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Sample records for future igcc power

  1. Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station IGCC project: Project status

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, J.E.; Carlson, M.R.; Hurd, R.; Pless, D.E.; Grant, M.D.

    1997-12-31

    The Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station is a nominal 250 MW (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant located to the southeast of Tampa, Florida in Polk County, Florida. This project is being partially funded under the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Program pursuant to a Round II award. The Polk Power Station uses oxygen-blown, entrained-flow IGCC technology licensed from Texaco Development Corporation to demonstrate significant reductions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions when compared to existing and future conventional coal-fired power plants. In addition, this project demonstrates the technical feasibility of commercial scale IGCC and Hot Gas Clean Up (HGCU) technology. The Polk Power Station achieved ``first fire`` of the gasification system on schedule in mid-July, 1996. Since that time, significant advances have occurred in the operation of the entire IGCC train. This paper addresses the operating experiences which occurred in the start-up and shakedown phase of the plant. Also, with the plant being declared in commercial operation as of September 30, 1996, the paper discusses the challenges encountered in the early phases of commercial operation. Finally, the future plans for improving the reliability and efficiency of the Unit in the first quarter of 1997 and beyond, as well as plans for future alternate fuel test burns, are detailed. The presentation features an up-to-the-minute update on actual performance parameters achieved by the Polk Power Station. These parameters include overall Unit capacity, heat rate, and availability. In addition, the current status of the start-up activities for the HGCU portion of the plant is discussed.

  2. Syngas treating options for IGCC power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, H.; Mohammad-zadeh, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Increased environmental awareness, lower cost of gas turbine based combined cycle power plants, and advances in gasification processes have made the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) a viable technology to convert solid fuel to useful energy. The raw solid fuel derived synthesis gas (syngas) contains contaminants that should be removed before combustion in a gas turbine. Therefore, an important process in a gasification based plant is the cleaning of syngas. This paper provides information about various syngas treating technologies and describes their optimal selections for power generation or cogeneration of steam for industrial applications.

  3. Improved Refractory Materials for Slagging Gasifiers in IGCC Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Krabbe, Rick; Thomas, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    Gasifiers are the heart of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power system currently being developed as part of the DOE's Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Power Plant. A gasification chamber is a high pressure/high temperature reaction vessel used to contain a mixture of O2, H2O, and coal (or other carbon containing materials) while it is converted into thermal energy and chemicals (H2, CO, and CH4). IGCC systems are expected to play a dominant role in meeting the Nation's future energy needs. Gasifiers are also used to produce chemicals that serve as feedstock for other industrial processes, and are considered a potential source of H2 in applications such as fuel cells. A distinct advantage of gasifiers is their ability to meet or exceed current and anticipated future environmental emission regulations. Also, because gasification systems are part of a closed circuit, gasifiers are considered process ready to capture CO2 emissions for reuse or processing should that become necessary or economically feasible in the future. The service life of refractory liners for gasifiers has been identified by users as a critical barrier to IGC

  4. Filter system cost comparison for IGCC and PFBC power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, R.A.; McDaniel, H.M.; Buchanan, T.

    1995-12-01

    A cost comparison was conducted between the filter systems for two advanced coal-based power plants. The results from this study are presented. The filter system is based on a Westinghouse advanced particulate filter concept, which is designed to operate with ceramic candle filters. The Foster Wheeler second-generation 453 MWe (net) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) and the KRW 458 MWe (net) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are used for the comparison. The comparison presents the general differences of the two power plants and the process-related filtration conditions for PFBC and IGCC systems. The results present the conceptual designs for the PFBC and IGCC filter systems as well as a cost summary comparison. The cost summary comparison includes the total plant cost, the fixed operating and maintenance cost, the variable operating and maintenance cost, and the effect on the cost of electricity (COE) for the two filter systems.

  5. IGCC demonstration plant at Nakoso Power Station, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, R.

    2007-10-15

    The 250 MW IGCC demonstration plant at Nakoso Power Station is based on technology form Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) Ltd that uses a pressurized, air blown, two-stage, entrained-bed coal gasifier with a dry coal feed system. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. SCHUMACHER HOT GAS FILTER LONG-TERM OPERATING EXPERIENCE in the NUON POWER BUGGENUM IGCC POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibner, B.; Wolters, C.

    2002-09-18

    Coal is a main source of primary energy for power generation and it will remain indispensable in the future. In order to increase the efficiency and to meet environmental challenges new advanced coal-fired power systems were developed starting in the beginning of the 1990s. One of these efficient and clean technologies is the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process.

  7. Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

    2007-07-31

    IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

  8. Control system design for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture in IGCC power plants while loading-following

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Load-following requirements for future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with precombustion CO{sub 2} capture are expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. In this work, loadfollowing studies are performed using a comprehensive dynamic model of an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture developed in Aspen Engineering Suite (AES). Considering multiple single-loop controllers for power demand load following, the preferred IGCC control strategy from the perspective of a power producer is gas turbine (GT) lead with gasifier follow. In this strategy, the GT controls the load by manipulating its firing rate while the slurry feed flow to the gasifier is manipulated to control the syngas pressure at the GT inlet. The syngas pressure control is an integrating process with significant time delay mainly because of the large piping and equipment volumes between the gasifier and the GT inlet. A modified proportional–integral–derivative (PID) control is considered for IGCC syngas pressure control. The desired CO{sub 2} capture rate must be maintained while the IGCC plant follows the load. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate, the control performance of PID control is compared with linear model predictive control (LMPC). The results show that the LMPC outperforms PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

  9. Improved Refractories for IGCC Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Cynthia P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P.; Chinn, Richard E.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.

    2002-01-01

    The gasification of coal, petroleum residuals, and biomass provides the opportunity to produce energy more efficiently, and with significantly less environmental impact, than more-conventional combustion-based processes. In addition, the synthesis gas that is the product of the gasification process offers the gasifier operator the option of ''polygeneration'', i.e., the production of alternative products instead of power should it be economically favorable to do so. Because of these advantages, gasification is a key element in the U.S. Department of Energy?s Vision 21 power system. However, issues with both the reliability and the economics of gasifier operation will have to be resolved before gasification will be widely adopted by the power industry. Central to both increased reliability and economics is the development of materials with longer service lives in gasifier systems that can provide extended periods of continuous gasifier operation. The focus of the Advanced Refractories for Gasification project at the Albany Research Center is to develop improved materials capable of withstanding the harsh, high-temperature environment created by the gasification reaction, and includes both the refractory lining that insulates the slagging gasifier, as well as the thermocouple assemblies that are utilized to monitor gasifier operating temperatures. Current generation refractory liners in slagging gasifiers are typically replaced every 10 to 18 months, at costs ranging up to $2,000,000. Compounding materials and installation costs are the lost-opportunity costs for the three to four weeks that the gasifier is off-line for the refractory exchange. Current generation thermocouple devices rarely survive the gasifier start-up process, leaving the operator with no real means of temperature measurement during gasifier operation. As a result, the goals of this project include the development of a refractory liner with a service life at least double that of current generation

  10. Photocatalytic degradation of pollutants from Elcogas IGCC power station effluents.

    PubMed

    Durán, A; Monteagudo, J M; San Martín, I; García-Peña, F; Coca, P

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this work is to improve the quality of water effluents coming from Elcogas IGCC power station (Puertollano, Spain) with the purpose of fulfilling future more demanding normative, using heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation processes (UV/H(2)O(2)/TiO(2) or ZnO). The efficiency of photocatalytic degradation for the different catalysts (TiO(2) and ZnO) was determined from the analysis of the following parameters: cyanides, formates and ammonia content. In a first stage, the influence of two parameters (initial concentration of H(2)O(2) and amount of catalyst) on the degradation kinetics of cyanides and formates was studied based on a factorial experimental design. pH was always kept in a value >9.5 to avoid gaseous HCN formation. The degradation of cyanides and formates was found to follow pseudo-first order kinetics. Experimental kinetic constants were fitted using neural networks (NNs). The mathematical model reproduces experimental data within 90% of confidence and allows the simulation of the process for any value of parameters in the experimental range studied. Moreover, a measure of the saliency of the input variables was made based upon the connection weights of the neural networks, allowing the analysis of the relative relevance of each variable with respect to the others. Results showed that the photocatalytic process was effective, being the degradation rate of cyanides about five times higher when compared to removal of formates. Finally, the effect of lowering pH on the degradation of formates was evaluated after complete cyanides destruction was reached (10 min of reaction). Under the optimum conditions (pH 5.2, [H(2)O(2)]=40 g/l; [TiO(2)]=2g/l), 100% of cyanides and 92% of initial NH(3) concentration are degraded after 10 min, whereas 35 min are needed to degrade 98% of formates. PMID:17118539

  11. Alfalfa stem feedstock for IGCC power system fuel

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, M.M.; Onischak, M.; Schmid, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    A feasibility study has been completed for an integrated gasification combined cycle power generation (IGCC) system that involves a set of inter-related processes between the alfalfa separation plant and the power plant. The alfalfa fractionation process reduces the stem size, improves the bulk density for feeding and provides a uniform moisture feed. Alfalfa stem material was evaluated as a fuel for the system. The leaf meal, animal feed co-product is separated from the alfalfa plant. The pressurized gasification process is the RENUGAS{trademark} system licensed to Tampella Power Corporation. The adaptation of the process to alfalfa stems results in low-Btu fuel gas suitable for combustion turbines. The gasification process is expected to obtain very high carbon conversion, overcome ash agglomeration, control volatile alkali species, and remove particulate matter with a hot gas filter system. The collected ash residues are expected to be returned to the land that grew the alfalfa.

  12. Alfalfa stem feedstock for IGCC power system fuel

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, M.M.; Onischak, M.; Schmid, M.; Wiant, B.; Oelke, E.

    1995-12-31

    A feasibility study was completed for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation plant to operate in conjunction with an alfalfa processing plant that provides the gasification feedstock and a mid-level protein animal feed co-product. Alfalfa stem material was evaluated as a gasification feedstock. The leaf material was evaluated as a mid-level protein animal feed supplement. The alfalfa leaf-stem separation and power generation operations have dual and/or synergistic functions which contribute to a technically and economically compatible combination. The pressurized biomass gasification process selected is the IGT RENUGAS{trademark} system licensed to Tampella Power Corp. Adaptation of the air-blown gasification process to alfalfa stems results in low-Btu fuel gas suitable for combustion turbines. The gasification process is expected to obtain very high carbon conversion with low tar production, overcome ash agglomeration, and provide for control of volatile alkali species. A hot gas clean-up system removes particulate matter with a ceramic filter system. The collected ash residues are expected to be returned to the land that grew the alfalfa. The physical and chemical properties of the alfalfa feedstock were evaluated for the gasification process. The alfalfa char carbon-steam reaction, which is the slowest step in the complete conversion of biomass to gases, was measured and the char proved to have a high reactivity. Ash components were measured and evaluated in terms of agglomeration within the gasifier. Using this information, the alfalfa gasification conditions were predicted. A subsequent preliminary gasification test confirmed the alfalfa gasification conditions. To complete the engineering design of the IGCC system, additional testing is required, but the results to date are positive for a successful process.

  13. AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Provost, G,

    2012-01-01

    This slideshow presentation begins by outlining US energy challenges, particularly with respect to power generation capacity and clean energy plant operations. It goes on to describe the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR{sup TM}). Its mission and goals are given, followed by an overview of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} capture. The Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS) and 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS) are then presented. Facilities, training, education, and R&D are covered, followed by future simulators and directions.

  14. AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Provost, G,

    2012-01-01

    This presentation begins with a description of U.S. Energy Challenges, particularly Power Generation Capacity and Clean Energy Plant Operations. It goes on to describe the missions and goals of the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM). It moves on to the subject of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with CO{sub 2} Capture, particularly a Process/Project Overview, Dynamic Simulator/Operator Training System (OTS), 3D Virtual Immersive Training System (ITS), Facilities, Training, Education, and R&D, and Future Simulators/Directions

  15. Refractory failure in IGCC fossil fuel power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Cynthia P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P.; Chinn, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Current generation refractory materials used in slagging gasifiers employed in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) fossil fuel power systems have unacceptably short service lives, limiting the reliability and cost effectiveness of gasification as a means to generate power. The short service life of the refractory lining results from exposure to the extreme environment inside the operating gasifier, where the materials challenges include temperatures to 1650 C, thermal cycling, alternating reducing and oxidizing conditions, and the presence of corrosive slags and gases. Compounding these challenges is the current push within the industry for fuel flexibility, which results in slag chemistries and operating conditions that can vary widely as the feedstock for the gasifier is supplemented with alternative sources of carbon, such as petroleum coke and biomass. As a step toward our goal of developing improved refractory materials for this application, we have characterized refractory-slag interactions, under a variety of simulated gasifier conditions, utilizing laboratory exposure tests such as the static cup test and a gravimetric test. Combining this information with that gained from the post-mortem analyses of spent refractories removed from working gasifiers, we have developed a better understanding of refractory failure in gasifier environments. In this paper, we discuss refractory failures in slagging gasifiers and possible strategies to reduce them. Emphasis focuses on the refractories employed in gasifier systems which utilize coal as the primary feedstock.

  16. IGCC power plant integrated to a Finnish pulp and paper mill: IEA bioenergy techno-economic analysis activity. Research notes

    SciTech Connect

    Koljonen, T.; Solantausta, Y.; Salo, K.; Horvath, A.

    1999-02-01

    This site-specific study describes the technical and economic feasibility of a biomass gasification combined cycle producing heat and power for a typical Finish pulp and paper mill. The aim is to replace an old bark boiler by an IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) to enhance the economy and environmental performance of the power plant. The IGCC feasibility study is conducted for a pulp and paper industrial plant because of its suitable infrastructure for IGCC and a large amount of wood waste available at the site. For comparison, the feasibility of an IGCC integrated to a pulp mill is also assessed. The operation and design of the IGCC concept is based on a 20 MW(e) gas turbine (MW151). The heat of gas turbine exhaust gas is utilized in a HRSG (Heat Recovery Steam Generator) of two pressure levels to generate steam for the pulp and paper mill and the steam turbine. The IGCC power plant operates in condensing mode. The techno-economic assessment of the biomass IGCC integrated to a pulp and paper mill or a pulp mill indicated that the IGCC will be competitive compared to the conventional bark boiler steam cycle. The IGCC integrated to a pulp and paper mill was slightly more economical than the IGCC pulp mill integration.

  17. Proceedings of the coal-fired power systems 94: Advances in IGCC and PFBC review meeting. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, H.M.; Staubly, R.K.; Venkataraman, V.K.

    1994-06-01

    The Coal-Fired Power Systems 94 -- Advances in IGCC and PFBC Review Meeting was held June 21--23, 1994, at the Morgantown Energy Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. This Meeting was sponsored and hosted by METC, the Office of Fossil Energy, and the US Department of Energy (DOE). METC annually sponsors this conference for energy executives, engineers, scientists, and other interested parties to review the results of research and development projects; to discuss the status of advanced coal-fired power systems and future plans with the industrial contractors; and to discuss cooperative industrial-government research opportunities with METC`s in-house engineers and scientists. Presentations included industrial contractor and METC in-house technology developments related to the production of power via coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems, the summary status of clean coal technologies, and developments and advancements in advanced technology subsystems, such as hot gas cleanup. A keynote speaker and other representatives from the electric power industry also gave their assessment of advanced power systems. This meeting contained 11 formal sessions and one poster session, and included 52 presentations and 24 poster presentations. Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: opening commentaries; changes in the market and technology drivers; advanced IGCC systems; advanced PFBC systems; advanced filter systems; desulfurization system; turbine systems; and poster session. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. Comprehensive report to Congress, Clean Coal Technology program: Pinon Pine IGCC Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The objective of the proposed project is to demonstrate an advanced IGCC system based upon the air-blown, fluidized-bed KRW gasifier with in-bed desulfurization using limestone sorbent and an external fixed- bed zinc ferrite sulfur removal system. Sierra Pacific Power Company (SPPC) requested financial assistance from DOE for the design, construction, and operation of a nominal 800 ton-per-day (86-Megawatt gross), air blown integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) demonstration plant. The project, named the Pinon Pine IGCC Power Project, is to be located at SPPC's Tracy Station, a power generation facility located on a rural 400-acre plot about 17 miles east of Reno. The demonstration plant will produce electrical power for the utility grid. The project, including the demonstration phase, will last 96 months at a total cost of $269,993,100. DOE's share of the project cost will be 50 percent, or $134,996,550.

  19. Could IGCC swing

    SciTech Connect

    Blankinship, S.

    2007-06-15

    A few big-name utilities are looking to make big-time power from gasified coal. AEP has utility-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants in the works for Ohio and West Virginia. Duke Energy Indiana plans to build a 630 MW IGCC plant at Edwardsport to replace the existing 160 MW coal-fired unit there. NRG hopes to build utility-scale IGCC plants in New York and Delaware. Tampa Electric has announced plans to build a 630 MW IGCC at its Polk site, already the location of a 260 MW IGCC. In Taylorville, IL, another power-oriented IGCC is under development, owned by individuals from original developer ERORA and Omaha-based Tenaska. And yet another power producing IGCC is being proposed by Tondu Corporation at Corpus Christi, Texas to be fired by petroleum coke, also known as petcoke. The article gives an overview of these developments and moves on to discuss the popular question of the economic viability of IGCC making marketable byproducts in addition to power. Several projects are under way to make synthetic natural gas for coal. These are reported. Although the versatility of gasification may well give the ability to swing from various levels of power production to various levels of co-producing one or more products, for the time being it appears the IGCCs being built will produce power only, along with elemental sulphur and slag.

  20. Computer models and simulations of IGCC power plants with Canadian coals

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Furimsky, E.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, three steady state computer models for simulation of IGCC power plants with Shell, Texaco and BGL (British Gas Lurgi) gasifiers will be presented. All models were based on a study by Bechtel for Nova Scotia Power Corporation. They were built by using Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) steady state simulation software together with Fortran programs developed in house. Each model was integrated from several sections which can be simulated independently, such as coal preparation, gasification, gas cooling, acid gas removing, sulfur recovery, gas turbine, heat recovery steam generation, and steam cycle. A general description of each process, model's overall structure, capability, testing results, and background reference will be given. The performance of some Canadian coals on these models will be discussed as well. The authors also built a computer model of IGCC power plant with Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse gasifier, however, due to limitation of paper length, it is not presented here.

  1. Proceedings of the coal-fired power systems 94: Advances in IGCC and PFBC review meeting. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, H.M.; Staubly, R.K.; Venkataraman, V.K.

    1994-06-01

    The Coal-Fired Power Systems 94 -- Advances in IGCC and PFBC Review Meeting was held June 21--23, 1994, at the Morgantown Energy Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. This Meeting was sponsored and hosted by METC, the Office of Fossil Energy, and the US Department of Energy (DOE). METC annually sponsors this conference for energy executives, engineers, scientists, and other interested parties to review the results of research and development projects; to discuss the status of advanced coal-fired power systems and future plans with the industrial contractors; and to discuss cooperative industrial-government research opportunities with METC`s in-house engineers and scientists. Presentations included industrial contractor and METC in-house technology developments related to the production of power via coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems, the summary status of clean coal technologies, and developments and advancements in advanced technology subsystems, such as hot gas cleanup. A keynote speaker and other representatives from the electric power industry also gave their assessment of advanced power systems. This meeting contained 11 formal sessions and one poster session, and included 52 presentations and 24 poster presentations. Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: filter technology issues; hazardous air pollutants; sorbents and solid wastes; and membranes. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Improved refractories for slagging gasifiers in IGCC power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Chinn, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Most gasifiers are operated for refining, chemical production, and power generation. They are also considered a possible future source of H2 for future power systems under consideration. A gasifier fulfills these roles by acting as a containment vessel to react carbon-containing raw materials with oxygen and water using fluidized-bed, moving-bed, or entrained-flow systems to produce CO and H2, along with other gaseous by-products including CO2, CH4, SOx, HS, and/or NOx. The gasification process provides the opportunity to produce energy more efficiently and with less environmental impact than more conventional combustion processes. Because of these advantages, gasification is viewed as one of the key processes in the U.S. Department of Energy?s vision of an advanced power system for the 21st Century. However, issues with both the reliability and the economics of gasifier operation will have to be resolved before gasification will be widely adopted by the power industry. Central to both enhanced reliability and economics is the development of materials with longer service lives in gasifier systems that can provide extended periods of continuous, trouble-free gasifier operation. The focus of the Advanced Refractories for Gasification project at the Albany Research Center (ARC) is to develop improved refractory liner materials capable of withstanding the harsh, high-temperature environment created by the gasification reaction. Current generation refractory liners in slagging gasifiers are typically replaced every 3 to 18 months at costs ranging up to $1,000,000 or more, depending upon the size of the gasification vessel. Compounding materials and installation costs are the lost-opportunity costs for the time that the gasifier is off-line for refractory repair/exchange. The goal of this project is to develop new refractory materials or to extend the service life of refractory liner materials currently used to at least 3 years. Post-mortem analyses of refractory brick

  3. Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a

  4. Improved Refractories for Slagging Gasifiers in IGCC Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Cynthia P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P.; Chinn, Richard E.

    2003-04-24

    The gasification of coal and other carbon-containing fuels provides the opportunity to produce energy more efficiently, and with significantly less environmental impact, than more-conventional combustion-based processes. In addition, the synthesis gas that is the product of the gasification process offers the option of ''polygeneration,'' i.e., the production of alternative products instead of power should it be economically favorable to do so. Because of these advantages, gasification is viewed as one of the key processes in the U.S. Department of Energy's Vision 21 power system. However, issues with both the reliability and the economics of gasifier operation will have to be resolved before gasification will be widely adopted by the power industry. Central to both enhanced reliability and economics is the development of materials with longer service lives in gasifier systems that can provide extended periods of continuous, trouble-free gasifier operation. The focus of the Advanced Refractories for Gasification project at the Albany Research Center is to develop improved refractory materials capable of withstanding the harsh, high-temperature environment created by the gasification reaction, and includes both the refractory lining that protects and insulates the slagging gasifier, as well as the thermocouple assemblies that are utilized to monitor gasifier operating temperatures. Current generation refractory liners in slagging gasifiers are typically replaced every four to 18 months, at costs ranging up to $2,000,000, depending upon the size of the gasification vessel. Compounding materials and installation costs are the lost-opportunity costs for the time that the gasifier is off-line for the refractory exchange. Current generation thermocouple devices rarely survive the gasifier start-up process, leaving the operator with no real means of temperature measurement during routine operation. Reliable, efficient, and economical gasifier operation that includes the

  5. Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

    2008-03-31

    In order to meet DOE's goals of developing low-emissions coal-based power systems, PCI has further developed and adapted it's Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{reg_sign}) catalytic reactor to a combustion system operating on syngas as a fuel. The technology offers ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment, with high efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses and reduced diluent requirements), and with catalytically stabilized combustion which extends the lower Btu limit for syngas operation. Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using a two-stage (catalytic then gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage consists of a fuel-rich mixture reacting on a catalyst with final and excess combustion air used to cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, where the air used for cooling the catalyst mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During testing, operating with a simulated Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station syngas, the NOx emissions program goal of less than 0.03 lbs/MMBtu (6 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) was met. NOx emissions were generally near 0.01 lbs/MMBtu (2 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) (PCI's target) over a range on engine firing temperatures. In addition, low emissions were shown for alternative fuels including high hydrogen content refinery fuel gas and low BTU content Blast Furnace Gas (BFG). For the refinery fuel gas increased resistance to combustor flashback was achieved through preferential consumption of hydrogen in the catalytic bed. In the case of BFG, stable combustion for fuels as low as 88 BTU/ft{sup 3} was established and maintained without the need for using co-firing. This was achieved based on the upstream catalytic reaction delivering a hotter (and thus more reactive) product to the flame zone. The PCI catalytic reactor was also shown to be active in ammonia

  6. ULTRA LOW NOx CATALYTIC COMBUSTION FOR IGCC POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lance L. Smith

    2004-03-01

    Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using PCI's two-stage (catalytic / gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage is a Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{trademark}) catalytic reactor, wherein a fuel-rich mixture contacts the catalyst and reacts while final and excess combustion air cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, wherein the catalyst cooling air mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During the reporting period, PCI successfully achieved NOx = 0.011 lbs/MMBtu at 10 atm pressure (corresponding to 2.0 ppm NOx corrected to 15% O{sub 2} dry) with near-zero CO emissions, surpassing the project goal of < 0.03 lbs/MMBtu NOx. These emissions levels were achieved at scaled (10 atm, sub-scale) baseload conditions corresponding to Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station operation on 100% syngas (no co-firing of natural gas).

  7. Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is

  8. Getting IGCC a seat at the table

    SciTech Connect

    Blankinship, S.

    2006-11-15

    A dominant theme at the Gasification Technologies Conference in Washington, DC in early October was how all parties need to step up to assure integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology finds a place at the power generation table. That included a call for utilities and their ratepayers to be willing to accept more risk than they are accustomed to assuming. John Hofmeister, president and CEO of Shell Oil Company chided lawmakers and regulators for hindering progress by not adopting uniform regulations for carbon dioxide emissions. Among Shell's IGCC projects is Australia's equivalent of the United States' FutureGen Project - a 275 MW power production facility in Queensland that is expected to achieve 99.8% CO{sub 2} capture with sequestration and produce hydrogen. Randy Zwirn, president nd CEO of Siemens Power Generation, said OEMs must develop a philosophy for IGCC that he terms RAM - reliability, availability and maintainability. Texas Railroad Commissioner, Mike Williams described how his state has welcomed IGCC plants that can capture carbon and has established the groundwork for using or sequestrating it. Presentations reviewed in this article include status updates of more than a dozen IGCC projects underway. 1 photo.

  9. Development of ITM oxygen technology for integration in IGCC and other advanced power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Phillip A.

    2015-03-31

    Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) technology is based on the oxygen-ion-conducting properties of certain mixed-metal oxide ceramic materials that can separate oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas, such as air, under a suitable driving force. The “ITM Oxygen” air separation system that results from the use of such ceramic membranes produces a hot, pure oxygen stream and a hot, pressurized, oxygen-depleted stream from which significant amounts of energy can be extracted. Accordingly, the technology integrates well with other high-temperature processes, including power generation. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., the Recipient, in conjunction with a dozen subcontractors, developed ITM Oxygen technology under this five-phase Cooperative Agreement from the laboratory bench scale to implementation in a pilot plant capable of producing power and 100 tons per day (TPD) of purified oxygen. A commercial-scale membrane module manufacturing facility (the “CerFab”), sized to support a conceptual 2000 TPD ITM Oxygen Development Facility (ODF), was also established and operated under this Agreement. In the course of this work, the team developed prototype ceramic production processes and a robust planar ceramic membrane architecture based on a novel ceramic compound capable of high oxygen fluxes. The concept and feasibility of the technology was thoroughly established through laboratory pilot-scale operations testing commercial-scale membrane modules run under industrial operating conditions with compelling lifetime and reliability performance that supported further scale-up. Auxiliary systems, including contaminant mitigation, process controls, heat exchange, turbo-machinery, combustion, and membrane pressure vessels were extensively investigated and developed. The Recipient and subcontractors developed efficient process cycles that co-produce oxygen and power based on compact, low-cost ITMs. Process economics assessments show significant benefits relative to state

  10. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

  11. Modeling and optimization of a modified claus process as part of an integrted gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2011-01-01

    The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Due to these criteria, modifications are often required to the conventional process, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO2 capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant such as rapid change in the feed flowrates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was

  12. Rigorous Kinetic Modeling, Optimization, and Operability Studies of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E

    2011-12-15

    The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus

  13. Rigorous Kinetic Modeling and Optimization Study of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2012-02-08

    The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus

  14. Dynamic simulation and load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D,; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Load-following control of future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. To study control performance during load following, a plant-wide dynamic simulation of a coal-fed IGCC plant with CO{sub 2} capture has been developed. The slurry-fed gasifier is a single-stage, downward-fired, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow type with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The syngas from the outlet of the RSC goes to a scrubber followed by a two-stage sour shift process with inter-stage cooling. The acid gas removal (AGR) process is a dual-stage physical solvent-based process for selective removal of H{sub 2}S in the first stage and CO{sub 2} in the second stage. Sulfur is recovered using a Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. The recovered CO{sub 2} is compressed by a split-shaft multistage compressor and sent for sequestration after being treated in an absorber with triethylene glycol for dehydration. The clean syngas is sent to two advanced “F”-class gas turbines (GTs) partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit. A subcritical steam cycle is used for heat recovery steam generation. A treatment unit for the sour water strips off the acid gases for utilization in the Claus unit. The steady-state model developed in Aspen Plus® is converted to an Aspen Plus Dynamics® simulation and integrated with MATLAB® for control studies. The results from the plant-wide dynamic model are compared qualitatively with the data from a commercial plant having different configuration, operating condition, and feed quality than what has been considered in this work. For load-following control, the GT-lead with gasifier-follow control strategy is considered. A modified proportional–integral–derivative (PID) control is considered for the syngas

  15. Utilities split on readiness of IGCC

    SciTech Connect

    Javetski, J.

    2006-10-15

    For some generating companies, the dearth of operating experience for integrated gasification combined-cycle plants adds too much uncertainty to the risk/reward equation for new-capacity technology options. For others, the possibility of being able to comply with air pollution limits as far out as 2018, as well as to meet all-but-certain CO{sub 2} caps, makes IGCC well worth investing in now. The article compares the highest-level technical and economic characteristics of IGCC with those of pulverised coal combustion and other generating technologies. It then discusses the availability histories of six successful IGCC demonstration plants, presenting that for the Wabash River plant in some detail. The issue of financing IGCC is addressed. An insert on page 58 summarises a paper by Dave Stopek of Sangent and Lundy presented at Electric Power 2006. This discussed IGCC plant cost and factors to consider in selecting a technology supplier. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Systems Study for Improving Gas Turbine Performance for Coal/IGCC Application

    SciTech Connect

    Ashok K. Anand

    2005-12-16

    IGCC plant level parameters (IGCC Net Efficiency, IGCC Net Output, GT Output, NOx Emissions) of 11 GT identified cycle parameters were determined. Results indicate that IGCC net efficiency HHV gains up to 2.8 pts (40.5% to 43.3%) and IGCC net output gains up to 35% are possible due to improvements in GT technology alone with single digit NOx emission levels. Task 5.0--Recommendations for GT Technical Improvements: A trade off analysis was conducted utilizing the performance results of 18 gas turbine (GT) conceptual designs, and three most promising GT candidates are recommended. A roadmap for turbine technology development is proposed for future coal based IGCC power plants. Task 6.0--Determine Carbon Capture Impact on IGCC Plant Level Performance: A gas turbine performance model for high Hydrogen fuel gas turbine was created and integrated to an IGCC system performance model, which also included newly created models for moisturized syngas, gas shift and CO2 removal subsystems. This performance model was analyzed for two gas turbine technology based subsystems each with two Carbon removal design options of 85% and 88% respectively. The results show larger IGCC performance penalty for gas turbine designs with higher firing temperature and higher Carbon removal.

  17. Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasifiction combined sycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel

  18. Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel

  19. CO{sub 2} emission abatement in IGCC power plants by semiclosed cycles: Part A -- With oxygen-blown combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Chiesa, P.; Lozza, G.

    1999-10-01

    This paper analyzes the fundamentals of IGCC power plants where carbon dioxide produced by syngas combustion can be removed, liquefied and eventually disposed, to limit the environmental problems due to the greenhouse effect. To achieve this goal, a semiclosed-loop gas turbine cycle using an highly-enriched CO{sub 2} mixture as working fluid was adopted. As the oxidizer, the syngas combustion utilizes oxygen produced by an air separation unit. Combustion gases mainly consist of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O: after expansion, heat recovery and water condensation, a part of the exhausts, highly concentrated in CO{sub 2}, can be easily extracted, compressed and liquefied for storage or disposal. A detailed discussion about the configuration and the thermodynamic performance of these plants is the aim of the paper. Proper attention was paid to: (i) the modelization of the gasification section and of its integration with the power cycle, (ii) the optimization of pressure ratio due the change of the cycle working fluid, (iii) the calculation of the power consumption of the auxiliary equipment, including the compression train of the separated CO{sub 2} and the air separation unit. The resulting overall efficiency is in the 38--39% range, with status-of-the-art gas turbine technology, but resorting to a substantially higher pressure ratio. The extent of modifications to the gas turbine engine, with respect to commercial units, was therefore discussed. Relevant modifications are needed, but not involving changes in the technology. A second plant scheme will be considered in the second part of the paper, using air for syngas combustion and a physical absorption process to separate CO{sub 2} from nitrogen-rich exhausts. A comparison between the two options will be addressed there.

  20. Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

  1. Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation DECISION POINT 1 UNDER PHASE 3

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Lori

    2013-08-01

    Air Products and the DOE have partnered over a number of years in the development of ITM Oxygen technology in support of gasification technology. Throughout this process, studies of application of the technology to IGCC and oxy-coal combustion have shown significant reduction in capital and operating costs compared to similar systems using conventional cryogenic air separation. Phase 3, the current phase of the program, focuses on the design, construction and operation of a 30- to 100-TPD pilot facility, the Intermediate Scale Test Unit (ISTU). Execution of this phase to date has resulted in significant advances in a number of areas including ceramic membrane material development, module design and production, ceramic-to-metal seal design, process control strategies, and engineering development of process cycles. Phase 3 will be complete upon successful operation of the ISTU in a series of tests making oxygen from ceramic membrane modules and producing power from a hot gas expander. Phase 3 work has extended beyond the planned schedule due to a delay in delivery of equipment from vendors. Air Products is currently managing the equipment delay by close involvement with the vendor to redesign the problematic equipment and oversee its fabrication. The result of these unforeseen challenges is that the ISTU project completion date has been delayed. Tight cost controls have been implemented both by DOE program management and APCI to meet budget constraints despite increased costs due to budget delays. Total project costs have increased in several areas. Increased costs in the ISTU project include purchased equipment, instruments, construction, and contractor engineering. Increased costs for other tasks include additional work in support of module production by Ceramatec, Inc, and increased Air Products labor for component testing. Air Products plans to complete testing as outlined in the SOPO and successfully complete all project objectives by the end of FY14.

  2. U.S. and Chinese experts perspectives on IGCC technology for Chinese electric power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, B.C.B.; Wang Yingshi

    1997-11-01

    Although China is a very large and populous nation, and has one of the longest known histories in the world, it has only lately begun to seek its place among modern industrial nations. This move, precipitated by the government`s relatively recently adopted strategic goals of economic development, societal reform and promotion of engagement with other industrial nations, has brought to the fore the serious situation in which the Chinese electric power industry finds itself. Owing to the advanced average age of generation facilities and the technology used in them, serious expansion and modernization of this industry needs to take place, and soon, if it is to support the rapid industrial development already taking place in China. While China does have some oil and gas, coal constitutes its largest indigenous energy supply, by far. Coal has been mined and utilized for years in China. It is used directly to provide heat for homes, businesses and in industrial applications, and used to raise steam for the generation of electricity. The presently dominant coal utilization methods are characterized by low or marginal efficiencies and an almost universal lack of pollution control equipment. Because there is so much of it, coal is destined to be China`s predominant source of thermal energy for decades to come. Realizing these things--the rapidly increasing demand for more electric power than China presently can produce, the need to raise coal utilization efficiencies, and the corresponding need to preserve the environment--the Chinese government moved to commission several official working organizations to tackle these problems.

  3. Making IGCC slag valuable

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, K.

    2005-12-01

    All indications are that integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology will play a major role in tomorrow's generation industry. But before it does, some by-products of the process must be dealt with, for example unburned carbon that can make IGCC slag worthless. Charah Inc.'s processing system, used at Tampa Electric's Polk Station for years, segregates the slag's constituents by size, producing fuel and building materials. 3 figs.

  4. STUDY: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT COMPARISONS, IGCC VS. PC PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compares the environmental performance of two power generation technologies: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pulverized Coal-Fired Rankine Cycle. In addition, the capital and operating costs for power plants using these two technologies have been com...

  5. IGCC update: are we there yet?

    SciTech Connect

    Neville, A.

    2009-08-15

    If a number of technical, financial and regulatory hurdles can be overcome, power generated by integrated gasification combined-cycle technology could become an important source for US utilities. Our overview presents diverse perspectives from three industry experts about what it will take to move this technology off the design table and into the field. Well-known advantages are IGCC uses less water, creates a usable slag by-product and the technology required for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture has already been used successfully on coal gasification technology. These points, together with roadblocks to the deployment of IGCC technology in the USA, are discussed. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The United States of America and the People`s Republic of China experts report on integrated gasification combined-cycle technology (IGCC)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    A report written by the leading US and Chinese experts in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, intended for high level decision makers, may greatly accelerate the development of an IGCC demonstration project in the People`s Republic of China (PRC). The potential market for IGCC systems in China and the competitiveness of IGCC technology with other clean coal options for China have been analyzed in the report. Such information will be useful not only to the Chinese government but also to US vendors and companies. The goal of this report is to analyze the energy supply structure of China, China`s energy and environmental protection demand, and the potential market in China in order to make a justified and reasonable assessment on feasibility of the transfer of US Clean Coal Technologies to China. The Expert Report was developed and written by the joint US/PRC IGCC experts and will be presented to the State Planning Commission (SPC) by the President of the CAS to ensure consideration of the importance of IGCC for future PRC power production.

  7. Filter systems for IGCC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, S.; Gieger, R.; Sobel, N.; Johnson, D.

    1995-11-01

    The objectives of this program were to identify metallic filter medium to be utilized in the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle process (IGCC). In IGCC processes utilizing high efficiency desulfurizing technology, the traditional corrosion attack, sulfidation, is minimized so that metallic filters are viable alternatives over ceramic filters. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station is being developed to demonstrate Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology. The Pall Gas Solid Separation (GSS) System is a self cleaning filtration system designed to remove virtually all particulate matter from gas streams. The heart of the system is the filter medium used to collect the particles on the filter surface. The medium`s filtration efficiency, uniformity, permeability, voids volume, and surface characteristics are all important to establishing a permeable permanent cake. In-house laboratory blowback tests, using representative full scale system particulate, were used to confirm the medium selection for this project. Test elements constructed from six alloys were supplied for exposure tests: PSS 310SC (modified 310S alloy); PSS 310SC heat treated; PSS 310SC-high Cr; PSS 310SC-high Cr heat treated; PSS Hastelloy X; and PSS Hastelloy X heat treated.

  8. Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Virr, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020[degree]F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

  9. Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Virr, M.J.

    1992-11-01

    The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020{degree}F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

  10. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    York, William; Hughes, Michael; Berry, Jonathan; Russell, Tamara; Lau, Y. C.; Liu, Shan; Arnett, Michael; Peck, Arthur; Tralshawala, Nilesh; Weber, Joseph; Benjamin, Marc; Iduate, Michelle; Kittleson, Jacob; Garcia-Crespo, Andres; Delvaux, John; Casanova, Fernando; Lacy, Ben; Brzek, Brian; Wolfe, Chris; Palafox, Pepe; Ding, Ben; Badding, Bruce; McDuffie, Dwayne; Zemsky, Christine

    2015-07-30

    The objective of this program was to develop the technologies required for a fuel flexible (coal derived hydrogen or syngas) gas turbine for IGCC that met DOE turbine performance goals. The overall DOE Advanced Power System goal was to conduct the research and development (R&D) necessary to produce coal-based IGCC power systems with high efficiency, near-zero emissions, and competitive capital cost. To meet this goal, the DOE Fossil Energy Turbine Program had as an interim objective of 2 to 3 percentage points improvement in combined cycle (CC) efficiency. The final goal is 3 to 5 percentage points improvement in CC efficiency above the state of the art for CC turbines in IGCC applications at the time the program started. The efficiency goals were for NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm NOx (@15 % O2). As a result of the technologies developed under this program, the DOE goals were exceeded with a projected 8 point efficiency improvement. In addition, a new combustion technology was conceived of and developed to overcome the challenges of burning hydrogen and achieving the DOE’s NOx goal. This report also covers the developments under the ARRA-funded portion of the program that include gas turbine technology advancements for improvement in the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of gas turbines for industrial applications with carbon capture and sequestration. Example applications could be cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, steel and aluminum plants, manufacturing facilities, etc. The DOE’s goal for more than 5 percentage point improvement in efficiency was met with cycle analyses performed for representative IGCC Steel Mill and IGCC Refinery applications. Technologies were developed in this program under the following areas: combustion, larger latter stage buckets, CMC and EBC, advanced materials and coatings, advanced configurations to reduce cooling, sealing and rotor purge flows, turbine aerodynamics, advanced sensors, advancements in first

  11. A utility`s perspective of the market for IGCC

    SciTech Connect

    Black, C.R.

    1993-08-01

    I believe, in the short-term U. S. market that IGCC`s primary competition is, natural gas-fired combined cycle technology. I believe that in order for IGCC to compete on a commercial basis, that natural gas prices have to rise relative to coal prices, and that the capital cost of the technology must come down. While this statement may seem to be somewhat obvious, it raises two interesting points. The first is that while the relative pricing of natural gas and coal is not generally within the technology supplier`s control, the capital cost is. The reduction of capital cost represents a major challenge for the technology suppliers in order for this technology to become commercialized. The second point is that the improvements being achieved with IGCC efficiencies probably won`t help it outperform the effects of natural gas pricing. This is due to the fact that the combined cycle portion of the IGCC technology is experiencing the most significant improvements in efficiency. I do see, however, a significant advantage for IGCC technology compared to conventional pulverized coal-fired units. As IGCC efficiencies continue to improve, combined with their environmentally superior performance, I believe that IGCC will be the ``technology of choice`` for utilities that install new coal-fired generation. We have achieved economic justification of our project by virtue of the DOE`s funding of $120 million awarded in Round III of their Clean Coal Technology Program. This program provides the bridge between current technology economics and those of the future. And Tampa Electric is pleased to be taking a leadership position in furthering the IGCC knowledge base.

  12. Power systems for future missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, S. P.; Frye, P. E.; Littman, Franklin D.; Meisl, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive scenario of future missions was developed and applicability of different power technologies to these missions was assessed. Detailed technology development roadmaps for selected power technologies were generated. A simple methodology to evaluate economic benefits of current and future power system technologies by comparing Life Cycle Costs of potential missions was developed. The methodology was demonstrated by comparing Life Cycle Costs for different implementation strategies of DIPS/CBC technology to a selected set of missions.

  13. Powering the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Stirling Technology Company (STC) developed the RG-350 convertor using components from separate Goddard Space Center and U.S. Army Natick SBIR contracts. Based on the RG-350, STC commercialized a product line of Stirling cycle generator sets, known as RemoteGen(TM), with power levels ranging from 10We to 3kWe. Under SBIR agreements with Glenn Research Center, the company refined and extended the capabilities of the RemoteGen convertors. They can provide power in remote locations by efficiently producing electricity from multiple-fuel sources, such as propane, alcohol, gasoline, diesel, coal, solar energy, or wood pellets. Utilizing any fuel source that can create heat, RemoteGen enables the choice of the most appropriate fuel source available. The engines operate without friction, wear, or maintenance. These abilities pave the way for self-powered appliances, such as refrigerators and furnaces. Numerous applications for RemoteGen include quiet, pollution-free generators for RVs and yachts, power for cell phone towers remote from the grid, and off-grid residential power variously using propane, ethanol, and solid biomass fuels. One utility and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory are evaluating a solar dish concentrator version with excellent potential for powering remote irrigation pumps.

  14. Progress of the Sarlux IGCC project

    SciTech Connect

    Collodi, G.; Zaccolo, G.

    1998-07-01

    SARLUX, a joint venture between SARAS and ENRON, is developing a new 551 MW IGCC plant in the SARAS Refinery located in Sarroch, Sardinia, Italy. The plant will be built by the Raggruppamento Temporaneo d'Imprese (Consortium) formed by SNAMPROGETTI - GENERAL ELECTRIC - TURBOTECNICA under a lump-sum, turn-key construction contract. The process configuration includes three parallel Texaco low pressure quench gasifiers (TAR feedstock) followed by two trains of gas cooling, COS hydrolysis, Selexol (UOP) sulphur removal and syngas moisturization. The combined cycle unit (CCU) consists of three parallel single shaft units General Electric STAG 109E producing 551 MW net power to ENEL national grid. Facilities for pure hydrogen and liquid sulphur production are included, as well as all necessary utilities required to support the IGCC operation. The contract, started on January 1997, is at present under the construction phase. After 14 months, the overall progress of the project is 47% with the engineering and procurement activities almost concluded. The commissioning of the utility units is expected from September 1998, the first CCU train on March 1999 (on gasoil) and the first gasifier will be ignited on August 1999. At present an intensive and complete training program is under-way for the Sarlux personnel involved in the management and conduction of the new IGCC.

  15. Solar TiO2-assisted photocatalytic degradation of IGCC power station effluents using a Fresnel lens.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, J M; Durán, A; Guerra, J; García-Peña, F; Coca, P

    2008-03-01

    The heterogeneous TiO2 assisted photocatalytic degradation of wastewater from a thermoelectric power station under concentrated solar light irradiation using a Fresnel lens has been studied. The efficiency of photocatalytic degradation was determined from the analysis of cyanide and formate removal. Firstly, the influence of the initial concentration of H2O2 and TiO2 on the degradation kinetics of cyanides and formates was studied based on a factorial experimental design. Experimental kinetic constants were fitted using neural networks. Results showed that the photocatalytic process was effective for cyanides destruction (mainly following a molecular mechanism), whereas most of formates (degraded mainly via a radical path) remained unaffected. Finally, to improve formates degradation, the effect of lowering pH on their degradation rate was evaluated after complete cyanide destruction. The photooxidation efficiency of formates reaches a maximum at pH around 5-6. Above pH 6, formate anion is subjected to electrostatic repulsion with the negative surface of TiO2. At pH<4.5, formate adsorption and photon absorption are reduced due to some catalyst agglomeration. PMID:18078669

  16. Process screening study of alternative gas treating and sulfur removal systems for IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) power plant applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biasca, F.E.; Korens, N.; Schulman, B.L.; Simbeck, D.R.

    1987-12-01

    One of the inherent advantages of the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plant (IGCC) over other coal-based electric generation technologies is that the sulfur in the coal is converted into a form which can be removed and recovered. Extremely low sulfur oxide emissions can result. Gas treating and sulfur recovery processes for the control of sulfur emissions are an integral part of the overall IGCC plant design. There is a wide range of commercially proven technologies which are highly efficient for sulfur control. In addition, there are many developing technologies and new concepts for applying established technologies which offer potential improvements in both technical and economic performance. SFA Pacific, Inc. has completed a screening study to compare several alternative methods of removing sulfur from the gas streams generated by the Texaco coal gasification process for use in an IGCC plant. The study considered cleaning the gas made from high and low sulfur coals to produce a low sulfur fuel gas and a severely desulfurized synthesis gas (suitable for methanol synthesis), while maintaining a range of low levels of total sulfur emissions. The general approach was to compare the technical performance of the various processes in meeting the desulfurization specifications laid out in EPRI's design basis for the study. The processing scheme being tested at the Cool Water IGCC facility incorporates the Selexol acid gas removal process which is used in combination with a Claus sulfur plant and a SCOT tailgas treating unit. The study has identified several commercial systems, as well as some unusual applications, which can provide efficient removal of sulfur from the fuel gas and also produce extremely low sulfur emissions - so as to meet very stringent sulfur emissions standards. 29 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Innovative gasification technology for future power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, K.; Shadle, L.J.; Sadowski, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    Ever tightening environmental regulations have changed the way utility and non-utility electric generation providers currently view their fuels choices. While coal is still, by far, the major fuel utilized in power production, the general trend over the past 20 years has been to switch to low-sulfur coal and/or make costly modifications to existing coal-fired facilities to reach environmental compliance. Unfortunately, this approach has led to fragmented solutions to balance our energy and environmental needs. To date, few integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) suppliers have been able to compete with the cost of other more conventional technologies or fuels. One need only look at the complexity of many IGCC approaches to understand that unless a view toward IEC is adopted, the widespread application of such otherwise potentially attractive technologies will be unlikely in our lifetime. Jacobs-Sirrine Engineers and Riley Stoker Corporation are working in partnership with the Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center to help demonstrate an innovative coal gasification technology called {open_quotes}PyGas{trademark},{close_quotes} for {open_quotes}pyrolysis-gasification{close_quotes}. This hybrid variation of fluidized-bed and fixed-bed gasification technologies is being developed with the goal to efficiently produce clean gas at costs competitive with more conventional systems by incorporating many of the principles of IEC within the confines of a single-gasifier vessel. Our project is currently in the detailed design stage of a 4 ton-per-hour gasification facility to be built at the Fort Martin Station of Allegheny Power Services. By locating the test facility at an existing coal-fired plant, much of the facility infrastructure can be utilized saving significant costs. Successful demonstration of this technology at this new facility is a prerequisite to its commercialization.

  18. Italian IGCC project sets pace for new refining era

    SciTech Connect

    Del Bravo, R.; Starace, F.; Chellini, I.M.; Chiantore, P.V.

    1996-12-09

    A joint venture company, api Energia S.p.A., is starting construction of a 280 mw integrated gasification combined cycle plant (IGCC) that will generate electricity for the Italian grid and steam in a refinery on Italy` Adriatic coast. The refinery will supply the heavy residue for the gasifiers. This is one of the three IGCC plants planned for construction in Italy following the liberalization of the electricity production sector there and the introduction of specific government decrees that regulate the exchange and wheeling of electricity. By the year 2000, approximately 1,300 mw of electricity produced by heavy residues with IGCC will be put on the Italian grid. The paper describes the project, its sponsors plant configuration for gasification, the combined cycle power plant, auxiliary systems, the economics, and contracts.

  19. Inductive power transfer: Powering our future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covic, Grant A.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to provide power without wires was imagined over a century ago, but assumed commercially impractical and impossible to realise. However for more than two decades the University of Auckland has been at the forefront of developing and commercialising this technology alongside its industrial partners. This research has proven that significant wireless power can be transferred over relatively large air-gaps efficiently and robustly. Early solutions were applied in industrial applications to power moving vehicles in clean room systems, industrial plants, and in theme parks, but more recently this research has helped develop technology that has the ability to impact us directly at home. The seminar will describe some of the early motivations behind this research, and introduce some of the solutions which have been developed by the team of researchers at Auckland over two decades, many of which have found their way into the market. It will also describe how the technology has recently been re-developed to enable battery charging of electric vehicles without the need to plug in, and alongside this how it has the potential to change the way we drive in the future.

  20. An update on the Pinon Pine IGCC project

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, G.; Gonzalez, M.; Fankhanel, M.

    1995-09-01

    Sierra Pacific Power Company (SPPCo) is engaged in an IGCC project funded in part under the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program, Round 4. The facility which will have a net power production of approximately 100 MW from a nominal 880 T/D of Western coal, is being built at the Tracy Station near Reno, Nevada. Foster Wheeler USA Corporation has been appointed by SPPCo to be responsible for the design, procurement and construction of the overall facilities and has subcontracted The M. W. Kellogg Company for the design and certain procurement activities for the gasification island which will use the KRW fluidized bed coal gasifier with hot gas cleanup. A GE 6 FA gas turbine will be the heart of the power island. This IGCC facility, known as the Pinon Pine Power Project, began construction in February, 1995 is scheduled for startup late 1996 and will be operated as one of SPPCo`s baseload power generating units.

  1. Plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2009-01-01

    To eliminate the harmful effects of greenhouse gases, especially that of CO2, future coalfired power plants need to consider the option for CO2 capture. The loss in efficiency for CO2 capture is less in an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant compared to other conventional coal combustion processes. However, no IGCC plant with CO2 capture currently exists in the world. Therefore, it is important to consider the operability and controllability issues of such a plant before it is commercially built. With this objective in mind, a detailed plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture has been developed. The plant considers a General Electric Energy (GEE)-type downflow radiant-only gasifier followed by a quench section. A two-stage water gas shift (WGS) reaction is considered for conversion of about 96 mol% of CO to CO2. A two-stage acid gas removal (AGR) process based on a physical solvent is simulated for selective capture of H2S and CO2. The clean syngas is sent to a gas turbine (GT) followed by a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The steady state results are validated with data from a commercial gasifier. A 5 % ramp increase in the flowrate of coal is introduced to study the system dynamics. To control the conversion of CO at a desired level in the WGS reactors, the steam/CO ratio is manipulated. This strategy is found to be efficient for this operating condition. In the absence of an efficient control strategy in the AGR process, the environmental emissions exceeded the limits by a great extent.

  2. Transient studies of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2010-01-01

    Next-generation coal-fired power plants need to consider the option for CO2 capture as stringent governmental mandates are expected to be issued in near future. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are more efficient than the conventional coal combustion processes when the option for CO2 capture is considered. However, no IGCC plant with CO2 capture currently exists in the world. Therefore, it is important to consider the operability and controllability issues of such a plant before it is commercially built. To facilitate this objective, a detailed plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture has been developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign}. The plant considers a General Electric Energy (GEE)-type downflow radiant-only gasifier followed by a quench section. A two-stage water gas shift (WGS) reaction is considered for conversion of CO to CO2. A two-stage acid gas removal (AGR) process based on a physical solvent is simulated for selective capture of H2S and CO2. Compression of the captured CO2 for sequestration, an oxy-Claus process for removal of H2S and NH3, black water treatment, and the sour water treatment are also modeled. The tail gas from the Claus unit is recycled to the SELEXOL unit. The clean syngas from the AGR process is sent to a gas turbine followed by a heat recovery steam generator. This turbine is modeled as per published data in the literature. Diluent N2 is used from the elevated-pressure ASU for reducing the NOx formation. The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is modeled by considering generation of high-pressure, intermediate-pressure, and low-pressure steam. All of the vessels, reactors, heat exchangers, and the columns have been sized. The basic IGCC process control structure has been synthesized by standard guidelines and existing practices. The steady state results are validated with data from a commercial gasifier. In the future grid-connected system, the plant should satisfy the environmental

  3. Generic process design and control strategies used to develop a dynamic model and training software for an IGCC plant with CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Provost, G.; Stone, H.; McClintock, M.; Erbes, M.; Zitney, S.; Turton, R.; Phillips, J.; Quintrell, M.; Marasigan, J.

    2008-01-01

    To meet the growing demand for education and experience with the analysis, operation, and control of commercial-scale Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is leading a collaborative R&D project with participants from government, academia, and industry. One of the goals of this project is to develop a generic, full-scope, real-time generic IGCC dynamic plant simulator for use in establishing a world-class research and training center, as well as to promote and demonstrate the technology to power industry personnel. The NETL IGCC dynamic plant simulator will combine for the first time a process/gasification simulator and a power/combined-cycle simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework for use in training applications as well as engineering studies. As envisioned, the simulator will have the following features and capabilities: A high-fidelity, real-time, dynamic model of process-side (gasification and gas cleaning with CO2 capture) and power-block-side (combined cycle) for a generic IGCC plant fueled by coal and/or petroleum coke Full-scope training simulator capabilities including startup, shutdown, load following and shedding, response to fuel and ambient condition variations, control strategy analysis (turbine vs. gasifier lead, etc.), representative malfunctions/trips, alarms, scenarios, trending, snapshots, data historian, and trainee performance monitoring The ability to enhance and modify the plant model to facilitate studies of changes in plant configuration and equipment and to support future R&D efforts To support this effort, process descriptions and control strategies were developed for key sections of the plant as part of the detailed functional specification, which will form the basis of the simulator development. These plant sections include: Slurry Preparation Air Separation Unit Gasifiers Syngas Scrubbers Shift Reactors Gas Cooling

  4. Kemper County IGCC (tm) Project Preliminary Public Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Matt; Rush, Randall; Madden, Diane; Pinkston, Tim; Lunsford, Landon

    2012-07-01

    The Kemper County IGCC Project is an advanced coal technology project that is being developed by Mississippi Power Company (MPC). The project is a lignite-fueled 2-on-1 Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) facility incorporating the air-blown Transport Integrated Gasification (TRIG™) technology jointly developed by Southern Company; Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR); and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama. The estimated nameplate capacity of the plant will be 830 MW with a peak net output capability of 582 MW. As a result of advanced emissions control equipment, the facility will produce marketable byproducts of ammonia, sulfuric acid, and carbon dioxide. 65 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) will be captured and used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR), making the Kemper County facility’s carbon emissions comparable to those of a natural-gas-fired combined cycle power plant. The commercial operation date (COD) of the Kemper County IGCC plant will be May 2014. This report describes the basic design and function of the plant as determined at the end of the Front End Engineering Design (FEED) phase of the project.

  5. Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2005-12-01

    refocused to address pre-mixed combustion phenomenon for IGCC applications. The work effort on this task was shifted to another joint GE Energy/DOE-NETL program investigation, High Hydrogen Pre-mixer Designs, as of April 1, 2004. Task 4--Information Technology (IT) Integration: The fourth task was originally to demonstrate Information Technology (IT) tools for advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplant condition assessment and condition based maintenance. The task focused on development of GateCycle. software to model complete-plant IGCC systems, and the Universal On-Site Monitor (UOSM) to collect and integrate data from multiple condition monitoring applications at a power plant. The work on this task was stopped as of April 1, 2004.

  6. Challenges for future space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Forecasts of space power needs are presented. The needs fall into three broad categories: survival, self-sufficiency, and industrialization. The cost of delivering payloads to orbital locations and from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Mars are determined. Future launch cost reductions are predicted. From these projections the performances necessary for future solar and nuclear space power options are identified. The availability of plentiful cost effective electric power and of low cost access to space are identified as crucial factors in the future extension of human presence in space.

  7. Power technologies and the space future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faymon, Karl A.; Fordyce, J. Stuart; Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Advancements in space power and energy technologies are critical to serve space development needs and help solve problems on Earth. The availability of low cost power and energy in space will be the hallmark of this advance. Space power will undergo a dramatic change for future space missions. The power systems which have served the U.S. space program so well in the past will not suffice for the missions of the future. This is especially true if the space commercialization is to become a reality. New technologies, and new and different space power architectures and topologies will replace the lower power, low-voltage systems of the past. Efficiencies will be markedly improved, specific powers will be greatly increased, and system lifetimes will be markedly extended. Space power technology is discussed - its past, its current status, and predictions about where it will go in the future. A key problem for power and energy is its cost of affordability. Power must be affordable or it will not serve future needs adequately. This aspect is also specifically addressed.

  8. Electric Power: Decisions for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardon, Phillip L.; Preston, John

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the past 25 years of electricity consumption in the United States and considers the implications for the near future. Discusses strategies for energy conservation and provides a student activity for measuring and conserving electric power. (Author/JOW)

  9. Solar Power for Future NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    An overview of NASA missions and technology development efforts are discussed. Future spacecraft will need higher power, higher voltage, and much lower cost solar arrays to enable a variety of missions. One application driving development of these future arrays is solar electric propulsion.

  10. Challenges for future space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The future appears rich in missions that will extend the frontiers of knowledge, human presence in space, and opportunities for profitable commerce. The key to success of these ventures is the availability of plentiful, cost effective electric power and assured, low cost access to space. While forecasts of space power needs are problematic, an assessment of future needs based on terrestrial experience was made. These needs fall into three broad categories-survival, self sufficiency and industrialization. The cost of delivering payloads to orbital locations from low earth orbit (LEO) to Mars was determined and future launch cost reductions projected. From these factors, then, projections of the performance necessary for future solar and nuclear space power options were made. These goals are largely dependent upon orbital location and energy storage needs.

  11. Feasibility studies to improve plant availability and reduce total installed cost in IGCC plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Kevin; Anasti, William; Fang, Yichuan; Subramanyan, Karthik; Leininger, Tom; Zemsky, Christine

    2015-03-30

    The main purpose of this project is to look at technologies and philosophies that would help reduce the costs of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, increase its availability or do both. GE’s approach to this problem is to consider options in three different areas: 1) technology evaluations and development; 2) constructability approaches; and 3) design and operation methodologies. Five separate tasks were identified that fall under the three areas: Task 2 – Integrated Operations Philosophy; Task 3 – Slip Forming of IGCC Components; Task 4 – Modularization of IGCC Components; Task 5 – Fouling Removal; and Task 6 – Improved Slag Handling. Overall, this project produced results on many fronts. Some of the ideas could be utilized immediately by those seeking to build an IGCC plant in the near future. These include the considerations from the Integrated Operations Philosophy task and the different construction techniques of Slip Forming and Modularization (especially if the proposed site is in a remote location or has a lack of a skilled workforce). Other results include ideas for promising technologies that require further development and testing to realize their full potential and be available for commercial operation. In both areas GE considers this project to be a success in identifying areas outside the core IGCC plant systems that are ripe for cost reduction and ity improvement opportunities.

  12. Future Orbital Power Systems Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA is actively involved in program planning for missions requiring several orders of magnitude, more energy than in the past. Therefore, a two-day symposium was held to review the technology requirements for future orbital power systems. The purpose of the meeting was to give leaders from government and industry a broad view of current government supported technology efforts and future program plans in space power. It provided a forum for discussion, through workshops, to comment on current and planned programs and to identify opportunities for technology investment. Several papers are presented to review the technology status and the planned programs.

  13. Future Photovoltaic Power Generation for Space-Based Power Utilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Landis, Geoffrey; Hepp, Aloysius; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses requirements for large earth orbiting power stations that can serve as central utilities for other orbiting spacecraft, or for beaming power to the earth itself. The current state of the art of space solar cells, and a variety of both evolving thin film cells as well as new technologies that may impact the future choice of space solar cells for high power mission applications are addressed.

  14. Can We Power Future Mars Missions?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Sturm, Erick J., II; Woolley, Ryan C.; Jordan, James F.

    2006-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration identified the exploration of Mars as one of the key pathways. In response, NASAs Mars Program Office is developing a detailed mission lineup for the next decade that would lead to future explorations. Mission architectures for the next decade include both orbiters and landers. Existing power technologies, which could include solar panels, batteries, radioisotope power systems, and in the future fission power, could support these missions. Second and third decade explorations could target human precursor and human in-situ missions, building on increasingly complex architectures. Some of these could use potential feed forward from earlier Constellation missions to the Moon, discussed in the ESAS study. From a potential Mars Sample Return mission to human missions the complexity of the architectures increases, and with it the delivered mass and power requirements also amplify. The delivered mass at Mars mostly depends on the launch vehicle, while the landed mass might be further limited by EDL technologies, including the aeroshell, parachutes, landing platform, and pinpoint landing. The resulting in-situ mass could be further divided into payload elements and suitable supporting power systems. These power systems can range from tens of watts to multi-kilowatts, influenced by mission type, mission configuration, landing location, mission duration, and season. Regardless, the power system design should match the power needs of these surface assets within a given architecture. Consequently, in this paper we will identify potential needs and bounds of delivered mass and architecture dependent power requirements to surface assets that would enable future in-situ exploration of Mars.

  15. Briefing Book, Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council (IGCC) Meeting of April 28, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    1988-04-28

    The IGCC of the U.S. government was created under the intent of Public Law 93-410 (1974) to serve as a forum for the discussion of Federal plans, activities, and policies that are related to or impact on geothermal energy. Eight Federal Departments were represented on the IGCC at the time of this meeting. The main presentations in this report were on: Department of Energy Geothermal R&D Program, the Ormat binary power plant at East Mesa, CA, Potential for direct use of geothermal at Defense bases in U.S. and overseas, Department of Defense Geothermal Program at China Lake, and Status of the U.S. Geothermal Industry. The IGCC briefing books and minutes provide a historical snapshot of what development and impact issues were important at various time. (DJE 2005)

  16. The R and D program for IGCC in the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Bolt, N.

    1994-12-31

    Early 1994 the 250 MWe IGCC demonstration plant in Buggenum, the Netherlands has been commissioned. Start-up of the integrated plant is in progress. From 1994 till 1996 a demonstration program is to be performed concentrating on economical aspects of IGCC, environmental aspects of IGCC, the IGCC performance, operation, control and availability and single component behavior. The IGCC demonstration project is accompanied by a long term R and D program which aims at reduced investment costs and improved efficiency, high availability and low maintenance costs, fulfillment of (Dutch) environmental requirements.

  17. Future trends in power generation cost by power resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-08-01

    The Japan Energy Economy Research Institute has been evaluating power generation cost by each power resource every year focusing on nuclear power generation. The Institute is surveying the cost evaluations by power resources in France, Britain and the U.S.A., the nuclear generation advanced nations. The OECD is making power generation cost estimation using a hypothesis which uniforms basically the conditions varying in different member countries. In model power generation cost calculations conducted by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry of Japan, nuclear power generation is the most economical system in any fiscal year. According to recent calculations performed by the Japan Energy Economy Research Institute, the situation is such that it is difficult to distinguish the economical one from others among the power generation systems in terms of generation costs except for thermal power generation. Economic evaluations are given on estimated power generation costs based on construction costs for nuclear and thermal power plants, nuclear fuel cycling cost, and fuel cost data on petroleum, LNG and coal. With regard to the future trends, scenario analyses are made on generation costs, that assume fluctuations in fuel prices and construction costs, the important factors to give economic influence on power generation.

  18. MI high power operation and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, Ioanis; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Fermilab's Main Injector on acceleration cycles to 120 GeV has been running a mixed mode operation delivering beam to both the antiproton source for pbar production and to the NuMI[1] target for neutrino production since 2005. On January 2008 the slip stacking process used to increase the beam to the pbar target was expanded to include the beam to the NuMI target increasing both the beam intensity and power. The current high power MI operation will be described along with the near future plans.

  19. Commercial gasifier for IGCC applications study report

    SciTech Connect

    Notestein, J.E.

    1990-06-01

    This was a scoping-level study to identify and characterize the design features of fixed-bed gasifiers appearing most important for a gasifier that was to be (1) potentially commercially attractive, and (2) specifically intended for us in integrated coal gasification/combined-cycle (IGCC) applications. It also performed comparative analyses on the impact or value of these design features and on performance characteristics options of the whole IGCC system since cost, efficiency, environmental traits, and operability -- on a system basis -- are what is really important. The study also reviewed and evaluated existing gasifier designs, produced a conceptual-level gasifier design, and generated a moderately advanced system configuration that was utilized as the reference framework for the comparative analyses. In addition, technical issues and knowledge gaps were defined. 70 figs., 31 tabs.

  20. ConocoPhillips Sweeny IGCC/CCS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Talarico; Charles Sugg; Thomas Hren; Lauri Branch; Joseph Garcia; Alan Rezigh; Michelle Pittenger; Kathleen Bower; Jonathan Philley; Michael Culligan; Jeremy Maslen; Michele Woods; Kevin Elm

    2010-06-16

    Under its Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Program, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) selected ConocoPhillips Company (ConocoPhillips) to receive funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 for the proposed Sweeny Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC)/Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project (Project) to be located in Brazoria County, Texas. Under the program, the DOE is partnering with industry to demonstrate the commercial viability and operational readiness of technologies that would capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources and either sequester those emissions, or beneficially reuse them. The primary objective of the proposed Project was to demonstrate the efficacy of advanced technologies that capture CO{sub 2} from a large industrial source and store the CO{sub 2} in underground formations, while achieving a successful business venture for the entity (entities) involved. The Project would capture 85% of the CO{sub 2} produced from a petroleum coke (petcoke) fed, 703 MWnet (1,000 MWgross) IGCC power plant, using the ConocoPhillips (COP) proprietary and commercially proven E-Gas{trademark} gasification technology, at the existing 247,000 barrel per day COP Sweeny Refinery. In addition, a number of other commercially available technologies would be integrated into a conventional IGCC Plant in a unique, efficient, and reliable design that would capture CO{sub 2}. The primary destination for the CO{sub 2} would be a depleted natural gas field suitable for CO{sub 2} storage ('Storage Facility'). COP would also develop commercial options to sell a portion of the IGCC Plant's CO{sub 2} output to the growing Gulf Coast enhanced oil recovery (EOR) market. The IGCC Plant would produce electric power for sale in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas Houston Zone. The existing refinery effluent water would be treated and reused to fulfill all process water needs. The

  1. Worldwide supercritical power plants: Status and future

    SciTech Connect

    Gorokhov, V.A.; Ramezan, M.; Ruth, L.A.; Kim, S.S.

    1999-07-01

    During the last decade leading industrial countries initiated a new wave of research and development on supercritical (SC) steam power plants. This new interest is accompanied by the jump from SC steam parameters to ultra-supercritical (USC) parameters and was initiated mostly due to the increase in cost of fuel on the world market, and by increased environmental regulations including reduction of greenhouse gases. As a result, a significant number of new pulverized coal (PC) power units with increased efficiency and reduced emissions were installed in the last two decades, and a few more are planned to be installed in the near future. Different driving forces are responsible for development and implementation of highly efficient advanced PC-fired systems: need for new capacity, quality and cost of fuel, level of technology development, environmental requirements, and internal situation with regard to power supply (deregulation). For example, in Europe, Germany in particular, controlling CO{sub 2} is a major issue in any new installation, while in Japan economics is the major issue as the costs of imported fuels are high, and there are greater economic incentives for efficiency improvement. This paper discusses the status of existing and planned SC and USC power plants worldwide and their technical and environmental performance.

  2. Coal and nuclear power: Illinois' energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This conference was sponsored by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago; the US Department of Energy; the Illinois Energy Resources Commission; and the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources. The theme for the conference, Coal and Nuclear Power: Illinois' Energy Future, was based on two major observations: (1) Illinois has the largest reserves of bituminous coal of any state and is surpassed in total reserves only by North Dakota, and Montana; and (2) Illinois has made a heavy commitment to the use of nuclear power as a source of electrical power generation. Currently, nuclear power represents 30% of the electrical energy produced in the State. The primary objective of the 1982 conference was to review these two energy sources in view of the current energy policy of the Reagan Administration, and to examine the impact these policies have on the Midwest energy scene. The conference dealt with issues unique to Illinois as well as those facing the entire nation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 30 individual presentations.

  3. Comparison of Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne IGCC and commercial IGCC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Hoffmann; Jenny Tennant; Gary J. Stiegel

    2006-06-15

    This report compares the performance and cost of commercial Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants using General Electric Energy (GEE) and Shell gasifiers with conceptual IGCC plant designs using the Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) compact gasifier. the PWR gasifier is also compared with the GEEE gasifier in hydrogen production and carbon capture mode. With the exception of the PWR gasifier, the plants are designed with commercially available equipment to be operational in approximately 2010. All results should be considered preliminary and dictated in large part by the selected design basis. 10 refs., 54 exhibits

  4. Clean coal technologies in electric power generation: a brief overview

    SciTech Connect

    Janos Beer; Karen Obenshain

    2006-07-15

    The paper talks about the future clean coal technologies in electric power generation, including pulverized coal (e.g., advanced supercritical and ultra-supercritical cycles and fluidized-bed combustion), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and CO{sub 2} capture technologies. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Future Photovoltaic Power Generation for Space-Based Power Utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S.; Landis, G.; Raffaelle, R.; Hepp, A.

    2002-01-01

    A recent NASA program, Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT), investigated the technologies needed to provide cost-competitive ground baseload electrical power from space based solar energy conversion. This goal mandated low cost, light weight gigawatt (GW) power generation. Investment in solar power generation technologies would also benefit high power military, commercial and science missions. These missions are generally those involving solar electric propulsion, surface power systems to sustain an outpost or a permanent colony on the surface of the moon or mars, space based lasers or radar, or as large earth orbiting power stations which can serve as central utilities for other orbiting spacecraft, or as in the SERT program, potentially beaming power to the earth itself. This paper will discuss requirements for the two latter options, the current state of the art of space solar cells, and a variety of both evolving thin film cells as well as new technologies which may impact the future choice of space solar cells for a high power mission application. The space world has primarily transitioned to commercially available III-V (GaInP/GaAs/Ge) cells with 24-26% air mass zero (AMO) efficiencies. Research in the III-V multi-junction solar cells has focused on fabricating either lattice-mismatched materials with optimum stacking bandgaps or new lattice matched materials with optimum bandgaps. In the near term this will yield a 30% commercially available space cell and in the far term possibly a 40% cell. Cost reduction would be achieved if these cells could be grown on a silicon rather than a germanium substrate since the substrate is ~65% of the cell cost or, better yet, on a polyimide or possibly a ceramic substrate. An overview of multi-junction cell characteristics will be presented here. Thin film cells require substantially less material and have promised the advantage of large area, low cost manufacturing. However, space cell requirements

  6. State estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) plant as part of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    An accurate estimation of process state variables not only can increase the effectiveness and reliability of process measurement technology, but can also enhance plant efficiency, improve control system performance, and increase plant availability. Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO2 capture will have to satisfy stricter operational and environmental constraints. To operate the IGCC plant without violating stringent environmental emission standards requires accurate estimation of the relevant process state variables, outputs, and disturbances. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured at all, while some of them can be measured, but with low precision, low reliability, or low signal-to-noise ratio. As a result, accurate estimation of the process variables is of great importance to avoid the inherent difficulties associated with the inaccuracy of the data. Motivated by this, the current paper focuses on the state estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) process as part of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture. This process has extensive heat and mass integration and therefore is very suitable for testing the efficiency of the designed estimators in the presence of complex interactions between process variables. The traditional Kalman filter (KF) (Kalman, 1960) algorithm has been used as a state estimator which resembles that of a predictor-corrector algorithm for solving numerical problems. In traditional KF implementation, good guesses for the process noise covariance matrix (Q) and the measurement noise covariance matrix (R) are required to obtain satisfactory filter performance. However, in the real world, these matrices are unknown and it is difficult to generate good guesses for them. In this paper, use of an adaptive KF will be presented that adapts Q and R at every time step of the algorithm. Results show that very accurate estimations of the desired process states, outputs or disturbances can be

  7. FutureGen Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cabe, Jim; Elliott, Mike

    2010-09-30

    This report summarizes the comprehensive siting, permitting, engineering, design, and costing activities completed by the FutureGen Industrial Alliance, the Department of Energy, and associated supporting subcontractors to develop a first of a kind near zero emissions integrated gasification combined cycle power plant and carbon capture and storage project (IGCC-CCS). With the goal to design, build, and reliably operate the first IGCC-CCS facility, FutureGen would have been the lowest emitting pulverized coal power plant in the world, while providing a timely and relevant basis for coal combustion power plants deploying carbon capture in the future. The content of this report summarizes key findings and results of applicable project evaluations; modeling, design, and engineering assessments; cost estimate reports; and schedule and risk mitigation from initiation of the FutureGen project through final flow sheet analyses including capital and operating reports completed under DOE award DE-FE0000587. This project report necessarily builds upon previously completed siting, design, and development work executed under DOE award DE-FC26- 06NT4207 which included the siting process; environmental permitting, compliance, and mitigation under the National Environmental Policy Act; and development of conceptual and design basis documentation for the FutureGen plant. For completeness, the report includes as attachments the siting and design basis documents, as well as the source documentation for the following: • Site evaluation and selection process and environmental characterization • Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permit Application including well design and subsurface modeling • FutureGen IGCC-CCS Design Basis Document • Process evaluations and technology selection via Illinois Clean Coal Review Board Technical Report • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for slurry-fed gasifier configuration • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance

  8. Powering the Future of Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's future of science and space exploration. The topics include: 1) NASA's strategic goals; 2) NASA around the Country; 3) Marshall's History; 4) Marshall's Missions; 5) Marshall Statistics: From Exploration to Opportunity; 6) Propulsion and Transportation Systems; 7) Life Support systems; 8) Earth Science; 9) Space Science; 10) NASA Innovation Creates New Jobs, Markets, and Technologies; 11) NASA Inspires Future Generations of Explorers; and 12) Why Explore?

  9. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-12

    This document describes some of the accomplishments of the Department of Energy Water Power Program, and how those accomplishments are supporting the advancement of renewable energy generated using hydropower technologies and marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  10. IGCC performance comparison for variations in gasifier type and gas turbine firing temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stochl, R. J.; Nainiger, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Performance estimates were made for a series of integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems using three generic types of coal gasification subsystems. The objectives of this study were (1) to provide a self consistent comparison of IGCC systems using different types of gasifiers and different oxidants and (2) to use this framework of cases to evaluate the effect of a gas turbine firing temperature and cooling approach an overall system efficiency. The basic IGCC systems considered included both air and oxygen blown versions of a fluidized bed gasifier, represented by the Westinghouse design, and an entrained bed gasifier, represented by the Texaco design. Also considered were systems using an oxygen blown, fixed bed gasifier, represented by the British Gas Corporation (BGC) slagging gasifier. All of these gasifiers were integrated with a combined cycle using a gas turbine firing temperature of 1700 K (2600 F) and a compressor pressure ratio of 16:1. Steam turbine throttle conditions were chosen to be 16.6 MPa/811 K (2400 psia/1000 F) with a single reheat to 810 K (1000 F). Some of these cases were modified to allow the evaluation of the effect of gas turbine firing temperature. Turbine firing temperatures from state of the art 1365 K (2000 F) to an advanced technology 1920 K (3000 F) were analyzed. A turbine cooling technology that maintains metal temperatures below acceptable limits was assumed for each level of firing temperature. System performance comparisons were made using three advanced turbine cooling technologies for the 1920 K (3000 F) firing temperature. The results indicate that the IGCC using the BGC gasifier had the highest net system efficiency (42.1 percent) of the five gasification cases considered.

  11. Key issues in space nuclear power challenges for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The future appears rich in missions that will extend the frontiers of knowledge, human presence in space, and opportunities for profitable commerce. Key to the success of these ventures is the availability of plentiful, cost effective electric power and assured, low cost access to space. While forecasts of space power needs are problematic, an assessment of future needs based on terrestrial experience has been made. These needs fall into three broad categories: survival, self sufficiency, and industrialization. The cost of delivering payloads to orbital locations from LEO to Mars has been determined and future launch cost reductions projected. From these factors, then, projections of the performance necessary for future solar and nuclear space power options has been made. These goals are largely dependent upon orbital location and energy storage needs. Finally the cost of present space power systems has been determined and projections made for future systems.

  12. The future of high power laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poprawe, Reinhart; Loosen, Peter; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-05-01

    High Power Lasers have been used for years in corresponding applications. Constantly new areas and new processes have been demonstrated, developed and transferred to fruitful use in industry. With the advent of diode pumped solid state lasers in the multi-kW-power regime at beam qualities not far away from the diffraction limit, a new area of applicability has opened. In welding applications speeds could be increased and systems could be developed with higher efficiently leading also to new perspectives for increased productivity, e.g. in combined processing. Quality control is increasingly demanded by the applying industries, however applications still are rare. Higher resolution of coaxial process control systems in time and space combined with new strategies in signal processing could give rise to new applications. The general approach described in this paper emphasizes the fact, that laser applications can be developed more efficiently, more precisely and with higher quality, if the laser radiation is tailored properly to the corresponding application. In applying laser sources, the parameter ranges applicable are by far wider and more flexible compared to heat, mechanical or even electrical energy. The time frame ranges from several fs to continuous wave and this spans approximately 15 orders of magnitude. Spacewise, the foci range from several µm to cm and the resulting intensities suitable for materials processing span eight orders of magnitude from 10 3 to 10 11 W/cm2. In addition to space (power, intensity) and time (pulse) the wavelength can be chosen as a further parameter of optimization. As a consequence, the resulting new applications are vast and can be utilized in almost every market segment of our global economy (Fig. 1). In the past and only partly today, however, this flexibility of laser technology is not exploited in full in materials processing, basically because in the high power regime the lasers with tailored beam properties are not

  13. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper.

  14. Fusion Propulsion and Power for Future Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froning, H. D., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    There are innovative magnetic and electric confinement fusion power and propulsion system designs with potential for: vacuum specific impulses of 1500-2000 seconds with rocket engine thrust/mass ratios of 5-10 g's; environmentally favorable exhaust emissions if aneutronic fusion propellants can be used; a 2 to 3-fold reduction in the mass of hypersonic airliners and SSTO aerospace planes; a 10 to 20 fold reduction in Mars expedition mass and cost (if propellant from planetary atmospheres is used); and feasibility or in-feasibility of these systems could be confirmed with a modest applied research and exploratory development cost.

  15. Deregulation holds key to power industry future

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, M.W.

    1996-10-01

    Deregulation and its accompanying regulatory and legislative changes are the keys to today`s widespread innovations in the electric utility industry. As deregulation saturates the market, utilities eager to gain customers are lowering prices and offering diversified services. These changes will continue to reverberate well into the 21st century. Just as AT and T and the Baby Bells struck out on their own, electric utilities are changing their way of thinking to stay in business and keep their customers happy. The result? Capital expenditures on power plants are down while alternatives to energy production are up.

  16. Photovoltaic Power for Future NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey; Bailey, Sheila G.; Lyons, Valerie J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in crystalline solar cell technology are reviewed. Dual-junction and triple-junction solar cells are presently available from several U. S. vendors. Commercially available triple-junction cells consisting of GaInP, GaAs, and Ge layers can produce up to 27% conversion efficiency in production lots. Technology status and performance figures of merit for currently available photovoltaic arrays are discussed. Three specific NASA mission applications are discussed in detail: Mars surface applications, high temperature solar cell applications, and integrated microelectronic power supplies for nanosatellites.

  17. Powering nanorobotic devices: challenges and future strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Krishna Moorthi

    2014-04-01

    Nanotechnology, even after 55 years since its foundation (1959 Richard Feynman's speech - `There is lot of space in the bottom'), is still in its infancy. However, of late, there has been a large increase in the research being done in this field in many prominent Universities and Research institutions across the globe. Nanorobotics is the combination of Nanotechnology and the science of Robotics, to create robots that are only a few nanometres (10-9 metres) in size. Nanobots are yet to be made. But with the current pace of ongoing researches, scientists predict that nanobots will be made a reality by next ten years. The main proposed function of nanobots is to use them in the medical field to interact with cells or intra-cellular substances and prevent or reverse structural and genetical problems and diseases. One of the major challenges faced while creating a nanobot to travel through human body is to power it. Nanobots would require a very small yet highly potential source of energy. There are many hypothesised energy sources for nanobots which are either already available within the human body naturally or which are to be supplied externally. But, all of these energy sources pose a few challenges which need to be addressed if they are to be used to power nanobots. These challenges can be overcome using a number of strategies that can be used to make an economically, ecologically and medically viable energy source.

  18. Results from Symposium on Future Orbital power systems technology requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorland, S.

    1979-01-01

    The technology requirements for future orbital power systems were reviewed. Workshops were held in 10 technology disciplines to discuss technology deficiencies, adequacy of current programs to resolve those deficiencies and recommendations for tasks that might reduce the testing and risks involved in future orbital energy systems. Those recommendations are summarized.

  19. The status and future of geothermal power

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, Charles F.

    2000-08-01

    Geothermal electricity production in the United States began in 1960. Today there are over 20 plants in the western United States providing a total of about 2,200 MW of clean and reliable electricity. Currently identified resources could provide over 20,000 MW of power in the U.S., and undiscovered resources might provide 5 times that amount. In the 1990s industry growth slowed due to the loss of market incentives and competition from natural gas. However, increased interest in clean energy sources, ongoing technological improvements, and renewed opportunities abroad hold promise for a resurgence in the industry. This review paper covers the status of the technology, the issues faced, and the latest research. While the focus is on geothermal in the U.S., a brief description of the large international market is included.

  20. Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition

    SciTech Connect

    2007-11-15

    The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

  1. Power Systems of the Future: A 21st Century Power Partnership Thought Leadership Report (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    Powerful trends in technology, policy environments, financing, and business models are driving change in power sectors globally. In light of these trends, the question is no longer whether power systems will be transformed, but rather how these transformations will occur. Power Systems of the Future, a thought leadership report from the 21st Century Power Partnership, explores these pathways explores actions that policymakers and regulators can take to encourage desired power system outcomes.

  2. Solar-powered airplanes: A historical perspective and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiongfeng; Guo, Zheng; Hou, Zhongxi

    2014-11-01

    Solar-powered airplanes are studied in this research. A solar-powered airplane consumes solar energy instead of traditional fossil fuels; thus it has received a significant amount of interest from researchers and the public alike. The historical development of solar-powered airplanes is reviewed. Notable prototypes, particularly those sponsored by the government, are introduced in detail. Possible future applications of solar-powered airplanes in the civilian and military fields are proposed. Finally, the challenges being faced by solar-powered airplanes are discussed. This study proposes that the solar-powered airplanes are potential alternatives to some present technologies and that they complement current satellites, traditional airplanes, airships, and balloons. However, these planes require further development and enormous technical obstacles must be addressed.

  3. Advanced CO{sub 2} Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal IGCC System

    SciTech Connect

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2013-09-30

    The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low rank coals. The plant uses an integrated CO{sub 2} scrubber/Water Gas Shift (WGS) catalyst to capture over90 percent capture of the CO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a similar plant with conventional cold gas cleanup system based on SelexolTM technology and 90 percent carbon capture. TDA’s system uses a high temperature physical adsorbent capable of removing CO{sub 2} above the dew point of the synthesis gas and a commercial WGS catalyst that can effectively convert CO in The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low rank coals. The plant uses an integrated CO{sub 2} scrubber/Water Gas Shift (WGS) catalyst to capture over90 percent capture of the CO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a similar plant with conventional cold gas cleanup system based on SelexolTM technology and 90 percent carbon capture. TDA’s system uses a high temperature physical adsorbent capable of removing CO{sub 2} above the dew point of the synthesis gas and a commercial WGS catalyst that can effectively convert CO in bituminous coal the net plant efficiency is about 2.4 percentage points higher than an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant equipped with SelexolTM to capture CO{sub 2}. We also previously completed two successful field demonstrations: one at the National Carbon Capture Center (Southern- Wilsonville, AL) in 2011, and a second demonstration in fall of 2012 at the Wabash River IGCC plant (Terra Haute, IN). In this project, we first optimized the sorbent to catalyst ratio used in the combined WGS and CO{sub 2} capture

  4. Computing and cognition in future power-plant operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, R.A.; Sheridan, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to speculate on the nature of future interactions between people and computers in the operation of power plants. In particular, the authors offer a taxonomy for examining the differing functions of operators in interacting with the plant and its computers, and the differing functions of the computers in interacting with the plant and its operators.

  5. Power Systems for Future Missions: Appendices A-L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, S. P.; Frye, P. E.; Littman, Franklin D.; Meisl, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    Selection of power system technology for space applications is typically based on mass, readiness of a particular technology to meet specific mission requirements, and life cycle costs (LCC). The LCC is typically used as a discriminator between competing technologies for a single mission application. All other future applications for a given technology are usually ignored. As a result, development cost of a technology becomes a dominant factor in the LCC comparison. Therefore, it is common for technologies such as DIPS and LMR-CBC to be potentially applicable to a wide range of missions and still lose out in the initial LCC comparison due to high development costs. This collection of appendices (A through L) contains the following power systems technology plans: CBC DIPS Technology Roadmap; PEM PFC Technology Roadmap; NAS Battery Technology Roadmap; PV/RFC Power System Technology Roadmap; PV/NAS Battery Technology Roadmap; Thermionic Reactor Power System Technology Roadmap; SP-100 Power System Technology Roadmap; Dynamic SP-100 Power System Technology Roadmap; Near-Term Solar Dynamic Power System Technology Roadmap; Advanced Solar Dynamic Power System Technology Roadmap; Advanced Stirling Cycle Dynamic Isotope Power System Technology Roadmap; and the ESPPRS (Evolutionary Space Power and Propulsion Requirements System) User's Guide.

  6. Power systems for future missions. Appendices A-L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, S. P.; Frye, P. E.; Littman, Franklin D.; Meisl, C. J.

    1994-12-01

    Selection of power system technology for space applications is typically based on mass, readiness of a particular technology to meet specific mission requirements, and life cycle costs (LCC). The LCC is typically used as a discriminator between competing technologies for a single mission application. All other future applications for a given technology are usually ignored. As a result, development cost of a technology becomes a dominant factor in the LCC comparison. Therefore, it is common for technologies such as DIPS and LMR-CBC to be potentially applicable to a wide range of missions and still lose out in the initial LCC comparison due to high development costs. This collection of appendices (A through L) contains the following power systems technology plans: CBC DIPS Technology Roadmap; PEM PFC Technology Roadmap; NAS Battery Technology Roadmap; PV/RFC Power System Technology Roadmap; PV/NAS Battery Technology Roadmap; Thermionic Reactor Power System Technology Roadmap; SP-100 Power System Technology Roadmap; Dynamic SP-100 Power System Technology Roadmap; Near-Term Solar Dynamic Power System Technology Roadmap; Advanced Solar Dynamic Power System Technology Roadmap; Advanced Stirling Cycle Dynamic Isotope Power System Technology Roadmap; and the ESPPRS (Evolutionary Space Power and Propulsion Requirements System) User's Guide.

  7. Future Opportunities for Dynamic Power Systems for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic power systems have the potential to be used in Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) and Fission Surface Power Systems (FSPS) to provide high efficiency, reliable and long life power generation for future NASA applications and missions. Dynamic power systems have been developed by NASA over the decades, but none have ever operated in space. Advanced Stirling convertors are currently being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These systems have demonstrated high efficiencies to enable high system specific power (>8 W(sub e)/kg) for 100 W(sub e) class Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRG). The ASRG could enable significant extended and expanded operation on the Mars surface and on long-life deep space missions. In addition, advanced high power Stirling convertors (>150 W(sub e)/kg), for use with surface fission power systems, could provide power ranging from 30 to 50 kWe, and would be enabling for both lunar and Mars exploration. This paper will discuss the status of various energy conversion options currently under development by NASA Glenn for the Radioisotope Power System Program for NASA s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and the Prometheus Program for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD).

  8. Technology and application options for future battery power regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitch, J.W.; Carpenter, C.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Traditionally, utilities have been interested in battery storage as an option to supply peak power through load leveling. Recently, other benefits of battery storage have been identified which potentially have equal or greater value to electric utilities. These benefits are power regulation functions including area regulation, area protection, spinning reserve, power factor correction, thermal unit minimum loading, and the ability to absorb qualifying facilities. Lead-acid batteries similar to those manufactured for automotive and industrial uses are currently being marketed for utility applications. Compared to the traditional fooded-cell battery that regulates routine watering and maintenance, valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries can meet many of the requirements or power regulation at significantly lower operating and maintenance costs. This paper presents an overview of future battery storage applications and technologies. Trends in the utility industry and the future role of battery storage will be addressed with an emphasis on power regulation options. Discussions on battery storage for specific power regulation applications are presented as well as the status of advanced battery development in Europe, Japan, and the United States.

  9. Standardized Modular Power Interfaces for Future Space Explorations Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Earlier studies show that future human explorations missions are composed of multi-vehicle assemblies with interconnected electric power systems. Some vehicles are often intended to serve as flexible multi-purpose or multi-mission platforms. This drives the need for power architectures that can be reconfigured to support this level of flexibility. Power system developmental costs can be reduced, program wide, by utilizing a common set of modular building blocks. Further, there are mission operational and logistics cost benefits of using a common set of modular spares. These benefits are the goals of the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Modular Power System (AMPS) project. A common set of modular blocks requires a substantial level of standardization in terms of the Electrical, Data System, and Mechanical interfaces. The AMPS project is developing a set of proposed interface standards that will provide useful guidance for modular hardware developers but not needlessly constrain technology options, or limit future growth in capability. In 2015 the AMPS project focused on standardizing the interfaces between the elements of spacecraft power distribution and energy storage. The development of the modular power standard starts with establishing mission assumptions and ground rules to define design application space. The standards are defined in terms of AMPS objectives including Commonality, Reliability-Availability, Flexibility-Configurability and Supportability-Reusability. The proposed standards are aimed at assembly and sub-assembly level building blocks. AMPS plans to adopt existing standards for spacecraft command and data, software, network interfaces, and electrical power interfaces where applicable. Other standards including structural encapsulation, heat transfer, and fluid transfer, are governed by launch and spacecraft environments and bound by practical limitations of weight and volume. Developing these mechanical interface standards is more difficult but

  10. Middle Eastern power systems; Present and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Middle Eastern Power systems have evolved independently of each other over many decades. The region covers a wide geographical area of over 4 million square kilometers with an estimated population in 1990 of over 120 million people. This paper discusses the present status and future power system developments in the Middle East with emphasis on the Mashrequ Arab Countries (MAC). MAC consists of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Yemen, and the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, namely, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Interconnections within MAC and possible extensions to Turkey, Europe, and Central Africa are discussed. A common characteristic of the MAC power systems is that they are all operated by government or semi-government bodies. The energy resources in the region are varied. Countries such as Iraq, Egypt, and Syria have significant hydro power resources. On the other hand, the GCC countries and Iraq have abundant fossil fuel reserves.

  11. Radioisotope power system options for future planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockfield, Robert D.

    2001-02-01

    Like previous missions to the outer planets, future spacecraft missions such as Pluto/Kuiper Express, Europa Orbiter, and Solar Probe will require radioisotope power systems for their long voyages away from the Sun. Several candidate advanced power conversion technologies have been proposed that have been proposed that have higher power conversion efficiencies than the traditional thermoelectric generators, with the potential for reduced mass and reduced quantities of nuclear fuel required. Studies conducted by Lockheed Martin under the direction of the Department of Energy have included the development of system conceptual designs utilizing Alkali Metal to Electric Conversion (AMTEC) and Stirling power conversion. Generator concepts based on these conversion technologies are compared in this paper with an alternative Small RTG, based on the General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG). .

  12. Future NASA Power Technologies for Space and Aero Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.

    2015-01-01

    To achieve the ambitious goals that NASA has outlined for the next decades considerable development of power technology will be necessary. This presentation outlines the development objectives for both space and aero applications. It further looks at the various power technologies that support these objectives and examines drivers that will be a driving force for future development. Finally, the presentation examines what type of non-traditional learning areas should be emphasized in student curriculum so that the engineering needs of the third decade of the 21st Century are met.

  13. NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems Planning and Potential Future Systems Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, June F.; Woerner, Dave F.; Cairns-Gallimore, Dirk; Johnson, Stephen G.; Qualls, Louis

    2016-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program is to make RPS ready and available to support the exploration of the solar system in environments where the use of conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet the needs of the missions. To meet this goal, the RPS Program, working closely with the Department of Energy, performs mission and system studies (such as the recently released Nuclear Power Assessment Study), assesses the readiness of promising technologies to infuse in future generators, assesses the sustainment of key RPS capabilities and knowledge, forecasts and tracks the Program's budgetary needs, and disseminates current information about RPS to the community of potential users. This process has been refined and used to determine the current content of the RPS Program's portfolio. This portfolio currently includes an effort to mature advanced thermoelectric technology for possible integration into an enhanced Multi-Mission Radioisotope Generator (eMMRTG), sustainment and production of the currently deployed MMRTG, and technology investments that could lead to a future Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). This paper describes the program planning processes that have been used, the currently available MMRTG, and one of the potential future systems, the eMMRTG.

  14. Stochastic modeling of coal gasification combined cycle systems: Cost models for selected integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, H.C.; Rubin, E.S.

    1990-06-01

    This report documents cost models developed for selected integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. The objective is to obtain a series of capital and operating cost models that can be integrated with an existing set of IGCC process performance models developed at the US Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center. These models are implemented in ASPEN, a Fortran-based process simulator. Under a separate task, a probabilistic modeling capability has been added to the ASPEN simulator, facilitating analysis of uncertainties in new process performance and cost (Diwekar and Rubin, 1989). One application of the cost models presented here is to explicitly characterize uncertainties in capital and annual costs, supplanting the traditional approach of incorporating uncertainty via a contingency factor. The IGCC systems selected by DOE/METC for cost model development include the following: KRW gasifier with cold gas cleanup; KRW gasifier with hot gas cleanup; and Lurgi gasifier with hot gas cleanup. For each technology, the cost model includes both capital and annual costs. The capital cost models estimate the costs of each major plant section as a function of key performance and design parameters. A standard cost method based on the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technical Assessment Guide (1986) was adopted. The annual cost models are based on operating and maintenance labor requirements, maintenance material requirements, the costs of utilities and reagent consumption, and credits from byproduct sales. Uncertainties in cost parameters are identified for both capital and operating cost models. Appendices contain cost models for the above three IGCC systems, a number of operating trains subroutines, range checking subroutines, and financial subroutines. 88 refs., 69 figs., 21 tabs.

  15. CE IGCC repowering project: Controls & instrumentation. Topical report, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The IGCC Control System is used to provide operator interface and controls for manual and auto operation of the IGCC Repowering Project Located at Springfield, Illinois. A Distributed Control System (DCS) is provided for analog (process control) loop functions and to provide the operator interface. A Data Acquisition System (DAS) is provided for gathering performance data and optimization. Programmable Logic Controllers will be provided for the following digital control systems: (a) GSSS (Gasifier Supervisory Safety System) including pulverized coal handling and char handling; (b) Coal Pulverization System; (c) HRSG (Heat Recovery Steam Generation); (d) Hot Gas Cleanup System; (e) Steam Turbine; and (f) Combined Cycle Operation. In general all systems are provided for auto/manual cascade operation; upstream equipment is interlocked to be proven in service operation and/or valve position before downstream equipment may operate.

  16. Powering the Space Exploration Initiative - NASA future space power requirements and issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) establishes the long-term goal of returning to the moon and then exploring Mars. One of the prerequisites for SEI is the exploration technology program which includes program elements on space nuclear power and surface solar power. These program elements in turn build upon the ongoing NASA research and technology base program in space energy conversion. NASA's future space mission planning encompasses both robotic and piloted missions spanning a range of power levels and operational conditions. In response to the breadth of future candidate missions, NASAs current research and technology program in space energy conversion spans a number of technologies so that spacecraft designers can be make intelligent decisions about future power system options. These technologies are discussed.

  17. Overview of past, present and future marine power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsy El-Gohary, M.

    2013-06-01

    In efforts to overcome an foreseeable energy crisis predicated on limited oil and gas supplies, reserves; economic variations facing the world, and of course the environmental side effects of fossil fuels, an urgent need for energy sources that provide sustainable, safe and economic supplies for the world is imperative. The current fossil fuel energy system must be improved to ensure a better and cleaner transportation future for the world. Despite the fact that the marine transportation sector consumes only 5% of global petroleum production; it is responsible for 15% of the world NO x and SO x emissions. These figures must be the engine that powers the scientific research worldwide to develop new solutions for a very old energy problem. In this paper, the most effective types of marine power plants were discussed. The history of the development of each type was presented first and the technical aspects were discussed second. Also, the fuel cells as a new type of power plants used in marine sector were briefed to give a complete overview of the past, present and future of the marine power plants development. Based on the increased worldwide concerns regarding harmful emissions, many researchers have introduced solutions to this problem, including the adoption of new cleaner fuels. This paper was guided using the same trend and by implementing the hydrogen as fuel for marine internal combustion engine, gas turbines, and fuel cells.

  18. IEC fusion: The future power and propulsion system for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Coventry, Matt; Hanson, John; Hrbud, Ivana; Miley, George H.; Nadler, Jon

    2000-01-01

    Rapid access to any point in the solar system requires advanced propulsion concepts that will provide extremely high specific impulse, low specific power, and a high thrust-to-power ratio. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion is one of many exciting concepts emerging through propulsion and power research in laboratories across the nation which will determine the future direction of space exploration. This is part of a series of papers that discuss different applications of the Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion concept for both in-space and terrestrial use. IEC will enable tremendous advances in faster travel times within the solar system. The technology is currently under investigation for proof of concept and transitioning into the first prototype units for commercial applications. In addition to use in propulsion for space applications, terrestrial applications include desalinization plants, high energy neutron sources for radioisotope generation, high flux sources for medical applications, proton sources for specialized medical applications, and tritium production. .

  19. Organization of IGCC processes with reduced order CFD models

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Y.; Zitney, S.; Biegler, L.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated gasificationcombinedcycle(IGCC)plantshavesignificantadvantagesforefficientpowergen- eration withcarboncapture.Moreover,withthedevelopmentofaccurateCFDmodelsforgasificationand combined cyclecombustion,keyunitsoftheseprocessescannowbemodeledmoreaccurately.However, the integrationofCFDmodelswithinsteady-stateprocesssimulators,andsubsequentoptimizationof the integratedsystem,stillpresentssignificantchallenges.Thisstudydescribesthedevelopmentand demonstration ofareducedordermodeling(ROM)frameworkforthesetasks.Theapproachbuildson the conceptsofco-simulationandROMdevelopmentforprocessunitsdescribedinearlierstudies.Here we showhowtheROMsderivedfrombothgasificationandcombustionunitscanbeintegratedwithin an equation-orientedsimulationenvironmentfortheoveralloptimizationofanIGCCprocess.Inaddi- tion toasystematicapproachtoROMdevelopment,theapproachincludesvalidationtasksfortheCFD model aswellasclosed-looptestsfortheintegratedflowsheet.Thisapproachallowstheapplicationof equation-based nonlinearprogrammingalgorithmsandleadstofastoptimizationofCFD-basedprocess flowsheets. TheapproachisillustratedontwoflowsheetsbasedonIGCCtechnology.

  20. Development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture will be discussed. The IGCC reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power using Illinois No.6 coal as the feed. The plant includes an entrained, downflow, General Electric Energy (GEE) gasifier with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC), a two-stage water gas shift (WGS) conversion process, and two advanced 'F' class combustion turbines partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit (ASU). A subcritical steam cycle is considered for heat recovery steam generation. Syngas is selectively cleaned by a SELEXOL acid gas removal (AGR) process. Sulfur is recovered using a two-train Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. A multistage intercooled compressor is used for compressing CO2 to the pressure required for sequestration. Using Illinois No.6 coal, the reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power. The plant-wide steady-state and dynamic IGCC simulations have been generated using the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} and Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign} process simulators, respectively. The model is generated based on the Case 2 IGCC configuration detailed in the study available in the NETL website1. The GEE gasifier is represented with a restricted equilibrium reactor model where the temperature approach to equilibrium for individual reactions can be modified based on the experimental data. In this radiant-only configuration, the syngas from the Radiant Syngas Cooler (RSC) is quenched in a scrubber. The blackwater from the scrubber bottom is further cleaned in the blackwater treatment plant. The cleaned water is returned back to the scrubber and also used for slurry preparation. The acid gas from the sour water stripper (SWS) is sent to the Claus plant. The syngas from the scrubber passes through a sour shift process. The WGS reactors are modeled as adiabatic plug flow reactors with rigorous kinetics based on the mid

  1. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE

  2. Electric power industry in Korea: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hoesung

    1994-12-31

    Electrical power is an indispensable tool in the industrialization of a developing country. An efficient, reliable source of electricity is a key factor in the establishment of a wide range of industries, and the supply of energy must keep pace with the increasing demand which economic growth creates in order for that growth to be sustained. As one of the most successful of all developing countries, Korea has registered impressive economic growth over the last decade, and it could be said that the rapid growth of the Korean economy would not have been possible without corresponding growth in the supply of electric power. Power producers in Korea, and elsewhere in Asia, are to be commended for successfully meeting the challenge of providing the necessary power to spur what some call an economic miracle. The future continues to hold great potential for participants in the electrical power industry, but a number of important challenges must be met in order for that potential to be fully realized. Demand for electricity continues to grow at a staggering rate, while concerns over the environmental impact of power generating facilities must not be ignored. As it becomes increasingly difficult to finance the rapid, and increasingly larger-scale expansion of the power industry through internal sources, the government must find resources to meet the growing demand at least cost. This will lead to important opportunities for the private sector. It is important, therefore, for those interested in participating in the power production industry and taking advantage of the newly emerging opportunities that lie in the Korean market, and elsewhere in Asia, to discuss the relevant issues and become informed of the specific conditions of each market.

  3. Personnel Safety for Future Magnetic Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Cadwallader

    2009-07-01

    The safety of personnel at existing fusion experiments is an important concern that requires diligence. Looking to the future, fusion experiments will continue to increase in power and operating time until steady state power plants are achieved; this causes increased concern for personnel safety. This paper addresses four important aspects of personnel safety in the present and extrapolates these aspects to future power plants. The four aspects are personnel exposure to ionizing radiation, chemicals, magnetic fields, and radiofrequency (RF) energy. Ionizing radiation safety is treated well for present and near-term experiments by the use of proven techniques from other nuclear endeavors. There is documentation that suggests decreasing the annual ionizing radiation exposure limits that have remained constant for several decades. Many chemicals are used in fusion research, for parts cleaning, as use as coolants, cooling water cleanliness control, lubrication, and other needs. In present fusion experiments, a typical chemical laboratory safety program, such as those instituted in most industrialized countries, is effective in protecting personnel from chemical exposures. As fusion facilities grow in complexity, the chemical safety program must transition from a laboratory scale to an industrial scale program that addresses chemical use in larger quantity. It is also noted that allowable chemical exposure concentrations for workers have decreased over time and, in some cases, now pose more stringent exposure limits than those for ionizing radiation. Allowable chemical exposure concentrations have been the fastest changing occupational exposure values in the last thirty years. The trend of more restrictive chemical exposure regulations is expected to continue into the future. Other issues of safety importance are magnetic field exposure and RF energy exposure. Magnetic field exposure limits are consensus values adopted as best practices for worker safety; a typical

  4. Nuclear Power Now and in the Near Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchill, William

    2006-04-01

    The presentation will describe the present status of nuclear power in the United States including its operating, economic, and safety record. This status report will be based on publicly-available records of the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. The report will provide a brief description and state the impact of both the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents. It will list the lessons learned and report significant improvements in U.S. nuclear power plants. The major design differences between Chernobyl and U.S. nuclear reactors will be discussed. The presentation will project the near future of nuclear power considering the 2005 Energy Bill, initiatives by the U.S. Department of Energy and industry, and public opinions. Issues to be considered include plant operating safety, disposition of nuclear waste, protection against proliferation of potential weapons materials, economic performance, environmental impact and protection, and advanced nuclear reactor designs and fuel cycle options. The risk of nuclear power plant operations will be compared to risks presented by other industrial activities.

  5. A regenerative process for carbon dioxide removal and hydrogen production in IGCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh Khayyat, Armin

    Advanced power generation technologies, such as Integrated Gasification-Combined Cycles (IGCC) processes, are among the leading contenders for power generation conversion because of their significantly higher efficiencies and potential environmental advantages, compared to conventional coal combustion processes. Although the increased in efficiency in the IGCC processes will reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide per unit of power generated, further reduction in CO2 emissions is crucial due to enforcement of green house gases (GHG) regulations. In IGCC processes to avoid efficiency losses, it is desirable to remove CO2 in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C, which makes regenerable MgO-based sorbents ideal for such operations. In this temperature range, CO2 removal results in the shifting of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction towards significant reduction in carbon monoxide (CO), and enhancement in hydrogen production. However, regenerable, reactive and attrition resistant sorbents are required for such application. In this work, a highly reactive and attrition resistant regenerable MgO-based sorbent is prepared through dolomite modification, which can simultaneously remove carbon dioxide and enhance hydrogen production in a single reactor. The results of the experimental tests conducted in High-Pressure Thermogravimetric Analyzer (HP-TGA) and high-pressure packed-bed units indicate that in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C at 20 atm more than 95 molar percent of CO2 can be removed from the simulated coal gas, and the hydrogen concentration can be increased to above 70 percent. However, a declining trend is observed in the capacity of the sorbent exposed to long-term durability analysis, which appears to level off after about 20 cycles. Based on the physical and chemical analysis of the sorbent, a two-zone expanding grain model was applied to obtain an excellent fit to the carbonation reaction rate data at various operating conditions. The modeling

  6. Advanced radioisotope power sources for future deep space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, Erik N.

    2001-02-01

    The use of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) has been well established for deep space mission applications. The success of the Voyager, Galileo, Cassini and numerous other missions proved the efficacy of these technologies in deep space. Future deep space missions may also require Advanced Radioisotope Power System (ARPS) technologies to accomplish their goals. In the Exploration of the Solar System (ESS) theme, several missions are in the planning stages or under study that would be enabled by ARPS technology. Two ESS missions in the planning stage may employ ARPS. Currently planned for launch in 2006, the Europa Orbiter mission (EO) will perform a detailed orbital exploration of Jupiter's moon Europa to determine the presence of liquid water under the icy surface. An ARPS based upon Stirling engine technology is currently baselined for this mission. The Pluto Kuiper Express mission (PKE), planned for launch in 2004 to study Pluto, its moon Charon, and the Kuiper belt, is baselined to use a new RTG (F-8) assembled from parts remaining from the Cassini spare RTG. However, if this unit is unavailable, the Cassini spare RTG (F-5) or ARPS technologies would be required. Future missions under study may also require ARPS technologies. Mission studies are now underway for a detailed exploration program for Europa, with multiple mission concepts for landers and future surface and subsurface explorers. For the orbital phase of these missions, ARPS technologies may provide the necessary power for the spacecraft and orbital telecommunications relay capability for landed assets. For extended surface and subsurface operations, ARPS may provide the power for lander operations and for drilling. Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) will perform a detailed study of Saturn's rings and ring dynamics. The Neptune Orbiter (NO) mission will perform a detailed multi disciplinary study of Neptune. Titan Explorer (TE) will perform in-situ exploration of Saturn's moon Titan, with both

  7. Future computing platforms for science in a power constrained era

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abdurachmanov, David; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Knight, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Power consumption will be a key constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics (HEP). This makes performance-per-watt a crucial metric for selecting cost-efficient computing solutions. For this paper, we have done a wide survey of current and emerging architectures becoming available on the market including x86-64 variants, ARMv7 32-bit, ARMv8 64-bit, Many-Core and GPU solutions, as well as newer System-on-Chip (SoC) solutions. We compare performance and energy efficiency using an evolving set of standardized HEP-related benchmarks and power measurement techniques we have been developing. In conclusion, we evaluate the potentialmore » for use of such computing solutions in the context of DHTC systems, such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG).« less

  8. Future Computing Platforms for Science in a Power Constrained Era

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurachmanov, David; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Knight, Robert

    2015-12-23

    Power consumption will be a key constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics (HEP). This makes performance-per-watt a crucial metric for selecting cost-efficient computing solutions. For this paper, we have done a wide survey of current and emerging architectures becoming available on the market including x86-64 variants, ARMv7 32-bit, ARMv8 64-bit, Many-Core and GPU solutions, as well as newer System-on-Chip (SoC) solutions. We compare performance and energy efficiency using an evolving set of standardized HEP-related benchmarks and power measurement techniques we have been developing. We evaluate the potential for use of such computing solutions in the context of DHTC systems, such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG).

  9. Investigation of Insulation Materials for Future Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Ellis, David L.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Technology Advancement Project is developing next generation high-temperature insulation materials that directly benefit thermal management and improve performance of RPS for future science missions. Preliminary studies on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) for Stirling convertors used on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) have shown the potential benefits of MLI for space vacuum applications in reducing generator size and increasing specific power (W/kg) as compared to the baseline Microtherm HT (Microtherm, Inc.) insulation. Further studies are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on candidate MLI foils and aerogel composite spacers. This paper presents the method of testing of foils and spacers and experimental results to date.

  10. Future computing platforms for science in a power constrained era

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurachmanov, David; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Knight, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Power consumption will be a key constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics (HEP). This makes performance-per-watt a crucial metric for selecting cost-efficient computing solutions. For this paper, we have done a wide survey of current and emerging architectures becoming available on the market including x86-64 variants, ARMv7 32-bit, ARMv8 64-bit, Many-Core and GPU solutions, as well as newer System-on-Chip (SoC) solutions. We compare performance and energy efficiency using an evolving set of standardized HEP-related benchmarks and power measurement techniques we have been developing. In conclusion, we evaluate the potential for use of such computing solutions in the context of DHTC systems, such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG).

  11. Future Computing Platforms for Science in a Power Constrained Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurachmanov, David; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Knight, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Power consumption will be a key constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics (HEP). This makes performance-per-watt a crucial metric for selecting cost-efficient computing solutions. For this paper, we have done a wide survey of current and emerging architectures becoming available on the market including x86-64 variants, ARMv7 32-bit, ARMv8 64-bit, Many-Core and GPU solutions, as well as newer System-on-Chip (SoC) solutions. We compare performance and energy efficiency using an evolving set of standardized HEP-related benchmarks and power measurement techniques we have been developing. We evaluate the potential for use of such computing solutions in the context of DHTC systems, such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG).

  12. Investigation of Insulation Materials for Future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Ellis, David L.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power System (RPS) Technology Advancement Project is developing next generation high temperature insulation materials that directly benefit thermal management and improve performance of RPS for future science missions. Preliminary studies on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) for Stirling convertors used on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) have shown the potential benefits of MLI for space vacuum applications in reducing generator size and increasing specific power (W/kg) as compared to the baseline Microtherm HT (Microtherm, Inc.) insulation. Further studies are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) on candidate MLI foils and aerogel composite spacers. This paper presents the method of testing of foils and spacers and experimental results to date.

  13. Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1992-10-01

    Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit {number_sign}1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

  14. Status of Tampa Electric Company IGCC Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    Tampa Electric Company will utilize Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle technology for its new Polk Power Station Unit [number sign]1. The project is partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program Round III. This paper describes the technology to be used, process details, demonstration of a new hot gas clean-up system, and the schedule, leading to commercial operation in July 1996.

  15. Update on DOE Advanced IGCC/H2 Gas Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Cooling Flow Reduction: a) Focus on improving turbine hot gas path part cooling efficiency. b) Applicable to current metallic turbine components and synergistic with advanced materials. c) Address challenges of IGCC/hydrogen fuel environment (for example, possible cooling hole plugging). Leakage Flow Reduction: a) Focus on decreasing turbine parasitic leakages, i.e. between static-to-static, static-to-rotating turbine parts. b) Develop improved seal designs in a variety of important areas. Purge Flow Reduction: a) Focus on decreasing required flows to keep rotor disk cavities within temperature limits. b) Develop improved sealing at the cavity rims and modified flow geometries to minimize hot gas ingestion and aerodynamic impact.

  16. Pilot scale experience on IGCC hot gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Salo, K.; Ghazanfari, R.; Feher, G.

    1995-11-01

    In September 1993 Enviropower Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Department of Energy in order to develop and demonstrate the major components of an IGCC process such as hot gas cleanup systems. The objectives of the project are to develop and demonstrate: (1) hydrogen sulfide removal using regenerable metal oxide sorbent in pressurized fluidized bed reactors, (2) recovery of elemental sulfur from the tail-gas of the sorbent regenerator, and (3) hot gas particulate removal using ceramic candle filters.

  17. The SPi chip as an integrated power management device for serial powering of future HEP experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trimpl, M.; Deptuch, G.; Gingu, C.; Yarema, R.; Holt, R.; Weber, M.; Kierstead, J.; Lynn, D.; /Brookhaven

    2009-01-01

    Serial powering is one viable and very efficient way to distribute power to future high energy physics (HEP) experiments. One promising way to realize serial powering is to have a power management device on the module level that provides the necessary voltage levels and features monitoring functionality. The SPi (Serial Powering Interface) chip is such a power manager and is designed to meet the requirements imposed by current SLHC upgrade plans. It incorporates a programmable shunt regulator, two linear regulators, current mode ADCs to monitor the current distribution on the module, over-current detection, and also provides module power-down capabilities. Compared to serially powered setups that use discrete components, the SPi offers a higher level of functionality in much less real estate and is designed to be radiation tolerant. Bump bonding techniques are used for chip on board assembly providing the most reliable connection at lowest impedance. This paper gives an overview of the SPi and outlines the main building blocks of the chip. First stand alone tests are presented showing that the chip is ready for operation in serially powered setups.

  18. Large-Scale Data Challenges in Future Power Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jian; Sharma, Poorva; Gorton, Ian; Akyol, Bora A.

    2013-03-25

    This paper describes technical challenges in supporting large-scale real-time data analysis for future power grid systems and discusses various design options to address these challenges. Even though the existing U.S. power grid has served the nation remarkably well over the last 120 years, big changes are in the horizon. The widespread deployment of renewable generation, smart grid controls, energy storage, plug-in hybrids, and new conducting materials will require fundamental changes in the operational concepts and principal components. The whole system becomes highly dynamic and needs constant adjustments based on real time data. Even though millions of sensors such as phase measurement units (PMUs) and smart meters are being widely deployed, a data layer that can support this amount of data in real time is needed. Unlike the data fabric in cloud services, the data layer for smart grids must address some unique challenges. This layer must be scalable to support millions of sensors and a large number of diverse applications and still provide real time guarantees. Moreover, the system needs to be highly reliable and highly secure because the power grid is a critical piece of infrastructure. No existing systems can satisfy all the requirements at the same time. We examine various design options. In particular, we explore the special characteristics of power grid data to meet both scalability and quality of service requirements. Our initial prototype can improve performance by orders of magnitude over existing general-purpose systems. The prototype was demonstrated with several use cases from PNNL’s FPGI and was shown to be able to integrate huge amount of data from a large number of sensors and a diverse set of applications.

  19. AVESTAR Center: Dynamic simulation-based collaboration toward achieving opertional excellence for IGCC plants with crbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, Strphen E.; Liese, Eric A.; Mahapatra, Priyadarshi; Turton, Richard; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Provost, Graham

    2012-01-01

    To address challenges in attaining operational excellence for clean energy plants, the National Energy Technology Laboratory has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR(TM)). The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with operator training systems and 3D virtual immersive training systems into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. This paper will highlight the AVESTAR Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture.

  20. Climate modelling and near future solar power assessment in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, Marco; Vignati, Elisabetta; Huld, Thomas; Monforti-Ferrario, Fabio; Wilson, Julian; Dosio, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    In this work the near future (2030-2050) solar power in Europe is assessed using numerical experiments. The photovoltaic energy is computed on the basis of the solar radiation and air temperature simulated by regional climate models run in the framework of the FP6-ENSEMBLES project. The multi-model simulation of the climate evolution over Europe is performed at a 25 km resolution using the IPCC A1B scenario, and the period 1961-2050 is analyzed. The A1B scenario assumes a world of very rapid economic growth, with a global population peak in mid-century. Preliminary results show a general increase of near-surface air temperature, accompanied by an increase (reduction) of the solar radiation in Southern (Northern) Europe, with significant positive effects on the photovoltaic energy availability over Western Europe.

  1. Technological implications of SNAP reactor power system development on future space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.V.

    1982-11-16

    Nuclear reactor systems are one method of satisfying space mission power needs. The development of such systems must proceed on a path consistent with mission needs and schedules. This path, or technology roadmap, starts from the power system technology data base available today. Much of this data base was established during the 1960s and early 1970s, when government and industry developed space nuclear reactor systems for steady-state power and propulsion. One of the largest development programs was the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. By the early 1970s, a technology base had evolved from this program at the system, subsystem, and component levels. There are many implications of this technology base on future reactor power systems. A review of this base highlights the need for performing a power system technology and mission overview study. Such a study is currently being performed by Rockwell's Energy Systems Group for the Department of Energy and will assess power system capabilities versus mission needs, considering development, schedule, and cost implications. The end product of the study will be a technology roadmap to guide reactor power system development.

  2. The future of nuclear power: The role of the IFR

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author is in favor of nuclear energy for three major reasons: (1) a nuclear power station emits no particulates or sulfur; (2) a nuclear power station emits no carbon dioxide and therefore does not contribute (appreciably) to the possibility of global warming which is a major environmental issue of this century; (3) nuclear energy offers the opportunity to have an energy supply sustainable for the next hundred thousands years, and is the only supply presently known to be able to do so at a reasonable cost. He notes that at Rio de Janeiro, the USA joined other countries in calling for an approach to an indefinitely sustainable future. Alas, they were not bold or honest enough to state that using nuclear power, combined with considerable increase in energy efficiency and prudent use of renewables, is the only known way of achieving one other than massive population reduction or poverty. It is unlikely that improved energy efficiency can do the job alone. If the first two were the only issues, ordinary light water reactors would be adequate. One would not need the breeder reactor. But unless huge quantities of high quality uranium are found, or a cheap way of extracting it from seawater, one will need to have a way of using the uranium 238 or thorium. This is the role of this meeting. The author arrives at a set of criteria for a breeder reactor system: (1) it must be safe (secure against major accidents); (2) the system must be proliferation resistant; (3) the cost of the produced electricity must be competitive with other sources of energy--with perhaps a small margin for environmental advantage; (4) it must be capable of rapid expansion if and when needed.

  3. Brayton Power Conversion Unit Tested: Provides a Path to Future High-Power Electric Propulsion Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2003-01-01

    Closed-Brayton-cycle conversion technology has been identified as an excellent candidate for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) power conversion systems. Advantages include high efficiency, long life, and high power density for power levels from about 10 kWe to 1 MWe, and beyond. An additional benefit for Brayton is the potential for the alternator to deliver very high voltage as required by the electric thrusters, minimizing the mass and power losses associated with the power management and distribution (PMAD). To accelerate Brayton technology development for NEP, the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a low-power NEP power systems testbed that utilizes an existing 2- kWe Brayton power conversion unit (PCU) from previous solar dynamic technology efforts. The PCU includes a turboalternator, a recuperator, and a gas cooler connected by gas ducts. The rotating assembly is supported by gas foil bearings and consists of a turbine, a compressor, a thrust rotor, and an alternator on a single shaft. The alternator produces alternating-current power that is rectified to 120-V direct-current power by the PMAD unit. The NEP power systems testbed will be utilized to conduct future investigations of operational control methods, high-voltage PMAD, electric thruster interactions, and advanced heat rejection techniques. The PCU was tested in Glenn s Vacuum Facility 6. The Brayton PCU was modified from its original solar dynamic configuration by the removal of the heat receiver and retrofitting of the electrical resistance gas heater to simulate the thermal input of a steady-state nuclear source. Then, the Brayton PCU was installed in the 3-m test port of Vacuum Facility 6, as shown. A series of tests were performed between June and August of 2002 that resulted in a total PCU operational time of about 24 hr. An initial test sequence on June 17 determined that the reconfigured unit was fully operational. Ensuing tests provided the operational data needed to characterize PCU

  4. CE IGCC Repowering Project: Use of the Lockheed Kinetic Extruder for coal feeding; Topical report, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    ABB CE is evaluating alternate methods of coal feed across a pressure barrier for its pressurized coal gasification process. The Lockheed Kinetic Extruder has shown to be one of the most promising such developments. In essence, the Kinetic Extruder consists of a rotor in a pressure vessel. Coal enters the rotor and is forced outward to the surrounding pressure vessel by centrifugal force. The force on the coal passing across the rotor serves as a pressure barrier. Should this technology be successfully developed and tested, it could reduce the cost of IGCC technology by replacing the large lockhoppers conventionally used with a much smaller system. This will significantly decrease the size of the gasifier island. Kinetic Extruder technology needs testing over an extended period of time to develop and prove the long term reliability and performance needed in a commercial application. Major issues to be investigated in this program are component design for high temperatures, turn-down, scale-up factors, and cost. Such a test would only be economically feasible if it could be conducted on an existing plant. This would defray the cost of power and feedstock. Such an installation was planned for the CE IGCC Repowering Project in Springfield, Illinois. Due to budgetary constraints, however, this provision was dropped from the present plant design. It is believed that, with minor design changes, a small scale test version of the Kinetic Extruder could be installed parallel to an existing lockhopper system without prior space allocation. Kinetic Extruder technology represents significant potential cost savings to the IGCC process. For this reason, a test program similar to that specified for the Springfield project would be a worthwhile endeavor.

  5. TECHNOECONOMIC APPRAISAL OF INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED-CYCLE POWER GENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a technoeconomic appraisal of the integrated (coal) gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system. lthough not yet a proven commercial technology, IGCC is a future competitive technology to current pulverized-coal boilers equipped with SO2 and NOx controls, because of i...

  6. Optimal integrated design of air separation unit and gas turbine block for IGCC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, R.; Grossman, I.; Biegler, L.; Zitney, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are considered as a promising technology for power generation. However, they are not yet in widespread commercial use and opportunities remain to improve system feasibility and profitability via improved process integration. This work focuses on the integrated design of gasification system, air separation unit (ASU) and the gas turbine (GT) block. The ASU supplies oxygen to the gasification system and it can also supply nitrogen (if required as a diluent) to the gas turbine block with minimal incremental cost. Since both GT and the ASU require a source of compressed air, integrating the air requirement of these units is a logical starting point for facility optimization (Smith et al., 1997). Air extraction from the GT can reduce or avoid the compression cost in the ASU and the nitrogen injection can reduce NOx emissions and promote trouble-free operation of the GT block (Wimer et al., 2006). There are several possible degrees of integration between the ASU and the GT (Smith and Klosek, 2001). In the case of 'total' integration, where all the air required for the ASU is supplied by the GT compressor and the ASU is expected to be an elevated-pressure (EP) type. Alternatively, the ASU can be 'stand alone' without any integration with the GT. In this case, the ASU operates at low pressure (LP), with its own air compressor delivering air to the cryogenic process at the minimum energy cost. Here, nitrogen may or may not be injected because of the energy penalty issue and instead, syngas humidification may be preferred. A design, which is intermediate between these two cases, involves partial supply of air by the gas turbine and the remainder by a separate air compressor. These integration schemes have been utilized in some IGCC projects. Examples include Nuon Power Plant at Buggenum, Netherlands (both air and nitrogen integration), Polk Power Station at Tampa, US (nitrogen-only integration) and LGTI at Plaquemine

  7. Optimal Integrated Design of Air Separation Unit and Gas Turbine Block for IGCC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindra S. Kamath; Ignacio E. Grossmann; Lorenz T. Biegler; Stephen E. Zitney

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are considered as a promising technology for power generation. However, they are not yet in widespread commercial use and opportunities remain to improve system feasibility and profitability via improved process integration. This work focuses on the integrated design of gasification system, air separation unit (ASU) and the gas turbine (GT) block. The ASU supplies oxygen to the gasification system and it can also supply nitrogen (if required as a diluent) to the gas turbine block with minimal incremental cost. Since both GT and the ASU require a source of compressed air, integrating the air requirement of these units is a logical starting point for facility optimization (Smith et al., 1997). Air extraction from the GT can reduce or avoid the compression cost in the ASU and the nitrogen injection can reduce NOx emissions and promote trouble-free operation of the GT block (Wimer et al., 2006). There are several possible degrees of integration between the ASU and the GT (Smith and Klosek, 2001). In the case of 'total' integration, where all the air required for the ASU is supplied by the GT compressor and the ASU is expected to be an elevated-pressure (EP) type. Alternatively, the ASU can be 'stand alone' without any integration with the GT. In this case, the ASU operates at low pressure (LP), with its own air compressor delivering air to the cryogenic process at the minimum energy cost. Here, nitrogen may or may not be injected because of the energy penalty issue and instead, syngas humidification may be preferred. A design, which is intermediate between these two cases, involves partial supply of air by the gas turbine and the remainder by a separate air compressor. These integration schemes have been utilized in some IGCC projects. Examples include Nuon Power Plant at Buggenum, Netherlands (both air and nitrogen integration), Polk Power Station at Tampa, US (nitrogen-only integration) and LGTI at Plaquemine

  8. [Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. 1996 DOE annual technical report, January--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project uses a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal to syngas. The gasification plant is coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTUs/cf (HHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product. Approximately 10% of the raw, hot syngas at 900 F is designed to pass through an intermittently moving bed of metal-oxide sorbent which removes sulfur-bearing compounds from the syngas. PPS-1 will be the first unit in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology on a commercial unit. The emphasis during 1996 centered around start-up activities.

  9. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    CRS Sirrine (CRSS) is evaluating a novel IGCC process in which gases exiting the gasifier are burned in a gas turbine combustion system. The turbine exhaust gas is used to generate additional power in a conventional steam generator. This results in a significant increase in efficiency. However, the IGCC process requires development of novel approaches to control SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions and alkali vapors which can damage downstream turbine components. Ammonia is produced from the reaction of coal-bound nitrogen with steam in the reducing zone of any fixed bed coal gasifier. This ammonia can be partially oxidized to NO{sub x} when the product gas is oxidized in a gas turbine combustor. Alkali metals vaporize in the high-temperature combustion zone of the gasifier and laser condense on the surface of small char or ash particles or on cooled metal surfaces. It these alkali-coated materials reach the gas turbine combustor, the alkali will revaporize condense on turbine blades and cause rapid high temperature corrosion. Efficiency reduction will result. PSI Technology Company (PSIT) was contracted by CRSS to evaluate and recommend solutions for NO{sub x} emissions and for alkali metals deposition. Various methods for NO{sub x} emission control and the potential process and economic impacts were evaluated. This included estimates of process performance, heat and mass balances around the combustion and heat transfer units and a preliminary economic evaluation. The potential for alkali metal vaporization and condensation at various points in the system was also estimated. Several control processes and evaluated, including an order of magnitude cost for the control process.

  10. Recycling of residual IGCC slags and their benefits as degreasers in ceramics.

    PubMed

    Iglesias Martín, I; Acosta Echeverría, A; García-Romero, E

    2013-11-15

    This work studies the evolution of IGCC slag grains within a ceramic matrix fired at different temperatures to investigate the effect of using IGCC slag as a degreaser. Pressed ceramic specimens from two clay mixtures are used in this study. The M1 mixture is composed of standard clays, whereas the M2 mixture is composed of the same clay mixture as M1 mixture but contains 15% by weight IGCC slag. The amount of IGCC slag added coincides with the amount of slag typically used as a degreaser in the ceramic industry. Specimens are fired at 950 °C, 1000 °C, 1050 °C, 1100 °C and 1150 °C. The mineralogical composition and the IGCC slag grain shape within the ceramic matrix are determined by X-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results reveal that the surface of the slag grains is welded to the ceramic matrix while the quartz grains are separated, which causes increased water absorption and reduces the mechanical strength. IGCC slag, however, reduces water absorption. This behaviour is due to the softening temperature of the slag. This property is quite important from an industrial viewpoint because IGCC slag can serve as an alternative to traditional degreasing agents in the ceramic building industry. Additionally, using IGCC slag allows for the transformation of waste into a secondary raw material, thereby avoiding disposal at landfills; moreover, these industrial wastes are made inert and improve the properties of ceramics. PMID:23778155

  11. The future of nuclear power: value orientations and risk perception.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Stephen C; Rosa, Eugene A; Dan, Amy; Dietz, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, there has been a revival of interest in nuclear power. Two decades ago, the expansion of nuclear power in the United States was halted by widespread public opposition as well as rising costs and less than projected increases in demand for electricity. Can the renewed enthusiasm for nuclear power overcome its history of public resistance that has persisted for decades? We propose that attitudes toward nuclear power are a function of perceived risk, and that both attitudes and risk perceptions are a function of values, beliefs, and trust in the institutions that influence nuclear policy. Applying structural equation models to data from a U.S. national survey, we find that increased trust in the nuclear governance institutions reduces perceived risk of nuclear power and together higher trust and lower risk perceptions predict positive attitudes toward nuclear power. Trust in environmental institutions and perceived risks from global environmental problems do not predict attitudes toward nuclear power. Values do predict attitudes: individuals with traditional values have greater support for, while those with altruistic values have greater opposition to, nuclear power. Nuclear attitudes do not vary by gender, age, education, income, or political orientation, though nonwhites are more supportive than whites. These findings are consistent with, and provide an explanation for, a long series of public opinion polls showing public ambivalence toward nuclear power that persists even in the face of renewed interest for nuclear power in policy circles. PMID:19000075

  12. High power gas laser - Applications and future developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.

    1977-01-01

    Fast flow can be used to create the population inversion required for lasing action, or can be used to improve laser operation, for example by the removal of waste heat. It is pointed out that at the present time all lasers which are capable of continuous high-average power employ flow as an indispensable aspect of operation. High power laser systems are discussed, taking into account the gasdynamic laser, the HF supersonic diffusion laser, and electric discharge lasers. Aerodynamics and high power lasers are considered, giving attention to flow effects in high-power gas lasers, aerodynamic windows and beam manipulation, and the Venus machine. Applications of high-power laser technology reported are related to laser material working, the employment of the laser in controlled fusion machines, laser isotope separation and photochemistry, and laser power transmission.

  13. Automated management of power systems. [for future planetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, M. S.; Bridgeforth, A.

    1979-01-01

    APSM (Automated Power System Management) is a technology readiness program underway to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate various techniques involved in power system monitoring, as well as computational and control functions. The demonstration breadboard consists of the Viking Orbiter '75 power subassembly breadboard modified to incorporate dedicated microprocessors and digital interface circuits, as well as test support equipment for both spacecraft and ground computer simulation, fault simulation, and data acquisition.

  14. Future NASA mission applications of space nuclear power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.; Mankins, John; Mcconnell, Dudley G.; Reck, Gregory M.

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies sponsored by NASA show a continuing need for space nuclear power. A recently completed study considered missions (such as a Jovian grand tour, a Uranus or Neptune orbiter and probe, and a Pluto flyby) that can only be done with nuclear power. There are also studies for missions beyond the outer boundaries of the solar system at distances of 100 to 1000 astronomical units. The NASA 90-day study on the Space Exploration Initiative identified a need for nuclear reactors to power lunar surface bases and radioisotope power sources for use in lunar or Martian rovers, as well as considering options for advanced, nuclear propulsion systems for human missions to Mars.

  15. Hydrogen powered aircraft : The future of air transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Bhupendra; Karakurt, Adam; Sekaran, Paulas R.; Sethi, Vishal; Singh, Riti

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates properties and traits of hydrogen with regard to environmental concerns and viability in near future applications. Hydrogen is the most likely energy carrier for the future of aviation, a fuel that has the potential of zero emissions. With investigation into the history of hydrogen, this study establishes issues and concerns made apparent when regarding the fuel in aero applications. Various strategies are analyzed in order to evaluate hydrogen's feasibility which includes production, storage, engine configurations and aircraft configurations.

  16. Photovoltaic power system considerations for future lunar bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.; Appelbaum, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    The cost of transportation to the lunar surface places a premium on developing ultralightweight power system technology to support the eventual establishment of a lunar base. The photovoltaic technology issues to be addressed by the Surface Power program element of NASA's Project Pathfinder are described.

  17. Future Directions in Community Power Research: A Colloquium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirt, Frederick M., Ed.

    This compilation of symposium papers on community power structure research focuses on the theme that community power structure research must shift away from case study methods and move toward aggregate data analysis. Advocating comparative analysis, seven authors present their views under the following topics: (1) Charles R. Adrian, "Several Loose…

  18. Current and future developments in diesel powered hovercraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. C.; Stevens, M. J.; Buttigieg, J. A.

    After evaluating the development status of the application of diesel power to air-cushion vehicles (ACVs) and surface-effect ships (SESs), attention is given to the AP1-88 ACV, which is both the first and largest operational diesel-powered amphibious craft of this type. An account is given of the ACV and SES features that are dictated by the need to accommodate diesel power sources; the major advantages and disadvantages of diesel (vs gas turbine) engines are discussed. Although cost reductions are achievable against gas turbine powerplant use, lower payload fractions and slightly lower performance capabilities appear to be inescapable.

  19. Prospects for advanced coal-fuelled fuel cell power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, D.; Vanderlaag, P. C.; Oudhuis, A. B. J.; Ribberink, J. S.

    1994-04-01

    As part of ECN's in-house R&D programs on clean energy conversion systems with high efficiencies and low emissions, system assessment studies have been carried out on coal gasification power plants integrated with high-temperature fuel cells (IGFC). The studies also included the potential to reduce CO2 emissions, and to find possible ways for CO2 extraction and sequestration. The development of this new type of clean coal technology for large-scale power generation is still far off. A significant market share is not envisaged before the year 2015. To assess the future market potential of coal-fueled fuel cell power plants, the promise of this fuel cell technology was assessed against the performance and the development of current state-of-the-art large-scale power generation systems, namely the pulverized coal-fired power plants and the integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. With the anticipated progress in gas turbine and gas clean-up technology, coal-fueled fuel cell power plants will have to face severe competition from advanced IGCC power plants, despite their higher efficiency.

  20. Future Concepts for Modular, Intelligent Aerospace Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Soeder, James F.

    2004-01-01

    Nasa's resent commitment to Human and Robotic Space Exploration obviates the need for more affordable and sustainable systems and missions. Increased use of modularity and on-board intelligent technologies will enable these lofty goals. To support this new paradigm, an advanced technology program to develop modular, intelligent power management and distribution (PMAD) system technologies is presented. The many benefits to developing and including modular functionality in electrical power components and systems are shown to include lower costs and lower mass for highly reliable systems. The details of several modular technologies being developed by NASA are presented, broken down into hierarchical levels. Modularity at the device level, including the use of power electronic building blocks, is shown to provide benefits in lowering the development time and costs of new power electronic components.

  1. U.S. Electric Power Futures: Preliminary Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.; Logan, J.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation shows key findings of an effort to simulate the evolution of the U.S. power sector under a number of policy and technology scenarios using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) Model.

  2. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    Water power technologies harness energy from rivers and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses, and can help the United States meet its pressing energy, environmental, and economic challenges. Water power technologies; fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower uses dams or impoundments to store river water in a reservoir. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients.

  3. Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in COAL IGCC Powerplants

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2004-09-30

    The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, has been re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for Coal IGCC powerplants. The new program has been re-titled as ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants'' to better match the new scope. This technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished in the reporting period April 1, 2004 to August 31, 2004 on the revised Re-Directed and De-Scoped program activity. The program Tasks are: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: This first materials task has been refocused to address Coal IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials use in gas turbines and remains in the program. This task will screen material performance and quantify the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in Coal IGCC applications. The materials of interest will include those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: This second task develops and demonstrates new sensor technologies to determine the in-service health of advanced technology Coal IGCC powerplants, and remains in the program with a reduced scope. Its focus is now on only two critical sensor need areas for advanced Coal IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor for detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation, and a Fuel Heating Value Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware.

  4. Load-following control of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a decentralized control strategy is considered for load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture without flaring the syngas. The control strategy considered is gas turbine (GT) lead with gasifier follow. In this strategy, the GT controls the power load by manipulating its firing rate while the slurry feed flow to the gasifier is manipulated to control the syngas pressure at the GT inlet. However, the syngas pressure control is an integrating process with significant timedelay. In this work, a modified proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control is considered for syngas pressure control given that conventional PID controllers show poor control performance for integrating processes with large time delays. The conventional PID control is augmented with an internal feedback loop. The P-controller used in this internal loop converts the integrating process to an open-loop stable process. The resulting secondorder plus time delay model uses a PID controller where the tuning parameters are found by minimizing the integral time-weighted absolute error (ITAE) for disturbance rejection. A plant model with single integrator and time delay is identified by a P-control method. When a ramp change is introduced in the set-point of the load controller, the performance of both the load and pressure controllers with the modified PID control strategy is found to be superior to that using a traditional PID controller. Key

  5. [Accidents of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants and future].

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    A massive earthquake of magnitude 9 terribly happened far out at sea of Tohoku area on 11 March, 2011. After this earthquake the hugest tsunami in the history came to the hundreds km of the seashore of Tohoku area. Due to this tsunami all of the four nuclear power plants of Fukushima Daiichi lost every electric power and, soon after this, loss nuclear fuels from number 1 to 3 reactors melt through their power containers. According to this phenomena, large amount of the radio-activities have been released in the air. There were some releases but major contaminations happened at the time of the two releases in the morning of 15 March, 2011. Due to this, to the direction of the northwest until the Iitate Village over 30km zone was contaminated. In this paper I explain the time course of the accidents and that how contaminated. PMID:24568025

  6. Coal gasification for electric power generation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D F; Gluckman, M J; Alpert, S B

    1982-03-26

    The electric utility industry is being severely affected by rapidly escalating gas and oil prices, restrictive environmental and licensing regulations, and an extremely tight money market. Integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants have the potential to be economically competitive with present commercial coal-fired power plants while satisfying stringent emission control requirements. The current status of gasification technology is discussed and the critical importance of the 100-megawatt Cool Water IGCC demonstration program is emphasized. PMID:17788466

  7. Microgrids, virtual power plants and our distributed energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Asmus, Peter

    2010-12-15

    Opportunities for VPPs and microgrids will only increase dramatically with time, as the traditional system of building larger and larger centralized and polluting power plants by utilities charging a regulated rate of return fades. The key questions are: how soon will these new business models thrive - and who will be in the driver's seat? (author)

  8. Nuclear Power Plant NDE Challenges - Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S. R.

    2007-03-21

    The operating fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants was built to fossil plant standards (of workmanship, not fitness for service) and with good engineering judgment. Fortuitously, those nuclear power plants were designed using defense-in-depth concepts, with nondestructive examination (NDE) an important layer, so they can tolerate almost any component failure and still continue to operate safely. In the 30+ years of reactor operation, many material failures have occurred. Unfortunately, NDE has not provided the reliability to detect degradation prior to initial failure (breaching the pressure boundary). However, NDE programs have been improved by moving from prescriptive procedures to performance demonstrations that quantify inspection effectiveness for flaw detection probability and sizing accuracy. Other improvements include the use of risk-informed strategies to ensure that reactor components contributing the most risk receive the best and most frequent inspections. Another challenge is the recent surge of interest in building new nuclear power plants in the United States to meet increasing domestic energy demand. New construction will increase the demand for NDE but also offers the opportunity for more proactive inspections. This paper reviews the inception and evolution of NDE for nuclear power plants over the past 40 years, recounts lessons learned, and describes the needs remaining as existing plants continue operation and new construction is contemplated.

  9. Power-Solidarity Relationship of Teachers with Their Future Colleagues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acikalin, Isil

    2007-01-01

    Classroom talk is an example of institutional discourse, based on asymmetrical distribution of communicative rights and obligations between teachers and students. Teachers hold power and solidarity relationships with their students. It has been assumed that, in general, women are more concerned with solidarity while men are more interested in…

  10. State and future of super critical PC power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kjaer, S.

    1996-12-31

    Construction work on two seawater-cooled 400 MW pulverized coal-fired and gas-fired power plants with advanced design parameters for operation in 1997 and 1998 has been initiated by the Danish power company ELSAM. Main steam pressure at the turbine inlet will be 285 Bar (4130 psia) and main steam temperature 580{degrees}C (1076{degrees}F). Double reheat is foreseen at 580{degrees}C (1076{degrees}F) and final feed water temperature will be 300{degrees}C (572{degrees}F). Net efficiency will be 47% on coal and 49% on gas. Information on the design of the super critical tower boilers and the five casing turbo-groups will be presented. ELSAM`s investigations into further improvements in the conversion from coal to electricity above an efficiency of 50% will also be presented. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Nuclear power for the future: Implications of some crisis scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, K.H.

    1996-12-31

    As energy issues have dropped from public awareness, electricity demand growth has remained low, deregulation has destabilized the utility decision process, and least-cost regulation has pointed utilities to gas-fired plants for those additions that are coming on-line, the nuclear power industry has begun to ask the question: What will cause nuclear energy to again compete as an option in new, domestic generating capacity additions? Since virtually all of today`s corporate and societal decisions are driven by short-term factors, the preceding question can be translated into: What crisis might occur that would project nuclear as the solution to an immediately perceived problem? Thus, an examination of scenarios that would project nuclear power into the country`s immediate consciousness is in order, along with an analysis of the implications for and challenges to the nuclear industry resulting therefrom. This paper undertakes such an analysis.

  12. Decommissioning nuclear power plants - the wave of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, F.S. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    The paper discusses the project controls developed in the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. Considerations are given to the contaminated piping and equipment that have to be removed and the spent and used fuel that has to be disposed of. The storage issue is of primary concern here. The cost control aspects and the dynamics of decommissioning are discussed. The effects of decommissioning laws on the construction and engineering firms are mentioned. 5 refs.

  13. High-Power Solar Electric Propulsion for Future NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Hack, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    NASA has sought to utilize high-power solar electric propulsion as means of improving the affordability of in-space transportation for almost 50 years. Early efforts focused on 25 to 50 kilowatt systems that could be used with the Space Shuttle, while later efforts focused on systems nearly an order of magnitude higher power that could be used with heavy lift launch vehicles. These efforts never left the concept development phase in part because the technology required was not sufficiently mature. Since 2012 the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate has had a coordinated plan to mature the requisite solar array and electric propulsion technology needed to implement a 30 to 50 kilowatt solar electric propulsion technology demonstration mission. Multiple solar electric propulsion technology demonstration mission concepts have been developed based on these maturing technologies with recent efforts focusing on an Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission. If implemented, the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle will form the basis for a capability that can be cost-effectively evolved over time to provide solar electric propulsion transportation for a range of follow-on mission applications at power levels in excess of 100 kilowatts.

  14. Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. Discovering Sustainable Solutions to Power and Secure America’s Future

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2010-09-01

    Sustainability is fundamental to the Department of Energy’s research mission and operations as reflected in the Department’s Strategic Plan. Our overarching mission is to discover the solutions to power and secure America’s future.

  15. Pu-powered space probes face uncertain future

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    When fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 crashed into the gas clouds of Jupiter in July, the only representatives of humankind with a good view were a trio of spacecraft, Voyager 2, Galileo, and Ulysses. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) supplied by the Department of Energy provided the power to run the observing instruments on these spacecraft, but now that source of power-and all deep-space missions-may be in jeopardy. Despite the fact that the recently passed congressional appropriations bill increased funding for the RTG program by nearly 20 percent, from $51 million in 1994 to $61 million in 1995, rumors persist that the program is in danger of being discontinued. Peter Ulrich, chief of the Flight Programs Branch of the Solar System Exploration Division of the Office of Space Science at NASA, was confident that the program would stay alive through NASA`s next mission. RTGs will be on board the Cassini spacecraft scheduled to blast off in 1997 for an exploration of Saturn and its rings and moons. RTG`s use the heat produced by the alpha decay of plutonium-238 to heat a thermocouple, which generates electricity. Cassini is designed to carry three RTGs, producing a total of 750 W of electricity initially, decreasing to about 600 W by the time it reaches Saturn seven years after launch. The RTGs on Cassini will carry a total of about 70 lb of plutonium oxide. RTGs have no moving parts. They are simple, rugged, and reliable. According to Ulrich, {open_quotes}It`s really a very well-matched power source for something like a remote mission.{close_quotes} The political situation is less clear, though. {open_quotes}What I hear unofficially is funding looks dime,{close_quotes} said the DOE spokesperson, {open_quotes}and the lights are being turned off for these missions.{close_quotes} If that happens, the lights will go out on NASA`s deep-space missions to other parts of our solar system.

  16. Powering up the future: radical polymers for battery applications.

    PubMed

    Janoschka, Tobias; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2012-12-18

    Our society's dependency on portable electric energy, i.e., rechargeable batteries, which permit power consumption at any place and in any time, will eventually culminate in resource wars on limited commodities like lithium, cobalt, and rare earth metals. The substitution of conventional metals as means of electric charge storage by organic and polymeric materials, which may ultimately be derived from renewable resources, appears to be the only feasible way out. In this context, the novel class of organic radical batteries (ORBs) excelling in rate capability (i.e., charging speed) and cycling stability (>1000 cycles) sets new standards in battery research. This review examines stable nitroxide radical bearing polymers, their processing to battery systems, and their promising performance. PMID:23238940

  17. The Future Potential of Waver Power in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Mirko Previsic; Jeff Epler; Maureen Hand; Donna Heimiller; Walter Short; Kelly Eurek

    2012-09-20

    The theoretical ocean wave energy resource potential exceeds 50% of the annual domestic energy demand of the United States, is located close to coastal population centers, and, although variable in nature, may be more consistent and predictable than some other renewable generation technologies. As a renewable electricity generation technology, ocean wave energy offers a low air pollutant option for diversifying the U.S. electricity generation portfolio. Furthermore, the output characteristics of these technologies may complement other renewable technologies. This study addresses the following: (1) The theoretical, technical and practical potential for electricity generation from wave energy (2) The present lifecycle cost profile (Capex, Opex, and Cost of Electricity) of wave energy conversion technology at a reference site in Northern California at different plant scales (3) Cost of electricity variations as a function of deployment site, considering technical, geo-spatial and and electric grid constraints (4) Technology cost reduction pathways (5) Cost reduction targets at which the technology will see significant deployment within US markets, explored through a series of deployment scenarios RE Vision Consulting, LLC (RE Vision), engaged in various analyses to establish current and future cost profiles for marine hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, quantified the theoretical, technical and practical resource potential, performed electricity market assessments and developed deployment scenarios. RE Vision was supported in this effort by NREL analysts, who compiled resource information, performed analysis using the ReEDSa model to develop deployment scenarios, and developed a simplified assessment of the Alaska and Hawaii electricity markets.

  18. Electric power 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    Subjects covered include: power industry trends - near term fuel strategies - price/quality/delivery/opportunity; generating fleet optimization and plant optimization; power plant safety and security; coal power plants - upgrades and new capacity; IGCC, advanced combustion and CO{sub 2} capture technologies; gas turbine and combined cycle power plants; nuclear power; renewable power; plant operations and maintenance; power plant components - design and operation; environmental; regulatory issues, strategies and technologies; and advanced energy strategies and technologies. The presentations are in pdf format.

  19. Future Power Production by LENR with Thin-Film Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz; Lipson, Andrei; Luo, Nie; Shrestha, P. Joshi

    2007-03-01

    PdD cluster reaction theory was recently proposed to explain a wide range of Low energy Nuclear Reaction (LENR) experiments. If understood and optimized, cluster reactions could lead to a revolutionary new power source of nuclear energy. The route is two-fold. First, the excess heat must be obtained reproducibly and over extended run times. Second, the percentage of excess must be significantly (order of magnitude or more) higher than the 20-50% typically today. The thin film methods described here have proven to be quite reproducible, e.g. providing excess heat of 20-30% in nine consecutive runs of several weeks each. However, mechanical separation of the films occurs over long runs due to the severe mechanical stresses created.. Techniques to overcome these problems are possible using graded bonding techniques similar to that used in high temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Thus the remaining key issue is to increase the excess heat. The cluster model provides import insight into this. G. H. Miley, H. Hora, et al., 233rd Amer Chem Soc Meeting, Chicago, IL, March 25-29, 2007.

  20. Powering future vehicles with the refuelable zinc/air battery

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    A recent road test at LLNL underscored the zinc/air battery`s capacity to give electric vehicles some of the attractive features of gas-driven cars: a 400-km range between refueling, 10-minute refueling, and highway-safe acceleration. Developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the battery weights only one-sixth as much as standard lead/acid batteries and occupies one-third the space, yet costs less per mile to operate. What`s more, because the battery is easily refuelable, it promises trouble-free, nearly 24-hour-a-day operation for numerous kinds of electric vehicles, from forklifts to delivery vans and possibly, one day, personal automobiles. The test of a Santa Barbara Municipal Transit bus with a hybrid of zinc/air and lead/acid batteries capped a short development period for the zinc/air battery. The test run indicated the zinc/air battery`s potential savings in vehicle weight from 5.7 to 4.0 metric tons, in battery weight from 2.0 to 0.3 metric tons, in battery volume from 0.79 to 0.25 m{sup 3}, and in electricity cost from 5.6 cents per mile to 4.7 cents per mile. The power, however, remains the same.

  1. High average power lasers for future particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jay W.; Crane, John K.; Messerly, Michael J.; Prantil, Matthew A.; Pax, Paul H.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Allen, Graham S.; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Phan, Henry H.; Heebner, John E.; Ebbers, Christopher A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Hartouni, Edward P.; Siders, Craig W.; Spinka, Thomas M.; Barty, C. P. J.; Bayramian, Andrew J.; Haefner, Leon C.; Albert, Felicie; Lowdermilk, W. Howard; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Bonanno, Regina E.

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are of increasing interest to the accelerator community and include applications as diverse as stripping electrons from hydrogen atoms, sources for Compton scattering, efficient high repetition rate lasers for dielectric laser acceleration, peta-watt peak power lasers for laser wake field and high energy, short pulse lasers for proton and ion beam therapy. The laser requirements for these applications are briefly surveyed. State of the art of laser technologies with the potential to eventually meet those requirements are reviewed. These technologies include diode pumped solid state lasers (including cryogenic), fiber lasers, OPCPA based lasers and Ti:Sapphire lasers. Strengths and weakness of the various technologies are discussed along with the most important issues to address to get from the current state of the art to the performance needed for the accelerator applications. Efficiency issues are considered in detail as in most cases the system efficiency is a valuable indicator of the actual ability of a given technology to deliver the application requirements.

  2. Wind Generation in the Future Competitive California Power Market

    SciTech Connect

    Sezgen, O.; Marnay, C.; Bretz, S.

    1998-03-01

    renewable capital costs, about 7.35 GW of the 10 GW potential capacity at the 36 specific sites is profitably developed and 62 TWh of electricity produced per annum by the year 2030. Most of the development happens during the earlier years of the forecast. Sensitivity of these results to future gas price scenarios is also presented. This study also demonstrates that an analysis based on a simple levelized profitability calculation approach does not sufficiently capture the implications of time varying prices in a competitive market.

  3. PG&E`s Geysers` Power Plant improvements - past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Louden, P.; Southall, W.; Paquin, C.

    1996-04-10

    Geothermal power plant retrofits can improve plant efficiency, reduce operations and maintenance costs, as well as increase plant availability. All geothermal power producers must find new ways to become more competitive as the electric power industry becomes deregulated. To survive and thrive in the competitive power generation market, geothermal plant operators must continually look for economic power plant upgrades that reduce the cost of production and improve availability. This paper describes past and present power plant retrofits as well as shows how further research can help future plant improvements. Past power plant retrofits at Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s Geysers Power Plants include innovative H{sub 2}S burners that reduced chemical costs and a turbine jack-shaft that improved unit efficiency. Other important retrofits that dramatically reduced turbine forced outage and repair costs were turbine blade and nozzle changes, turbine weld repairs, and steam desuperheating.

  4. Power Systems of the Future: A 21st Century Power Partnership Thought Leadership Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zinaman, O.; Miller, M.; Adil, A.; Arent, D.; Cochran, J.; Vora, R.; Aggarwal, S.; Bipath, M.; Linvill, C.; David, A.; Kauffman, R.; Futch, M.; Villanueva Arcos, E.; Valenzuela, J. M.; Martinot, E.; Bazilian, M.; Pillai, R. K.

    2015-02-01

    This report summarizes key forces driving transformation in the power sector around the world, presents a framework for evaluating decisions regarding extent and pace of change, and defines pathways for transformation. Powerful trends in technology, policy environments, financing, and business models are driving change in power sectors globally. In light of these trends, the question is no longer whether power systems will be transformed, but rather how these transformations will occur. Three approaches to policy and technology decision-making can guide these transformations: adaptive, reconstructive, and evolutionary. Within these approaches, we explore the five pathways that have emerged as viable models for power system transformation.

  5. IGCC repowering project clean coal II project public design report. Annual report, October 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) is participating in a $270 million coal gasification combined cycle repowering project that was designed to provide a nominal 60 MW of electricity to City, Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) in Springfield, Illinois. The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system consists of CE`s air-blown entrained flow two-stage gasifier; an advanced hot gas cleanup system; a combustion turbine adapted to use low-BTU gas; and all necessary coal handling equipment, The project is currently completing the second budget period of five. The major activities to date are: (1) Establishment of a design, cost, and schedule for the project; (2) Establishment of financial commitments; (3) Acquire design and modeling data; (4) Establishment of an approved for design (AFD) engineering package; (5) Development of a detailed cost estimate; (6) Resolution of project business issues; (7) CWL&P renewal and replacement activities; and (8) Application for environmental air permits. A Project Management Plan was generated, The conceptual design of the plant was completed and a cost and schedule baseline for the project was established in Budget Period One. This information was used to establish AFD Process Flow Diagrams, Piping and Instrument Diagrams, Equipment Data Sheets, material take offs, site modification plans and other information necessary to develop a plus or minus 20% cost estimate. Environmental permitting activities were accomplished, including the Air Permit Application, completion of the National Environmental Policy Act process, and the draft Environmental Monitoring Plan. At the end of 1992 the DOE requested that Duke Engineering and Services Inc., (DESI) be used to complete the balance of plant cost estimate. DESI was retained to do this work, DESI completed the material take off estimate and included operations, maintenance, and startup in the estimate.

  6. Degradation of TBC Systems in Environments Relevant to Advanced Gas Turbines for IGCC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, Brian

    2014-09-30

    Air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to provide thermal insulation for the hottest components in gas turbines. Zirconia stabilized with 7wt% yttria (7YSZ) is the most common ceramic top coat used for turbine blades. The 7YSZ coating can be degraded from the buildup of fly-ash deposits created in the power-generation process. Fly ash from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system can result from coal-based syngas. TBCs are also exposed to harsh gas environments containing CO2, SO2, and steam. Degradation from the combined effects of fly ash and harsh gas atmospheres has the potential to severely limit TBC lifetimes. The main objective of this study was to use lab-scale testing to systematically elucidate the interplay between prototypical deposit chemistries (i.e., ash and its constituents, K2SO4, and FeS) and environmental oxidants (i.e., O2, H2O and CO2) on the degradation behavior of advanced TBC systems. Several mechanisms of early TBC failure were identified, as were the specific fly-ash constituents responsible for degradation. The reactivity of MCrAlY bondcoats used in TBC systems was also investigated. The specific roles of oxide and sulfate components were assessed, together with the complex interplay between gas composition, deposit chemistry and alloy reactivity. Bondcoat composition design strategies to mitigate corrosion were established, particularly with regard to controlling phase constitution and the amount of reactive elements the bondcoat contains in order to achieve optimal corrosion resistance.

  7. Tampa electric company - IGCC project. Quarterly report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This quarterly report consists of materials presented at a recent review of the project. The project is an IGCC project being conducted by Tampa Electric Company. The report describes the status of the facility construction, components, operations staff training, and discusses aspects of the project which may impact the final scheduled completion.

  8. Insulation Requirements of High-Voltage Power Systems in Future Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qureshi, A. Haq; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The scope, size, and capability of the nation's space-based activities are limited by the level of electrical power available. Long-term projections show that there will be an increasing demand for electrical power in future spacecraft programs. The level of power that can be generated, conditioned, transmitted, and used will have to be considerably increased to satisfy these needs, and increased power levels will require that transmission voltages also be increased to minimize weight and resistive losses. At these projected voltages, power systems will not operate satisfactorily without the proper electrical insulation. Open or encapsulated power supplies are currently used to keep the volume and weight of space power systems low and to protect them from natural and induced environmental hazards. Circuits with open packaging are free to attain the pressure of the outer environment, whereas encapsulated circuits are imbedded in insulating materials, which are usually solids, but could be liquids or gases. Up to now, solid insulation has usually been chosen for space power systems. If the use of solid insulation is continued, when voltages increase, the amount of insulation for encapsulation also will have to increase. This increased insulation will increase weight and reduce system reliability. Therefore, non-solid insulation media must be examined to satisfy future spacecraft power and voltage demands. In this report, we assess the suitability of liquid, space vacuum, and gas insulation for space power systems.

  9. Coal gasification for power generation. 2nd ed.

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-15

    The report gives an overview of the opportunities for coal gasification in the power generation industry. It provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered in the report include: An overview of coal generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; A description of gasification technology including processes and systems; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; A discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; An evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; A discussion of IGCC project development options; A discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; Profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and A description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

  10. Power and spectrally efficient M-ARY QAM schemes for future mobile satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreenath, K.; Feher, K.

    1990-01-01

    An effective method to compensate nonlinear phase distortion caused by the mobile amplifier is proposed. As a first step towards the future use of spectrally efficient modulation schemes for mobile satellite applications, we have investigated effects of nonlinearities and the phase compensation method on 16-QAM. The new method provides about 2 dB savings in power for 16-QAM operation with cost effective amplifiers near saturation and thereby promising use of spectrally efficient linear modulation schemes for future mobile satellite applications.

  11. The Satellite Nuclear Power Station - An option for future power generation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. R.; Clement, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    A new concept in nuclear power generation is being explored which essentially eliminates major objections to nuclear power. The Satellite Nuclear Power Station, remotely operated in synchronous orbit, would transmit power safely to the ground by a microwave beam. Fuel reprocessing would take place in space and no radioactive materials would ever be returned to earth. Even the worst possible accident to such a plant should have negligible effect on the earth. An exploratory study of a satellite nuclear power station to provide 10,000 MWe to the earth has shown that the system could weigh about 20 million pounds and cost less than $1000/KWe. An advanced breeder reactor operating with an MHD power cycle could achieve an efficiency of about 50% with a 1100 K radiator temperature. If a hydrogen moderated gas core reactor is used, its breeding ratio of 1.10 would result in a fuel doubling time of a few years. A rotating fluidized bed or NERVA type reactor might also be used. The efficiency of power transmission from synchronous orbit would range from 70% to 80%.

  12. Development of Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems for NASA's Future Science Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, A. K.

    2005-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of NASA's current efforts on development of advanced radioisotope power systems (RPS) for future science missions. The current efforts include development of flight qualified Multimission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) systems with nominal 100 watts power level and capability to operate in both deep space and planetary environments. In addition, advanced technology development efforts are being conducted to increase the specific power of both RTG and SRG systems to enable future science missions. The efforts also include new technologies that have the potential to provide significant increases in specific power of RPS system. A notional RPS technology development roadmap will be presented and various potential mission opportunities identified.

  13. Results of the automated power systems management /APSM/ program and future technology implementation. [of spacecraft power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridgeforth, A. O.

    1982-01-01

    The APSM program was initiated in 1975. The purpose of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology and benefits of autonomous operation of planetary spacecraft power systems to meet the projected requirements of future missions. Development of the APSM program was based on implementing a selected set of autonomous functions in a state-of-the-art breadboard power system. A distributed microcomputer system was developed to implement the functions. Several critical programmatic elements were identified as necessary to implement autonomous functions. These elements, including proper skill combination, well defined autonomous functions, and management of the software design and development task, were found to be more significant than hardware management. The incorporation of APSM technology in future space programs is also discussed.

  14. Measure of the impact of future dark energy experiments based on discriminating power among quintessence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Michael; Abrahamse, Augusta; Albrecht, Andreas; Bozek, Brandon; Yashar, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We evaluate the ability of future data sets to discriminate among different quintessence dark energy models. This approach gives an alternative (and complementary) measure for assessing the impact of future experiments, as compared with the large body of literature that compares experiments in abstract parameter spaces (such as the well-known w0-wa parameters) and more recent work that evaluates the constraining power of experiments on individual parameter spaces of specific quintessence models. We use the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) models of future data sets and compare the discriminative power of experiments designated by the DETF as stages 2, 3, and 4 (denoting increasing capabilities). Our work reveals a minimal increase in discriminating power when comparing stage 3 to stage 2, but a very striking increase in discriminating power when going to stage 4 (including the possibility of completely eliminating some quintessence models). We also see evidence that even modest improvements over DETF stage 4 (which many believe are realistic) could result in even more dramatic discriminating power among quintessence dark energy models. We develop and demonstrate the technique of using the independently measured modes of the equation of state (derived from principle component analysis) as a common parameter space in which to compare the different quintessence models, and we argue that this technique is a powerful one. We use the PNGB, Exponential, Albrecht-Skordis, and Inverse Tracker (or inverse power law) quintessence models for this work. One of our main results is that the goal of discriminating among these models sets a concrete measure on the capabilities of future dark energy experiments. Experiments have to be somewhat better than DETF stage 4 simulated experiments to fully meet this goal.

  15. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ritterbusch, Stanley; Golay, Michael; Duran, Felicia; Galyean, William; Gupta, Abhinav; Dimitrijevic, Vesna; Malsch, Marty

    2003-01-29

    OAK B188 Summary of methods proposed for risk informing the design and regulation of future nuclear power plants. All elements of the historical design and regulation process are preserved, but the methods proposed for new plants use probabilistic risk assessment methods as the primary decision making tool.

  16. Design of Ultra-High-Power-Density Machine Optimized for Future Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin B.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch is developing a compact, nonpolluting, bearingless electric machine with electric power supplied by fuel cells for future "more-electric" aircraft with specific power in the projected range of 50 hp/lb, whereas conventional electric machines generate usually 0.2 hp/lb. The use of such electric drives for propulsive fans or propellers depends on the successful development of ultra-high-power-density machines. One possible candidate for such ultra-high-power-density machines, a round-rotor synchronous machine with an engineering current density as high as 20,000 A/sq cm, was selected to investigate how much torque and power can be produced.

  17. Marginal Power Loss Extraction Method for Future High Output Power Density Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takao, Kazuto; Adachi, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Yusuke; Ohashi, Hiromichi

    Novel exact MOSFET switching loss analysis and formulation methods have been proposed for designing high output power density converters. To analyze influences of circuit stray parameters on MOSFET switching loss with experiments, a parameter adjustable circuit board has been fabricated. The circuit board has a function to vary circuit stray inductance and capacitance values like a circuit simulator. Correlations between MOSFET switching loss energies and circuit stray parameters are successfully analyzed with the circuit board. Based on the analysis results, switching loss energies are formulated with empirical equations to establish a exact power loss calculation tool for the converter design. Switching loss energies caused by semiconductor device parameters are modeled by a capacitance charge/discharge model. The procedure to formulate the switching loss energies with empirical equations is presented. Switching loss energies calculated with empirical equations are verified with measurements, and high accuracy of more than 95% has been achieved.

  18. Synthetic fuels development in Kentucky: Four scenarios for an energy future as constructed from lessons of the past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musulin, Mike, II

    The continued failure of synthetic fuels development in the United States to achieve commercialization has been documented through the sporadic periods of mounting corporate and government enthusiasm and high levels of research and development efforts. Four periods of enthusiasm at the national level were followed by waning intervals of shrinking financial support and sagging R&D work. The continuing cycle of mobilization and stagnation has had a corresponding history in Kentucky. To better understand the potential and the pitfalls of this type of technological development the history of synthetic fuels development in the United States is presented as background, with a more detailed analysis of synfuels development in Kentucky. The first two periods of interest in synthetic fuels immediately after the Second World War and in the 1950s did not result in any proposed plants for Kentucky, but the third and fourth periods of interest created a great deal of activity. A theoretically grounded case study is utilized in this research project to create four different scenarios for the future of synthetic fuels development. The Kentucky experience is utilized in this case study because a fifth incarnation of synthetic fuels development has been proposed for the state in the form of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant (IGCC) to utilize coal and refuse derived fuel (RDF). The project has been awarded a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology program. From an examination and analysis of these periods of interest and the subsequent dwindling of interest and participation, four alternative scenarios are constructed. A synfuels breakthrough scenario is described whereby IGCC becomes a viable part of the country's energy future. A multiplex scenario describes how IGCC becomes a particular niche in energy production. The status quo scenario describes how the old patterns of project failure repeat themselves. The fourth scenario describes

  19. IGCC and PFBC By-Products: Generation, Characteristics, and Management Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

    1997-09-01

    The following report is a compilation of data on by-products/wastes from clean coal technologies, specifically integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). DOE had two objectives in providing this information to EPA: (1) to familiarize EPA with the DOE CCT program, CCT by-products, and the associated efforts by DOE contractors in the area of CCT by-product management and (2) to provide information that will facilitate EPA's effort by complementing similar reports from industry groups, including CIBO (Council of Industrial Boiler Owners) and EEI USWAG (Edison Electric Institute Utility Solid Waste Activities Group). The EERC cooperated and coordinated with DOE CCT contractors and industry groups to provide the most accurate and complete data on IGCC and PFBC by-products, although these technologies are only now being demonstrated on the commercial scale through the DOE CCT program.

  20. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems, Volume 4. Appendix C: Design and performance of standardized fixed bed air-blown gasifier IGCC systems for future electric power generation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    This appendix is a compilation of work done to predict overall cycle performance from gasifier to generator terminals. A spreadsheet has been generated for each case to show flows within a cycle. The spreadsheet shows gaseous or solid composition of flow, temperature of flow, quantity of flow, and heat heat content of flow. Prediction of steam and gas turbine performance was obtained by the computer program GTPro. Outputs of all runs for each combined cycle reviewed has been added to this appendix. A process schematic displaying all flows predicted through GTPro and the spreadsheet is also added to this appendix. The numbered bubbles on the schematic correspond to columns on the top headings of the spreadsheet.

  1. High-Temperature Corrosion in Fossil Fuel Power Generation: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, B. A.

    2013-08-01

    Fossil fuels have historically represented two-thirds of all electricity generation in the United States and are projected to continue to play a similar role despite historically low projected growth rates in electricity demand and the recent dramatic shift from coal to more natural gas usage. Economic and environmental drivers will require more reliable and efficient fossil fuel generation systems in the future, likely with new system designs, higher operating temperatures, and more aggressive environments. Some of the current corrosion issues in power plants are reviewed along with research on materials solutions for systems envisioned for the near future, such as coal gasification and oxy-fired coal boilers.

  2. FutureGen: Stepping-Stone to Sustainable Fossil-Fuel Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.E.

    2006-11-01

    This presentation will highlight the U.S. Department of Energy's FutureGen Initiative. The nearly $1 billion government-industry project is a stepping-stone toward future coal-fired power plants that will produce hydrogen and electricity with zero-emissions, including carbon dioxide. The 275-megawatt FutureGen plant will initiate operations around 2012 and employ advanced coal gasification technology integrated with combined cycle electricity generation, hydrogen production, and carbon capture and sequestration. The initiative is a response to a presidential directive to develop a hydrogen economy by drawing upon the best scientific research to address the issue of global climate change. The FutureGen plant will be based on cutting-edge power generation technology as well as advanced carbon capture and sequestration systems. The centerpiece of the project will be coal gasification technology that can eliminate common air pollutants such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides and convert them to useable by-products. Gasification will convert coal into a highly enriched hydrogen gas, which can be burned much more cleanly than directly burning the coal itself. Alternatively, the hydrogen can be used in a fuel cell to produce ultra-clean electricity, or fed to a refinery to help upgrade petroleum products. Carbon sequestration will also be a key feature that will set the Futuregen plant apart from other electric power plant projects. The initial goal will be to capture 90 percent of the plant's carbon dioxide, but capture of nearly 100 percent may be possible with advanced technologies. Once captured, the carbon dioxide will be injected as a compressed fluid deep underground, perhaps into saline reservoirs. It could even be injected into oil or gas reservoirs, or into unmineable coal seams, to enhance petroleum or coalbed methane recovery. The ultimate goal for the FutureGen plant is to show how new technology can eliminate environmental concerns over the future use of

  3. The future of nuclear energy: A perspective on nuclear power development

    SciTech Connect

    Sackett, J. I.

    2000-04-03

    The author begins by discussing the history of nuclear power development in the US. He discusses the challenges for nuclear power such as the proliferation of weapons material, waste management, economics, and safety. He then discusses the future for nuclear power, specifically advanced reactor development. People can all be thankful for nuclear power, for it may well be essential to the long term survival of civilization. Within the seeds of its potential for great good, are also the seeds for great harm. People must ensure that it is applied for great good. What is not in question is whether people can live without it, they cannot. United States leadership is crucial in determining how this technology is developed and applied. The size and capability of the United States technical community is decreasing, a trend that cannot be allowed to continue. It is the author's belief that in the future, the need, the vision and the confidence in nuclear power will be restored, but only if the US addresses the immediate challenges. It is a national challenge worthy of the best people this nation has to offer.

  4. US power plant sites at risk of future sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkandt, R.; Auffhammer, M.; Levermann, A.

    2015-12-01

    Unmitigated greenhouse gas emissions may increase global mean sea-level by about 1 meter during this century. Such elevation of the mean sea-level enhances the risk of flooding of coastal areas. We compute the power capacity that is currently out-of-reach of a 100-year coastal flooding but will be exposed to such a flood by the end of the century for different US states, if no adaptation measures are taken. The additional exposed capacity varies strongly among states. For Delaware it is 80% of the mean generated power load. For New York this number is 63% and for Florida 43%. The capacity that needs additional protection compared to today increases by more than 250% for Texas, 90% for Florida and 70% for New York. Current development in power plant building points towards a reduced future exposure to sea-level rise: proposed and planned power plants are less exposed than those which are currently operating. However, power plants that have been retired or canceled were less exposed than those operating at present. If sea-level rise is properly accounted for in future planning, an adaptation to sea-level rise may be costly but possible.

  5. A Basic Study Toward Optimization of LFC Resources in Future Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Yoshihiko; Masuda, Ryoichi; Sugita, Shinya

    Load frequency control (LFC) in future power systems, in which a large amount of solar photovoltaic generation is introduced, is studied. The constraints in LFC resources are classified as rate, simple, and energy limits. First the nonlinear transfer functions of the limiters are modeled using random noise input. Second the transfer functions of limiters are characterized by coefficients of necessary facilities (CoNF). Third the appropriateness of concept and identified value of CoNF is demonstrated through numerical simulations using a simple power system model. Also a way to control the contribution of existing and introducing resources to regulation of frequency fluctuation is proposed and demonstrated.

  6. Current and Future Costs for Parabolic Trough and Power Tower Systems in the US Market: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C.; Mehos, M.; Ho, C. K.; Kolb, G. J.

    2010-10-01

    NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is employed to estimate the current and future costs for parabolic trough and molten salt power towers in the US market. Future troughs are assumed to achieve higher field temperatures via the successful deployment of low melting-point, molten-salt heat transfer fluids by 2015-2020. Similarly, it is assumed that molten salt power towers are successfully deployed at 100MW scale over the same time period, increasing to 200MW by 2025. The levelized cost of electricity for both technologies is predicted to drop below 11 cents/kWh (assuming a 10% investment tax credit and other financial inputs outlined in the paper), making the technologies competitive in the marketplace as benchmarked by the California MPR. Both technologies can be deployed with large amounts of thermal energy storage, yielding capacity factors as high as 65% while maintaining an optimum LCOE.

  7. The History and Future of NDE in the Management of Nuclear Power Plant Materials Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-04-01

    The author has spent more than 25 years conducting engineering and research studies to quantify the performance of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) in nuclear power plant (NPP) applications and identifying improvements to codes and standards for NDE to manage materials degradation. This paper will review this fundamental NDE engineering/research work and then look to the future on how NDE can be optimized for proactively managing materials degradation in NPP components.

  8. The role of advanced technology in the future of the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, T.F.

    1994-10-01

    This presentation reviews the directions that technology has given the power generation industry in the past and how advanced technology will be the key for the future of the industry. The topics of the presentation include how the industry`s history has defined its culture, how today`s economic and regulatory climate has constrained its strategy, and how certain technology options might give some of the players an unfair advantage.

  9. The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

    1990-12-01

    A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing.

  10. The impact of H2S emissions on future geothermal power generation - The Geysers region, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.

    1977-01-01

    The future potential for geothermal power generation in the Geysers region of California is as much as 10 times the current 502 MW(e) capacity. However, environmental factors such as H2S emissions and institutional considerations may play the primary role in determining the rate and ultimate level of development. In this paper a scenario of future geothermal generation capacity and H2S emissions in the Geysers region is presented. Problem areas associated with H2S emissions, H2S abatement processes, plant operations, and government agency resources are described. The impact of H2S emissions on future development and the views of effected organizations are discussed. Potential actions needed to remove these constraints are summarized.

  11. High-power beam combining: a step to a future laser weapon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protz, Rudolf; Zoz, Jürgen; Geidek, Franz; Dietrich, Stephan; Fall, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Due to the enormous progress in the field of high-power fiber lasers during the last years commercial industrial fiber lasers are now available, which deliver a near-diffraction limited beam with power levels up to10kW. For the realization of a future laser weapon system, which can be used for Counter-RAM or similar air defence applications, a laser source with a beam power at the level of 100kW or more is required. At MBDA Germany the concept for a high-energy laser weapon system is investigated, which is based on such existing industrial laser sources as mentioned before. A number of individual high-power fiber laser beams are combined together, using one common beam director telescope. By this "geometric" beam coupling scheme, sufficient laser beam power for an operational laser weapon system can be achieved. The individual beams from the different lasers are steered by servo-loops, using fast tip-tilt mirrors. This principle enables the concentration of the total laser beam power at the common focal point on a distant target, also allowing fine tracking of target movements and first order compensation of turbulence effects on laser beam propagation. The proposed beam combination concept was demonstrated using several experimental set-ups. Different experiments were performed, to investigate laser beam target interaction and target fine tracking also at large distances. Content and results of these investigations are reported. An example for the lay-out of an Air Defence High Energy Laser Weapon (ADHELW ) is given. It can be concluded, that geometric high-power beam combining is an important step for the realization of a laser weapon system in the near future.

  12. Technology status and project development risks of advanced coal power generation technologies in APEC developing economies

    SciTech Connect

    Lusica, N.; Xie, T.; Lu, T.

    2008-10-15

    The report reviews the current status of IGCC and supercritical/ultrasupercritical pulverized-coal power plants and summarizes risks associated with project development, construction and operation. The report includes an economic analysis using three case studies of Chinese projects; a supercritical PC, an ultrasupercritical PC, and an IGCC plant. The analysis discusses barriers to clean coal technologies and ways to encourage their adoption for new power plants. 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  13. CE IGCC repowering project: Clean Coal II Project. Annual report, 1 January, 1992--31 December, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    CE is participating in a $270 million coal gasification combined cycle repowering project that will provide a nominal 60 MW of electricity to City, Water, light and Power (CWL and P) in Springfield, Illinois. The IGCC system will consist of CE`s air-blown entrained flow two-stage gasifier; an advanced hot gas cleanup system; a combustion turbine adapted to use low-Btu gas: and all necessary coal handling equipment. The project is currently in the second budget period of five. The major activities during this budgeted period are: Establishment of an approved for design (AFD) engineering package; development of a detailed cost estimate; resolution of project business issues; CWL and P renewal and replacement activities; and application for environmental air permits. The Project Management Plan was updated. The conceptual design of the plant was completed and a cost and schedule baseline for the project was established previously in Budget Period One. This information was used to establish AFD Process Flow Diagrams, Piping and Instrument Diagrams, Equipment Data Sheets, material take offs, site modification plans and other information necessary to develop a plus or minus 20% cost estimate. Environmental permitting activities are continuing. At the end of 1992 the major activities remaining for Budget Period two is to finish the cost estimate and complete the Continuation Request Documents.

  14. Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect

    Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

    2010-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

  15. Markov chain algorithms: a template for building future robust low-power systems

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Biplab; Birklykke, Alex A.; Duwe, Henry; Mansinghka, Vikash K.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Although computational systems are looking towards post CMOS devices in the pursuit of lower power, the expected inherent unreliability of such devices makes it difficult to design robust systems without additional power overheads for guaranteeing robustness. As such, algorithmic structures with inherent ability to tolerate computational errors are of significant interest. We propose to cast applications as stochastic algorithms based on Markov chains (MCs) as such algorithms are both sufficiently general and tolerant to transition errors. We show with four example applications—Boolean satisfiability, sorting, low-density parity-check decoding and clustering—how applications can be cast as MC algorithms. Using algorithmic fault injection techniques, we demonstrate the robustness of these implementations to transition errors with high error rates. Based on these results, we make a case for using MCs as an algorithmic template for future robust low-power systems. PMID:24842030

  16. Demand-Supply Balancing Capability Analysis for a Future Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogimoto, Kazuhiko; Kataoka, Kazuto; Ikegami, Takashi; Nonaka, Shunsuke; Azuma, Hitoshi; Fukutome, Suguru

    Under the anticipated high penetration of variable renewable energy generation such as photovoltaics and higher share of nuclear generation, the issue of supply-demand balancing capability should be evaluated and fixed in a future power system. Improvement of existing balancing measures and new technologies such as demand activation and energy storage are expected to solve the issue. Under the situation, a long-range power system supply-demand analysis should have the capability to evaluate the balancing capability and balancing counter measures. This paper presents a new analysis methodology of activated demand model and evaluation of supply-demand balancing capability for a long-range power system demand-supply analysis model, ESPRIT. Model analysis was made to verify the new methodology of the tool including day-ahead scheduling of a heat pump water heater, an EV/PHEV and a battery.

  17. The assessment of future extremes of air temperature to design EPR type power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parey, S.; Hoang, T. T. H.; Dacunha-Castelle, D.

    2010-09-01

    EDF projects the construction of new EPR type nuclear power plants in Europe. These installations are likely to run until the second half of the century, and thus, it is necessary to think their dimensioning in taking current knowledge of climate change impact into account. This paper will present the study dedicated to the estimation of future extremes of air temperature by using the statistical extreme value theory. The adopted methodology consists firstly in comparing current climate temperature extremes between local observations and models at the nearest grid point. Then, if the extremes of both series are comparable, future extremes are derived from the modelled series for a future period. In parallel, the link between the evolution of the mean, variance and extremes is studied in the observation series. If a strong link is identified, future extremes are derived from the stationary extremes of the centred and normalised series and the changes in mean and variance given by climate models for the desired future period. The approach will be illustrated with an example of such an evaluation for an EPR project in the United Kingdom.

  18. Concentrated solar power generation: Firm and dispatchable capacity for Brazil's solar future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschek, Jan; Haasz, Thomas; Fahl, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    The Brazilian electricity mix is currently dominated by renewable energy forms, foremost hydropower. Large additional capacity demands are expected in the mid-term future but additional potential for hydro power is limited. In addition it is planned to construct more than 17 GW of wind power and additional capacity of photovoltaics (PV). Due to the fluctuating nature of such renewables, however, wind and PV are hardly able to provide firm capacity. Concentrated solar power (CSP) might be a feasible option to provide firm and dispatchable capacity at low carbon emissions. This study analyses the opportunities for integrating CSP into the Brazilian energy system. Making use of the TiPS-B model, a novel application of the optimization model generator TIMES, we compare different climate protection strategies with a reference scenario and analyze the contribution of CSP to the electricity mix. The analysis covers various types of CSP power plants with molten salt energy storage where we look at possible dispatch strategies considering the fluctuations in electricity supply and use. The consideration of solar water heaters (SWH) is the first step to transfer the power system model to an energy system model that is capable of showing the benefits of energy saving measures on the demand side. It can be demonstrated that the Brazilian power system is likely to change significantly in future. This development would go hand in hand with a strong increase in carbon emissions if no mitigation actions are taken and fossil fueled power plants are used to fill the gap in capacity. CSP power plants are found as a feasible alternative for covering the demand while taking carbon mitigation actions. In a scenario, aiming at 4 and 2 degrees global warming, CSP provides for 7.6 GW and 14.6 GW capacity in 2050, respectively. Different storage configurations are used to provide energy in the evening hours to cover the demand peak providing a strong benefit over photovoltaic electricity

  19. What are the Historical and Future Impacts of Temperature Variability on Thermoelectric Power Plant Performance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, C.; Pratson, L.

    2015-12-01

    Current literature hypothesize that climate change-driven temperature increases will negatively affect the power production capacity of thermoelectric power plants, which currently produce ~88% of electricity used in the United States. This impact can occur through 1) warm cooling water that reduces the quantity of heat removed from the once-through (open-loop) steam system, 2) increased air temperature and/or humidity that decrease the amount of heat absorption in cooling towers/ponds of wet-recirculating (closed-loop) plants, and 3) environmental protection regulations that impose restrictions on both cooling water withdrawal volume and temperature of discharge. However, despite the widespread consensus that temperature and power generation are negatively related, different models yield a range of results and the magnitude of effects is uncertain. In this study, we test current literature's model predictions using historical data by assembling and analyzing a database of relevant parameters from distinct sources. We examine how daily and seasonal changes in cooling water, ambient air, and wet bulb temperatures have historically impacted coal and natural gas power plants in the U.S., focusing on 39 plants over a period up to 14 years. This allows us to assess how future changes in temperatures may affect generation. Our results suggest that water and ambient air temperatures have a lower impact on thermoelectric plant performance than previously predicted. Moreover, we find that recirculating power plants are more resilient to temperature variability than are once-through plants.

  20. Future Market Share of Space Solar Electric Power Under Open Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Mahasenan, N.; Clarke, J. F.; Edmonds, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper assesses the value of Space Solar Power deployed under market competition with a full suite of alternative energy technologies over the 21st century. Our approach is to analyze the future energy system under a number of different scenarios that span a wide range of possible future demographic, socio-economic, and technological developments. Scenarios both with, and without, carbon dioxide concentration stabilization policies are considered. We use the comprehensive set of scenarios created for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (Nakicenovic and Swart 2000). The focus of our analysis will be the cost of electric generation. Cost is particularly important when considering electric generation since the type of generation is, from a practical point of view, largely irrelevant to the end-user. This means that different electricity generation technologies must compete on the basis of price. It is important to note, however, that even a technology that is more expensive than average can contribute to the overall generation mix due to geographical and economic heterogeneity (Clarke and Edmonds 1993). This type of competition is a central assumption of the modeling approach used here. Our analysis suggests that, under conditions of full competition of all available technologies, Space Solar Power at 7 cents per kW-hr could comprise 5-10% of global electric generation by the end of the century, with a global total generation of 10,000 TW-hr. The generation share of Space Solar Power is limited due to competition with lower-cost nuclear, biomass, and terrestrial solar PV and wind. The imposition of a carbon constraint does not significantly increase the total amount of power generated by Space Solar Power in cases where a full range of advanced electric generation technologies are also available. Potential constraints on the availability of these other electric generation options can increase the amount of

  1. Degradation of thermal barrier coatings on an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) simulated film-cooled turbine vane pressure surface due to particulate fly ash deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kevin

    Coal synthesis gas (syngas) can introduce contaminants into the flow of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) industrial gas turbine which can form molten deposits onto components of the first stage of a turbine. Research is being conducted at West Virginia University (WVU) to study the effects of particulate deposition on thermal barrier coatings (TBC) employed on the airfoils of an IGCC turbine hot section. WVU had been working with U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to simulate deposition on the pressure side of an IGCC turbine first stage vane to study the effects on film cooling. To simulate the particulate deposition, TBC coated, angled film-cooled test articles were subjected to accelerated deposition injected into the flow of a combustor facility with a pressure of approximately 4 atm and a gas temperature of 1560 K. The particle characteristics between engine conditions and laboratory are matched using the Stokes number and particulate loading. To investigate the degradation on the TBC from the particulate deposition, non-destructive evaluations were performed using a load-based multiple-partial unloading micro-indentation technique and were followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) examinations. The micro-indentation technique used in the study was developed by Kang et al. and can quantitatively evaluate the mechanical properties of materials. The indentation results found that the Young's Modulus of the ceramic top coat is higher in areas with deposition formation due to the penetration of the fly ash. The increase in the modulus of elasticity has been shown to result in a reduction of strain tolerance of the 7% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) TBC coatings. The increase in the Young's modulus of the ceramic top coat is due to the stiffening of the YSZ columnar microstructure from the cooled particulate fly ash. SEM evaluation was used to

  2. Observing trans-Planckian ripples in the primordial power spectrum with future large scale structure probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Sloth, Martin S; Wong, Yvonne Y Y E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk E-mail: ywong@mppmu.mpg.de

    2008-09-15

    We revisit the issue of ripples in the primordial power spectra caused by trans-Planckian physics, and the potential for their detection by future cosmological probes. We find that for reasonably large values of the first slow-roll parameter {epsilon} ({approx}>0.001), a positive detection of trans-Planckian ripples can be made even if the amplitude is as low as 10{sup -4}. Data from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and the proposed future 21 cm survey with the Fast Fourier Transform Telescope (FFTT) will be particularly useful in this regard. If the scale of inflation is close to its present upper bound, a scale of new physics as high as {approx}0.2 M{sub P} could lead to observable signatures.

  3. Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-08-01

    OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

  4. Potential Impact of the National Plan for Future Electric Power Supply on Air Quality in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, C.; Hong, J.

    2014-12-01

    Korean Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE) announced the national plan for Korea's future electric power supply (2013 - 2027) in 2013. According to the plan, the national demand for electricity will be increased by 60% compared to that of 2010 and primary energy sources for electric generation will still lean on the fossil fuels such as petroleum, LNG, and coal, which would be a potential threat to air quality of Korea. This study focused on two subjects: (1) How the spatial distribution of the primary air pollutant's emissions (i.e., NOx, SOx, CO, PM) will be changed and (2) How the primary emission changes will influence on the national ambient air quality including ozone in 2027. We used GEOS-Chem model simulation with modification of Korean emissions inventory (Clean Air Policy Support System (CAPSS)) to simulate the current and future air quality in Korea. The national total emissions of CO, NOx, SOx, PM in year 2027 will be increased by 3%, 8%, 13%, 2%, respectively compared to 2010 and there are additional concern that the future location of the power plants will be closer to the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA), where there are approximately 20 million population vulnerable to the potentially worsened air quality. While there are slight increase of concentration of CO, NOx, SOx, and PM in 2027, the O3 concentration is expected to be similar to the level of 2010. Those results may imply the characteristics of air pollution in East Asia such as potentially severe O3 titration and poorer O3/CO or O3/NOx ratio. Furthermore, we will discuss on the impact of transboundary pollution transport from China in the future, which is one of the large factors to control the air quality of Korea.

  5. Combined Heat and Power: A Decade of Progress, A Vision for the Future

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-08-01

    Over the past 10 years, DOE has built a solid foundation for a robust CHP marketplace. We have aligned with key partners to produce innovative technologies and spearhead market-transforming projects. Our commercialization activities and Clean Energy Regional Application Centers have expanded CHP across the nation. More must be done to tap CHP’s full potential. Read more about DOE’s CHP Program in “Combined Heat and Power: A Decade of Progress, A Vision for the Future.”

  6. Thermal effects in high power cavities for photoneutralization of D- beams in future neutral beam injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Feng, Jiatai; Pichot, Mikhaël; Chaibi, Walid

    2015-04-01

    Photoneutralization may represent a key issue in the neutral beam injectors for future fusion reactors. In fact, photodetachment based neutralization combined with an energy recovery system increase the injector overall efficiency up to 60%. This is the SIPHORE injector concept in which photoneutralization is realized in a refolded cavity [1]. However, about 1 W of the several megaWatts intracavity power is absorbed by the mirrors coatings and gives rise to important thermoelastic distortions. This is expected to change the optical behavior of the mirrors and reduce the enhancement factor of the cavity. In this paper, we estimate these effects and we propose a thermal system to compensate it.

  7. PNNL Future Power Grid Initiative-developed GridOPTICS Software System (GOSS)

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-03

    The power grid is changing and evolving. One aspect of this change is the growing use of smart meters and other devices, which are producing large volumes of useful data. However, in many cases, the data can’t be translated quickly into actionable guidance to improve grid performance. There's a need for innovative tools. The GridOPTICS(TM) Software System, or GOSS, developed through PNNL's Future Power Grid Initiative, is open source and became publicly available in spring 2014. The value of this middleware is that it easily integrates grid applications with sources of data and facilitates communication between them. Such a capability provides a foundation for developing a range of applications to improve grid management.

  8. An intelligent man-machine system for future nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Takizawa, Yoji; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Juichiro; Fukumoto, Akira . Nuclear Engineering Lab.)

    1994-07-01

    The objective of the development of an intelligent man-machine system for future nuclear power plants is enhancement of operational reliability by applying recent advances in cognitive science, artificial intelligence, and computer technologies. To realize this objective, the intelligent man-machine system, aiming to support a knowledge-based decision making process in an operator's supervisory plant control tasks, consists of three main functions, i.e., a cognitive model-based advisor, a robust automatic sequence controller, and an ecological interface. These three functions have been integrated into a console-type nuclear power plant monitoring and control system as a validation test bed. The validation tests in which experienced operator crews participated were carried out in 1991 and 1992. The test results show the usefulness of the support functions and the validity of the system design approach.

  9. Current status and future trends in computer modeling of high-power travelling-wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    DeHope, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    The interaction of a slow electromagnetic wave and a linear propagating electron stream has been utilized for many years for microwave amplification. Pulsed devices of high peak and average power typically are based on periodic, filter-type circuits and interaction takes place on the first forward-wave branch of a fundamental backward-wave dispersion curve. These devices have served as useful test vehicles over the years in the development of advanced computational methods and models. A working relationship has thereby developed between the plasma computation community and the microwave tube industry. The talk will describe the operational principles and design steps in modern, high-power TWT development. The major computational stages that the industry has seen over the last four decades in both 2-d and 3-d modeling will be reviewed and comments made on their relevancy to current work and future trends.

  10. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-10-29

    The U.S. wind power industry is in an era of substantial growth, with the U.S. and China likely to vie for largest-market status for years to come. With the market evolving at such a rapid pace, keeping up with current trends in the marketplace has become increasingly difficult. At the same time, limits to future growth are uncertain. This paper summarizes major trends in the U.S. wind market, and explores the technical and economic feasibility of achieving much greater levels of wind penetration. China would be well served to conduct similar analyses of the feasibility, benefits, challenges, and policy needs associated with much higher levels of wind power generation than currently expressed in national targets.

  11. Present and future nuclear power generation as a reflection of individual countries' resources and objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.

    1987-06-26

    The nuclear reactor industry has been in a state of decline for more than a decade in most of the world. The reasons are numerous and often unique to the energy situation of individual countries. Two commonly cited issues influence decisions relating to construction of reactors: costs and the need, or lack thereof, for additional generating capacity. Public concern has ''politicized'' the nuclear industry in many non-communist countries, causing a profound effect on the economics of the option. The nuclear installations and future plans are reviewed on a country-by-country basis for 36 countries in the light of the resources and objectives of each. Because oil and gas for power production throughout the world are being phased out as much as possible, coal-fired generation currently tends to be the chosen alternative to nuclear power production. Exceptions occur in many of the less developed countries that collectively have a very limited operating experience with nuclear reactors. The Chernobyl accident in the USSR alarmed the public; however, national strategies and plans to build reactors have not changed markedly in the interim. Assuming that the next decade of nuclear power generation is uneventful, additional electrical demand would cause the nuclear power industry to experience a rejuvenation in Europe as well as in the US. 80 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

  12. Modelling the energy future of Switzerland after the phase out of nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Paula; Van Vliet, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    In September 2013, the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) published the final report of the proposed measures in the context of the Energy Strategy 2050 (ES2050). The ES2050 draws an energy scenario where the nuclear must be substituted by alternative sources. This implies a fundamental change in the energy system that has already been questioned by experts, e.g. [Piot, 2014]. Therefore, we must analyse in depth the technical implications of change in the Swiss energy mix from a robust baseload power such as nuclear, to an electricity mix where intermittent sources account for higher rates. Accomplishing the ES2050 imply difficult challenges, since nowadays nuclear power is the second most consumed energy source in Switzerland. According to the SFOE, nuclear accounts for a 23.3% of the gross production, only surpassed by crude oil products (43.3%). Hydropower is the third source more consumed, representing approximately the half of the nuclear (12.2%). Considering that Switzerland has almost reached the maximum of its hydropower capacity, renewables are more likely to be the alternative when the nuclear phase out takes place. Hence, solar and wind power will play an important role in the future Swiss energy mix, even though currently new renewables account for only 1.9% of the gross energy consumption. In this study we look for realistic and efficient combinations of energy resources to substitute nuclear power. Energy modelling is a powerful tool to design an energy system with high energy security that avoids problems of intermittency [Mathiesen & Lund, 2009]. In Switzerland, energy modelling has been used by the government [Abt et. al., 2012] and also has significant relevance in academia [Mathys, 2012]. Nevertheless, we detected a gap in the study of the security in energy scenarios [Busser, 2013]. This study examines the future electricity production of Switzerland using Calliope, a multi-scale energy systems model, developed at Imperial College, London and

  13. The Belem Framework for Action: Harnessing the Power and Potential of Adult Learning and Education for a Viable Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Learning, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the Belem Framework for Action. This framework focuses on harnessing the power and potential of adult learning and education for a viable future. This framework begins with a preamble on adult education and towards lifelong learning.

  14. Moving to a low-carbon future: perspectives on nuclear and alternative power sources.

    PubMed

    Morgan, M Granger

    2007-11-01

    This paper summarizes key findings from climate science to make the case that the United States (and ultimately the world) will need to dramatically reduce carbon dioxide emissions from the energy system over the next few decades. While transportation energy is an important consideration, the focus of this paper is on electric power. Today, the United States generates just over half of its electric power from coal. The average size-weighted age of the fleet of U.S. coal plants is 35 y, and many will have to be replaced in the next few years. If that capacity were to be replaced with new conventional coal plants, it would commit the nation (and the world) to many more decades of high carbon-dioxide emissions, or it would make the cost of meeting a future carbon-dioxide emission constraint much higher than it needs to be. A range of low- and no-carbon energy technologies offers great potential to create a portfolio of options that can dramatically reduce emissions. A few of the advantages and disadvantages of these technologies are discussed. Policy and regulatory advances that will be needed to move the energy system to a low-carbon future are identified. PMID:18049235

  15. Climate services for energy production: are regional climate models reliable for future solar power generation scenarios?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitta, Marcello; Castelli, Mariapina; Calmanti, Sandro

    2013-04-01

    In this study we present an analysis of surface solar radiation from Regional Climate Models (RCMs) scenario simulations produced during the ENSEMBLES project in order to understand the relation between changes in atmospheric properties and variation of the energy produced by solar power plants. Several studies have recently pointed out the inability and the scarce accuracy of IPCC models in capturing the past decadal variability of Surface Solar Radiation (SSR) (Wild 2009, Wild et al 2010). Most of these works compare observed and estimated SSR for the last 6-7 decades and show that only half of the models are able to reproduce partially the observed decrease (global dimming) and the increase (global brightening) in SSR which occurred respectively in the time intervals 1950-1980 and 1990-2000. We focus on the Euro-Mediterranean area and we compare the SSR data for the period 1951-2000 in order to assess the error associated to the model ensemble. Furthermore we analyze the XXI century regional ENSEMBLES scenarios in order to quantify potential future changes of SSR. The preliminary results obtained so far confirm the findings of Wild et al. for the period 1950-2000. For the future, the analysis shows a positive linear trend over the Mediterranean region. On the other hand, most of the models predict a negative linear trend over Central Europe. We also discuss future energy strategies considering the variability of energy production from solar panels estimated by probabilistic climate change scenarios.

  16. HVDC submarine power cables systems state of the art and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Valenza, D.; Cipollini, G.

    1995-12-31

    The paper begins with an introduction on the reasons that lead to the use of HVDC submarine cable links. The main aspects for the choice of direct current are presented as well as the advantages deriving from the utilization of submarine cables. The second part is dedicated to a discussion on the various type of insulation that could be used in power cables and their possible application to HVDC submarine cables. In the following there is a description of the main characteristics and technical details of some particular project that at present time (1995) are in progress. Two projects are briefly presented: Spain-Morocco, a 26 km long interconnection for the transmission, in a first phase, of 700 MW from Spain to Morocco at 400 kV a.c. by means of three cables, plus one spare, of the fluid filled type. The cables are designed for a future change to d.c. 450 kV, allowing a transmission of 500 MW each (i.e., 2 GW total). One of the peculiarities of the link is the maximum water depth of 615 m (world record for submarine power cables at the time of installation). Italy-Greece, a 1km long interconnection for the transmission of 500 MW (bi-directional) by means of one paper insulated mass impregnated cable having 1,250 sq mm conductor size and insulated for a rated voltage of 400 kV. This link (the installation of which will be posterior to the Spain-Morocco) will attain the world record for the maximum water depth for submarine power cables: 1,000 m. The last part deals with the future developments expected in this field, in terms of conductor size and voltage, that means an increase in transmissible capacity.

  17. Space- and Earth-based solar power for the growing energy needs of future generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seboldt, Wolfgang

    2004-08-01

    The future global supply with terrestrial regenerative energies (solar, wind, hydro and geothermal) is discussed and compared to energy from space via Solar Power Satellites. It is shown that both have the potential to satisfy global energy needs. Obviously, regenerative solutions must be taken into account and installed with higher priority within the next decades to reduce the deposition of CO 2 into the atmosphere. This is absolutely necessary to stabilize the climate. In addition, the threatening depletion of fossil and nuclear fuels in the long run forces research into alternative solutions. Concerning solar power from space, the recently developed concepts for light-weight inflatable and deployable solar arrays/concentrators—like in the NASA 'Sun Tower' and the 'European Sail Tower SPS'—are reviewed and major problems with wireless power transmission are discussed. Compared to earlier concepts the designs have the potential to reduce significantly the masses and, thus, the costs. But the technological demands and operational uncertainties are still immense. Anyhow, major progress with cost reductions of one to two orders of magnitude is required for the space option to become competitive with terrestrial regenerative options.

  18. A Cryogenic High-Power-Density Bearingless Motor for Future Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Siebert, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing a high-power-density switched-reluctance cryogenic motor for all-electric and pollution-free flight. However, cryogenic operation at higher rotational speeds markedly shortens the life of mechanical rolling element bearings. Thus, to demonstrate the practical feasibility of using this motor for future flights, a non-contact rotor-bearing system is a crucial technology to circumvent poor bearing life that ordinarily accompanies cryogenic operation. In this paper, a bearingless motor control technology for a 12-8 (12 poles in the stator and 8 poles in the rotor) switched-reluctance motor operating in liquid nitrogen (boiling point, 77 K (-196 C or -321 F)) was presented. We pushed previous disciplinary limits of electromagnetic controller technique by extending the state-of-the-art bearingless motor operating at liquid nitrogen for high-specific-power applications. The motor was levitated even in its nonlinear region of magnetic saturation, which is believed to be a world first for the motor type. Also we used only motoring coils to generate motoring torque and levitation force, which is an important feature for developing a high specific power motor.

  19. Nitrogen oxides emissions from thermal power plants in china: current status and future predictions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hezhong; Liu, Kaiyun; Hao, Jiming; Wang, Yan; Gao, Jiajia; Qiu, Peipei; Zhu, Chuanyong

    2013-10-01

    Increasing emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) over the Chinese mainland have been of great concern due to their adverse impacts on regional air quality and public health. To explore and obtain the temporal and spatial characteristics of NOx emissions from thermal power plants in China, a unit-based method is developed. The method assesses NOx emissions based on detailed information on unit capacity, boiler and burner patterns, feed fuel types, emission control technologies, and geographical locations. The national total NOx emissions in 2010 are estimated at 7801.6 kt, of which 5495.8 kt is released from coal-fired power plant units of considerable size between 300 and 1000 MW. The top provincial emitter is Shandong where plants are densely concentrated. The average NOx-intensity is estimated at 2.28 g/kWh, markedly higher than that of developed countries, mainly owing to the inadequate application of high-efficiency denitrification devices such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Future NOx emissions are predicted by applying scenario analysis, indicating that a reduction of about 40% by the year 2020 can be achieved compared with emissions in 2010. These results suggest that NOx emissions from Chinese thermal power plants could be substantially mitigated within 10 years if reasonable control measures were implemented effectively. PMID:24010996

  20. Microbeam methodologies as powerful tools in manganese hyperaccumulation research: present status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Denise R.; Marshall, Alan; Baker, Alan J. M.; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    Microbeam studies over the past decade have garnered unique insight into manganese (Mn) homeostasis in plant species that hyperaccumulate this essential mineral micronutrient. Electron- and/or proton-probe methodologies employed to examine tissue elemental distributions have proven highly effective in illuminating excess foliar Mn disposal strategies, some apparently unique to Mn hyperaccumulating plants. When applied to samples prepared with minimal artefacts, these are powerful tools for extracting true ‘snapshot’ data of living systems. For a range of reasons, Mn hyperaccumulation is particularly suited to in vivo interrogation by this approach. Whilst microbeam investigation of metallophytes is well documented, certain methods originally intended for non-biological samples are now widely applied in biology. This review examines current knowledge about Mn hyperaccumulators with reference to microbeam methodologies, and discusses implications for future research into metal transporters. PMID:23970891

  1. Microbeam methodologies as powerful tools in manganese hyperaccumulation research: present status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Denise R; Marshall, Alan; Baker, Alan J M; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    Microbeam studies over the past decade have garnered unique insight into manganese (Mn) homeostasis in plant species that hyperaccumulate this essential mineral micronutrient. Electron- and/or proton-probe methodologies employed to examine tissue elemental distributions have proven highly effective in illuminating excess foliar Mn disposal strategies, some apparently unique to Mn hyperaccumulating plants. When applied to samples prepared with minimal artefacts, these are powerful tools for extracting true 'snapshot' data of living systems. For a range of reasons, Mn hyperaccumulation is particularly suited to in vivo interrogation by this approach. Whilst microbeam investigation of metallophytes is well documented, certain methods originally intended for non-biological samples are now widely applied in biology. This review examines current knowledge about Mn hyperaccumulators with reference to microbeam methodologies, and discusses implications for future research into metal transporters. PMID:23970891

  2. Precision engineering for future propulsion and power systems: a perspective from Rolls-Royce.

    PubMed

    Beale, Sam

    2012-08-28

    Rolls-Royce today is an increasingly global business, supplying integrated power systems to a wide variety of customers for use on land, at sea and in the air. Its reputation for 'delivering excellence' to these customers has been built largely on its gas turbine technology portfolio, and this reputation relies on the quality of the company's expertise in design, manufacture and delivery of services. This paper sets out to examine a number of examples, such as the high-pressure turbine blade, of the company's reliance on precision design and manufacture, highlighting how this precision contributes to customer satisfaction with its products. A number of measures the company is taking to accelerate its competitiveness in precision manufacture are highlighted, not least its extensive relationships with the academic research base. The paper finishes by looking briefly at the demands of the company's potential future product portfolio. PMID:22802505

  3. Survey of future requirements for large space structures. [space platforms, large antennas, and power surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The future requirements for large space structures were examined and the foundation for long range planning of technology development for such structures is provided. Attention is concentrated on a period after 1985 for actual use. Basic ground rule of the study was that applications be of significant importance and have promise of direct economic benefit to mankind. The inputs to the study came from visits to a large number of government and industrial organizations, written studies in current literature, and approximate analyses of potential applications. The paper identifies diverse space applications for large area structures in three general categories: (1) large surfaces for power, (2) large antenna to receive and transmit energy over the radio frequency bandwidth, and (3) space platforms to provide area for general utilizations.

  4. Status and Future of High-Power Light-Emitting Diodes for Solid-State Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krames, Michael R.; Shchekin, Oleg B.; Mueller-Mach, Regina; Mueller, Gerd O.; Zhou, Ling; Harbers, Gerard; Craford, M. George

    2007-06-01

    Status and future outlook of III-V compound semiconductor visible-spectrum light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are presented. Light extraction techniques are reviewed and extraction efficiencies are quantified in the 60%+ (AlGaInP) and ~80% (InGaN) regimes for state-of-the-art devices. The phosphor-based white LED concept is reviewed and recent performance discussed, showing that high-power white LEDs now approach the 100-lm/W regime. Devices employing multiple phosphors for “warm” white color temperatures (~3000 4000 K) and high color rendering (CRI > 80), which provide properties critical for many illumination applications, are discussed. Recent developments in chip design, packaging, and high current performance lead to very high luminance devices (~50 Mcd/m2 white at 1 A forward current in 1 x 1 mm2 chip) that are suitable for application to automotive forward lighting. A prognosis for future LED performance levels is considered given further improvements in internal quantum efficiency, which to date lag achievements in light extraction efficiency for InGaN LEDs.

  5. Optimized ISRU Propellants for Propulsion and Power Needs for Future Mars Colonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Eric E.; Gustafson, Robert J.; Gramer, Daniel J.; Chiaverini, Martin J.; Teeter, Ronald R.; White, Brant C.

    2003-01-01

    In recent studies (Rice, 2000, 2002) conducted by ORBITEC for the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC), we conceptualized systems and an evolving optimized architecture for producing and utilizing Mars-based in-situ space resources utilization (ISRU) propellant combinations for future Mars colonization. The propellants are to be used to support the propulsion and power systems for ground and flight vehicles. The key aspect of the study was to show the benefits of ISRU, develop an analysis methodology, as well as provide guidance to propellant system choices in the future based upon what is known today about Mars. The study time frame included an early unmanned and manned exploration period (through 2040) and two colonization scenarios that are postulated to occur from 2040 to 2090. As part of this feasibility study, ORBITEC developed two different Mars colonization scenarios: a low case that ends with a 100-person colony (an Antarctica analogy) and a high case that ends with a 10,000-person colony (a Mars terraforming scenario). A population growth model, mission traffic model, and infrastructure model were developed for each scenario to better understand the requirements of future Mars colonies. Additionally, propellant and propulsion systems design concepts were developed. Cost models were also developed to allow comparison of the different ISRU propellant approaches. This paper summarizes the overall results of the study. ISRU proved to be a key enabler for these colonization missions. Carbon monoxide and oxygen, proved to be the most cost-effective ISRU propellant combination. The entire final reports Phase I and II) and all the details can be found at the NIAC website www.niac.usra.edu.

  6. Design of an ultra low power CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Husson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Despite a continuously increasing demand, neutron electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) are still far from being completely established because their development is a very difficult task. A low-noise, ultra low power consumption CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter has been implemented in a 0.35 {mu}m CMOS technology. The prototype is composed of a pixel array for detection of charged particles, and the readout electronics is integrated on the same substrate for signal processing. The excess electrons generated by an impinging particle are collected by the pixel array. The charge collection time and the efficiency are the crucial points of a CMOS detector. The 3-D device simulations using the commercially available Synopsys-SENTAURUS package address the detailed charge collection process. Within a time of 1.9 {mu}s, about 59% electrons created by the impact particle are collected in a cluster of 4 x 4 pixels with the pixel pitch of 80 {mu}m. A charge sensitive preamplifier (CSA) and a shaper are employed in the frond-end readout. The tests with electrical signals indicate that our prototype with a total active area of 2.56 x 2.56 mm{sup 2} performs an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of less than 400 e - and 314 {mu}W power consumption, leading to a promising prototype. (authors)

  7. Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

    2013-09-17

    System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

  8. Evaluating potentials for future generation off-shore wind-power outside Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benestad, R. E.; Haugen, J.; Haakenstad, H.

    2012-12-01

    With todays critical need of renewable energy sources, it is naturally to look towards wind power. With the long coast of Norway, there is a large potential for wind farms offshore Norway. Although there are more challenges with offshore wind energy installations compared to wind farms on land, the offshore wind is generally higher, and there is also higher persistence of wind speed values in the power generating classes. I planning offshore wind farms, there is a need of evaluation of the wind resources, the wind climatology and possible future changes. In this aspect, we use data from regional climate model runs performed in the European ENSEMBLE-project (van der Linden and J.F.B. Mitchell, 2009). In spite of increased reliability in RCMs in the recent years, the simulations still suffer from systematic model errors, therefore the data has to be corrected before using them in wind resource analyses. In correcting the wind speeds from the RCMs, we will use wind speeds from a Norwegian high resolution wind- and wave- archive, NORA10 (Reistad et al 2010), to do quantile mapping (Themeβl et. al. 2012). The quantile mapping is performed individually for each regional simulation driven by ERA40-reanalysis from the ENSEMBLE-project corrected against NORA10. The same calibration is then used to the belonging regional climate scenario. The calibration is done for each grid cell in the domain and for each day of the year centered in a +/-15 day window to make an empirical cumulative density function for each day of the year. The quantile mapping of the scenarios provide us with a new wind speed data set for the future, more correct compared to the raw ENSEMBLE scenarios. References: Reistad M., Ø. Breivik, H. Haakenstad, O. J. Aarnes, B. R. Furevik and J-R Bidlo, 2010, A high-resolution hindcast of wind and waves for The North Sea, The Norwegian Sea and The Barents Sea. J. Geophys. Res., 116. doi:10.1029/2010JC006402. Themessl M. J., A. Gobiet and A. Leuprecht, 2012

  9. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Vesey, R. A.; Campbell, E. M.; Betti, R.

    2016-02-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion-relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values: i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and Bz = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.

  10. Thermoelectric Power Generation System for Future Hybrid Vehicles Using Hot Exhaust Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Kook; Won, Byeong-Cheol; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Kim, Shi-Ho; Yoo, Jeong-Ho; Jang, Ju-Chan

    2011-05-01

    The present experimental and computational study investigates a new exhaust gas waste heat recovery system for hybrid vehicles, using a thermoelectric module (TEM) and heat pipes to produce electric power. It proposes a new thermoelectric generation (TEG) system, working with heat pipes to produce electricity from a limited hot surface area. The current TEG system is directly connected to the exhaust pipe, and the amount of electricity generated by the TEMs is directly proportional to their heated area. Current exhaust pipes fail to offer a sufficiently large hot surface area for the high-efficiency waste heat recovery required. To overcome this, a new TEG system has been designed to have an enlarged hot surface area by the addition of ten heat pipes, which act as highly efficient heat transfer devices and can transmit the heat to many TEMs. As designed, this new waste heat recovery system produces a maximum 350 W when the hot exhaust gas heats the evaporator surface of the heat pipe to 170°C; this promises great possibilities for application of this technology in future energy-efficient hybrid vehicles.