plant Binding immunoglobulin Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Li, Haiyang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Haonan; Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Xu, Huawei; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Qiao, Yongli; Tyler, Brett M; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete an array of specific effector proteins to manipulate host innate immunity to promote pathogen colonization. However, little is known about the host targets of effectors and the specific mechanisms by which effectors increase susceptibility. Here we report that the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses an essential effector PsAvh262 to stabilize endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-luminal binding immunoglobulin proteins (BiPs), which act as negative regulators of plant resistance to Phytophthora. By stabilizing BiPs, PsAvh262 suppresses ER stress-triggered cell death and facilitates Phytophthora infection. The direct targeting of ER stress regulators may represent a common mechanism of host manipulation by microbes. PMID:27256489

  10. A Phytophthora sojae effector suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated immunity by stabilizing plant Binding immunoglobulin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Li, Haiyang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Haonan; Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Xu, Huawei; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Qiao, Yongli; Tyler, Brett M.; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete an array of specific effector proteins to manipulate host innate immunity to promote pathogen colonization. However, little is known about the host targets of effectors and the specific mechanisms by which effectors increase susceptibility. Here we report that the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses an essential effector PsAvh262 to stabilize endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-luminal binding immunoglobulin proteins (BiPs), which act as negative regulators of plant resistance to Phytophthora. By stabilizing BiPs, PsAvh262 suppresses ER stress-triggered cell death and facilitates Phytophthora infection. The direct targeting of ER stress regulators may represent a common mechanism of host manipulation by microbes. PMID:27256489

  11. Apoplastic venom allergen-like proteins of cyst nematodes modulate the activation of basal plant innate immunity by cell surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Torres, Jose L; Wilbers, Ruud H P; Warmerdam, Sonja; Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Diaz-Granados, Amalia; van Schaik, Casper C; Helder, Johannes; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska; Schots, Arjen; Smant, Geert

    2014-12-01

    Despite causing considerable damage to host tissue during the onset of parasitism, nematodes establish remarkably persistent infections in both animals and plants. It is thought that an elaborate repertoire of effector proteins in nematode secretions suppresses damage-triggered immune responses of the host. However, the nature and mode of action of most immunomodulatory compounds in nematode secretions are not well understood. Here, we show that venom allergen-like proteins of plant-parasitic nematodes selectively suppress host immunity mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Venom allergen-like proteins are uniquely conserved in secretions of all animal- and plant-parasitic nematodes studied to date, but their role during the onset of parasitism has thus far remained elusive. Knocking-down the expression of the venom allergen-like protein Gr-VAP1 severely hampered the infectivity of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. By contrast, heterologous expression of Gr-VAP1 and two other venom allergen-like proteins from the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in plants resulted in the loss of basal immunity to multiple unrelated pathogens. The modulation of basal immunity by ectopic venom allergen-like proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana involved extracellular protease-based host defenses and non-photochemical quenching in chloroplasts. Non-photochemical quenching regulates the initiation of the defense-related programmed cell death, the onset of which was commonly suppressed by venom allergen-like proteins from G. rostochiensis, H. schachtii, and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Surprisingly, these venom allergen-like proteins only affected the programmed cell death mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Furthermore, the delivery of venom allergen-like proteins into host tissue coincides with the enzymatic breakdown of plant cell walls by migratory nematodes. We, therefore, conclude that parasitic nematodes most likely utilize

  12. Homologous RXLR effectors from Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis and Phytophthora sojae suppress immunity in distantly related plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse pathogens secrete effector proteins into plant cells to manipulate host cellular processes. Oomycete pathogens contain very large complements of predicted effector genes defined by an RXLR host cell entry motif. The genome of Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa, downy mildew of Arabidopsis) ...

  13. Plasmodesmata localizing proteins regulate transport and signaling during systemic acquired immunity in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants is mediated by the signaling molecules azelaic acid (AzA),glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), and salicylic acid (SA).Here, we show that AzA and G3P transport occurs via the symplastic route, which is regulated by channels known as plasmodesmata (PD). In contrast...

  14. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    Innate immunity; Humoral immunity; Cellular immunity; Immunity; Inflammatory response; Acquired (adaptive) immunity ... and usually does not react against them. INNATE IMMUNITY Innate, or nonspecific, immunity is the defense system ...

  15. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" Immunity) Vaccines can prevent outbreaks of disease and save ... disease is contained. This is known as "community immunity." In the illustration below, the top box depicts ...

  16. Analysis of Globodera rostochiensis effectors reveals conserved functions of SPRYSEC proteins in suppressing and eliciting plant immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shawkat; Magne, Maxime; Chen, Shiyan; Obradovic, Natasa; Jamshaid, Lubna; Wang, Xiaohong; Bélair, Guy; Moffett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCNs), including Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.), are important pests of potato. Plant parasitic nematodes produce multiple effector proteins, secreted from their stylets, to successfully infect their hosts. These include proteins delivered to the apoplast and to the host cytoplasm. A number of effectors from G. rostochiensis predicted to be delivered to the host cytoplasm have been identified, including several belonging to the secreted SPRY domain (SPRYSEC) family. SPRYSEC proteins are unique to members of the genus Globodera and have been implicated in both the induction and the repression of host defense responses. We have tested the properties of six different G. rostochiensis SPRYSEC proteins by expressing them in Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum. We have found that all SPRYSEC proteins tested are able to suppress defense responses induced by NB-LRR proteins as well as cell death induced by elicitors, suggesting that defense repression is a common characteristic of members of this effector protein family. At the same time, GrSPRYSEC-15 elicited a defense responses in N. tabacum, which was found to be resistant to a virus expressing GrSPRYSEC-15. These results suggest that SPRYSEC proteins may possess characteristics that allow them to be recognized by the plant immune system. PMID:26322064

  17. Analysis of Globodera rostochiensis effectors reveals conserved functions of SPRYSEC proteins in suppressing and eliciting plant immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shawkat; Magne, Maxime; Chen, Shiyan; Obradovic, Natasa; Jamshaid, Lubna; Wang, Xiaohong; Bélair, Guy; Moffett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCNs), including Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.), are important pests of potato. Plant parasitic nematodes produce multiple effector proteins, secreted from their stylets, to successfully infect their hosts. These include proteins delivered to the apoplast and to the host cytoplasm. A number of effectors from G. rostochiensis predicted to be delivered to the host cytoplasm have been identified, including several belonging to the secreted SPRY domain (SPRYSEC) family. SPRYSEC proteins are unique to members of the genus Globodera and have been implicated in both the induction and the repression of host defense responses. We have tested the properties of six different G. rostochiensis SPRYSEC proteins by expressing them in Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum. We have found that all SPRYSEC proteins tested are able to suppress defense responses induced by NB-LRR proteins as well as cell death induced by elicitors, suggesting that defense repression is a common characteristic of members of this effector protein family. At the same time, GrSPRYSEC-15 elicited a defense responses in N. tabacum, which was found to be resistant to a virus expressing GrSPRYSEC-15. These results suggest that SPRYSEC proteins may possess characteristics that allow them to be recognized by the plant immune system. PMID:26322064

  18. Phosphorylation-Coupled Proteolysis of the Transcription Factor MYC2 Is Important for Jasmonate-Signaled Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Qingzhe; Yan, Liuhua; Tan, Dan; Chen, Rong; Sun, Jiaqiang; Gao, Liyan; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Chuanyou

    2013-01-01

    As a master regulator of jasmonic acid (JA)–signaled plant immune responses, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) Leu zipper transcription factor MYC2 differentially regulates different subsets of JA–responsive genes through distinct mechanisms. However, how MYC2 itself is regulated at the protein level remains unknown. Here, we show that proteolysis of MYC2 plays a positive role in regulating the transcription of its target genes. We discovered a 12-amino-acid element in the transcription activation domain (TAD) of MYC2 that is required for both the proteolysis and the transcriptional activity of MYC2. Interestingly, MYC2 phosphorylation at residue Thr328, which facilitates its turnover, is also required for the MYC2 function to regulate gene transcription. Together, these results reveal that phosphorylation-coupled turnover of MYC2 stimulates its transcription activity. Our results exemplify that, as with animals, plants employ an “activation by destruction” mechanism to fine-tune their transcriptome to adapt to their ever-changing environment. PMID:23593022

  19. [Influence of Professional Contact with Plutonium-239 on Indicators of the Immune Status of the Personnel at Siberian Chemical Plant].

    PubMed

    Oradovskaya, I V; Radzivil, T T

    2015-01-01

    The results of the examination and monitoring of the personnel at the Siberian Chemical Plant (SChP) and adult population of Seversk are presented. The results of primary examination of the personnel who professionally contact the ionizing radiation (IR) from external sources and incorporated 239Pu showed that clinical symptoms of dysfunction of the immune system manifested themselves with a frequency of 75.30%. Infectious-inflammatory diseases (46.95%) and the combined pathology of infectious and allergic character (20.12%) were the most widespread. The allergic diseases (AD) without manifestations of an infectious component were observed not often (7.62%). The monitoring which was carried out for 10 years revealed a decrease in a percentage of persons with clinical signs of disorders of the immune system up to 60.68% among the personnel at the Chemical-Steel Plant and even more among the whole group of the studied personnel at SChP--49.68% (389 : 783). Among the population their frequency made up 51.78%. Features of clinical manifestations of dysfunction ofthe immune system depending on accumulation of 239Pu in the organism are established. Similar dynamics of infectious and infectious and allergic syndromes is revealed when the activity of 239Pu is 40 nCi. AD frequency reliably increased .when the activity of 239Pu is 20 nCi, but if accumulation is higher than 20-40 nCi it decreases and again increases when the activity is over 40 nCi. Pathologies of infectious and allergic genesis are most often observed when the content of 239Pu in an organism is over 40 nCi. Indicators of the immune status (IS) of the personnel at SChP with incorporated 239Pu are analyzed. 59 people--carriers of 239Pu and 408 people without 239Pu accumulated in an organism are examined. In comparison with the control, IS indicators characteristic for all dose loading groups are revealed: increase of lymphocytes, existence of dissociation in indicators of relative and absolute values of the T

  20. Plant-based porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus VLPs induce an immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Campero, Laura; Monroy-García, Alberto; Durán-Meza, Ana L; Villagrana-Escareño, María V; Ruíz-García, Jaime; Hernández, Jesús; Núñez-Palenius, Héctor G; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2015-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) significantly affects the swine industry worldwide. An efficient, protective vaccine is still lacking. Here, we report for the first time the generation and purification of PRRSV virus like particles (VLPs) by expressing GP5, M and N genes in Nicotiana silvestris plants. The particles were clearly visible by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with a size of 60-70 nm. Hydrodynamic diameter of the particles was obtained and it was confirmed that the VLPs had the appropriate size for PRRS virions and that the VLPs were highly pure. By measuring the Z potential we described the electrophoretic mobility behavior of VLPs and the best conditions for stability of the VLPs were determined. The particles were immunogenic in mice. A western blot of purified particles allowed detection of three coexpressed genes. These VLPs may serve as a platform to develop efficient PRRSV vaccines. PMID:26412521

  1. Structural Analysis and Involvement in Plant Innate Immunity of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri Lipopolysaccharide*

    PubMed Central

    Casabuono, Adriana; Petrocelli, Silvana; Ottado, Jorgelina; Orellano, Elena G.; Couto, Alicia S.

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker, provoking defoliation and premature fruit drop with concomitant economical damage. In plant pathogenic bacteria, lipopolysaccharides are important virulence factors, and they are being increasingly recognized as major pathogen-associated molecular patterns for plants. In general, three domains are recognized in a lipopolysaccharide: the hydrophobic lipid A, the hydrophilic O-antigen polysaccharide, and the core oligosaccharide, connecting lipid A and O-antigen. In this work, we have determined the structure of purified lipopolysaccharides obtained from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri wild type and a mutant of the O-antigen ABC transporter encoded by the wzt gene. High pH anion exchange chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum analysis were performed, enabling determination of the structure not only of the released oligosaccharides and lipid A moieties but also the intact lipopolysaccharides. The results demonstrate that Xac wild type and Xacwzt LPSs are composed mainly of a penta- or tetra-acylated diglucosamine backbone attached to either two pyrophosphorylethanolamine groups or to one pyrophosphorylethanolamine group and one phosphorylethanolamine group. The core region consists of a branched oligosaccharide formed by Kdo2Hex6GalA3Fuc3NAcRha4 and two phosphate groups. As expected, the presence of a rhamnose homo-oligosaccharide as O-antigen was determined only in the Xac wild type lipopolysaccharide. In addition, we have examined how lipopolysaccharides from Xac function in the pathogenesis process. We analyzed the response of the different lipopolysaccharides during the stomata aperture closure cycle, the callose deposition, the expression of defense-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production in citrus leaves, suggesting a functional role of the O-antigen from Xac lipopolysaccharides in the basal response. PMID:21596742

  2. Structural analysis and involvement in plant innate immunity of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Casabuono, Adriana; Petrocelli, Silvana; Ottado, Jorgelina; Orellano, Elena G; Couto, Alicia S

    2011-07-22

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker, provoking defoliation and premature fruit drop with concomitant economical damage. In plant pathogenic bacteria, lipopolysaccharides are important virulence factors, and they are being increasingly recognized as major pathogen-associated molecular patterns for plants. In general, three domains are recognized in a lipopolysaccharide: the hydrophobic lipid A, the hydrophilic O-antigen polysaccharide, and the core oligosaccharide, connecting lipid A and O-antigen. In this work, we have determined the structure of purified lipopolysaccharides obtained from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri wild type and a mutant of the O-antigen ABC transporter encoded by the wzt gene. High pH anion exchange chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum analysis were performed, enabling determination of the structure not only of the released oligosaccharides and lipid A moieties but also the intact lipopolysaccharides. The results demonstrate that Xac wild type and Xacwzt LPSs are composed mainly of a penta- or tetra-acylated diglucosamine backbone attached to either two pyrophosphorylethanolamine groups or to one pyrophosphorylethanolamine group and one phosphorylethanolamine group. The core region consists of a branched oligosaccharide formed by Kdo₂Hex₆GalA₃Fuc3NAcRha₄ and two phosphate groups. As expected, the presence of a rhamnose homo-oligosaccharide as O-antigen was determined only in the Xac wild type lipopolysaccharide. In addition, we have examined how lipopolysaccharides from Xac function in the pathogenesis process. We analyzed the response of the different lipopolysaccharides during the stomata aperture closure cycle, the callose deposition, the expression of defense-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production in citrus leaves, suggesting a functional role of the O-antigen from Xac lipopolysaccharides in the basal response. PMID:21596742

  3. Pepper Mild Mottle Virus, a Plant Virus Associated with Specific Immune Responses, Fever, Abdominal Pains, and Pruritus in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Philippe; Richet, Hervé; Desnues, Christelle; Balique, Fanny; Moal, Valérie; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Berbis, Philippe; Lecoq, Hervé; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Berland, Yvon; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, metagenomic studies have identified viable Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), a plant virus, in the stool of healthy subjects. However, its source and role as pathogen have not been determined. Methods and Findings 21 commercialized food products containing peppers, 357 stool samples from 304 adults and 208 stool samples from 137 children were tested for PMMoV using real-time PCR, sequencing, and electron microscopy. Anti-PMMoV IgM antibody testing was concurrently performed. A case-control study tested the association of biological and clinical symptoms with the presence of PMMoV in the stool. Twelve (57%) food products were positive for PMMoV RNA sequencing. Stool samples from twenty-two (7.2%) adults and one child (0.7%) were positive for PMMoV by real-time PCR. Positive cases were significantly more likely to have been sampled in Dermatology Units (p<10−6), to be seropositive for anti-PMMoV IgM antibodies (p = 0.026) and to be patients who exhibited fever, abdominal pains, and pruritus (p = 0.045, 0.038 and 0.046, respectively). Conclusions Our study identified a local source of PMMoV and linked the presence of PMMoV RNA in stool with a specific immune response and clinical symptoms. Although clinical symptoms may be imputable to another cofactor, including spicy food, our data suggest the possibility of a direct or indirect pathogenic role of plant viruses in humans. PMID:20386604

  4. Xanthomonas campestris cell–cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-01-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell–cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell–cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery. PMID:26248667

  5. Xanthomonas campestris cell-cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-11-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell-cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell-cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery. PMID:26248667

  6. A Noncanonical Role for the CKI-RB-E2F Cell Cycle Signaling Pathway in Plant Effector-Triggered Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shui; Gu, Yangnan; Zebell, Sophia G.; Anderson, Lisa K.; Wang, Wei; Mohan, Rajinikanth; Dong, Xinnian

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Effector-triggered immunity (ETI), the major host defense mechanism in plants, is often associated with programmed cell death (PCD). Plants lack close homologs of caspases, the key mediators of PCD in animals. So although the NB-LRR receptors involved in ETI are well studied, how they activate PCD and confer disease resistance remains elusive. We show that the Arabidopsis nuclear envelope protein, CPR5, negatively regulates ETI and the associated PCD through a physical interaction with CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITORs (CKIs). Upon ETI induction, CKIs are released from CPR5 to cause over-activation of another core cell cycle regulator, E2F. In cki and e2f mutants, ETI responses induced by both TIR-NB-LRR and CC-NB-LRR classes of immune receptors are compromised. We further show that E2F is deregulated during ETI probably through CKI-mediated hyperphosphorylation of RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED 1 (RBR1). This study demonstrates that canonical cell cycle regulators also play important noncanonical roles in plant immunity. PMID:25455564

  7. The LOV Protein of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Plays a Significant Role in the Counteraction of Plant Immune Responses during Citrus Canker

    PubMed Central

    Kraiselburd, Ivana; Daurelio, Lucas D.; Tondo, María Laura; Merelo, Paz; Cortadi, Adriana A.; Talón, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R.; Orellano, Elena G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens interaction with a host plant starts a set of immune responses that result in complex changes in gene expression and plant physiology. Light is an important modulator of plant defense response and recent studies have evidenced the novel influence of this environmental stimulus in the virulence of several bacterial pathogens. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is the bacterium responsible for citrus canker disease, which affects most citrus cultivars. The ability of this bacterium to colonize host plants is influenced by bacterial blue-light sensing through a LOV-domain protein and disease symptoms are considerably altered upon deletion of this protein. In this work we aimed to unravel the role of this photoreceptor during the bacterial counteraction of plant immune responses leading to citrus canker development. We performed a transcriptomic analysis in Citrus sinensis leaves inoculated with the wild type X. citri subsp. citri and with a mutant strain lacking the LOV protein by a cDNA microarray and evaluated the differentially regulated genes corresponding to specific biological processes. A down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes (together with a corresponding decrease in photosynthesis rates) was observed upon bacterial infection, this effect being more pronounced in plants infected with the lov-mutant bacterial strain. Infection with this strain was also accompanied with the up-regulation of several secondary metabolism- and defense response-related genes. Moreover, we found that relevant plant physiological alterations triggered by pathogen attack such as cell wall fortification and tissue disruption were amplified during the lov-mutant strain infection. These results suggest the participation of the LOV-domain protein from X. citri subsp. citri in the bacterial counteraction of host plant defense response, contributing in this way to disease development. PMID:24260514

  8. Immunization with Plant-Expressed Hemagglutinin Protects Chickens from Lethal Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus H5N1 Challenge Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, Donata; Giritch, Anatoli; Geisler, Katharina; Bettmann, Ulrike; Klimyuk, Victor; Hehnen, Hans-Robert; Gleba, Yuri; Beer, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) is a striking disease in susceptible poultry, which leads to severe economic losses. Inactivated vaccines are the most widely used vaccines in avian influenza virus (AIV) vaccination programs. However, these vaccines interfere with the serological detection of wild-type AIV infections in immunized populations. The use of vaccines that allow differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA strategy) would stop current stamping-out policies. Therefore, novel vaccination strategies are needed to allow improved protection of animals and humans against HPAI virus (HPAIV) infection. The presented study analyzed for the first time the immunogenic capacity of plant-expressed full-length hemagglutinin (rHA0) of HPAIV H5N1 in several vaccine formulations within the highly relevant host species chicken. We were able to express plant-expressed rHA0 at high levels and could show that, when administered with potent adjuvants, it is highly immunogenic and can fully protect chicken against lethal challenge infection. Real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and serological tests demonstrated only marginally increased virus replication in animals vaccinated with plant-derived rHA0 compared to animals immunized with an inactivated reference vaccine. In addition, the use of plant-expressed rHA0 also allowed an easy serological differentiation of vaccinated from AIV-infected animals based on antibodies against the influenza virus NP protein. PMID:20810729

  9. A chemical genetic approach demonstrates that MPK3/MPK6 activation and NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative burst are two independent signaling events in plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Juan; Xie, Jie; Yan, Chengfei; Zou, Xiaoqin; Ren, Dongtao; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-01-01

    Summary Plant recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 triggers rapid activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis has at least four PAMP/pathogen-responsive MAPKs: MPK3, MPK6, MPK4, and MPK11. It was speculated that these MAPKs may function downstream of ROS in plant immunity because of their activation by exogenously added H2O2. MPK3/MPK6 or their orthologs in other plant species were also reported to be involved in ROS burst from the plant respiratory burst oxidase homologue (Rboh) of human neutrophil gp91phox. However, detailed genetic analysis is lacking. Using a chemical genetic approach, we generated another conditional loss-of-function mpk3 mpk6 double mutant. Together with the conditionally rescued mpk3 mpk6 double mutant reported previously, we demonstrate that flg22-triggered ROS burst is independent of MPK3/MPK6. In Arabidopsis mutant lacking a functional AtRbohD, flg22-induced ROS burst was completely blocked. However, the activation of MPK3/MPK6 was not affected. Based on these results, we conclude that the rapid ROS burst and MPK3/MPK6 activation are two independent early signaling events downstream of FLS2 in plant immunity. We also found that MPK4 negatively impacts the flg22-induced ROS burst. In addition, salicylic acid-pretreatment enhances AtRbohD-mediated ROS burst, which is again independent of MPK3/MPK6 based on the analysis of mpk3 mpk6 double mutant. The establishment of a mpk3 mpk6 double mutant system using the chemical genetic approach offers us a powerful tool to investigate the function of MPK3/MPK6 in plant defense signaling pathway. PMID:24245741

  10. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  11. Plant Aquaporin AtPIP1;4 Links Apoplastic H2O2 Induction to Disease Immunity Pathways1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shan; Wang, Xiaobing; Li, Ping; Wang, Hao; Ji, Hongtao; Xie, Junyi; Qiu, Qinglei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a stable component of reactive oxygen species, and its production in plants represents the successful recognition of pathogen infection and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). This production of H2O2 is typically apoplastic but is subsequently associated with intracellular immunity pathways that regulate disease resistance, such as systemic acquired resistance and PAMP-triggered immunity. Here, we elucidate that an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) aquaporin (i.e. the plasma membrane intrinsic protein AtPIP1;4) acts to close the cytological distance between H2O2 production and functional performance. Expression of the AtPIP1;4 gene in plant leaves is inducible by a bacterial pathogen, and the expression accompanies H2O2 accumulation in the cytoplasm. Under de novo expression conditions, AtPIP1;4 is able to mediate the translocation of externally applied H2O2 into the cytoplasm of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells. In plant cells treated with H2O2, AtPIP1;4 functions as an effective facilitator of H2O2 transport across plasma membranes and mediates the translocation of externally applied H2O2 from the apoplast to the cytoplasm. The H2O2-transport role of AtPIP1;4 is essentially required for the cytoplasmic import of apoplastic H2O2 induced by the bacterial pathogen and two typical PAMPs in the absence of induced production of intracellular H2O2. As a consequence, cytoplasmic H2O2 quantities increase substantially while systemic acquired resistance and PAMP-triggered immunity are activated to repress the bacterial pathogenicity. By contrast, loss-of-function mutation at the AtPIP1;4 gene locus not only nullifies the cytoplasmic import of pathogen- and PAMP-induced apoplastic H2O2 but also cancels the subsequent immune responses, suggesting a pivotal role of AtPIP1;4 in apocytoplastic signal transduction in immunity pathways. PMID:26945050

  12. The Tomato Calcium Sensor Cbl10 and Its Interacting Protein Kinase Cipk6 Define a Signaling Pathway in Plant Immunity[C][W

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Fernando; Gutiérrez-Beltrán, Emilio; Pareja-Jaime, Yolanda; Chakravarthy, Suma; Martin, Gregory B.; del Pozo, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling is an early and necessary event in plant immunity. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) kinase Pto triggers localized programmed cell death (PCD) upon recognition of Pseudomonas syringae effectors AvrPto or AvrPtoB. In a virus-induced gene silencing screen in Nicotiana benthamiana, we independently identified two components of a Ca2+-signaling system, Cbl10 (for calcineurin B-like protein) and Cipk6 (for calcineurin B-like interacting protein kinase), as their silencing inhibited Pto/AvrPto-elicited PCD. N. benthamiana Cbl10 and Cipk6 are also required for PCD triggered by other plant resistance genes and virus, oomycete, and nematode effectors and for host susceptibility to two P. syringae pathogens. Tomato Cipk6 interacts with Cbl10 and its in vitro kinase activity is enhanced in the presence of Cbl10 and Ca2+, suggesting that tomato Cbl10 and Cipk6 constitute a Ca2+-regulated signaling module. Overexpression of tomato Cipk6 in N. benthamiana leaves causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which requires the respiratory burst homolog RbohB. Tomato Cbl10 and Cipk6 interact with RbohB at the plasma membrane. Finally, Cbl10 and Cipk6 contribute to ROS generated during effector-triggered immunity in the interaction of P. syringae pv tomato DC3000 and N. benthamiana. We identify a role for the Cbl/Cipk signaling module in PCD, establishing a mechanistic link between Ca2+ and ROS signaling in plant immunity. PMID:23903322

  13. Phosphorylation-Dependent Differential Regulation of Plant Growth, Cell Death, and Innate Immunity by the Regulatory Receptor-Like Kinase BAK1

    PubMed Central

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Roux, Milena; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Sklenar, Jan; Jones, Alexandra; Zipfel, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    Plants rely heavily on receptor-like kinases (RLKs) for perception and integration of external and internal stimuli. The Arabidopsis regulatory leucine-rich repeat RLK (LRR-RLK) BAK1 is involved in steroid hormone responses, innate immunity, and cell death control. Here, we describe the differential regulation of three different BAK1-dependent signaling pathways by a novel allele of BAK1, bak1-5. Innate immune signaling mediated by the BAK1-dependent RKs FLS2 and EFR is severely compromised in bak1-5 mutant plants. However, bak1-5 mutants are not impaired in BR signaling or cell death control. We also show that, in contrast to the RD kinase BRI1, the non-RD kinases FLS2 and EFR have very low kinase activity, and we show that neither was able to trans-phosphorylate BAK1 in vitro. Furthermore, kinase activity for all partners is completely dispensable for the ligand-induced heteromerization of FLS2 or EFR with BAK1 in planta, revealing another pathway specific mechanistic difference. The specific suppression of FLS2- and EFR-dependent signaling in bak1-5 is not due to a differential interaction of BAK1-5 with the respective ligand-binding RK but requires BAK1-5 kinase activity. Overall our results demonstrate a phosphorylation-dependent differential control of plant growth, innate immunity, and cell death by the regulatory RLK BAK1, which may reveal key differences in the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of ligand-binding RD and non-RD RKs. PMID:21593986

  14. Avr4 promotes Cf-4 receptor-like protein association with the BAK1/SERK3 receptor-like kinase to initiate receptor endocytosis and plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Postma, Jelle; Liebrand, Thomas W H; Bi, Guozhi; Evrard, Alexandre; Bye, Ruby R; Mbengue, Malick; Kuhn, Hannah; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Robatzek, Silke

    2016-04-01

    The first layer of plant immunity is activated by cell surface receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and proteins (RLPs) that detect infectious pathogens. Constitutive interaction with the SUPPRESSOR OF BIR1 (SOBIR1) RLK contributes to RLP stability and kinase activity. As RLK activation requires transphosphorylation with a second associated RLK, it remains elusive how RLPs initiate downstream signaling. We employed live-cell imaging, gene silencing and coimmunoprecipitation to investigate the requirement of associated kinases for functioning and ligand-induced subcellular trafficking of Cf RLPs that mediate immunity of tomato against Cladosporium fulvum. Our research shows that after elicitation with matching effector ligands Avr4 and Avr9, BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1/SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR KINASE 3 (BAK1/SERK3) associates with Cf-4 and Cf-9. BAK1/SERK3 is required for the effector-triggered hypersensitive response and resistance of tomato against C. fulvum. Furthermore, Cf-4 interacts with SOBIR1 at the plasma membrane and is recruited to late endosomes upon Avr4 trigger, also depending on BAK1/SERK3. These observations indicate that RLP-mediated resistance and endocytosis require ligand-induced recruitment of BAK1/SERK3, reminiscent of BAK1/SERK3 interaction and subcellular fate of the FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) RLK. This reveals that diverse classes of cell surface immune receptors share common requirements for initiation of resistance and endocytosis. PMID:26765243

  15. Assessment of Some Immune Parameters in Occupationally Exposed Nuclear Power Plants Workers: Flowcytometry Measurements of T, B, NK and NKT Cells.

    PubMed

    Gyuleva, Ilona; Panova, Delyana; Djounova, Jana; Rupova, Ivanka; Penkova, Kalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the results of a 10-year survey of the radiation effects of some immune parameters of occupationally exposed personnel from the Nuclear Power Plant "Kozloduy", Bulgaria. 438 persons working in NPP with cumulative doses between 0.06 mSv and 766.36mSv and a control group with 65 persons were studied. Flow cytometry measurements of T, B, natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cell lymphocyte populations were performed. Data were interpreted with regard to cumulative doses, length of service and age. The average values of the studied parameters of cellular immunity were in the reference range relative to age and for most of the workers were not significantly different from the control values. Low doses of ionizing radiation showed some trends of change in the number of CD3+CD4+ helper-inducer lymphocytes, CD3+ CD8+ and NKT cell counts. The observed changes in some of the studied parameters could be interpreted in terms of adaptation processes at low doses. At doses above 100-200 mSv, compensatory mechanisms might be involved to balance deviations in lymphocyte subsets. The observed variations in some cases could not be attributed only to the radiation exposure because of the impact of a number of other exogenous and endogenous factors on the immune system. PMID:26675014

  16. Plant-derived H7 VLP vaccine elicits protective immune response against H7N9 influenza virus in mice and ferrets.

    PubMed

    Pillet, S; Racine, T; Nfon, C; Di Lenardo, T Z; Babiuk, S; Ward, B J; Kobinger, G P; Landry, N

    2015-11-17

    In March 2013, the Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the first reported case of human infection with an avian influenza A H7N9 virus. Infection with this virus often caused severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome resulting in a case fatality rate >35%. The risk of pandemic highlighted, once again, the need for a more rapid and scalable vaccine response capability. Here, we describe the rapid (19 days) development of a plant-derived VLP vaccine based on the hemagglutinin sequence of influenza H7N9 A/Hangzhou/1/2013. The immunogenicity of the H7 VLP vaccine was assessed in mice and ferrets after one or two intramuscular dose(s) with and without adjuvant (alum or GLA-SE™). In ferrets, we also measured H7-specific cell-mediated immunity. The mice and ferrets were then challenged with H7N9 A/Anhui/1/2013 influenza virus. A single immunization with the adjuvanted vaccine elicited a strong humoral response and protected mice against an otherwise lethal challenge. Two doses of unadjuvanted vaccine significantly increased humoral response and resulted in 100% protection with significant reduction of clinical signs leading to nearly asymptomatic infections. In ferrets, a single immunization with the alum-adjuvanted H7 VLP vaccine induced strong humoral and CMI responses with antigen-specific activation of CD3(+) T cells. Compared to animals injected with placebo, ferrets vaccinated with alum-adjuvanted vaccine displayed no weight loss during the challenge. Moreover, the vaccination significantly reduced the viral load in lungs and nasal washes 3 days after the infection. This candidate plant-made H7 vaccine therefore induced protective responses after either one adjuvanted or two unadjuvanted doses. Studies are currently ongoing to better characterize the immune response elicited by the plant-derived VLP vaccines. Regardless, these data are very promising for the rapid production of an immunogenic and protective vaccine against

  17. Comparative analyses of genotype dependent expressed sequence tags and stress-responsive transcriptome of chickpea wilt illustrate predicted and unexpected genes and novel regulators of plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Nasheeman; Ghai, Deepali; Barman, Pranjan; Basu, Swaraj; Gangisetty, Nagaraju; Mandal, Mihir K; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2009-01-01

    Background The ultimate phenome of any organism is modulated by regulated transcription of many genes. Characterization of genetic makeup is thus crucial for understanding the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity, evolution and response to intra- and extra-cellular stimuli. Chickpea is the world's third most important food legume grown in over 40 countries representing all the continents. Despite its importance in plant evolution, role in human nutrition and stress adaptation, very little ESTs and differential transcriptome data is available, let alone genotype-specific gene signatures. Present study focuses on Fusarium wilt responsive gene expression in chickpea. Results We report 6272 gene sequences of immune-response pathway that would provide genotype-dependent spatial information on the presence and relative abundance of each gene. The sequence assembly led to the identification of a CaUnigene set of 2013 transcripts comprising of 973 contigs and 1040 singletons, two-third of which represent new chickpea genes hitherto undiscovered. We identified 209 gene families and 262 genotype-specific SNPs. Further, several novel transcription regulators were identified indicating their possible role in immune response. The transcriptomic analysis revealed 649 non-cannonical genes besides many unexpected candidates with known biochemical functions, which have never been associated with pathostress-responsive transcriptome. Conclusion Our study establishes a comprehensive catalogue of the immune-responsive root transcriptome with insight into their identity and function. The development, detailed analysis of CaEST datasets and global gene expression by microarray provide new insight into the commonality and diversity of organ-specific immune-responsive transcript signatures and their regulated expression shaping the species specificity at genotype level. This is the first report on differential transcriptome of an unsequenced genome during vascular wilt. PMID:19732460

  18. A Phytophthora sojae effector PsCRN63 forms homo-/hetero-dimers to suppress plant immunity via an inverted association manner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Meixiang; Shen, Danyu; Liu, Tingli; Chen, Yanyu; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dou, Daolong

    2016-01-01

    Oomycete pathogens produce a large number of effectors to promote infection. Their mode of action are largely unknown. Here we show that a Phytophthora sojae effector, PsCRN63, suppresses flg22-induced expression of FRK1 gene, a molecular marker in pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). However, PsCRN63 does not suppress upstream signaling events including flg22-induced MAPK activation and BIK1 phosphorylation, indicating that it acts downstream of MAPK cascades. The PsCRN63-transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed increased susceptibility to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pst) DC3000 and oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The callose deposition were suppressed in PsCRN63-transgenic plants compared with the wild-type control plants. Genes involved in PTI were also down-regulated in PsCRN63-transgenic plants. Interestingly, we found that PsCRN63 forms an dimer that is mediated by inter-molecular interactions between N-terminal and C-terminal domains in an inverted association manner. Furthermore, the N-terminal and C-terminal domains required for the dimerization are widely conserved among CRN effectors, suggesting that homo-/hetero-dimerization of Phytophthora CRN effectors is required to exert biological functions. Indeed, the dimerization was required for PTI suppression and cell death-induction activities of PsCRN63. PMID:27243217

  19. A Phytophthora sojae effector PsCRN63 forms homo-/hetero-dimers to suppress plant immunity via an inverted association manner.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Meixiang; Shen, Danyu; Liu, Tingli; Chen, Yanyu; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dou, Daolong

    2016-01-01

    Oomycete pathogens produce a large number of effectors to promote infection. Their mode of action are largely unknown. Here we show that a Phytophthora sojae effector, PsCRN63, suppresses flg22-induced expression of FRK1 gene, a molecular marker in pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). However, PsCRN63 does not suppress upstream signaling events including flg22-induced MAPK activation and BIK1 phosphorylation, indicating that it acts downstream of MAPK cascades. The PsCRN63-transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed increased susceptibility to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pst) DC3000 and oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The callose deposition were suppressed in PsCRN63-transgenic plants compared with the wild-type control plants. Genes involved in PTI were also down-regulated in PsCRN63-transgenic plants. Interestingly, we found that PsCRN63 forms an dimer that is mediated by inter-molecular interactions between N-terminal and C-terminal domains in an inverted association manner. Furthermore, the N-terminal and C-terminal domains required for the dimerization are widely conserved among CRN effectors, suggesting that homo-/hetero-dimerization of Phytophthora CRN effectors is required to exert biological functions. Indeed, the dimerization was required for PTI suppression and cell death-induction activities of PsCRN63. PMID:27243217

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing Rift Valley fever virus antigens: Mice exhibit systemic immune responses as the result of oral administration of the transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Kalbina, Irina; Lagerqvist, Nina; Moiane, Bélisario; Ahlm, Clas; Andersson, Sören; Strid, Åke; Falk, Kerstin I

    2016-11-01

    The zoonotic Rift Valley fever virus affects livestock and humans in Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula. The economic impact of this pathogen due to livestock losses, as well as its relevance to public health, underscores the importance of developing effective and easily distributed vaccines. Vaccines that can be delivered orally are of particular interest. Here, we report the expression in transformed plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) of Rift Valley fever virus antigens. The antigens used in this study were the N protein and a deletion mutant of the Gn glycoprotein. Transformed lines were analysed for specific mRNA and protein content by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Furthermore, the plant-expressed antigens were evaluated for their immunogenicity in mice fed the transgenic plants. After oral intake of fresh transgenic plant material, a proportion of the mice elicited specific IgG antibody responses, as compared to the control animals that were fed wild-type plants and of which none sero-converted. Thus, we show that transgenic plants can be readily used to express and produce Rift Valley Fever virus proteins, and that the plants are immunogenic when given orally to mice. These are promising findings and provide a basis for further studies on edible plant vaccines against the Rift Valley fever virus. PMID:27402440

  1. Immune Restoration

    MedlinePlus

    ... marrow cells immune to HIV infection. Letting the immune system repair itself: CD4 counts have increased for many ... have taken ART. Some scientists believe that the immune system might be able to heal and repair itself ...

  2. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cells. T cells are responsible for cell-mediated immunity. This type of immunity becomes deficient in persons with HIV, the virus ... blood. B lymphocytes provide the body with humoral immunity as they circulate in the fluids in search ...

  3. Functional Characterization of a Nudix Hydrolase AtNUDX8 upon Pathogen Attack Indicates a Positive Role in Plant Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Jose Pedro; Dong, Xinnian

    2014-01-01

    Nudix hydrolases comprise a large gene family of twenty nine members in Arabidopsis, each containing a conserved motif capable of hydrolyzing specific substrates like ADP-glucose and NADH. Until now only two members of this family, AtNUDX6 and AtNUDX7, have been shown to be involved in plant immunity. RPP4 is a resistance gene from a multigene family that confers resistance to downy mildew. A time course expression profiling after Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis inoculation in both wild-type (WT) and the rpp4 mutant was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in RPP4-mediated resistance. AtNUDX8 was one of several differentially expressed, downregulated genes identified. A T-DNA knockout mutant (KO-nudx8) was obtained from a Salk T-DNA insertion collection, which exhibited abolished AtNUDX8 expression. The KO-nudx8 mutant was infected separately from the oomycete pathogen Hpa and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326. The mutant displayed a significantly enhanced disease susceptibility to both pathogens when compared with the WT control. We observed a small, stunted phenotype for KO-nudx8 mutant plants when grown over a 12/12 hour photoperiod but not over a 16/8 hour photoperiod. AtNUDX8 expression peaked at 8 hours after the lights were turned on and this expression was significantly repressed four-fold by salicylic acid (SA). The expression of three pathogen-responsive thioredoxins (TRX-h2, TRX-h3 and TRX-h5) were downregulated at specific time points in the KO-nudx8 mutant when compared with the WT. Furthermore, KO-nudx8 plants like the npr1 mutant, displayed SA hypersensitivity. Expression of a key SA biosynthetic gene ICS1 was repressed at specific time points in the KO-nudx8 mutant suggesting that AtNUDX8 is involved in SA signaling in plants. Similarly, NPR1 and PR1 transcript levels were also downregulated at specific time points in the KO-nudx8 mutant. This study shows that AtNUDX8 is involved in plant immunity as

  4. Transient transcriptional regulation of the CYS-C1 gene and cyanide accumulation upon pathogen infection in the plant immune response.

    PubMed

    García, Irene; Rosas, Tábata; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2013-08-01

    Cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) detoxifies cyanide primarily through the enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase, mainly by the mitochondrial CYS-C1. CYS-C1 loss of function is not toxic for the plant and leads to an increased level of cyanide in cys-c1 mutants as well as a root hairless phenotype. The classification of genes differentially expressed in cys-c1 and wild-type plants reveals that the high endogenous cyanide content of the cys-c1 mutant is correlated with the biotic stress response. Cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated during compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions. In addition, cys-c1 plants present an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and an increased tolerance to the biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 bacterium and Beet curly top virus. The cys-c1 mutation produces a reduction in respiration rate in leaves, an accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and an induction of the alternative oxidase AOX1a and pathogenesis-related PR1 expression. We hypothesize that cyanide, which is transiently accumulated during avirulent bacterial infection and constitutively accumulated in the cys-c1 mutant, uncouples the respiratory electron chain dependent on the cytochrome c oxidase, and this uncoupling induces the alternative oxidase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which act by stimulating the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. PMID:23784464

  5. Transient Transcriptional Regulation of the CYS-C1 Gene and Cyanide Accumulation upon Pathogen Infection in the Plant Immune Response1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    García, Irene; Rosas, Tábata; Bejarano, Eduardo R.; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) detoxifies cyanide primarily through the enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase, mainly by the mitochondrial CYS-C1. CYS-C1 loss of function is not toxic for the plant and leads to an increased level of cyanide in cys-c1 mutants as well as a root hairless phenotype. The classification of genes differentially expressed in cys-c1 and wild-type plants reveals that the high endogenous cyanide content of the cys-c1 mutant is correlated with the biotic stress response. Cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated during compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions. In addition, cys-c1 plants present an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and an increased tolerance to the biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 bacterium and Beet curly top virus. The cys-c1 mutation produces a reduction in respiration rate in leaves, an accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and an induction of the alternative oxidase AOX1a and pathogenesis-related PR1 expression. We hypothesize that cyanide, which is transiently accumulated during avirulent bacterial infection and constitutively accumulated in the cys-c1 mutant, uncouples the respiratory electron chain dependent on the cytochrome c oxidase, and this uncoupling induces the alternative oxidase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which act by stimulating the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. PMID:23784464

  6. A Highly-Conserved Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein in Xanthomonas Functions as a Harpin-Like Protein to Trigger Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Che, Yi-Zhou; Zou, Li-Fang; Zakria, Muhammad; Zou, Hua-Song; Chen, Gong-You

    2013-01-01

    Harpins are produced by Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria and typically elicit hypersensitive response (HR) in non-host plants. The characterization of harpins in Xanthomonas species is largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that Xanthomonas produce a highly conserved single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBX) that elicits HR in tobacco as by harpin Hpa1. SSBX, like Hpa1, is an acidic, glycine-rich, heat-stable protein that lacks cysteine residues. SSBX-triggered HR in tobacco, as by Hpa1, is characterized by the oxidative burst, the expression of HR markers (HIN1, HSR203J), pathogenesis-related genes, and callose deposition. Both SSBX- and Hpa1-induced HRs can be inhibited by general metabolism inhibitors actinomycin D, cycloheximide, and lanthanum chloride. Furthermore, those HRs activate the expression of BAK1 and BIK1 genes that are essential for induction of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and salicylic acid pathways. Once applied to plants, SSBX induces resistance to the fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata and enhances plant growth. When ssbX was deleted in X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, the causal agent of bacterial leaf streak in rice, the resulting ssbXoc mutant was reduced in virulence and bacterial growth in planta, but retained its ability to trigger HR in tobacco. Interestingly, ssbXoc contains an imperfect PIP-box (plant-inducible promoter) and the expression of ssbXoc is regulated by HrpX, which belongs to the AraC family of transcriptional activators. Immunoblotting evidence showed that SSBx secretion requires a functional type-III secretion system as Hpa1 does. This is the first report demonstrating that Xanthomonas produce a highly-conserved SSBX that functions as a harpin-like protein for plant immunity. PMID:23418541

  7. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunits affecting plant innate immunity, energy metabolism, and flowering time – joint functions among B'η subfamily members

    PubMed Central

    Kataya, Amr RA; Heidari, Behzad; Lillo, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric complex comprising a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. The regulatory subunits are essential for substrate specificity and localization of the complex and are classified into B/B55, B', and B” non-related families in higher plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the close paralogs B'η, B'θ, B'γ, and B'ζ were further classified into a subfamily of B' called B'η. Here we present results that consolidate the evidence for a role of the B'η subfamily in regulation of innate immunity, energy metabolism and flowering time. Proliferation of the virulent Pseudomonas syringae in B'θ knockout mutant decreased in comparison with wild type plants. Additionally, B'θ knockout plants were delayed in flowering, and this phenotype was supported by high expression of FLC (FLOWERING LOCUS C). B'ζ knockout seedlings showed growth retardation on sucrose-free medium, indicating a role for B'ζ in energy metabolism. This work provides insight into functions of the B'η subfamily members, highlighting their regulation of shared physiological traits while localizing to distinct cellular compartments. PMID:26039486

  8. Bacterial Cyclic β-(1,2)-Glucan Acts in Systemic Suppression of Plant Immune Responses[W

    PubMed Central

    Rigano, Luciano Ariel; Payette, Caroline; Brouillard, Geneviève; Marano, Maria Rosa; Abramowicz, Laura; Torres, Pablo Sebastián; Yun, Maximina; Castagnaro, Atilio Pedro; Oirdi, Mohamed El; Dufour, Vanessa; Malamud, Florencia; Dow, John Maxwell; Bouarab, Kamal; Vojnov, Adrian Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Although cyclic glucans have been shown to be important for a number of symbiotic and pathogenic bacterium–plant interactions, their precise roles are unclear. Here, we examined the role of cyclic β-(1,2)-glucan in the virulence of the black rot pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc). Disruption of the Xcc nodule development B (ndvB) gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase required for cyclic glucan synthesis, generated a mutant that failed to synthesize extracellular cyclic β-(1,2)-glucan and was compromised in virulence in the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana. Infection of the mutant bacterium in N. benthamiana was associated with enhanced callose deposition and earlier expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Application of purified cyclic β-(1,2)-glucan prior to inoculation of the ndvB mutant suppressed the accumulation of callose deposition and the expression of PR-1 in N. benthamiana and restored virulence in both N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis plants. These effects were seen when cyclic glucan and bacteria were applied either to the same or to different leaves. Cyclic β-(1,2)-glucan–induced systemic suppression was associated with the transport of the molecule throughout the plant. Systemic suppression is a novel counterdefensive strategy that may facilitate pathogen spread in plants and may have important implications for the understanding of plant–pathogen coevolution and for the development of phytoprotection measures. PMID:17601826

  9. Colletotrichum higginsianum extracellular LysM proteins play dual roles in appressorial function and suppression of chitin-triggered plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Hiroyuki; Hacquard, Stéphane; Kombrink, Anja; Hughes, H Bleddyn; Halder, Vivek; Robin, Guillaume P; Hiruma, Kei; Neumann, Ulla; Shinya, Tomonori; Kombrink, Erich; Shibuya, Naoto; Thomma, Bart P H J; O'Connell, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    The genome of the hemibiotrophic anthracnose fungus, Colletotrichum higginsianum, encodes a large repertoire of candidate-secreted effectors containing LysM domains, but the role of such proteins in the pathogenicity of any Colletotrichum species is unknown. Here, we characterized the function of two effectors, ChELP1 and ChELP2, which are transcriptionally activated during the initial intracellular biotrophic phase of infection. Using immunocytochemistry, we found that ChELP2 is concentrated on the surface of bulbous biotrophic hyphae at the interface with living host cells but is absent from filamentous necrotrophic hyphae. We show that recombinant ChELP1 and ChELP2 bind chitin and chitin oligomers in vitro with high affinity and specificity and that both proteins suppress the chitin-triggered activation of two immune-related plant mitogen-activated protein kinases in the host Arabidopsis. Using RNAi-mediated gene silencing, we found that ChELP1 and ChELP2 are essential for fungal virulence and appressorium-mediated penetration of both Arabidopsis epidermal cells and cellophane membranes in vitro. The findings suggest a dual role for these LysM proteins as effectors for suppressing chitin-triggered immunity and as proteins required for appressorium function. PMID:27174033

  10. Structural determinants at the interface of the ARC2 and leucine-rich repeat domains control the activation of the plant immune receptors Rx1 and Gpa2.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Erik J; Spiridon, Laurentiu N; Roosien, Jan; Butterbach, Patrick; Pomp, Rikus; Westerhof, Lotte; Wilbers, Ruud; Bakker, Erin; Bakker, Jaap; Petrescu, Andrei-José; Smant, Geert; Goverse, Aska

    2013-07-01

    Many plant and animal immune receptors have a modular nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) architecture in which a nucleotide-binding switch domain, NB-ARC, is tethered to a LRR sensor domain. The cooperation between the switch and sensor domains, which regulates the activation of these proteins, is poorly understood. Here, we report structural determinants governing the interaction between the NB-ARC and LRR in the highly homologous plant immune receptors Gpa2 and Rx1, which recognize the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida and Potato virus X, respectively. Systematic shuffling of polymorphic sites between Gpa2 and Rx1 showed that a minimal region in the ARC2 and N-terminal repeats of the LRR domain coordinate the activation state of the protein. We identified two closely spaced amino acid residues in this region of the ARC2 (positions 401 and 403) that distinguish between autoactivation and effector-triggered activation. Furthermore, a highly acidic loop region in the ARC2 domain and basic patches in the N-terminal end of the LRR domain were demonstrated to be required for the physical interaction between the ARC2 and LRR. The NB-ARC and LRR domains dissociate upon effector-dependent activation, and the complementary-charged regions are predicted to mediate a fast reassociation, enabling multiple rounds of activation. Finally, we present a mechanistic model showing how the ARC2, NB, and N-terminal half of the LRR form a clamp, which regulates the dissociation and reassociation of the switch and sensor domains in NB-LRR proteins. PMID:23660837

  11. The rat ErbB2 tyrosine kinase receptor produced in plants is immunogenic in mice and confers protective immunity against ErbB2(+) mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Matić, Slavica; Quaglino, Elena; Arata, Lucia; Riccardo, Federica; Pegoraro, Mattia; Vallino, Marta; Cavallo, Federica; Noris, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    The rat ErbB2 (rErbB2) protein is a 185-kDa glycoprotein belonging to the epidermal growth factor-related proteins (ErbB) of receptor tyrosine kinases. Overexpression and mutations of ErbB proteins lead to several malignancies including breast, lung, pancreatic, bladder and ovary carcinomas. ErbB2 is immunogenic and is an ideal candidate for cancer immunotherapy. We investigated the possibility of expressing the extracellular (EC) domain of rErbB2 (653 amino acids, aa) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, testing the influence of the 23 aa transmembrane (TM) sequence on protein accumulation. Synthetic variants of the rErbB2 gene portion encoding the EC domain, optimized with a human codon usage and either linked to the full TM domain (rErbB2_TM, 676 aa), to a portion of it (rErbB2-pTM, 662 aa), or deprived of it (rErbB2_noTM, 653 aa) were cloned in the pEAQ-HT expression vector as 6X His tag fusions. All rErbB2 variants (72-74.5 kDa) were transiently expressed, but the TM was detrimental for rErbB2 EC accumulation. rERbB2_noTM was the most expressed protein; it was solubilized and purified with Nickel affinity resin. When crude soluble extracts expressing rErbB2_noTM were administered to BALB/c mice, specific rErbB2 immune responses were triggered. A potent antitumour activity was induced when vaccinated mice were challenged with syngeneic transplantable ErbB2(+) mammary carcinoma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of expression of rErbB2 in plants and of its efficacy in inducing a protective antitumour immune response, opening interesting perspectives for further immunological testing. PMID:25865255

  12. Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopAF1 suppresses plant immunity by targeting methionine recycling to block ethylene induction

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Erica J.; Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Finkel, Omri M.; Wan, Li; Kieber, Joseph J.; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2016-01-01

    HopAF1 is a type III effector protein of unknown function encoded in the genomes of several strains of Pseudomonas syringae and other plant pathogens. Structural modeling predicted that HopAF1 is closely related to deamidase proteins. Deamidation is the irreversible substitution of an amide group with a carboxylate group. Several bacterial virulence factors are deamidases that manipulate the activity of specific host protein substrates. We identified Arabidopsis methylthioadenosine nucleosidase proteins MTN1 and MTN2 as putative targets of HopAF1 deamidation. MTNs are enzymes in the Yang cycle, which is essential for the high levels of ethylene biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We hypothesized that HopAF1 inhibits the host defense response by manipulating MTN activity and consequently ethylene levels. We determined that bacterially delivered HopAF1 inhibits ethylene biosynthesis induced by pathogen-associated molecular patterns and that Arabidopsis mtn1 mtn2 mutant plants phenocopy the effect of HopAF1. Furthermore, we identified two conserved asparagines in MTN1 and MTN2 from Arabidopsis that confer loss of function phenotypes when deamidated via site-specific mutation. These residues are potential targets of HopAF1 deamidation. HopAF1-mediated manipulation of Yang cycle MTN proteins is likely an evolutionarily conserved mechanism whereby HopAF1 orthologs from multiple plant pathogens contribute to disease in a large variety of plant hosts. PMID:27274076

  13. Analysis of Globodera rostochiensis effectors reveals conserved functions of SPRYSEC proteins in suppressing and eliciting plant immune responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCNs), including Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.), are important pests of potato. Plant parasitic nematodes produce multiple effector proteins, secreted from their stylets, to successfully infect their hosts. These include proteins that are delivered to the apoplast, as well as...

  14. Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  15. Molecular Steps in the Immune Signaling Pathway Evoked by Plant Elicitor Peptides: Ca2+-Dependent Protein Kinases, Nitric Oxide, and Reactive Oxygen Species Are Downstream from the Early Ca2+ Signal1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhao, Yichen; Walker, Robin K.; Berkowitz, Gerald A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous plant elicitor peptides (Peps) can act to facilitate immune signaling and pathogen defense responses. Binding of these peptides to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plasma membrane-localized Pep receptors (PEPRs) leads to cytosolic Ca2+ elevation, an early event in a signaling cascade that activates immune responses. This immune response includes the amplification of signaling evoked by direct perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by plant cells under assault. Work included in this report further characterizes the Pep immune response and identifies new molecular steps in the signal transduction cascade. The PEPR coreceptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 Associated Kinase1 contributes to generation of the Pep-activated Ca2+ signal and leads to increased defense gene expression and resistance to a virulent bacterial pathogen. Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) decode the Ca2+ signal, also facilitating defense gene expression and enhanced resistance to the pathogen. Nitric oxide and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species generation (due to the function of Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog proteins D and F) are also involved downstream from the Ca2+ signal in the Pep immune defense signal transduction cascade, as is the case with BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 Associated Kinase1 and CPK5, CPK6, and CPK11. These steps of the pathogen defense response are required for maximal Pep immune activation that limits growth of a virulent bacterial pathogen in the plant. We find a synergism between function of the PEPR and Flagellin Sensing2 receptors in terms of both nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation. Presented results are also consistent with the involvement of the secondary messenger cyclic GMP and a cyclic GMP-activated Ca2+-conducting channel in the Pep immune signaling pathway. PMID:24019427

  16. A plant-produced Pfs25 VLP malaria vaccine candidate induces persistent transmission blocking antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum in immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Jones, R Mark; Chichester, Jessica A; Mett, Vadim; Jaje, Jennifer; Tottey, Stephen; Manceva, Slobodanka; Casta, Louis J; Gibbs, Sandra K; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Shamloul, Moneim; Norikane, Joey; Mett, Valentina; Streatfield, Stephen J; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Roeffen, Will; Sauerwein, Robert W; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2013-01-01

    Malaria transmission blocking vaccines (TBVs) are considered an effective means to control and eventually eliminate malaria. The Pfs25 protein, expressed predominantly on the surface of the sexual and sporogonic stages of Plasmodium falciparum including gametes, zygotes and ookinetes, is one of the primary targets for TBV. It has been demonstrated that plants are an effective, highly scalable system for the production of recombinant proteins, including virus-like particles (VLPs). We engineered VLPs (Pfs25-CP VLP) comprising Pfs25 fused to the Alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein (CP) and produced these non-enveloped hybrid VLPs in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a Tobacco mosaic virus-based 'launch' vector. Purified Pfs25-CP VLPs were highly consistent in size (19.3±2.4 nm in diameter) with an estimated 20-30% incorporation of Pfs25 onto the VLP surface. Immunization of mice with one or two doses of Pfs25-CP VLPs plus Alhydrogel® induced serum antibodies with complete transmission blocking activity through the 6 month study period. These results support the evaluation of Pfs25-CP VLP as a potential TBV candidate and the feasibility of the 'launch' vector technology for the production of VLP-based recombinant vaccines against infectious diseases. PMID:24260245

  17. Structure comparison of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein GliPR and the plant pathogenesis-related protein P14a indicates a functional link between the human immune system and a plant defense system.

    PubMed

    Szyperski, T; Fernández, C; Mumenthaler, C; Wüthrich, K

    1998-03-01

    The human glioma pathogenesis-related protein (GliPR) is highly expressed in the brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme and exhibits 35% amino acid sequence identity with the tomato pathogenesis-related (PR) protein P14a, which has an important role for the plant defense system. A molecular model of GliPR was computed with the distance geometry program DIANA on the basis of a P14a-GliPR sequence alignment and a set of 1,200 experimental NMR conformational constraints collected with P14a. The GliPR structure is represented by a group of 20 conformers with small residual DIANA target function values, low AMBER-energies after restrained energy-minimization with the program OPAL, and an average rms deviation relative to the mean of 1.6 A for the backbone heavy atoms. Comparison of the GliPR model with the P14a structure lead to the identification of a common partially solvent-exposed spatial cluster of four amino acid residues, His-69, Glu-88, Glu-110, and His-127 in the GliPR numeration. This cluster is conserved in all known plant PR proteins of class 1, indicating a common putative active site for GliPR and PR-1 proteins and thus a functional link between the human immune system and a plant defense system. PMID:9482873

  18. Structure comparison of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein GliPR and the plant pathogenesis-related protein P14a indicates a functional link between the human immune system and a plant defense system

    PubMed Central

    Szyperski, T.; Fernández, C.; Mumenthaler, C.; Wüthrich, K.

    1998-01-01

    The human glioma pathogenesis-related protein (GliPR) is highly expressed in the brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme and exhibits 35% amino acid sequence identity with the tomato pathogenesis-related (PR) protein P14a, which has an important role for the plant defense system. A molecular model of GliPR was computed with the distance geometry program diana on the basis of a P14a–GliPR sequence alignment and a set of 1,200 experimental NMR conformational constraints collected with P14a. The GliPR structure is represented by a group of 20 conformers with small residual diana target function values, low amber-energies after restrained energy-minimization with the program opal, and an average rms deviation relative to the mean of 1.6 Å for the backbone heavy atoms. Comparison of the GliPR model with the P14a structure lead to the identification of a common partially solvent-exposed spatial cluster of four amino acid residues, His-69, Glu-88, Glu-110, and His-127 in the GliPR numeration. This cluster is conserved in all known plant PR proteins of class 1, indicating a common putative active site for GliPR and PR-1 proteins and thus a functional link between the human immune system and a plant defense system. PMID:9482873

  19. Childhood Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  20. Immunizations - diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  1. Effect of host plant and immune challenge on the levels of chemosensory and odorant-binding proteins in caterpillar salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Celorio-Mancera, Maria de la Paz; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Janz, Niklas; Zubarev, Roman A

    2015-06-01

    More than half of the proteome from mandibular glands in caterpillars is represented by chemosensory proteins. Based on sequence similarity, these proteins are putative transporters of ligands to gustatory receptors in sensory organs of insects. We sought to determine whether these proteins are inducible by comparing, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the salivary (mandibular and labial) proteomes from caterpillars (Vanessa cardui) reared on different plants and artificial diet containing either bacteria or bacterial cell-walls. We included a treatment where the caterpillars were switched from feeding on artificial diet to plant material at some point in their development. Additionally, we evaluated the degree of overlap between the proteomes in the hemolymph-filled coelom and salivary glands of caterpillars reared on plant material. We found that the quality and quantity of the identified proteins differed clearly between hemolymph-filled coelome, labial and mandibular glands. Our results indicated that even after molting and two-day feeding on a new diet, protein production is affected by the previous food source used by the caterpillar. Candidate proteins involved in chemosensory perception by insects were detected: three chemosensory (CSPs) and two odorant-binding proteins (OBPs). Using the relative amounts of these proteins across tissues and treatments as criteria for their classification, we detected hemolymph- and mandibular gland-specific CSPs and observed that their levels were affected by caterpillar diet. Moreover, we could compare the protein and transcript levels across tissues and treatment for at least one CSP and one OBP. Therefore, we have identified specific isoforms for testing the role of CSPs and OBPs in plant and pathogen recognition. We detected catalase, immune-related protein and serine proteases and their inhibitors in high relative levels in the mandibular glands in comparison to the labial glands. These findings suggest that the

  2. A plant-expressed conjugate vaccine breaks CD4+ tolerance and induces potent immunity against metastatic Her2+ breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chotprakaikiat, Warayut; Allen, Alex; Bui-Minh, Duc; Harden, Elena; Jobsri, Jantipa; Cavallo, Federica; Gleba, Yuri; Stevenson, Freda K.; Ottensmeier, Christian; Klimyuk, Victor; Savelyeva, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Passive antibody therapy for cancer is an effective but costly treatment modality. Induction of therapeutically potent anticancer antibodies by active vaccination is an attractive alternative but has proven challenging in cancer due to tolerogenic pressure in patients. Here, we used the clinically relevant cancer target Her2, known to be susceptible to targeting by antibody therapy, to demonstrate how potent antibody can be induced by vaccination. A novel 44kD Her2 protein fragment was generated and found to be highly effective at inducing anti-Her2 antibody including trastuzumab-like reactivities. In the tolerant and spontaneous BALB-neuT mouse model of metastatic breast cancer this Her2-targeting vaccine was only effective if the fragment was conjugated to a foreign immunogenic carrier; Fragment C of tetanus toxin. Only the conjugate vaccine induced high affinity anti-Her2 antibody of multiple isotypes and suppressed tumor development. The magnitude of CD4+ T-cell help and breadth of cytokines secreted by the CD4+ T helper (Th) cells induced to the foreign antigen was critical. We used a highly efficient plant-based bio-manufacturing process for protein antigens, magnICON, for vaccine expression, to underpin feasibility of future clinical testing. Hence, our novel Her2-targeting conjugate vaccine combines preclinical efficacy with clinical deliverability, thus setting the scene for therapeutic testing. PMID:27471642

  3. Echinoderm immunity.

    PubMed

    Smith, L Courtney; Ghosh, Julie; Buckley, Katherine M; Clow, Lori A; Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Haug, Tor; Henson, John H; Li, Chun; Lun, Cheng Man; Majeske, Audrey J; Matranga, Valeria; Nair, Sham V; Rast, Jonathan P; Raftos, David A; Roth, Mattias; Sacchi, Sandro; Schrankel, Catherine S; Stensvåg, Klara

    2010-01-01

    A survey for immune genes in the genome for the purple sea urchin has shown that the immune system is complex and sophisticated. By inference, immune responses of all echinoderms maybe similar. The immune system is mediated by several types of coelomocytes that are also useful as sensors of environmental stresses. There are a number of large gene families in the purple sea urchin genome that function in immunity and of which at least one appears to employ novel approaches for sequence diversification. Echinoderms have a simpler complement system, a large set of lectin genes and a number of antimicrobial peptides. Profiling the immune genes expressed by coelomocytes and the proteins in the coelomic fluid provide detailed information about immune functions in the sea urchin. The importance of echinoderms in maintaining marine ecosystem stability and the disastrous effects of their removal due to disease will require future collaborations between ecologists and immunologists working towards understanding and preserving marine habitats. PMID:21528703

  4. Analysis of a plant complex resistance gene locus underlying immune-related hybrid incompatibility and its occurrence in nature.

    PubMed

    Alcázar, Rubén; von Reth, Marcel; Bautor, Jaqueline; Chae, Eunyoung; Weigel, Detlef; Koornneef, Maarten; Parker, Jane E

    2014-12-01

    Mechanisms underlying speciation in plants include detrimental (incompatible) genetic interactions between parental alleles that incur a fitness cost in hybrids. We reported on recessive hybrid incompatibility between an Arabidopsis thaliana strain from Poland, Landsberg erecta (Ler), and many Central Asian A. thaliana strains. The incompatible interaction is determined by a polymorphic cluster of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (TNL) RPP1 (Recognition of Peronospora parasitica1)-like genes in Ler and alleles of the receptor-like kinase Strubbelig Receptor Family 3 (SRF3) in Central Asian strains Kas-2 or Kond, causing temperature-dependent autoimmunity and loss of growth and reproductive fitness. Here, we genetically dissected the RPP1-like Ler locus to determine contributions of individual RPP1-like Ler (R1-R8) genes to the incompatibility. In a neutral background, expression of most RPP1-like Ler genes, except R3, has no effect on growth or pathogen resistance. Incompatibility involves increased R3 expression and engineered R3 overexpression in a neutral background induces dwarfism and sterility. However, no individual RPP1-like Ler gene is sufficient for incompatibility between Ler and Kas-2 or Kond, suggesting that co-action of at least two RPP1-like members underlies this epistatic interaction. We find that the RPP1-like Ler haplotype is frequent and occurs with other Ler RPP1-like alleles in a local population in Gorzów Wielkopolski (Poland). Only Gorzów individuals carrying the RPP1-like Ler haplotype are incompatible with Kas-2 and Kond, whereas other RPP1-like alleles in the population are compatible. Therefore, the RPP1-like Ler haplotype has been maintained in genetically different individuals at a single site, allowing exploration of forces shaping the evolution of RPP1-like genes at local and regional population scales. PMID:25503786

  5. Plant-based oral tolerance to hemophilia therapy employs a complex immune regulatory response including LAP+CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomei; Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Rogers, Geoffrey L; Liao, Gongxian; Hoffman, Brad E; Leong, Kam W; Terhorst, Cox; Daniell, Henry; Herzog, Roland W

    2015-04-01

    Coagulation factor replacement therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia is severely complicated by antibody ("inhibitor") formation. We previously found that oral delivery to hemophilic mice of cholera toxin B subunit-coagulation factor fusion proteins expressed in chloroplasts of transgenic plants suppressed inhibitor formation directed against factors VIII and IX and anaphylaxis against factor IX (FIX). This observation and the relatively high concentration of antigen in the chloroplasts prompted us to evaluate the underlying tolerance mechanisms. The combination of oral delivery of bioencapsulated FIX and intravenous replacement therapy induced a complex, interleukin-10 (IL-10)-dependent, antigen-specific systemic immune suppression of pathogenic antibody formation (immunoglobulin [Ig] 1/inhibitors, IgE) in hemophilia B mice. Tolerance induction was also successful in preimmune mice but required prolonged oral delivery once replacement therapy was resumed. Orally delivered antigen, initially targeted to epithelial cells, was taken up by dendritic cells throughout the small intestine and additionally by F4/80(+) cells in the duodenum. Consistent with the immunomodulatory responses, frequencies of tolerogenic CD103(+) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were increased. Ultimately, latency-associated peptide expressing CD4(+) regulatory T cells (CD4(+)CD25(-)LAP(+) cells with upregulated IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) expression) as well as conventional CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells systemically suppressed anti-FIX responses. PMID:25700434

  6. Transcriptomics of the Interaction between the Monopartite Phloem-Limited Geminivirus Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Sardinia Virus and Solanum lycopersicum Highlights a Role for Plant Hormones, Autophagy and Plant Immune System Fine Tuning during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miozzi, Laura; Napoli, Chiara; Sardo, Luca; Accotto, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), a DNA virus belonging to the genus Begomovirus, causes severe losses in tomato crops. It infects only a limited number of cells in the vascular tissues, making difficult to detect changes in host gene expression linked to its presence. Here we present the first microarray study of transcriptional changes induced by the phloem-limited geminivirus TYLCSV infecting tomato, its natural host. The analysis was performed on the midrib of mature leaves, a material naturally enriched in vascular tissues. A total of 2206 genes were up-regulated and 1398 were down-regulated in infected plants, with an overrepresentation of genes involved in hormone metabolism and responses, nucleic acid metabolism, regulation of transcription, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and autophagy among those up-regulated, and in primary and secondary metabolism, phosphorylation, transcription and methylation-dependent chromatin silencing among those down-regulated. Our analysis showed a series of responses, such as the induction of GA- and ABA-responsive genes, the activation of the autophagic process and the fine tuning of the plant immune system, observed only in TYLCSV-tomato compatible interaction so far. On the other hand, comparisons with transcriptional changes observed in other geminivirus-plant interactions highlighted common host responses consisting in the deregulation of biotic stress responsive genes, key enzymes in the ethylene biosynthesis and methylation cycle, components of the ubiquitin proteasome system and DNA polymerases II. The involvement of conserved miRNAs and of solanaceous- and tomato-specific miRNAs in geminivirus infection, investigated by integrating differential gene expression data with miRNA targeting data, is discussed. PMID:24587146

  7. Pto Kinase Binds Two Domains of AvrPtoB and Its Proximity to the Effector E3 Ligase Determines if It Evades Degradation and Activates Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Johannes; Schwizer, Simon; Martin, Gregory B.

    2014-01-01

    The tomato—Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst)—pathosystem is one of the best understood models for plant-pathogen interactions. Certain wild relatives of tomato express two closely related members of the same kinase family, Pto and Fen, which recognize the Pst virulence protein AvrPtoB and activate effector-triggered immunity (ETI). AvrPtoB, however, contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase domain in its carboxyl terminus which causes degradation of Fen and undermines its ability to activate ETI. In contrast, Pto evades AvrPtoB-mediated degradation and triggers ETI in response to the effector. It has been reported recently that Pto has higher kinase activity than Fen and that this difference allows Pto to inactivate the E3 ligase through phosphorylation of threonine-450 (T450) in AvrPtoB. Here we show that, in contrast to Fen which can only interact with a single domain proximal to the E3 ligase of AvrPtoB, Pto binds two distinct domains of the effector, the same site as Fen and another N-terminal domain. In the absence of E3 ligase activity Pto binds to either domain of AvrPtoB to activate ETI. However, the presence of an active E3 ligase domain causes ubiquitination of Pto that interacts with the domain proximal to the E3 ligase, identical to ubiquitination of Fen. Only when Pto binds its unique distal domain can it resist AvrPtoB-mediated degradation and activate ETI. We show that phosphorylation of T450 is not required for Pto-mediated resistance in vivo and that a kinase-inactive version of Pto is still capable of activating ETI in response to AvrPtoB. Our results demonstrate that the ability of Pto to interact with a second site distal to the E3 ligase domain in AvrPtoB, and not a higher kinase activity or T450 phosphorylation, allows Pto to evade ubiquitination and to confer immunity to Pst. PMID:25058029

  8. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  9. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  10. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  11. Pepper Heat Shock Protein 70a Interacts with the Type III Effector AvrBsT and Triggers Plant Cell Death and Immunity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) function as molecular chaperones and are essential for the maintenance and/or restoration of protein homeostasis. The genus Xanthomonas type III effector protein AvrBsT induces hypersensitive cell death in pepper (Capsicum annuum). Here, we report the identification of the pepper CaHSP70a as an AvrBsT-interacting protein. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirm the specific interaction between CaHSP70a and AvrBsT in planta. The CaHSP70a peptide-binding domain is essential for its interaction with AvrBsT. Heat stress (37°C) and Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) infection distinctly induce CaHSP70a in pepper leaves. Cytoplasmic CaHSP70a proteins significantly accumulate in pepper leaves to induce the hypersensitive cell death response by Xcv (avrBsT) infection. Transient CaHSP70a overexpression induces hypersensitive cell death under heat stress, which is accompanied by strong induction of defense- and cell death-related genes. The CaHSP70a peptide-binding domain and ATPase-binding domain are required to trigger cell death under heat stress. Transient coexpression of CaHSP70a and avrBsT leads to cytoplasmic localization of the CaHSP70a-AvrBsT complex and significantly enhances avrBsT-triggered cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana. CaHSP70a silencing in pepper enhances Xcv growth but disrupts the reactive oxygen species burst and cell death response during Xcv infection. Expression of some defense marker genes is significantly reduced in CaHSP70a-silenced leaves, with lower levels of the defense hormones salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Together, these results suggest that CaHSP70a interacts with the type III effector AvrBsT and is required for cell death and immunity in plants. PMID:25491184

  12. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  13. Maternal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Michelle H; Beigi, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization holds tremendous promise to improve maternal and neonatal health for a number of infectious conditions. The unique susceptibilities of pregnant women to infectious conditions, as well as the ability of maternally-derived antibody to offer vital neonatal protection (via placental transfer), together have produced the recent increased attention on maternal immunization. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) currently recommends 2 immunizations for all pregnant women lacking contraindication, inactivated Influenza and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap). Given ongoing research the number of vaccines recommended during pregnancy is likely to increase. Thus, achieving high vaccination coverage of pregnant women for all recommended immunizations is a key public health enterprise. This review will focus on the present state of vaccine acceptance in pregnancy, with attention to currently identified barriers and determinants of vaccine acceptance. Additionally, opportunities for improvement will be considered. PMID:25483490

  14. Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

  15. Immunity challenge.

    PubMed

    Davenport, R John

    2003-06-11

    As people get older, their immune systems falter. The elderly are more susceptible to infections than youngsters are, and hyperactive inflammatory responses appear to contribute to some age-associated illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. Investigating the effect of aging on the immune system was once a scientific stepchild, but card-carrying immunologists are now tackling the problem head-on. Despite the immune system's complexity, researchers have started to make sense of how its components change with age. As the research progresses, scientists hope to bolster elderly people's response to infectious diseases and quiet the inflammation that can make aging a painful experience. PMID:12844525

  16. Immunization Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... underused vaccines is increasing. Immunization currently averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year. An ... avoided, however, if global vaccination coverage improves. An estimated 19.4 million infants worldwide are still missing ...

  17. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation and tissue repair. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... and adaptive immune systems. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  18. Childhood Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    Today, children in the United States routinely get vaccines that protect them from more than a dozen ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ...

  19. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The immune system includes specialized white blood cells, called lymphocytes that adapt themselves to fight specific foreign invaders. These cells develop into two groups in the bone marrow. From the bone ...

  20. [Immune status of people participating in the clean-up of after-effects of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident living in the industrial region of Donbass].

    PubMed

    Frolov, V M; Peresadin, N A; Kazakova, S E; Safonova, E F

    1993-01-01

    The examination of 286 subjects exposed to radiation hazards when taking part in liquidation of the Chernobyl accident aftereffects was performed to compare persons living under ecologically unfavourable conditions (significant air pollution due to heavy industry) against those living in relatively comfortable environment. It was found that immune status of the former displayed imbalance. In the latter immunity was much less damaged. The findings suggest a conclusion on the role of environmental factors in immunological disturbances in subjects exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation. PMID:8307292

  1. Immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kistangari, Gaurav; McCrae, Keith R

    2013-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common hematologic disorder characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia. ITP presents as a primary or a secondary form. ITP may affect individuals of all ages, with peaks during childhood and in the elderly, in whom the age-specific incidence of ITP is greatest. Bleeding is the most common clinical manifestation of ITP. The pathogenesis of ITP is complex, involving alterations in humoral and cellular immunity. Corticosteroids remain the most common first line therapy for ITP. This article summarizes the classification and diagnosis of primary and secondary ITP, as well as the pathogenesis and options for treatment. PMID:23714309

  2. Immune-system-dependent anti-tumor activity of a plant-derived polyphenol rich fraction in a melanoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Cadena, A; Urueña, C; Prieto, K; Martinez-Usatorre, A; Donda, A; Barreto, A; Romero, P; Fiorentino, S

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that part of the anti-tumor effects of several chemotherapeutic agents require an intact immune system. This is in part due to the induction of immunogenic cell death. We have identified a gallotannin-rich fraction, obtained from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et) as an anti-tumor agent in both breast carcinoma and melanoma. Here, we report that P2Et treatment results in activation of caspase 3 and 9, mobilization of cytochrome c and externalization of annexin V in tumor cells, thus suggesting the induction of apoptosis. This was preceded by the onset of autophagy and the expression of immunogenic cell death markers. We further demonstrate that P2Et-treated tumor cells are highly immunogenic in vaccinated mice and induce immune system activation, clearly shown by the generation of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) producing tyrosine-related protein 2 antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover, the tumor protective effects of P2Et treatment were abolished in immunodeficient mice, and partially lost after CD4 and CD8 depletion, indicating that P2Et's anti-tumor activity is highly dependent on immune system and at least in part of T cells. Altogether, these results support the hypothesis that the gallotannin-rich fraction P2Et's anti-tumor effects are mediated to a great extent by the endogenous immune response following to the exposure to immunogenic dying tumor cells. PMID:27253407

  3. Effector triggered immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce virulence factors called effectors, which are important components of the infection process. Effectors aid in pathogenesis by facilitating bacterial attachment, pathogen entry into or exit from the host cell, immunoevasion, and immunosuppression. Effectors also have the ability to subvert host cellular processes, such as hijacking cytoskeletal machinery or blocking protein translation. However, host cells possess an evolutionarily conserved innate immune response that can sense the pathogen through the activity of its effectors and mount a robust immune response. This “effector triggered immunity” (ETI) was first discovered in plants but recent evidence suggest that the process is also well conserved in metazoans. We will discuss salient points of the mechanism of ETI in metazoans from recent studies done in mammalian cells and invertebrate model hosts. PMID:25513770

  4. The bacterial lipopeptide iturins induce Verticillium dahliae cell death by affecting fungal signalling pathways and mediate plant defence responses involved in pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Han, Qin; Wu, Fengli; Wang, Xiaonan; Qi, Hong; Shi, Liang; Ren, Ang; Liu, Qinghai; Zhao, Mingwen; Tang, Canming

    2015-04-01

    Verticillium wilt in cotton caused by Verticillium dahliae is one of the most serious plant diseases worldwide. Because no known fungicides or cotton cultivars provide sufficient protection against this pathogen, V. dahliae causes major crop yield losses. Here, an isolated cotton endophytic bacterium, designated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 41B-1, exhibited greater than 50% biocontrol efficacy against V. dahliae in cotton plants under greenhouse conditions. Through high-performance liquid chromatography and mass analysis of the filtrate, we found that the antifungal compounds present in the strain 41B-1 culture filtrate were a series of isoforms of iturins. The purified iturins suppressed V. dahliae microsclerotial germination in the absence or presence of cotton. Treatment with the iturins induced reactive oxygen species bursts, Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and defects in cell wall integrity. The oxidative stress response and high-osmolarity glycerol pathway contribute to iturins resistance in V. dahliae. In contrast, the Slt2 MAPK pathway may be involved in iturins sensitivity in this fungus. In addition to antagonism, iturins could induce plant defence responses as activators and mediate pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity. These findings suggest that iturins may affect fungal signalling pathways and mediate plant defence responses against V. dahliae. PMID:24934960

  5. Trained immunity: A smart way to enhance innate immune defence.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Jos W M; Joosten, Leo A B; Riksen, Niels; Netea, Mihai G

    2015-11-01

    The innate arm of the immune system is generally viewed as primitive and non-specific and - in contrast to the adaptive immune arm - not to possess memory. However in plants and invertebrate animals that lack adaptive immunity, innate immunity will exhibit a prolonged enhanced functional state after adequate priming. A similar enhancement of function of the innate immunity has occasionally been described in vertebrates, including humans. Over the past few years we have studied this phenomenon in greater detail and we have coined the term 'Trained (innate) immunity' (TI). TI can be induced by a variety of stimuli, of which we have studied BCG and β-glucan in greater detail. The non-specific protective effects of BCG that have been observed in vaccination studies in the literature are probably due to TI. Monocytes and macrophages are among the main cells of the innate immune arm that can be trained. We have discovered that both BCG (via NOD2 signalling) and β-glucan (via dectin-1) induce epigenetic reprogramming, in particular stable changes in histone trimethylation at H3K4. These epigenetic changes lead to cellular activation, enhanced cytokine production and a change in the metabolic state of the cell with a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. TI is not only important for host defence and vaccine responses, but most probably also for diseases like atherosclerosis. Modulation of TI is a promising area for new treatments. PMID:26597205

  6. Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Kistanguri, Gaurav; McCrae, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common hematologic disorder characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia. ITP presents as a primary form characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 × 109/L) in the absence of other causes or disorders that may be associated with thrombocytopenia, or a secondary form in which immune thrombocytopenia develops in association with another disorder that is usually immune or infectious. ITP may affect individuals of all ages, with peaks during childhood and in the elderly, in whom the age specific incidence of ITP is greatest. Bleeding is the most common clinical manifestation of ITP, with the risk of bleeding and related morbidity increased in elderly patients. The pathogenesis of ITP is complex, involving alterations in humoral and cellular immunity. Thrombocytopenia is caused by antibodies that react with glycoproteins expressed on platelets and megakaryocytes (glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, Ib/IX and others), causing shortened survival of circulating platelets and impairing platelet production. Diminished numbers and function of regulatory T cells, as well as the effects of cytotoxic T cells also contribute to the pathogenesis of ITP. Corticosteroids remain the most common first line therapy for ITP, occasionally in conjunction with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and anti-Rh(D). However, these agents do not lead to durable remissions in the majority of adults with ITP, and considerable heterogeneity exists in the use of second line approaches, which may include splenectomy, Rituximab, or thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TRAs). This review summarizes the classification and diagnosis of primary and secondary ITP, as well as the pathogenesis and options for treatment. Remarkable advances in the understanding and management of ITP have been achieved over the last decade, though many questions remain. PMID:23714309

  7. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  8. Making healthier or killing enemies? Bacterial volatile-elicited plant immunity plays major role upon protection of Arabidopsis than the direct pathogen inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Rouhallah; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial volatiles protect plants either by directly inhibiting a pathogenic fungus or by improving the defense capabilities of plants. The effect of bacterial volatiles on fungal growth was dose-dependent. A low dosage did not have a noticeable effect on Botrytis cinerea growth and development, but was sufficient to elicit induced resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Bacterial volatiles displayed negative effects on biofilm formation on a polystyrene surface and in in planta leaf colonization of B. cinerea. However, bacterial volatile-mediated induced resistance was the major mechanism mediating protection of plants from B. cinerea. It was responsible for more than 90% of plant protection in comparison with direct fungal inhibition. Our results broaden our knowledge of the role of bacterial volatiles in plant protection. PMID:27574539

  9. Making healthier or killing enemies? Bacterial volatile-elicited plant immunity plays major role upon protection of Arabidopsis than the direct pathogen inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Rouhallah; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial volatiles protect plants either by directly inhibiting a pathogenic fungus or by improving the defense capabilities of plants. The effect of bacterial volatiles on fungal growth was dose-dependent. A low dosage did not have a noticeable effect on Botrytis cinerea growth and development, but was sufficient to elicit induced resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Bacterial volatiles displayed negative effects on biofilm formation on a polystyrene surface and in in planta leaf colonization of B. cinerea. However, bacterial volatile-mediated induced resistance was the major mechanism mediating protection of plants from B. cinerea. It was responsible for more than 90% of plant protection in comparison with direct fungal inhibition. Our results broaden our knowledge of the role of bacterial volatiles in plant protection. PMID:27574539

  10. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  11. Structural Determinants at the Interface of the ARC2 and Leucine-Rich Repeat Domains Control the Activation of the Plant Immune Receptors Rx1 and Gpa21[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Slootweg, Erik J.; Spiridon, Laurentiu N.; Roosien, Jan; Butterbach, Patrick; Pomp, Rikus; Westerhof, Lotte; Wilbers, Ruud; Bakker, Erin; Bakker, Jaap; Petrescu, Andrei-José; Smant, Geert; Goverse, Aska

    2013-01-01

    Many plant and animal immune receptors have a modular nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) architecture in which a nucleotide-binding switch domain, NB-ARC, is tethered to a LRR sensor domain. The cooperation between the switch and sensor domains, which regulates the activation of these proteins, is poorly understood. Here, we report structural determinants governing the interaction between the NB-ARC and LRR in the highly homologous plant immune receptors Gpa2 and Rx1, which recognize the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida and Potato virus X, respectively. Systematic shuffling of polymorphic sites between Gpa2 and Rx1 showed that a minimal region in the ARC2 and N-terminal repeats of the LRR domain coordinate the activation state of the protein. We identified two closely spaced amino acid residues in this region of the ARC2 (positions 401 and 403) that distinguish between autoactivation and effector-triggered activation. Furthermore, a highly acidic loop region in the ARC2 domain and basic patches in the N-terminal end of the LRR domain were demonstrated to be required for the physical interaction between the ARC2 and LRR. The NB-ARC and LRR domains dissociate upon effector-dependent activation, and the complementary-charged regions are predicted to mediate a fast reassociation, enabling multiple rounds of activation. Finally, we present a mechanistic model showing how the ARC2, NB, and N-terminal half of the LRR form a clamp, which regulates the dissociation and reassociation of the switch and sensor domains in NB-LRR proteins. PMID:23660837

  12. Immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Maher, George M

    2014-10-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children is a relatively uncommon and generally benign condition presenting as abrupt onset of bruising, petechiae and thrombocytopenia in an otherwise healthy child due to production of anti-platelet autoantibodies. Diagnosis is largely clinical and laboratory investigation should be kept to a minimum. Indications for treatment have not been standardized and include bleeding, parental anxiety and quality of life. Multiple treatments are available that have been proven to increase the platelet count; the most commonly employed include IVIG, steroids and WinRho (anti-D). Intracranial hemorrhage is the most serious potential complication but is extremely rare and splenectomy is reserved for chronically symptomatic patients who have not responded to other modalities. Identification of molecular targets may be a promising avenue for future research. PMID:25423768

  13. The zinc-binding nuclear protein HIPP3 acts as an upstream regulator of the salicylate-dependent plant immunity pathway and of flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zschiesche, Wiebke; Barth, Olaf; Daniel, Katharina; Böhme, Sandra; Rausche, Juliane; Humbeck, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Biotic and abiotic stress responses of plants are linked to developmental programs. Proteins involved in different signaling pathways are the molecular basis of this concerted interplay. In our study, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana HEAVY METAL-ASSOCIATED ISOPRENYLATED PLANT PROTEIN3 (HIPP3; At5g60800) acts as an upstream regulator of stress- and development-related regulatory networks. Localization, metal-binding and stress-responsive gene expression of HIPP3 were analyzed via microscopy, protein and inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-MS analyses and quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, transcriptome and phenotype analyses of plants overexpressing HIPP3 were used to unravel its function. Our data show that HIPP3 is a nuclear, zinc-binding protein. It is repressed during drought stress and abscisic acid (ABA) treatment and, similar to other pathogen-related genes, is induced after infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. HIPP3 overexpression affects the regulation of > 400 genes. Strikingly, most of these genes are involved in pathogen response, especially in the salicylate pathway. In addition, many genes of abiotic stress responses and seed and flower development are affected by HIPP3 overexpression. Plants overexpressing HIPP3 show delayed flowering. We conclude that HIPP3 acts via its bound zinc as an upstream regulator of the salicylate-dependent pathway of pathogen response and is also involved in abiotic stress responses and seed and flower development. PMID:25913773

  14. Bacterial RNAs activate innate immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boyoung; Park, Yong-Soon; Lee, Soohyun; Song, Geun Cheol; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The common molecular patterns of microbes play a critical role in the regulation of plant innate immunity. However, little is known about the role of nucleic acids in this process in plants. We pre-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaves with total RNAs from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto DC3000) and subsequently inoculated these plants with the same bacterial cells. Total Pto DC3000 RNAs pre-infiltrated into Arabidopsis leaves elicited plant immune responses against Pto DC3000. However, sheared RNAs and RNase A application failed to induce immunity, suggesting that intact bacterial RNAs function in plant innate immunity. This notion was supported by the positive regulation of superoxide anion levels, callose deposition, two mitogen-activated protein kinases and defense-related genes observed in bacterial RNA-pre-treated leaves. Intriguingly, the Pto DC3000 population was not compromised in known pattern recognition receptor mutants for chitin, flagellin and elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu). Plant defense-related mutant analyses further revealed that bacterial RNA-elicited innate immunity was normally required for salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling. Notably, among total RNAs, the abundant bacterial RNA species 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs were the major determinants of this response. Our findings provide evidence that bacterial RNA serves as a microbe-associated molecular pattern in plants. PMID:26499893

  15. Immunization and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Immunization & Pregnancy Vaccines help keep apregnant woman and her growing family healthy. Vaccine Before pregnancy Hepatitis A ... 232-4636) • English or Spanish National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases Immunization Services Division CS238938B 03/ ...

  16. Immune System Involvement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips" to find out more! Email * Zipcode The Immune System and Psoriatic Disease What is an autoimmune disease? ... swollen and painful joints and tendons. Treating the immune system The immune system is not only the key ...

  17. Childhood Immunization Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  18. Immune System and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... substances that are usually not harmful Immune deficiency diseases - disorders in which the immune system is missing one or more of its parts Autoimmune diseases - diseases causing your immune system to attack your ...

  19. [Plant hormones, plant growth regulators].

    PubMed

    Végvári, György; Vidéki, Edina

    2014-06-29

    Plants seem to be rather defenceless, they are unable to do motion, have no nervous system or immune system unlike animals. Besides this, plants do have hormones, though these substances are produced not in glands. In view of their complexity they lagged behind animals, however, plant organisms show large scale integration in their structure and function. In higher plants, such as in animals, the intercellular communication is fulfilled through chemical messengers. These specific compounds in plants are called phytohormones, or in a wide sense, bioregulators. Even a small quantity of these endogenous organic compounds are able to regulate the operation, growth and development of higher plants, and keep the connection between cells, tissues and synergy between organs. Since they do not have nervous and immume systems, phytohormones play essential role in plants' life. PMID:24954142

  20. [Use of an "immunologic compass" for diagnosis of immune disorders in clean-up crew members after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant].

    PubMed

    Frolov, V M; Peresadin, N A; Kazakova, S E; Safonova, E F; Korobka, Iu N; Petrunia, A M

    1994-01-01

    A total of 389 patients with cerebrovascular diseases who participated in liquidation of the Chernobyl power plant accident consequences were examined using rosette formation test and the cytotoxic method with monoclonal antibodies (MCAB). The predominant type of immunologic abnormalities found in 79.1% of patients was a marked reduction of CD4+ cell (T-helpers/inductors) count and a moderate reduction of CD8+ (T-suppressor/keller) count, this resulting in reduction of the CD4/CD8 coefficient. In 11.3% of the examinees CD(4+)-lymphocyte count was reduced and CD8+ count was within the normal range, in 6.2% both CD4+ and CD8+ counts were reduced, and in 3.4% CD4+ count was reduced and CD8+ moderately elevated. Results of theophylline test did not coincide with those of CD4+ and CD8+ measurements in 44.2% of cases. PMID:8032719

  1. Phytophthora infestans effector AVR3a is essential for virulence and manipulates plant immunity by stabilizing host E3 ligase CMPG1

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Jorunn I. B.; Armstrong, Miles R.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Boevink, Petra C.; Hein, Ingo; Taylor, Rosalind M.; Zhendong, Tian; Engelhardt, Stefan; Vetukuri, Ramesh R.; Harrower, Brian; Dixelius, Christina; Bryan, Glenn; Sadanandom, Ari; Whisson, Stephen C.; Kamoun, Sophien; Birch, Paul R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Fungal and oomycete plant pathogens translocate effector proteins into host cells to establish infection. However, virulence targets and modes of action of their effectors are unknown. Effector AVR3a from potato blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans is translocated into host cells and occurs in two forms: AVR3aKI, which is detected by potato resistance protein R3a, strongly suppresses infestin 1 (INF1)-triggered cell death (ICD), whereas AVR3aEM, which evades recognition by R3a, weakly suppresses host ICD. Here we show that AVR3a interacts with and stabilizes host U-box E3 ligase CMPG1, which is required for ICD. In contrast, AVR3aKI/Y147del, a mutant with a deleted C-terminal tyrosine residue that fails to suppress ICD, cannot interact with or stabilize CMPG1. CMPG1 is stabilized by the inhibitors MG132 and epoxomicin, indicating that it is degraded by the 26S proteasome. CMPG1 is degraded during ICD. However, it is stabilized by mutations in the U-box that prevent its E3 ligase activity. In stabilizing CMPG1, AVR3a thus modifies its normal activity. Remarkably, given the potential for hundreds of effector genes in the P. infestans genome, silencing Avr3a compromises P. infestans pathogenicity, suggesting that AVR3a is essential for virulence. Interestingly, Avr3a silencing can be complemented by in planta expression of Avr3aKI or Avr3aEM but not the Avr3aKI/Y147del mutant. Our data provide genetic evidence that AVR3a is an essential virulence factor that targets and stabilizes the plant E3 ligase CMPG1, potentially to prevent host cell death during the biotrophic phase of infection. PMID:20457921

  2. Our Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    Our Immune System A story for children with primary immunodeficiency diseases Written by Sara LeBien IMMUNE DEFICIENCY FOUNDATION A note ... who are immune deficient to better understand their immune system. What is a “ B-cell, ” a “ T-cell, ” ...

  3. Immunization for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... nfid.org/#sthash.eZ72dCSP.dpuf Diseases & Vaccines Overview Immunization Schedules Talk to you doctor about your immunization ... years Immunization Schedule for Children, 7-18 years Immunization News July 8, 2016 HPV-related cancers on ...

  4. Your Child's Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations Print A A A Text Size What's in ... But in both cases, the protection is temporary. Immunization (vaccination) is a way of creating immunity to ...

  5. The modulation of immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Modulation of Immunity by Thymus-Derived Lymphocytes; Modulation of Immunity by Macrophages; Modulation of Immunity by Soluble Mediators; Viruses and the Immune Response; and Methanol Extraction Residue: Effects and Mechanisms of Action.

  6. Epigenetic Control of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Busslinger, Meinrad; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Immunity relies on the heterogeneity of immune cells and their ability to respond to pathogen challenges. In the adaptive immune system, lymphocytes display a highly diverse antigen receptor repertoire that matches the vast diversity of pathogens. In the innate immune system, the cell's heterogeneity and phenotypic plasticity enable flexible responses to changes in tissue homeostasis caused by infection or damage. The immune responses are calibrated by the graded activity of immune cells that can vary from yeast-like proliferation to lifetime dormancy. This article describes key epigenetic processes that contribute to the function of immune cells during health and disease. PMID:24890513

  7. Integrated Immune Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Integrated Immune Experiment. The objectives include: 1) Address significant lack of data regarding immune status during flight; 2) Replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; 3) Determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation; 4) Determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and 5) Determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  8. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  9. Immunity in a variable world

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaro, Brian P.; Little, Tom J.

    2008-01-01

    Immune function is likely to be a critical determinant of an organism's fitness, yet most natural animal and plant populations exhibit tremendous genetic variation for immune traits. Accumulating evidence suggests that environmental heterogeneity may retard the long-term efficiency of natural selection and even maintain polymorphism, provided alternative host genotypes are favoured under different environmental conditions. ‘Environment’ in this context refers to abiotic factors such as ambient temperature or availability of nutrient resources, genetic diversity of pathogens or competing physiological demands on the host. These factors are generally controlled in laboratory experiments measuring immune performance, but variation in them is likely to be very important in the evolution of resistance to infection. Here, we review some of the literature emphasizing the complexity of natural selection on immunity. Our aim is to describe how environmental and genetic heterogeneities, often excluded from experimentation as ‘noise’, may determine the evolutionary potential of populations or the potential for interacting species to coevolve. PMID:18926975

  10. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    MedlinePlus

    ... they’ve been exposed. For example, the passive rabies immunization (rabies immune globulin) is commonly used after a certain ... of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual ...

  11. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  12. Immune system structures (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The immune system protects the body from potentially harmful substances. The inflammatory response (inflammation) is part of innate immunity. It occurs when tissues are injured by bacteria, trauma, toxins, heat or any other cause.

  13. Immune system structures (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The immune system protects the body from potentially harmful substances. The inflammatory response (inflammation) is part of innate immunity. It occurs when tissues are injured by bacteria, trauma, toxins, heat, or any other cause.

  14. Aging changes in immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004008.htm Aging changes in immunity To use the sharing features ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. Aging Changes and Their Effects on the Immune System ...

  15. Immune System and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  16. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000093.htm Pneumonia - weakened immune system To use the sharing features on this page, ... fighting off infection because of problems with the immune system. This type of disease is called "pneumonia in ...

  17. Immunity to cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.; Mitchell, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: Identification and Characterization of Tumor Antigens; Immune Responses to Tumor Antigens; Regulation of the Immune Response to Tumor Cells, Immunotherapy and Biomodulators, and Immunotherapy and Immunoprophylaxis.

  18. NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION SURVEY (NIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Immunization Survey (NIS) is sponsored by the National Immunization Program (NIP) and conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  19. Exercise and immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... know exactly if or how exercise increases your immunity to certain illnesses, but there are several theories ( ... not exercise more intensely just to increase their immunity. Heavy, long-term exercise (such as marathon running ...

  20. Modulation of host immunity by beneficial microbes.

    PubMed

    Zamioudis, Christos; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2012-02-01

    In nature, plants abundantly form beneficial associations with soilborne microbes that are important for plant survival and, as such, affect plant biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Classical examples of symbiotic microbes are mycorrhizal fungi that aid in the uptake of water and minerals, and Rhizobium bacteria that fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. Several other types of beneficial soilborne microbes, such as plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria and fungi with biological control activity, can stimulate plant growth by directly suppressing deleterious soilborne pathogens or by priming aboveground plant parts for enhanced defense against foliar pathogens or insect herbivores. The establishment of beneficial associations requires mutual recognition and substantial coordination of plant and microbial responses. A growing body of evidence suggests that beneficial microbes are initially recognized as potential invaders, after which an immune response is triggered, whereas, at later stages of the interaction, mutualists are able to short-circuit plant defense responses to enable successful colonization of host roots. Here, we review our current understanding of how symbiotic and nonsymbiotic beneficial soil microbes modulate the plant immune system and discuss the role of local and systemic defense responses in establishing the delicate balance between the two partners. PMID:21995763

  1. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A Text Size How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! View Survey ...

  2. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-09

    Immune Deficiency Disorders:; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorder:; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  3. The Immune System Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  4. Chapter 2: Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Turvey, Stuart E.; Broide, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an explosion of interest in the innate immune system. Questions about how the innate immune system senses infection and empowers a protective immune response are being answered at the molecular level. These basic science discoveries are being translated into a more complete understanding of the central role innate immunity plays in the pathogenesis of many human infectious and inflammatory diseases. It is particularly exciting that we are already seeing a return on these scientific investments with the emergence of novel therapies to harness the power of the innate immune system. In this review we explore the defining characteristics of the innate immune system, and through more detailed examples, we highlight recent breakthroughs that have advanced our understanding of the role of innate immunity in human health and disease. PMID:19932920

  5. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what ‘immunity’ means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first ‘immune’ cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1–3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide ‘layers’ of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. PMID:25871013

  6. Assessing barriers to immunization.

    PubMed

    Niederhauser, Victoria; Ferris, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Parental barriers to childhood immunizations vary among countries, states and communities. There is a plethora of studies that exist to examine barriers to immunizations including many intervention studies designed to improve immunization rates in children. Often, intervention studies designed to minimize barriers and increase immunization uptake among children lack the inclusion of a standardized instrument to measure accurately parental barriers to childhood immunizations before and after interventions. The Searching for Hardships and Obstacles To Shots (SHOTS) survey is a standardized survey instrument to measure parental barriers to childhood immunizations. In several studies, the SHOTS survey has demonstrated consistent reliability and has been validated in diverse populations. The inclusion of the SHOTS survey instrument in studies to examine barriers to childhood immunization will provide researchers and clinicians with a better understanding of parents' individualized barriers to immunizations. Furthermore, use of the SHOTS survey instrument to collect information about parental barriers to immunizations can lead to targeted interventions to minimize these obstacles at the individual and community level and to help us to achieve our national, state and community childhood immunization goals. PMID:26810618

  7. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity. PMID:21395512

  8. Neural circuitry and immunity.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Valentin A; Tracey, Kevin J

    2015-12-01

    Research during the last decade has significantly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the interface between the nervous system and the immune system. Insight into bidirectional neuro-immune communication has characterized the nervous system as an important partner of the immune system in the regulation of inflammation. Neuronal pathways, including the vagus nerve-based inflammatory reflex, are physiological regulators of immune function and inflammation. In parallel, neuronal function is altered in conditions characterized by immune dysregulation and inflammation. Here, we review these regulatory mechanisms and describe the neural circuitry modulating immunity. Understanding these mechanisms reveals possibilities to use targeted neuromodulation as a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. These findings and current clinical exploration of neuromodulation in the treatment of inflammatory diseases define the emerging field of Bioelectronic Medicine. PMID:26512000

  9. Immunization of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2002-03-01

    Complex networks such as the sexual partnership web or the Internet often show a high degree of redundancy and heterogeneity in their connectivity properties. This peculiar connectivity provides an ideal environment for the spreading of infective agents. Here we show that the random uniform immunization of individuals does not lead to the eradication of infections in all complex networks. Namely, networks with scale-free properties do not acquire global immunity from major epidemic outbreaks even in the presence of unrealistically high densities of randomly immunized individuals. The absence of any critical immunization threshold is due to the unbounded connectivity fluctuations of scale-free networks. Successful immunization strategies can be developed only by taking into account the inhomogeneous connectivity properties of scale-free networks. In particular, targeted immunization schemes, based on the nodes' connectivity hierarchy, sharply lower the network's vulnerability to epidemic attacks.

  10. Lipid antigens in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowds, C. Marie; Kornell, Sabin-Christin

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are not only a central part of human metabolism but also play diverse and critical roles in the immune system. As such, they can act as ligands of lipid-activated nuclear receptors, control inflammatory signaling through bioactive lipids such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins, and modulate immunity as intracellular phospholipid- or sphingolipid-derived signaling mediators. In addition, lipids can serve as antigens and regulate immunity through the activation of lipid-reactive T cells, which is the topic of this review. We will provide an overview of the mechanisms of lipid antigen presentation, the biology of lipid-reactive T cells, and their contribution to immunity. PMID:23999493

  11. Improving immunization strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Liljeros, Fredrik; Argyrakis, Panos; Bunde, Armin; Havlin, Shlomo

    2007-04-01

    We introduce an immunization method where the percentage of required vaccinations for immunity are close to the optimal value of a targeted immunization scheme of highest degree nodes. Our strategy retains the advantage of being purely local, without the need for knowledge on the global network structure or identification of the highest degree nodes. The method consists of selecting a random node and asking for a neighbor that has more links than himself or more than a given threshold and immunizing him. We compare this method to other efficient strategies on three real social networks and on a scale-free network model and find it to be significantly more effective.

  12. Enhancing crop innate immunity: new promising trends

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pin-Yao; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to potentially pathogenic microbes present in their surrounding environment. Due to the activation of the pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) response that largely relies on accurate detection of pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), plants are resistant to the majority of potential pathogens. However, adapted pathogens may avoid recognition or repress plant PTI and resulting diseases significantly affect crop yield worldwide. PTI provides protection against a wide range of pathogens. Reinforcement of PTI through genetic engineering may thus generate crops with broad-spectrum field resistance. In this review, new approaches based on fundamental discoveries in PTI to improve crop immunity are discussed. Notably, we highlight recent studies describing the interfamily transfer of PRRs or key regulators of PTI signaling. PMID:25414721

  13. Vaccination Strategies for Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ogra, Pearay L.; Faden, Howard; Welliver, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:11292646

  14. Plant defensins: Defense, development and application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant defensins are small, highly stable, cysteine-rich peptides that constitute a part of the innate immune system primarily directed against fungal pathogens. Biological activities reported for plant defensins include antifungal activity, antibacterial activity, proteinase inhibitory activity, an...

  15. Immunotherapy of plant viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Benvenuto, E; Tavladoraki, P

    1995-07-01

    The stable expression of antibodies in plants is one recent strategy for the unconventional control of plant viruses that is undergoing development. The advantages of this approach are its wide applicability and intrinsic safety; however, to be successful, the 'genetic immunization' of plants requires careful antibody design, efficient expression and targeting to appropriate cell compartments. PMID:7551641

  16. Immune interventions in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Liu, Qiang; Anrather, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory and immune responses in the brain can shape the clinical presentation and outcome of stroke. Approaches for effective management of acute stroke are sparse and many measures for brain protection fail, but our ability to modulate the immune system and modify the disease progression of multiple sclerosis is increasing. As a result, immune interventions are currently being explored as therapeutic interventions in acute stroke. In this Review, we compare the immunological features of acute stroke with those of multiple sclerosis, identify unique immunological features of stroke, and consider the evidence for immune interventions. In acute stroke, microglia activation and cell death products trigger an inflammatory cascade that damages vessels and the parenchyma within minutes to hours of the ischaemia or haemorrhage. Immune interventions that restrict brain inflammation, vascular permeability and tissue oedema must be administered rapidly to reduce acute immune-mediated destruction and to avoid subsequent immunosuppression. Preliminary results suggest that the use of drugs that modify disease in multiple sclerosis might accomplish these goals in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Further elucidation of the immune mechanisms involved in stroke is likely to lead to successful immune interventions. PMID:26303850

  17. Immunizations. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobo, Nichole; Garrett, Jennifer; Teskey, Carmen; Duncan, Kay; Strasser, Kathy; Burrows-Mezu, Alicia L.

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that immunizations are essential to primary prevention of disease from infancy through adulthood. Promotion of immunizations by the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is central to the public health focus of school nursing practice…

  18. Chemoimmunotherapy: reengineering tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy drugs have long been considered immune suppressive. However, more recent data indicate that some cytotoxic drugs effectively treat cancer in part by facilitating an immune response to the tumor when given at the standard dose and schedule. These drugs induce a form of tumor cell death that is immunologically active, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response specific for the tumor. In addition, cancer chemotherapy drugs can promote tumor immunity through ancillary and largely unappreciated immunologic effects on both the malignant and normal host cells present within the tumor microenvironment. These more subtle immunomodulatory effects are dependent on the drug itself, its dose, and its schedule in relation to an immune-based intervention. The recent approvals of two new immune-based therapies for prostate cancer and melanoma herald a new era in cancer treatment and have led to heightened interest in immunotherapy as a valid approach to cancer treatment. A detailed understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of interactions between chemotherapy drugs and the immune system is essential for devising the optimal strategy for integrating new immune-based therapies into the standard of care for various cancers, resulting in the greatest long-term clinical benefit for cancer patients. PMID:23389507

  19. Innate immunity and adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-10-12

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  20. Immunization alters body odor.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine did not generalize this training to discriminate between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine. From these experiments, we conclude that: (1) immunization alters urine odor in similar ways for RV and WNV immunizations; and (2) immune activation with LPS also alters urine odor but in ways different from those of RV and WNV. PMID:24524972

  1. Swine immune system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probably no area of veterinary medicine has seen a greater explosion in knowledge then the immune system and its implications in disease and vaccination. In this chapter on the Swine Immune System for the 10th Edition of Diseases of Swine we expand on the information provided in past editions by in...

  2. Innate immunity and adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-01-01

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  3. The Genetics of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaro, Brian P.; Schneider, David S.

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, Brian P. Lazzaro and David S. Schneider examine the topic of the Genetics of Immunity as explored in this month's issues of GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. These inaugural articles are part of a joint Genetics of Immunity collection (ongoing) in the GSA journals. PMID:24939182

  4. Immunity and Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupin, Henri; Guerin, Nicole

    1990-01-01

    The three articles in this issue of a periodical focussed on various aspects of the life and health of children in the tropics concern: (1) immune defenses; (2) interactions between nutrition disorders and infection; and (3) immunity and vaccination. The science of immunology has progressed rapidly in recent years. A brief review of present…

  5. Resident commensals shaping immunity

    PubMed Central

    Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    All animals coexist with myriad commensal microorganisms in a symbiotic relationship that plays a key role in health and disease. Continuous commensal–host interactions profoundly affect the development and regulation of the host’s immune system. The complex interaction of the commensal microbiota with the immune system is a topic of substantial interest. An understanding of these interactions and the mechanisms through which commensal microbes actively shape host immunity may yield new insights into the pathogenesis of many immune-mediated diseases and lead to new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. This review examines recent advances in this field and their potential implications not just for the colonized tissues but also for the entire immune system. PMID:23830047

  6. Autophagy and Immune Senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanlin; Puleston, Daniel J; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2016-08-01

    With extension of the average lifespan, aging has become a heavy burden in society. Immune senescence is a key risk factor for many age-related diseases such as cancer and increased infections in the elderly, and hence has elicited much attention in recent years. As our body's guardian, the immune system maintains systemic health through removal of pathogens and damage. Autophagy is an important cellular 'clearance' process by which a cell internally delivers damaged organelles and macromolecules to lysosomes for degradation. Here, we discuss the most current knowledge of how impaired autophagy can lead to cellular and immune senescence. We also provide an overview, with examples, of the clinical potential of exploiting autophagy to delay immune senescence and/or rejuvenate immunity to treat various age-related diseases. PMID:27395769

  7. Endocannabinoids and immune regulation☆

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Rupal; Mousawy, Khalida; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors. These discoveries have added to our understanding of exogenous and endogenous cannabinoid signaling along with exploring the various pathways of their biosynthesis, molecular structure, inactivation, and anatomical distribution of their receptors throughout the body. The endocannabinoid system is involved in immunoregulation and neuroprotection. In this article, we have reviewed the possible mechanisms of the regulation of the immune response by endocannabinoids which include modulation of immune response in different cell types, effect on cytokine network, induction of apoptosis in immune cells and downregulation of innate and adaptive immune response. Studies from our laboratory have suggested that administration of endocannabinoids or use of inhibitors of enzymes that breakdown the endocannabinoids, leads to immunosuppression and recovery from immune-mediated injury to organs such as the liver. Thus, manipulation of endocannabinoids in vivo may constitute a novel treatment modality against inflammatory disorders. PMID:19428268

  8. Behavioral Immunity in Insects

    PubMed Central

    de Roode, Jacobus C.; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Parasites can dramatically reduce the fitness of their hosts, and natural selection should favor defense mechanisms that can protect hosts against disease. Much work has focused on understanding genetic and physiological immunity against parasites, but hosts can also use behaviors to avoid infection, reduce parasite growth or alleviate disease symptoms. It is increasingly recognized that such behaviors are common in insects, providing strong protection against parasites and parasitoids. We review the current evidence for behavioral immunity in insects, present a framework for investigating such behavior, and emphasize that behavioral immunity may act through indirect rather than direct fitness benefits. We also discuss the implications for host-parasite co-evolution, local adaptation, and the evolution of non-behavioral physiological immune systems. Finally, we argue that the study of behavioral immunity in insects has much to offer for investigations in vertebrates, in which this topic has traditionally been studied. PMID:26466629

  9. Siglecs and Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Shiv; Netravali, Ilka Arun; Cariappa, Annaiah; Mattoo, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Sialic acid binding Ig-like lectins or Siglecs vary in their specificity for sialic acid containing ligands and are mainly expressed by cells of the immune system. Many siglecs are inhibitory receptors expressed in innate immune cells that regulate inflammation mediated by DAMPs and PAMPs. This family also includes molecules involved in adhesion and phagocytosis and receptors that can associate with the ITAM containing DAP12 adaptor. Siglecs contribute to the inhibition of immune cells both by binding to cis-ligands (expressed in the same cells) as well as by responding to pathogen derived sialoglycoconjugates. They can help maintain tolerance in B lymphocytes, modulate the activation of conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and contribute to the regulation of T cell function both directly and indirectly. Siglecs modulate immune responses influencing almost every cell in the immune system, and are of relevance both in health and disease. PMID:22224769

  10. Neuroimmunoregulation and natural immunity.

    PubMed

    Berczi, I; Chow, D A; Sabbadini, E R

    1998-09-01

    The development and function of the immune system is regulated by neuroendocrine factors. Immune function may be divided into adaptive and natural immunity. Adaptive immune responses are driven by specific determinants of the antigen (epitopes), require 5-10 d to fully develop, and show an accelerated or memory response after repeated exposure to the same antigen. Natural immunity may be divided into host defense mediated by non-immune factors (e.g., antimicrobial proteins, enzymes, mucus etc.) and polyspecific responses of the immune system. This polyspecific response relies on natural antibodies and on some other serum proteins (e.g., lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-LBP, C-reactive protein-CRP), and on surface receptors of macrophages, natural killer cells and B and T lymphocytes for activation. Highly conserved homologous (crossreactive) epitopes, or homotopes for short, are recognized by the natural immune system. Natural antibodies, LBP, and CRP are capable of activating the entire immune system after combination with the appropriate homotope. During febrile illness natural immune host defense is promptly elevated because of the rapid rise of natural antibodies, LBP, and CRP in the serum. This is known as the acute phase response (APR), which is initiated by a sudden rise of cytokines in the circulation, such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-alpha. The cytokines act on the brain, the neuroendocrine system, and on other tissues and organs, which leads to fever and profound hormonal and metabolic changes. The hypothalamus-pituitary adrenal axis is activated and serves as the primary regulator of immune and inflammatory reactions. Insulin, glucagon, and catecholeamine levels are also raised. Bone marrow activity and leukocyte function are high and the liver is converted to the rapid production of acute-phase proteins (APP). APP include LBP, CRP, fibrinogen, some complement components, enzyme inhibitors, and anti-inflammatory proteins, which may rise in the serum from

  11. Exercise, immunity and aging.

    PubMed

    Venjatraman, J T; Fernandes, G

    1997-01-01

    In general population, many protective immune responses are impaired in old age, leading to an increased risk of infection. However, recent studies in SENIEUR subjects (healthy centenarians who are examples of successful aging) suggest that complex remodeling and reshaping of the immune system occurs with aging. An appropriate regular regimen of endurance exercise might help elderly to lead a quality of life by preserving immune function. However, very little is known regarding the interaction between exercise, aging and the immune system. Given that a number of age-related changes occur in many physiological systems which are known to alter the immune function both at rest and during exercise, it would be of value to learn the extent to which both acute and chronic exercise influence immune function in the elderly. The immune system response to exercise is multifaceted, depending on the nature of exercise. Significant interaction between the neuroendocrine and immune systems, and the role of lifestyle factors in immune function are known to occur. In theory, moderate exercise should help to reverse the adverse effects of aging upon the immune system by increasing the production of endocrine hormones which may contribute to less accumulation of autoreactive immune cells by enhancing the programmed cell death. Active elderly subjects demonstrated a significantly greater proliferative response to phytohemagglutinins (PHA) and to pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and higher rates of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) production. A moderate training program can enhance the resting natural killer (NK) cell function of healthy elderly people, potentially increasing resistance to both viral infections and preventing the formation of malignant cells. Recent studies have suggested that endurance training in later life is associated with a lesser age-related decline in certain aspects of circulating T cell function and related cytokine

  12. Recommended Immunizations for Adults 50+

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Health Screenings and Immunizations Recommended Immunizations For Adults 50+ The content in this section ... out more, visit How Vaccines Prevent Disease . Vaccines, Vaccinations, and Immunizations Understanding the difference between vaccines, vaccinations, ...

  13. Rebuilding immunity with Remune.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, L

    1998-01-01

    Remune, an immune response therapy composed of inactivated HIV, is designed to enhance the immune system's ability to recognize and kill HIV proteins. Developed by Dr. Jonas Salk, researchers hope Remune's actions can alter the course of HIV infection and slow disease progression. Remune has gained Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to enter the critical Phase III trial stage. Two clinical trials are tracking Remune's immunogenicity (ability to provoke an immune response), its immunogenicity relative to dose level, and its effect on viral load. An ongoing trial, approved in February of 1996, enrolled 2,500 patients at 74 sites. The manufacturer, Immune Response Corporation (IRC), announced earlier this year that treatment with Remune induces an immune response to HIV that cross-reacts with different strains of the virus. This immune response is crucial for developing an effective worldwide treatment. Remune decreases levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a). IRC recently began a Phase I clinical trial in Great Britain that combines Remune with a protease inhibitor, two antiviral nucleoside analogues, and Interleukin-2. The trial is designed to determine the role that the drug may play in restoring immune response. PMID:11365486

  14. Immunizations for foreign travel.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of preparing travelers for destinations throughout the world is providing them with immunizations. Before administering any vaccines, however, a careful health and immunization history and travel itinerary should be obtained in order to determine vaccine indications and contraindications. There are three categories of immunizations for foreign travel. The first category includes immunizations which are routinely recommended whether or not the individual is traveling. Many travelers are due for primary vaccination or boosting against tetanus-diphtheria, measles-mumps-rubella, pneumococcal pneumonia, and influenza, for example, and the pre-travel visit is an ideal time to administer these. The second category are immunizations which might be required by a country as a condition for entry; these are yellow fever and cholera. The final category contains immunizations which are recommended because there is a risk of acquiring a particular disease during travel. Typhoid fever, meningococcal disease, rabies, and hepatitis are some examples. Travelers who are pregnant or who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus require special consideration. Provision of appropriate immunizations for foreign travel is an important aspect of preventing illness in travelers. PMID:1337807

  15. Immunity to Francisella

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Siobhán C.; Elkins, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, studies on the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis have greatly intensified, generating a wealth of new information on the interaction of this organism with the immune system. Here we review the basic elements of the innate and adaptive immune responses that contribute to protective immunity against Francisella species, with special emphasis on new data that has emerged in the last 5 years. Most studies have utilized the mouse model of infection, although there has been an expansion of work on human cells and other new animal models. In mice, basic immune parameters that operate in defense against other intracellular pathogen infections, such as interferon gamma, TNF-α, and reactive nitrogen intermediates, are central for control of Francisella infection. However, new important immune mediators have been revealed, including IL-17A, Toll-like receptor 2, and the inflammasome. Further, a variety of cell types in addition to macrophages are now recognized to support Francisella growth, including epithelial cells and dendritic cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are clearly important for control of primary infection and vaccine-induced protection, but new T cell subpopulations and the mechanisms employed by T cells are only beginning to be defined. A significant role for B cells and specific antibodies has been established, although their contribution varies greatly between bacterial strains of lower and higher virulence. Overall, recent data profile a pathogen that is adept at subverting host immune responses, but susceptible to many elements of the immune system's antimicrobial arsenal. PMID:21687418

  16. Testicular defense systems: immune privilege and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shutao; Zhu, Weiwei; Xue, Shepu; Han, Daishu

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian testis possesses a special immunological environment because of its properties of remarkable immune privilege and effective local innate immunity. Testicular immune privilege protects immunogenic germ cells from systemic immune attack, and local innate immunity is important in preventing testicular microbial infections. The breakdown of local testicular immune homeostasis may lead to orchitis, an etiological factor of male infertility. The mechanisms underlying testicular immune privilege have been investigated for a long time. Increasing evidence shows that both a local immunosuppressive milieu and systemic immune tolerance are involved in maintaining testicular immune privilege status. The mechanisms underlying testicular innate immunity are emerging based on the investigation of the pattern recognition receptor-mediated innate immune response in testicular cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of testicular defense mechanisms and identifies topics that merit further investigation. PMID:24954222

  17. Geographical variation in parasitism shapes larval immune function in a phytophagous insect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelweith, Fanny; Dourneau, Morgane; Thiéry, Denis; Moret, Yannick; Moreau, Jérôme

    2013-12-01

    Two of the central goals of immunoecology are to understand natural variation in the immune system among populations and to identify those selection pressures that shape immune traits. Maintenance of the immune system can be costly, and both food quality and parasitism selection pressure are factors potentially driving immunocompetence. In tritrophic interactions involving phytophagous insects, host plants, and natural enemies, the immunocompetence of phytophagous insects is constrained by selective forces from both the host plants and the natural enemies. Here, we assessed the roles of host plants and natural enemies as selective pressures on immune variation among natural populations of Lobesia botrana. Our results showed marked geographical variation in immune defenses and parasitism among different natural populations. Larval immune functions were dependent of the host plant quality and were positively correlated to parasitism, suggesting that parasitoids select for greater investment into immunity in moth. Furthermore, investment in immune defense was negatively correlated with body size, suggesting that it is metabolically expensive. The findings emphasize the roles of host plants and parasitoids as selective forces shaping host immune functions in natural conditions. We argue that kinds of study are central to understanding natural variations in immune functions, and the selective forces beyond.

  18. Immune System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lock onto them. T cells are like the soldiers, destroying the invaders that the intelligence system has ... can't be prevented, you can help your child's immune system stay stronger and fight illnesses by ...

  19. Immunizations for Preterm Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Immunizations For Preterm Babies Page Content Some parents of ... full-term and preterm babies. The hepatitis B vaccine deserves special mention. In most circumstances, the AAP ...

  20. Immunization Action Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Handouts for Patients & Staff A-Z ... Index Supplies Checklist Administering Vaccines Temperature Logs Adult Vaccination Topics of Interest Documenting Vaccination Translations Parent Handouts ...

  1. FastStats: Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Immunization Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Percent of children 19-35 months old receiving vaccinations for: Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (4+ doses DTP, DT, ...

  2. Immune System 101

    MedlinePlus

    ... your healthy cells. How HIV Affects This Complex Process HIV disrupts this process by directly infecting the helper T-cells. Your ... T-cells are destroyed in the HIV replication process. For more information, see NIAID's The Immune System . ...

  3. Immunization Against Infectious Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimer, Edward A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The success of present and future immunization programs is endangered by public and physician complacency and by complex legal and ethical problems related to informed consent and responsibility for rare, vaccine-related injury. (BB)

  4. Immune Gamma Globulin Therapeutic Indications in Immune Deficiency and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Luanna; Wu, Eveline Y; Tarrant, Teresa K

    2016-07-01

    Immune gamma globulin (IgG) has a long history in the treatment of both primary immune deficiency and autoimmune disorders. Disease indications continue to expand and new-generation products increase the versatility of delivery. This review encompasses a historical perspective as well as current and future implications of human immune globulin for the treatment of immune-mediated illness. PMID:27401913

  5. Innate Immunity and Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bonifati, Domenico Marco

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of central nervous system (CNS) is usually associated with trauma and infection. Neuroinflammation occurs in close relation to trauma, infection, and neurodegenerative diseases. Low-level neuroinflammation is considered to have beneficial effects whereas chronic neuroinflammation can be harmful. Innate immune system consisting of pattern-recognition receptors, macrophages, and complement system plays a key role in CNS homeostasis following injury and infection. Here, we discuss how innate immune components can also contribute to neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. PMID:23843682

  6. CDPKs in immune and stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Boudsocq, Marie; Sheen, Jen

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+ has long been recognized as a conserved second messenger and principal mediator in plant immune and stress responses. How Ca2+ signals are sensed and relayed into diverse primary and global signaling events is still largely unknown. Comprehensive analyses of the plant-specific multigene family of Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are unraveling the molecular, cellular and genetic mechanisms of Ca2+ signaling. CDPKs, which exhibit overlapping and distinct expression patterns, sub-cellular localizations, substrate specificities and Ca2+ sensitivities, play versatile roles in the activation and repression of enzymes, channels and transcription factors. Here, we review the recent advances on the multifaceted functions of CDPKs in the complex immune and stress signaling networks, including oxidative burst, stomatal movements, hormonal signaling and gene regulation. PMID:22974587

  7. No hormone to rule them all: Interactions of plant hormones during the responses of plants to pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shigenaga, Alexandra M; Argueso, Cristiana T

    2016-08-01

    Plant hormones are essential regulators of plant growth and immunity. In the last few decades, a vast amount of information has been obtained detailing the role of different plant hormones in immunity, and how they work together to ultimately shape the outcomes of plant pathogen interactions. Here we provide an overview on the roles of the main classes of plant hormones in the regulation of plant immunity, highlighting their metabolic and signaling pathways and how plants and pathogens utilize these pathways to activate or suppress defence. PMID:27312082

  8. Immune mechanisms in cerebral ischemic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Bonilla, Lidia; Benakis, Corinne; Moore, Jamie; Iadecola, Costantino; Anrather, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Stressor-induced tolerance is a central mechanism in the response of bacteria, plants, and animals to potentially harmful environmental challenges. This response is characterized by immediate changes in cellular metabolism and by the delayed transcriptional activation or inhibition of genetic programs that are not generally stressor specific (cross-tolerance). These programs are aimed at countering the deleterious effects of the stressor. While induction of this response (preconditioning) can be established at the cellular level, activation of systemic networks is essential for the protection to occur throughout the organs of the body. This is best signified by the phenomenon of remote ischemic preconditioning, whereby application of ischemic stress to one tissue or organ induces ischemic tolerance (IT) in remote organs through humoral, cellular and neural signaling. The immune system is an essential component in cerebral IT acting simultaneously both as mediator and target. This dichotomy is based on the fact that activation of inflammatory pathways is necessary to establish IT and that IT can be, in part, attributed to a subdued immune activation after index ischemia. Here we describe the components of the immune system required for induction of IT and review the mechanisms by which a reprogrammed immune response contributes to the neuroprotection observed after preconditioning. Learning how local and systemic immune factors participate in endogenous neuroprotection could lead to the development of new stroke therapies. PMID:24624056

  9. Innate immunity underlies symbiotic relationships.

    PubMed

    Kisseleva, E P

    2014-12-01

    Here, the modern data regarding interactions between normal microbiota and barrier tissues in plants, humans and animals are reviewed. The main homeostatic mechanisms responsible for interactions between epithelium and innate immune cells with symbiotic bacteria are described. A key step in this process is recognition of soluble microbial products by ligation to pattern-recognition receptors expressed on the host cells. As a result, epithelial cells secrete mucus, antibacterial peptides and immunoregulatory molecules. The main outcomes from immunological reactions towards symbiotic bacteria involve development of conditions for formation and maintenance of microbial biocenosis as well as providing safety for the host. Also, it is considered important to preserve and transfer beneficial bacteria to progeny. PMID:25716721

  10. Fusion-mediated transfer of plasmids into Spiroplasma floricola cells.

    PubMed

    Salman, M; Tarshis, M; Rottem, S

    1992-07-01

    We have developed and characterized a system for the transfer of plasmids encapsulated in large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) into Spiroplasma floricola BNR1 cells. The approach is based on the ability of S. floricola-derived LUV to fuse with S. floricola cells. The fusion was continuously monitored by an assay for lipid mixing based on the dequenching of the fluorescent probe octadecylrhodamine B (R18) that was incorporated into LUV at self-quenching concentrations. The fusion was also evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter measurements and by sucrose density gradient analysis. LUV-cell fusion occurred only in the presence of low concentrations (5%) of polyethylene glycol (polyethylene glycol 8000) and depended on temperature, the LUV/cell ratio, and divalent cations in the incubation medium. Throughout the fusion process, spiroplasma cells remained intact and viable. Under optimal fusion conditions, the plasmid pACYC, encapsulated in LUV by reversed-phase evaporation, was transferred into live S. floricola cells and expressed chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity. The expression was transient with maximal chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity observed after 6 h of incubation of the transfected cells. PMID:1624433

  11. Inner membrane fusion mediates spatial distribution of axonal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yiyi; Lee, Hao-Chih; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Suhan, Joseph; Qiu, Minhua; Ba, Qinle; Yang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria form a dynamic interconnected network to respond to changing needs at different subcellular locations. A fundamental yet unanswered question regarding this network is whether, and if so how, local fusion and fission of individual mitochondria affect their global distribution. To address this question, we developed high-resolution computational image analysis techniques to examine the relations between mitochondrial fusion/fission and spatial distribution within the axon of Drosophila larval neurons. We found that stationary and moving mitochondria underwent fusion and fission regularly but followed different spatial distribution patterns and exhibited different morphology. Disruption of inner membrane fusion by knockdown of dOpa1, Drosophila Optic Atrophy 1, not only increased the spatial density of stationary and moving mitochondria but also changed their spatial distributions and morphology differentially. Knockdown of dOpa1 also impaired axonal transport of mitochondria. But the changed spatial distributions of mitochondria resulted primarily from disruption of inner membrane fusion because knockdown of Milton, a mitochondrial kinesin-1 adapter, caused similar transport velocity impairment but different spatial distributions. Together, our data reveals that stationary mitochondria within the axon interconnect with moving mitochondria through fusion and fission and that local inner membrane fusion between individual mitochondria mediates their global distribution. PMID:26742817

  12. Adaptive immunity in the liver.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Zongwen; Leung, Miranda Wy; He, Xiaosong; Zhang, Weici; Yang, Guoxiang; Leung, Patrick Sc; Eric Gershwin, M

    2016-05-01

    The anatomical architecture of the human liver and the diversity of its immune components endow the liver with its physiological function of immune competence. Adaptive immunity is a major arm of the immune system that is organized in a highly specialized and systematic manner, thus providing long-lasting protection with immunological memory. Adaptive immunity consists of humoral immunity and cellular immunity. Cellular immunity is known to have a crucial role in controlling infection, cancer and autoimmune disorders in the liver. In this article, we will focus on hepatic virus infections, hepatocellular carcinoma and autoimmune disorders as examples to illustrate the current understanding of the contribution of T cells to cellular immunity in these maladies. Cellular immune suppression is primarily responsible for chronic viral infections and cancer. However, an uncontrolled auto-reactive immune response accounts for autoimmunity. Consequently, these immune abnormalities are ascribed to the quantitative and functional changes in adaptive immune cells and their subsets, innate immunocytes, chemokines, cytokines and various surface receptors on immune cells. A greater understanding of the complex orchestration of the hepatic adaptive immune regulators during homeostasis and immune competence are much needed to identify relevant targets for clinical intervention to treat immunological disorders in the liver. PMID:26996069

  13. Adaptive immunity in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, Zongwen; Leung, Miranda WY; He, Xiaosong; Zhang, Weici; Yang, Guoxiang; Leung, Patrick SC; Eric Gershwin, M

    2016-01-01

    The anatomical architecture of the human liver and the diversity of its immune components endow the liver with its physiological function of immune competence. Adaptive immunity is a major arm of the immune system that is organized in a highly specialized and systematic manner, thus providing long-lasting protection with immunological memory. Adaptive immunity consists of humoral immunity and cellular immunity. Cellular immunity is known to have a crucial role in controlling infection, cancer and autoimmune disorders in the liver. In this article, we will focus on hepatic virus infections, hepatocellular carcinoma and autoimmune disorders as examples to illustrate the current understanding of the contribution of T cells to cellular immunity in these maladies. Cellular immune suppression is primarily responsible for chronic viral infections and cancer. However, an uncontrolled auto-reactive immune response accounts for autoimmunity. Consequently, these immune abnormalities are ascribed to the quantitative and functional changes in adaptive immune cells and their subsets, innate immunocytes, chemokines, cytokines and various surface receptors on immune cells. A greater understanding of the complex orchestration of the hepatic adaptive immune regulators during homeostasis and immune competence are much needed to identify relevant targets for clinical intervention to treat immunological disorders in the liver. PMID:26996069

  14. Viral suppressors of RNA-based viral immunity: Host targets

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qingfa; Wang, Xianbing

    2010-01-01

    Discovery of diverse plant and animal viral proteins as suppressors of RNA silencing has provided strong support for an RNA-based viral immunity (RVI), which is now known to specifically destroy viral RNAs by RNA interference in fungi, plants and invertebrates. Here we review several recent studies that have revealed new mechanistic insights into plant and insect viral suppressors of RVI or suggested a role for RNA silencing suppression during mammalian viral infection. PMID:20638637

  15. The peptide growth factor, phytosulfokine, attenuates pattern-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Daisuke; Tsuda, Kenichi; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2012-07-01

    Pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) is triggered by recognition of elicitors called microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Although immune responses may provide good protection of plants from pathogen attack, excessive immune responses have negative impacts on plant growth and development. Thus, a good balance between positive and negative effects on the immune signaling network is important for plant fitness. However, little information is known about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in attenuation of PTI. Here, we describe a growth-promoting peptide hormone, phytosulfokine (PSK), as attenuating PTI signaling in Arabidopsis. This research was motivated by the observation that expression of the PSK Receptor 1 (PSKR1) gene was induced by MAMP treatment. Plants homozygous for pskr1 T-DNA insertions showed enhanced defense gene expression and seedling growth inhibition triggered by MAMPs. The pskr1 plants also showed enhanced PTI against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. These results indicate that the PSKR-mediated signaling attenuates immune responses. Tyrosyl protein sulfotransferase (TPST) is an enzyme required for production of the mature sulfated PSK. Like pskr1 mutants, a tpst T-DNA insertion line exhibited enhanced MAMP-triggered seedling growth inhibition, which was suppressed by exogenous application of PSK. Thus, PSK signaling mediated by PSKR1 attenuates PTI but stimulates growth. PMID:22353039

  16. Ontogeny of Early Life Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, David J.; Levy, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    The human immune system is comprised of cellular and molecular components designed to coordinately prevent infection while avoiding potentially harmful inflammation and auto-immunity. Immunity varies with age, reflecting unique age-dependent challenges including fetal gestation, the neonatal phase and infancy. Herein, we review novel mechanistic insights into early life immunity, with emphasis on emerging models of human immune ontogeny, which may inform age-specific translational development of novel anti-infectives, immunomodulators and vaccines. PMID:24880460

  17. Role of nutrients in the development of neonatal immune response

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Lin, Hong; Ho-Lin, Deborah; Dnistrian, Ann; Cassileth, Barrie R; Perlman, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Nutrients exert unique regulatory effects in the perinatal period that mold the developing immune system. The interactions of micronutrients and microbial and environmental antigens condition the post-birth maturation of the immune system, influencing reactions to allergens, fostering tolerance towards the emerging gastrointestinal flora and ingested antigens, and defining patterns of host defense against potential pathogens. The shared molecular structures that are present on microbes or certain plants, but not expressed by human cells, are recognized by neonatal innate immune receptors. Exposure to these activators in the environment through dietary intake in early life can modify the immune response to allergens and prime the adaptive immune response towards pathogens that express the corresponding molecular structures. PMID:19906219

  18. Role of nutrients in the development of neonatal immune response.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Lin, Hong; Ho-Lin, Deborah; Dnistrian, Ann; Cassileth, Barrie R; Perlman, Jeffrey M

    2009-11-01

    Nutrients exert unique regulatory effects in the perinatal period that mold the developing immune system. The interactions of micronutrients and microbial and environmental antigens condition the post-birth maturation of the immune system, influencing reactions to allergens, fostering tolerance towards the emerging gastrointestinal flora and ingested antigens, and defining patterns of host defense against potential pathogens. The shared molecular structures that are present on microbes or certain plants, but not expressed by human cells, are recognized by neonatal innate immune receptors. Exposure to these activators in the environment through dietary intake in early life can modify the immune response to allergens and prime the adaptive immune response towards pathogens that express the corresponding molecular structures. PMID:19906219

  19. Organising for immunization.

    PubMed

    Michie, S

    1993-06-01

    In the late 1960s, health workers from a mission hospital in rural Zambia began registering children under 14 years old within 30 miles of the hospital (about 3000 children) by incorporating the cooperation of community leaders. They wanted to give every 0-4 year old child a Road to Health card and every 5-14 year old a vaccine record card and to promote the significance of immunization to parents and community leaders. The mission hospital established mobile health units to conduct regular visits in the center of villages. Staff hugh scales from a tree and borrowed a table to conduct the clinic. They kept a good relationship and communication with the community, leading successful education and communication activities. By 1988, many younger mothers were unfamiliar with a measles or whooping cough epidemic so they tended to not have their infants immunized. Epidemics began killing children nationwide, frightening these mothers so they brought their children for immunizations. The medical mission achieved an 85-90% vaccination coverage rate with immunization clinic attendance climbing quickly. 1 mother even walked 30 miles to have her infant injected with the DPT vaccine, but 10 years earlier, she did not bring her children. Further, measles had not reached her area because the immunization level was so high that it stopped the epidemic. PMID:12318293

  20. Immune memory in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Milutinović, Barbara; Kurtz, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for innate immune memory (or 'priming') in invertebrates has been accumulating over the last years. We here provide an in-depth review of the current state of evidence for immune memory in invertebrates, and in particular take a phylogenetic viewpoint. Invertebrates are a very heterogeneous group of animals and accordingly, evidence for the phenomenon of immune memory as well as the hypothesized molecular underpinnings differ largely for the diverse invertebrate taxa. The majority of research currently focuses on Arthropods, while evidence from many other groups of invertebrates is fragmentary or even lacking. We here concentrate on immune memory that is induced by pathogenic challenges, but also extent our view to a non-pathogenic context, i.e. allograft rejection, which can also show forms of memory and can inform us about general principles of specific self-nonself recognition. We discuss definitions of immune memory and a number of relevant aspects such as the type of antigens used, the route of exposure, and the kinetics of reactions following priming. PMID:27402055

  1. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  2. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals. PMID:22355456

  3. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neuroblastoma. We present preclinical research and clinical trials on several promising candidates such as IL-12, dendritic cell vaccines, anti-GD2 antibodies, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. An optimal treatment plan for neuroblastoma will most likely involve multimodal approaches and combinations of immune therapies. PMID:19342881

  4. [Immune-mediated neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Stoll, G; Reiners, K

    2016-08-01

    The Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are the most common immune-mediated polyneuropathies, which can show variable clinical and electrophysiological manifestations. Rarer immune-mediated neuropathies encompass paraproteinemic neuropathies (PPN), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and vasculitic neuropathies. The diagnosis usually relies on the history of symptom evolution, distribution of nerve dysfunction and particularly on characteristic features in nerve conduction studies, aided by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy findings. The therapeutic toolbox encompasses corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis often accompanied by long-term immunosuppression. It is important to note that immune-mediated neuropathies selectively respond to treatment and contraindications need to be considered. Despite treatment a considerable number of patients suffer from permanent neurological deficits. PMID:27474733

  5. Vitamin D and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Shelley; Geldenhuys, Sian; Hart, Prue H.

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to an increased risk of a wide range of adverse health outcomes. The active form of vitamin D has an important role in calcium metabolism and in bone mineralisation, but the evidence for other health outcomes is mixed, with the strongest effects seen in the weakest epidemiological study designs. There are plausible pathways whereby vitamin D deficiency can impair immune function, resulting in both overactivity and increased risk of autoimmune disease, as well as immune suppression with poorer resistance to infection. Vitamin D status may influence the bacterial flora that constitute the microbiome and affect immune function through this route. Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet radiation causes the production of a range of chemicals, including vitamin D, and new research is exploring possible vitamin D-independent immunomodulatory pathways. PMID:25580272

  6. [Immune mechanisms in uremia].

    PubMed

    Dobbelstein, H

    1975-05-15

    There is both clinical and experimental evidence that cellular and humoral immunity are suppressed in patients with renal insufficiency: observations in organ transplantation and in vitro stimulation of lymphocytes from uraemic patients, investigations of acute and late hypersensitivity reactions, the immune response after active immunization as well as changes of immunoglobulins and lymphatic organs in uraemia are discussed in the paper. The underlying mechanisms are complex and not yet fully understood. Lymphopenia, atrophy of the thymus gland, toxic serum factors, induction of enhancing mechanisms by certain serum fractions and metabolic defects of lymphocytes--all were shown to be involved or at least considered to be. At present, however, it is impossible to define their rank of importance and the exact place they may occupy in the genesis of this type of "natural immunosuppression". PMID:540

  7. Mechanisms of immune resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Alfred; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Grutkoski, Patricia S.; Song, Grace Y.

    2008-01-01

    Initially after injury, the innate/proinflammatory and some aspects of the acquired immune response are up-regulated to maintain a defense against foreign pathogens, clear tissue debris present at the wound site, and orchestrate aspects of tissue remodeling, cell proliferation and angiogenic process, associated with the wound response. However, for proper wound healing to progress, this initial inflammatory response has to be regulated or shut down so as to allow for the reestablishment of matrix, recellularization, and tissue remodeling. Inability to properly resolve the extent of innate/acquired response at a site of injury can lead to poor wound healing, immune suppression, and recurrent infectious episodes. This review attempts to summarize information on regulatory mechanisms that are thought to be involved in controlling/resolving innate or acquired immune responses so as to provide a framework for use in thinking about the impact these processes and their manipulation may have on wound healing and its potential management. PMID:12907886

  8. Immune System and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Norbert; Schwarz, Markus J.

    2010-01-01

    Although an immune dysfunction and the involvement of infectious agents in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia are discussed since decades, the field never came into the mainstream of research. In schizophrenia a blunted type-1 immune response seems to be associated with a dysbalance in the activation of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and in the tryptophan - kynurenine metabolism resulting in increased production of kynurenic acid in schizophrenia. This is associated with an imbalance in the glutamatergic neurotransmission, leading to an NMDA antagonism in schizophrenia. The immunological effects of antipsychotics rebalance partly the immune imbalance and the overweight of the production of the kynurenic acid. This immunological imbalance results in an inflammatory state combined with increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and increased cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. COX-2 inhibitors have been tested in clinical trials, pointing to favourable effects in schizophrenia. PMID:21057585

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease related innate immunity and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuan; Chen, Zhonge

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic nonspecific intestinal inflammatory disease, including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). Its pathogenesis remains not yet clear. Current researchers believe that after environmental factors act on individuals with genetic susceptibility, an abnormal intestinal immune response is launched under stimulation of intestinal flora. However, previous studies only focused on adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of IBD. Currently, roles of innate immune response in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation have also drawn much attention. In this study, IBD related innate immunity and adaptive immunity were explained, especially the immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:27398134

  10. Autophagy in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xu-Jie; Zang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is now emerging as a spotlight in trafficking events that activate innate and adaptive immunity. It facilitates innate pathogen detection and antigen presentation, as well as pathogen clearance and lymphocyte homeostasis. In this review, we first summarize new insights into its functions in immunity, which underlie its associations with autoimmunity. As some lines of evidence are emerging to support its role in autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases, we further discuss whether and how it affects autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus and multiple sclerosis, as well as autoinflammatory diseases, such as Crohn disease and vitiligo. PMID:22878595

  11. The mucosal immune system for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Azegamia, Tatsuhiko; Kiyonoa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-20

    Mucosal surfaces are continuously exposed to the external environment and therefore represent the largest lymphoid organ of the body. In the mucosal immune system, gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs), including Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles, play an important role in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in the gut. GALTs have unique organogenesis characteristics and interact with the network of dendritic cells and T cells for the simultaneous induction and regulation of IgA responses and oral tolerance. In these lymphoid tissues, antigens are up taken by M cells in the epithelial layer, and antigen-specific immune responses are subsequently initiated by GALT cells. Nasopharynx- and tear-duct-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs and TALTs) are key organized lymphoid structures in the respiratory tract and ocular cavities, respectively, and have been shown to interact with each other. Mucosal surfaces are also characterized by host-microbe interactions that affect the genesis and maturation of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues and the induction and regulation of innate and acquired mucosal immune responses. Because most harmful pathogens enter the body through mucosal surfaces by ingestion, inhalation, or sexual contact, the mucosa is a candidate site for vaccination. Mucosal vaccination has some physiological and practical advantages, such as decreased costs and reduced risk of needle-stick injuries and transmission of bloodborne diseases, and it is painless. Recently, the application of modern bioengineering and biochemical engineering technologies, including gene transformation and manipulation systems, resulted in the development of systems to express vaccine antigens in transgenic plants and nanogels, which will usher in a new era of delivery systems for mucosal vaccine antigens. In this review, based on some of our research group's thirty seven years of progress and effort, we highlight the unique features of mucosal immune

  12. Pectin Biosynthesis Is Critical for Cell Wall Integrity and Immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Gerit; Thao, Amanda; Xiong, Guangyan; Li, Baohua; Soltis, Nicole E; Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Hillmer, Rachel A; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Pauly, Markus; Glazebrook, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Plant cell walls are important barriers against microbial pathogens. Cell walls of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves contain three major types of polysaccharides: cellulose, various hemicelluloses, and pectins. UDP-d-galacturonic acid, the key building block of pectins, is produced from the precursor UDP-d-glucuronic acid by the action of glucuronate 4-epimerases (GAEs). Pseudomonas syringae pv maculicola ES4326 (Pma ES4326) repressed expression of GAE1 and GAE6 in Arabidopsis, and immunity to Pma ES4326 was compromised in gae6 and gae1 gae6 mutant plants. These plants had brittle leaves and cell walls of leaves had less galacturonic acid. Resistance to specific Botrytis cinerea isolates was also compromised in gae1 gae6 double mutant plants. Although oligogalacturonide (OG)-induced immune signaling was unaltered in gae1 gae6 mutant plants, immune signaling induced by a commercial pectinase, macerozyme, was reduced. Macerozyme treatment or infection with B. cinerea released less soluble uronic acid, likely reflecting fewer OGs, from gae1 gae6 cell walls than from wild-type Col-0. Although both OGs and macerozyme-induced immunity to B. cinerea in Col-0, only OGs also induced immunity in gae1 gae6. Pectin is thus an important contributor to plant immunity, and this is due at least in part to the induction of immune responses by soluble pectin, likely OGs, that are released during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:26813622

  13. MicroRNAs in Rice Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Baldrich, Patricia; San Segundo, Blanca

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short regulatory non-coding RNAs that guide gene silencing in most eukaryotes. They regulate gene expression by triggering sequence-specific cleavage or translational repression of target transcripts. Plant miRNAs are known to play important roles in a wide range of developmental processes. Increasing evidence also supports that the modulation of miRNA levels plays an important role in reprogramming plant responses to abiotic stress (drought, cold, salinity and nutrient deficiency) and biotic stress (antibacterial resistance). Most of these studies were carried out in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. During the last years, the adoption of high-throughput sequencing technologies has significantly contributed to uncover multiple miRNAs while allowing miRNA profiling in plants. However, although a plethora of rice miRNAs have been shown to be regulated by pathogen infection, the biological function remains largely unknown for most of them. In this review, we summarize our current understanding on the contribution of miRNAs to rice immunity and discuss their potential applications in rice biotechnology. A better understanding of the miRNA species controlling rice immunity may lead to practical biotechnological applications leading to the development of appropriate strategies for rice protection. PMID:26897721

  14. Cytokines and antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ludmila; Pawelec, Graham

    2003-06-01

    Currently, the notion of immunosurveillance against tumors is enjoying something of a renaissance. Even if we still refuse to accept that tumors arising in the normal host are unable to trigger an immune response because of the lack of initiation ("danger") signals, there is no doubt that the immune system can be manipulated experimentally and by implication therapeutically to exert anti-tumor effects. For this activity to be successful, the appropriate cytokine milieu has to be provided, making cytokine manipulation central to immunotherapy. On the other hand, the major hurdle currently preventing successful immunotherapy is the ability of tumors to evolve resistant variants under the pressure of immune selection. Here, too, the cytokine milieu plays an essential role. The purpose of this brief review is to consider the current status of the application of cytokines in facilitating antitumor immunity, as well their role in inhibiting responses to tumors. Clearly, encouraging the former but preventing the latter will be the key to the effective clinical application of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:12779349

  15. Immunizations - general overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a very small, very safe amount of viruses or bacteria that have been weakened or killed. Your immune system then learns to recognize and attack the infection if you are exposed to it later in life. As a result, you will not become ill, ...

  16. Bed rest and immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Aviles, Hernan; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.; Niesel, David; Pandya, Utpal; Allen, Christopher; Ochs, Hans D.; Blancher, Antoine; Abbal, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Space flight has been shown to result in altered immune responses. The current study was designed to investigate this possibility by using the bed rest model of some space flight conditions. A large number of women are included as subjects in the study. The hypothesis being tested is: 60 days head-down tilt bed rest of humans will affect the immune system and resistance to infection. Blood, urine and saliva samples will be obtained from bed rest subjects prior to, at intervals during, and after completion of 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest. Leukocyte blastogenesis, cytokine production and virus reactivation will be assessed. The ability of the subjects to respond appropriately to immunization with the neoantigen bacteriophage φX-174 will also be determined. Bed rest is being carried out at MEDES, Toulouse France, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX. The studies to be carried out in France will also allow assessment of the effects of muscle/bone exercise and nutritional countermeasures on the immune system in addition to the effects of bed rest.

  17. Increasing Immunization Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toole, Kimberly; Perry, Cynthia S.

    2004-01-01

    School nurses often have the responsibility to ensure that students meet all immunization requirements for school entry and school attendance. In large inner-city school districts, many obstacles exist which make this task daunting and often result in lengthy absences and exclusions for students. It is critical that school nurses find creative and…

  18. Dioxin and immune regulation

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Nikki B.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.

    2014-01-01

    The immune toxicity of the ubiquitous environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), commonly referred to as dioxin, has been studied for over 35 years but only recently has the profound immune suppression induced by TCDD exposure been linked to induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The effects of TCDD are mediated through its binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. The subsequent AHR-dependent effects on immune responses are determined by the cell types involved, their activation status, and the type of antigenic stimulus. Collectively, studies indicate that TCDD inhibits CD4+ T cell differentiation into T helper (Th)1, Th2, and Th17 effector cells, while inducing Foxp3-negative and/or preserving Foxp3+ Tregs. Although it is not yet clear how activation of AHR by TCDD induces Tregs, there is a potential therapeutic role for alternative AHR ligands in the treatment of immune-mediated disorders. PMID:20146706

  19. Photodynamic immune modulation (PIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, John R.; Hunt, David W. C.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Chan, Agnes H.; Lui, Harvey; Levy, Julia G.

    1999-09-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is accepted for treatment of superficial and lumen-occluding tumors in regions accessible to activating light and is now known to be effective in closure of choroidal neovasculature in Age Related Macular Degeneration. PDT utilizes light absorbing drugs (photosensitizers) that generate the localized formation of reactive oxygen species after light exposure. In a number of systems, PDT has immunomodulatory effects; Photodynamic Immune Modulation (PIM). Using low- intensity photodynamic regimens applied over a large body surface area, progression of mouse autoimmune disease could be inhibited. Further, this treatment strongly inhibited the immunologically- medicated contact hypersensitivity response to topically applied chemical haptens. Immune modulation appears to result from selective targeting of activated T lymphocytes and reduction in immunostimulation by antigen presenting cells. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated skin condition, exhibits heightened epidermal cell proliferation, epidermal layer thickening and plaque formation at different body sites. In a recent clinical trial, approximately one-third of patients with psoriasis and arthritis symptoms (psoriatic arthritis) displayed a significant clinical improvement in several psoriasis-related parameters after four weekly whole-body PIM treatments with verteporfin. The safety profile was favorable. The capacity of PIM to influence other human immune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis is under extensive evaluation.

  20. Epidemic processes with immunization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Hinrichsen, Haye

    2003-09-01

    We study a model of directed percolation (DP) with immunization, i.e., with different probabilities for the first infection and subsequent infections. The immunization effect leads to an additional non-Markovian term in the corresponding field theoretical action. We consider immunization as a small perturbation around the DP fixed point in d<6, where the non-Markovian term is relevant. The immunization causes the system to be driven away from the neighborhood of the DP critical point. In order to investigate the dynamical critical behavior of the model, we consider the limits of low and high first-infection rate, while the second-infection rate remains constant at the DP critical value. Scaling arguments are applied to obtain an expression for the survival probability in both limits. The corresponding exponents are written in terms of the critical exponents for ordinary DP and DP with a wall. We find that the survival probability does not obey a power-law behavior, decaying instead as a stretched exponential in the low first-infection probability limit and to a constant in the high first-infection probability limit. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by optimized numerical simulations in 1+1 dimensions.

  1. Increasing immunization coverage.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Lawrence D; Curry, Edward S; Harlor, Allen D; Laughlin, James J; Leeds, Andrea J; Lessin, Herschel R; Rodgers, Chadwick T; Granado-Villar, Deise C; Brown, Jeffrey M; Cotton, William H; Gaines, Beverly Marie Madry; Gambon, Thresia B; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Gorski, Peter A; Kraft, Colleen A; Marino, Ronald Vincent; Paz-Soldan, Gonzalo J; Zind, Barbara

    2010-06-01

    In 1977, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement calling for universal immunization of all children for whom vaccines are not contraindicated. In 1995, the policy statement "Implementation of the Immunization Policy" was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, followed in 2003 with publication of the first version of this statement, "Increasing Immunization Coverage." Since 2003, there have continued to be improvements in immunization coverage, with progress toward meeting the goals set forth in Healthy People 2010. Data from the 2007 National Immunization Survey showed that 90% of children 19 to 35 months of age have received recommended doses of each of the following vaccines: inactivated poliovirus (IPV), measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), varicella-zoster virus (VZB), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). For diphtheria and tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, 84.5% have received the recommended 4 doses by 35 months of age. Nevertheless, the Healthy People 2010 goal of at least 80% coverage for the full series (at least 4 doses of DTaP, 3 doses of IPV, 1 dose of MMR, 3 doses of Hib, 3 doses of HBV, and 1 dose of varicella-zoster virus vaccine) has not yet been met, and immunization coverage of adolescents continues to lag behind the goals set forth in Healthy People 2010. Despite these encouraging data, a vast number of new challenges that threaten continued success toward the goal of universal immunization coverage have emerged. These challenges include an increase in new vaccines and new vaccine combinations as well as a significant number of vaccines currently under development; a dramatic increase in the acquisition cost of vaccines, coupled with a lack of adequate payment to practitioners to buy and administer vaccines; unanticipated manufacturing and delivery problems that have caused significant shortages of various vaccine products; and the rise of a public antivaccination movement that uses the

  2. Evolutionary responses of innate Immunity to adaptive immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Innate immunity is present in all metazoans, whereas the evolutionarily more novel adaptive immunity is limited to jawed fishes and their descendants (gnathostomes). We observe that the organisms that possess adaptive immunity lack diversity in their innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), rais...

  3. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  4. Technique Selectively Represses Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Matters December 3, 2012 Technique Selectively Represses Immune System Myelin (green) encases and protects nerve fibers (brown). A new technique prevents the immune system from attacking myelin in a mouse model of ...

  5. Transcriptome and Metabolite Profiling of the Infection Cycle of Zymoseptoria tritici on Wheat Reveals a Biphasic Interaction with Plant Immunity Involving Differential Pathogen Chromosomal Contributions and a Variation on the Hemibiotrophic Lifestyle Definition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Jason J.; Kanyuka, Kostya; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Derbyshire, Mark; Andongabo, Ambrose; Devonshire, Jean; Lysenko, Artem; Saqi, Mansoor; Desai, Nalini M.; Powers, Stephen J.; Hooper, Juliet; Ambroso, Linda; Bharti, Arvind; Farmer, Andrew; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.; Dietrich, Robert A.; Courbot, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici causes Septoria tritici blotch disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Pathogen reproduction on wheat occurs without cell penetration, suggesting that dynamic and intimate intercellular communication occurs between fungus and plant throughout the disease cycle. We used deep RNA sequencing and metabolomics to investigate the physiology of plant and pathogen throughout an asexual reproductive cycle of Z. tritici on wheat leaves. Over 3,000 pathogen genes, more than 7,000 wheat genes, and more than 300 metabolites were differentially regulated. Intriguingly, individual fungal chromosomes contributed unequally to the overall gene expression changes. Early transcriptional down-regulation of putative host defense genes was detected in inoculated leaves. There was little evidence for fungal nutrient acquisition from the plant throughout symptomless colonization by Z. tritici, which may instead be utilizing lipid and fatty acid stores for growth. However, the fungus then subsequently manipulated specific plant carbohydrates, including fructan metabolites, during the switch to necrotrophic growth and reproduction. This switch coincided with increased expression of jasmonic acid biosynthesis genes and large-scale activation of other plant defense responses. Fungal genes encoding putative secondary metabolite clusters and secreted effector proteins were identified with distinct infection phase-specific expression patterns, although functional analysis suggested that many have overlapping/redundant functions in virulence. The pathogenic lifestyle of Z. tritici on wheat revealed through this study, involving initial defense suppression by a slow-growing extracellular and nutritionally limited pathogen followed by defense (hyper) activation during reproduction, reveals a subtle modification of the conceptual definition of hemibiotrophic plant infection. PMID:25596183

  6. Climate change, nutrition and immunity: Effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on the immune function of an insect herbivore.

    PubMed

    Gherlenda, Andrew N; Haigh, Anthony M; Moore, Ben D; Johnson, Scott N; Riegler, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Balanced nutrition is fundamental to health and immunity. For herbivorous insects, nutrient-compositional shifts in host plants due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperature may compromise this balance. Therefore, understanding their immune responses to such shifts is vital if we are to predict the outcomes of climate change for plant-herbivore-parasitoid and pathogen interactions. We tested the immune response of Paropsis atomaria Olivier (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feeding on Eucalyptus tereticornis Sm. seedlings exposed to elevated CO2 (640 μmol mol(-1); CE) and temperature (ambient plus 4 °C; TE). Larvae were immune-challenged with a nylon monofilament in order to simulate parasitoid or pathogen attack without other effects of actual parasitism or pathology. The cellular (in vivo melanisation) and humoral (in vitro phenoloxidase PO activity) immune responses were assessed, and linked to changes in leaf chemistry. CE reduced foliar nitrogen (N) concentrations and increased C:N ratios and concentrations of total phenolics. The humoral response was reduced at CE. PO activity and haemolymph protein concentrations decreased at CE, while haemolymph protein concentrations were positively correlated with foliar N concentrations. However, the cellular response increased at CE and this was not correlated with any foliar traits. Immune parameters were not impacted by TE. Our study revealed that opposite cellular and humoral immune responses occurred as a result of plant-mediated effects at CE. In contrast, elevated temperatures within the tested range had minimal impact on immune responses. These complex interactions may alter the outcomes of parasitoid and pathogen attack in future climates. PMID:26678330

  7. Adaptive immune resistance: How cancer protects from immune attack

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immune resistance is a process where the cancer changes its phenotype in response to a cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory immune response, thereby evading it. This adaptive process is triggered by the specific recognition of cancer cells by T cells, which leads to the production of immune-activating cytokines. Cancers then hijack mechanisms developed to limit inflammatory and immune responses and protect themselves from the T cell attack. Inhibiting adaptive immune resistance is the mechanistic basis of responses to PD-1 or PD-L1 blocking antibodies, and may be of relevance for the development of other cancer immunotherapy strategies. PMID:26272491

  8. Tomato immune receptor Ve1 recognizes effector of multiple fungal pathogens uncovered by genome and RNA sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal plant pathogens secrete effector molecules to establish disease on their hosts, while plants in turn utilize immune receptors to intercept these effectors. The tomato immune receptor Ve1 governs resistance to race 1 strains of the soil-borne vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and V. alb...

  9. Recombinant lentivector as a genetic immunization vehicle for antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    He, Yukai; Munn, David; Falo, Louis D

    2011-01-01

    Summary Encouraged by remarkable successes in preventing infectious diseases and by the well established potential of immune system for controlling tumor growth, active therapeutic immunization approaches hold great promise for treating malignant tumors. In recent years, engineered recombinant viral vectors have been carefully examined as genetic immunization vehicles and have been demonstrated to induce potent T cell mediated immune responses that can control tumor growth. Very recent efforts suggest that lentivectors possess important advantages over other candidate recombinant viral vectors for genetic immunization. Here we review the development of recombinant lentivectors and the characteristics of T cell immune responses elicited by lentivector immunization, including the mechanism of T cell priming with a focus on the role of skin dendritic cells (DC) and potential applications for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:18377355

  10. Humoral immunity in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Barker, A F; Craig, S; Bardana, E J

    1987-09-01

    Bronchiectasis occurs in patients with immunodeficiency and fungal hypersensitivity disorders. To assess the prevalence of abnormal humoral immune parameters in bronchiectasis, a retrospective study was carried out on sera from 30 patients. Studies included immunoglobulin quantitation and specific antibody to fungal species. Eleven patients were found to have immunodeficiency (nine with panhypoglobulinemia and two with selective IgM deficiency). Six patients had elevations of serum IgA and four patients had elevations of serum IgE. Six patients had elevated total antibody to Aspergillus or Candida species and six had precipitin bands to one or more fungal antigens. This study indicates that immunodeficiency is prevalent and plays a causative role in some patients with bronchiectasis. Hypersensitivity reactions to Aspergillus, Candida, and other ubiquitous environmental fungi may also play an etiopathogenic role in this disease (bronchiectasis, humoral immunity, immunodeficiency). PMID:3631652

  11. Immunization Strategies Against Henipaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Geisbert, Thomas W.; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Wang, Lin-Fa; Middleton, Deborah; Pallister, Jackie; Bossart, Katharine N.

    2015-01-01

    Hendra virus and Nipah virus are recently discovered and closely related emerging viruses that now comprise the genus henipavirus within the subfamily Paramyxoviridae and are distinguished by their broad species tropism and ability to cause fatal disease in a wide variety of mammalian hosts including humans. The high mortality associated with human and animal henipavirus infections has highlighted the importance and necessity of developing effective immunization strategies. The development of suitable animal models of henipavirus infection and pathogenesis has been critical for testing the efficacy of potential therapeutic approaches. Several henipavirus challenge models have been used and recent successes in both active and passive immunization strategies against henipaviruses have been reported which have all targeted the viral envelope glycoproteins. PMID:22481140

  12. Synthetic plant defense elicitors

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Yasemin; Eulgem, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug-like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection. PMID:25674095

  13. Auto immune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    van Gerven, Nicole Mf; de Boer, Ynto S; Mulder, Chris Jj; van Nieuwkerk, Carin Mj; Bouma, Gerd

    2016-05-21

    To provide an update of the latest trends in epidemiology, clinical course, diagnostics, complications and treatment of auto immune hepatitis (AIH). A search of the MEDLINE database was performed using the search terms: "auto immune hepatitis", "clinical presentation", "symptoms", "signs", "diagnosis", "auto antibodies", "laboratory values", "serology", "histopathology", "histology", "genetics", "HLA genes", "non-HLA genes", "environment", "epidemiology", "prevalence", "incidence", "demographics", "complications", "HCC", "PBC", "PSC", "corticosteroid", "therapy", "treatment", "alternative treatment". English-language full-text articles and abstracts were considered. Articles included reviews, meta-analysis, prospective retrospective studies. No publication date restrictions were applied. AIH is an immune meditated progressive inflammatory liver disease that predominantly affects middle-aged females but may affect people of all ages. The clinical spectrum of AIH is wide, ranging from absent or mild symptoms to fulminant hepatic failure. The aetiology of AIH is still unknown, but is believed to occur as the consequence of an aberrant immune response towards an un-known trigger in a genetically susceptible host. In the absence of a gold standard, diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical, biochemical and histopathological criteria. Immunosuppressive treatment has been the cornerstone of treatment since the earliest description of the disease in 1950 by Waldenström. Such treatment is often successful at inducing remission and generally leads to normal life expectancy. Nevertheless, there remain significant areas of unmet aetiological a clinical needs including fundamental insight in disease pathogenesis, optimal therapy, duration of treatment and treatment alternatives in those patients unresponsive to standard treatment regimens. PMID:27217697

  14. Auto immune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    van Gerven, Nicole MF; de Boer, Ynto S; Mulder, Chris JJ; van Nieuwkerk, Carin MJ; Bouma, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    To provide an update of the latest trends in epidemiology, clinical course, diagnostics, complications and treatment of auto immune hepatitis (AIH). A search of the MEDLINE database was performed using the search terms: “auto immune hepatitis”, “clinical presentation”, “symptoms”, “signs”, “diagnosis”, “auto antibodies”, “laboratory values”, “serology”, “histopathology”, “histology”, “genetics”, “HLA genes”, “non-HLA genes”, “environment”, “epidemiology”, “prevalence”, “incidence”, “demographics”, “complications”, “HCC”, “PBC”, “PSC”, “corticosteroid”, “therapy”, “treatment”, “alternative treatment”. English-language full-text articles and abstracts were considered. Articles included reviews, meta-analysis, prospective retrospective studies. No publication date restrictions were applied. AIH is an immune meditated progressive inflammatory liver disease that predominantly affects middle-aged females but may affect people of all ages. The clinical spectrum of AIH is wide, ranging from absent or mild symptoms to fulminant hepatic failure. The aetiology of AIH is still unknown, but is believed to occur as the consequence of an aberrant immune response towards an un-known trigger in a genetically susceptible host. In the absence of a gold standard, diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical, biochemical and histopathological criteria. Immunosuppressive treatment has been the cornerstone of treatment since the earliest description of the disease in 1950 by Waldenström. Such treatment is often successful at inducing remission and generally leads to normal life expectancy. Nevertheless, there remain significant areas of unmet aetiological a clinical needs including fundamental insight in disease pathogenesis, optimal therapy, duration of treatment and treatment alternatives in those patients unresponsive to standard treatment regimens. PMID:27217697

  15. Update on global immunization.

    PubMed

    Weber, Carol J

    2007-10-01

    The international community recognizes that investing in the health development of poor and disadvantaged countries is central to reducing poverty. Immunization is one strategy in the global effort to reduce infant mortality, improve maternal health, and combat infectious disease. In this day of global interdependence, all countries are vulnerable to uncontrolled spread of disease through epidemics. Achieving the Millennium Development Goals will not only help developing countries, but it will also contribute to improving health and security for all. PMID:17990623

  16. Sublethal Heavy Metal Stress Stimulates Innate Immunity in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Swarnendu; Acharya, Krishnendu

    2015-01-01

    Effect of sublethal heavy metal stress as plant biotic elicitor for triggering innate immunity in tomato plant was investigated. Copper in in vivo condition induced accumulation of defense enzymes like peroxidase (PO), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), and β-1,3 glucanase along with higher accumulation of total phenol, antioxidative enzymes (catalase and ascorbate peroxidase), and total chlorophyll content. Furthermore, the treatment also induced nitric oxide (NO) production which was confirmed by realtime visualization of NO burst using a fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA) and spectrophotometric analysis. The result suggested that the sublethal dose of heavy metal can induce an array of plant defense responses that lead to the improvement of innate immunity in plants. PMID:25729768

  17. Toward understanding of rice innate immunity against Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Azizi, P; Rafii, M Y; Abdullah, S N A; Nejat, N; Maziah, M; Hanafi, M M; Latif, M A; Sahebi, M

    2016-01-01

    The blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, causes serious disease on a wide variety of grasses including rice, wheat and barley. The recognition of pathogens is an amazing ability of plants including strategies for displacing virulence effectors through the adaption of both conserved and variable pathogen elicitors. The pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) were reported as two main innate immune responses in plants, where PTI gives basal resistance and ETI confers durable resistance. The PTI consists of extracellular surface receptors that are able to recognize PAMPs. PAMPs detect microbial features such as fungal chitin that complete a vital function during the organism's life. In contrast, ETI is mediated by intracellular receptor molecules containing nucleotide-binding (NB) and leucine rich repeat (LRR) domains that specifically recognize effector proteins produced by the pathogen. To enhance crop resistance, understanding the host resistance mechanisms against pathogen infection strategies and having a deeper knowledge of innate immunity system are essential. This review summarizes the recent advances on the molecular mechanism of innate immunity systems of rice against M. oryzae. The discussion will be centered on the latest success reported in plant-pathogen interactions and integrated defense responses in rice. PMID:25198435

  18. Brucella evasion of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Anna; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-02-01

    The complex immune system of mammals is the result of evolutionary forces that include battles against pathogens, as sensing and defeating intruders is a prerequisite to host survival. On the other hand, microorganisms have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade both arms of immunity: the innate and the adaptive immune systems. The successful pathogenic intracellular bacterium Brucella is not an exception to the rule: Brucella displays mechanisms that allow evasion of immune surveillance in order to establish persistent infections in mammals. In this review, we highlight some key mechanisms that pathogenic Brucella use to evade the adaptive immune system. PMID:23374122

  19. Pentraxins in humoral innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Inforzato, Antonio; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Valentino, Sonia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Innate immunity represents the first line of defence against pathogens and plays key roles in activation and orientation of the adaptive immune response. The innate immune system comprises both a cellular and a humoral arm. Components of the humoral arm include soluble pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) that recognise pathogens associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate the immune response in coordination with the cellular arm, therefore acting as functional ancestors of antibodies. The long pentraxin PTX3 is a prototypic soluble PRM that is produced at sites of infection and inflammation by both somatic and immune cells. Gene targeting of this evolutionarily conserved protein has revealed a non-redundant role in resistance to selected pathogens. Moreover, PTX3 exerts important functions at the crossroad between innate immunity, inflammation and female fertility. Here we review the studies on PTX3, with emphasis on pathogen recognition and crosstalk with other components of the innate immune system. PMID:21948359

  20. Ocular Immune Privilege and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Allografts are afforded a level of protection from rejection within immune-privileged tissues. Immune-privileged tissues involve mechanisms that suppress inflammation and promote immune tolerance. There are anatomical features, soluble factors, membrane-associated proteins, and alternative antigen-presenting cells (APC) that contribute to allograft survival in the immune-privileged tissue. This review presents the current understanding of how the mechanism of ocular immune privilege promotes tolerogenic activity by APC, and T cells in response to the placement of foreign antigen within the ocular microenvironment. Discussed will be the unique anatomical, cellular, and molecular mechanisms that lessen the chance for graft destroying immune responses within the eye. As more is understood about the molecular mechanisms of ocular immune privilege greater is the potential for using these molecular mechanisms in therapies to prevent allograft rejection. PMID:26904026

  1. Insect Immunity to Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Lu, H-L; St Leger, R J

    2016-01-01

    The study of infection and immunity in insects has achieved considerable prominence with the appreciation that their host defense mechanisms share many fundamental characteristics with the innate immune system of vertebrates. Studies on the highly tractable model organism Drosophila in particular have led to a detailed understanding of conserved innate immunity networks, such as Toll. However, most of these studies have used opportunistic human pathogens and may not have revealed specialized immune strategies that have arisen through evolutionary arms races with natural insect pathogens. Fungi are the commonest natural insect pathogens, and in this review, we focus on studies using Metarhizium and Beauveria spp. that have addressed immune system function and pathogen virulence via behavioral avoidance, the use of physical barriers, and the activation of local and systemic immune responses. In particular, we highlight studies on the evolutionary genetics of insect immunity and discuss insect-pathogen coevolution. PMID:27131327

  2. Comparative immune systems in animals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Tao, Xin; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2014-02-01

    Animal immune systems can be classified into those of innate immunity and those of adaptive immunity. It is generally thought that the former are universal for all animals and depend on germline-encoded receptors that recognize highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), whereas the latter are vertebrate specific and are mediated primarily by lymphocytes bearing a unique antigen receptor. However, novel adaptive or adaptive-like immunities have been found in invertebrates and jawless vertebrates, and extraordinarily complex innate immunities, created through huge expansions of many innate gene families, have recently been found in the cephalochordate amphioxus and the echinoderm sea urchin. These studies not only inspire immunologists to seek novel immune mechanisms in invertebrates but also raise questions about the origin and evolution of vertebrate immunities. PMID:25384142

  3. Flavonoids and immune function in human: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Ilaria; Miglio, Cristiana; Morabito, Giuseppa; Ioannone, Francesca; Serafini, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids, through a modulation of immune function, have been suggested to be involved in the role played by plant foods in disease prevention. We performed a systematic search in the MEDLINE database to review the effect of flavonoid-rich foods and flavonoids supplements on immune function. A total of 58 studies, were identified as suitable: 41 addressed in vivo proinflammatory cytokines and 15 measured ex vivo markers of immune function. According to our findings and on the basis of single food items, the number of studies in humans is limited and, for galenic supplements, only quercetin has been investigated. More evidences are needed to clarify the role of flavonoids as modulator of immune function in humans. PMID:24915384

  4. Addressing Immunization Registry Population Inflation in Adolescent Immunization Rates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective While U.S. adolescent immunization rates are available annually at national and state levels, finding pockets of need may require county or sub-county information. Immunization information systems (IISs) are one tool for assessing local immunization rates. However, the presence of IIS records dating back to early childhood and challenges in capturing mobility out of IIS areas typically leads to denominator inflation. We examined the feasibility of weighting adolescent immunization records by length of time since last report to produce more accurate county adolescent counts and immunization rates. Methods We compared weighted and unweighted adolescent denominators from the Oregon ALERT IIS, along with county-level Census Bureau estimates, with school enrollment counts from Oregon's annual review of seventh-grade school immunization compliance for public and private schools. Adolescent immunization rates calculated using weighted data, for the state as a whole, were also checked against comparable National Immunization Survey (NIS) rates. Results Weighting individual records by the length of time since last activity substantially improved the fit of IIS data to county populations for adolescents. A nonlinear logarithmic (ogive) weight produced the best fit to the school count data of all examined estimates. Overall, the ogive weighted results matched NIS adolescent rates for Oregon. Conclusion The problem of mobility-inflated counts of teenagers can be addressed by weighting individual records based on time since last immunization. Well-populated IISs can rely on their own data to produce adolescent immunization rates and find pockets of need. PMID:25729105

  5. Immune evasion in cancer: Mechanistic basis and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Vinay, Dass S; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Pawelec, Graham; Talib, Wamidh H; Stagg, John; Elkord, Eyad; Lichtor, Terry; Decker, William K; Whelan, Richard L; Kumara, H M C Shantha; Signori, Emanuela; Honoki, Kanya; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Amin, Amr; Helferich, William G; Boosani, Chandra S; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Keith, W Nicol; Bilsland, Alan; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Fujii, Hiromasa; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan; Choi, Beom K; Kwon, Byoung S

    2015-12-01

    Cancer immune evasion is a major stumbling block in designing effective anticancer therapeutic strategies. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding how cancers evade destructive immunity, measures to counteract tumor escape have not kept pace. There are a number of factors that contribute to tumor persistence despite having a normal host immune system. Immune editing is one of the key aspects why tumors evade surveillance causing the tumors to lie dormant in patients for years through "equilibrium" and "senescence" before re-emerging. In addition, tumors exploit several immunological processes such as targeting the regulatory T cell function or their secretions, antigen presentation, modifying the production of immune suppressive mediators, tolerance and immune deviation. Besides these, tumor heterogeneity and metastasis also play a critical role in tumor growth. A number of potential targets like promoting Th1, NK cell, γδ T cell responses, inhibiting Treg functionality, induction of IL-12, use of drugs including phytochemicals have been designed to counter tumor progression with much success. Some natural agents and phytochemicals merit further study. For example, use of certain key polysaccharide components from mushrooms and plants have shown to possess therapeutic impact on tumor-imposed genetic instability, anti-growth signaling, replicative immortality, dysregulated metabolism etc. In this review, we will discuss the advances made toward understanding the basis of cancer immune evasion and summarize the efficacy of various therapeutic measures and targets that have been developed or are being investigated to enhance tumor rejection. PMID:25818339

  6. Evolution and Conservation of Plant NLR Functions

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Florence; Vernaldi, Saskia; Maekawa, Takaki

    2013-01-01

    In plants and animals, nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeats (NLR)-containing proteins play pivotal roles in innate immunity. Despite their similar biological functions and protein architecture, comparative genome-wide analyses of NLRs and genes encoding NLR-like proteins suggest that plant and animal NLRs have independently arisen in evolution. Furthermore, the demonstration of interfamily transfer of plant NLR functions from their original species to phylogenetically distant species implies evolutionary conservation of the underlying immune principle across plant taxonomy. In this review we discuss plant NLR evolution and summarize recent insights into plant NLR-signaling mechanisms, which might constitute evolutionarily conserved NLR-mediated immune mechanisms. PMID:24093022

  7. Regulators of Innate Immunity in Cereal-fungal Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant immune system plays a crucial role in preventing microbial invasion and growth. PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) are presented by diverse pathogens, and trigger the activation of non-specific basal defense mechanisms. These responses include the transcription of thousands o...

  8. Resin collection and social immunity in honey bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined if the use of resins, complex plant secretions with diverse antimicrobial properties, acts as a colony-level immune defense by honey bees. Colonies were enriched with extracts of Brazilian or Minnesotan propolis (a bee mixture of resins and wax) or were left as controls. We measured ge...

  9. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by surface-localised pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) is a key component of plant innate immunity. Most known plant PRRs are receptor kinases and initiation of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) signalling requires phosphorylation of the PR...

  10. Exercise, nutrition and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Nieman, David C; Pedersen, Bente K

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous bouts of prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune cell function. Furthermore, inadequate or inappropriate nutrition can compound the negative influence of heavy exertion on immunocompetence. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction. An adequate intake of iron, zinc and vitamins A, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important for the maintenance of immune function, but excess intakes of some micronutrients can also impair immune function and have other adverse effects on health. Immune system depression has also been associated with an excess intake of fat. To maintain immune function, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy requirements. An athlete exercising in a carbohydrate-depleted state experiences larger increases in circulating stress hormones and a greater perturbation of several immune function indices. Conversely, consuming 30-60 g carbohydrate x h(-1) during sustained intensive exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones such as cortisol and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Convincing evidence that so-called 'immune-boosting' supplements, including high doses of antioxidant vitamins, glutamine, zinc, probiotics and Echinacea, prevent exercise-induced immune impairment is currently lacking. PMID:14971437

  11. Passive Immunization Against Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldo, Charles R.

    2005-01-01

    Poliomyelitis has gone from being one of the worst scourges of the 20th century to nearing eradication in the 21st. This success is well known to be attributable to the Salk inactivated and Sabin attenuated poliovirus vaccines. However, before introduction of these vaccines, William McDowall Hammon of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health led the first major breakthrough in prevention of the disease by using passive immunization in one of the earliest double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. This study provided the first evidence that antibodies to poliovirus could prevent the disease in humans. PMID:15855454

  12. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-04-01

    Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity. PMID:26752023

  13. Hypothalamic neurohormones and immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Quintanar, J. Luis; Guzmán-Soto, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed. PMID:23964208

  14. Immune Privilege of Corneal Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.; Larkin, D. Frank P.

    2013-01-01

    Corneal transplantation has been performed successfully for over 100 years. Normally, HLA typing and systemic immunosuppressive drugs are not utilized, yet 90% of corneal allografts survive. In rodents, corneal allografts representing maximal histoincompatibility enjoy >50% survival even without immunosuppressive drugs. By contrast, other categories of transplants are invariably rejected in such donor/host combinations. The acceptance of corneal allografts compared to other categories of allografts is called immune privilege. The cornea expresses factors that contribute to immune privilege by preventing the induction and expression of immune responses to histocompatibility antigens on the corneal allograft. Among these are soluble and cell membrane molecules that block immune effector elements and also apoptosis of T lymphocytes. However, some conditions rob the corneal allograft of its immune privilege and promote rejection, which remains the leading cause of corneal allograft failure. Recent studies have examined new strategies for restoring immune privilege to such high-risk hosts. PMID:20482389

  15. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Brazdova, Andrea; Senechal, Helene; Peltre, Gabriel; Poncet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility. PMID:27123194

  16. Hyperthyroidism and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, P.; Majoos, F.; Perrotta, A.

    1984-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and immune thrombocytopenia occurred concurrently in five patients; in a sixth, thyrotoxicosis developed after successful treatment of the thrombocytopenia. Correction of the hyperthyroidism was followed by a variable pattern of clinical response. In one case with mild asymptomatic thrombocytopenia spontaneous complete remission occurred. Two patients required adrenocorticosteroids to control severe thrombocytopenic purpura during the period of hyperthyroidism, after which complete remission occurred. Another patient with severe symptomatic thrombocytopenia remains with a partially compensated thrombocytolytic state but is without purpura and off all therapy. A fifth patient required splenectomy for drug-resistant thrombocytopenia and remains critically dependent on immunosuppressive therapy. The sixth patient had a relapse of immune thrombocytopenia with subsequent development of thyrotoxicosis but platelet count spontaneously returned to normal after correction of the hyperthyroidism. Pregnancy in two of these six patients was not associated with recurrence of either hyperthyroidism or thrombocytopenia. Management of symptomatic purpura in adults with co-existent hyperthyroidism may differ from that customarily employed since adrenocorticosteroid therapy may need to be extended until euthyroidism has been established before proceeding to splenectomy. When surgery is necessary, the risk of thyrotoxic storm should be anticipated, and the patient appropriately premedicated. PMID:6494085

  17. Immune interactions in endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Herington, Jennifer L; Bruner-Tran, Kaylon L; Lucas, John A; Osteen, Kevin G

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common, complex gynecologic disorder characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma at extrauterine (ectopic) sites. In women who develop this disease, alterations in specific biological processes involving both the endocrine and immune systems have been observed, which may explain the survival and growth of displaced endometrial tissue in affected women. In the past decade, a considerable amount of research has implicated a role for alterations in progesterone action at both eutopic and ectopic sites of endometrial growth which may contribute to the excessive inflammation associated with progression of endometriosis; however, it remains unclear whether these anomalies induce the condition or are simply a consequence of the disease process. In this article, we summarize current knowledge of alterations within the immune system of endometriosis patients and discuss how endometrial cells from women with this disease not only have the capacity to escape immunosurveillance, but also use inflammatory mechanisms to promote their growth within the peritoneal cavity. Finally, we discuss evidence that exposure to an environmental endocrine disruptor, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, can mediate the development of an endometrial phenotype that exhibits both reduced progesterone responsiveness and hypersensitivity to proinflammatory stimuli mimicking the endometriosis phenotype. Future studies in women with endometriosis should consider whether a heightened inflammatory response within the peritoneal microenvironment contributes to the development and persistence of this disease. PMID:21895474

  18. Protective immunity against plague.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Claire; Quenee, Lauriane; Anderson, Deborah; Schneewind, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    Plague, an infectious disease that reached catastrophic proportions during three pandemics, continues to be a legitimate public health concern worldwide. Although antibiotic therapy for the causative agent Yersinia pestis is available, pharmaceutical supply limitations, multi-drug resistance from natural selection as well as malicious bioengineering are a reality. Consequently, plague vaccinology is a priority for biodefense research. Development of a multi-subunit vaccine with Fraction 1 and LcrV as protective antigens seems to be receiving the most attention. However, LcrV has been shown to cause immune suppression and Y. pestis mutants lacking F1 expression are thought to be fully virulent in nature and in animal experiments. The LcrV variant, rV10, retains the well documented protective antigenic properties of LcrV but with diminished inhibitory effects on the immune system. More research is required to examine the molecular mechanisms of vaccine protection afforded by surface protein antigens and to decipher the host mechanisms responsible for vaccine success. PMID:17966437

  19. Immune thrombocytopenia and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Srividhya; Robinson, Susan E

    2011-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is not infrequently encountered during reproductive years with an estimated incidence of 0.1–1 per 1000 pregnancies. An international consensus group recently re-defined ITP and outlined standardized response criteria and up-to-date investigation and management. The pathogenesis encompasses autoantibody platelet destruction and immune-mediated decreased platelet production. Maternal antibodies may cross the placenta and have the potential to cause fetal and/or neonatal thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis and subsequent management of ITP in pregnancy requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the midwife, obstetrician, haematologist and anaesthetist. Women with ITP diagnosed prior to pregnancy should receive preconception counselling to outline potential treatments and provide information regarding expected maternal and neonatal outcome. Management prior to 36 weeks aims to avoid treatment in the absence of bleeding and ensure an acceptable platelet count for planned procedures. At 34–36 weeks, women are generally reviewed to consider whether a tailored course of treatment is required in preparation for delivery. Further research is required to determine a suitable platelet count for neuraxial anaesthesia. The mode of delivery should be guided by obstetric indication. It is pertinent to consider both the risk of maternal bleeding and thrombosis in maternal ITP. The risk of neonatal intracranial haemorrhage in association with ITP is less than 1%. Postpartum a cord blood platelet count should be checked. Additional management is dependent upon the neonatal platelet count. Data collection using the new standardized terminology should provide robust comparable epidemiological data regarding ITP in pregnancy.

  20. Chemokines and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Diana Carolina Torres; Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines and generally have low molecular weight ranging from 7 to 15kDa. Chemokines and their receptors are able to control the migration and residence of all immune cells. Some chemokines are considered pro-inflammatory, and their release can be induced during an immune response at a site of infection, while others are considered homeostatic and are involved in controlling of cells migration during tissue development or maintenance. The physiologic importance of this family of mediators is resulting from their specificity − members of the chemokine family induce recruitment of well-defined leukocyte subsets. There are two major chemokine sub-families based upon cysteine residues position: CXC and CC. As a general rule, members of the CXC chemokines are chemotactic for neutrophils, and CC chemokines are chemotactic for monocytes and sub-set of lymphocytes, although there are some exceptions. This review discusses the potential role of chemokines in inflammation focusing on the two best-characterized chemokines: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a CC chemokine, and interleukin-8, a member of the CXC chemokine sub-family. PMID:26466066

  1. Skin Immunization Obviates Alcohol-Related Immune Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Rhonda M.; Stottlemyer, John Mark; Cline, Rachel A.; Donahue, Cara; Behari, Jaideep; Falo, Louis D.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholics suffer from immune dysfunction that can impede vaccine efficacy. If ethanol (EtOH)-induced immune impairment is in part a result of direct exposure of immune cells to EtOH, then reduced levels of exposure could result in less immune dysfunction. As alcohol ingestion results in lower alcohol levels in skin than blood, we hypothesized that the skin immune network may be relatively preserved, enabling skin-targeted immunizations to obviate the immune inhibitory effects of alcohol consumption on conventional vaccines. We employed the two most common chronic EtOH mouse feeding models, the liver-damaging Lieber-DeCarli (LD) and liver-sparing Meadows-Cook (MC) diets, to examine the roles of EtOH and/or EtOH-induced liver dysfunction on alcohol related immunosuppression. Pair-fed mice were immunized against the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) by DNA immunization or against flu by administering the protein-based influenza vaccine either systemically (IV, IM), directly to liver (hydrodynamic), or cutaneously (biolistic, ID). We measured resulting tissue EtOH levels, liver stress, regulatory T cell (Treg), and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations. We compared immune responsiveness by measuring delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), and antibody induction as a function of delivery route and feeding model. We found that, as expected, and independent of the feeding model, EtOH ingestion inhibits DTH, CTL lysis, and antigen-specific total IgG induced by traditional systemic vaccines. On the other hand, skin-targeted vaccines were equally immunogenic in alcohol-exposed and non-exposed subjects, suggesting that cutaneous immunization may result in more efficacious vaccination in alcohol-ingesting subjects. PMID:26561838

  2. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  3. Marathon training and immune function.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C

    2007-01-01

    Many components of the immune system exhibit adverse change after marathon-type exertion. These immune changes occur in several compartments of the immune system and body (e.g. the skin, upper respiratory tract mucosal tissue, lung, peritoneal cavity, blood and muscle). Of all immune cells, natural killer (NK) cells, neutrophils and macrophages (of the innate immune system) exhibit the greatest changes in response to marathon competition, both in terms of numbers and function. Many mechanisms appear to be involved, including exercise-induced changes in stress hormone and cytokine concentrations, body temperature changes, increases in blood flow and dehydration. During this 'open window' of immune dysfunction (which may last between 3 and 72 hours, depending on the immune measure), viruses and bacteria may gain a foothold, increasing the risk of subclinical and clinical infection. Of the various nutritional and pharmacological countermeasures to marathon-induced immune perturbations that have been evaluated thus far, ingestion of carbohydrate beverages during intense and prolonged exercise has emerged as the most effective. However, carbohydrate ingestion during a marathon attenuates increases in plasma cytokines and stress hormones, but is largely ineffective against changes in other immune components including suppression of NK and T-cell function, and salivary IgA output. Other countermeasures, such as glutamine, antioxidant supplements and ibuprofen, have had disappointing results and thus the search for companion agents to carbohydrate continues. PMID:17465622

  4. Ubiquitin signaling in immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongbo; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has emerged as a crucial mechanism that regulates signal transduction in diverse biological processes, including different aspects of immune functions. Ubiquitination regulates pattern-recognition receptor signaling that mediates both innate immune responses and dendritic cell maturation required for initiation of adaptive immune responses. Ubiquitination also regulates the development, activation, and differentiation of T cells, thereby maintaining efficient adaptive immune responses to pathogens and immunological tolerance to self-tissues. Like phosphorylation, ubiquitination is a reversible reaction tightly controlled by the opposing actions of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases. Deregulated ubiquitination events are associated with immunological disorders, including autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27012466

  5. Ensuring excellence in immunization services.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase uptake of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, a domiciliary immunization service was established in Dudley primary care trust in England in 2010. Parents of unimmunized children were offered vaccines at home. Uptake of MMR vaccine among 2 year olds rose from 89% in 2007/08 to 96.9% in 2015. Children were also given any other outstanding immunizations. The domiciliary immunization service reached vulnerable unimmunized children who may otherwise have remained unprotected against life threatening childhood illnesses. Domiciliary immunization service was set up in 2010 to reduce inequalities in uptake of MMR vaccine among children aged between 2 and 5 years. PMID:26618244

  6. Host Resistance and Immune Aging.

    PubMed

    Bandaranayake, Thilinie; Shaw, Albert C

    2016-08-01

    Human immune system aging results in impaired responses to pathogens or vaccines. In the innate immune system, which mediates the earliest pro-inflammatory responses to immunologic challenge, processes ranging from Toll-like Receptor function to Neutrophil Extracellular Trap formation are generally diminished in older adults. Dysregulated, enhanced basal inflammation with age reflecting activation by endogenous damage-associated ligands contributes to impaired innate immune responses. In the adaptive immune system, T and B cell subsets and function alter with age. The control of cytomegalovirus infection, particularly in the T lineage, plays a dominant role in the differentiation and diversity of the T cell compartment. PMID:27394014

  7. Innate Immune Recognition of EBV.

    PubMed

    Lünemann, Anna; Rowe, Martin; Nadal, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to establish latency despite specific immune responses and to successfully persist lifelong in the human host shows that EBV has developed powerful strategies and mechanisms to exploit, evade, abolish, or downsize otherwise effective immune responses to ensure its own survival. This chapter focuses on current knowledge on innate immune responses against EBV and its evasion strategies for own benefit and summarizes the questions that remain to be tackled. Innate immune reactions against EBV originate both from the main target cells of EBV and from nontarget cells, which are elements of the innate immune system. Thus, we structured our review accordingly but with a particular focus on the innate recognition of EBV in its two stages in its life cycle, latent state and lytic replication. Specifically, we discuss (I) innate sensing and resulting innate immune responses against EBV by its main target cells, focusing on (i) EBV transmission between epithelial cells and B cells and their life cycle stages; and (ii) elements of innate immunity in EBV's target cells. Further, we debate (II) the innate recognition and resulting innate immune responses against EBV by cells other than the main target cells, focusing on (iii) myeloid cells: dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophil granulocytes; and (iv) natural killer cells. Finally, we address (III) how EBV counteracts or exploits innate immunity in its latent and lytic life cycle stages, concentrating on (v) TLRs; (vi) EBERs; and (vii) microRNAs. PMID:26428378

  8. The microbiome and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Thaiss, Christoph A; Zmora, Niv; Levy, Maayan; Elinav, Eran

    2016-07-01

    The intestinal microbiome is a signalling hub that integrates environmental inputs, such as diet, with genetic and immune signals to affect the host's metabolism, immunity and response to infection. The haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic cells of the innate immune system are located strategically at the host-microbiome interface. These cells have the ability to sense microorganisms or their metabolic products and to translate the signals into host physiological responses and the regulation of microbial ecology. Aberrations in the communication between the innate immune system and the gut microbiota might contribute to complex diseases. PMID:27383981

  9. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD. PMID:26900473

  10. Apoplastic interactions between plants and plant root intruders.

    PubMed

    Mitsumasu, Kanako; Seto, Yoshiya; Yoshida, Satoko

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogenic or parasitic organisms attack plant roots to obtain nutrients, and the apoplast including the plant cell wall is where the plant cell meets such organisms. Root parasitic angiosperms and nematodes are two distinct types of plant root parasites but share some common features in their strategies for breaking into plant roots. Striga and Orobanche are obligate root parasitic angiosperms that cause devastating agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants form an invasion organ called a haustorium, where plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are highly expressed. Plant-parasitic nematodes are another type of agriculturally important plant root parasite. These nematodes breach the plant cell walls by protruding a sclerotized stylet from which PCWDEs are secreted. Responding to such parasitic invasion, host plants activate their own defense responses against parasites. Endoparasitic nematodes secrete apoplastic effectors to modulate host immune responses and to facilitate the formation of a feeding site. Apoplastic communication between hosts and parasitic plants also contributes to their interaction. Parasitic plant germination stimulants, strigolactones, are recently identified apoplastic signals that are transmitted over long distances from biosynthetic sites to functioning sites. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the importance of apoplastic signals and cell walls for plant-parasite interactions. PMID:26322059

  11. Pathogen Tactics to Manipulate Plant Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, M Shahid; McCormack, Maggie E; Argueso, Cristiana T; Pajerowska-Mukhtar, Karolina M

    2016-07-11

    Cell death is a vital process for multicellular organisms. Programmed cell death (PCD) functions in a variety of processes including growth, development, and immune responses for homeostasis maintenance. In particular, plants and animals utilize PCD to control pathogen invasion and infected cell populations. Despite some similarity, there are a number of key differences between how these organisms initiate and regulate cell death. In contrast to animals, plants are sessile, lack a circulatory system, and have additional cellular structures, including cell walls and chloroplasts. Plant cells have the autonomous ability to induce localized cell death using conserved eukaryotic pathways as well as unique plant-specific pathways. Thus, in order to successfully infect host cells, pathogens must subvert immune responses and avoid detection to prevent PCD and allow infection. Here we discuss the roles of cell death in plant immune responses and the tactics pathogens utilize to avert cell death. PMID:27404256

  12. Nutritional support to maintain proper immune status during intense training.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune function which can increase the risk of picking up minor infections. To maintain robust immunity, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy, carbohydrate, protein, and micronutrient requirements. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction and an adequate intake of iron, zinc, and vitamins A, D, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important in the maintenance of immune function. Consuming carbohydrate during prolonged strenuous exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Similar effects can be seen with daily ingestion of high-dose antioxidant vitamin supplements, though concerns have been expressed that excessive antioxidant intake may impair exercise training adaptations. It is safe to say with reasonable confidence that individual amino acids, colostrum, Echinacea, and zinc are unlikely to boost immunity or reduce infection risk in athletes. The ingestion of carbohydrate during exercise and daily consumption of probiotic and plant polyphenol (e.g. quercetin)-containing supplements or foodstuffs (e.g. non-alcoholic beer) currently offer the best chance of success. This approach is likely to be most effective for individuals who are particularly prone to illness. PMID:23765353

  13. Mosquito Immunity against Arboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Shuzhen; Jupatanakul, Natapong; Dimopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) pose a significant threat to global health, causing human disease with increasing geographic range and severity. The recent availability of the genome sequences of medically important mosquito species has kick-started investigations into the molecular basis of how mosquito vectors control arbovirus infection. Here, we discuss recent findings concerning the role of the mosquito immune system in antiviral defense, interactions between arboviruses and fundamental cellular processes such as apoptosis and autophagy, and arboviral suppression of mosquito defense mechanisms. This knowledge provides insights into co-evolutionary processes between vector and virus and also lays the groundwork for the development of novel arbovirus control strategies that target the mosquito vector. PMID:25415198

  14. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William; Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation by E

  15. An Immunization Education Program for Childcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayney, Mary S.; Bartell, Julie C.

    2005-01-01

    The childhood immunization schedule includes at least 17 scheduled immunizations prior to the age of 24 months. Immunization laws require childcare centers to maintain immunization records and enforce immunization standards for children who attend these centers. Childcare providers generally receive little formal education about infectious…

  16. Nutrition and immunity in ruminant animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune system can be generally separated into three broad components; natural immunity, innate immunity, and acquired immunity, all of which must be fully developed and functioning properly to provide adequate immunological protection. Natural and innate immunity are typically grouped together u...

  17. Stimulatory Effect of β-glucans on Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Sook; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2011-01-01

    β-Glucans are naturally occurring polysaccharides that are produced by bacteria, yeast, fungi, and many plants. Although their pharmacological activities, such as immunomodulatory, anti-infective and anti-cancer effects, have been well studied, it is still unclear how β-glucans exert their activities. However, recent studies on the β-glucan receptors shed some light on their mechanism of action. Since β-glucans have large molecular weights, they must bind surface receptors to activate immune cells. In this review, we summarize the immunopharmacological activities and the potential receptors of β-glucans in immune cells. PMID:22039366

  18. Plant-Pathogen Effectors: Cellular Probes Interfering with Plant Defenses in Spatial and Temporal Manners.

    PubMed

    Toruño, Tania Y; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Coaker, Gitta

    2016-08-01

    Plants possess large arsenals of immune receptors capable of recognizing all pathogen classes. To cause disease, pathogenic organisms must be able to overcome physical barriers, suppress or evade immune perception, and derive nutrients from host tissues. Consequently, to facilitate some of these processes, pathogens secrete effector proteins that promote colonization. This review covers recent advances in the field of effector biology, focusing on conserved cellular processes targeted by effectors from diverse pathogens. The ability of effectors to facilitate pathogen entry into the host interior, suppress plant immune perception, and alter host physiology for pathogen benefit is discussed. Pathogens also deploy effectors in a spatial and temporal manner, depending on infection stage. Recent advances have also enhanced our understanding of effectors acting in specific plant organs and tissues. Effectors are excellent cellular probes that facilitate insight into biological processes as well as key points of vulnerability in plant immune signaling networks. PMID:27359369

  19. The Interaction of Human Enteric Pathogens with Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeong-A; Lee, Dong Hwan; Heu, Sunggi

    2014-01-01

    There are an increasing number of outbreaks of human pathogens related to fresh produce. Thus, the growth of human pathogens on plants should be explored. Human pathogens can survive under the harsh environments in plants, and can adhere and actively invade plants. Plant-associated microbiota or insects contribute to the survival and transmission of enteric pathogens in plants. Human enteric pathogens also trigger plant innate immunity, but some pathogens–such as Salmonella–can overcome this defense mechanism. PMID:25288993

  20. Plain Talk about Childhood Immunizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Health and Social Services, Juneau. Div. of Family and Youth Services.

    This booklet provides parents with information about immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases, balances the benefits and risk of vaccination, and responds to inaccuracies or misinformation about immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases. Section 1 presents a message to parents about vaccination. Section 2 offers facts about…

  1. Recommendations for Institutional Prematriculation Immunizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of American College Health, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The "Recommendations for Institutional Prematriculation Immunizations" described in this article are provided to colleges and universities to facilitate the implementation of a comprehensive institutional prematriculation immunization policy. In response to changing epidemiology and the introduction of new vaccines, the American College Health…

  2. Questions of Mind Over Immunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the possibility of disturbed immunity among people experiencing either clinical depression or some type of severe stress. Psychoneuroimmunology, the study of psychological treatment and its ability to shore up a person's immunity and slow the spread of infectious disease, is reviewed. (KR)

  3. Effects of Sodium Butyrate Treatment on Histone Modifications and the Expression of Genes Related to Epigenetic Regulatory Mechanisms and Immune Response in European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus Labrax) Fed a Plant-Based Diet

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Noelia; Rimoldi, Simona; Ceccotti, Chiara; Gliozheni, Emi; Piferrer, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria that inhabit the epithelium of the animals’ digestive tract provide the essential biochemical pathways for fermenting otherwise indigestible dietary fibers, leading to the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Of the major SCFAs, butyrate has received particular attention due to its numerous positive effects on the health of the intestinal tract and peripheral tissues. The mechanisms of action of this four-carbon chain organic acid are different; many of these are related to its potent regulatory effect on gene expression since butyrate is a histone deacetylase inhibitor that play a predominant role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and cell function. In the present work, we investigated in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) the effects of butyrate used as a feed additive on fish epigenetics as well as its regulatory role in mucosal protection and immune homeostasis through impact on gene expression. Seven target genes related to inflammatory response and reinforcement of the epithelial defense barrier [tnfα (tumor necrosis factor alpha) il1β, (interleukin 1beta), il-6, il-8, il-10, and muc2 (mucin 2)] and five target genes related to epigenetic modifications [dicer1(double-stranded RNA-specific endoribonuclease), ehmt2 (euchromatic histone-lysine-N-methyltransferase 2), pcgf2 (polycomb group ring finger 2), hdac11 (histone deacetylase-11), and jarid2a (jumonji)] were analyzed in fish intestine and liver. We also investigated the effect of dietary butyrate supplementation on histone acetylation, by performing an immunoblotting analysis on liver core histone extracts. Results of the eight-week-long feeding trial showed no significant differences in weight gain or SGR (specific growth rate) of sea bass that received 0.2% sodium butyrate supplementation in the diet in comparison to control fish that received a diet without Na-butyrate. Dietary butyrate led to a twofold increase in the acetylation level of histone H4 at

  4. Effects of Sodium Butyrate Treatment on Histone Modifications and the Expression of Genes Related to Epigenetic Regulatory Mechanisms and Immune Response in European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus Labrax) Fed a Plant-Based Diet.

    PubMed

    Terova, Genciana; Díaz, Noelia; Rimoldi, Simona; Ceccotti, Chiara; Gliozheni, Emi; Piferrer, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria that inhabit the epithelium of the animals' digestive tract provide the essential biochemical pathways for fermenting otherwise indigestible dietary fibers, leading to the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Of the major SCFAs, butyrate has received particular attention due to its numerous positive effects on the health of the intestinal tract and peripheral tissues. The mechanisms of action of this four-carbon chain organic acid are different; many of these are related to its potent regulatory effect on gene expression since butyrate is a histone deacetylase inhibitor that play a predominant role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and cell function. In the present work, we investigated in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) the effects of butyrate used as a feed additive on fish epigenetics as well as its regulatory role in mucosal protection and immune homeostasis through impact on gene expression. Seven target genes related to inflammatory response and reinforcement of the epithelial defense barrier [tnfα (tumor necrosis factor alpha) il1β, (interleukin 1beta), il-6, il-8, il-10, and muc2 (mucin 2)] and five target genes related to epigenetic modifications [dicer1(double-stranded RNA-specific endoribonuclease), ehmt2 (euchromatic histone-lysine-N-methyltransferase 2), pcgf2 (polycomb group ring finger 2), hdac11 (histone deacetylase-11), and jarid2a (jumonji)] were analyzed in fish intestine and liver. We also investigated the effect of dietary butyrate supplementation on histone acetylation, by performing an immunoblotting analysis on liver core histone extracts. Results of the eight-week-long feeding trial showed no significant differences in weight gain or SGR (specific growth rate) of sea bass that received 0.2% sodium butyrate supplementation in the diet in comparison to control fish that received a diet without Na-butyrate. Dietary butyrate led to a twofold increase in the acetylation level of histone H4 at

  5. Integrating temperature and nutrition--environmental impacts on an insect immune system.

    PubMed

    Bauerfeind, Stephanie S; Fischer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Globally increasing temperatures may strongly affect insect herbivore performance. In contrast to direct effects of temperature on herbivores, indirect effects mediated via thermal effects on host-plant quality are only poorly understood, despite having the potential to substantially impact the herbivores' performance. Part of this performance is the organisms' immune system which may be of pivotal importance for local survival. We here use a full-factorial design to explore the direct (larvae were reared at 17°C or 25°C) and indirect effects (host plants were reared at 17°C or 25°C) of temperature on immune function of the temperate-zone butterfly Pieris napi. At the higher rearing temperature haemocyte numbers and prophenoloxidase activity were reduced. Plant temperature, in contrast, did not affect immune competence despite clear effects on insect growth patterns. Overall, thermal and dietary impacts on the insects' immune responses were weak and trait-specific. PMID:24636910

  6. Immune Mechanisms in Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Glenthøj, Andreas; Ørskov, Andreas Due; Hansen, Jakob Werner; Hadrup, Sine Reker; O'Connell, Casey; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a spectrum of diseases, characterized by debilitating cytopenias and a propensity of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Comprehensive sequencing efforts have revealed a range of mutations characteristic, but not specific, of MDS. Epidemiologically, autoimmune diseases are common in patients with MDS, fueling hypotheses of common etiological mechanisms. Both innate and adaptive immune pathways are overly active in the hematopoietic niche of MDS. Although supportive care, growth factors, and hypomethylating agents are the mainstay of MDS treatment, some patients-especially younger low-risk patients with HLA-DR15 tissue type-demonstrate impressive response rates after immunosuppressive therapy. This is in contrast to higher-risk MDS patients, where several immune activating treatments, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, are in the pipeline. Thus, the dual role of immune mechanisms in MDS is challenging, and rigorous translational studies are needed to establish the value of immune manipulation as a treatment of MDS. PMID:27314337

  7. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  8. Immune Mechanisms in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Glenthøj, Andreas; Ørskov, Andreas Due; Hansen, Jakob Werner; Hadrup, Sine Reker; O’Connell, Casey; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a spectrum of diseases, characterized by debilitating cytopenias and a propensity of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Comprehensive sequencing efforts have revealed a range of mutations characteristic, but not specific, of MDS. Epidemiologically, autoimmune diseases are common in patients with MDS, fueling hypotheses of common etiological mechanisms. Both innate and adaptive immune pathways are overly active in the hematopoietic niche of MDS. Although supportive care, growth factors, and hypomethylating agents are the mainstay of MDS treatment, some patients—especially younger low-risk patients with HLA-DR15 tissue type—demonstrate impressive response rates after immunosuppressive therapy. This is in contrast to higher-risk MDS patients, where several immune activating treatments, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, are in the pipeline. Thus, the dual role of immune mechanisms in MDS is challenging, and rigorous translational studies are needed to establish the value of immune manipulation as a treatment of MDS. PMID:27314337

  9. Overview of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, David D.

    2010-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host from a universe of pathogenic microbes that are themselves constantly evolving. The immune system also helps the host eliminate toxic or allergenic substances that enter through mucosal surfaces. Central to the immune system’s ability to mobilize a response to an invading pathogen, toxin or allergen is its ability to distinguish self from non-self. The host uses both innate and adaptive mechanisms to detect and eliminate pathogenic microbes. Both of these mechanisms include self-nonself discrimination. This overview identifies key mechanisms used by the immune system to respond to invading microbes and other exogenous threats and identifies settings in which disturbed immune function exacerbates tissue injury. PMID:20176265

  10. Occurrence of glucocorticoids discharged from a sewage treatment plant in Japan and the effects of clobetasol propionate exposure on the immune responses of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kei; Sato, Kentaro; Shibano, Takazumi; Isobe, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Go; Kitamura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-04-01

    The present study evaluated the environmental risks to common carp (Cyprinus carpio) posed by glucocorticoids present in sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent. To gather information on the seasonal variations in glucocorticoid concentration, the authors sampled the effluent of a Japanese STP every other week for 12 mo. Six of 9 selected glucocorticoids were detected in the effluent, with clobetasol propionate and betamethasone 17-valerate detected at the highest concentrations and frequencies. The present study's results indicated that effluent glucocorticoid concentration may depend on water temperature, which is closely related to the removal efficiency of the STP or to seasonal variations in the public's use of glucocorticoids. In a separate experiment, to clarify whether glucocorticoids in environmental water increase susceptibility to bacterial infection in fish, the authors examined the responses to bacterial infection (Aeromonas veronii) of common carp exposed to clobetasol propionate. Clobetasol propionate exposure did not affect bacterial infection-associated mortality. In fish infected with A. veronii but not exposed to clobetasol propionate, head kidney weight and number of leukocytes in the head kidney were significantly increased (p < 0.05), whereas these effects were not observed in infected fish exposed to clobetasol. This suggests that clobetasol propionate alleviated bacterial infection-associated inflammation. Together, these results indicate that susceptibility to bacterial infection in common carp is not affected by exposure to glucocorticoids at environmentally relevant concentrations. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:946-952. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26126539

  11. Immune Response of Amebiasis and Immune Evasion by Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite and the causative agent of amebiasis. It is estimated approximately 1% of humans are infected with E. histolytica, resulting in an estimate of 100,000 deaths annually. Clinical manifestations of amebic infection range widely from asymptomatic to severe symptoms, including dysentery and extra-intestinal abscesses. Like other infectious diseases, it is assumed that only ~20% of infected individuals develop symptoms, and genetic factors of both the parasite and humans as well as the environmental factors, e.g., microbiota, determine outcome of infection. There are multiple essential steps in amebic infection: degradation of and invasion into the mucosal layer, adherence to the intestinal epithelium, invasion into the tissues, and dissemination to other organs. While the mechanisms of invasion and destruction of the host tissues by the amebae during infection have been elucidated at the molecular levels, it remains largely uncharacterized how the parasite survive in the host by evading and attacking host immune system. Recently, the strategies for immune evasion by the parasite have been unraveled, including immunomodulation to suppress IFN-γ production, elimination of immune cells and soluble immune mediators, and metabolic alterations against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to fend off the attack from immune system. In this review, we summarized the latest knowledge on immune reaction and immune evasion during amebiasis. PMID:27242782

  12. Immune Response of Amebiasis and Immune Evasion by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite and the causative agent of amebiasis. It is estimated approximately 1% of humans are infected with E. histolytica, resulting in an estimate of 100,000 deaths annually. Clinical manifestations of amebic infection range widely from asymptomatic to severe symptoms, including dysentery and extra-intestinal abscesses. Like other infectious diseases, it is assumed that only ~20% of infected individuals develop symptoms, and genetic factors of both the parasite and humans as well as the environmental factors, e.g., microbiota, determine outcome of infection. There are multiple essential steps in amebic infection: degradation of and invasion into the mucosal layer, adherence to the intestinal epithelium, invasion into the tissues, and dissemination to other organs. While the mechanisms of invasion and destruction of the host tissues by the amebae during infection have been elucidated at the molecular levels, it remains largely uncharacterized how the parasite survive in the host by evading and attacking host immune system. Recently, the strategies for immune evasion by the parasite have been unraveled, including immunomodulation to suppress IFN-γ production, elimination of immune cells and soluble immune mediators, and metabolic alterations against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to fend off the attack from immune system. In this review, we summarized the latest knowledge on immune reaction and immune evasion during amebiasis. PMID:27242782

  13. Apoplastic interactions between plants and plant root intruders

    PubMed Central

    Mitsumasu, Kanako; Seto, Yoshiya; Yoshida, Satoko

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogenic or parasitic organisms attack plant roots to obtain nutrients, and the apoplast including the plant cell wall is where the plant cell meets such organisms. Root parasitic angiosperms and nematodes are two distinct types of plant root parasites but share some common features in their strategies for breaking into plant roots. Striga and Orobanche are obligate root parasitic angiosperms that cause devastating agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants form an invasion organ called a haustorium, where plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are highly expressed. Plant-parasitic nematodes are another type of agriculturally important plant root parasite. These nematodes breach the plant cell walls by protruding a sclerotized stylet from which PCWDEs are secreted. Responding to such parasitic invasion, host plants activate their own defense responses against parasites. Endoparasitic nematodes secrete apoplastic effectors to modulate host immune responses and to facilitate the formation of a feeding site. Apoplastic communication between hosts and parasitic plants also contributes to their interaction. Parasitic plant germination stimulants, strigolactones, are recently identified apoplastic signals that are transmitted over long distances from biosynthetic sites to functioning sites. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the importance of apoplastic signals and cell walls for plant–parasite interactions. PMID:26322059

  14. Powering the Immune System: Mitochondria in Immune Function and Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Melissa A.; Sims, Katherine B.; Walter, Jolan E.; Traggiai, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical subcellular organelles that are required for several metabolic processes, including oxidative phosphorylation, as well as signaling and tissue-specific processes. Current understanding of the role of mitochondria in both the innate and adaptive immune systems is expanding. Concurrently, immunodeficiencies arising from perturbation of mitochondrial elements are increasingly recognized. Recent observations of immune dysfunction and increased incidence of infection in patients with primary mitochondrial disorders further support an important role for mitochondria in the proper function of the immune system. Here we review current findings. PMID:25309931

  15. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  16. Immunization Schedules for Preteens and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Preteens and Teens Recommend on Facebook ... on track. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Preteens and Teens (7-18 years) 2016 ...

  17. Immunization Schedules for Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Infants and Children Recommend on Facebook ... any questions. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Children (Birth through 6 years) Schedule for ...

  18. Plants in Their Own Behalf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrusky, Ben

    1983-01-01

    Chemical responses as active and precisely targeted as those of animal immune systems characterize the defenses plants mount against microbial/herbivoral predation and disease. Past and current research in this field is reported and discussed. Applications, such as the prediction of past outbreaks, are also discussed. (JN)

  19. Seasonal benefits of a natural propolis envelope to honey bee immunity and colony health.

    PubMed

    Borba, Renata S; Klyczek, Karen K; Mogen, Kim L; Spivak, Marla

    2015-11-01

    Honey bees, as social insects, rely on collective behavioral defenses that produce a colony-level immune phenotype, or social immunity, which in turn impacts the immune response of individuals. One behavioral defense is the collection and deposition of antimicrobial plant resins, or propolis, in the nest. We tested the effect of a naturally constructed propolis envelope within standard beekeeping equipment on the pathogen and parasite load of large field colonies, and on immune system activity, virus and storage protein levels of individual bees over the course of a year. The main effect of the propolis envelope was a decreased and more uniform baseline expression of immune genes in bees during summer and autumn months each year, compared with the immune activity in bees with no propolis envelope in the colony. The most important function of the propolis envelope may be to modulate costly immune system activity. As no differences were found in levels of bacteria, pathogens and parasites between the treatment groups, the propolis envelope may act directly on the immune system, reducing the bees' need to activate the physiologically costly production of humoral immune responses. Colonies with a natural propolis envelope had increased colony strength and vitellogenin levels after surviving the winter in one of the two years of the study, despite the fact that the biological activity of the propolis diminished over the winter. A natural propolis envelope acts as an important antimicrobial layer enshrouding the colony, benefiting individual immunity and ultimately colony health. PMID:26449975

  20. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  1. The biological significance of immunity.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, N A

    1989-01-01

    The classical definition of immunity as the resistance of the body to disease, views the immune system in simple mechanistic terms. In this brief overview, possible reasons and consequences of the presence of an effective immune system across a range of invertebrate and vertebrate animals are considered. Topics discussed include the forces favouring the development of immunity, such as the acquisition of the colonial habit and terrestrial mode of life by many primitive animals, the constant threats of microbial and macrobial invasion, and the need to eliminate somatic mutations. The consequences of immunity in terms of the development of autoimmunity and hypersensitivity reactions, as well as the interaction of the immune system with the brain, the neuroendocrine organs and environmental factors, are also examined. Finally, the possibilities that the delicate balance maintained between many parasites and the immune systems of their hosts results in the spread of disease, and may also determine the maintenance of sexual reproduction and the choice of mate, are discussed. PMID:2680665

  2. Photosensitizers for photodynamic immune modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, John R.; Boch, Ronald; Hunt, David W. C.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Tao, Jing-Song; Richter, Anna M.; Levy, Julia G.

    2000-06-01

    PDT may be an effective treatment for certain immune-mediated disorders. The immunomodulatory action of PDT is likely a consequence of effects exerted at a number of levels including stimulation of specific cell signaling pathways, selective depletion of activated immune cells, alteration of receptor expression by immune and non-immune cells, and the modulation of cytokine availability. QLT0074, a potent photosensitizer that exhibits rapid clearance kinetics in vivo, is in development for the treatment of immune disorders. In comparison to the well-characterized and structurally related photosensitizer verteporfin, lower concentrations of QLT0074 were required to induce apoptosis in human blood T cells and keratinocytes using blue light for photoactivation. Both photosensitizers triggered the stress activated protein kinase (SAPK) and p38 (HOG1) pathways but not extracellularly regulated kinase (ERK) activity in mouse Pam212 keratinocytes. In cell signaling responses, QLT0074 was active at lower concentrations than verteporfin. For all in vitro test systems, the stronger photodynamic activity of QLT0074 was associated with a greater cell uptake of this photosensitize than verteporfin. In mouse immune models, sub-erythemogenic doses of QLT0074 in combination with whole body blue light irradiation inhibited the contact hypersensitivity response and limited the development of adjuvant-induced arthritis. QLT0074 exhibits activities that indicate it may be a favorable agent for the photodynamic treatment of human immune disease.

  3. Immune Exhaustion and Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Fueyo, A; Markmann, J F

    2016-07-01

    Exhaustion of lymphocyte function through chronic exposure to a high load of foreign antigen is well established for chronic viral infection and antitumor immunity and has been found to be associated with a distinct molecular program and characteristic cell surface phenotype. Although exhaustion has most commonly been studied in the context of CD8 viral responses, recent studies indicate that chronic antigen exposure may affect B cells, NK cells and CD4 T cells in a parallel manner. Limited information is available regarding the extent of lymphocyte exhaustion development in the transplant setting and its impact on anti-graft alloreactivity. By analogy to the persistence of a foreign virus, the large mass of alloantigen presented by an allograft in chronic residence could provide an ideal setting for exhausting donor-reactive T cells. The extent of T cell exhaustion occurring with various allografts, the kinetics of its development, whether exhaustion is influenced positively or negatively by different immunosuppressants, and the impact of exhaustion on graft survival and tolerance development remains a fertile area for investigation. Harnessing or encouraging the natural processes of exhaustion may provide a novel means to promote graft survival and transplantation tolerance. PMID:26729653

  4. Immunity to Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, A

    1991-01-01

    Human serum contains antibodies, mainly of the IgM and IgG isotypes, to pathogenic species of Acanthamoeba. This, as well as the capacity of these amebas to activate complement via the alternative pathway, may be a first-line defense against acanthamoeba infections in humans. Both antibody and complement appear to be important in promoting recognition of these amebas by phagocytic cells such as neutrophils. However, killing of amebas by neutrophils is dependent on lymphokine/monokine priming of the neutrophil. This priming augments the respiratory-burst activity and release of lysosomal enzymes of neutrophils in their response to the ameba. The products of the oxygen-dependent respiratory burst appear to be of prime importance in the killing of this free-living ameba. Antibodies also may prevent tissue invasion by Acanthamoeba by inhibiting its adherence, phagocytic activity, and migration and by neutralizing cytopathogenic amebic agents. Studies on experimental Acanthamoeba infections in mice showed marked species and strain specificity with regard to induction of protection with amebic antigens. Immune compromise or, alternatively, invasion at unique body sites in healthy individuals may form the basis for human infection with Acanthamoeba. PMID:2047675

  5. Immune responses to improving welfare.

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that "increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better" because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as "sickness behavior," includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  6. Brassinosteroids Antagonize Gibberellin- and Salicylate-Mediated Root Immunity in Rice1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    De Vleesschauwer, David; Van Buyten, Evelien; Satoh, Kouji; Balidion, Johny; Mauleon, Ramil; Choi, Il-Ryong; Vera-Cruz, Casiana; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Höfte, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a unique class of plant steroid hormones that orchestrate myriad growth and developmental processes. Although BRs have long been known to protect plants from a suite of biotic and abiotic stresses, our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still rudimentary. Aiming to further decipher the molecular logic of BR-modulated immunity, we have examined the dynamics and impact of BRs during infection of rice (Oryza sativa) with the root oomycete Pythium graminicola. Challenging the prevailing view that BRs positively regulate plant innate immunity, we show that P. graminicola exploits BRs as virulence factors and hijacks the rice BR machinery to inflict disease. Moreover, we demonstrate that this immune-suppressive effect of BRs is due, at least in part, to negative cross talk with salicylic acid (SA) and gibberellic acid (GA) pathways. BR-mediated suppression of SA defenses occurred downstream of SA biosynthesis, but upstream of the master defense regulators NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 and OsWRKY45. In contrast, BR alleviated GA-directed immune responses by interfering at multiple levels with GA metabolism, resulting in indirect stabilization of the DELLA protein and central GA repressor SLENDER RICE1 (SLR1). Collectively, these data favor a model whereby P. graminicola coopts the plant BR pathway as a decoy to antagonize effectual SA- and GA-mediated defenses. Our results highlight the importance of BRs in modulating plant immunity and uncover pathogen-mediated manipulation of plant steroid homeostasis as a core virulence strategy. PMID:22353574

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells: immune evasive, not immune privileged

    PubMed Central

    Ankrum, James A.; Ong, Joon Faii; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    The diverse immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) may be exploited for treatment of a multitude of inflammatory conditions. MSCs have long been reported to be hypoimmunogenic or ‘immune privileged’; this property is thought to enable MSC transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers and the creation of off-the-shelf therapies consisting of MSCs grown in culture. However, recent studies describing generation of antibodies against and immune rejection of allogeneic donor MSCs suggest that MSCs may not actually be immune privileged. Nevertheless, whether rejection of donor MSCs influences the efficacy of allogeneic MSC therapies is not known, and no definitive clinical advantage of autologous MSCs over allogeneic MSCs has been demonstrated to date. Although MSCs may exert therapeutic function through a brief ‘hit and run’ mechanism, protecting MSCs from immune detection and prolonging their persistence in vivo may improve clinical outcomes and prevent patient sensitization toward donor antigens. PMID:24561556

  8. Precision Immunization: NASA Studies Immune Response to Flu Vaccine

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Human Research Program Twins Study investigator Emmanuel Mignot, M.D., Ph.D, known for discovering the cause of narcolepsy is related to the immune system, is studying twin astronauts Scott an...

  9. Active Suppression of Early Immune Response in Tobacco by the Human Pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Shirron, Natali; Yaron, Sima

    2011-01-01

    The persistence of enteric pathogens on plants has been studied extensively, mainly due to the potential hazard of human pathogens such as Salmonella enterica being able to invade and survive in/on plants. Factors involved in the interactions between enteric bacteria and plants have been identified and consequently it was hypothesized that plants may be vectors or alternative hosts for enteric pathogens. To survive, endophytic bacteria have to escape the plant immune systems, which function at different levels through the plant-bacteria interactions. To understand how S. enterica survives endophyticaly we conducted a detailed analysis on its ability to elicit or evade the plant immune response. The models of this study were Nicotiana tabacum plants and cells suspension exposed to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. The plant immune response was analyzed by looking at tissue damage and by testing oxidative burst and pH changes. It was found that S. Typhimurium did not promote disease symptoms in the contaminated plants. Live S. Typhimurium did not trigger the production of an oxidative burst and pH changes by the plant cells, while heat killed or chloramphenicol treated S. Typhimurium and purified LPS of Salmonella were significant elicitors, indicating that S. Typhimurium actively suppress the plant response. By looking at the plant response to mutants defective in virulence factors we showed that the suppression depends on secreted factors. Deletion of invA reduced the ability of S. Typhimurium to suppress oxidative burst and pH changes, indicating that a functional SPI1 TTSS is required for the suppression. This study demonstrates that plant colonization by S. Typhimurium is indeed an active process. S. Typhimurium utilizes adaptive strategies of altering innate plant perception systems to improve its fitness in the plant habitat. All together these results suggest a complex mechanism for perception of S. Typhimurium by plants. PMID:21541320

  10. Immune Dysfunction in Aged Horses.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Dianne

    2016-08-01

    The aging process in people is associated with changes in adaptive and innate immune responses. Similar changes occur in aged horses. Age-related progressive impairment in the ability to respond to pathogen challenge and an increased inflammatory reactivity may predispose geriatric horses to many diseases of old age. Specific recommendations for immune modification of older horses, including an age-appropriate vaccination schedule, are not currently available. In addition, the effect of old age on risk of infectious disease is poorly documented. More work is needed to better understand the interactions of age on immunity, vaccine response, and disease risk in horses. PMID:27329495

  11. Immune modulation following immunization with polyvalent vaccines in dogs.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Alois; May, Bettina; Teltscher, Andrea; Wistrela, Eva; Niedermüller, Hans

    2003-08-15

    A decline in T-cell-mediated immunity and transient state of immunosuppression after immunization has been reported in dogs. Nevertheless, dogs are still routinely vaccinated with polyvalent live vaccines and severe disease does not generally occur. In order to investigate these effects on the canine immune system and to elucidate possible mechanisms we determined the following immune parameters in the blood of 33 clinically sound German shepherd dogs before and after standard vaccination with a polyvalent vaccine against distemper, parvovirus, viral hepatitis, leptospirosis, kennel cough and rabies: white and differential blood cell count, the serum concentrations and/or activities of IL-1, IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, neopterin and IgG, natural killer (NK) cell activity, bactericidal activity and complement hemolytic activity, lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) and nitroblue tetrazolium test (NBT). Our major findings were that significant postvaccinal decreases in T-cell mitogenic response to PHA and in neutrophil function and neopterin serum concentration were accompanied by simultaneous increase in plasma IgG and hemolytic complement activity. This suggests a transient shift in the balance between cell-mediated and humoral (T(H)1/T(H)2) immunity rather than immunosuppression. These results do not imply that dogs should not receive live vaccines, as the response to vaccines just seems to create a state of altered homeostasis when immunization elicits protection by humoral and cell-mediated immunity. However, these recognized compromises of immune function should be considered and vaccines still be applied only in healthy animals and strictly according to the rules and regulations given by the manufacturer. PMID:12909408

  12. Medicinal plants: conception / contraception.

    PubMed

    Chaing, H S; Merino-chavez, G; Yang, L L; Wang, F N; Hafez, E S

    1994-01-01

    Researchers have conducted considerable experiments on the effectiveness and therapeutic values of Chinese herbs and parts of plants. We should not ignore the significance of natural medicine. The Chinese have been perfecting medicinal therapy based on the raw ingredients of plants/herbs and their derivatives for thousands of years. Chinese practitioners of traditional medicine prescribe medicines based on yin and yang. Traditional medicine is communicated in a verb or written form. Natural resources used in traditional medicine to treat diseases are not limited to just medicinal plants but also include animals, shell fish, and minerals. Parts of plants used in traditional medicine are leaves, stems, flowers, bark, and root. Chinese medicine is the world's oldest continuous surviving tradition. The Chinese experimented with local plants, often resulting in mild to violent reactions. This process allowed them to become familiar with poisonous plants and those that could relieve pain or successfully treat illness. Current allopathic medicines are composed of synthetic compounds copied from natural chemical derivatives, which tend to be more potent than the original compound. Some medicinal plants used to effect conception/contraception include Striga astiatica (contraceptive); Eurycoma longifolia (male virility); and a mixture of lengkuas, mengkudu masak, black pepper seeds, ginger, salt, and 2 eggs (increase libido). Women in Malaysia take jamu to preserve their body shape and to provide nutrition during pregnancy. Praneem causes local cell-mediated immunity in the uterus. Clinical trials of Praneem with or without the hCG vaccine are planned. PMID:12287843

  13. Immunizing digital systems against electromagnetic interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, P. D.; Korsah, K.; Antonescu, C.

    This paper discusses the development of the technical basis for acceptance criteria applicable to the immunization of digital systems against electromagnetic interference (EMI). The work is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and stems from the safety-related issues that need to be addressed as a result of the application of digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants. Designers of digital circuits are incorporating increasingly higher clock frequencies and lower logic level voltages, thereby leading to potentially greater susceptibility of spurious interference being misinterpreted as legitimate logic. Development of the technical basis for acceptance criteria to apply to these digital systems centers around establishing good engineering practices to ensure that sufficient levels of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) are maintained between the nuclear power plant's electronic and electromechanical systems. First, good EMC design and installation practices are needed to control the emissions from interference sources and thereby their impact on other nearby circuits and systems. Secondly, a test and evaluation program is needed to outline the EMI tests to be performed, the associated test methods to be followed, and adequate test limits to ensure that the circuit or system under test meets the recommended guidelines. Test and evaluation should be followed by periodic maintenance to assess whether the recommended EMI control practices continue to be adhered to as part of the routine operation of the nuclear power plant. By following these steps, the probability of encountering safety-related instrumentation problems associated with EMI will be greatly reduced.

  14. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  15. Corneal Transplantation and Immune Privilege

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2013-01-01

    Corneal transplants have been successfully performed in human subjects for over 100 years and enjoy an immune privilege that is unrivaled in the field of transplantation. Immune privilege is defined as the reduced incidence and tempo in the immune rejection of corneal allografts compared to other categories of organ allografts performed under the same conditions. Skin allografts transplanted across various MHC or minor histocompatibility barriers undergo rejection in approximately 100% of the hosts. By contrast, orthotopic corneal allografts experience long-term survival in 50% to >90% of the hosts, depending on the histocompatibility barriers that confront the host. The capacity of corneal allografts to evade immune rejection is attributable to multiple anatomical, physiological, and immunoregulatory conditions that conspire to prevent the induction and expression of alloimmunity. PMID:23360158

  16. Immune Infiltration and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Strasner, Amy; Karin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that inflammation influences prostate cancer (PCa) development and that immune cells are among the primary drivers of this effect. This information has launched numerous clinical trials testing immunotherapy drugs in PCa patients. The results of these studies are promising but have yet to generate a complete response. Importantly, the precise immune profile that determines clinical outcome remains unresolved. Individual immune cell types are divided into various functional subsets whose effects on tumor development may differ depending on their particular phenotype and functional status, which is often shaped by the tumor microenvironment. Thus, this review aims to examine the current knowledge regarding the role of inflammation and specific immune cell types in mediating PCa progression to assist in directing and optimizing immunotherapy targets, regimens, and responses and to uncover areas in which further research is needed. Finally, a summary of ongoing immunotherapy clinical trials in PCa is provided. PMID:26217583

  17. Synthetic vaccines: Immunity without harm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Abhinav P.; Murthy, Niren

    2011-03-01

    Multilamellar lipid vesicles with crosslinked walls carrying protein antigens in the vesicle core and immunostimulatory drugs in the vesicle walls generate immune responses comparable to the strongest live vector vaccines.

  18. High noise immunity one shot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    Multivibrator circuit, which includes constant current source, isolates line noise from timing circuitry and field effect transistor controls circuit's operational modes. Circuit has high immunity to supply line noise.

  19. Primer on the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Spiering, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    The human body regularly encounters and combats many pathogenic organisms and toxic molecules. Its ensuing responses to these disease-causing agents involve two interrelated systems: innate immunity and adaptive (or acquired) immunity. Innate immunity is active at several levels, both at potential points of entry and inside the body (see figure). For example, the skin represents a physical barrier preventing pathogens from invading internal tissues. Digestive enzymes destroy microbes that enter the stomach with food. Macrophages and lymphocytes, equipped with molecular detectors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which latch onto foreign structures and activate cellular defenses, patrol the inside of the body. These immune cells sense and devour microbes, damaged cells, and other foreign materials in the body. Certain proteins in the blood (such as proteins of the complement system and those released by natural killer cells, along with antimicrobial host-defense peptides) attach to foreign organisms and toxins to initiate their destruction. PMID:26695756

  20. Immune Modulation by Volatile Anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Stollings, Lindsay M; Jia, Li-Jie; Tang, Pei; Dou, Huanyu; Lu, Binfeng; Xu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Volatile general anesthetics continue to be an important part of clinical anesthesia worldwide. The impact of volatile anesthetics on the immune system has been investigated at both mechanistic and clinical levels, but previous studies have returned conflicting findings due to varied protocols, experimental environments, and subject species. While many of these studies have focused on the immunosuppressive effects of volatile anesthetics, compelling evidence also exists for immunoactivation. Depending on the clinical conditions, immunosuppression and activation due to volatile anesthetics can be either detrimental or beneficial. This review provides a balanced perspective on the anesthetic modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses as well as indirect effectors of immunity. Potential mechanisms of immunomodulation by volatile anesthetics are also discussed. A clearer understanding of these issues will pave the way for clinical guidelines that better account for the impact of volatile anesthetics on the immune system, with the ultimate goal of improving perioperative management. PMID:27286478

  1. Harnessing nanoparticles for immune modulation

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Daniel R.; Shea, Lonnie D; Miller, Stephen D.; King, Nicholas J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent approaches using nanoparticles engineered for immune regulation have yielded promising results in preclinical models of disease. The number of nanoparticle therapies is growing, fueled by innovations in nanotechnology and advances in understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases. In particular, recent mechanistic insight into the ways in which nanoparticles interact with the mononuclear phagocyte system and impact its function during homeostasis and inflammation have highlighted the potential of nanoparticle-based therapies for controlling severe inflammation while concurrently restoring peripheral immune tolerance in autoimmune disease. Here we review recent advances in nanoparticle-based approaches aimed at immune-modulation, and discuss these in the context of concepts in polymeric nanoparticle development, including particle modification, delivery and the factors associated with successful clinical deployment. PMID:26088391

  2. Genetics Home Reference: immune thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop frequent bruising or red or purple spots (purpura) on the skin caused by bleeding just under ... of immune thrombocytopenia: Genetic Testing Registry: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura Johns Hopkins Medicine MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura ( ...

  3. Frequently Asked Questions about Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most current information. Do immunizations cause SIDS, multiple sclerosis, or other problems? There are concerns, many of ... circulate on the Internet, linking some vaccines to multiple sclerosis, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) , and other problems. ...

  4. Physiology of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Denburg, J. A.; Bienenstock, J.

    1979-01-01

    The established mechanisms of immune responsiveness to foreign or self components are reviewed, with particular reference to relevant clinical problems and current research. A multitiered immunological system of cellular and subcellular elements are involved when the body deals with perturbations from without or within. The concept exists that a delicate balance between positive ('helper') and negative ('suppressor') forces is essential to maintaining health. Brief discussion is given to diagnosis of immune abnormalities in the light of these facts. PMID:21297689

  5. Portable Immune-Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.; Mishra, Saroj K.

    1995-01-01

    Portable immune-assessment system developed for use in rapidly identifying infections or contaminated environment. System combines few specific fluorescent reagents for identifying immune-cell dysfunction, toxic substances, buildup of microbial antigens or microbial growth, and potential identification of pathogenic microorganisms using fluorescent microplate reader linked to laptop computer. By using few specific dyes for cell metabolism, DNA/RNA conjugation, specific enzyme activity, or cell constituents, one makes immediate, onsite determination of person's health or of contamination of environment.

  6. Immunization and private sector participation.

    PubMed

    1998-10-01

    Representatives from Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama met August 19-20 in Honduras to discuss promoting and strengthening the participation of the private medical sector in immunization and surveillance programs for vaccine-preventable diseases. Participants met to analyze countries' experiences in incorporating the private medical sector into immunization and surveillance activities for vaccine-preventable diseases; to review regional and global goals for vaccine-preventable diseases, cold chain requirements, and issues related to introducing new vaccines into routine immunization schedules; and to sign agreements to facilitate the incorporation of the private medical sector into immunization and surveillance activities in the region. Country experiences are outlined. The Ministries of Health and the Societies/Associations of Pediatrics established specific objectives designed to develop and/or strengthen private medical sector participation in immunization. Agreements reached on epidemiological surveillance, a basic vaccination schedule, quality vaccines, the cold chain, national committees on immunization practices, annual work plans, technical cooperation, monitoring, and information, education, and promotion are described. PMID:12321836

  7. Pathobiology of secondary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Cines, Douglas B.; Liebman, Howard; Stasi, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) remains a diagnosis of exclusion both from nonimmune causes of thrombocytopenia and immune thrombocytopenia that develops in the context of other disorders (secondary immune thrombocytopenia). The pathobiology, natural history, and response to therapy of the diverse causes of secondary ITP differ from each other and from primary ITP, so accurate diagnosis is essential. Immune thrombocytopenia can be secondary to medications or to a concurrent disease, such as an autoimmune condition (eg, systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], antiphospholipid antibody syndrome [APS], immune thyroid disease, or Evans syndrome), a lymphoproliferative disease (eg, chronic lymphocytic leukemia or large granular T-lymphocyte lymphocytic leukemia), or chronic infection, eg, with Helicobacter pylori, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or hepatitis C virus (HCV). Response to infection may generate antibodies that cross-react with platelet antigens (HIV, H pylori) or immune complexes that bind to platelet Fcγ receptors (HCV) and platelet production may be impaired by infection of megakaryocyte bone marrow-dependent progenitor cells (HCV and HIV), decreased production of thrombopoietin (TPO), and splenic sequestration of platelets secondary to portal hypertension (HCV). Sudden and severe onset of thrombocytopenia has been observed in children after vaccination for measles, mumps, and rubella or natural viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and varicella zoster virus. This thrombocytopenia may be caused by cross-reacting antibodies and closely mimics acute ITP of childhood. Proper diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder, where necessary, play an important role in patient management. PMID:19245930

  8. How to give an immunization.

    PubMed

    1986-07-01

    This article provides information on the 6 major childhood immunizations and the 3 basic types of injections (intradermal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular). The Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) has recommended the following vaccination schedule: birth, Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), oral polio; 6 weeks, diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT), oral polio; 10 weeks, DPT, oral polio; 14 weeks, DPT, oral polio; and 9 months, measles. The timing of immunization is crucial. DPT and measles vaccines may be ineffective if administered too early since maternal antibodies block new immune response; however, the longer the time between the wearing off of maternal protection and vaccination, the longer the unprotected exposure to disease. 3.5 million children in the Third World die each year from the 6 childhood diseases against which immunization provides protection. Of the 90 million 1-year-olds in January 1986, only 18% had received injections against measles, 38% had received DPT injections, and 34% had received oral polio vacine. The EPI is endeavoring to achieve the goal of universal child immunization by 1990. PMID:12314495

  9. Gut immunity in Lepidopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai; Yang, Bing; Huang, Wuren; Dobens, Leonard; Song, Hongsheng; Ling, Erjun

    2016-11-01

    Lepidopteran insects constitute one of the largest fractions of animals on earth, but are considered pests in their relationship with man. Key to the success of this order of insects is its ability to digest food and absorb nutrition, which takes place in the midgut. Because environmental microorganisms can easily enter Lepidopteran guts during feeding, the innate immune response guards against pathogenic bacteria, virus and microsporidia that can be devoured with food. Gut immune responses are complicated by both resident gut microbiota and the surrounding peritrophic membrane and are distinct from immune responses in the body cavity, which depend on the function of the fat body and hemocytes. Due to their relevance to agricultural production, studies of Lepidopteran insect midgut and immunity are receiving more attention, and here we summarize gut structures and functions, and discuss how these confer immunity against different microorganisms. It is expected that increased knowledge of Lepidopteran gut immunity may be utilized for pest biological control in the future. PMID:26872544

  10. Mexico's immunization programme gets results.

    PubMed

    1994-04-01

    With a decline of almost 60% over the past decade in the mortality of children under age 5 years old to the current rate of 33 child deaths/1000 live births, Mexico has joined the 20 countries listed by UNICEF as making the most progress in reducing child mortality since 1980. Much of this progress can be attributed to Mexico's immunization program, which has brought the proportion of fully immunized children under age 5 years to 94% over the past 5 years. Mexico's president has been instrumental in the program's success, having a personal interest in childhood vaccination and supervising the twice-yearly immunization coverage surveys. Even though presidential elections are being held this year, the immunization program should remain strong regardless of who wins because all of Mexico's political parties have pledged to remain committed to immunization. Awareness in the population about the need for vaccination is maintained with the help of the mass media, especially radio and television. The country's enthusiasm for vaccination seems to be paying off in terms of declining child mortality and the eradication of wild poliovirus. The immunization program reaches all but 2-3% of Mexico's children, despite some logistical difficulties and resistance to vaccines among certain religious groups such as the Mennonites and Jehovah's witnesses. PMID:12321777

  11. Intense exercise training and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Williams, Clyde

    2013-01-01

    Regular moderate exercise reduces the risk of infection compared with a sedentary lifestyle, but very prolonged bouts of exercise and periods of intensified training are associated with increased infection risk. In athletes, a common observation is that symptoms of respiratory infection cluster around competitions, and even minor illnesses such as colds can impair exercise performance. There are several behavioral, nutritional and training strategies that can be adopted to limit exercise-induced immunodepression and minimize the risk of infection. Athletes and support staff can avoid transmitting infections by avoiding close contact with those showing symptoms of infection, by practicing good hand, oral and food hygiene and by avoiding sharing drinks bottles and cutlery. Medical staff should consider appropriate immunization for their athletes particularly when travelling to international competitions. The impact of intensive training stress on immune function can be minimized by getting adequate sleep, minimizing psychological stress, avoiding periods of dietary energy restriction, consuming a well-balanced diet that meets energy and protein needs, avoiding deficiencies of micronutrients (particularly iron, zinc, and vitamins A, D, E, B6 and B12), ingesting carbohydrate during prolonged training sessions, and consuming - on a daily basis - plant polyphenol containing supplements or foodstuffs and Lactobacillus probiotics. PMID:23899753

  12. Alternative adaptive immunity strategies: coelacanth, cod and shark immunity.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, Francesco; Gerdol, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The advent of high throughput sequencing has permitted to investigate the genome and the transcriptome of novel non-model species with unprecedented depth. This technological advance provided a better understanding of the evolution of adaptive immune genes in gnathostomes, revealing several unexpected features in different fish species which are of particular interest. In the present paper, we review the current understanding of the adaptive immune system of the coelacanth, the elephant shark and the Atlantic cod. The study of coelacanth, the only living extant of the long thought to be extinct Sarcopterygian lineage, is fundamental to bring new insights on the evolution of the immune system in higher vertebrates. Surprisingly, coelacanths are the only known jawed vertebrates to lack IgM, whereas two IgD/W loci are present. Cartilaginous fish are of great interest due to their basal position in the vertebrate tree of life; the genome of the elephant shark revealed the lack of several important immune genes related to T cell functions, which suggest the existence of a primordial set of TH1-like cells. Finally, the Atlantic cod lacks a functional major histocompatibility II complex, but balances this evolutionary loss with the expansion of specific gene families, including MHC I, Toll-like receptors and antimicrobial peptides. Overall, these data point out that several fish species present an unconventional adaptive immune system, but the loss of important immune genes is balanced by adaptive evolutionary strategies which still guarantee the establishment of an efficient immune response against the pathogens they have to fight during their life. PMID:26423359

  13. Dominant resistance against plant viruses

    PubMed Central

    de Ronde, Dryas; Butterbach, Patrick; Kormelink, Richard

    2014-01-01

    To establish a successful infection plant viruses have to overcome a defense system composed of several layers. This review will overview the various strategies plants employ to combat viral infections with main emphasis on the current status of single dominant resistance (R) genes identified against plant viruses and the corresponding avirulence (Avr) genes identified so far. The most common models to explain the mode of action of dominant R genes will be presented. Finally, in brief the hypersensitive response (HR) and extreme resistance (ER), and the functional and structural similarity of R genes to sensors of innate immunity in mammalian cell systems will be described. PMID:25018765

  14. Plant-bacterium interactions analyzed by proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Amber; Zahur, Muzna; Zeeshan, Nadia; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the plant immune response has resulted in a highly effective defense system that is able to resist potential attack by microbial pathogens. The primary immune response is referred to as pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered immunity and has evolved to recognize common features of microbial pathogens. In response to the delivery of pathogen effector proteins, plants acquired R proteins to fight against pathogen attack. R-dependent defense response is important in understanding the biochemical and cellular mechanisms and underlying these interactions will enable molecular and transgenic approaches for crops with increased biotic resistance. Proteomic analyses are particularly useful for understanding the mechanisms of host plant against the pathogen attack. Recent advances in the field of proteome analyses have initiated a new research area, i.e., the analysis of more complex microbial communities and their interaction with plant. Such areas hold great potential to elucidate, not only the interactions between bacteria and their host plants, but also of bacteria-bacteria interactions between different bacterial taxa, symbiotic, pathogenic bacteria, and commensal bacteria. During biotic stress, plant hormonal signaling pathways prioritizes defense over other cellular functions. Some plant pathogens take advantage of hormone dependent regulatory system by mimicking hormones that interfere with host immune responses to promote virulence (vir). In this review, it is discussed the cross talk that plays important role in response to pathogens attack with different infection strategies using proteomic approaches. PMID:23424014

  15. Has innate immunity evolved through different routes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrinello, Nicolò

    2010-03-01

    Invertebrate self/non-self recognition, defense responses, mating and development share innate immune surveillance and functions challenged by competition and linked to fitness. Independent evolutionary branches of immune responses may use conserved gene traits. On the other hand immunity genes may be conserved due to their role in development. Finally, upregulation of innate immunity genes during ascidian metamorphosis supports the danger hypothesis.

  16. Eicosanoids: Progress Toward Manipulating Insect Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect immunity is exclusively innate, lacking the antibody-based adaptive immunity of vertebrates. Innate immunity is a naturally occurring, non-specific system that does not require previous infectious experience. In this essay I describe insect immunity and review the roles of prostaglandins an...

  17. Curcumin and tumor immune-editing: resurrecting the immune system.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Panda, Abir Kumar; Mukherjee, Shravanti; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has long been known to posses medicinal properties and recent scientific studies have shown its efficacy in treating cancer. Curcumin is now considered to be a promising anti-cancer agent and studies continue on its molecular mechanism of action. Curcumin has been shown to act in a multi-faceted manner by targeting the classical hallmarks of cancer like sustained proliferation, evasion of apoptosis, sustained angiogenesis, insensitivity to growth inhibitors, tissue invasion and metastasis etc. However, one of the emerging hallmarks of cancer is the avoidance of immune system by tumors. Growing tumors adopt several strategies to escape immune surveillance and successfully develop in the body. In this review we highlight the recent studies that show that curcumin also targets this process and helps restore the immune activity against cancer. Curcumin mediates several processes like restoration of CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell populations, reversal of type-2 cytokine bias, reduction of Treg cell population and suppression of T cell apoptosis; all these help to resurrect tumor immune surveillance that leads to tumor regression. Thus interaction of curcumin with the immune system is also an important feature of its multi-faceted modes of action against cancer. Finally, we also point out the drawbacks of and difficulties in curcumin administration and indicate the use of nano-formulations of curcumin for better therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26464579

  18. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  19. Glucosinolate Metabolites Required for an Arabidopsis Innate Immune Response*

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Nicole K.; Adio, Adewale M.; Denoux, Carine; Jander, Georg; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The perception of pathogen or microbe-associated molecular pattern molecules by plants triggers a basal defense response analogous to animal innate immunity, and is defined in part by the deposition of the glucan polymer callose at the cell wall at the site of pathogen contact. Transcriptional and metabolic profiling in Arabidopsis mutants, coupled with the monitoring of pathogen triggered callose deposition, have identified major roles in pathogen response for the plant hormone ethylene and the secondary metabolite 4-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate. Two genes, PEN2 and PEN3, are also necessary for resistance to pathogens and are required for both callose deposition and glucosinolate activation, suggesting that the pathogen triggered callose response is required for resistance to microbial pathogens. Our study shows that well-studied plant metabolites, previously identified as important in avoiding damage by herbivores, are also required as a component of the plant defense response against microbial pathogens. PMID:19095898

  20. Plant defense activators: applications and prospects in cereal crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review addresses the current understanding of the plant immune response and the molecular mechanisms responsible for systemic acquired resistance as well as the phenomenon of "priming" in plant defense. A detailed discussion of the role of salicylic acid in activating the plant transcription c...

  1. Philippine campaign boosts child immunizations.

    PubMed

    Manuel-santana, R

    1993-03-01

    In 1989, USAID awarded the Philippines a 5-year, US $50 million Child Survival Program targeting improvement in immunization coverage of children, prenatal care coverage for pregnant women, and contraceptive prevalence. Upon successful completion of performance benchmarks at the end of each year, USAID released monies to fund child survival activities for the following year. This program accomplished a major program goal, which was decentralization of health planning. The Philippine Department of Health soon incorporated provincial health planning. The Philippine Department of Health soon incorporated provincial health planning in its determination of allocation of resources. Social marketing activities contributed greatly to success in achieving the goal of boosting the immunization coverage rate for the 6 antigens listed under the Expanded Program for Immunization (51%-85% of infants, 1986-1991). In fact, rural health officers in Tarlac Province in Central Luzon went from household to household to talk to mothers about the benefits of immunizing a 1-year-old child, thereby contributing greatly to their achieving a 95% full immunization coverage rate by December 1991. Social marketing techniques included modern marketing strategies and multimedia channels. They first proved successful in metro Manila which, at the beginning of the campaign, had the lowest immunization rate of all 14 regions. Every Wednesday was designated immunization day and was when rural health centers vaccinated the children. Social marketing also successfully publicized oral rehydration therapy (ORT), breast feeding, and tuberculosis control. Another contributing factor to program success in child survival activities was private sector involvement. For example, the Philippine Pediatric Society helped to promote ORT as the preferred treatment for acute diarrhea. Further, the commercial sector distributed packets of oral rehydration salts and even advertised its own ORT product. At the end of 2

  2. Immune System Disturbances in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Szatmár; Mirnics, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological, genetic, transcriptome, postmortem, peripheral biomarker, and therapeutic studies of schizophrenia all point to a dysregulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems in the disease, and it is likely that these immune changes actively contribute to disease symptoms. Gene expression disturbances in the brain of subjects with schizophrenia show complex, region-specific changes with consistently replicated and potentially interdependent induction of serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade A member 3 (SERPINA3) and interferon inducible transmembrane protein (IFITM) family transcripts in the prefrontal cortex. Recent data suggest that IFITM3 expression is a critical mediator of maternal immune activation. As the IFITM gene family is primarily expressed in the endothelial cells and meninges, and as the meninges play a critical role in interneuron development, we suggest that these two non-neuronal cell populations might play an important role in the disease pathophysiology. Finally, we propose that IFITM3 in particular might be a novel, appealing, knowledge-based drug target for treatment of schizophrenia. Gene*environment interactions play a critical role in the emergence of schizophrenia pathophysiology. Epidemiological, genetic, transcriptome, postmortem, peripheral biomarker, and therapeutic studies of schizophrenia all point to a dysregulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems in the disease (1-3) and it is likely that these immune changes actively contribute to disease symptoms (1, 4, 5). Regardless of the abundance of data obtained to date, our understanding of the mechanism by which the immune system disturbances arise is limited: we do not have a good insight into the origin or sequence of events by which the immune dysregulation develops, and to date we have not taken full advantage of these changes as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23890736

  3. Trained immunity: A program of innate immune memory in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B; Latz, Eicke; Mills, Kingston H G; Natoli, Gioacchino; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; O'Neill, Luke A J; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-04-22

    The general view that only adaptive immunity can build immunological memory has recently been challenged. In organisms lacking adaptive immunity, as well as in mammals, the innate immune system can mount resistance to reinfection, a phenomenon termed "trained immunity" or "innate immune memory." Trained immunity is orchestrated by epigenetic reprogramming, broadly defined as sustained changes in gene expression and cell physiology that do not involve permanent genetic changes such as mutations and recombination, which are essential for adaptive immunity. The discovery of trained immunity may open the door for novel vaccine approaches, new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of immune deficiency states, and modulation of exaggerated inflammation in autoinflammatory diseases. PMID:27102489

  4. Species-wide Genetic Incompatibility Analysis Identifies Immune Genes as Hotspots of Deleterious Epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Eunyoung; Bomblies, Kirsten; Kim, Sang-Tae; Karelina, Darya; Zaidem, Maricris; Ossowski, Stephan; Martín-Pizarro, Carmen; Laitinen, Roosa A. E.; Rowan, Beth A.; Tenenboim, Hezi; Lechner, Sarah; Demar, Monika; Habring-Müller, Anette; Lanz, Christa; Rätsch, Gunnar; Weigel, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intraspecific genetic incompatibilities prevent the assembly of specific alleles into single genotypes and influence genome- and species-wide patterns of sequence variation. A common incompatibility in plants is hybrid necrosis, characterized by autoimmune responses due to epistatic interactions between natural genetic variants. By systematically testing thousands of F1 hybrids of Arabidopsis thaliana strains, we identified a small number of incompatibility hotspots in the genome, often in regions densely populated by NLR immune receptor genes. In several cases, these immune receptor loci interact with each other, suggestive of conflict within the immune system. A particularly dangerous locus is a highly variable cluster of NLR genes, DANGEROUS MIX2 (DM2), which causes multiple, independent incompatibilities with genes that encode a range of biochemical functions, including NLRs. Our findings suggest that deleterious interactions of immune receptors at the front lines of host-pathogen co-evolution limit the combinations of favorable disease resistance alleles accessible to plant genomes. PMID:25467443

  5. [Cancer immunotherapy. Importance of overcoming immune suppression].

    PubMed

    Malvicini, Mariana; Puchulo, Guillermo; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the immune system is involved in the control of tumor progression. Effective antitumor immune response depends on the interaction between several components of the immune system, including antigen-presenting cells and different T cell subsets. However, tumor cells develop a number of mechanisms to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. In this review we discuss these mechanisms and address possible therapeutic approaches to overcome the immune suppression generated by tumors. PMID:21163748

  6. Eosinophilia Associated with Disorders of Immune Deficiency or Immune Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kelli W; Milner, Joshua D; Freeman, Alexandra F

    2015-08-01

    Increased serum eosinophil levels have been associated with multiple disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation. Although primary immunodeficiency diseases are rare, it is important to consider these in the differential diagnosis of patients with eosinophilia. In this review, the clinical features, laboratory findings, diagnosis, and genetic basis of disease of several disorders of immune deficiency or dysregulation are discussed. The article includes autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome, DOCK8 deficiency, phosphoglucomutase 3 deficiency, ADA-SCID, Omenn syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome, Comel-Netherton syndrome, and severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome. PMID:26209898

  7. Eosinophilia associated with disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kelli W.; Milner, Joshua D.; Freeman, Alexandra F.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Elevated serum eosinophil levels have been associated with multiple disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation. Although primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are rare, it is important to consider these in the differential diagnosis of patients with eosinophilia. This review discusses the clinical features, laboratory findings, diagnosis, and genetic basis of disease of several disorders of immune deficiency or dysregulation – all which have documented eosinophilia as part of the syndrome. The article includes autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome, DOCK8 deficiency, PGM3 deficiency, ADA-SCID, Omenn syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome, Comel-Netherton syndrome, and severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome (SAM). PMID:26209898

  8. Immune-Related Adverse Events From Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Marrone, K A; Ying, W; Naidoo, J

    2016-09-01

    Immunotherapy for cancer treatment has come of age, specifically with the use of immune checkpoint antibodies directed against molecules such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1. Single-agent and combinatorial approaches utilizing these agents and other immunotherapies that may enhance antitumor effects are under investigation. With increasing clinical use of these agents, an appreciation for their toxicities comes to the fore. Adverse events that occur as a result of the immunologic effects of these therapies are termed "immune-related adverse events" (irAEs), and range in both frequency and severity in reported single-agent and combination studies. Improvements in our understanding of how and why irAEs develop and how to effectively manage them are needed. Herein we provide a state-of-the-art synopsis of the incidence, clinical features, mechanisms, and management of selected irAEs with immune checkpoint inhibitors currently in use. PMID:27170616

  9. Enhancing Plant Disease Resistance without R Genes.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur; Fernando, Dilantha; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Gupta, Vijai Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Crop plants encounter constant biotic challenges, and these challenges have historically been best managed with resistance (R) genes. However, the rapid evolution of new pathogenic strains along with the nonavailability or nonidentification of R genes in cultivated crop species against a large number of plant pathogens have led researchers to think beyond R genes. Biotechnological tools have shown promise in dealing with such challenges. Technologies such as transgenerational plant immunity, interspecies transfer of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), pathogen-derived resistance (PDR), gene regulation, and expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in host plants from other plant species have led to enhanced disease resistance and increased food security. PMID:27113633

  10. Rhizosphere chemical dialogues: plant-microbe interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Badri, D.V.; van der Lelie, D.; Weir, T. L.; Vivanco, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Every organism on earth relies on associations with its neighbors to sustain life. For example, plants form associations with neighboring plants, microflora, and microfauna, while humans maintain symbiotic associations with intestinal microbial flora, which is indispensable for nutrient assimilation and development of the innate immune system. Most of these associations are facilitated by chemical cues exchanged between the host and the symbionts. In the rhizosphere, which includes plant roots and the surrounding area of soil influenced by the roots, plants exude chemicals to effectively communicate with their neighboring soil organisms. Here we review the current literature pertaining to the chemical communication that exists between plants and microorganisms and the biological processes they sustain.

  11. Immune responses to improving welfare

    PubMed Central

    Berghman, L. R.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that “increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better” because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as “sickness behavior,” includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  12. Norovirus mechanisms of immune antagonism.

    PubMed

    Roth, Alexa N; Karst, Stephanie M

    2016-02-01

    Noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks globally. Several lines of evidence indicate that noroviruses can antagonize or evade host immune responses, including the absence of long-lasting immunity elicited during a primary norovirus exposure and the ability of noroviruses to establish prolonged infections that are associated with protracted viral shedding. Specific norovirus proteins possessing immune antagonist activity have been described in recent years although mechanistic insight in most cases is limited. In this review, we discuss these emerging strategies used by noroviruses to subvert the immune response, including the actions of two nonstructural proteins (p48 and p22) to impair cellular protein trafficking and secretory pathways; the ability of the VF1 protein to inhibit cytokine induction; and the ability of the minor structural protein VP2 to regulate antigen presentation. We also discuss the current state of the understanding of host and viral factors regulating the establishment of persistent norovirus infections along the gastrointestinal tract. A more detailed understanding of immune antagonism by pathogenic viruses will inform prevention and treatment of disease. PMID:26673810

  13. Is adenomyosis an immune disease?

    PubMed

    Ota, H; Igarashi, S; Hatazawa, J; Tanaka, T

    1998-01-01

    Adenomyosis is characterized as ectopic endometrial tissues within the myometrium in the uterus. The only difference between adenomyosis and endometriosis is the site of endometriotic tissues: inside or outside of the uterus. It is well known that endometriosis is frequently associated with various autoimmune phenomena. This short review covers various aspects of the immune cascade found in adenomyosis. In adenomyosis, a series of immune responses is activated, including changes in both cellular and humoral immunity, i.e. a strong expression of cell surface antigens or adhesion molecules, an increased number of macrophages or immune cells, and deposition of immunoglobulins and complement components. Furthermore, the disease exhibited high frequency of autoantibodies in peripheral blood. Thus, an immunological 'vicious circle' is formed in the endometrium in adenomyosis. Endometrial cells seem to be under immunological stress, protecting themselves by exposing heat shock proteins. It is concluded that the endometrial environment in adenomyosis differs widely from that in normal fertile women. These abnormal immune responses might be involved in poor reproductive performance in adenomyosis. PMID:9825851

  14. Immunity, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is a chronic inflammatory condition with immune competent cells in lesions producing mainly pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dead cells and oxidized forms of low density lipoproteins (oxLDL) are abundant. The major direct cause of CVD appears to be rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. oxLDL has proinflammatory and immune-stimulatory properties, causes cell death at higher concentrations and contains inflammatory phospholipids with phosphorylcholine (PC) as an interesting epitope. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) may be atheroprotective, one mechanism being anti-inflammatory. Bacteria and virus have been discussed, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence, and antibiotic trials have not been successful. Heat shock proteins could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and lipid mediators. To prove that inflammation is a cause of atherosclerosis and CVD, clinical studies with anti-inflammatory and/or immune-modulatory treatment are needed. The potential causes of immune reactions and inflammation in atherosclerosis and how inflammation can be targeted therapeutically to provide novel treatments for CVD are reviewed. PMID:23635324

  15. Immune function during space flight.

    PubMed

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Shearer, William T

    2002-10-01

    It is very likely that the human immune system will be altered in astronauts exposed to the conditions of long-term space flight: isolation, containment, microgravity, radiation, microbial contamination, sleep disruption, and insufficient nutrition. In human and animal subjects flown in space, there is evidence of immune compromise, reactivation of latent virus infection, and possible development of a premalignant or malignant condition. Moreover, in ground-based space flight model investigations, there is evidence of immune compromise and reactivation of latent virus infection. All of these observations in space flight itself or in ground-based models of space flight have a strong resonance in a wealth of human pathologic conditions involving the immune system where reactivated virus infections and cancer appear as natural consequences. The clinical conditions of Epstein-Barr-driven lymphomas in transplant patients and Kaposi's sarcoma in patients with autoimmune deficiency virus come easily to mind in trying to identify these conditions. With these thoughts in mind, it is highly appropriate, indeed imperative, that careful investigations of human immunity, infection, and cancer be made by space flight researchers. PMID:12361785

  16. Immune function during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Shearer, William T.

    2002-01-01

    It is very likely that the human immune system will be altered in astronauts exposed to the conditions of long-term space flight: isolation, containment, microgravity, radiation, microbial contamination, sleep disruption, and insufficient nutrition. In human and animal subjects flown in space, there is evidence of immune compromise, reactivation of latent virus infection, and possible development of a premalignant or malignant condition. Moreover, in ground-based space flight model investigations, there is evidence of immune compromise and reactivation of latent virus infection. All of these observations in space flight itself or in ground-based models of space flight have a strong resonance in a wealth of human pathologic conditions involving the immune system where reactivated virus infections and cancer appear as natural consequences. The clinical conditions of Epstein-Barr-driven lymphomas in transplant patients and Kaposi's sarcoma in patients with autoimmune deficiency virus come easily to mind in trying to identify these conditions. With these thoughts in mind, it is highly appropriate, indeed imperative, that careful investigations of human immunity, infection, and cancer be made by space flight researchers.

  17. The exosomes in tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanfang; Gu, Yan; Cao, Xuetao

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are a kind of nanometric membrane vesicles and can be released by almost all kinds of cells, including cancer cells. As the important mediators in intercellular communications, exosomes mediate exchange of protein and genetic material derived from parental cells. Emerging evidences show that exosomes secreted by either host cells or cancer cells are involved in tumor initiation, growth, invasion and metastasis. Moreover, communications between immune cells and cancer cells via exosomes play dual roles in modulating tumor immunity. In this review, we focus on exosome-mediated immunosuppression via inhibition of antitumor responses elicited by immune cells (DCs, NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, etc.) and induction of immunosuppressive or regulatory cell populations (MDSCs, Tregs and Bregs). Transfer of cytokines, microRNAs (miRNAs) and functional mRNAs by tumor-derived exosomes (TEXs) is crucial in the immune escape. Furthermore, exosomes secreted from several kinds of immune cells (DCs, CD4+ and CD8+ Tregs) also participate in immunosuppression. On the other hand, we summarize the current application of DC-derived and modified tumor-derived exosomes as tumor vaccines. The potential challenges about exosome-based vaccines for clinical application are also discussed. PMID:26405598

  18. Hepatitis B immunization in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, M H; Goldstein, M A

    1995-10-01

    This article reviews the epidemiology of hepatitis B in the United States, previous vaccination strategy, and reasons for its failure and issues leading to the recommendation to vaccinate all adolescents. A review of specific hepatitis B virus risk behaviors of adolescents and barriers to vaccinating adolescents is covered. Strategies that favor successful completion of the immunization series are also examined. Hepatitis B infection is an important public health concern for adolescents. The previous vaccine strategy to immunize only individuals though to be at high risk was unsuccessful, especially because providers of care could not identify these individuals. Furthermore, many individuals thought not to be at high risk for infection were exposed through contacts which could not be identified. Challenges to immunization of adolescents include logistical issues, patient education, cost of the vaccine, and patient compliance. Several of these issues can be addressed by a school-based hepatitis B immunization program. The body of evidence and national policy is rapidly changing to support the recommendation that all adolescents receive the hepatitis B immunization series. The series would be most effective if administered during the middle-school years. A universal adolescent hepatitis B vaccination program would result in the most immediate health benefits and acceleration toward the eradication of hepatitis B in the United States. PMID:8580124

  19. Adipose tissue immunity and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and altered immune response are important components of obesity and contribute greatly to the promotion of obesity-related metabolic complications, especially cancer development. Adipose tissue expansion is associated with increased infiltration of various types of immune cells from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Thus, adipocytes and infiltrating immune cells secrete pro-inflammatory adipokines and cytokines providing a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. Accumulation of B and T cells in adipose tissue precedes macrophage infiltration causing a chronic low-grade inflammation. Phenotypic switching toward M1 macrophages and Th1 T cells constitutes an important mechanism described in the obese state correlating with increased tumor growth risk. Other possible synergic mechanisms causing a dysfunctional adipose tissue include fatty acid-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and hypoxia. Recent investigations have started to unravel the intricacy of the cross-talk between tumor cell/immune cell/adipocyte. In this sense, future therapies should take into account the combination of anti-inflammatory approaches that target the tumor microenvironment with more sophisticated and selective anti-tumoral drugs. PMID:24106481

  20. RhoGTPases--NODes for effector-triggered immunity in animals.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Lynda M; Boyer, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    A recent study published in Nature by Keestra and colleagues addresses how the immune system detects the pathogenic potential of microbes and provides evidence that one strategy involves NOD1, which monitors the activation state of the RhoGTPases that are targeted by virulence effectors produced by pathogenic microbes. Interestingly, their findings reveal striking similarities with previous observations made in flies and plants, establishing the evolutionary conservation of this detection system in the innate immune arsenal in many taxa. PMID:23689278