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Sample records for future muon facilities

  1. LINACS FOR FUTURE MUON FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Slawomir Bogacz, Rolland Johnson

    2008-10-01

    Future Muon Colliders (MC) and Neutrino Factories (NF) based on muon storage rings will require innovative linacs to: produce the muons, cool them, compress longi-tudinally and ‘shape’ them into a beam and finally to rap-idly accelerate them to multi-GeV (NF) and TeV (MC) energies. Each of these four linac applications has new requirements and opportunities that follow from the na-ture of the muon in that it has a short lifetime (τ = 2.2 μsec) in its own rest frame, it is produced in a tertiary process into a large emittance, and its electron, photon, and neutrino decay products can be more than an annoy-ance. As an example, for optimum performance, the linac repetition rates should scale inversely with the laboratory lifetime of the muon in its storage ring, something as high as 1 kHz for a 40 GeV Neutrino Factory or as low as 20 Hz for a 5 TeV Muon Collider. A superconducting 8 GeV Linac capable of CW operation is being studied as a ver-satile option for muon production [1] for colliders, facto-ries, and muon beams for diverse purposes. A linac filled with high pressure hydrogen gas and imbedded in strong magnetic fields has been proposed to rapidly cool muon beams [2]. Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are possible because muons do not generate significant syn-chrotron radiation even at extremely high energy and in strong magnetic fields. We will describe the present status of linacs for muon applications; in particular the longitu-dinal bunch compression in a single pass linac and multi-pass acceleration in the RLA, especially the optics and technical requirements for RLA designs, using supercon-ducting RF cavities capable of simultaneous acceleration of both μ+ and μ- species, with pulsed linac quadrupoles to allow the maximum number of passes. The design will include the optics for the multi-pass linac and droplet-shaped return arcs.

  2. Recirculating Linac Accelerators For Future Muon Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Yves Roblin, Alex Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Kevin Beard

    2012-04-01

    Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require rapid acceleration of shortlived muons to multi-GeV and TeV energies. A Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) that uses superconducting RF structures can provide exceptionally fast and economical acceleration to the extent that the focusing range of the RLA quadrupoles allows each muon to pass several times through each high-gradient cavity. A new concept of rapidly changing the strength of the RLA focusing quadrupoles as the muons gain energy is being developed to increase the number of passes that each muon will make in the RF cavities, leading to greater cost effectiveness. We discuss the optics and technical requirements for RLA designs, using RF cavities capable of simultaneous acceleration of both m+ and m- species. The design will include the optics for the multi-pass linac and droplet-shaped return arcs.

  3. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-06-18

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu} factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both {+-} {mu}. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider.

  4. Fast E-field switching of a pulsed surface muon beam: The commissioning of the European muon facility at ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, G. H.; Clarke-Gayther, M. A.; Scott, C. A.; Uden, C. N.; Williams, W. G.

    1994-03-01

    The ISIS pulsed muon facility at RAL has been upgraded by the inclusion of a fast E-field kicker which simultaneously divides and distributes the muon pulses at surface momentum to the three experimental areas at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. This upgraded facility has been successfully commissioned in conjunction with a new μSR spectrometer. It has been shown that this new spectrometer can operate as expected with a figure of merit for μSR experiments similar to that of the original spectrometer, in spite of receiving only half of the relative muon intensity. This twofold increase in experimental capability will be further increased in the near future by the incorporation of experimental equipment in the third beamline. Such a facility will be capable of satisfying a European wide demand for μSR research with pulsed surface muons.

  5. Research and Development of Future Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

  6. Cosmic muon flux measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousis, L. N.; Guarnaccia, E.; Link, J. M.; Mariani, C.; Pelkey, R.

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

  7. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  8. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  9. Muon-decay medium-baseline neutrino beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jun; He, Miao; Hou, Zhi-Long; Jing, Han-Tao; Li, Yu-Feng; Li, Zhi-Hui; Song, Ying-Peng; Tang, Jing-Yu; Wang, Yi-Fang; Wu, Qian-Fan; Yuan, Ye; Zheng, Yang-Heng

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino beam with about 300 MeV in energy, high-flux and medium baseline is considered a rational choice for measuring CP violation before the more powerful Neutrino Factory is to be built. Following this concept, a unique neutrino beam facility based on muon-decayed neutrinos is proposed. The facility adopts a continuous-wave proton linac of 1.5 GeV and 10 mA as the proton driver, which can deliver an extremely high beam power of 15 MW. Instead of pion-decayed neutrinos, unprecedentedly intense muon-decayed neutrinos are used for better background discrimination. The schematic design for the facility is presented here, including the proton driver, the assembly of a mercury-jet target and capture superconducting solenoids, a pion /muon beam transport line, a long muon decay channel of about 600 m and the detector concept. The physics prospects and the technical challenges are also discussed.

  10. Future Facilities Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Albert De Roeck, Rolf Ent

    2009-10-01

    For the session on future facilities at DIS09 discussions were organized on DIS related measurements that can be expected in the near and medium –or perhaps far– future, including plans from JLab, CERN and FNAL fixed target experiments, possible measurements and detector upgrades at RHIC, as well as the plans for possible future electron proton/ion colliders such as the EIC and the LHeC project.

  11. Current status of the J-PARC muon facility, MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Kawamura, N.; Strasser, P.; Koda, A.; Fujimori, H.; Ikedo, Y.; Makimura, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Nakamura, J.; Kojima, K.; Adachi, T.; Kadono, R.; Takeshita, S.; Nishiyama, K.; Higemoto, W.; Ito, T.; Nagamine, K.; Ohata, H.; Makida, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Okamura, T.; Okada, R.; Ogitsu, T.

    2014-12-01

    The muon science facility (MUSE), along with the neutron, hadron, and neutrino facilities, is one of the experimental areas of the J-PARC project. The MUSE facility is located in the Materials and Life Science Facility (MLF), which is a building integrated to include both neutron and muon science programs. Since the autumn of 2008, users operation is effective and making use of the pulsed muon beam particularly at the D-Line. Unfortunately, MUSE suffered severe damages from the earthquake on March 11, 2011, the so-called "Higashi-Nippon Dai-Shinsai". We managed to have a stable operation of the superconducting solenoid magnet with use of the on-line refrigerator on December, 2012, although we had to overcome a lot of difficulties against components not working properly. But we had to stop again the whole operations on May 2013, because of the radioactive materials leakage accident at the Hadron Hall Experimental Facility. Finally we restarted the users' runs on February 2014.

  12. Fast cooling, muon acceleration and the prospect of muon colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Mark

    Facilities based on stored muons offer unique potential for future high-energy physics capabilities. Three key characteristics of the muon make this possible: * The muon is a lepton; * The muon is roughly 200 times as massive as the electron; * The muon decays to an electron and two neutrinos. As the next heavier members of the lepton family with respect to the electron and positron, μ+ and μ-. beams can be collided to provide a precision lepton probe of the electroweak couplings. This makes a muon collider a suitable option for a lepton collider companion to a hadron collider discovery machine...

  13. Facilities of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The bricks-and-mortar infrastructure of community colleges has not nearly kept pace with increases in student enrollments. Not only are colleges bursting at the proverbial seams, but, according to the American Graduation Initiative, many two-year institutions "face large needs due to deferred maintenance or lack the modern facilities and equipment…

  14. The Future of Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daigneau, William A.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a conference of college facility managers at which facilities professionals identified forces affecting the profession's future in five areas (information technology, resource scarcity, societal changes, government role in education, environmental deterioration) and six important roles for the manager (operational efficiency expert,…

  15. Tests of Scintillator+WLS Strips for Muon System at Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, Dmitri; Evdokimov, Valery; Lukić, Strahinja

    2015-10-11

    Prototype scintilator+WLS strips with SiPM readout for muon system at future colliders were tested for light yield, time resolution and position resolution. Depending on the configuration, light yield of up to 36 photoelectrons per muon per SiPM has been achieved, as well as time resolution of 0.5 ns and position resolution of ~ 7 cm.

  16. Front End and HFOFO Snake for a Muon Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Alexahin, Y.

    2015-09-01

    A neutrino factory or muon collider requires the capture and cooling of a large number of muons. Scenarios for capture, bunching, phase-energy rotation and initial cooling of μ’s produced from a proton source target have been developed, for neutrino factory and muon collider scenarios. They require a drift section from the target, a bunching section and a $\\phi-\\delta E$ rotation section leading into the cooling channel. The currently preferred cooling channel design is an “HFOFO Snake” configuration that cools both $\\mu^+$ and $\\mu^-$ transversely and longitudinally. The status of the design is presented and variations are discussed.

  17. Novel Muon Beam Facilities for Project X at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.V.; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Abrams, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    Innovative muon beam concepts for intensity-frontier experiments such as muon-to-electron conversion are described. Elaborating upon a previous single-beam idea, we have developed a design concept for a system to generate four high quality, low-energy muon beams (two of each sign) from a single beam of protons. As a first step, the production of pions by 1 and 3 GeV protons from the proposed Project X linac at Fermilab is being simulated and compared with the 8-GeV results from the previous study.

  18. Accelerator Test Facility for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2010-06-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. This article briefly reviews the needs and possibilities for a Muon Collider beam test facility to carry out the R&D program on the collider front-end and 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  19. Time and position resolution of the scintillator strips for a muon system at future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Dmitri; Evdokimov, Valery; Lukić, Strahinja

    2016-07-01

    Prototype scintilator+WLS strips with SiPM readout for a muon system at future colliders were tested for light yield, time resolution and position resolution. Depending on the configuration, light yield of up to 36 photoelectrons per muon per SiPM has been observed, as well as time resolution of 0.45 ns and position resolution along the strip of 7.7 cm.

  20. Time and position resolution of the scintillator strips for a muon system at future colliders

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Denisov, Dmitri; Evdokimov, Valery; Lukic, Strahinja

    2016-03-31

    In this study, prototype scintilator+WLS strips with SiPM readout for a muon system at future colliders were tested for light yield, time resolution and position resolution. Depending on the configuration, light yield of up to 36 photoelectrons per muon per SiPM has been observed, as well as time resolution of 0.45 ns and position resolution along the strip of 7.7 cm.

  1. Strongest Pulsed Muon Source at J-PARC MUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Kawamura, N.; Strasser, P.; Koda, A.; Fujimori, H.; Makimura, S.; Nakahara, K.; Kato, M.; Takeshita, S.; Nishiyama, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kojima, K.; Kadono, R.; Higemoto, W.; Ito, T.; Ninomiya, K.; Hiraishi, M.; Miyazaki, M.; Kubo, K.

    2011-10-06

    The muon science facility (MUSE, abbreviation of MUon Science Establishment), along with the neutron, hadron, and neutrino facilities, is located in the Materials and Life Science Facility (MLF), which is a building integrated to include both neutron and muon science programs. On the November, 2009 beam cycle, we achieved extraction of the world's strongest pulsed muon beam at J-PARC MUSE by beam tuning at the Decay-Surface muon beam line (D-line). Surface muons ({mu}{sup +}) as much as 1.8x10{sup 6}/s were extracted with the use of 120 kW of protons from the Rapid Cycle Synchrotron (RCS), which corresponds to 1.5x10{sup 7}/s surface muons when a future proton beam reached at the intensity of 1MW. These intensities, at the future 1 MW operation, will correspond to more than ten times those at the RIKEN-RAL Muon facility.

  2. 120 MW, 800 MHz Magnicon for a Future Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-15

    Development of a pulsed magnicon at 800 MHz was carried out for the muon collider application, based on experience with similar amplifiers in the frequency range between 915 MHz and 34.3 GHz. Numerical simulations using proven computer codes were employed for the conceptual design, while established design technologies were incorporated into the engineering design. A cohesive design for the 800 MHz magnicon amplifier was carried out, including design of a 200 MW diode electron gun, design of the magnet system, optimization of beam dynamics including space charge effects in the transient and steady-state regimes, design of the drive, gain, and output cavities including an rf choke in the beam exit aperture, analysis of parasitic oscillations and design means to eliminate them, and design of the beam collector capable of 20 kW average power operation.

  3. Precision muon tracking detectors and read-out electronics for operation at very high background rates at future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Nowak, S.; Richter, R.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schwegler, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    The experience of the ATLAS MDT muon spectrometer shows that drift-tube chambers provide highly reliable precision muon tracking over large areas. The ATLAS muon chambers are exposed to unprecedentedly high background of photons and neutrons induced by the proton collisions. Still higher background rates are expected at future high-energy and high-luminosity colliders beyond HL-LHC. Therefore, drift-tube detectors with 15 mm tube diameter (30 mm in ATLAS), optimised for high rate operation, have been developed for such conditions. Several such full-scale sMDT chambers have been constructed with unprecedentedly high sense wire positioning accuracy of better than 10 μm. The chamber design and assembly methods have been optimised for large-scale production, reducing considerably cost and construction time while maintaining the high mechanical accuracy and reliability. Tests at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN showed that the rate capability of sMDT chambers is improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to the MDT chambers. By using read-out electronics optimised for high counting rates, the rate capability can be further increased.

  4. A facility for the test of large-area muon chambers at high rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Altieri, S.; Belli, G.; Bonifas, A.; Carabelli, V.; Gatignon, L.; Hessey, N.; Maggi, M.; Peigneux, J.-P.; Reithler, H.; Silari, M.; Vitulo, P.; Wegner, M.

    2000-09-01

    Operation of large-area muon detectors at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be characterized by large sustained hit rates over the whole area, reaching the range of kHz cm -2. We describe a dedicated test zone built at CERN to test the performance and the aging of the muon chambers currently under development. A radioactive source delivers photons causing the sustained rate of random hits, while a narrow beam of high-energy muons is used to directly calibrate the detector performance. A system of remotely controlled lead filters serves to vary the rate of photons over four orders of magnitude, to allow the study of performance as a function of rate.

  5. Future Facility: FAIR at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Guenther

    2007-05-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR, is a new particle accelerator facility to be built at the GSI site in Germany. The research at FAIR will cover a wide range of topics in nuclear and hadron physics, high density plasma and atomic physics, and applications in condensed matter physics and biology. A 1.1 km circumference double ring of rapidly cycling 100 and 300 Tm synchrotrons, will be FAIR's central accelerator system. It will be used to produce, inter alia, high intensity secondary beams of antiprotons and short-lived radioactive nuclei. A subsequent suite of cooler and storage rings will deliver heavy ion and antiproton beams of unprecedented quality. Large experiments are presently being designed by the NUSTAR, PANDA, PAX, CBM, SPARC, FLAIR, HEDgeHOB and BIOMAT collaborations.

  6. Your Language Laboratory Facilities Present and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theuma, Jean R.

    Rationale and facilities of the University of Hawaii's language laboratories are examined. The two-fold summary defines present (Fall 1968) and future (Fall 1969) needs, physical facilities, expected language enrollments, schedules, staff, services, research, experimentation, and planning. Also treated is the financial aspect of laboratory…

  7. Future Investigations with New Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnhardt, Hermann

    At the beginning of the third millenium more than 700 m2 of mirror collecting power at 6-10m class telescopes combined with more than 20 sophisticated instruments will be available for astronomical research, and last but not least, also for the investigation of minor bodies in the outer solar system (MBOSS) from the ground. The detector and computer technology will support wide field applications at large to medium size telescopes. Telescopes operated in Earth orbit open access to almost all wavelength regions from the high energy to the coolest regimes in space. Large radio telescope arrays for the sub-mm wavelength region are in the planning phase. A spacecraft mission to Pluto/Charon and possibly to another Transneptunian object (TNO) appears over the horizon for future research.

  8. Muon beamline at ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, G. H.; Clarke-Gayther, M. A.; Scott, C. A.; Cox, S. F. J.; Kilcoyne, S. H.

    1994-07-01

    The original pulsed surface muon facility was established at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory's ISIS in 1987. The facility was then upgraded in 1993 from a single beam line and spectrometer to a triple beam facility with three spectrometers working independently. The layout of ISIS is shown. A plan of the ISIS experimental hall is shown, indicating the respective locations of the neutron beams, the KARMEN neutrino facility and the muon beam line complex. Other topics shown in the report include the following: (1) Muon production; (2) Transport of muons to the experimental areas; (3) Positron elimination from the ISIS muon beam; (4) Creation of three independent beam lines.

  9. Participation in Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, Yagmur

    2013-03-20

    Muon accelerators hold great promise for the future of high energy physics and their construction can be staged to support a broad physics program. Great progress was made over the past decade toward developing the technology for muon beam cooling which is one of the main challenges for building such facilities.

  10. Accelerator Design Concept for Future Neutrino Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    ISS Accelerator Working Group; Zisman, Michael S; Berg, J. S.; Blondel, A.; Brooks, S.; Campagne, J.-E.; Caspar, D.; Cevata, C.; Chimenti, P.; Cobb, J.; Dracos, M.; Edgecock, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Fernow, R.; Filthaut, F.; Gallardo, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.; Gerigk, F.; Hanson, G.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, C.; Kaplan, D.; Keil, E.; Kirk, H.; Klier, A.; Kurup, A.; Lettry, J.; Long, K.; Machida, S.; McDonald, K.; Meot, F.; Mori, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.; Paul, K.; Poklonskiy, A.; Popovic, M.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, T.; Sandstrom, R.; Sevior, R.; Sievers, P.; Simos, N.; Torun, Y.; Vretenar, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Zisman, Michael S

    2008-02-03

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  11. Supernovae and cosmology with future European facilities.

    PubMed

    Hook, I M

    2013-06-13

    Prospects for future supernova surveys are discussed, focusing on the European Space Agency's Euclid mission and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), both expected to be in operation around the turn of the decade. Euclid is a 1.2 m space survey telescope that will operate at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, and has the potential to find and obtain multi-band lightcurves for thousands of distant supernovae. The E-ELT is a planned, general-purpose ground-based, 40-m-class optical-infrared telescope with adaptive optics built in, which will be capable of obtaining spectra of type Ia supernovae to redshifts of at least four. The contribution to supernova cosmology with these facilities will be discussed in the context of other future supernova programmes such as those proposed for DES, JWST, LSST and WFIRST. PMID:23630381

  12. On the future of BNL user facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to portray the emerging technology of high-power high-brightness electron beams. This new technology will impact several fields of science and it is essential that BNL stay abreast of the development. BNL has a relative advantage and vital interest in pursuing this technology that will impact its two major facilities, the NSLS and RHIC. We have a sensible development path towards this critical future technology, in which BNL will gradually acquire a strong basis of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) technology while executing useful projects. The technology of high-power AND high-brightness (HPHB) electron beams is based of the convergence of two extant, but relatively recent technologies: Photoinjectors and superconducting energy-recovering linacs. The HPHB technology presents special opportunities for the development of future BNL user facilities for High-Energy and Nuclear Science (HE-NP) and Basic Energy Science (BES). In HE-NP this technology makes it possible to build high-energy electron cooling for RHIC in the short range and a unique linac-based electron-ion collider (eRHIC). In BES, we can build short pulse, coherent FIR sources and high flux femtosecond hard x-ray sources based on Compton scattering in the short range and, in the longer range, femtosecond, ultra-high brightness synchrotron light sources and, ultimately, an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL).

  13. Studying Stellar Halos with Future Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greggio, Laura; Falomo, Renato; Uslenghi, Michela

    2015-08-01

    Stellar halos around galaxies retain fundamental evidence of the processes which lead to their build up. Sophisticated models of galaxy formation in a cosmological context yield quantitative predictions about various observable characteristics, including the amount of substructure, the slope of radial mass profiles and three dimensional shapes, and the properties of the stellar populations in the galaxies halos. The comparison of such models with the observations leads to constraints on the general picture of galaxy formation in the hierarchical Universe, as well as on the physical processes taking place in the halos formation. With the current observing facilities, stellar halos can be effectively probed only for a limited number of nearby galaxies. In this contribution we illustrate the progress which we expect in this field with the future large aperture ground based telescopes (E-ELT and TNT), and with JWST. In particular we adress the following issues: (I) the characterization of the stellar populations in the halos innermost regions and substructures, (ii) the measurement of the halos profiles and shapes , and the halos mass content, (iii) the study of Globular Clusters inhabiting the halos of distant galaxies. In order to assess the expected capabilities of future facilities we present the results of a set of simulated images to evaluate to which level of accuracy it will be possible to probe the halos of distant galaxies.

  14. Muon radiography in Russia with emulsion technique. First experiments future perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, A. B.; Bagulya, A. V.; Chernyavsky, M. M.; Konovalova, N. S.; Polukhina, N. G.; Shchedrina, T. V.; Starkov, N. I.; Tioukov, V. E.; Vladymyrov, M. S.; Managadze, A. K.; Roganova, T. M.; Orurk, O. I.; Zemskova, S. G.

    2015-12-31

    Cosmic ray muon radiography is a novel technique for imaging the internal structures of massive objects. It exploits the capability of high energy muons from cosmic-rays in order to obtain a density map of investigated object and trying to guess information on the variation in the density distribution. Nuclear emulsions are tracking detectors well suited to be employed in this context since they have an excellent angular resolution (few mrad), they are cheap, compact and robust, easily transportable, able to work in harsh environments, and do not require power supply. This work presents the first successful results in the field of muon radiography in Russia with nuclear emulsions.

  15. Status report of a high luminosity muon collider and future research and development plans

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.; Sessler, A.

    1996-11-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV (c-of-m) high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are analyzed. Finally, we present an R & D plan to determine whether such machines are practical, and, if they are, lead to the construction of a 0.5 TeV demonstration by 2010, and to a 4 TeV collider by the year 2020.

  16. Neutrino physics at muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    King, B.J.

    1998-03-01

    An overview is given of the neutrino physics potential of future muon storage rings that use muon collider technology to produce, accelerate and store large currents of muons. After a general characterization of the neutrino beam and its interactions, some crude quantitative estimates are given for the physics performance of a muon ring neutrino experiment (MURINE) consisting of a high rate, high performance neutrino detector at a 250 GeV muon collider storage ring.

  17. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Sessler, A.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is

  18. The cosmic ray muon tomography facility based on large scale MRPC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuewu; Zeng, Ming; Zeng, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Ziran; Yue, Xiaoguang; Luo, Zhifei; Yi, Hengguan; Yu, Baihui; Cheng, Jianping

    2015-06-01

    Cosmic ray muon tomography is a novel technology to detect high-Z material. A prototype of TUMUTY with 73.6 cm×73.6 cm large scale position sensitive MRPC detectors has been developed and is introduced in this paper. Three test kits have been tested and image is reconstructed using MAP algorithm. The reconstruction results show that the prototype is working well and the objects with complex structure and small size (20 mm) can be imaged on it, while the high-Z material is distinguishable from the low-Z one. This prototype provides a good platform for our further studies of the physical characteristics and the performances of cosmic ray muon tomography.

  19. Preparing Campus Facilities for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gracie, Larry W.; Griffith, Ross A.

    The recent experiences of North Carolina State University and Wake Forest University in the planning and construction of campus buildings are described as illustrations of the planning of space to meet the goals and needs of the institution in the future. At North Carolina State University, 780 additional acres were received from the state, and a…

  20. New dimensions for future health care facilities.

    PubMed

    Del Nord, Romano

    2007-01-01

    The questions most insistently asked nowadays are: what "space" will health treatment have, and what should we understand by "care" or "assistance", in a future scenario characterized by a renewed dimension of the concept of health? As things stand, over 40% of the social/health expenditure borne by governments is absorbed by hospital structures. The main factors cutting into this expenditure and determining the very nature of the hospital today are directly connected to phenomena such as the growing use of techno-medicines, biotechnologies and e-health, the unstoppable increase in health service consumerism, and the effects induced by longer life expectancy. The progressive and necessary disappearance of the boundaries between the various medical/surgical specializations aimed at making treatment less fragmented, the growth of new "medical practices" connected to the introduction of gene therapies, selective chemotherapies, immunotherapy, stem cells, the most recent radiotherapy techniques, and the ever-growing weight of chronic pathologies and rehabilitation activities are all factors that make it essential to rethink not only the idea of "Hospital", but also the idea of the whole infrastructural system within which said "Hospital" is situated. PMID:17621770

  1. Space facilities: Meeting future needs for research, development, and operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The National Facilities Study (NFS) represents an interagency effort to develop a comprehensive and integrated long-term plan for world-class aeronautical and space facilities that meet current and projected needs for commercial and government aerospace research and development and space operations. At the request of NASA and the DOD, the National Research Council's Committee on Space Facilities has reviewed the space related findings of the NFS. The inventory of more than 2800 facilities will be an important resource, especially if it continues to be updated and maintained as the NFS report recommends. The data in the inventory provide the basis for a much better understanding of the resources available in the national facilities infrastructure, as well as extensive information on which to base rational decisions about current and future facilities needs. The working groups have used the inventory data and other information to make a set of recommendations that include estimates of cast savings and steps for implementation. While it is natural that the NFS focused on cost reduction and consolidations, such a study is most useful to future planning if it gives equal weight to guiding the direction of future facilities needed to satisfy legitimate national aspirations. Even in the context of cost reduction through facilities closures and consolidations, the study is timid about recognizing and proposing program changes and realignments of roles and missions to capture what could be significant savings and increased effectiveness. The recommendations of the Committee on Space Facilities are driven by the clear need to be more realistic and precise both in recognizing current incentives and disincentives in the aerospace industry and in forecasting future conditions for U.S. space activities.

  2. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Low Energy Muon Science: LEMS`93

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, M.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains papers on research with low energy muons. Topics cover fundamental electroweak physics; muonic atoms and molecules, and muon catalyzed fusion; muon spin research; and muon facilities. These papers have been indexed and cataloged separately.

  3. Densitometric tomography using the measurement of muon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivert, F.; Busto, J.; Brunner, J.; Salin, P.; Gaffet, S.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g. seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The present work develops a recent method to investigate the in situ density of rocks using atmospheric the muon flux measurement , its attenuation depending on the rock density and thickness. This new geophysical technique have been mainly applied in volcanology (Lesparre N., 2011) using scintillator detectors. The present project (T2DM2) aims to realize underground muons flux measurements in order to characterizing the rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measure with a new Muon telescope instrumentation using Micromegas detectors in Time Projection Chambers (TPC) configuration. The first step of the work presented considers the muon flux simulation using the Gaisser model, for the interactions between muons and atmospheric particles, and the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the muons/rock interactions. The results show that the muon flux attenuation caused by density variations are enough significant to be observed until around 500 m depth and for period of time in the order of one month. Such a duration scale and depth of investigation is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes involved within the Karst unsaturated zone where LSBB is located. Our work now concentrates on the optimization of the spatial distribution of detectors that will be deployed in future.

  4. Future directions of accelerator-based NP and HEP facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    2011-07-24

    Progress in particle and nuclear physics has been closely connected to the progress in accelerator technologies - a connection that is highly beneficial to both fields. This paper presents a review of the present and future facilities and accelerator technologies that will push the frontiers of high-energy particle interactions and high intensity secondary particle beams.

  5. Future directions of accelerator-based NP and HEP facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Progress in particle and nuclear physics has been closely connected to the progress in accelerator technologies - a connection that is highly beneficial to both fields. This paper presents a review of the present and future facilities and accelerator technologies that will push the frontiers of high-energy particle interactions and high intensity secondary particle beams.

  6. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-05

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  7. The US Muon Accelerator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, Y.; Kirk, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, Steve; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Zisman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-01

    An accelerator complex that can produce ultra-intense beams of muons presents many opportunities to explore new physics. A facility of this type is unique in that, in a relatively straightforward way, it can present a physics program that can be staged and thus move forward incrementally, addressing exciting new physics at each step. At the request of the US Department of Energy's Office of High Energy Physics, the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC) and the Fermilab Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) have recently submitted a proposal to create a Muon Accelerator Program that will have, as a primary goal, to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for an energy-frontier Muon Collider by the end of a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a description of a Muon Collider facility and gives an overview of the proposal.

  8. A Highly intense DC muon source, MuSIC and muon CLFV search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Sato, A.; Sakamoto, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Tran, N. H.; Hashim, I. H.; Fukuda, M.; Hayashida, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, M.

    2014-08-01

    MuSIC is a new muon facility, which provides the world's highest intense muon beam with continuous time structure at Research Center of Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. It's intensity is designed to be 108 muons per second with only 0.4 kW proton beam. Such a high intense muon beam is very important for searches of rare decay processes, for example search for the muon to electron conversion.

  9. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  10. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  11. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, Steve

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate O(1021) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  12. R&D Proposal for the National Muon Acccelerator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-02-01

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons - the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently

  13. R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Muon Accelerator Program; Zisman, Michael S.; Geer, Stephen

    2010-02-24

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons--the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently

  14. Muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B. |; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  15. The LHCb Muon System

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, W.

    2005-10-12

    In this paper is described the design, the construction and the performances of several Multi Wire Proportional Chamber prototypes built for the LHCb Muon system. In particular we report results for detection efficiency, time resolution, high rate performances and ageing effect measured at the CERN T11 test beam area and at the high irradiation ENEA Casaccia Calliope Facility.

  16. CHARM 2010: Experiment summary and future charm facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    The CHARM 2010 meeting had over 30 presentations of experimental results, plus additional future facilities talks just before this summary talk. Since there is not enough time to even summarize all that has been shown from experiments and to recognize all the memorable plots and results - tempting as it is to reproduce the many clean signals and data vs theory figures, the quantum correlations plots, and the D-mixing plots before and after the latest CLEO-c data is added. So, this review will give only my personal observations, exposing my prejudices and my areas of ignorance, no doubt. This overview will be at a fairly high level of abstraction - no re-showing individual plots or results. I ask the forgiveness of those who will have been slighted in this way - meaning all the presents.

  17. New scintillator materials for future and present facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, Franco; Giaz, Agnese

    2015-02-01

    In the recent years LaBr3:Ce crystals started a new generation of high performing scintillator detectors. In fact, a large number of different, new and promising scintillators are now becoming commercially available, as for example CeBr3, CLYC, SrI2. Some others, like GYGAG:Ce, CLLB, CLLC, will be available in the near future. The CLYC crystal enriched with 6Li provides extremely high efficiency for thermal neutron identification and detection with performances comparable to 3He tubes. The CLYC enriched with 7Li can provide the direct measurement of the neutron kinetic energy from the energy pulse signal. The most recent R&D activity shows that `co-doping' technique has the effect to improve the crystal proportionality and the mechanical properties thus significantly increasing the reliability and energy resolution of LaBr3;Ce and CeBr3 scintillators. Such a new generation of detectors can be the backbone for the detectors array of the future accelerator facilities as for example ELI-NP which will provide very intense high-energy γ-ray beam with very low bandwidth.

  18. Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.

    2009-10-19

    Parameters are given of muon colliders with center of mass energies of 1.5 and 3 TeV. Pion production is from protons on a mercury target. Capture, decay, and phase rotation yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling reduces the emittances until the trains are merged into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in 6 dimensions is then applied, followed by final transverse cooling in 50 T solenoids. After acceleration the muons enter the collider ring. Ongoing R&D is discussed.

  19. MUON STORAGE RINGS - NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-05-30

    The concept of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Source (Neutrino Factory) has sparked considerable interest in the High Energy Physics community. Besides providing a first phase of a muon collider facility, it would generate more intense and well collimated neutrino beams than currently available. The BNL-AGS or some other proton driver would provide an intense proton beam that hits a target, produces pions that decay into muons. The muons must be cooled, accelerated and injected into a storage ring with a long straight section where they decay. The decays occurring in the straight sections of the ring would generate neutrino beams that could be directed to detectors located thousands of kilometers away, allowing studies of neutrino oscillations with precisions not currently accessible. For example, with the neutrino source at BNL, detectors at Soudan, Minnesota (1,715 km), and Gran Sasso, Italy (6,527 km) become very interesting possibilities. The feasibility of constructing and operating such a muon-storage-ring based Neutrino-Factory, including geotechnical questions related to building non-planar storage rings (e.g. at 8{degree} angle for BNL-Soudan, and 3{degree} angle for BNL-Gran Sasso) along with the design of the muon capture, cooling, acceleration, and storage ring for such a facility is being explored by the growing Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC). The authors present overview of Neutrino Factory concept based on a muon storage ring, its components, physics opportunities, possible upgrade to a full muon collider, latest simulations of front-end, and a new bowtie-muon storage ring design.

  20. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  1. OBSIP: An Evolving Facility for the Future of Geoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, B.; Lodewyk, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Pool "OBSIP" was founded in 1999 as a National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored instrument facility that provides ocean bottom seismometers and technical support for research in the areas of marine geology, seismology, and geodynamics. OBSIP provides both short period instruments (for active source seismic refraction studies) and long period instruments (for long term passive experiments). OBSIP is comprised of three Institutional Instrument Contributors each of whom contribute instruments and technical support to the pool and an OBSIP Management Office. In the past year, OBSIP has provided instruments for five experiments and supported over 12 research cruises recovering and/or deploying instruments. The most extensive OBSIP experiment in the past few years has been the Cascadia Initiative. The Cascadia Initiative is an onshore/offshore seismic and geodetic experiment deployed in the Pacific Northwest to study questions surrounding the evolution of the Juan de Fuca plate and the Gorda plate. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), OBSIP IIC's built 60 new ocean bottom seismometers. Both LDEO and SIO designed new seismometer packages to withstand trawling by local fisherman for deployment in shallow areas. The Cascadia Initiative has required close cooperation between the OBSIP, the Deep Submergence Facility, the University National Oceanographic Laboratory System (who coordinates ship schedules for the cruises), and the Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team. At the recent ARRA Workshop, members from the scientific community met to discuss the future of the ARRA instruments and determine how OBS instrumentation can be best utilized to serve the scientific community. The OBSIP Management Office has developed a comprehensive Data Quality Plan that includes all steps of the data collection process, from instrument design to quality controlling data after it is uploaded to the Data Management Center. The

  2. Quality control and beam test of GEM detectors for future upgrades of the CMS muon high rate region at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaneo, D.; Abbas, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abi Akl, M.; Ahmed, W.; Ahmed, W.; Altieri, P.; Aly, R.; Armaingaud, C.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ashfaq, A.; Aspell, P.; Assran, Y.; Awan, I.; Bally, S.; Ban, Y.; Banerjee, S.; Barria, P.; Benussi, L.; Bhopatkar, V.; Bianco, S.; Bos, J.; Bouhali, O.; Braibant, S.; Buontempo, S.; Cai, J.; Calabria, C.; Caponero, M.; Caputo, C.; Cassese, F.; Castaneda, A.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Cavallo, F. R.; Celik, A.; Choi, M.; Choi, K.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, J.; Cimmino, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Colaleo, A.; Conde Garcia, A.; Dabrowski, M. M.; De Lentdecker, G.; De Oliveira, R.; De Robertis, G.; Dildick, S.; Dildick, S.; Dorney, B.; Elmetenawee, W.; Fabrice, G.; Ferrini, M.; Ferry, S.; Flanagan, W.; Giacomelli, P.; Gilmore, J.; Guiducci, L.; Gutierrez, A.; Hadjiiska, R. M.; Hassan, A.; Hauser, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Hohlmann, M.; Hoorani, H.; Jeng, Y. G.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kim, H. S.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, S.; Kumar, A.; Lee, J.; Lenzi, T.; Litov, L.; Loddo, F.; Maerschalk, T.; Magazzu, G.; Maggi, M.; Maghrbi, Y.; Magnani, A.; Majumdar, N.; Mal, P. K.; Mandal, K.; Marchioro, A.; Marinov, A.; Merlin, J. A.; Mohammed, N.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, A.; Muhammad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Oliveri, E.; Pant, L. M.; Paolucci, P.; Park, I.; Passeggio, G.; Pavlov, B.; Philipps, B.; Phipps, M.; Piccolo, D.; Postema, H.; Pugliese, G.; Baranac, A. Puig; Radi, A.; Radogna, R.; Raffone, G.; Ramkrishna, S.; Ranieri, A.; Riccardi, C.; Rodrigues, A.; Ropelewski, L.; RoyChowdhury, S.; Ryu, M. S.; Ryu, G.; Safonov, A.; Sakharov, A.; Salva, S.; Saviano, G.; Sharma, A.; Swain, S. K.; Talvitie, J. P.; Talvitie, J. P.; Tamma, C.; Tatarinov, A.; Teng, H.; Turini, N.; Tuuva, T.; Twigger, J.; Tytgat, M.; Vai, I.; Van Stenis, M.; Venditi, R.; Verhagen, E.; Verwilligen, P.; Vitulo, P.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Yang, U.; Yang, Y.; Yonamine, R.; Zaganidis, N.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, A.

    2015-03-01

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) are a proven position sensitive gas detector technology which nowadays is becoming more widely used in High Energy Physics. GEMs offer an excellent spatial resolution and a high particle rate capability, with a close to 100% detection efficiency. In view of the high luminosity phase of the CERN Large Hadron Collider, these aforementioned features make GEMs suitable candidates for the future upgrades of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. In particular, the CMS GEM Collaboration proposes to cover the high-eta region of the muon system with large-area triple-GEM detectors, which have the ability to provide robust and redundant tracking and triggering functions. In this contribution, after a general introduction and overview of the project, the construction of full-size trapezoidal triple-GEM prototypes will be described in more detail. The procedures for the quality control of the GEM foils, including gain uniformity measurements with an x-ray source will be presented. In the past few years, several CMS triple-GEM prototype detectors were operated with test beams at the CERN SPS. The results of these test beam campaigns will be summarised.

  3. PREFACE: Muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, Robert H.; Nagamine, Kanetada

    2004-10-01

    To a particle physicist a muon is a member of the lepton family, a heavy electron possessing a mass of about 1/9 that of a proton and a spin of 1/2, which interacts with surrounding atoms and molecules electromagnetically. Since its discovery in 1937, the muon has been put to many uses, from tests of special relativity to deep inelastic scattering, from studies of nuclei to tests of weak interactions and quantum electrodynamics, and most recently, as a radiographic tool to see inside heavy objects and volcanoes. In 1957 Richard Garwin and collaborators, while conducting experiments at the Columbia University cyclotron to search for parity violation, discovered that spin-polarized muons injected into materials might be useful to probe internal magnetic fields. This eventually gave birth to the modern field of muSR, which stands for muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance, and is the subject of this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. Muons are produced in accelerators when high energy protons (generally >500 MeV) strike a target like graphite, producing pions which subsequently decay into muons. Most experiments carried out today use relatively low-energy (~4 MeV), positively-charged muons coming from pions decaying at rest in the skin of the production target. These muons have 100% spin polarization, a range in typical materials of about 180 mg cm-2, and are ideal for experiments in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Negatively-charged muons are also occasionally used to study such things as muonic atoms and muon-catalysed fusion. The muSR technique provides a local probe of internal magnetic fields and is highly complementary to inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance, for example. There are four primary muSR facilities in the world today: ISIS (Didcot, UK), KEK (Tsukuba, Japan), PSI (Villigen, Switzerland) and TRIUMF (Vancouver, Canada), serving about 500 researchers world-wide. A new facility, JPARC (Tokai, Japan

  4. Nuclear Structure Studies at the Future FAIR facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, Berta

    2010-04-26

    This article is intended to be an introduction to studies of nuclear structure at the future FAIR facility. It addresses interested readers not necessarily expert in the field. It outlines the physics aims and experiments to be carried out at FAIR in the field of nuclear structure and astrophysics. Starting with a brief description of what can be achieved in experiments with intense, high quality stable beams the article leads the reader to how beams of unstable radioactive nuclei will be produced and exploited at FAIR. The characteristics of the beams from the main separation device, the Super-FRS, are outlined and the limitations they impose on experiment are discussed. The various setups at the three experimental branches associated with the Super-FRS are described. The aims of the various experimental setups, how they complement each other and the physics they will address are all explained. The concept of the r-process of nucleosynthesis is outlined at the beginning and used as a running example of how useful it will be to be able to carry out experiments with beams of short-lived, exotic ions.

  5. Public participation in energy facility siting. Part 2; Future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlatch, E.E. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-08-01

    The first planning era for energy facility siting was typified by technological decision making in a climate of eminent domain. The second planning era, from 1970 to present, involves regulatory/adjudicatory decision making in a climate of adversarial proceedings. However, outcomes are not much different than in the first: Decisions are still largely made on technological grounds, sites are secretly selected and anonymously secured, and public participation has little effect on decisions. The result has been endgame litigation that delays needed projects increases cost, and polarizes participants. Utilities are understandably reluctant to plan large base-load plants, yet almost all projections of electricity use indicate that such plants will be needed after 1996, if not before. The author discusses how it is in the self-interest of all three principal actors---industry, environmental groups, and state and local government---to move beyond confrontation to a third planning era based on negotiation. Unassisted negotiation (open siting or open planning) and assisted negotiation (facilitation and mediation) promise to produce mutual gain for all parties through cooperative and creative problem solving. Most importantly, they lay the groundwork for future productive interaction.

  6. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Brashaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drews, M.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Greis, J. R.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Winter, M.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2016-03-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240 MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than ~1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is fπ < 1.4% at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  7. Neutrinos from STORed Muons - nuSTORM

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan

    2013-02-27

    The results of LSND and MiniBooNE, along with the recent papers on a possible reactor neutrino flux anomaly, give tantalizing hints of new physics. Models beyond the nSM have been developed to explain these results and involve one or more additional neutrinos that are non-interacting or “sterile." Neutrino beams produced from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring provide a powerful way to study this potential new physics. In this talk, I will describe the facility, nuSTORM, and an appropriate far detector for neutrino oscillation searches at short baseline. I will present sensitivity plots that indicate that this experimental approach can provide well over 5 s confirmation or rejection of the LSND/MinBooNE results. In addition I will explain how the facility can be used to make neutrino interaction cross section measurements important to the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and, in general, add significantly to the study of neutrino interactions. The unique n beam available at the nuSTORM facility has the potential to be transformational in our approach to n interaction physics, offering a “n light source” to physicists from a number of disciplines. Finally, I will describe how nuSTORM can be used to facilitate accelerator R&D for future muon-based accelerator facilities.

  8. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2011 annual report : Shaping future supercomputing.

    SciTech Connect

    Papka, M.; Messina, P.; Coffey, R.; Drugan, C.

    2012-08-16

    The ALCF's Early Science Program aims to prepare key applications for the architecture and scale of Mira and to solidify libraries and infrastructure that will pave the way for other future production applications. Two billion core-hours have been allocated to 16 Early Science projects on Mira. The projects, in addition to promising delivery of exciting new science, are all based on state-of-the-art, petascale, parallel applications. The project teams, in collaboration with ALCF staff and IBM, have undertaken intensive efforts to adapt their software to take advantage of Mira's Blue Gene/Q architecture, which, in a number of ways, is a precursor to future high-performance-computing architecture. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) enables transformative science that solves some of the most difficult challenges in biology, chemistry, energy, climate, materials, physics, and other scientific realms. Users partnering with ALCF staff have reached research milestones previously unattainable, due to the ALCF's world-class supercomputing resources and expertise in computation science. In 2011, the ALCF's commitment to providing outstanding science and leadership-class resources was honored with several prestigious awards. Research on multiscale brain blood flow simulations was named a Gordon Bell Prize finalist. Intrepid, the ALCF's BG/P system, ranked No. 1 on the Graph 500 list for the second consecutive year. The next-generation BG/Q prototype again topped the Green500 list. Skilled experts at the ALCF enable researchers to conduct breakthrough science on the Blue Gene system in key ways. The Catalyst Team matches project PIs with experienced computational scientists to maximize and accelerate research in their specific scientific domains. The Performance Engineering Team facilitates the effective use of applications on the Blue Gene system by assessing and improving the algorithms used by applications and the techniques used to implement those algorithms

  9. The US Muon Accelerator Program (MAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan D.; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics has recently approved a Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). The primary goal of this effort is to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for a Muon Collider after a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a brief physics motivation for, and the description of, a Muon Collider facility and then gives an overview of the program. I will then describe in some detail the primary components of the effort.

  10. Design Concepts for Muon-Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R. D.; Berg, J. S.; Kirk, H. G.; Palmer, R. B.; Stratkis, D.; Alexahin, Y.; Bross, A.; Gollwitzer, K.; Mokhov, N. V.; Neuffer, D.; Palmer, M. A.; Yonehara, K.; Snopok, P.; Bogacz, A.; Roberts, T. J.; Delahaye, J. -P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon-based accelerators have the potential to enable facilities at both the Intensity and the Energy Frontiers. Muon storage rings can serve as high precision neutrino sources, and a muon collider is an ideal technology for a TeV or multi-TeV collider. Progress in muon accelerator designs has advanced steadily in recent years. In regard to 6D muon cooling, detailed and realistic designs now exist that provide more than 5 order-of-magnitude emittance reduction. Furthermore, detector performance studies indicate that with suitable pixelation and timing resolution, backgrounds in the collider detectors can be significantly reduced, thus enabling high-quality physics results. Thanks to these and other advances in design & simulation of muon systems, technology development, and systems demonstrations, muon storage-ring-based neutrino sources and a muon collider appear more feasible than ever before. A muon collider is now arguably among the most compelling approaches to a multi-TeV lepton collider. This paper summarizes the current status of design concepts for muon-based accelerators for neutrino factories and a muon collider.

  11. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Fellow

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Gail G.; Snopak, Pavel; Bao, Yu

    2015-03-20

    Muons are fundamental particles like electrons but much more massive. Muon accelerators can provide physics opportunities similar to those of electron accelerators, but because of the larger mass muons lose less energy to radiation, allowing more compact facilities with lower operating costs. The way muon beams are produced makes them too large to fit into the vacuum chamber of a cost-effective accelerator, and the short muon lifetime means that the beams must be reduced in size rather quickly, without losing too many of the muons. This reduction in size is called "cooling." Ionization cooling is a new technique that can accomplish such cooling. Intense muon beams can then be accelerated and injected into a storage ring, where they can be used to produce neutrino beams through their decays or collided with muons of the opposite charge to produce a muon collider, similar to an electron-positron collider. We report on the research carried out at the University of California, Riverside, towards producing such muon accelerators, as part of the Muon Accelerator Program based at Fermilab. Since this research was carried out in a university environment, we were able to involve both undergraduate and graduate students.

  12. The first muon beam from a new highly-intense DC muon source, MuSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nam Hoai; MuSIC Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    A new DC muon source, MuSIC, is now under construction at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Japan. The MuSIC adopts a new pion/muon collection system and a curved transport solenoid. These techniques are important in realization of future muon programs such as the muon to electron conversion experiments (COMET/Mu2e), neutrino factories, and muon colliders. The pion capture magnet and a part of the transport solenoid have been built and beam tests were carried out to assess the MuSIC's performance. Muon lifetime measurements and muonic X-ray measurements have been used for estimation of muon yield of the MuSIC. The result indicates that the MuSIC would be one of the most intense DC muon beams in the world.

  13. Ohio School Facilities Commission 1998 Annual Report: Building Our Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio School Facilities Commission, Columbus.

    The Ohio School Facilities Commission has published this manual intended to assure uniform, energy efficient, cost effective, easily maintainable, and technologically advanced educational facilities for its public schools. It provides a critical analysis of individual spaces and material/system components necessary for the construction of…

  14. The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF): Future Instrumentation and Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Alan T.; Bus, S. J.; Connelley, Michael S.; Rayner, John T.

    2014-11-01

    The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) is a 3.0-m infrared telescope located at an altitude of 4.2 km near the summit of Mauna Kea on the island of Hawaii. The IRTF was established by NASA to obtain solar system observations of interest to NASA. The funding for IRTF operations was renewed in May 2014 for another 5 years. We discuss new instrumentation and upgrades during this time period. Current instruments include: (1) SpeX, a 0.7-5 μm moderate-resolution spectrograph and camera, (2) MORIS, a high-speed CCD imager attached to SpeX for simultaneous visible and near-infrared observations, and (3) CSHELL, a 1-5 μm high-resolution spectrograph. Detector upgrades have recently been made to SpeX. We are also designing and constructing a new echelle spectrograph for 1-5 μm. This instrument will be commissioned starting in early 2016. We also plan to restore to service our 8-25 μm camera, MIRSI. Our 1-5 μm camera, NSFCAM, was lost due to a failure of the liquid nitrogen can that was caused by an ice plug. We can restore this instrument to service but no plans have been made yet. The IRTF supports remote observing from any site. This eliminates the need for travel to the observatory and short observing time slots can be supported. We also welcome onsite visiting astronomers. In the near future we plan to implement a low-order wave-front sensor to allow real-time focus and collimation of the telescope. This will greatly improve observational efficiency. In the longer term, we envision the construction of an adaptive optics system that is optimized for solar system observations. This instrument would use the restored NSFCAM, which has a circular variable filter allowing selection of any wavelength from 1-5 μm. We welcome input for planetary science cases needing diffraction-limited imaging at 1-5 μm. For further information on the IRTF and its instruments including visitor instruments, see: http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/. We gratefully acknowledge the support of

  15. The user facility FELIX: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Meer, A.F.G. van der; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1995-12-31

    The performance over the past year and the current user-relevant characteristics of the User Facility FELIX will be discussed. Also the existing plans for improving and extending the capabilities and provisions will be presented.

  16. Polarized muon beams for muon collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrinsky, A. N.

    1996-11-01

    An option for the production of intense and highly polarized muon beams, suitable for a high-luminosity muon collider, is described briefly. It is based on a multi-channel pion-collection system, narrow-band pion-to-muon decay channels, proper muon spin gymnastics, and ionization cooling to combine all of the muon beams into a single bunch of ultimately low emittance.

  17. Muon spin rotation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of the muon spin rotation research work centered around the development of the muon spin rotation facility at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collimation system was both designed and fabricated at Virginia State University. This improved collimation system, plus improvements in detectors and electronics enabled the acquisition of spectra free of background out to 15 microseconds. There were two runs at Brookhaven in 1984, one run was devoted primarily to beam development and the other run allowed several successful experiments to be performed. The effect of uniaxial strain on an Fe(Si) crystal at elevated temperature (360K) was measured and the results are incorporated herein. A complete analysis of Fe pulling data taken earlier is included.

  18. Muon collider progress

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  19. EFL College Newsletter 6. Fine Arts Facilities: Past, Present, Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    Three major planning questions on developing a fine arts facility for higher education institutions are discussed--(1) whether to concentrate the arts in a single place or thread them through the campus, (2) the practicality of the multi-use space--the auditorium that can function as theater, concert and lecture hall and classrooms, and (3) the…

  20. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema

    Tourun, Yagmur [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2010-01-08

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  1. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Tourun, Yagmur

    2009-07-29

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be 'at least 20 years away' for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  2. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Tourun, Yagmur

    2009-07-29

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  3. Simulation of large acceptance LINAC for muons

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, H; Kurennoy, S; Jason, A J

    2010-01-01

    There has been a recent need for muon accelerators not only for future Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders but also for other applications in industry and medical use. We carried out simulations on a large-acceptance muon linac with a new concept 'mixed buncher/acceleration'. The linac can accept pions/muons from a production target with large acceptance and accelerate muon without any beam cooling which makes the initial section of muon-linac system very compact. The linac has a high impact on Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider (NF/MC) scenario since the 300-m injector section can be replaced by the muon linac of only 10-m length. The current design of the linac consists of the following components: independent 805-MHz cavity structure with 6- or 8-cm-radius aperture window; injection of a broad range of pion/muon energies, 10-100 MeV, and acceleration to 150 - 200 MeV. Further acceleration of the muon beam are relatively easy since the beam is already bunched.

  4. Question of Lorentz violation in muon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, J. P.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Wilschut, H. W.; Timmermans, R. G. E.

    2016-06-01

    Possibilities to test the Lorentz invariance of the weak interaction in muon decay are considered. We derive the direction-dependent muon-decay rate with a general Lorentz-violating addition to the W -boson propagator. We discuss measurements of the directional and boost dependence of the Michel parameters and of the muon lifetime as a function of absolute velocity. The total muon-decay rate in the Lorentz-violating standard model extension is addressed. Suggestions are made for dedicated (re)analyses of the pertinent data and for future experiments.

  5. Complex plasma research on ISS past, present, and future facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seurig, R.; Morfill, G.; Fortov, V.; Hofmann, P.

    2007-11-01

    The research in dusty plasma, also known as complex plasma, under prolonged microgravity condition took its first steps in 1998 onboard the Russian Space Station MIR: cosmonauts Vladimir Solovyov and Pavel Vinogradov conducted the first experiments to obtain plasma-dust crystals in the 'Plazmennyi Kristall 1'(PK-1) device using the sun as a 'natural' ionization source. This experiment was followed afterwards by the PK-2 already utilizing its own DC plasma generator. A major step came only three years later with the PKE-Nefedov facility (formerly called PKE-3). Launched in February 2001 and operated in over 13 missions for five consecutive years in the Russian Segment of the International Space Station ISS, this bilateral German-Russian research facility has already shown some surprising, new behavior of radio-frequency induced complex plasmas. An advanced model of PKE-Nefedov, the PK-3 Plus experiment apparatus, is getting readied to be launched to ISS on Progress Cargo spacecraft 20P. Additional developments are in progress to continue this exciting growing research field with: (a) PK-4 utilizing high voltage DC controlled plasma, and (b) IMPACT Laboratory, the European Space Agency's next generation premier research laboratory for plasma and dust physics on the ISS. The paper will provide background information of each of the complex plasma research facilities.

  6. PREFACE: Muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, Robert H.; Nagamine, Kanetada

    2004-10-01

    To a particle physicist a muon is a member of the lepton family, a heavy electron possessing a mass of about 1/9 that of a proton and a spin of 1/2, which interacts with surrounding atoms and molecules electromagnetically. Since its discovery in 1937, the muon has been put to many uses, from tests of special relativity to deep inelastic scattering, from studies of nuclei to tests of weak interactions and quantum electrodynamics, and most recently, as a radiographic tool to see inside heavy objects and volcanoes. In 1957 Richard Garwin and collaborators, while conducting experiments at the Columbia University cyclotron to search for parity violation, discovered that spin-polarized muons injected into materials might be useful to probe internal magnetic fields. This eventually gave birth to the modern field of muSR, which stands for muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance, and is the subject of this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. Muons are produced in accelerators when high energy protons (generally >500 MeV) strike a target like graphite, producing pions which subsequently decay into muons. Most experiments carried out today use relatively low-energy (~4 MeV), positively-charged muons coming from pions decaying at rest in the skin of the production target. These muons have 100% spin polarization, a range in typical materials of about 180 mg cm-2, and are ideal for experiments in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Negatively-charged muons are also occasionally used to study such things as muonic atoms and muon-catalysed fusion. The muSR technique provides a local probe of internal magnetic fields and is highly complementary to inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance, for example. There are four primary muSR facilities in the world today: ISIS (Didcot, UK), KEK (Tsukuba, Japan), PSI (Villigen, Switzerland) and TRIUMF (Vancouver, Canada), serving about 500 researchers world-wide. A new facility, JPARC (Tokai, Japan

  7. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-04-07

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.

  8. The Future of School Facilities: Getting ahead of the Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeArmond, Michael; Taggart, Sara; Hill, Paul

    This paper asserts that instead of assuming that the future of learning has to take place in buildings we happen to have now, districts can let innovations in instruction and learning drive how they provide, design, and use school buildings. With this goal in mind, the paper looks at five trends in education and what they imply about the kinds of…

  9. Fermilab's SC Accelerator Magnet Program for Future U.S. HEP Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, Michael; Zlobin, Alexander; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The invention of SC accelerator magnets in the 1970s opened wide the possibilities for advancing the energy frontier of particle accelerators, while limiting the machine circumference and reducing their energy consumption. The successful development of SC accelerator magnets based on NbTi superconductor have made possible a proton-antiproton collider (Tevatron) at Fermilab, an electron-proton collider (HERA) at DESY, a relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at BNL and recently a proton-proton collider (LHC) at CERN. Further technological innovations and inventions are required as the US HEP looks forward towards the post-LHC energy or/and intensity frontiers. A strong, goal oriented national SC accelerator magnet program must take on this challenge to provide a strong base for the future of HEP in the U.S. The results and experience obtained by Fermilab during the past 30 years will allow us to play a leadership role in the SC accelerator magnet development in the U.S., in particular, focusing on magnets for a Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory [1]-[2]. In this paper, we summarize the required Muon Collider magnet needs and challenges, summarize the technology advances in the Fermilab accelerator magnet development over the past few years, and present and discuss our vision and long-term plans for these Fermilab-supported accelerator initiatives.

  10. Future Facilities for Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    Pulsars seen at gamma-ray energies offer insight into particle acceleration to very high energies, along with information about the geometry and interaction processes in the magnetospheres of these rotating neutron stars. During the next decade, a number of new gamma-ray facilities will become available for pulsar studies. This brief review describes the motivation for gamma-ray pulsar studies, the opportunities for such studies, and some specific discussion of the capabilities of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) for pulsar measurements.

  11. Future developments of INFN-LNL nuclear beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisoffi, G.

    2007-11-01

    The accelerator group at INFN-LNL has been mostly engaged, recently, in completing and commissioning the higher current injector of the linac booster ALPI (named PIAVE) and in constructing and assembling the front-end part of a high current driver linac for the RNB facility SPES. PIAVE, designed to accelerate ions with A/Q = < 8.5 up to 1.2 MeV/u, is now completed. The injector has been commissioned with O, Ar, Ne and Xe beams. Neon and argon beams have been delivered to experiments for a total of about 400 hours. A consolidation program of PIAVE and ALPI is planned, so as to deliver a larger variety of beams with a current range 10 div 100 pnA and with an energy exceeding the Coulomb barrier in relevant nuclear reaction cases. The RNB facility SPES, allowing a frontier program in RNB physics, is being designed and prototyped: beams of neutron rich medium-to-heavy mass nuclei will be produced inducing 238U fission with a 40 MeV 200μA proton beam impinging onto a multi-slice direct target. A further development of ALPI will make it best suitable for the re-acceleration of radioactive nuclear species, after charge breeding and isotope selection.

  12. OBSIP: An Evolving Facility for the Future of Geoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, B.; Lodewyk, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Pool 'OBSIP' was founded in 1999 as a National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored instrument facility that provides ocean bottom seismometers and technical support for research in the areas of marine geology, seismology, and geodynamics. OBSIP provides both short period instruments (for active source seismic refraction studies) and long period instruments (for long term passive experiments). OBSIP is comprised of three Institutional Instrument Contributors - Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), each of whom contribute instruments and technical support to the pool. In 2012, NSF funded the Incorporated Research Institutions of Seismology (IRIS) to develop an OBSIP Management Office. Through the management office, IRIS will bring is extensive experience in managing facilities (PASSCAL instrument center), supporting large research experiments (Earthscope), and providing high quality data through the DMC to OBSIP. In the past year, OBSIP has provided instruments for eight experiments and supported over 20 research cruises recovering and/or deploying instruments. The most extensive OBSIP experiment in the past few years has been the Cascadia Initiative. The Cascadia Initiative is an onshore/offshore seismic and geodetic experiment deployed in the Pacific Northwest to study questions surrounding the evolution of the Juan de Fuca plate and the Gorda plate. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, OBSIP IIC's built 60 new ocean bottom seismometers. Both LDEO and SIO designed new seismometer packages to withstand trawling by local fisherman for deployment in shallow areas. The Cascadia Initiative has required close cooperation between the OBSIP, the Deep Submergence Facility, the University National Oceanographic Laboratory System (who coordinates ship schedules for the cruises), and the Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team. At

  13. Measurement of the muon beam direction and muon flux for the T2K neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bay, F.; Bronner, C.; Ereditato, A.; Friend, M.; Hartz, M.; Hiraki, T.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Juget, F.; Kikawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Kubo, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Maruyama, T.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Otani, M.; Oyama, Y.; Patel, N.; Pistillo, C.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Tada, S.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yokoyama, M.

    2015-05-01

    The Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) neutrino experiment measures neutrino oscillations by using an almost pure muon neutrino beam produced at the J-PARC accelerator facility. The T2K muon monitor was installed to measure the direction and stability of the muon beam which is produced in conjunction with the muon neutrino beam. The systematic error in the muon beam direction measurement was estimated, using data and MC simulation, to be 0.28 mrad. During beam operation, the proton beam has been controlled using measurements from the muon monitor and the direction of the neutrino beam has been tuned to within 0.3 mrad with respect to the designed beam-axis. In order to understand the muon beam properties, measurement of the absolute muon yield at the muon monitor was conducted with an emulsion detector. The number of muon tracks was measured to be (4.06± 0.05± 0.10)× 10^4cm^{-2} normalized with 4× 10^{11} protons on target with 250 kA horn operation. The result is in agreement with the prediction, which is corrected based on hadron production data.

  14. OBSIP: An Evolving Facility for the Future of Geoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, B.; Aderhold, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Pool "OBSIP" is a National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored instrument facility that provides ocean bottom seismometers and technical support for research in the areas of marine geology, seismology, and geodynamics. OBSIP provides both short period instruments (for active source seismic refraction studies) and long period instruments (for long term passive experiments). OBSIP is comprised of three Institutional Instrument Contributors each of whom contribute instruments and technical support to the pool and an OBSIP Management Office. In 2015, OBSIP will provide instruments for six experiments and support nine research cruises recovering and/or deploying instruments. This includes the final recoveries for the Cascadia Initiative experiment and the Eastern North American Margin experiment, both multi-year community seismic experiments integrating large onshore and offshore deployments of instruments from multiple IICs. OBSIp supported additional experiments in New Zealand and Malawi, Africa. An active source experiment to image the magma plumbing of Santorini employs OBSIP's entire short period sensor pool. OBSIP is also incorporating new technical developments in the OBSIP fleet including long duration OBS technology, new shielding designs, and sensor upgrades. OBSIP continues to enable innovation in experiment design, instrument capabilities, and data return/QAQC tracking and adapts to the needs of a rapidly increasing and diversifying pool of users.

  15. Muons in gamma showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.; Vankov, C. P.; Halzen, F.

    1985-01-01

    Muon production in gamma-induced air showers, accounting for all major processes. For muon energies in the GeV region the photoproduction is by far the most important process, while the contribution of micron + micron pair creation is not negligible for TeV muons. The total rate of muons in gamma showers is, however, very low.

  16. Muon simulations for Super-Kamiokande, KamLAND, and CHOOZ

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Alfred; Horton-Smith, Glenn; Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.; Tonazzo, Alessandra

    2006-09-01

    Muon backgrounds at Super-Kamiokande, KamLAND, and CHOOZ are calculated using MUSIC. A modified version of the Gaisser sea-level muon distribution and a well-tested Monte Carlo integration method are introduced. Average muon energy, flux, and rate are tabulated. Plots of average energy and angular distributions are given. Implications for muon tracker design in future experiments are discussed.

  17. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-12-24

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams (?Beta Beams?), one based on decays of stored muon beams (?Neutrino Factory?), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam (?Superbeam?). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R&D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R&D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  18. Preparations for Muon Experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; Ankenbrandt, C.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments--the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment--is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration.

  19. Neutrino physics at a muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    King, B.J.

    1998-02-01

    This paper gives an overview of the neutrino physics possibilities at a future muon storage ring, which can be either a muon collider ring or a ring dedicated to neutrino physics that uses muon collider technology to store large muon currents. After a general characterization of the neutrino beam and its interactions, some crude quantitative estimates are given for the physics performance of a muon ring neutrino experiment (MURINE) consisting of a high rate, high performance neutrino detector at a 250 GeV muon collider storage ring. The paper is organized as follows. The next section describes neutrino production from a muon storage rings and gives expressions for event rates in general purpose and long baseline detectors. This is followed by a section outlining a serious design constraint for muon storage rings: the need to limit the radiation levels produced by the neutrino beam. The following two sections describe a general purpose detector and the experimental reconstruction of interactions in the neutrino target then, finally, the physics capabilities of a MURINE are surveyed.

  20. The Lab of the Future: Building Facilities that Attract Premier Faculty and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    Does the physical environment improve an institution's recruitment efforts? More specifically, could a facility such as a laboratory of the future attract the best and the brightest students and faculty? This issue has been the subject of at least two studies--first, "How Do Students Choose a College?" in 1986 by the Carnegie Foundation for the…

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-01-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. The CMS muon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, P.

    2002-02-01

    The muon detection system of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment is described. It consists of three different detector technologies: drift tubes in the barrel region, cathode strip chambers in the endcap region and resistive plate chambers in both barrel and endcap regions. The CMS muon detection system ensures excellent muon detection and efficient triggering in the pseudorapidity range 0< η<2.4. The most recent developments and some results from the R&D program will also be discussed.

  3. Muon Bunch Coalescing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Bhat, Chandra; Popovic, Milorad; Bogacz, Alex; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2007-06-25

    The idea of coalescing multiple muon bunches at high energy to enhance the luminosity of a muon collider provides many advantages. It circumvents space-charge, beam loading, and wakefield problems of intense low energy bunches while restoring the synergy between muon colliders and neutrino factories based on muon storage rings. A sampling of initial conceptual design work for a coalescing ring is presented here.

  4. Imaging Fukushima Daiichi reactors with muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Haruo; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Greene, Steve J.; Lukić, Zarija; Masuda, Koji; Milner, Edward C.; Morris, Christopher L.; Perry, John O.

    2013-05-01

    A study of imaging the Fukushima Daiichi reactors with cosmic-ray muons to assess the damage to the reactors is presented. Muon scattering imaging has high sensitivity for detecting uranium fuel and debris even through thick concrete walls and a reactor pressure vessel. Technical demonstrations using a reactor mockup, detector radiation test at Fukushima Daiichi, and simulation studies have been carried out. These studies establish feasibility for the reactor imaging. A few months of measurement will reveal the spatial distribution of the reactor fuel. The muon scattering technique would be the best and probably the only way for Fukushima Daiichi to make this determination in the near future.

  5. Imaging Fukushima Daiichi reactors with muons

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, Haruo; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Greene, Steve J.; Milner, Edward C.; Morris, Christopher L.; Lukic, Zarija; Masuda, Koji; Perry, John O.

    2013-05-15

    A study of imaging the Fukushima Daiichi reactors with cosmic-ray muons to assess the damage to the reactors is presented. Muon scattering imaging has high sensitivity for detecting uranium fuel and debris even through thick concrete walls and a reactor pressure vessel. Technical demonstrations using a reactor mockup, detector radiation test at Fukushima Daiichi, and simulation studies have been carried out. These studies establish feasibility for the reactor imaging. A few months of measurement will reveal the spatial distribution of the reactor fuel. The muon scattering technique would be the best and probably the only way for Fukushima Daiichi to make this determination in the near future.

  6. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; et al

    2016-03-01

    Here, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less thanmore » $$\\sim$$1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $$f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$$ at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.« less

  7. Intense muon beams and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    2000-10-05

    High intensity muon sources are needed in exploring neutrino factories, lepton flavor violating muon processes, and lower energy experiments as the stepping phase towards building higher energy {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. We present a brief overview, sketch of a neutrino source, and an example of a muon storage ring at BNL with detector(s) at Fermilab, Sudan, etc. Physics with low energy neutrino beams based on muon storage rings ({mu}SR) and conventional Horn Facilities are described and compared. CP violation Asymmetries and a new Statistical Figure of Merit to be used for comparison is given. Improvements in the sensitivity of low energy experiments to study Flavor changing neutral currents are also included.

  8. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  9. Study of muon-induced neutron production using accelerator muon beam at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; Lin, C. J.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Draeger, E.; White, C. G.; Luk, K. B.; Steiner, H.

    2015-08-17

    Cosmogenic muon-induced neutrons are one of the most problematic backgrounds for various underground experiments for rare event searches. In order to accurately understand such backgrounds, experimental data with high-statistics and well-controlled systematics is essential. We performed a test experiment to measure muon-induced neutron production yield and energy spectrum using a high-energy accelerator muon beam at CERN. We successfully observed neutrons from 160 GeV/c muon interaction on lead, and measured kinetic energy distributions for various production angles. Works towards evaluation of absolute neutron production yield is underway. This work also demonstrates that the setup is feasible for a future large-scale experiment for more comprehensive study of muon-induced neutron production.

  10. Ultra Slow Muon Project at J-PARC, MUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Y.; Nakahara, K.; Shimomura, K.; Strasser, P.; Kawamura, N.; Koda, A.; Makimura, S.; Fujimori, H.; Nishiyama, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Bakule, P.; Adachi, T.; Ogitsu, T.

    2009-03-17

    The muon science facility (MUSE), along with the neutron, hadron, and neutrino facilities, is one of the experimental areas of the J-PARC project, which was approved for construction at the Tokai JAEA site. The MUSE facility is located in the Materials and Life Science Facility (MLF), which is a building integrated to include both neutron and muon science programs. Construction of the MLF building was started in the beginning of 2004, and first muon beam is expected in the autumn of 2008.As a next step, we are planning to install, a Super Omega muon channel with a large acceptance of 400 msr, to extract the world strongest pulsed surface muon beam. Its goal is to extract 4x10{sup 8} surface muons/s for the generation of the intense ultra slow muons, utilizing laser resonant ionization of Mu by applying an intense pulsed VUV laser system. As maximum 1x10{sup 6} ultra slow muons/s will be expected, which will allow for the extension of {mu}SR into the field of thin film and surface science.

  11. Proceedings of the workshop on future hadron facilities in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics on future hadron facilities: Workshop on future hadron facilities in the US; 30 {times} 30 TeV-summary report; A high luminosity, 2 {times} 2 TeV collider in the tevatron tunnel; magnets working group; cryogenics discussion; vacuum report; antiproton source production; injector working group; interaction region working group; lattice/beam dynamics working group; LEBT for high-luminosity colliders; some notes on long-range beam-beam effects for the 2TeV collider; synchrotron radiation masks for high energy proton accelerators. Emittance preservation in a proton synchrotron; beam-beam interaction effects on betatron tunes; analytic solutions for phase trombone modules; and chromatic corrections of RHIC when one or two insertions is at {Beta}* = 0.5m.

  12. CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) HISTORY & STATUS & FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    FARABEE, O.A.

    2006-02-24

    In 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) decided to shut down the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) due to lack of national missions that justified the annual operating budget of approximately $88M/year. The initial vision was to ''deactive'' the facility to an industrially and radiologically safe condition to allow long-term, minimal surveillance storage until approximately 2045. This approach would minimize near term cash flow and allow the radioactive decay of activated components. The final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) would then be performed using then-current methodology in a safe and efficient manner. the philosophy has now changed to close coupling the initial deactivation with final D and D. This paper presents the status of the facility and focuses on the future challenge of sodium removal.

  13. Study of nuclear reactions in laser plasmas at future ELI-NP facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzalone, G.; Altana, C.; Anzalone, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Lamia, L.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Negoita, F.; Odorici, F.; Petrascu, H.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this contribution we will present the future activities that our collaboration will carry out at ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics), the new multi peta-watt Laser facility, currently under construction at Bucharest (Romania). The activities concerns the study of nuclear reactions in laser plasmas. In this framework we proposed the construction of a new, general-purpose experimental set-up able to detect and identify neutrons and charged particles.

  14. The Lunar L1 Gateway Concept: Supporting Future Major Space Science Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H.; Geffre, J.; Prusha, S.; Caroff, L.; Weisbin, C.

    2004-01-01

    We report here on a series of ongoing studies to evaluate alternative architectures for future space science facilities and how robots, humans, and autonomous systems might be optimally used to support them. This presentation outlines one scenario -- a "Gateway" at the Earth-Moon L1 point for supporting multiple options beyond Low Earth Orbit -- plus our process for evaluating human/robotic activities to construct telescopes.

  15. Telescience and microgravity. Impact on future facilities, ground segments and operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, R.

    Scientific activities related to experimentation in long duration microgravity missions can only be accomplished by the implementation of the Telescience Concept. Telescience is in fact the logical answer to the need of an intelligent interactive conduct of experiments, to the lack (or very little availability) of crew time on board of the Segments of the Columbus project and to the PIs demand for decentralized operations. Telescience could also be seen as the preparative phase for the ultimate, future exploitation of Microgravity by means of Expert Systems that will utilize AI and Robotics for routine operations (Data Factories, Space Productions and Commercial Enterprises). The implications of Telescience on future Space Activities is reviewed with reference to the Principal Investigator Activities, Crew Members Roles and Facilities. The possibilities offered by newly designed Facilities to be operated in Telescience are pointed out with reference to the scientific objectives that would not be achieved otherwise. Diagnostic facilities (mainly non invasive) that provide digital measurements to be inputted (in real time) into numerical codes for computation of field parameters are being considered. Ground Segment Structure, User Support Centers Organization and Test Bedding activities will be discussed as essential factors of the Telescience Scenario of the Multiuser, permanent platform Facilities for the Microgravity disciplines (Material, Fluid, Life and Engineering Science).

  16. Muon Cooling R&D Progress in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Derun

    2008-02-01

    Muon ionization cooling R&D is important for a neutrino factory and future muon collider. In addition to theoretical studies, much progress has been made in muon cooling channel hardware R&D since NuFact-2006. This paper reports the progress on hardware R&D that includes experimental RF test programs using 805-MHz RF cavity, superconducting (SC) solenoids (coupling coils), 201-MHz RF cavity, liquid hydrogen absorber and MUCOOL Test Area (MTA) experiment preparation for beam tests.

  17. A report on the Indiana University Workshop on future U.S. hadron facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, M. J.

    In July 1994 a workshop was held at Indiana University to study and discuss options for future hadron collider facilities in the United States, and to identify related R&D programs. The workshop was conducted under the auspices of the Accelerator Physics, Technologies, and Facilities Working Group of the DPF Long Term Planning Study. Roughly 50 participants from 17 institutions in the U.S. and Europe (CERN) were organized into six working groups to study magnets, cryogenics and vacuum, antiproton sources, injectors, interaction regions, and lattice and beam dynamics. Upgrades to existing facilities (namely, Fermilab) and a post-LHC facility were discussed at the workshop. In this paper, the discussion will focus on the post-LHC facility. One of the specific goals of the workshop was to develop a defensible parameters list for a 30 TeV x 30 TeV hadron collider with luminosity of 1 x 10(exp 34) cm(exp -2) sec(exp -1). While this accelerator would have only 50% higher energy than the SSC design, it was realized that the role of synchrotron radiation at this energy would significantly enhance the design and operation of the machine. Radiation damping times of a few hours, rather than one day, can be realized thus allowing less intense, but brighter proton beams.

  18. A report on the Indiana University Workshop on future U.S. hadron facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, M. J.

    1996-02-01

    In July 1994 a workshop was held at Indiana University to study and discuss options for future hadron collider facilities in the United States, and to identify related R&D programs. The workshop was conducted under the auspices of the Accelerator Physics, Technologies, and Facilities Working Group of the DPF Long Term Planning Study. Roughly 50 participants from 17 institutions in the U.S. and Europe (CERN) were organized into six working groups to study magnets, cryogenics and vacuum, antiproton sources, injectors, interaction regions, and lattice and beam dynamics. Upgrades to existing facilities (namely, Fermilab) and a post-LHC facility were discussed at the workshop. In this paper, the discussion will focus on the post-LHC facility. One of the specific goals of the workshop was to develop a defensible parameters list for a 30 TeV×30 TeV hadron collider with luminosity of 1×1034 cm-2 sec-1. While this accelerator would have only 50% higher energy than the SSC design, it was realized that the role of synchrotron radiation at this energy would significantly enhance the design and operation of the machine. Radiation damping times of a few hours, rather than one day, can be realized thus allowing less intense, but brighter proton beams.

  19. A report on the Indiana University Workshop on future U.S. hadron facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    In July 1994 a workshop was held at Indiana University to study and discuss options for future hadron collider facilities in the United States, and to identify related R&D programs. The workshop was conducted under the auspices of the Accelerator Physics, Technologies, and Facilities Working Group of the DPF Long Term Planning Study. Roughly 50 participants from 17 institutions in the U.S. and Europe (CERN) were organized into six working groups to study magnets, cryogenics and vacuum, antiproton sources, injectors, interaction regions, and lattice and beam dynamics. Upgrades to existing facilities (namely, Fermilab) and a post-LHC facility were discussed at the workshop. In this paper, the discussion will focus on the post-LHC facility. One of the specific goals of the workshop was to develop a defensible parameters list for a 30 TeV {times} 30 TeV hadron collider with luminosity of 1 {times} 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1}. While this accelerator would have only 50% higher energy than the SSC design, it was realized that the role of synchrotron radiation at this energy would significantly enhance the design and operation of the machine. Radiation damping times of a few hours, rather than one day, can be realized thus allowing less intense, but brighter proton beams.

  20. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  1. BUILDING 830 GAMMA IRRADIATION FACILITY EVALUATION OF OPTIONS FOR ITS FUTURE DISPOSITION.

    SciTech Connect

    BOWERMAN,B.; COWGILL,M.; HEISER,J.; MOSKOWITZ,P.

    1998-09-30

    In the spring of 1997, the Suffolk County Department of Health Services audited the BNL site, and identified the Building 830 Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) as an underground tank regulated under Suffolk County Health Code, Article 12. As a result of this audit, a project was initiated to review the GIF and to collect information to develop an options list for its future disposition. The overall objective of this task was to evaluate the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the GIF, including the proper disposal of the cobalt-60 sources currently located in the GIF. This objective was accomplished through the performance of the following subtasks. (1) Characterize the GIF and the cobalt-60 sources: (a) Compile available data on the physical and radiological characteristics of the gamma sources; (b) Conduct underwater surveys to verify visually the physical state of the sources, and if possible, their activity levels (curie content); and (c) Prepare the pool, to the extent possible, for removal of the sources. (2) Identify options for future disposition: (a) Contact other gamma facilities and find out their experiences with recycling, disposal, and D&D; and (b) Contact vendors for the disposal or recycling of the cobalt-60 sources. Identify options and factors affecting them, such as costs, regulatory issues, health and safety requirements, equipment availability. This report summarizes the results of these subtasks. The remainder of this introductory section gives a description of the GIF, provides a brief history of the facility, and discusses the applicable Article 12 requirements. Section 2 focuses on the sources themselves, and the current facility configuration. Contacts with other gamma facilities are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 presents the options developed from these contacts and from BNL experience, and their estimated costs. Costs are tabulated and compared in Section 5, and Section 6 presents conclusions.

  2. Multiple muons in MACRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinz, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the multiple muon events in the Monopole Astrophysics and Cosmic Ray Observatory detector was conducted to determine the cosmic ray composition. Particular emphasis is placed on the interesting primary cosmic ray energy region above 2000 TeV/nucleus. An extensive study of muon production in cosmic ray showers has been done. Results were used to parameterize the characteristics of muon penetration into the Earth to the location of a detector.

  3. The Muon Detector of Cms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunhua

    2005-04-01

    Muons are an unmistakable signature of most of the LHC physics is designed to explore. The ability to trigger on and reconstruct muons at highest luminorsities is central to the concept of CMS. CMS is characterized by simplicity of design, with one magnet whose solenoideal field facilitates precision racking in the central barrel region and triggering on muons through their bending in the tharnverse and side views. The CMS muon system has three purpose: muon identification, muon trigger and nuon momentum measurement.

  4. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs.

    PubMed

    Pomp, S; Bartlett, D T; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Röttger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-10-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe. PMID:24153422

  5. Materials Science Experiments Under Microgravity - A Review of History, Facilities, and Future Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Materials science experiments have been a key issue already since the early days of research under microgravity conditions. A microgravity environment facilitates processing of metallic and semiconductor melts without buoyancy driven convection and sedimentation. Hence, crystal growth of semiconductors, solidification of metallic alloys, and the measurement of thermo-physical parameters are the major applications in the field of materials science making use of these dedicated conditions in space. In the last three decades a large number of successful experiments have been performed, mainly in international collaborations. In parallel, the development of high-performance research facilities and the technological upgrade of diagnostic and stimuli elements have also contributed to providing optimum conditions to perform such experiments. A review of the history of materials science experiments in space focussing on the development of research facilities is given. Furthermore, current opportunities to perform such experiments onboard ISS are described and potential future options are outlined.

  6. Tandem injected relativistic heavy ion facility at Brookhaven: Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.; Barton, D.S.; Benjamin, J.; Chasman, C.; Foelsche, H.; Wegner, H.E.

    1987-04-01

    The Brookhaven Tandem Facility has been recently joined to the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) by means of an approx. =680 meter long heavy ion transfer line. The design and construction of this line are described as well as the Tandem and AGS modifications which made it possible to initiate a relativistic heavy ion research program. Operational experience and performance during the first 14.6 GeV/amu /sup 16/O and /sup 28/Si runs are reviewed. At present the facility is capable of accelerating ions up to mass approx.32. Future developments are described which will lead to the acceleration of heavier ions up to gold, and hopefully to the construction of a relativistic heavy ion collider for the entire mass range at center of mass energies up to 250 GeV per nucleon pair.

  7. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  8. Telecommunication using muon beams

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  9. Frontiers of muon spectroscopy—25 years of muon science at ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    The ISIS muon source developed with support from the European Community (EC) and groups at Grenoble, Parma, Uppsala and Munich in the late 1980s, with a single instrument providing many scientists with their first opportunity to explore the unique capabilities of muon spectroscopy. The timing was opportune, as the muon technique was making an important contribution to the study of the then recently discovered cuprate high T c superconductors. The ISIS user community developed rapidly over subsequent years, with the technique finding a broad range of applications in condensed matter physics, materials science and chemistry. The single instrument was hugely oversubscribed, and the importance of the technique was recognized in 1993 with a further grant from the EC to develop the triple beamline facility that is currently available at ISIS. During 2009 the suite of spectrometers available at the facility received a major upgrade, with the Science and Technology Facilities Council funding the development of a 5 T high field instrument that has enabled entirely new applications of muon spectroscopy to be explored. The facility continues to flourish, with a strong user community exploiting the technique to support research across an increasingly broad range of subject areas. Condensed matter science continues to be a major area of interest, with applications including semiconductors and dielectrics, superconductors, magnetism, interstitial diffusion and charge transport. Recently, however, molecular science and radical chemistry have become prominent in the ISIS programme, applications where the availability of high magnetic fields is frequently vital to the success of the experiments. For ISIS, 23 March 2012 marked a significant milestone, it being 25 years since muons were first produced at the facility for research in condensed matter and molecular science. To celebrate, the ISIS muon group organized a science symposium with the theme 'Frontiers of Muon Spectroscopy

  10. Which future for electromagnetic Astronomy: Ground Based vs Space Borne Large Astrophysical Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubertini, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    The combined use of large ground based facilities and large space observatories is playing a key role in the advance of astrophysics by providing access to the entire electromagnetic spectrum, allowing high sensitivity observations from the lower radio wavelength to the higher energy gamma rays.It is nowadays clear that a forward steps in the understanding of the Universe evolution and large scale structure formation is essential and only possible with the combined use of multiwavelength imaging and spectral high resolution instruments.The increasing size, complexity and cost of large ground and space observatories places a growing emphasis on international collaboration. If the present set of astronomical facilities is impressive and complete, with nicely complementary space and ground based telescopes, the scenario becomes worrisome and critical in the next two decades. In fact, only a few ‘Large’ main space missions are planned and there is a need to ensure proper ground facility coverage: the synergy Ground-Space is not escapable in the timeframe 2020-2030.The scope of this talk is to review the current astronomical instrumentation panorama also in view of the recent major national agencies and international bodies programmatic decisions.This Division B meeting give us a unique opportunity to review the current situation and discuss the future perspectives taking advantage of the large audience ensured by the IAU GA.

  11. Underwater measurements of muon intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorov, V. M.; Pustovetov, V. P.; Trubkin, Y. A.; Kirilenkov, A. V.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental measurements of cosmic ray muon intensity deep underwater aimed at determining a muon absorption curve are of considerable interest, as they allow to reproduce independently the muon energy spectrum at sea level. The comparison of the muon absorption curve in sea water with that in rock makes it possible to determine muon energy losses caused by nuclear interactions. The data available on muon absorption in water and that in rock are not equivalent. Underground measurements are numerous and have been carried out down to the depth of approx. 15km w.e., whereas underwater muon intensity have been measured twice and only down to approx. 3km deep.

  12. Muons and neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first generation of large and precise detectors, some initially dedicated to search for nucleon decay has accumulated significant statistics on neutrinos and high-energy muons. A second generation of even better and bigger detectors are already in operation or in advanced construction stage. The present set of experimental data on muon groups and neutrinos is qualitatively better than several years ago and the expectations for the following years are high. Composition studies with underground muon groups, neutrino detection, and expected extraterrestrial neutrino fluxes are discussed.

  13. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    submitted 227 contributions, which were intensively discussed during day and evening sessions. The scientific program was centered around invited talks from speakers outside the μSR community, who presented lectures on topics where μSR is giving or expected to give significant contributions. The invited speakers, covering various fields of interest, included Radu Coldea (Oxford, Quantum Magnetism), Claude- Henri Delmas (Bordeaux, Electro- and Solid State Chemistry), Dirk Johrendt (Munich, Iron Based Materials), Marc-Henri Julien (Grenoble, Cuprate Superconductors), Manfred Fiebig (Zürich, Multiferroics), Allan MacDonald (Austin, Topological Electronic States), Hidenori Takagi (Stuttgart and Tokyo, Transition Metal Oxides), and Jean-Marc Triscone (Geneva, Oxide Heterostructures). In addition to an overview about status and progress of the existing facilities in Europe, Canada and Japan, future projects and new ideas for μSR facilities in South Korea, China and the USA were presented. A special evening session was held to discuss about muon site and muon states calculations by DFT and other techniques. Several talks and posters can be found on the conference web page www.psi.ch/muSR2014. In a ceremony at the beginning of the conference, Roberto De Renzi from the University of Parma was awarded the 2014 Yamazaki Prize for muon science by the International Society for Muon Spin Spectroscopy (ISMS) for his sustained and exceptional contributions to the development of the muon spin relaxation technique to investigate magnetism and superconductivity and for promoting synergies between μSR and NMR. In the closing session Rob Kie (UBC Vancouver and TRIUMF) very effectively summarized the five days of meeting, while giving an enlightening personal impression. In the same session five best poster prizes were awarded and ISMS gave two prizes to young researchers presenting outstanding work at the conference. The conference organizers also on behalf of the entire μSR community are

  14. Rare kaon, muon, and pion decay

    SciTech Connect

    Littenberg, L.

    1998-12-01

    The author discusses the status of and prospects for the study of rare decays of kaons, muons, and pions. Studies of rare kaon decays are entering an interesting new phase wherein they can deliver important short-distance information. It should be possible to construct an alternative unitarity triangle to that determined in the B sector, and thus perform a critical check of the Standard Model by comparing the two. Rare muon decays are beginning to constrain supersymmetric models in a significant way, and future experiments should reach sensitivities which this kind of model must show effects, or become far less appealing.

  15. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  16. Muons in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayden, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    Positive muons have long been used as extrinsic probes in chemistry, offering unique properties for the investigation of local magnetism, dynamics, transport and radical kinetics. Exciting new developments in muon beam lines offer the opportunity of extending these studies selectively to surfaces permitting, for example, the detection of increased mobility of polymer chains at the surface of a polymer film. So called pump and probe methods, involving external perturbations by laser irradiation to manipulate vibrational and electronic states, can be followed by muon pulses allowing the probing of the properties of these states. Muoniated radical probes are finding greater use in soft matter. Selectivity is achieved in these complex systems through an appropriate target molecule giving the chance to measure partitioning and interfacial transfer in surfactant systems. Improvements in sample environments allow the observation of muons in increasingly extreme combinations of temperature and pressure, such as supercritical water, allowing the characterization of the chemistry in these systems.

  17. Decisional tool to assess current and future process robustness in an antibody purification facility.

    PubMed

    Stonier, Adam; Simaria, Ana Sofia; Smith, Martin; Farid, Suzanne S

    2012-07-01

    Increases in cell culture titers in existing facilities have prompted efforts to identify strategies that alleviate purification bottlenecks while controlling costs. This article describes the application of a database-driven dynamic simulation tool to identify optimal purification sizing strategies and visualize their robustness to future titer increases. The tool harnessed the benefits of MySQL to capture the process, business, and risk features of multiple purification options and better manage the large datasets required for uncertainty analysis and optimization. The database was linked to a discrete-event simulation engine so as to model the dynamic features of biopharmaceutical manufacture and impact of resource constraints. For a given titer, the tool performed brute force optimization so as to identify optimal purification sizing strategies that minimized the batch material cost while maintaining the schedule. The tool was applied to industrial case studies based on a platform monoclonal antibody purification process in a multisuite clinical scale manufacturing facility. The case studies assessed the robustness of optimal strategies to batch-to-batch titer variability and extended this to assess the long-term fit of the platform process as titers increase from 1 to 10 g/L, given a range of equipment sizes available to enable scale intensification efforts. Novel visualization plots consisting of multiple Pareto frontiers with tie-lines connecting the position of optimal configurations over a given titer range were constructed. These enabled rapid identification of robust purification configurations given titer fluctuations and the facility limit that the purification suites could handle in terms of the maximum titer and hence harvest load. PMID:22641562

  18. Internships and UNAVCO: Training the Future Geoscience Workforce Through the NSF GAGE Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. R.; MacPherson-Krutsky, C. C.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Bartel, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Facilities are uniquely positioned to both serve a broad, national audience and provide unique workforce experience to students and recent graduates. Intentional efforts dedicated to broadening participation in the future geoscience workforce at the NSF GAGE (Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope) Facility operated by UNAVCO, are designed to meet the needs of the next generation of students and professionals. As a university-governed consortium facilitating research and education in the geosciences, UNAVCO is well-situated to both prepare students for geoscience technical careers and advanced research positions. Since 1998, UNAVCO has offered over 165 student assistant or intern positions including engineering, data services, education and outreach, and business support. UNAVCO offers three formal programs: the UNAVCO Student Internship Program (USIP), Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS), and the Geo-Launchpad (GLP) internship program. Interns range from community college students up through graduate students and recent Masters graduates. USIP interns gain real-world work experience in a professional setting, collaborate with teams toward a common mission, and contribute their knowledge, skills, and abilities to the UNAVCO community. RESESS interns conduct authentic research with a scientist in the Front Range area as well as participate in a structured professional development series. GLP students are in their first 2 years of higher education and work alongside UNAVCO technical staff gaining valuable work experience and insight into the logistics of supporting scientific research. UNAVCO's efforts in preparing the next generation of scientists largely focuses on increasing diversity in the geosciences, whether continuing academic studies or moving into the workforce. To date, well over half of our interns and student assistants come from backgrounds historically underrepresented in the geosciences. Over 80% of former interns

  19. Potential applications of advanced remote handling and maintenance technology to future waste handling facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kring, C.T.; Herndon, J.N.; Meacham, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been advancing the technology in remote handling and remote maintenance of in-cell systems planned for future US nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Much of the experience and technology developed over the past decade in this endeavor are directly applicable to the in-cell systems being considered for the facilities of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). The ORNL developments are based on the application of teleoperated force-reflecting servomanipulators controlled by an operator completely removed from the hazardous environment. These developments address the nonrepetitive nature of remote maintenance in the unstructured environments encountered in a waste handling facility. Employing technological advancements in dexterous manipulators, as well as basic design guidelines that have been developed for remotely maintained equipment and processes, can increase operation and maintenance system capabilities, thereby allowing the attainment of two Federal Waste Management System major objectives: decreasing plant personnel radiation exposure and increasing plant availability by decreasing the mean-time-to-repair in-cell maintenance and process equipment.

  20. Dosimetry at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1993-10-01

    Although the primary reason for the existence of the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility is to provide basic data on the physics of systems of fissile material, the physical arrangements and ability to provide sources of radiation have led to applications for all types of radiation dosimetry. In the broad definition of radiation phenomena, the facility has provided sources to evaluate biological effects, radiation shielding and transport, and measurements of basic parameters such as the evaluation of delayed neutron parameters. Within the last 15 years, many of the radiation measurements have been directed to calibration and intercomparison of dosimetry related to nuclear criticality safety. Future plans include (1) the new applications of Godiva IV, a bare-metal pulse assembly, for dosimetry (including an evaluation of neutron and gamma-ray room return); (2) a proposal to relocate the Health Physics Research Reactor from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to Los Alamos, which will provide the opportunity to continue the application of a primary benchmark source to radiation dosimetry; and (3) a proposal to employ SHEBA, a low-enrichment solution assembly, for accident dosimetry and evaluation.

  1. Muon tomography of rock density using Micromegas-TPC telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivert, Fanny; Busto, José; Gaffet, Stéphane; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Brunner, Jurgen; Salin, Pierre; Decitre, Jean-Baptiste; Lázaro Roche, Ignacio; Martin, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g., seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The current work is based on a recently developed method to investigate in situ the density of rocks using a measurement of the muon flux, whose attenuation depends on the quantity of matter the particles travel through and hence on the rock density and thickness. The present project (T2DM2) aims at performing underground muon flux measurements in order to characterize spatial and temporal rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measured with a new muon telescope device using Micromegas-Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detectors. The first step of the work presented covers the muon flux simulation based on the Gaisser model (Gaisser T., 1990), for the muon flux at the ground level, and on the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the propagation of muons through the rock. The results show that the muon flux distortion caused by density variations is enough significant to be observed at 500 m depth for measurement times of about one month. This time-scale is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes within the unsaturated Karst zone where LSBB is located. The work now focuses on the optimization of the detector layout along the LSBB galleries in order to achieve the best sensitivity.

  2. Thermal protection system technology and facility needs for demanding future planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laub, B.; Venkatapathy, E.

    2004-02-01

    NASA has successfully launched numerous science missions to inner and outer planets in our solar system of which the most challenging were to Venus and Jupiter and the knowledge gained from those missions have been invaluable yet incomplete. Future missions will be built on what we have learned from the past missions but they will be more demanding from both the science as well as the mission design and engineering perspectives. The Solar System Exploration Decadal Survey (SSEDS) produced for NASA by the National Research Council identified a broad range of science objectives many of which can only be satisfied with atmospheric entry probes. The SSEDS recommended new probe/lander missions to both Venus and Jupiter. The Pioneer-Venus probe mission was launched in August 1978 and four probes successfully entered the Venusian atmosphere in December 1978. The Galileo mission was launched in October 1989 and one probe successfully entered the Jovian atmosphere in December 1995. The thermal protection system requirements for these two missions were unlike any other planetary probes and required fully dense carbon phenolic for the forebody heat shield. Developing thermal protection systems to accomplish future missions outlined in the Decadal Survey presents a technology challenge since they will be more demanding than these past missions. Unlike Galileo, carbon phenolic may not be an adequate TPS for a future Jupiter multiprobe mission since non-equatorial probes will enter at significantly higher velocity than the Galileo equatorial probe and the entry heating scales approximately with the cube of the entry velocity. At such heating rates the TPS mass fraction for a carbon phenolic heat shield would be prohibitive. A new, robust and efficient TPS is required for such probes. The Giant Planet Facility (GPF), developed and employed during the development of the TPS for the Galileo probe was dismantled after completion of the program. Furthermore, flight data from the

  3. Toward the Computational Prediction of Muon Sites and Interaction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfà, Pietro; De Renzi, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The rapid developments of computational quantum chemistry methods and supercomputing facilities motivate the renewed interest in the analysis of the muon/electron interactions in μSR experiments with ab initio approaches. Modern simulation methods seem to be able to provide the answers to the frequently asked questions of many μSR experiments: where is the muon? Is it a passive probe? What are the interaction parameters governing the muon-sample interaction? In this review we describe some of the approaches used to provide quantitative estimations of the aforementioned quantities and we provide the reader with a short discussion on the current developments in this field.

  4. Design of the muon collider lattice: Present status

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.; Courant, E.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-05-01

    The last component of a muon collider facility, as presently envisioned, is a colliding-beam storage ring. Design studies on various problems for this ring have been in progress over the past year. In this paper we discuss the current status of the design. The projected muon currents require very low beta values at the IP, {beta}* = 3 mm, in order to achieve the design luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The beta values in the final-focus quadrupoles are roughly 400 km. To cancel the corresponding chromaticities, sextupole schemes for local correction have been included in the optics of the experimental insertion. The hour-glass effect constraints the bunch length to be comparable too. To obtain such short bunches with reasonable rf voltage requires a very small value of the momentum compaction a, which can be obtained by using flexible momentum compaction (FMC) modules in the arcs. A preliminary design of a complete collider ring has now been made; it uses an experimental insertion and arc modules as well as a utility insertion. The layout of this ring is shown schematically, and its parameters are summarized. Though some engineering features are unrealistic, and the beam performance needs some improvement, we believe that this study can serve as the basis for a workable collider design. The remaining sections of the paper will describe the lattice, show beam behaviour, and discuss future design studies.

  5. Design and Performance of the ATLAS Muon Detector Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polini, Alessandro; ATLAS Muon Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    Muon detection plays a key role at the Large Hadron Collider. The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer includes Monitored Drift Tubes (MDT) and Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) for precision momentum measurement in the toroidal magnetic field. Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in the barrel region, and Thin Gap Chambers (TGC) in the end-caps, provide the level-1 trigger and a second coordinate used for tracking in conjunction with the MDT. The Detector Control System of each subdetector is required to monitor and safely operate tens of thousand of channels, which are distributed on several subsystems, including low and high voltage power supplies, trigger and front-end electronics, currents and thresholds monitoring, alignment and environmental sensors, gas and electronic infrastructure. The system is also required to provide a level of abstraction for ease of operation as well as expert level actions and detailed analysis of archived data. The hardware architecture and software solutions adopted are shown along with results from the commissioning phase and the routine operation with colliding beams at 3.5 + 3.5 TeV. Design peculiarities of each subsystem and their use to monitor the detector and the accelerator performance are discussed along with the effort for a simple and coherent operation in a running experiment. The material presented can be a base to future test facilities and projects.

  6. Ultra slow muon microscopy by laser resonant ionization at J-PARC, MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Y.; Ikedo, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Strasser, P.; Kawamura, N.; Nishiyama, K.; Koda, A.; Fujimori, H.; Makimura, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nagatomo, T.; Kadono, R.; Torikai, E.; Iwasaki, M.; Wada, S.; Saito, N.; Okamura, K.; Yokoyama, K.; Ito, T.; Higemoto, W.

    2013-04-01

    As one of the principal muon beam line at the J-PARC muon facility (MUSE), we are now constructing a Muon beam line (U-Line), which consists of a large acceptance solenoid made of mineral insulation cables (MIC), a superconducting curved transport solenoid and superconducting axial focusing magnets. There, we can extract 2 × 108/s surface muons towards a hot tungsten target. At the U-Line, we are now establishing a new type of muon microscopy; a new technique with use of the intense ultra-slow muon source generated by resonant ionization of thermal Muonium (designated as Mu; consisting of a μ + and an e - ) atoms generated from the surface of the tungsten target. In this contribution, the latest status of the Ultra Slow Muon Microscopy project, fully funded, is reported.

  7. Muon background studies for shallow depth Double - Chooz near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, H.

    2015-08-17

    Muon events are one of the main concerns regarding background in neutrino experiments. The placement of experimental set-ups in deep underground facilities reduce considerably their impact on the research of the expected signals. But in the cases where the detector is installed on surface or at shallow depth, muon flux remains high, being necessary their precise identification for further rejection. Total flux, mean energy or angular distributions are some of the parameters that can help to characterize the muons. Empirically, the muon rate can be measured in an experiment by a number of methods. Nevertheless, the capability to determine the muons angular distribution strongly depends on the detector features, while the measurement of the muon energy is quite difficult. Also considering that on-site measurements can not be extrapolated to other sites due to the difference on the overburden and its profile, it is necessary to find an adequate solution to perform the muon characterization. The method described in this work to obtain the main features of the muons reaching the experimental set-up, is based on the muon transport simulation by the MUSIC software, combined with a dedicated sampling algorithm for shallow depth installations based on a modified Gaisser parametrization. This method provides all the required information about the muons for any shallow depth installation if the corresponding overburden profile is implemented. In this work, the method has been applied for the recently commissioned Double - Chooz near detector, which will allow the cross-check between the simulation and the experimental data, as it has been done for the far detector.

  8. Muon background studies for shallow depth Double - Chooz near detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, H.

    2015-08-01

    Muon events are one of the main concerns regarding background in neutrino experiments. The placement of experimental set-ups in deep underground facilities reduce considerably their impact on the research of the expected signals. But in the cases where the detector is installed on surface or at shallow depth, muon flux remains high, being necessary their precise identification for further rejection. Total flux, mean energy or angular distributions are some of the parameters that can help to characterize the muons. Empirically, the muon rate can be measured in an experiment by a number of methods. Nevertheless, the capability to determine the muons angular distribution strongly depends on the detector features, while the measurement of the muon energy is quite difficult. Also considering that on-site measurements can not be extrapolated to other sites due to the difference on the overburden and its profile, it is necessary to find an adequate solution to perform the muon characterization. The method described in this work to obtain the main features of the muons reaching the experimental set-up, is based on the muon transport simulation by the MUSIC software, combined with a dedicated sampling algorithm for shallow depth installations based on a modified Gaisser parametrization. This method provides all the required information about the muons for any shallow depth installation if the corresponding overburden profile is implemented. In this work, the method has been applied for the recently commissioned Double - Chooz near detector, which will allow the cross-check between the simulation and the experimental data, as it has been done for the far detector.

  9. Advancing EDL Technologies for Future Space Missions: From Ground Testing Facilities to Ablative Heatshields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovitch, Jason

    Motivated by recent MSL results where the ablation rate of the PICA heatshield was over-predicted, and staying true to the objectives outlined in the NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities report, this work focuses on advancing EDL technologies for future space missions. Due to the difficulties in performing flight tests in the hypervelocity regime, a new ground testing facility called the vertical expansion tunnel is proposed. The adverse effects from secondary diaphragm rupture in an expansion tunnel may be reduced or eliminated by orienting the tunnel vertically, matching the test gas pressure and the accelerator gas pressure, and initially separating the test gas from the accelerator gas by density stratification. If some sacrifice of the reservoir conditions can be made, the VET can be utilized in hypervelocity ground testing, without the problems associated with secondary diaphragm rupture. The performance of different constraints for the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE) method is investigated in the context of modeling reacting flows characteristic to ground testing facilities, and re-entry conditions. The effectiveness of different constraints are isolated, and new constraints previously unmentioned in the literature are introduced. Three main benefits from the RCCE method were determined: 1) the reduction in number of equations that need to be solved to model a reacting flow; 2) the reduction in stiffness of the system of equations needed to be solved; and 3) the ability to tabulate chemical properties as a function of a constraint once, prior to running a simulation, along with the ability to use the same table for multiple simulations. Finally, published physical properties of PICA are compiled, and the composition of the pyrolysis gases that form at high temperatures internal to a heatshield is investigated. A necessary link between the composition of the solid resin, and the composition of the pyrolysis gases created is provided

  10. Precision muon physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorringe, T. P.; Hertzog, D. W.

    2015-09-01

    The muon is playing a unique role in sub-atomic physics. Studies of muon decay both determine the overall strength and establish the chiral structure of weak interactions, as well as setting extraordinary limits on charged-lepton-flavor-violating processes. Measurements of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment offer singular sensitivity to the completeness of the standard model and the predictions of many speculative theories. Spectroscopy of muonium and muonic atoms gives unmatched determinations of fundamental quantities including the magnetic moment ratio μμ /μp, lepton mass ratio mμ /me, and proton charge radius rp. Also, muon capture experiments are exploring elusive features of weak interactions involving nucleons and nuclei. We will review the experimental landscape of contemporary high-precision and high-sensitivity experiments with muons. One focus is the novel methods and ingenious techniques that achieve such precision and sensitivity in recent, present, and planned experiments. Another focus is the uncommonly broad and topical range of questions in atomic, nuclear and particle physics that such experiments explore.

  11. Fukushima Daiichi Muon Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    Japanese government announced cold-shutdown condition of the reactors at Fukushima Daiichi by the end of 2011, and mid- and long-term roadmap towards decommissioning has been drawn. However, little is known for the conditions of the cores because access to the reactors has been limited by the high radiation environment. The debris removal from the Unit 1 - 3 is planned to start as early as 2020, but the dismantlement is not easy without any realistic information of the damage to the cores, and the locations and amounts of the fuel debris. Soon after the disaster of Fukushima Daiichi, several teams in the US and Japan proposed to apply muon transmission or scattering imagings to provide information of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors without accessing inside the reactor building. GEANT4 modeling studies of Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 and 2 showed clear superiority of the muon scattering method over conventional transmission method. The scattering method was demonstrated with a research reactor, Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA), where a fuel assembly was imaged with 3-cm resolution. The muon scattering imaging of Fukushima Daiichi was approved as a national project and is aiming at installing muon trackers to Unit 2. A proposed plan includes installation of muon trackers on the 2nd floor (operation floor) of turbine building, and in front of the reactor building. Two 7mx7m detectors were assembled at Toshiba and tested.

  12. Assessing the feasibility of interrogating nuclear waste storage silos using cosmic-ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, F.; Bonechi, L.; Cimmino, L.; D'Alessandro, R.; Ireland, D. G.; Kaiser, R.; Mahon, D. F.; Mori, N.; Noli, P.; Saracino, G.; Shearer, C.; Viliani, L.; Yang, G.

    2015-06-01

    Muon radiography is a fast growing field in applied scientific research. In recent years, many detector technologies and imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering and absorption properties of cosmic-ray muons have been developed for the non-destructive assay of various structures across a wide range of applications. This work presents the first results that assess the feasibility of using muon radiography to interrogate waste silos within the U.K. Nuclear Industry. Two such approaches, using different techniques that exploit each of these properties, have previously been published, and show promising results from both simulation and experimental data for the detection of shielded high-Z materials and density variations from volcanic assay. Both detection systems used are based on scintillator and photomultiplier technologies. Results from dedicated simulation studies using both these proven technologies and image reconstruction techniques are presented for an intermediate-sized legacy nuclear waste storage facility filled with concrete and an array of uranium samples. Both results highlight the potential to identify uranium objects of varying thicknesses greater than 5 cm within real-time durations of several weeks. Increased contributions from Coulomb scattering within the concrete matrix of the structure hinder the ability of both approaches to resolve similar objects of 2 cm dimensions even with increased statistics. These results are all dependent on both the position of the objects within the facility and the locations of the detectors. Results for differing thicknesses of concrete, which reflect the non-standard composition of these complex, legacy structures under interrogation, are also presented alongside studies performed for a series of data collection durations. It is anticipated that with further research and optimisation of detector technologies and geometries, muon radiography in one, or both of these forms, will play a key role in future

  13. Muon Reconstruction and Identification in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, A.

    2010-02-10

    We present the design strategies and status of the CMS muon reconstruction and identification identification software. Muon reconstruction and identification is accomplished through a variety of complementary algorithms. The CMS muon reconstruction software is based on a Kalman filter technique and reconstructs muons in the standalone muon system, using information from all three types of muon detectors, and links the resulting muon tracks with tracks reconstructed in the silicon tracker. In addition, a muon identification algorithm has been developed which tries to identify muons with high efficiency while maintaining a low probability of misidentification. The muon identification algorithm is complementary by design to the muon reconstruction algorithm that starts track reconstruction in the muon detectors. The identification algorithm accepts reconstructed tracks from the inner tracker and attempts to quantify the muon compatibility for each track using associated calorimeter and muon detector hit information. The performance status is based on detailed detector simulations as well as initial studies using cosmic muon data.

  14. Closure of the Fast Flux Test Facility: Current Status and Future Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Farabee, O.A.; Witherspoon, W.V.

    2008-01-15

    K) that was used as an intermediate cooling fluid in several FFTF systems has been drained and removed or flushed to sodium systems where it became mixed with the sodium. The in-containment hot cell has minimal sodium contamination, is currently inerted with argon and is being used for loading of the T-3 transportation cask with the sodium-bonded fuel for transportation to Idaho National Laboratory. The majority of the fuel handling machines are still operational and being used for loading the sodium-bonded fuel into the T-3 casks. This equipment will be shut down immediately following completion of shipment of the sodium-bonded fuel. The majority of hotel systems are still operating. Four of the eight 400-ton chillers have been shut down and four of the cooling towers have been shut down. The argon system is operational and supplying gas for sodium systems cover gas, in-containment hot cell atmosphere and fuel handling systems. The nitrogen system remains in service supplying cover gas to the demineralized water system and fire suppression systems. Eleven of the facilities nineteen transformers containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been removed and significant re-routing of power has been performed to support the long term minimum cost surveillance mode. Future plans include the complete deactivation, the long-term surveillance and maintenance, the sodium disposition and the decontamination and decommissioning The most complex and costly activity during the decontamination and decommissioning phase will be the removal of the 'residual sodium' in the sodium systems. It was impractical to remove the residual sodium during the systems draining evolution. It is estimated that approximately 24,000 liters (6,400 gallons) remain within the systems. The complexity of design of the FFTF exceeds any sodium facility in the United States in which sodium removal has occurred. There are a total of 21 miles of sodium piping in the FFTF as well as three large vessels (the

  15. Radiation impact caused by activation of air from the future GSI accelerator facility fair.

    PubMed

    Gutermuth, F; Wildermuth, H; Radon, T; Fehrenbacher, G

    2005-01-01

    The Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt is planning a new accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). Two future experimental areas are regarded to be the most decisive points concerning the activation of air. One is the area for the production of antiprotons. A second crucial experimental area is the so-called Super Fragment Separator. The production of radioactive isotopes in air is calculated using the residual nuclei option of the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The results are compared with the data for the activation of air given by Sullivan and in IAEA report 283. The resulting effective dose is calculated using a program package from the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection, the Bundesamt für Stranlenschutz. The results demonstrate that a direct emission of the total radioactivity produced into the air will probably conflict with the limits of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance. Special measures have to be planned in order to reduce the amount of radioactivity released into the air. PMID:16381762

  16. Prototype performance of novel muon telescope detector at STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan,L.; Ames, V.

    2008-02-04

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design [l]. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRF'C. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution.

  17. Prototype Performance of Novel Muon Telescope Detector at STAR.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan,L.

    2008-04-05

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRPC. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution.

  18. MUON EDM EXPERIMENT USING STAGE II OF THE NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNOW,R.C.; GALLARDO,J.C.; MORSE,W.M.; SEMERTZIDIS,Y.K.

    2002-07-01

    During the second stage of a future neutrino factory unprecedented numbers of bunched muons will become available. The cooled medium-energy muon beam could be used for a high sensitivity search for an electric dipole moment (EDM) of the muon with a sensitivity better than 10{sup -24}e {center_dot} cm. This will make the sensitivity of the EDM experiment to non-standard physics competitive and in many models more sensitive than the present limits on edms of the electron and nucleons. The experimental design exploits the strong motional electric field sensed by relativistic particles in a magnetic storage ring.

  19. Developments at the ISIS muon source and the concomitant benefit to the user community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, A. D.; Adams, D. J.; Baker, P. J.; Bekasovs, A.; Coomer, F. C.; Cottrell, S. P.; Higgins, S. D.; Jago, S. J. S.; Jones, K. G.; Lord, J. S.; Markvardsen, A.; Parker, P. G.; Peck, J. N. T.; Pratt, F. L.; Telling, M. T. F.; Williamson, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    For the last 27 years, muon experiments at ISIS have been making a significant contribution to a number of scientific fields. However, as a community of researchers, we are always aiming to improve and extend the instruments' capabilities. In this paper we will review the current significant developments at the ISIS muon facility, namely the primary beamline upgrade, proton pulse compression and the MANTID muon analysis package.

  20. Data management and its role in delivering science at DOE BES user facilities - Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen D.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Ren, Shelly; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S.; Jemian, Pete R.; Luitz, Steffen; Salnikov, Andrei A.; Gaponenko, Igor; Proffen, Thomas; Lewis, Paul; Green, Mark L.

    2009-07-01

    The primary mission of user facilities operated by Basic Energy Sciences under the Department of Energy is to produce data for users in support of open science and basic research [1]. We trace back almost 30 years of history across selected user facilities illustrating the evolution of facility data management practices and how these practices have related to performing scientific research. The facilities cover multiple techniques such as X-ray and neutron scattering, imaging and tomography sciences. Over time, detector and data acquisition technologies have dramatically increased the ability to produce prolific volumes of data challenging the traditional paradigm of users taking data home upon completion of their experiments to process and publish their results. During this time, computing capacity has also increased dramatically, though the size of the data has grown significantly faster than the capacity of one's laptop to manage and process this new facility produced data. Trends indicate that this will continue to be the case for yet some time. Thus users face a quandary for how to manage today's data complexity and size as these may exceed the computing resources users have available to themselves. This same quandary can also stifle collaboration and sharing. Realizing this, some facilities are already providing web portal access to data and computing thereby providing users access to resources they need [2]. Portal based computing is now driving researchers to think about how to use the data collected at multiple facilities in an integrated way to perform their research, and also how to collaborate and share data. In the future, inter-facility data management systems will enable next tier cross-instrument-cross facility scientific research fuelled by smart applications residing upon user computer resources. We can learn from the medical imaging community that has been working since the early 1990's to integrate data from across multiple modalities to achieve

  1. Back to the Future: The Modernization of the Alaska Satellite Facility Data Access Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garron, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) downlinks, archives, and distributes remote-sensing data, specializing in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data access. People interested in ASF data access the data holdings through the User Remote Sensing Access interface, or URSA. URSA is a user-friendly, relatively intuitive, data search and order interface designed for on-demand processing of the SAR data holdings at ASF. URSA remains a popular interface with the SAR data community, however lessons learned and technological advancements since the release of URSA in 2006 have indicated that the next generation of user interface for these data is warranted. In addition, ASF is creating a new paradigm of accessing ASF data products through an online archive. The next generation user access interface, known internally as URSA 2.0, will bring the user experience in line with this new paradigm. The new release of URSA will support expedited user access to ASF’s restructured data archive to registered users in a single click download procedure for individual granules, or an entire set of search results. A single login for the ASF Web sites will ease information management for both the user and the ASF staff, creating the framework for future integration with the proposed Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) profile authentication systems. Additional features will include full and swift metadata exchange with Earth Observing System Clearinghouse (ECHO), resulting in links for the non-geospatial aspects of individual projects that have been defined by area and discipline. In support of new missions and newly available data sets, ASF is developing a generic data ingest mechanism that will be able to deliver data from disparate sources into the ASF archive. This presentation will define the practicable breadth of each of these components and provide an opportunity for feedback to the team supporting the development of the URSA 2.0.

  2. The Future of the Plate Boundary Observatory in the GAGE Facility and beyond 2018

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, G. S.; Bendick, R. O.; Foster, J. H.; Freymueller, J. T.; La Femina, P. C.; Miller, M. M.; Rowan, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and Earthscope (GAGE) Facility, which operates the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), builds on UNAVCO's strong record of facilitating research and education in the geosciences and geodesy-related engineering fields. Precise positions and velocities for the PBO's ~1100 continuous GPS stations and other PBO data products are used to address a wide range of scientific and technical issues across North America. A large US and international community of scientists, surveyors, and civil engineers access PBO data streams, software, and other on-line resources daily. In a global society that is increasingly technology-dependent, consistently risk-averse, and often natural resource-limited, communities require geodetic research, education, and infrastructure to make informed decisions about living on a dynamic planet. The western U.S. and Alaska, where over 95% of the PBO sensor assets are located, have recorded significant geophysical events like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunami. UNAVCO community science provides first-order constraints on geophysical processes to support hazards mapping and zoning, and form the basis for earthquake and tsunami early warning applications currently under development. The future of PBO was discussed at a NSF-sponsored three-day workshop held in September 2014 in Breckenridge, CO. Over 40 invited participants and community members, including representatives from interested stakeholder groups, UNAVCO staff, and members of the PBO Working Group and Geodetic Infrastructure Advisory Committee participated in workshop, which included retrospective and prospective plenary presentations and breakout sessions focusing on specific scientific themes. We will present some of the findings of that workshop in order to continue a dialogue about policies and resources for long-term earth observing networks. How PBO fits into the recently released U.S. National Plan for Civil Earth Observations will also be

  3. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spata, Michael F.

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  4. Now and for the Future: Adequate and Equitable K-12 Facilities in Wyoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    21st Century School Fund, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This white paper provides the conclusion of the 21st Century School Fund and JFW, Inc. inquiry into and analysis of Wyoming's current programs for managing and funding its K-12 public school facilities. The Wyoming School Facilities Department engaged 21CSF and JFW, Inc. to provide an independent analysis of the state's current building portfolio…

  5. Antimicrobial Stewardship in Rhode Island Long-Term Care Facilities: Current Standings and Future Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Haley J; Mermel, Leonard A; Baier, Rosa R; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Dosa, David; Kavoosifar, Sara; Reece, Rebecca; LaPlante, Kerry L

    2016-08-01

    Our survey of antimicrobial stewardship practices among Rhode Island long-term care facilities demonstrated opportunities to develop formal programs. Results suggest infection preventionists are largely responsible for ensuring appropriate antibiotic use in long-term care facilities and there is a need for increased interdisciplinary access to individuals with antimicrobial stewardship expertise. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:979-982. PMID:27185014

  6. A Compact and High Performance Muon Capture Channel for Muon Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Gallardo, J.; Palmer, R.B.

    2011-03-28

    to reduce heating on the absorber windows minimizing losses in the accepted muon fluxes. The next step for verifying these ideas should be an experimental demonstration of a single muon accelerator magnetically-insulated rf cavity. A successful demonstration will provide us with a new versatile tool for a future muon accelerator.

  7. On muon energy spectrum in muon groups underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakatanov, V. N.; Chudakov, A. E.; Novoseltsev, Y. F.; Novoseltseva, M. V.; Stenkin, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which was used to measure muon energy spectrum characteristics in muon groups underground using mu-e decays recording. The Baksan Telescope's experimental data on mu-e decays intensity in muon groups of various multiplicities are analyzed. The experimental data indicating very flat spectrum does not however represent the total spectrum in muon groups. Obviously the muon energy spectrum depends strongly on a distance from the group axis. The core attraction effect makes a significant distortion, making the spectrum flatter. After taking this into account and making corrections for this effect the integral total spectrum index in groups has a very small depencence on muon multiplicity and agrees well with expected one: beta=beta (sub expected) = 1.75.

  8. Muon capture for the front end of a muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Yoshikawa, C.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the design of the muon capture front end for a {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} Collider. In the front end, a proton bunch on a target creates secondary pions that drift into a capture transport channel, decaying into muons. A sequence of rf cavities forms the resulting muon beams into strings of bunches of differing energies, aligns the bunches to (nearly) equal central energies, and initiates ionization cooling. The muons are then cooled and accelerated to high energy into a storage ring for high-energy high luminosity collisions. Our initial design is based on the somewhat similar front end of the International Design Study (IDS) neutrino factory.

  9. Future directions in intermediate energy heavy ion physics. A proposed expansion of the Holifield Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    A proposal is presented for a major accelerator addition to the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. The expanded facility will provide ion beams of mass 1 to 238 amu with a combination of energy, intensity, momentum resolution, and beam quality not currently available at any other facility in North America. The physics motivation for such an addition is discussed, and involves physics dominated by meson-exchange forces, Coulomb-force dominated physics, and possibly a regime where the quark and gluon degrees of freedom are significant. The physics research would include topics in atomic and interdisciplinary areas as well as nuclear physics. Some remarks are made on the merits of Oak Ridge as a site for this facility, placing the proposal in some historical perspective. The accelerator system is then described, giving the required beam properties, and the parameters of the synchrotron ring components, injection, ring magnets, RF systems, vacuum system, and electron cooling system and stochastic cooling system requirements. Also described are such facilities as buildings, beam transport and shielding, and experimental facilities, including target areas. (LEW)

  10. Muon cherenkov telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamova, E.; Angelov, I.; Kalapov, I.; Davidkov, K.; Stamenov, J.

    2001-08-01

    : The Muon Cerenkov Telescope is a system of water cerenkov detectors, using the coincidence technique to register cosmic ray muons. It is constructed in order to study the variations of cosmic rays and their correlation with solar activity and processes in the Earth magnetosphere. 1 Basic design of the Muon Cerenkov Telescope The telescope has 18 water cerenkov detectors / 0.25 m2 each /, situated in two parallel planes. / Fig. 1/ Each detector /fig. 2/ consists of a container with dimensions 50x50x12.5 cm made of 3mm thick glass with mirror cover of the outer side. The container is filled with distilled water to 10cm level. A photomultiplier is attached to a transparent circle at the floor of the container and the discriminator is placed in its housing. When a charged particle with energy greater than the threshold energy for cerenkov radiation generation passes the radiator, cerenkov photons are initiated and a part of them reach the PMT cathode after multiple reflections from the mirror sides of the container.

  11. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  12. From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Both Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories require a muon source capable of producing and capturing {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This paper reviews the similarities and differences between Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider accelerator complexes, the ongoing R&D needed for a Muon Collider that goes beyond Neutrino Factory R&D, and some thoughts about how a Neutrino Factory on the CERN site might eventually be upgraded to a Muon Collider.

  13. Closure of the Fast Flux Test Facility: current status and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, C. P.; Doebler, S. V.; Burke, T. M.

    2007-07-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast reactor situated on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in the southeastern portion of Washington State. DOE issued the final order to shut down the facility in 2001, when it was concluded that there was no longer a need for FFTF. Deactivation activities are in progress to remove or stabilize major hazards and deactivate systems to achieve end points documented in the project baseline. The reactor has been de-fueled, and approximately 97% of the fuel has been removed from the facility. Approximately 97% of the sodium has been drained from the plant's systems and placed into an on-site Sodium Storage Facility. The residual sodium will be kept frozen under a blanket of inert gas until it is removed later as part of the facility's decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). Plant systems have been shut down and placed in a low-risk state to minimize requirements for surveillance and maintenance. D and D work cannot begin until an Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared to evaluate various end state options and to provide a basis for selecting one of the options. The Environmental Impact Statement is expected to be issued in 2009. (authors)

  14. CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    LESPERANCE, C.P.

    2007-05-23

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast reactor situated on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in the southeastern portion of Washington State. DOE issued the final order to shut down the facility in 2001, when it was concluded that there was no longer a need for FFTF. Deactivation activities are in progress to remove or stabilize major hazards and deactivate systems to achieve end points documented in the project baseline. The reactor has been defueled, and approximately 97% of the fuel has been removed from the facility. Approximately 97% of the sodium has been drained from the plant's systems and placed into an on-site Sodium Storage Facility. The residual sodium will be kept frozen under a blanket of inert gas until it is removed later as part of the facility's decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). Plant systems have been shut down and placed in a low-risk state to minimize requirements for surveillance and maintenance. D&D work cannot begin until an Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared to evaluate various end state options and to provide a basis for selecting one of the options. The Environmental Impact Statement is expected to be issued in 2009.

  15. Performance of the Majorana Demonstrator Muon Veto System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Clinton; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is a neutrinoless double beta decay experiment operating at the 4850-ft. level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. The low-background goals of this Ge-based experiment require a muon veto system. The operation of the partial veto panel array (2/3 coverage) provides the first opportunity to study muon events during the commissioning of the Ge detectors. The Prototype Ge detector module operated in the Demonstrator shield for a total exposure of over 600 kg*day with the partial veto system. The operation of Module 1, consisting of 22.5 kg of Ge mass, in the shield with full veto panel coverage will provide a complete array to study muon-induced events in the experiment. The veto panels are synchronized with Ge detectors using a common 100MHz clock, presenting a unique opportunity to 1) study the flux and angular distribution of muons incident on the Demonstrator using the experiment's modular veto panel design, and 2) examine the effect of muon-related events on the Ge detectors. In this talk the performance of the muon veto system, including an analysis of the coincidence patterns of the incident muons and the corresponding spectra produced in the Ge detectors, is presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  16. COMET and PRISM - Search for Charged Lepton Flavor Violation with Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuno, Yoshitaka

    2012-04-01

    The experiment (COMET) at J-PARC to search for a charged-lepton-flavor-violating process of muon to electron conversion in a muonic atom is described. Future prospects of an experiment (PRISM) with even higher sensitivity is mentioned. On-going R&D on a highly intense muon source (MuSIC) at Osaka University is presented.

  17. Simulations for the future converter of the e-linac for the TRIUMF ARIEL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebois, M.; Bricault, P.

    2011-09-01

    In the next years, TRIUMF activity will be focused on building a new facility to produce very intense neutron rich radioactive ion beams. Unlike others ISOL facilities, the e-linac primary beam, that will induce the fission, is an intense electron beam (50 MeV energy and 10 mA intensity). This challenging choice, which make this installation unique, despite the ALTO facility, makes an average fission rate of 1013-14fissions/s in the target.This beam is sent on an uranium carbide target (UCx), but due to its power, it is essential to insert a "converter" on the beam path to avoid a target overheating. The purpose of this converter is to convert electrons into Bremsstralhung radiation. The γ rays produce excite the dipole resonance of 23892U (15 MeV) inducing fission. Energy deposition, fission rate and thermal behavior were simulated using Monte Carlo techniques are presented in this paper

  18. ESA's Research on Growing from Solutions in Microgravity: The Protein Crystallisation Diagnostics Facility and Future Prospects with the Solution Crystallisation Diagnostics Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletser, V.; Mazzoni, S.; Minster, O.; Potthast, L.

    The Protein Crystallization Diagnostics Facility (PCDF) is an instrument developed by Astrium under an ESA contract to observe and study nucleation and crystallisation processes of molecules from solutions in long duration microgravity experiments on board the International Space Station using advanced diagnostics. The experiment PROTEIN, performed with PCDF, aimed at unravelling physical processes and relating the formation of defects in crystals to their growth conditions. This PCDF experiment was performed on the ISS in 2009, integrated in the European Drawer Rack. The PCDF mission was an important milestone and a basis for future experiments. On the occasion of the 2004 Announcement of Opportunity, new proposals in crystallisation and growth have been selected, which targeted a broader range of systems like synthetic zeolites and model colloidal systems. The preparatory activities within the relevant Topical Teams identified a common need for scattering techniques, ranging from traditional state of the art dynamic and static light scattering to sophisticated multi-speckle techniques based on multipixel sensors. This led to the idea of upgrading the process unit of PCDF with a set of diagnostic techniques and interfaces adapted to investigations on zeolites, and to study the possibility of developing a new instrument for studying colloidal structures. The feasibility study of these instruments, called respectively Solution Crystallisation Diagnostics Facility (SCDF) for zeolites and for colloids, has been recently completed, aiming at a consolidated instrument design and development with a plan to upload it in ISS tentatively in 2013. A general overview of present and future activities in aggregation and crystallisation are presented. Starting with the first results from the PCDF mission, the planned future experiments in SCDF will be discussed along with a detailed description of the instrument capabilities.

  19. CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    BURKE, T.M.

    2005-04-13

    Deactivation activities are currently in progress at the Fast Flux Test Facility. These deactivation activities are intended to remove most hazardous materials and prepare the facility for final disposition. The two major hazards to be removed are the nuclear fuel and the alkali metal (most sodium) coolant. The fuel and coolant removal activities are proceeding well and are expected to complete in 2006. Plant systems are being shut down as allowed by completion of various fuel and coolant removal actions. A Decommissioning Environmental Impact Statement is in progress to evaluate a range of potential final disposition end states.

  20. Physical applications of muon catalysis: Muon capture in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filchenkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental research on capture of negative muons in hydrogen are reported with an emphasis on the accompanying phenomenon of muon catalysis in hydrogen and subtleties of the experimental method. A conclusion is drawn that precise determination of the capture rate is important for refining the standard model.

  1. The New (g-2) Experiment: A proposal to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment to +-0.14 ppm precision

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, R.M.; Lynch, K.R.; Miller, J.P.; Roberts, B.L.; Morse, W.M.; Semertzides, Y.K.; Druzhinin, V.P.; Khazin, B.I.; Koop, I.A.; Logashenko, I.; Redin, S.I.; /Boston U. /Brookhaven /Novosibirsk, IYF /Cornell U., CIHEP /Fermilab /Frascati /Illinois U., Urbana /James Madison U. /Groningen, KVI /KEK, Tsukuba /Kentucky U.

    2009-02-01

    We propose to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment, a{sub {mu}}, to 0.14 ppm-a fourfold improvement over the 0.54 ppm precision obtained in the BNL experiment E821. The muon anomaly is a fundamental quantity and its precise determination will have lasting value. The current measurement was statistics limited, suggesting that greater precision can be obtained in a higher-rate, next-generation experiment. We outline a plan to use the unique FNAL complex of proton accelerators and rings to produce high-intensity bunches of muons, which will be directed into the relocated BNL muon storage ring. The physics goal of our experiment is a precision on the muon anomaly of 16 x 10{sup -11}, which will require 21 times the statistics of the BNL measurement, as well a factor of 3 reduction in the overall systematic error. Our goal is well matched to anticipated advances in the worldwide effort to determine the standard model (SM) value of the anomaly. The present comparison, {Delta}a{sub {mu}} (Expt: -SM) = (295 {+-} 81) x 10{sup -11}, is already suggestive of possible new physics contributions to the muon anomaly. Assuming that the current theory error of 51 x 10{sup -11} is reduced to 30 x 10{sup -11} on the time scale of the completion of our experiment, a future {Delta}a{sub {mu}} comparison would have a combined uncertainty of {approx} 34 x 10{sup -11}, which will be a sensitive and complementary benchmark for proposed standard model extensions. The experimental data will also be used to improve the muon EDM limit by up to a factor of 100 and make a higher-precision test of Lorentz and CPT violation. We describe in this Proposal why the FNAL complex provides a uniquely ideal facility for a next-generation (g-2) experiment. The experiment is compatible with the fixed-target neutrino program; indeed, it requires only the unused Booster batch cycles and can acquire the desired statistics in less than two years of running. The proton beam preparations are largely aligned

  2. Muon Spin Rotation Spectroscopy - Utilizing Muons in Solid State Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Andreas

    2012-10-17

    Over the past decades muon spin rotation techniques (mSR) have established themselves as an invaluable tool to study a variety of static and dynamic phenomena in bulk solid state physics and chemistry. Common to all these approaches is that the muon is utilized as a spin microprobe and/or hydrogen-like probe, implanted in the material under investigation. Recent developments extend the range of application to near surface phenomena, thin film and super-lattice studies. After briefly summarizing the production of so called surface muons used for bulk studies, and discussing the principle differences between pulsed and continuous muon beams, the production of keV-energy muon sources will be discussed. A few topical examples from different active research fields will be presented to demonstrate the power of these techniques.

  3. Electron-muon ranger: performance in the MICE muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bene, P.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradshaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Cadoux, F.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Debieux, S.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Graulich, J. S.; Greis, J.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Husi, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Masciocchi, F.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nicola, L.; Noah Messomo, E.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rothenfusser, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Sandström, R.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Wisting, H.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. The EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100-280 MeV/c.

  4. An intense low energy muon source for the muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Taqqu, D.

    1996-05-01

    A scheme for obtaining an intense source of low energy muons is described. It is based on the production of pions in a high field magnetic bottle trap. By ensuring efficient slowing down and extraction of the decay muons an intense intermediate energy muon beam is obtained. For the specific case of negative muons a novel technique called frictional accumulation provides efficient conversion into a 10 keV{mu}{sup {minus}} beam whose emittance is then reduced in a configuration providing extended frictional cooling. The result is a beam of very small transverse and longitudinal emittance that can be used together with an equivalent {mu}{sup +} beam as compact intense muon source for the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider. A final luminosity around 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} is expected to be obtained at 2 TeV. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Electron-Muon Ranger: Performance in the MICE muon beam

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adams, D.

    2015-12-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. Lastly, the EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta inmore » the range 100–280 MeV/c.« less

  6. Electron-Muon Ranger: Performance in the MICE muon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.

    2015-12-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. Lastly, the EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100–280 MeV/c.

  7. Information Retrieval in an Office Filing Facility and Future Work in Project Minstrel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeaton, A. F.; van Rijsbergen, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Review of office filing facility filing and retrieval mechanisms for unstructured and mixed media information focuses on free text methods. Also discussed are the state of the art in handling voice and image data, problems with searching text surrogates to implement free text content retrieval, and work of Project Minstrel. (Author/MBR)

  8. A METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING FUTURE PHYSICAL FACILITIES REQUIREMENTS FOR INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    YURKOVICH, JOHN V.

    A COMPUTERIZED METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE PHYSICAL FACILITIES REQUIREMENTS OF A LARGE UNIVERSITY WAS DEVELOPED. THE RESEARCH INCLUDED THE DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION, AND TESTING OF SYSTEMS FOR (1) CLASSIFYING SPACE, (2) MAINTAINING A PERPETUAL SPACE INVENTORY, (3) CONDUCTING ROOM UTILIZATION STUDIES, (4) PROJECTING STUDENTS BY A SET OF…

  9. Multi-anvil High Pressure Facility at National Synchrotron Light Source: Then, Now, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Weidner, D. J.; Vaughan, M. T.; Chen, J.; Li, B.; Liebermann, R. C.

    2007-12-01

    Multi-anvil high pressure facility (Beamline X17B2) at National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) was the first of its kind established in the United States with the support from NSF through the Center for High Pressure Research (CHiPR, 1990 - 2002). During this period, the facility provided a fertile ground for steep growth of research on earth materials at simultaneously high pressures and temperatures. Main areas of study included the thermoelastic and structural properties of minerals, phase equilibria, rheology, acoustic velocities, kinetics of phase transformations, and physical properties of melts. The rheological and acoustic measurements at high pressures in conjunction with synchrotron were first developed at this facility, and both techniques are being adapted today by other laboratories around the world. Last five years has witnessed great increases in efficiency and productivity of this facility, a beneficiary of the construction of a permanent hutch and time-sharing mechanism made possible by NSLS, and the establishment of the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES). While other above- mentioned areas of research continued to grow, the rheological studies of minerals experienced fast expansion through the use of two new high pressure deformation apparatus, the Deformation DIA (D-DIA) and the Rotational Drickamer apparatus (RDA, led by S. Karato from Yale Univ.) Experiments are currently being performed on various mantle minerals to derive their rheological properties. Performance of the facility will receive another boost through the addition of a monochromatic side station jointly supported by DoD, COMPRES and NSLS, and construction of the station is well underway. With continued operation of COMPRES in next five years, we will see several significant additions to the large- volume facility at NSLS: a new system for precise measurements of stress at high pressure; a 2000-ton press; D- TCup apparatus for deformation

  10. Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fako, R.; Barariu, Gh.; Toma, R.; Georgescu, R.; Sociu, F.

    2013-07-01

    Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa), to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module) where it is intended to remain at least 50 years. The present situation for radioactive waste management in Romania is reviewed in the present paper. Focus will be done on existent disposal facilities but, also, on future facilities planned for storage / disposal of radioactive wastes. Considering specific data for Romanian radioactive waste inventory, authors are reviewing the advance in the radioactive waste management in Romania considering its particularities. The team tries to highlight the expected limitations and unknown data related with cementitious engineered barriers that has to be faced in the near future incase of interim storage or for the upcoming long periods of disposal.

  11. Muon Cooling—emittance exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Zohreh

    2001-05-01

    Muon Cooling is the key factor in building of a Muon collider, (to a less degree) Muon storage ring, and a Neutrino Factory. Muon colliders potential to provide a probe for fundamental particle physics is very interesting, but may take a considerable time to realize, as much more work and study is needed. Utilizing high intensity Muon sources-Neutrino Factories, and other intermediate steps are very important and will greatly expand our abilities and confidence in the credibility of high energy muon colliders. To obtain the needed collider luminosity, the phase-space volume must be greatly reduced within the muon life time. The Ionization cooling is the preferred method used to compress the phase space and reduce the emittance to obtain high luminosity muon beams. We note that, the ionization losses results not only in damping, but also heating. The use of alternating solenoid lattices has been proposed, where the emittance are large. We present an overview of the cooling and discuss formalism, solenoid magnets and some beam dynamics.

  12. High luminosity muon collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  13. Muon collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R. |; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-03-01

    The possibility of muon colliders was introduced by Skrinsky et al., Neuffer, and others. More recently, several workshops and collaboration meetings have greatly increased the level of discussion. In this paper we present scenarios for 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV colliders based on an optimally designed proton source, and for a lower luminosity 0.5 TeV demonstration based on an upgraded version of the AGS. It is assumed that a demonstration version based on upgrades of the FERMILAB machines would also be possible. 53 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Search for the neutrinoless muon decay. mu. /sup +/. -->. e/sup +/. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, S.L.

    1985-07-01

    Separate muon, electron, and tau numbers are conserved in the minimal standard model of electroweak interactions with massless neutrinos. However, in many extensions to the standard model, separate lepton numbers are not expected to be conserved quantities. A new search for muon number non-conserving processes has been undertaken at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), specifically to look for three neutrinoless decay modes of the muon. The search for the decay of a muon to an electron and a photon is discussed here. A new detector facility, located in the LAMPF stopped muon channel, was developed for this experiment. This Crystal Box detector consists of a cylindrical drift chamber surrounded by a plastic scintillator hodoscope and a large solid angle, modularized, NaI(Tl) calorimeter. The apparatus measures the trajectories, relative timing, and energies of charged particles and photons from the decays of positive muons stopped in a central target. The assembly and calibration of the detector are described, and the procedure for taking data is discussed. The sample of 1.3 million candidate events, from the first data run of the Crystal Box, was analyzed using a maximum-likelihood method. The upper limit on the branching ratio, relative to normal muon decay, for a muon decaying to an electron and a photon is found to be consistent with previous measurements. With 90% confidence, the branching ratio for this neutrinoless decay is observed to be less than 2.8 x 10/sup 10/.

  15. Light ion production for a future radiobiological facility at CERN: Preliminary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford-Haworth, Joshua; Bellodi, Giulia; Küchler, Detlef; Lombardi, Alessandra; Röhrich, Jörg; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Recent medical applications of ions such as carbon and helium have proved extremely effective for the treatment of human patients. However, before now a comprehensive study of the effects of different light ions on organic targets has not been completed. There is a strong desire for a dedicated facility which can produce ions in the range of protons to neon in order to perform this study. This paper will present the proposal and preliminary investigations into the production of light ions, and the development of a radiobiological research facility at CERN. The aims of this project will be presented along with the modifications required to the existing linear accelerator (Linac3), and the foreseen facility, including the requirements for an ion source in terms of some of the specification parameters and the flexibility of operation for different ion types. Preliminary results from beam transport simulations will be presented, in addition to some planned tests required to produce some of the required light ions (lithium, boron) to be conducted in collaboration with the Helmholtz-Zentrum für Materialien und Energie, Berlin.

  16. Light ion production for a future radiobiological facility at CERN: Preliminary studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford-Haworth, Joshua; Bellodi, Giulia; Küchler, Detlef; Lombardi, Alessandra; Scrivens, Richard; Röhrich, Jörg

    2014-02-15

    Recent medical applications of ions such as carbon and helium have proved extremely effective for the treatment of human patients. However, before now a comprehensive study of the effects of different light ions on organic targets has not been completed. There is a strong desire for a dedicated facility which can produce ions in the range of protons to neon in order to perform this study. This paper will present the proposal and preliminary investigations into the production of light ions, and the development of a radiobiological research facility at CERN. The aims of this project will be presented along with the modifications required to the existing linear accelerator (Linac3), and the foreseen facility, including the requirements for an ion source in terms of some of the specification parameters and the flexibility of operation for different ion types. Preliminary results from beam transport simulations will be presented, in addition to some planned tests required to produce some of the required light ions (lithium, boron) to be conducted in collaboration with the Helmholtz-Zentrum für Materialien und Energie, Berlin.

  17. Future directions in technology development - Increased use of space as a facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrus, Judith H.; Harris, Leonard A.; Levine, Jack; Tyson, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    As human activities in space continue to grow in size and scope, the role of in-space technology experiments, as a necessary tool for essential technological development, will also grow. NASA has recognized the increasing importance of such experiments, and has instituted programs to plan, organize, and coordinate future in-space technology experiment activities within the overall space community. This paper discusses the history of in-space technology experiments, and expected future trends. It also describes NASA activities in this growing area of experimentation, and provides several examples of such experiments.

  18. Muon tracking underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistoni, G.; Campana, P.; Chiarella, V.; Denni, U.; Iarocci, E.

    1986-04-01

    The design and performance of plastic streamer tubes for use in large underground particle-physics experiments such as the muon, astrophysics, and cosmic-ray observatory (MACRO) being developed for Gran Sasso Laboratory are reported. The large (1000 sq m or more) detector area required to achieve high-angular-resolution muon tracking in MACRO is covered by modules with eight 3 x 3-cm-cross section active streamer-tube cells each, similar to those used in the Mt. Blanc Laboratory detector. The MACRO modules have a maximum length of 12 m; and the cells have 60-micron-diameter wires, two conducting graphite sides, and two insulating sides (electrodeless electric-field shaping). The results of performance tests flowing 3:1 He:n-pentane through a tube module are presented graphically. Spatial resolution 1 cm and time resolution 100 ns are obtained, and the ability of the streamer tubes to detect large ionization losses with respect to the minimum is demonstrated.

  19. The Future of the Physical Learning Environment: School Facilities that Support the User

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuuskorpi, Marko; Gonzalez, Nuria Cabellos

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the conclusions of a study, carried out in collaboration with schools in six European countries, which focused on tomorrow's physical learning environments. The study, which stemmed from a project entitled Forum for the Future and which was funded by the Finnish National Board of Education (FNBE), was designed to contribute to…

  20. The National Ignition Facility: the path to a carbon-free energy future.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Christopher J

    2012-08-28

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centres on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality. PMID:22802504

  1. Future is new focus at energy department`s Rocky Flats facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1993-11-12

    After several years of intensive effort to address radioactive pollution threatening nearby communities, officials at the Energy Department`s Rocky Flats plant now are turning their attention to the site`s plutonium buildings and finding a cleanup challenge of equally daunting proportions. Containing and mopping up off-site soil and water contamination remains the first priority at the Colorado facility, but site environmental managers say the huge volumes of plutonium and associated radioactive waste stored in Rocky Flats` aging building pose increasingly urgent safety concerns.

  2. Atomic physics at the future facility for antiproton and ion research: status report 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumberidze, A.; Stöhlker, Th; Litvinov, Yu A.; SPARC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    In this contribution, a brief overview of the Stored Particle Atomic physics Research Collaboration scientific program at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is given. The program comprises a very broad range of research topics addressing atomic structure and dynamics in hitherto unexplored regimes, light-matter interactions, lepton pair production phenomena, precision tests of quantum electrodynamics and standard model in the regime of extreme fields and many more. We also present the current strategy for the realization of the envisioned physics program within the modularized start version (MSV) of FAIR.

  3. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to a Carbon-Free Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, C J

    2011-03-16

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centers on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

  4. Intense Muon Beams for Experiments at Project X

    SciTech Connect

    C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, C. Y. Yoshikawa, V.S. Kashikhin, D.V. Neuffer, J. Miller, R.A. Rimmer

    2011-03-01

    A coherent approach for providing muon beams to several experiments for the intensity-frontier program at Project X is described. Concepts developed for the front end of a muon collider/neutrino factory facility, such as phase rotation and ionization cooling, are applied, but with significant differences. High-intensity experiments typically require high-duty-factor beams pulsed at a time interval commensurate with the muon lifetime. It is challenging to provide large RF voltages at high duty factor, especially in the presence of intense radiation and strong magnetic fields, which may preclude the use of superconducting RF cavities. As an alternative, cavities made of materials such as ultra-pure Al and Be, which become very good –but not super– conductors at cryogenic temperatures, can be used.

  5. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2009-04-29

    There is considerable interest in the use of muon beams to create either an intense source of decay neutrinos aimed at a detector located 3000-7500 km away (a Neutrino Factory), or a Muon Collider that produces high-luminosity collisions at the energy frontier. R&D aimed at producing these facilities has been under way for more than 10 years. This paper will review experimental results from MuCool, MERIT, and MICE and indicate the extent to which they will provide proof-of-principle demonstrations of the key technologies required for a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. Progress in constructing components for the MICE experiment will also be described.

  6. Quasi-isochronous Muon Collection Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, C.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Intense muon beams have many potential applications, including neutrino factories and muon colliders. However, muons are produced as tertiary beams, resulting in diffuse phase space distributions. To make useful beams, the muons must be rapidly cooled before they decay. An idea conceived recently for the collection and cooling of muon beams, namely, the use of a Quasi-Isochronous Helical Channel (QIHC) to facilitate capture of muons into RF buckets, has been developed further. The resulting distribution could be cooled quickly and coalesced into a single bunch to optimize the luminosity of a muon collider. After a brief elaboration of the QIHC concept, recent developments are described.

  7. Probing beyond the Standard Model with Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Hisano, Junji

    2008-02-21

    Muon's Properties are the most precisely studied among unstable particles. After discovery of muons in 40's, the studies of muons contributed to construction and establishment of the standard model in the particle physics. Now we are going to LHC era, however, precision frontier is still important in the particle physics. In this article, we review roles of muon physics in the particle physics. Muon g-2, lepton flavor violation (LFV) in muon decay, and electric dipole moment (EDM) of muon are mainly discussed.

  8. Overview of Progress and Future Prospects in Indirect Drive Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; ">ICF Program, Facility (NIF). Experiments on the NIF have achieved the highest yet recorded stagnation pressures (Pstagnation > 150-230 Gigabar) of any facility based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, albeit they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the NIF (i.e. ∼ 300 - 400 Gbar), and have exhibited undesirable shape distortions that waste kinetic energy. We review the issues that have been uncovered and discuss the program strategy and plan that we are following to systematically address the known issues as we press on.

  9. Jules Horowitz Reactor, a new irradiation facility: Improving dosimetry for the future of nuclear experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoire, G.; Beretz, D.; Destouches, C.

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is an experimental reactor under construction at the French Nuclear Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA) facility at Cadarache. It will achieve its first criticality by the end of 2014. Experiments that will be conducted at JHR will deal with fuel, cladding, and material behavior. The JHR will also produce medical radio-isotopes and doped silicon for the electronic industry. As a new irradiation facility, its instrumentation will benefit from recent improvements. Nuclear instrumentation will include reactor dosimetry, as it is a reference technique to determine neutron fluence in experimental devices or characterize irradiation locations. Reactor dosimetry has been improved with the progress of simulation tools and nuclear data, but at the same time the customer needs have increased: Experimental results must have reduced and assessed uncertainties. This is now a necessary condition to perform an experimental irradiation in a test reactor. Items improved, in the framework of a general upgrading of the dosimetry process based on uncertainty minimization, will include dosimeter, nuclear data, and modelling scheme. (authors)

  10. The Gran Sasso muon puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Mahbubani, Rakhi E-mail: rakhi@cern.ch

    2012-07-01

    We carry out a time-series analysis of the combined data from three experiments measuring the cosmic muon flux at the Gran Sasso laboratory, at a depth of 3800 m.w.e. These data, taken by the MACRO, LVD and Borexino experiments, span a period of over 20 years, and correspond to muons with a threshold energy, at sea level, of around 1.3 TeV. We compare the best-fit period and phase of the full muon data set with the combined DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA data, which spans the same time period, as a test of the hypothesis that the cosmic ray muon flux is responsible for the annual modulation detected by DAMA. We find in the muon data a large-amplitude fluctuation with a period of around one year, and a phase that is incompatible with that of the DAMA modulation at 5.2σ. Aside from this annual variation, the muon data also contains a further significant modulation with a period between 10 and 11 years and a power well above the 99.9% C.L threshold for noise, whose phase corresponds well with the solar cycle: a surprising observation for such high energy muons. We do not see this same period in the stratospheric temperature data.

  11. The new Arecibo Observatory Remote Optical Facility (AO-ROF) in Culebra Island, Puerto Rico: Current Status and Future Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, P. T.

    2015-12-01

    The idea of establishing the Arecibo Observatory Remote Optical Facility (AO-ROF) in the island of Culebra is a solution to mitigate the ever cumulative quantity of cloud, fog, and rain that has distressed observations at the Arecibo Observatory (AO) during major optical campaigns and observations. Given Culebra Island's favorable geographical and climatological characteristics as its low elevation and geographic location, it appears to have more steady weather conditions than Arecibo, so therefore it provides more availability for optical observations. Placed on Culebra, optical instruments can observe the same thermospheric volume over AO sampled by the Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR). This capability will become especially important during the High Frequency (HF) facility is on operation. Small and large scale irregularities created by that HF can be readily observed and tracked from the Culebra site, and simultaneous observations from AO of the same atmospheric volume will permit direct vector measurements of dynamical evolution of the irregularities. This work presents a discussion of the current status of AO-ROF facility, as well the future projects.

  12. Muon Simulation at the Daya Bay SIte

    SciTech Connect

    Mengyun, Guan; Jun, Cao; Changgen, Yang; Yaxuan, Sun; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2006-05-23

    With a pretty good-resolution mountain profile, we simulated the underground muon background at the Daya Bay site. To get the sea-level muon flux parameterization, a modification to the standard Gaisser's formula was introduced according to the world muon data. MUSIC code was used to transport muon through the mountain rock. To deploy the simulation, first we generate a statistic sample of sea-level muon events according to the sea-level muon flux distribution formula; then calculate the slant depth of muon passing through the mountain using an interpolation method based on the digitized data of the mountain; finally transport muons through rock to get underground muon sample, from which we can get results of muon flux, mean energy, energy distribution and angular distribution.

  13. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /MUONS Inc., Batavia /UCLA /UC, Riverside /Mississippi U.

    2007-12-01

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}s {ge} 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R&D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R&D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R&D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R&D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel.

  14. Laser-Assisted Muon Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Aihua; Li Shumin; Berakdar, Jamal

    2007-06-22

    We show theoretically that the muon lifetime can be changed dramatically by embedding the decaying muon in a strong linearly polarized laser field. Evaluating the S-matrix elements taking all electronic multiphoton processes into account we find that a CO{sub 2} laser with an electric field amplitude of 10{sup 6} V cm{sup -1} results in an order of magnitude shorter lifetime of the muon. We also analyze the dependencies of the decay rate on the laser frequency and intensity.

  15. Measurement of muon intensity by Cerenkov method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z. H.; Li, G. J.; Bai, G. Z.; Liu, J. G.; Geng, Q. X.; Ling, J.

    1985-01-01

    Optical detection is an important technique in studies and observations of air showers, muons and relevant phenomena. The muon intensity is measured in a proper energy range and to study some problems about Cerenkov radiation of cosmic rays are studied, by a muon-telescope operated with Cerenkov detector. It is found that the measured muon intensity agrees with the integral energy spectrum of cosmic ray muons.

  16. Muon front end for the neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. T.; Stratakis, D.; Prior, G.; Gilardoni, S.; Neuffer, D.; Snopok, P.; Alekou, A.; Pasternak, J.

    2013-04-01

    In the neutrino factory, muons are produced by firing high-energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons and pass through a capture channel known as the muon front end, before acceleration to 12.6 GeV. The muon front end comprises a variable frequency rf system for longitudinal capture and an ionization cooling channel. In this paper we detail recent improvements in the design of the muon front end.

  17. Muon ID - taking care of lower momenta muons

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Fisk, G.; Para, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    In the Muon package under study, the tracks are extrapolated using an algorithm which accounts for the magnetic field and the ionization (dE/dx). We improved the calculation of the field dependent term to increase the muon detection efficiency at lower momenta using a Runge-Kutta method. The muon identification and hadron separation in b-bbar jets is reported with the improved software. In the same framework, the utilization of the Kalman filter is introduced. The principle of the Kalman filter is described in some detail with the propagation matrix, with the Runge-Kutta term included, and the effect on low momenta for low momenta single muons particles is described.

  18. An experimental test of the weak equivalence principle for antihydrogen at the future FLAIR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaum, Klaus; Raizen, Mark G.; Quint, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    We present new experimental ideas to investigate the gravitational interaction of antihydrogen. The experiment can first be performed in an off-line mirror measurement on hydrogen atoms, as a testing ground for our methods, before the implementation with antihydrogen atoms. A beam of hydrogen atoms is formed by launching a cold beam of protons through a cloud of trapped electrons in a nested Penning trap arrangement. In the next step, the atoms are stopped in a series of pulsed electromagnetic coils — so-called atomic coilgun. The stopped atoms are confined in a magnetic quadrupole trap and cooled by single-photon laser cooling. We intend to employ the method of Raman interferometry to study the gravitational interaction of atomic hydrogen — and later on antihydrogen at the FLAIR facility — with high sensitivity.

  19. Future radiation measurements in low Earth orbit. [long duration exposure facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The first Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission has demonstrated the value of the LDEF concept for deep surveys of the space radiation environment. This paper will survey the types of measurements that could be done on a second LDEF mission. One of the most surprising discoveries on LDEF1 was the Be-7 that was found imbedded on the windward surface. LDEF2 could follow up on this discovery and search for evidence of other cosmogenic nuclei. Another experiment could be designed to investigate the presence of energetic heavy ions observed on LDEF1. The relative abundance of rare earths can also be used to search for evidence that cosmic rays accelerate in episodes which occur throughout their propagation in the stellar medium. Further investigations of radiation effects could also be undertaken. A second LDEF mission also offers the opportunity for new investigations such as measurements of cosmic ray differential energy spectrum to ultrahigh energies. These and other ideas will be discussed.

  20. Future carbon beams at SPIRAL1 facility: Which method is the most efficient?

    SciTech Connect

    Maunoury, L. Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Dupuis, M.; Frigot, R.; Grinyer, J.; Jardin, P.; Leboucher, C.

    2014-02-15

    Compared to in-flight facilities, Isotope Separator On-Line ones can in principle produce significantly higher radioactive ion beam intensities. On the other hand, they have to cope with delays for the release and ionization which make the production of short-lived isotopes ion beams of reactive and refractory elements particularly difficult. Many efforts are focused on extending the capabilities of ISOL facilities to those challenging beams. In this context, the development of carbon beams is triggering interest [H. Frånberg, M. Ammann, H. W. Gäggeler, and U. Köster, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A708 (2006); M. Kronberger, A. Gottberg, T. M. Mendonca, J. P. Ramos, C. Seiffert, P. Suominen, and T. Stora, in Proceedings of the EMIS 2012 [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B Production of molecular sideband radioisotope beams at CERN-ISOLDE using a Helicon-type plasma ion source (to be published)]: despite its refractory nature, radioactive carbon beams can be produced from molecules (CO or CO{sub 2}), which can subsequently be broken up and multi-ionized to the required charge state in charge breeders or ECR sources. This contribution will present results of experiments conducted at LPSC with the Phoenix charge breeder and at GANIL with the Nanogan ECR ion source for the ionization of carbon beams in the frame of the ENSAR and EMILIE projects. Carbon is to date the lightest condensable element charge bred with an ECR ion source. Charge breeding efficiencies will be compared with those obtained using Nanogan ECRIS and charge breeding times will be presented as well.

  1. Life science experiments performed in space in the ISS/Kibo facility and future research plans

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, current techniques in molecular biology have been used to perform experiments in space, focusing on the nature and effects of space radiation. In the Japanese ‘Kibo’ facility in the International Space Station (ISS), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has performed five life science experiments since 2009, and two additional experiments are currently in progress. The first life science experiment in space was the ‘Rad Gene’ project, which utilized two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines containing a mutated p53 gene (mp53) and a parental wild-type p53 gene (wtp53) respectively. Four parameters were examined: (i) detecting space radiation–induced DSBs by observing γH2AX foci; (ii) observing p53-dependent gene expression during space flight; (iii) observing p53-dependent gene expression after space flight; and (iv) observing the adaptive response in the two cell lines containing the mutated and wild type p53 genes after exposure to space radiation. These observations were completed and have been reported, and this paper is a review of these experiments. In addition, recent new information from space-based experiments involving radiation biology is presented here. These experiments involve human cultured cells, silkworm eggs, mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse eggs in various experiments designed by other principal investigators in the ISS/Kibo. The progress of Japanese science groups involved in these space experiments together with JAXA are also discussed here. The Japanese Society for Biological Sciences in Space (JSBSS), the Utilization Committee of Space Environment Science (UCSES) and the Science Council of Japan (ACJ) have supported these new projects and new experimental facilities in ISS/Kibo. Currently, these organizations are proposing new experiments for the ISS through 2024. PMID:27130692

  2. Life science experiments performed in space in the ISS/Kibo facility and future research plans.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    Over the past several years, current techniques in molecular biology have been used to perform experiments in space, focusing on the nature and effects of space radiation. In the Japanese 'Kibo' facility in the International Space Station (ISS), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has performed five life science experiments since 2009, and two additional experiments are currently in progress. The first life science experiment in space was the 'Rad Gene' project, which utilized two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines containing a mutated P53 : gene (m P53 : ) and a parental wild-type P53 : gene (wt P53 : ) respectively. Four parameters were examined: (i) detecting space radiation-induced DSBs by observing γH2AX foci; (ii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression during space flight; (iii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression after space flight; and (iv) observing the adaptive response in the two cell lines containing the mutated and wild type P53 : genes after exposure to space radiation. These observations were completed and have been reported, and this paper is a review of these experiments. In addition, recent new information from space-based experiments involving radiation biology is presented here. These experiments involve human cultured cells, silkworm eggs, mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse eggs in various experiments designed by other principal investigators in the ISS/Kibo. The progress of Japanese science groups involved in these space experiments together with JAXA are also discussed here. The Japanese Society for Biological Sciences in Space (JSBSS), the Utilization Committee of Space Environment Science (UCSES) and the Science Council of Japan (ACJ) have supported these new projects and new experimental facilities in ISS/Kibo. Currently, these organizations are proposing new experiments for the ISS through 2024. PMID:27130692

  3. Search for lepton-flavor-violating rare muon processes

    SciTech Connect

    Djilkibaev, R. M. Lobashev, V. M.

    2010-12-15

    A new approach to seeking three lepton-flavor-violating rare muon processes ({mu} {sup {yields}}e conversion, {mu} {sup {yields}}e + {gamma}, and {mu} {sup {yields}}3e) on the basis of a single experimental facility is proposed. This approach makes it possible to improve the sensitivity level of relevant experiments by factors of 10{sup 5}, 600, and 300 for, respectively, the first, the second, and the third of the above processes in relation to the existing experimental level. The approach is based on employing a pulsed proton beam and on combining a muon source and the detector part of the facility into a unified magnetic system featuring a nonuniform field. A new detector design involving separate units andmaking it possible to study all three muonic processes at a single facility that admits a simple rearrangement of the detectors used is discussed.

  4. Simulation of future global warming scenarios in rice paddies with an open-field warming facility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To simulate expected future global warming, hexagonal arrays of infrared heaters have previously been used to warm open-field canopies of upland crops such as wheat. Through the use of concrete-anchored posts, improved software, overhead wires, extensive grounding, and monitoring with a thermal camera, the technology was safely and reliably extended to paddy rice fields. The system maintained canopy temperature increases within 0.5°C of daytime and nighttime set-point differences of 1.3 and 2.7°C 67% of the time. PMID:22145582

  5. Optimising a muon spectrometer for measurements at the ISIS pulsed muon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giblin, S. R.; Cottrell, S. P.; King, P. J. C.; Tomlinson, S.; Jago, S. J. S.; Randall, L. J.; Roberts, M. J.; Norris, J.; Howarth, S.; Mutamba, Q. B.; Rhodes, N. J.; Akeroyd, F. A.

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the development of a state-of-the-art muon spectrometer for the ISIS pulsed muon source. Conceived as a major upgrade of the highly successful EMU instrument, emphasis has been placed on making effective use of the enhanced flux now available at the ISIS source. This has been achieved both through the development of a highly segmented detector array and enhanced data acquisition electronics. The pulsed nature of the ISIS beam is particularly suited to the development of novel experiments involving external stimuli, and therefore the ability to sequence external equipment has been added to the acquisition system. Finally, the opportunity has also been taken to improve both the magnetic field and temperature range provided by the spectrometer, to better equip the instrument for running the future ISIS user programme.

  6. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration R and D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    2000-07-01

    The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) comprises some 140 scientists and engineers located at U.S. National Laboratories and Universities, and at a number of non-U.S. research institutions. In the past year, the MC R and D program has shifted its focus mainly toward the design issues related to the development of a Neutrino Factory based on a muon storage ring. In this paper the status of the various R and D activities is described, and future plans are outlined.

  7. The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) Facility onboard China's Future Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bobing

    2015-08-01

    The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility is one of several space astronomy payloads of the cosmic lighthouse program onboard China's Space Station, which is planned for operation starting around 2020 for about 10 years. The main scientific objectives of HERD are indirect dark matter search, precise cosmic ray spectrum and composition measurements up to the knee energy, and high energy gamma-ray monitoring and survey. HERD is composed of a 3-D cubic calorimeter (CALO) surrounded by microstrip silicon trackers (STKs)from five sides except the bottom. CALO is made of about 10^4 cubes of LYSO crystals, corresponding to about 55 radiation lengths and 3 nuclear interaction lengths, respectively. HERD can achieve the following performance: energy resolution of 1% for electrons and gamma-rays beyond 100 GeV, 20% for protons from 100 GeV to 1 PeV; 2) electron/proton separation power better than 10^5 ; effective geometrical factors of > 3 m^2 sr for electron and diffuse gamma-rays, > 2 m^2 sr for cosmic ray nuclei. The prototype of about 1/40 of HERD calorimeter is under construction. A beam test in CERN with the prototype is approved and will be carried out in Nov. 2015.

  8. Strontium-82 and Future Germanium-68 Production at the ARRONAX Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sounalet, T.; Michel, N.; Alliot, C.; Audouin, A.; Barbet, J.; Bonraisin, A. C.; Bortoli, Y.; Bossé, V.; Bourdeau, C.; Bouvet, G.; Buhour, J. M.; Cadiou, A.; Fresneau, S.; Guillamet, M.; Haddad, F.; Laizé, J.; Milleto, T.; Milon, F.; Mokili, M.; Montavon, G.

    2014-05-01

    The ARRONAX cyclotron is fully operational since the end of 2010. It delivers projectiles (p, d, α) at high energy (up to 70 MeV for protons) and high intensity(2*375μA for protons). The main fields of application of ARRONAX are radionuclide production for nuclear medicine and irradiation of inert or living materials for radiolysis and radio-biology studies. A large part of the beam time will be used to produce radionuclides for targeted radionuclide therapy (copper-67, scandium-47 and astatine-211) as well as for PET imaging (scandium-44, copper-64, strontium-82 for rubidium-82 generators, and germanium-68 for gallium-68 generators). Since June 2012, large scale production of 82Sr has started with rubidium chloride (RbCl) targets. Several improvements are being explored which consist of changing the target material from RbCl to Rb metal and introducing an additional target behind the rubidium assembly. Thus, a target alloy of nickel/gallium for germanium-68 production has been developed. It is obtained by electroplating and exhibits a better thermal behavior than the natural gallium target used in most production facilities.

  9. Key Future Measurements of TMDs at Jefferson Lab and Other Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allada, Kalyan

    2016-02-01

    Transverse-momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) provide a description of nucleon structure in terms of the parton transverse momentum and its transverse spin. At leading twist there are eight TMDs, each offering a unique feature of quarks in a polarized or an unpolarized nucleon. The Sivers distribution is one of the most interesting TMD due to its non-universality. It has been extracted using the data from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS), but there is no data yet from spin-dependent Drell-Yan (DY) process. Such measurement will provide a crucial test of TMD formalism which predicts an equal magnitude and opposite sign for the Sivers function extracted from SIDIS and DY process. We will discuss key future measurements of TMDs using both SIDIS and DY process with a focus on Hall A SoLID SIDIS program at Jefferson Lab.

  10. JEMMRLA - Electron Model of a Muon RLA with Multi-pass Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Slawomir Alex; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Roblin, Yves R.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a demonstration experiment for a new concept of a 'dogbone' RLA with multi-pass return arcs -- JEMMRLA (Jlab Electron Model of Muon RLA). Such an RLA with linear-field multi-pass arcs was introduced for rapid acceleration of muons for the next generation of Muon Facilities. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Here we describe a test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected in the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to a readily available 1.5 GHz. The hardware requirements are not very demanding making it straightforward to implement. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration: in medical isotope production, radiation cancer therapy and homeland security.

  11. Muon spin rotation in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stronach, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The muon spin rotation (MuSR) technique is used to probe the microscopic electron density in materials. High temperature MuSR and magnetization measurements in nickel are in progress to allow an unambiguous determination of the muon impurity interaction and the impurity induced change in local spin density. The first results on uniaxial stress induced frequency shifts in an Fe single crystal are also reported.

  12. The Reconstruction Software for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment Trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, A.; Long, K.; Santos, E.; Adey, D.; Hanlet, P.; Heidt, C.

    2014-01-01

    The international Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate the principle of muon ionization cooling, for application to a future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. In order to measure the change in emittance, MICE is equipped with a pair of high precision scintillating fibre trackers. The trackers are required to measure a 10% change in emittance to 1% accuracy (giving an overall precision of 0.1%). This paper describes the tracker reconstruction software, as a part of the overall MICE software framework, MAUS. Channel clustering is described, proceeding to the formation of space-points, which are then associated with particle tracks using pattern recognition algorithms. Finally a full custom Kalman track fit is performed, to account for energy loss and multiple scattering. Exemplar results are shown for Monte Carlo data.

  13. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers, Technology Developments, and Synergies with Other Future Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers that define the main performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We will also discuss the synergy between ATLAST and other anticipated future facilities (e.g., TMT, EELT, ALMA) and the priorities for technology development that will enable the construction for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions.

  14. Measurement of the front-end dead-time of the LHCb muon detector and evaluation of its contribution to the muon detection inefficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, L.; Anelli, M.; Archilli, F.; Auriemma, G.; Baldini, W.; Bencivenni, G.; Bizzeti, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bochin, B.; Bozzi, C.; Brundu, D.; Cadeddu, S.; Campana, P.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Carletti, M.; Casu, L.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Dané, E.; De Simone, P.; Falabella, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, M.; Fontana, M.; Fresch, P.; Furfaro, E.; Graziani, G.; Kashchuk, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Loi, A.; Maev, O.; Manca, G.; Martellotti, G.; Neustroev, P.; Oldeman, R. G. C.; Palutan, M.; Passaleva, G.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Saitta, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Tellarini, G.; Vacca, C.; Vazquez-Gomez, R.; Vecchi, S.; Veltri, M.; Vorobyev, A.

    2016-04-01

    A method is described which allows to deduce the dead-time of the front-end electronics of the LHCb muon detector from a series of measurements performed at different luminosities at a bunch-crossing rate of 20 MHz. The measured values of the dead-time range from ~ 70 ns to ~ 100 ns. These results allow to estimate the performance of the muon detector at the future bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz and at higher luminosity.

  15. The application of advanced remote systems technology to future waste handling facilities: Waste Systems Data and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kring, C.T.; Herndon, J.N.; Meacham, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been advancing the technology in remote handling and remote maintenance of in-cell systems planned for future US nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Much of the experience and technology developed over the past decade in this endeavor are directly applicable to the in-cell systems being considered for the facilities of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). The ORNL developments are based on the application of teleoperated force-reflecting servomanipulators controlled by an operator completely removed from the hazardous environment. These developments address the nonrepetitive nature of remote maintenance in the unstructured environments encountered in a waste handling facility. Employing technological advancements in dexterous manipulators, as well as basic design guidelines that have been developed for remotely maintained equipment and processes, can increase operation and maintenance system capabilities, thereby allowing the attainment of two FWMS major objectives: decreasing plant personnel radiation exposure and increasing plant availability by decreasing the mean-time-to-repair in-cell maintenance and process equipment. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Quasi-isochronous muon collection channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Neuffer, David; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2015-04-26

    Intense muon beams have many potential commercial and scientific applications, ranging from low-energy investigations of the basic properties of matter using spin resonance to large energy-frontier muon colliders. However, muons originate from a tertiary process that produces a diffuse swarm. To make useful beams, the swarm must be rapidly captured and cooled before the muons decay. In this STTR project a promising new concept for the collection and cooling of muon beams to increase their intensity and reduce their emittances was investigated, namely, the use of a nearly isochronous helical cooling channel (HCC) to facilitate capture of the muons into RF bunches. The muon beam can then be cooled quickly and coalesced efficiently to optimize the luminosity of a muon collider, or could provide compressed muon beams for other applications. Optimal ways to integrate such a subsystem into the rest of a muon collection and cooling system, for collider and other applications, were developed by analysis and simulation. The application of quasi-isochronous helical cooling channels (QIHCC) for RF capture of muon beams was developed. Innovative design concepts for a channel incorporating straight solenoids, a matching section, and an HCC, including RF and absorber, were developed, and its subsystems were simulated. Additionally, a procedure that uses an HCC to combine bunches for a muon collider was invented and simulated. Difficult design aspects such as matching sections between subsystems and intensity-dependent effects were addressed. The bunch recombination procedure was developed into a complete design with 3-D simulations. Bright muon beams are needed for many commercial and scientific reasons. Potential commercial applications include low-dose radiography, muon catalyzed fusion, and the use of muon beams to screen cargo containers for homeland security. Scientific uses include low energy beams for rare process searches, muon spin resonance applications, muon beams for

  17. Low Cost, Low Power, Passive Muon Telescope For Interrogating Martian Sub-Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naudet, C. J.; Tanaka, H.; Kedar, S.; Plaut, J. J.; Webb, F.

    2012-12-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography. Unlike gamma rays and neutrons that penetrate only a few meters of rock, muons can traverse through up to several kilometers of a geological target. Recent development and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes, caves, and mines have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can image deep into kilometer-scale geological structures and provide unprecedentedly crisp density profile images of their interior. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near-horizontal Martian mu-on flux, which is used for muon radiography of surface features, is at least as strong as that on Earth, making the technique suitable for geological exploration of Mars. The muon telescope represents an entirely new class of instruments for planetary exploration, providing a wholly new type of measurement for delineation of potentially habitable subsurface environments through detection of caves, sub-surface ice, and water, and for the interpretation of composition and evolutionary state of the Martian surface. Muon radiography is a proven, sim-ple, low cost, and efficient technology that could detect subsurface radiation-shielded habitable environments that would not be detectable by any other technique available today. Thanks to its low power and low data rate demands, it could be integrated as a secondary instrument on future missions with minimal impact on primary mission operations. A mission that includes a muon detector could set the stage for a future mission to directly explore subsurface habitable envi-ronments on Mars. Developing the technology now would position it favorably for a surface mission in the 2018-2024 time period to explore Martian regions with previously-identified po-tential trace gas sources

  18. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    submitted 227 contributions, which were intensively discussed during day and evening sessions. The scientific program was centered around invited talks from speakers outside the μSR community, who presented lectures on topics where μSR is giving or expected to give significant contributions. The invited speakers, covering various fields of interest, included Radu Coldea (Oxford, Quantum Magnetism), Claude- Henri Delmas (Bordeaux, Electro- and Solid State Chemistry), Dirk Johrendt (Munich, Iron Based Materials), Marc-Henri Julien (Grenoble, Cuprate Superconductors), Manfred Fiebig (Zürich, Multiferroics), Allan MacDonald (Austin, Topological Electronic States), Hidenori Takagi (Stuttgart and Tokyo, Transition Metal Oxides), and Jean-Marc Triscone (Geneva, Oxide Heterostructures). In addition to an overview about status and progress of the existing facilities in Europe, Canada and Japan, future projects and new ideas for μSR facilities in South Korea, China and the USA were presented. A special evening session was held to discuss about muon site and muon states calculations by DFT and other techniques. Several talks and posters can be found on the conference web page www.psi.ch/muSR2014. In a ceremony at the beginning of the conference, Roberto De Renzi from the University of Parma was awarded the 2014 Yamazaki Prize for muon science by the International Society for Muon Spin Spectroscopy (ISMS) for his sustained and exceptional contributions to the development of the muon spin relaxation technique to investigate magnetism and superconductivity and for promoting synergies between μSR and NMR. In the closing session Rob Kie (UBC Vancouver and TRIUMF) very effectively summarized the five days of meeting, while giving an enlightening personal impression. In the same session five best poster prizes were awarded and ISMS gave two prizes to young researchers presenting outstanding work at the conference. The conference organizers also on behalf of the entire μSR community are

  19. Muon-muon and other high energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The first section looks at the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron, of lepton and photon-photon colliders for comparison. The second section discusses the physics considerations for the muon collider. The third section covers muon collider components. The fourth section is about the intersection region and detectors. In the fifth section, the authors discuss modifications to enhance the muon polarization`s operating parameters with very small momentum spreads, operations at energies other than the maximum for which the machine is designed, and designs of machines for different maximum energies. The final section discusses a Research and Development plan aimed at the operation of a 0.5 TeV demonstration machine by the year 2010, and of the 4 TeV machine by the year 2020.

  20. Chromaticity correction for a muon collider optics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Muon Collider (MC) is a promising candidate for the next energy frontier machine. However, in order to obtain peak luminosity in the 10{sup 34} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} range the collider lattice designmust satisfy a number of stringent requirements. In particular the expected large momentum spread of the muon beam and the very small {beta}* call for a careful correction of the chromatic effects. Here we present a particular solution for the interaction region (IR) optics whose distinctive feature is a three-sextupole local chromatic correction scheme. The scheme may be applied to other future machines where chromatic effects are expected to be large. The expected large muon energy spread requires the optics to be stable over a wide range of momenta whereas the required luminosity calls for {beta}* in the mm range. To avoid luminosity degradation due to hour-glass effect, the bunch length must be comparatively small. To keep the needed RF voltage within feasible limits the momentum compaction factor must be small over the wide range of momenta. A low {beta}* means high sensitivity to alignment and field errors of the Interaction Region (IR) quadrupoles and large chromatic effects which limit the momentum range of optics stability and require strong correction sextupoles, which eventually limit the Dynamic Aperture (DA). Finally, the ring circumference should be as small as possible, luminosity being inversely proportional to the collider length. A promising solution for a 1.5 TeV center of mass energy MC with {beta}* = 1 m in both planes has been proposed. This {beta}* value has been chosen as a compromise between luminosity and feasibility based on the magnet design and energy deposition considerations. The proposed solution for the IR optics together with a new flexible momentum compaction arc cell design allows to satisfy all requirements and is relatively insensitive to the beam-beam effect.

  1. Muon motion in titanium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempton, J. R.; Petzinger, K. G.; Kossler, W. J.; Schone, H. E.; Hitti, B. S.; Stronach, C. E.; Adu, N.; Lankford, W. F.; Reilly, J. J.; Seymour, E. F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Motional narrowing of the transverse-field muon spin rotation signal was observed in gamma-TiH(x) for x = 1.83, 1.97, and 1.99. An analysis of the data for TiH1.99 near room temperature indicates that the mechanism responsible for the motion of the muon out of the octahedral site is thermally activated diffusion with an attempt frequency comparable to the optical vibrations of the lattice. Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the effect of muon and proton motion upon the muon field-correlation time were used to interpret the motional narrowing in TiH1.97 near 500 K. The interpretation is dependent upon whether the Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound (BPP) theory or an independent spin-pair relaxation model is used to obtain the vacancy jump rate from proton NMR T1 measurements. Use of BPP theory shows that the field-correction time can be obtained if the rate of motion of the muon with respect to the rate of the motion for the protons is decreased. An independent spin-pair relaxation model indicates that the field-correlation time can be obtained if the rate of motion for the nearest-neighbor protons is decreased.

  2. Vibrational Stability of SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Recently developed, the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facilities at Fermilab support the International Linear Collider (ILC), High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These facilities; Meson Detector Building (MDB) and New Muon Lab (NML) have very different foundations, structures, relative elevations with respect to grade level and surrounding soil composition. Also, there are differences in the operating equipment and their proximity to the primary machine. All the future machines have stringent operational stability requirements. The present study examines both near-field and ambient vibration in order to develop an understanding of the potential contribution of near-field sources (e.g. compressors, ultra-high and standard vacuum equipment, klystrons, modulators, utility fans and pumps) and distant noise sources to the overall system displacements. Facility vibration measurement results and methods of possible isolation from noise sources are presented and discussed.

  3. Muon-Pair Production by Atmospheric Muons in CosmoALEPH

    SciTech Connect

    Maciuc, F.; Grupen, C.; Hashim, N.O.; Luitz, S.; Mailov, A.; Muller, A.S.; Putzer, A.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Schmelling, M.; Tcaciuc, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Ziegler, T.; Zuber, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Siegen U. /SLAC /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum /Heidelberg U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /CERN /Princeton U. /Oxford U.

    2006-03-06

    Data from a dedicated cosmic ray run of the ALEPH detector were used in a study of muon trident production, i.e., muon pairs produced by muons. Here the overburden and the calorimeters are the target materials while the ALEPH time projection chamber provides the momentum measurements. A theoretical estimate of the muon trident cross section is obtained by developing a Monte Carlo simulation for muon propagation in the overburden and the detector. Two muon trident candidates were found to match the expected theoretical pattern. The observed production rate implies that the nuclear form factor cannot be neglected for muon tridents.

  4. Future Estimation of Convenience Living Facilities Withdrawal due to Population Decline all Over Japan from 2010 TO 2040 - Focus on Supermarkets, Convenience Stores and Drugstores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Yuka; Akiyama, Yuki; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2016-06-01

    Population explosion is considered to be one of the most crucial problems in the world. However, in Japan, the opposite problem: population decline has become serious now. Japanese population is estimated to decrease by twenty millions in 2040. This negative situation will cause to increase areas where many residents cannot make a daily living all over Japan because many convenience living facilities such as supermarkets, convenience stores and drugstores will be difficult to maintain their market area population due to future population decline. In our research, we used point data of convenience living facilities developed by address geocoding of digital telephone directory and point data of future population projection developed by distribution of Japanese official population projection data proportionally among the building volume of digital residential map, which can monitor building volumes all over Japan. In conclusion, we estimated that various convenience living facilities in Japan will shrink and close by population decline in near future. In particular, it is cleared that approximately 14.7% of supermarkets will be possible to withdraw all over Japan by 2040. In addition, it is cleared that over 40% of supermarkets in some countryside prefectures will be possible to withdraw by 2040. Thus, we estimated future distributions of convenience living facilities that cannot maintain their market area population due to future population decline. Moreover, we estimated the number of people that they will become inconvenience in buying fresh foods.

  5. Muon collider interaction region design

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.I.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; Alexakhin, V.Y.; /Dubna, JINR

    2010-05-01

    Design of a muon collider interaction region (IR) presents a number of challenges arising from low {beta}* < 1 cm, correspondingly large beta-function values and beam sizes at IR magnets, as well as the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. As a consequence, the designs of the IR optics, magnets and machine-detector interface are strongly interlaced and iterative. A consistent solution for the 1.5 TeV c.o.m. muon collider IR is presented. It can provide an average luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} with an adequate protection of magnet and detector components.

  6. Law of Conservation of Muons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Feinberg, G.; Weinberg, S.

    1961-02-01

    A multiplicative selection rule for mu meson-electron transitions is proposed. A "muon parity" = -1 is considered for the muon and its neutrino, while the "muon parity" for all other particles is +1. The selection rule then states that (-1) exp(no. of initial (-1) parity particles) = (-1) exp(no. of final (-1) parity particles). Several reactions that are forbidden by an additive law but allowed by the multiplicative law are suggested; these reactions include mu{sup +} .> e{sup +} + nu{sub mu} + {ovr nu}{sub e}, e{sup -} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + mu{sup -}, and muonium .> antimuonium (mu{sup +} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + e{sup +}). An intermediate-boson hypothesis is suggested. (T.F.H.)

  7. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonio, Marco

    2011-10-06

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  8. nuSTORM: Neutrinos from STORed Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan

    2015-05-15

    The results of LSND and MiniBooNE, along with the recent papers on a possible reactor neutrino flux anomaly, give tantalizing hints of new physics. Models beyond the νSM have been developed to explain these results and involve one or more additional neutrinos that are non-interacting or “sterile.” Neutrino beams produced from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring provide a powerful way to study this potential new physics. In this paper, I will describe the facility, nuSTORM, and an appropriate far detector for neutrino oscillation searches at short baseline. I will present sensitivity plots that indicated that this experimental approach can provide well over 5 σ confirmation or rejection of the LSND/MinBooNE results.

  9. MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel M.

    2006-03-20

    Ionization cooling of a muon beam is a key technique for a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. An international collaboration is mounting an experiment to demonstrate muon ionization cooling at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. We aim to complete the experiment by 2010.

  10. Using the Fermilab proton source for a muon to electron conversion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Bogert, D.; DeJongh, F.; Geer, S.; McGinnis, D.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    The Fermilab proton source is capable of providing 8 GeV protons for both the future long-baseline neutrino program (NuMI), and for a new program of low energy muon experiments. In particular, if the 8 GeV protons are rebunched and then slowly extracted into an external beamline, the resulting proton beam would be suitable for a muon-to-electron conversion experiment designed to improve on the existing sensitivity by three orders of magnitude. We describe a scheme for the required beam manipulations. The scheme uses the Accumulator for momentum stacking, and the Debuncher for bunching and slow extraction. This would permit simultaneous operation of the muon program with the future NuMI program, delivering 10{sup 20} protons per year at 8 GeV for the muon program at the cost of a modest ({approx}10%) reduction in the protons available to the neutrino program.

  11. Strong dynamics at the muon collider: Working group report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P.C.; Eichten, E.

    1998-03-01

    New strong dynamics at the energy scale {approx} 1 TeV is an attractive and elegant theoretical ansatz for the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. We review here, the theoretical models for strong dynamics, particularly, technicolor theories and their low energy signatures. We emphasize that the fantastic beam energy resolution ({sigma}{sub E}/E {approximately} 10{sup -4}) expected at the first muon collider ({radical}s=100-500 GeV) allows the possibility of resolving some extraordinarily narrow technihadron resonances and, Higgs-like techniscalars produced in the s-channel. Investigating indirect probes for strong dynamics such as search for muon compositeness, we find that the muon colliders provide unparalleled reaches. A big muon collider ({radical}s=3-4 TeV) would be a remarkable facility to study heavy technicolor particles such as the topcolor Z`, to probe the dynamics underlying fermion masses and mixings and to fully explore the strongly interacting electroweak sector.

  12. Exotic muon decays and the KARMEN anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gninenko, S. N.; Krasnikov, N. V.

    1998-08-01

    An anomaly in time distribution of neutrinos from the ISIS pulsed beam stop source observed by the KARMEN collaboration is discussed. We show that the anomaly can be interpreted as a superposition of two exponentials, both having time constants consistent with the μ+ lifetime of 2.2 μs. It is assumed that they both originate from muon decays at rest. One of them describes the time distribution of the prompt neutrino events, while the other describes the time distribution of events from delayed decays of slowly moving (β~=0.02) particles in the KARMEN calorimeter. We propose here that these particles are produced in exotic decays of positive muons μ+-->e++X, resulting in the second exponential time distribution shifted by the time of flight with respect to the time distribution of neutrino events. This model gives an acceptable fit to the KARMEN data if X has a mass of 103.9 MeV. The possible decay modes of this new massive neutral particle are discussed. This hypothesis can be experimentally tested in the near future by studying the low energy part of the e+ spectrum in the μ+ decays.

  13. Proposed studies of strongly coupled plasmas at the future FAIR and LHC facilities: the HEDgeHOB collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Shutov, A.; Udrea, S.; Deutsch, C.; Fortov, V. E.; Gryaznov, V.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Jacobi, J.; Kain, V.; Kuster, M.; Ni, P.; Piriz, A. R.; Schmidt, R.; Spiller, P.; Varentsov, D.; Zioutas, K.

    2006-04-01

    Detailed theoretical studies have shown that intense heavy-ion beams that will be generated at the future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) (Henning 2004 Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 214 211) at Darmstadt will be a very efficient tool to create high-energy-density (HED) states in matter including strongly coupled plasmas. In this paper we show, with the help of two-dimensional numerical simulations, the interesting physical states that can be achieved considering different beam intensities using zinc as a test material. Another very interesting experiment that can be performed using the intense heavy-ion beam at FAIR will be generation of low-entropy compression of a test material such as hydrogen that is enclosed in a cylindrical shell of a high-Z material such as lead or gold. In such an experiment, one can study the problem of hydrogen metallization and the interiors of giant planets. Moreover, we discuss an interesting method to diagnose the HED matter that is at the centre of the Sun. We have also carried out simulations to study the damage caused by the full impact of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam on a superconducting magnet. An interesting outcome of this study is that the LHC beam can induce HED states in matter.

  14. Future high intensity ISOL facilities: Selected current R&D topics and possible synergies with other projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Alex C.

    2003-05-01

    The long-term future of ISOL facilities will be governed by the quest for ever increasing secondary beam intensities. One important aspect concerns a new generation of high-power driver accelerators which aim at multi-megawatt beam powers, used in a two-step production scheme for fission products. Within the EURISOL study, e.g. a 1 GeV, 5 mA proton has been investigated in some detail. It would be upgradeable in energy and also have, up to a certain extend, the capability for heavy-ion acceleration. The required R&D programme was assessed, and found to be in the mainstream of today's accelerator development which addresses also other projects like accelerator-driven transmutation of nuclear waste, neutrino beams, …. The concomitant development of high-power spallation targets and the secondary uranium targets is the second issue where a lot of R&D effort is done by several communities. Linked to this are also the studies in which photo-fission is used as a "low-cost" option for a dedicated region of the nuclear chart. The present paper will introduce in this general context, and discuss (selected) relevant new experimental results which are obtained in linac in particular.

  15. Superconducting magnet system for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Johnson, R.P.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Novitski, I.; Yonehara, K.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    A helical cooling channel has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. A novel superconducting magnet system for a muon beam cooling experiment is being designed at Fermilab. The inner volume of the cooling channel is filled with liquid helium where passing muon beam can be decelerated and cooled in a process of ionization energy loss. The magnet parameters are optimized to match the momentum of the beam as it slows down. The results of 3D magnetic analysis for two designs of magnet system, mechanical and quench protection considerations are discussed.

  16. Physics with a millimole of muons

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1998-03-01

    The eventual prospect of muon colliders reaching several TeV encourages us to consider the experimental opportunities presented by very copious stores of muons, approaching 10{sup 21} per year. I summarize and comment upon some highlights of the Fermilab Workshop on Physics at the First Muon Collider and at the Front End of a Muon Collider. Topics include various varieties of {mu}{mu} colliders, {mu}p colliders, and applications of the intense neutrino beams that can be generated in muon storage rings.

  17. Muon g-2 Experiment Shimming

    ScienceCinema

    Kiburg, Brendan

    2016-06-28

    The Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab will use as its primary instrument a 52-foot-wide electromagnet that creates a precise magnetic field. In this video, Fermilab's Brendan Kiburg explains the lengthy process of finely "shimming" that magnetic field into shape.

  18. Cosmic muons, as messengers from the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brancus, I. M.; Rebel, H.

    2015-02-01

    Penetrating from the outer space into the Earth atmosphere, primary cosmic rays are producing secondary radiation by the collisions with the air target subsequently decaying in hadrons, pions, muons, electrons and photons, phenomenon called Extensive air Shower (EAS). The muons, considered as the "penetrating" component, survive the propagation to the Earth and even they are no direct messenger of the Universe, they reflect the features of the primary particles. The talk gives a description of the development of the extensive air showers generating the secondary particles, especially the muon component. Results of the muon flux and of the muon charge ratio, (the ratio between the positive and the negative muons), obtained in different laboratories and in WILLI experiment, are shown. At the end, the contribution of the muons measured in EAS to the investigation of the nature of the primary cosmic rays is emphasized in KASCADE and WILLI-EAS experiments.

  19. Cosmic muons, as messengers from the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Brancus, I. M.; Rebel, H.

    2015-02-24

    Penetrating from the outer space into the Earth atmosphere, primary cosmic rays are producing secondary radiation by the collisions with the air target subsequently decaying in hadrons, pions, muons, electrons and photons, phenomenon called Extensive air Shower (EAS). The muons, considered as the “penetrating” component, survive the propagation to the Earth and even they are no direct messenger of the Universe, they reflect the features of the primary particles. The talk gives a description of the development of the extensive air showers generating the secondary particles, especially the muon component. Results of the muon flux and of the muon charge ratio, (the ratio between the positive and the negative muons), obtained in different laboratories and in WILLI experiment, are shown. At the end, the contribution of the muons measured in EAS to the investigation of the nature of the primary cosmic rays is emphasized in KASCADE and WILLI-EAS experiments.

  20. Deep underwater muon and neutrino detection status and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Talkington, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    DUMAND, the acronym for deep underwater muon and neutrino detection, is a project started by a group of U.S. physicists to produce a detector large enough to detect a significant rate of very high-energy natural neutrinos. This project will permit the study of elementary particle interactions in cosmic rays at energies beyond those available from contemplated future particle accelerators. It may also allow the observation of extraterrestrial and possibly extragalactic sources of neutrinos.

  1. The Mile Deep Muon Detector at Sanford Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Margaret; Gabriel, Steve

    2012-03-01

    For educating students and teachers about basic nuclear and particle physics, you can't go wrong with cosmic rays muons as a cheap and reliable source of data. A simple and relatively inexpensive detector gives a myriad of possibilities to cover core material in physical science, chemistry, physics, and statistics and gives students opportunities to design their own investigations. At Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake, in Lead, SD, cosmic ray muon detectors are being used to answer the first question always asked by any visitor to the facility, ``Why are you building the lab a mile underground'' A conventional Quarknet-style detector is available in the education facility on the surface, with a much larger companion detector, the Mile Deep Muon Detector, set up 4850 feet below the surface. Using the Quarknet data acquisition board, the data will be made available to students and teachers through the Cosmic Ray E-lab website. The detector was tested and installed as part of a summer program for students beginning their first or second year of college.

  2. The PixFEL project: development of advanced X-ray pixel detectors for application at future FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, G.; Comotti, D.; Fabris, L.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Forti, F.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Pancheri, L.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.; Mendicino, R.; Benkechkache, M. A.

    2015-02-01

    The PixFEL project aims to develop an advanced X-ray camera for imaging suited for the demanding requirements of next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities. New technologies can be deployed to boost the performance of imaging detectors as well as future pixel devices for tracking. In the first phase of the PixFEL project, approved by the INFN, the focus will be on the development of the microelectronic building blocks, carried out with a 65 nm CMOS technology, implementing a low noise analog front-end channel with high dynamic range and compression features, a low power ADC and high density memory. At the same time PixFEL will investigate and implement some of the enabling technologies to assembly a seamless large area X-ray camera composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. A pixel matrix with active edge will be developed to minimize the dead area of the sensor layer. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be explored to build a four-side buttable readout chip with small pixel pitch and all the on-board required functionalities. The ambitious target requirements of the new pixel device are: single photon resolution, 1 to 104 photons @ 1 keV to 10 keV input dynamic range, 10-bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, 1 kevent in-pixel memory and 100 μm pixel pitch. The long term goal of PixFEL will be the development of a versatile X-ray camera to be operated either in burst mode (European XFEL), or in continuous mode to cope with the high frame rates foreseen for the upgrade phase of the LCLS-II at SLAC.

  3. FEASIBILITY STUDY II OF A MUON BASED NEUTRINO SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    GALLARDO,J.C.; OZAKI,S.; PALMER,R.B.; ZISMAN,M.

    2001-06-30

    The concept of using a muon storage ring to provide a well characterized beam of muon and electron neutrinos (a Neutrino Factory) has been under study for a number of years now at various laboratories throughout the world. The physics program of a Neutrino Factoryis focused on the relatively unexplored neutrino sector. In conjunction with a detector located a suitable distance from the neutrino source, the facility would make valuable contributions to the study of neutrino masses and lepton mixing. A Neutrino Factory is expected to improve the measurement accuracy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} and provide measurements of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and the sign of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}. It may also be able to measure CP violation in the lepton sector.

  4. EMPACT: Electrons Muons Partons with Air Core Toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, M.D. )

    1990-05-25

    The EMPACT experiment utilizes a broad approach to maximize its discovery potential for new phenomena accessible at the SSC. The high resolution detector has a balances emphasis on, and large acceptance for, electrons, muons, jets, and noninteracting particles, and is capable of utilizing the ultimate luminosity of the SSC. The detector emphasizes excellent calorimetry augmented by TRD tracking, and employs an innovative system of superconducting air core toroids for muon measurements. Significant engineering effort has established the feasibility of a baseline detector concept and has addressed the related issues of support facilities, assembly, and detector integration. The design has been tested against the challenges of predicted phenomena, with the expectation that this will optimize the capacity for observing the unexpected. EMPACT's international collaboration has unprecedented support from major aerospace industries who are providing tools and expertise for project design and integration, which will assure that a detector optimized for performance and cost will be available for the first collisions at the new laboratory.

  5. High pressure research using muons at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanov, R.; Guguchia, Z.; Maisuradze, A.; Andreica, D.; Elender, M.; Raselli, A.; Shermadini, Z.; Goko, T.; Knecht, F.; Morenzoni, E.; Amato, A.

    2016-04-01

    Pressure, together with temperature and magnetic field, is an important thermodynamical parameter in physics. Investigating the response of a compound or of a material to pressure allows to elucidate ground states, investigate their interplay and interactions and determine microscopic parameters. Pressure tuning is used to establish phase diagrams, study phase transitions and identify critical points. Muon spin rotation/relaxation (μSR) is now a standard technique making increasing significant contribution in condensed matter physics, material science research and other fields. In this review, we will discuss specific requirements and challenges to perform μSR experiments under pressure, introduce the high pressure muon facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI, Switzerland) and present selected results obtained by combining the sensitivity of the μSR technique with pressure.

  6. A new X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for extraterrestrial materials using a muon beam

    PubMed Central

    Terada, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Osawa, T.; Tachibana, S.; Miyake, Y.; Kubo, M. K.; Kawamura, N.; Higemoto, W.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Ebihara, M.; Uesugi, M.

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of the intense pulsed muon source at J-PARC MUSE, Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex/MUon Science Establishment (106 s−1 for a momentum of 60 MeV/c), enabled us to pioneer a new frontier in analytical sciences. Here, we report a non-destructive elemental analysis using µ− capture. Controlling muon momentum from 32.5 to 57.5 MeV/c, we successfully demonstrate a depth-profile analysis of light elements (B, C, N, and O) from several mm-thick layered materials and non-destructive bulk analyses of meteorites containing organic materials. Muon beam analysis, enabling a bulk analysis of light to heavy elements without severe radioactivation, is a unique analytical method complementary to other non-destructive analyses. Furthermore, this technology can be used as a powerful tool to identify the content and distribution of organic components in future asteroidal return samples. PMID:24861282

  7. 20 - 50 GeV muon storage rings for a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, G.H.; Johnstone, C.; Meot, F.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-07-01

    Muon decay rings are under study as part of an International Scoping Study (ISS) for a future Neutrino Factory. Both isosceles triangle- and racetrack-shaped rings are being considered for a 20 GeV muon energy, but with upgrade potentials of 40 or 50 GeV. Both rings are designed with long straights to optimize directional muon decay. The neutrinos from muon decay pass to one or two distant detectors; the racetrack ring has one very long production straight aligned with one detector while the triangular ring has two straights which can be aligned with two detectors. Decay ring specifications and lattice studies are the primary topic of this paper. Injection, collimation, and the RF system are covered in a second contribution to these proceedings.

  8. Directivity function of muon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetyan, G. G.

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a new concept of directivity function (DF) to describe directional sensitivity of a particle detector. DF is a 3D function, describing the sensitivity of a detector to asymptotic directions of primary protons. It defines the contribution of primary protons, arriving from different asymptotic directions to the count rate of the detector. We develop the approach for computing the DF and derive it in particular case of SEVAN muon detector, located at mount Aragats, Armenia. Obtained data enable one to outline the region of solid angles, inside of which the arriving protons contribute a given percentage of count rate. In general, the DF can have the multi peak shape. It provides the most detailed and accurate description of directional sensitivity of a particle detector and we suggest that it is used in space research based on neutron and muon detectors.

  9. Muon data analysis program RUMDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, S. H.

    1994-07-01

    There are currently two data analysis programs available for muon users at ISIS. Both programs can be used for analyzing MuSR and EMU data and can be run on (MUSR01), (EMU01) or set-up to run on a user's account. RUMDA - 'Reading University Muon Data Analysis' was originally from Reading University and is now controlled at ISIS. At present (mid 1994) this suite of programs is run using VAX/VMS and the ISIS plotting package 'GENIE'. It is possible to fit data to any function with a maximum of 10 variables. UDA - 'mu Data Analysis' is a dashboard driven program which allows the user to plot and fit data files on the screen or as hard copies. It is possible to fit data to a combination of Gaussian and/or Lorentzian line shapes. A manual describing this program can be found in the back of the MuSR User Guide.

  10. Radiation tests of real-sized prototype RPCs for the Phase-2 Upgrade of the CMS Muon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. S.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S. Y.; Hong, B.; Go, Y.; Kang, M. H.; Lim, J. H.; Park, S. K.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Rios, A. A. O.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Sayed, A.; Singh, G.; Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Pugliese, G.; Verwilligen, P.; van Doninck, W.; Colafranceschi, S.; Sharma, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kumarl, R.; Metha, A.; Singh, J.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M. I.; Awan, I. M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Muhammad, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shahzad, H.; Kim, M. S.; Goutzvitz, M.; Grenier, G.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Carpinteyro Bernardino, S.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Pedraza, I.; Severiano, C. B.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pant, L. M.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Orso, I.; Paolucci, P.; Thyssen, F.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Ban, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Choi, M.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Lomidze, D.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Sanabria, J. C.; Crotty, I.; Vaitkus, J.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a systematic study of double-gap and four-gap phenolic resistive plate chambers (RPCs) for the Phase-2 upgrade of the CMS muon system at high η. In the present study, we constructed real-sized double-gap and four-gap RPCs with gap thicknesses of 1.6 and 0.8 mm, respectively, with 2-mm-thick phenolic high-pressure-laminated (HPL) plates. We examined the prototype RPCs with cosmic rays and with 100-GeV muons provided by the SPS H4 beam line at CERN. To examine the rate capability of the prototype RPCs both at Korea University and at the CERN GIF++ facility, the chambers were irradiated with 137Cs sources providing maximum gamma rates of about 1.5 kHz cm‑2. For the 1.6-mm-thick double-gap RPCs, we found the relatively high threshold on the produced detector charge was conducive to effectively suppressing the rapid increase of strip cluster sizes of muon hits with high voltage, especially when measuring the narrow-pitch strips. The gamma-induced currents drawn in the four-gap RPC were about one-fourth of those drawn in the double-gap RPC. The rate capabilities of both RPC types, proven through the present testing using gamma-ray sources, far exceeded the maximum rate expected in the new high-η endcap RPCs planned for future phase-II runs of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  11. Muon ID at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Fisk, G.; Para, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a new way to reconstruct and identify muons with high efficiency and high pion rejection. Since muons at the ILC are often produced with or in jets, for many of the physics channels of interest [1], an efficient algorithm to deal with the identification and separation of particles within jets is important. The algorithm at the core of the method accounts for the effects of the magnetic field and for the loss of energy by charged particles due to ionization in the detector. We have chosen to develop the analysis within the setup of one of the Linear Collider Concept Detectors adopted by the US. Within b-pair production jets, particles cover a wide range in momenta; however {approx}80% of the particles have a momentum below 30 GeV[2]. Our study, focused on bbar-b jets, is preceded by a careful analysis of single energy particles between 2 and 50 GeV. As medium energy particles are a substantial component of the jets, many of the particles lose part of their energy in the calorimeters and the solenoid coil before reaching the muon detector where they may have energy below 2 GeV. To deal with this problem we have implemented a Runge-Kutta correction of the calculated trajectory to better handle these lower energy particles. The multiple scattering and other stochastic processes, more important at lower energy, is addressed by a Kalman-filter integrated into the reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm provides a unique and powerful separation of muons from pions. The 5 Tesla magnetic field from a solenoid surrounds the hadron calorimeter and allows the reconstruction and precision.

  12. Neutron densities from muon capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan Ching, Chiang; Oset, Eulogio

    1991-10-01

    We show that, because of Pauli blocking and renormalization of the weak currents in nuclei, the muon capture rates are rather sensitive to the neutron distributions. We also show that, because of intrinsic theoretical uncertainties, neutron radia cannot be determined with precision but some reasonable limits can be given. However, the ratio of capture rates in different isotopes serves to determine the neutron radii of the isotopes provided the neutron density distribution for one of them is known.

  13. Introduction to Mini Muon Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, Konstantin N.

    2012-08-13

    Using a mini muon tracker developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory we performed experiments of simple landscapes of various materials, including TNT, 9501, lead, tungsten, aluminium, and water. Most common scenes are four two inches thick step wedges of different dimensions: 12-inch x 12-inch, 12-inch x 9-inch, 12-inch x 6-inch, and 12-inch x 3-inch; and a one three inches thick hemisphere of lead with spherical hollow, and a similar full lead sphere.

  14. Information extraction from muon radiography data

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, K. N.; Asaki, T. J.; Chartrand, R.; Hengartner, N. W.; Hogan, G. E.; Morris, C. L.; Priedhorsky, W. C.; Schirato, R.C.; Schultz, L. J.; Sottile, M. J.; Vixie, K. R.; Wohlberg, B. E.; Blanpied, G.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering muon radiography was proposed recently as a technique of detection and 3-d imaging for dense high-Z objects. High-energy cosmic ray muons are deflected in matter in the process of multiple Coulomb scattering. By measuring the deflection angles we are able to reconstruct the configuration of high-Z material in the object. We discuss the methods for information extraction from muon radiography data. Tomographic methods widely used in medical images have been applied to a specific muon radiography information source. Alternative simple technique based on the counting of high-scattered muons in the voxels seems to be efficient in many simulated scenes. SVM-based classifiers and clustering algorithms may allow detection of compact high-Z object without full image reconstruction. The efficiency of muon radiography can be increased using additional informational sources, such as momentum estimation, stopping power measurement, and detection of muonic atom emission.

  15. nuSTORM and A Path to a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Adey, David; Bayes, Ryan; Bross, Alan; Snopok, Pavel

    2015-05-20

    Our article reviews the current status of the nuSTORM facility and shows how it can be utilized to perform the next step on the path toward the realization of a μ+μ- collider. This review includes the physics motivation behind nuSTORM, a detailed description of the facility and the neutrino beams it can produce, and a summary of the short-baseline neutrino oscillation physics program that can be carried out at the facility. The idea for nuSTORM (the production of neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring) was discussed in the literature more than 30 years ago in the context of searching for noninteracting (sterile) neutrinos. However, only in the past 5 years has the concept been fully developed, motivated in large part by the facility's unmatched reach in addressing the evolving data on oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. Finally, this article reviews the basics of the μ+μ-collider concept and describes how nuSTORM provides a platform to test advanced concepts for six-dimensional muon ionization cooling.

  16. nuSTORM and a Path to a Muon Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adey, David; Bayes, Ryan; Bross, Alan D.; Snopok, Pavel

    2015-10-01

    This article reviews the current status of the nuSTORM facility and shows how it can be utilized to perform the next step on the path toward the realization of a μ+μ- collider. This review includes the physics motivation behind nuSTORM, a detailed description of the facility and the neutrino beams it can produce, and a summary of the short-baseline neutrino oscillation physics program that can be carried out at the facility. The basic idea for nuSTORM (the production of neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring) was discussed in the literature more than 30 years ago in the context of searching for noninteracting (sterile) neutrinos. However, only in the past 5 years has the concept been fully developed, motivated in large part by the facility's unmatched reach in addressing the evolving data on oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. Finally, this article reviews the basics of the μ+μ- collider concept and describes how nuSTORM provides a platform to test advanced concepts for six-dimensional muon ionization cooling.

  17. nuSTORM and A Path to a Muon Collider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adey, David; Bayes, Ryan; Bross, Alan; Snopok, Pavel

    2015-05-20

    Our article reviews the current status of the nuSTORM facility and shows how it can be utilized to perform the next step on the path toward the realization of a μ+μ- collider. This review includes the physics motivation behind nuSTORM, a detailed description of the facility and the neutrino beams it can produce, and a summary of the short-baseline neutrino oscillation physics program that can be carried out at the facility. The idea for nuSTORM (the production of neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring) was discussed in the literature more than 30 years agomore » in the context of searching for noninteracting (sterile) neutrinos. However, only in the past 5 years has the concept been fully developed, motivated in large part by the facility's unmatched reach in addressing the evolving data on oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. Finally, this article reviews the basics of the μ+μ-collider concept and describes how nuSTORM provides a platform to test advanced concepts for six-dimensional muon ionization cooling.« less

  18. Beam dynamics in an ultra-low energy storage rings (review of existing facilities and feasibility studies for future experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    Storage rings operating at ultra-low energies and in particular electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. However, earlier measurements showed strong limitations on beam intensity, fast decay of ion current, reduced life time etc. The nature of these effects was not fully understood. Also a large variety of experiments in future generation ultra-low energy storage and decelerator facilities including in-ring collision studies with a reaction microscope require a comprehensive investigation of the physical processes involved into the operation of such rings. In this paper, we present review of non-linear and long term beam dynamics studies on example of the ELISA, AD Recycler, TSR and USR rings using the computer codes BETACOOL, OPERA-3D and MAD-X. The results from simulations were benchmarked against experimental data of beam losses in the ELISA storage ring. We showed that decay of beam intensity in ultra-low energy rings is mainly caused by ion losses on ring aperture due to multiple scattering on residual gas. Beam is lost on ring aperture due to small ring acceptance. Rate of beam losses increases at high intensities because of the intra-beam scattering effect adds to vacuum losses. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of the effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target have been carried out as well. The life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with this internal gas jet target were estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the TSR ring, where low intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93 keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions have been reproduced. Based on these simulations

  19. Lifetime of Cosmic-Ray Muons and the Standard Model of Fundamental Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Sahansha; Shevde, Yash; Majewski, Walerian

    2015-04-01

    Muon is one of the twelve fundamental particles of matter, having the longest free-particle lifetime. It decays into three other leptons through an exchange of the weak vector bosons W+/W-. Muons are present in the secondary cosmic ray showers in the atmosphere, reaching the sea level. By detecting time delay between arrival of the muon and an appearance of the decay electron in our single scintillation detector (donated by the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA), we measured muon's lifetime at rest. It compares well with the value predicted by the Standard Model of Particles. From the lifetime we were able to calculate the ratio gw /MW of the weak coupling constant gw (an analog of the electric charge) to the mass of the W-boson MW. Using further Standard Model relations and an experimental value for MW, we calculated the weak coupling constant, the electric charge of the muon, and the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field. We determined the sea-level flux of cosmic muons.

  20. Muon cooling in a quadrupole magnet channel

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Poklonskiy, A.; /Michigan State U.

    2007-10-01

    As discussed before,[1] a cooling channel using quadrupole magnets in a FODO transport channel can be used for initial cooling of muons. In the present note we discuss this possibility of a FODO focusing channel for cooling, and we present ICOOL simulations of muon cooling within a FODO channel. We explore a 1.5m cell-length cooling channel that could be used for the initial transverse cooling stage of a muon collider or neutrino factory.

  1. Status of the MANX muon cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Hu, M.; Jansson, A.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Lopes, M.; Shiltsev, V.; Yarba, V.; Yu, M.; /Fermilab /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2008-06-01

    A demonstration experiment of six-dimensional (6D) phase space muon beam cooling is a key milestone on the roadmap toward to a real muon collider. In order to achieve this goal, they have designed the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory Experiment (MANX) channel, which consists of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC). They discuss the status of the simulation study of the MANX in this document.

  2. Materials science with muon spin rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    During this reporting period, the focus of activity in the Materials Science with Muon Spin Rotation (MSMSR) program was muon spin rotation studies of superconducting materials, in particular the high critical temperature and heavy-fermion materials. Apart from these studies, work was continued on the analysis of muon motion in metal hydrides. Results of these experiments are described in six papers included as appendices.

  3. Neutrino induced muons in Soudan 2.

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, D. M.; Soudan 2 Collaboration

    1999-06-23

    The neutrino-induced muon rate underground has been measured at Soudan 2. To discriminate from the intense background of atmospheric muons we consider only the through-going muons which originate from horizontal direction ({minus}0.14 < cos{theta} < 0.14). We calculate the horizontal, neutrino-induced muon rate at Soudan 2 from an exposure of 1.23 x 10{sup 8} s as {Phi}{sub {nu}{mu}} = (3.45 {+-} 0.52 {+-} 0.61) x 10{sup {minus}13} (cm{sup 2} sr s){sup {minus}1}.

  4. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Flanagan, Gene

    2014-09-10

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  5. The MANX Muon Cooling Experiment Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S. A.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Johnson, R. P.; Robertsa, T. J.; Yoneharab, K.

    2010-03-30

    The MANX experiment is being proposed to demonstrate the reduction of 6D muon phase space emittance, using a continuous liquid absorber to provide ionization cooling in a helical solenoid magnetic channel. The experiment involves the construction of a two-period-long helical cooling channel (HCC) to reduce the muon invariant emittance by a factor of two. The HCC would replace the current cooling section of the MICE experiment now being set up at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The MANX experiment would use the existing MICE spectrometers and muon beam line. We discuss the placement of detection planes to optimize the muon track resolution.

  6. Signatures of Noncommutative Geometry in Muon Decay for Nonsymmetric Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dinesh; Mobed, Nader; Ouimet, Pierre-Philippe

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to identify potential signatures of noncommutative geometry within the decay spectrum of a muon in orbit near the event horizon of a microscopic Schwarzschild black hole. This possibility follows from a re-interpretation of Moffat’s nonsymmetric theory of gravity, first published in Phys. Rev. D 19:3554, 1979, where the antisymmetric part of the metric tensor manifests the hypothesized noncommutative geometric structure throughout the manifold. It is further shown that for a given sign convention, the predicted signatures counteract the effects of curvature-induced muon stabilization predicted by Singh and Mobed in Phys. Rev. D 79:024026, 2009. While it is unclear whether evidence for noncommutative geometry may become observable anytime soon, this approach at least provides a useful direction for future quantum gravity research based on the ideas presented here.

  7. GPD physics with polarized muon beams at COMPASS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrero, Andrea [CEA-Saclay, DSM Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    A major part of the future COMPASS program is dedicated to the investigation of the nucleon structure through Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP). COMPASS will measure DVCS and DVMP reactions with a high intensity muon beam of 160 GeV and a 2.5 m-long liquid hydrogen target surrounded by a new TOF system. The availability of muon beams with high energy and opposite charge and polarization will allow to access the Compton form factor related to the dominant GPD H and to study the x{sub B}-dependence of the t-slope of the pure DVCS cross section and to study nucleon tomography. Projections on the achievable accuracies and preliminary results of pilot measurements will be presented.

  8. Analysis of airborne microorganisms, MVOC and odour in the surrounding of composting facilities and implications for future investigations.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Guido; Albrecht, Andreas; Jäckel, Udo; Kämpfer, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Emission and dispersal of microorganisms and odours from composting facilities were studied in a 3-year project at nine different composting facilities in Germany. Measurements were carried out under so-called 'normal-case', i.e. typical local climate conditions and working activities within the facilities, and 'real worst-case' conditions ('drainage flow' conditions) being characterized by the translocation of cold air mostly at night, and containing large amounts of bioaerosols. Highest concentrations of microorganisms were observed during turning of compost with a maximum of 2.4x10(6)cfu m(-3) for thermophilic actinomycetes. Other groups of microorganisms were detected in concentrations of about 10(5)cfu m(-3). During shredding of fresh organic material, the concentrations of all microorganisms reached 10(4)cfu m(-3). Here, odour concentrations turned out to be highest (up to 1,367 odour units (OU)m(-3)). At facilities equipped with a biofilter (odour reduction), a decrease in OU by a factor of 10 was observed. In the surrounding of the facilities, highest concentrations ranged between 10(1)-10(3)cfu m(-3) upwind and from 10(1)-10(4)cfu m(-3) downwind. The specific local meteorological situations must be considered carefully in advance and during sampling. Especially 'drainage flow' situations can lead to high microorganism concentrations (>10(4)-10(5)cfu m(-3) of thermophilic actinomycetes and thermophilic fungi) in the surroundings of composting facilities. PMID:17936684

  9. Fast Electromagnetic Calorimeters for the New Muon g-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzog, David

    2012-10-01

    The Intensity Frontier era brings a host of challenges for detector systems that must both accumulate data at very high rates while also maintaining an unusually high level of performance stability to suppress systematic uncertainties. The new muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab is typical of a group of next-generation measurements that also includes muon-to-electron conversion and rare kaon decay experiments. A common theme is detectors that must endure very high rates embedded in strong magnetic fields. I will focus on our design of the g-2 electromagnetic calorimeters, which must be compact, very fast, and be placed inside the highly uniform muon storage ring magnetic field. No magnetic materials can be used and stringent constraints exist on local current-generating electronics. We examined home-built W/SciFi detectors, PbF2 crystals and a custom undoped PbWO4 crystal using the Fermilab test beam facility. Very fast PMTs and on-board, large-area silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) were used for readout options. The leading design is based on PbF2, which produces very short pure Cherenkov light pulses that must be optimally coupled to SiPMs directly placed on the downstream surface. Custom electronics for the candidate SiPM arrays has been designed to preserve the intrinsic fast pulse signal. I will report on our test beam and lab results and our iterations with SiPM devices and electronics.

  10. First results of the cosmic ray muon variation study by means of the scintillation muon hodoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampilogov, N. V.; Astapov, I. I.; Barbashina, N. S.; Borog, V. V.; Dmitrieva, A. N.; Kovylyaeva, A. A.; Kompaniets, K. G.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shutenko, V. V.; Yashin, I. I.

    2016-02-01

    The new scintillation muon hodoscope to study cosmic ray muon flux variations was created in MEPhI. The basic characteristics of the hodoscope (sensitivity area, precision of the muon track reconstruction, ‘live’ time etc.) are comparable with other hodoscopes (TEMP and URAGAN) of MEPhI. Modular design is a distinctive feature of the detector, supplying relativity easy transportability, and low maintenance requirements give a possibility of a long-term autonomic operation. First results of the cosmic ray muon variation study by means of the scintillation muon hodoscope are presented and discussed.

  11. Hadronic interactions and EAS muon pseudorapidities investigated with the Muon Tracking Detector in KASCADE-Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabierowski, J.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, H.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Kolotaev, Y.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; KASCADE-Grande Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    The Muon Tracking Detector in the KASCADE-Grande EAS experiment allows the precise measurement of shower muon directions up to 700 m distance from the shower center. This directional information is used to study the pseudorapidity of muons in EAS, closely related to the pseudorapidity of their parent mesons. Moreover, the mean value of muon pseudorapidity in a registered shower reflects the longitudinal development of its hadronic component. All of this makes it a good tool for testing hadronic interaction models. The possibilities of such tests given by the KASCADE-Grande experimental setup are discussed and an example of the obtained muon pseudorapidity spectrum is shown.

  12. Imaging the Subsurface with Upgoing Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.; Schwellenbach, D.; Dreesen, W.; Green, A.

    2014-12-01

    We assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upgoing muons. Traditional muon imaging focuses on more-prevalent downgoing muons. Muons are subatomic particles capable of penetrating the earth's crust several kilometers. Downgoing muons have been used to image the Pyramid of Khafre of Giza, various volcanoes, and smaller targets like cargo. Unfortunately, utilizing downgoing muons requires below-target detectors. For aboveground objects like a volcano, the detector is placed at the volcano's base and the top portion of the volcano is imaged. For underground targets like tunnels, the detector would have to be placed below the tunnel in a deeper tunnel or adjacent borehole, which can be costly and impractical for some locations. Additionally, detecting and characterizing subsurface features like voids from tunnels can be difficult. Typical characterization methods like sonar, seismic, and ground penetrating radar have shown mixed success. Voids have a marked density contrast with surrounding materials, so using methods sensitive to density variations would be ideal. High-energy cosmic ray muons are more sensitive to density variation than other phenomena, including gravity. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, tomography using downgoing muons can resolve features to the sub-meter scale. We present results of exploratory work, which demonstrates that upgoing muon fluxes appear sufficient to achieve target detection within a few months. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Response of the D0 calorimeter to cosmic ray muons

    SciTech Connect

    Kotcher, J.

    1992-10-01

    The D0 Detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is a large multipurpose detector facility designed for the study of proton-antiproton collision products at the center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV. It consists of an inner tracking volume, hermetic uranium/liquid argon sampling calorimetry, and an outer 47{pi} muon detector. In preparation for our first collider run, the collaboration organized a Cosmic Ray Commissioning Run, which took place from February--May of 1991. This thesis is a detailed study of the response of the central calorimeter to cosmic ray muons as extracted from data collected during this run. We have compared the shapes of the experimentally-obtained pulse height spectra to the Landau prediction for the ionization loss in a continuous thin absorber in the four electromagnetic and four hadronic layers of the calorimeter, and find good agreement after experimental effects are folded in. We have also determined an absolute energy calibration using two independent methods: one which measures the response of the electronics to a known amount of charge injected at the preamplifiers, and one which uses a carry-over of the calibration from a beam test of central calorimeter modules. Both absolute energy conversion factors agree with one another, within their errors. The calibration determined from the test beam carryover, relevant for use with collider physics data, has an error of 2.3%. We believe that, with further study, a final error of {approx}1% will be achieved. The theory-to-experiment comparison of the peaks (or most probable values) of the muon spectra was used to determine the layer-to-layer consistency of the muon signal. We find that the mean response in the 3 fine hadronic layers is (12 {plus_minus} 2%) higher than that in the 4 electromagnetic layers. These same comparisons have been used to verify the absolute energy conversion factors. The conversion factors work well for the electromagnetic sections.

  14. A plastic scintillator-based muon tomography system with an integrated muon spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, V.; Armitage, J.; Baig, F.; Boniface, K.; Boudjemline, K.; Bueno, J.; Charles, E.; Drouin, P.-L.; Erlandson, A.; Gallant, G.; Gazit, R.; Godin, D.; Golovko, V. V.; Howard, C.; Hydomako, R.; Jewett, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Liu, Z.; Robichaud, A.; Stocki, T. J.; Thompson, M.; Waller, D.

    2015-10-01

    A muon scattering tomography system which uses extruded plastic scintillator bars for muon tracking and a dedicated muon spectrometer that measures scattering through steel slabs has been constructed and successfully tested. The atmospheric muon detection efficiency is measured to be 97% per plane on average and the average intrinsic hit resolution is 2.5 mm. In addition to creating a variety of three-dimensional images of objects of interest, a quantitative study has been carried out to investigate the impact of including muon momentum measurements when attempting to detect high-density, high-Z material. As expected, the addition of momentum information improves the performance of the system. For a fixed data-taking time of 60 s and a fixed false positive fraction, the probability to detect a target increases when momentum information is used. This is the first demonstration of the use of muon momentum information from dedicated spectrometer measurements in muon scattering tomography.

  15. The Cngs Facility:. Performance and Operational Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, Edda; Cornelis, Karel; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Ferrari, Alfredo; Pardons, Ans; Vincke, Heinz; Wenninger, Joerg; Sala, Paola; Guglielmi, Alberto

    2010-04-01

    The CNGS facility (CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso) aims at directly detecting muon to tau neutrino oscillations. An intense muon-neutrino beam (1E17 muon neutrinos/day) is generated at CERN and directed over 732 km towards the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, LNGS, in Italy, where two large and complex detectors, OPERA and ICARUS, are located. CNGS is the first long-baseline neutrino facility in which the measurement of the oscillation parameters is performed by observation of tau-neutrino appearance. In this paper, an overview of the CNGS facility is presented. The experience gained in operating this 500 kW neutrino beam facility is described. Major events since the commissioning of the facility in 2006 are summarized. Highlights on CNGS beam performance since the start of physics run in 2008 are given.

  16. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2013-06-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large-scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  17. ACCELERATION FOR A HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S

    2000-04-07

    The authors describe a method for designing the acceleration systems for a muon collider, with particular application and examples for a high energy muon collider. This paper primarily concentrates on design considerations coming from longitudinal motion, but some transverse issues are briefly discussed.

  18. Polarization Effects at a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-11-01

    For Muon Colliders, Polarization will be a useful tool if high polarization is achievable with little luminosity loss. Formulation and effects of beam polarization and luminosity including polarization effects in Higgs resonance studies are discussed for improving precision measurements and Higgs resonance ''discovery'' capability e.g. at the First Muon Collider (FMC).

  19. The OPAL muon barrel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, R. J.; Allison, J.; Ashton, P.; Bahan, G. A.; Baines, J. T. M.; Banks, J. N.; Barlow, R. J.; Barnett, S.; Beeston, C.; Chrin, J. T. M.; Clowes, S. G.; Davies, O. W.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Hinde, P. S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Lafferty, G. D.; Loebinger, F. K.; Macbeth, A. A.; McGowan, R. F.; Moss, M. W.; Murphy, P. G.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Dowd, A. J. P.; Pawley, S. J.; Phillips, P. D.; Richards, G. E.; Skillman, A.; Stephens, K.; Tresillian, N. J.; Wood, N. C.; Wyatt, T. R.

    1995-02-01

    The barrel part of the OPAL muon detector consists of 110 drift chambers forming four layers outside the hadron absorber. Each chamber covers an area of 1.2 m by up to 10.4 m and has two cells with wires parallel to the beam and a drift distance of 297 mm. A detailed description of the design, construction, operation and performance of the sub-detector is given. The system has been operating successfully since the start of LEP in 1989.

  20. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  1. Technical Challenges and Scientific Payoffs of Muon BeamAccelerators for Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-09-25

    Historically, progress in particle physics has largely beendetermined by development of more capable particle accelerators. Thistrend continues today with the recent advent of high-luminosityelectron-positron colliders at KEK and SLAC operating as "B factories,"the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and theworldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider.Looking to the future, one of the most promising approaches is thedevelopment of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very highscientific potential, and would substantially advance thestate-of-the-art in accelerator design. A 20-50 GeV muon storage ringcould serve as a copious source of well-characterized electron neutrinosor antineutrinos (a Neutrino Factory), providing beams aimed at detectorslocated 3000-7500 km from the ring. Such long baseline experiments areexpected to be able to observe and characterize the phenomenon ofcharge-conjugation-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector, and thusprovide an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in science,namely, why the matter-dominated universe in which we reside exists atall. By accelerating muons to even higher energies of several TeV, we canenvision a Muon Collider. In contrast with composite particles likeprotons, muons are point particles. This means that the full collisionenergy is available to create new particles. A Muon Collider has roughlyten times the energy reach of a proton collider at the same collisionenergy, and has a much smaller footprint. Indeed, an energy frontier MuonCollider could fit on the site of an existing laboratory, such asFermilab or BNL. The challenges of muon-beam accelerators are related tothe facts that i) muons are produced as a tertiary beam, with very large6D phase space, and ii) muons are unstable, with a lifetime at rest ofonly 2 microseconds. How these challenges are accommodated in theaccelerator design will be described. Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon

  2. Studies of heavy ion-induced high-energy density states in matter at the GSI Darmstadt SIS-18 and future FAIR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Adonin, A.; Deutsch, C.; Fortov, V. E.; Grandjouan, N.; Geil, B.; Grayaznov, V.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Kulish, M.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Mintsev, V.; Ni, P.; Nikolaev, D.; Piriz, A. R.; Shilkin, N.; Spiller, P.; Shutov, A.; Temporal, M.; Ternovoi, V.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D.

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents numerical simulation results of heating and compression of matter using intense beams of energetic heavy ions. In this study we consider different beam parameters that include those which are currently available at the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS18 at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt and those which will be available in the near future as a result of the upgraded facility. In addition to this, we carried out detailed calculations considering parameters of high-intensity beam which will be generated at the GSI future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR facility) that has been approved by the German Government. These simulations show that by using the above ion beam parameter range, it will be possible to carry out very useful studies on the thermophysical properties of high-energy density (HED) states in matter. This scheme would make it possible to investigate those regions of the phase diagram that are either very difficult to access or even are unaccessible using the traditional methods of shock waves. Moreover, employing a hollow ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot, it would be possible to achieve a low entropy compression of a test material like hydrogen, which is enclosed in a cylindrical shell of a high-density material such as lead or gold. These experiments will enable one to study the interiors of Giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn as well as to investigate the problem of hydrogen metallization.

  3. Can 250 fusions per muon be achieved

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear fusion of hydrogen isotopes can be induced by negative muons ( ) in reactions such as: + d + t + n + . This reaction is analagous to the nuclear fusion reaction achieved in stars in which hydrogen isotopes (such as deuterium, d, and tritium, t) at very high temperatures first penetrate the Coulomb repulsive barrier and then fuse together to produce an alpha particle ( ) and a neutron (n), releasing energy. The muon in general reappears after inducing fusion so that the reaction can be repeated many (N) times. Thus, the muon may serve as an effective catalyst for nuclear fusion. Muon-catalozed fusion is unique in that it proceeds rapidly in deuterium-tritium mixtures at relatively cold temperatures, e.g., room temperature. The need for plasma temperatures to initiate fusion is overcome by the presence of the muon.

  4. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  5. Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1990-10-01

    Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

  6. Monte Carlo simulations for the shielding of the future high-intensity accelerator facility FAIR at GSI.

    PubMed

    Radon, T; Gutermuth, F; Fehrenbacher, G

    2005-01-01

    The Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) is planning a significant expansion of its accelerator facilities. Compared to the present GSI facility, a factor of 100 in primary beam intensities and up to a factor of 10,000 in secondary radioactive beam intensities are key technical goals of the proposal. The second branch of the so-called Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is the production of antiprotons and their storage in rings and traps. The facility will provide beam energies a factor of approximately 15 higher than presently available at the GSI for all ions, from protons to uranium. The shielding design of the synchrotron SIS 100/300 is shown exemplarily by using Monte Carlo calculations with the FLUKA code. The experimental area serving the investigation of compressed baryonic matter is analysed in the same way. In addition, a dose comparison is made for an experimental area operated with medium energy heavy-ion beams. Here, Monte Carlo calculations are performed by using either heavy-ion primary particles or proton beams with intensities scaled by the mass number of the corresponding heavy-ion beam. PMID:16381714

  7. Ultra-slow muon generation by laser resonant ionization towards the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Makimura, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Bakule, P.; Scheuermann, R. J.; Nagamine, K.

    2001-01-01

    At KEK-MSL we have been pursuing the Ultra-Slow Muon Project, in which thermal muonium atoms (designated as Mu; consisting of a μ+ and an e -) are generated from the surface of a hot tungsten foil, placed at the primary 500 MeV proton beam line, and ionized by intense lasers synchronized with the emission of Mu. In the 21st century, it will be extended to the intense slow-muon facility of M-arena at the JOINT PROJECT of KEK and JAERI, where 3 GeV, 333 μA of proton beam is available, for the surface science, atomic physics, etc.

  8. Analysis of muon radiography of the Toshiba nuclear critical assembly reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C. L.; Bacon, Jeffery; Borozdin, Konstantin; Fabritius, J. M.; Perry, John; Ramsey, John; Ban, Yuichiro; Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Yuji; Yoshida, Noriyuki; Miyadera, Haruo; Mizokami, Shinya; Otsuka, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Daichi; Sugita, Tsukasa; Yoshioka, Kenichi

    2014-01-13

    A 1.2 × 1.2 m{sup 2} muon tracker was moved from Los Alamos to the Toshiba facility at Kawasaki, Japan, where it was used to take ∼4 weeks of data radiographing the Toshiba Critical Assembly Reactor with cosmic ray muons. In this paper, we describe the analysis procedure, show results of this experiment, and compare the results to Monte Carlo predictions. The results validate the concept of using cosmic rays to image the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors.

  9. Analysis of muon radiography of the Toshiba nuclear critical assembly reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.; Bacon, Jeffery; Ban, Yuichiro; Borozdin, Konstantin; Fabritius, J. M.; Izumi, Mikio; Miyadera, Haruo; Mizokami, Shinya; Otsuka, Yasuyuki; Perry, John; Ramsey, John; Sano, Yuji; Sugita, Tsukasa; Yamada, Daichi; Yoshida, Noriyuki; Yoshioka, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    A 1.2 × 1.2 m2 muon tracker was moved from Los Alamos to the Toshiba facility at Kawasaki, Japan, where it was used to take ˜4 weeks of data radiographing the Toshiba Critical Assembly Reactor with cosmic ray muons. In this paper, we describe the analysis procedure, show results of this experiment, and compare the results to Monte Carlo predictions. The results validate the concept of using cosmic rays to image the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors.

  10. High Rate Proton Irradiation of 15mm Muon Drifttubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibell, A.; Biebel, O.; Hertenberger, R.; Ruschke, A.; Schmitt, Ch.; Kroha, H.; Bittner, B.; Schwegler, P.; Dubbert, J.; Ott, S.

    2012-08-01

    Future LHC luminosity upgrades will significantly increase the amount of background hits from photons, neutrons 11.11d protons in the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. At the proposed LHC peak luminosity of 5\\cdot 1034(1)/(cm2s), background hit rates of more than 10(kHz)/(cm2) are expected in the innermost forward region, leading to a loss of performance of the current tracking chambers. Based on the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube chambers, a new high rate capable drift tube detecor using tubes with a reduced diameter of 15mm was developed. To test the response to highly ionizing particles, a prototype chamber of 46 15mm drift tubes was irradiated with a 20 MeV proton beam at the tandem accelerator at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Munich. Three tubes in a planar layer were irradiated while all other tubes were used for reconstruction of cosmic muon tracks through irradiated and nonirradiated parts of the chamber. To determine the rate capability of the 15mm drifttubes we investigated the effect of the proton hit rate on pulse height, efficiency and spatial resolution of the cosmic muon signals.

  11. Muon spin rotation research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stronach, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Data from cyclotron experiments and room temperature studies of dilute iron alloys and iron crystals under strain were analyzed. The Fe(Mo) data indicate that the effect upon the contact hyperfine field in Fe due to the introduction of Mo is considerably less than that expected from pure dilution, and the muon (+) are attracted to the Mo impurity sites. There is a significant change in the interstitial magnetic field with Nb concentration. The Fe(Ti) data, for which precession could clearly be observed early only at 468K and above, show that the Ti impurities are attractive to muon (+), and the magnitude of B(hf) is reduced far beyond the amount expected from pure dilution. Changes in the intersitital magnetic field with the introduction of Cr, W, Ge, and Si are also discussed. When strained to the elastic limit, the interstitial magnetic field in Fe crystals is reduced by 33 gauss, and the relaxation rate of the precession signal increases by 47%.

  12. The muon collider (Sandro's snake)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a feasibility study for the design of a muon collider. Recognized the fact that the particle lifetime increases linearly with the energy, we have adopted a scheme where steps of cooling and acceleration are entwined. We have indeed found convenient to accelerate the beam as fast as possible to increase its chances of survival, and necessary to dilute the action of cooling throughout the entire accelerating process to make it more effective and affordable. All acceleration and cooling steps are executed in a single pass essentially along a curvilinear and open path. We do not believe it is possible to handle the beam otherwise in circular and closed rings, as it has been proposed in the past. The example shown in this paper describes a muon collider at the energy of 250 GeV per beam and a luminosity of 4 [times] 10[sup 28] cm[sup [minus]2]s[sup [minus]1]. We have adopted an extrapolation of the stochastic cooling method for the reduction of the beam emittance.

  13. The program in muon and neutrino physics: Superbeams, cold muon beams, neutrino factory and the muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    R. Raja et al.

    2001-08-08

    The concept of a Muon Collider was first proposed by Budker [10] and by Skrinsky [11] in the 60s and early 70s. However, there was little substance to the concept until the idea of ionization cooling was developed by Skrinsky and Parkhomchuk [12]. The ionization cooling approach was expanded by Neufer [13] and then by Palmer [14], whose work led to the formation of the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) [3] in 1995. The concept of a neutrino source based on a pion storage ring was originally considered by Koshkarev [18]. However, the intensity of the muons created within the ring from pion decay was too low to provide a useful neutrino source. The Muon Collider concept provided a way to produce a very intense muon source. The physics potential of neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings was investigated by Geer in 1997 at a Fermilab workshop [19, 20] where it became evident that the neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings needed for the muon collider were exciting on their own merit. The neutrino factory concept quickly captured the imagination of the particle physics community, driven in large part by the exciting atmospheric neutrino deficit results from the SuperKamiokande experiment. As a result, the MC realized that a Neutrino Factory could be an important first step toward a Muon Collider and the physics that could be addressed by a Neutrino Factory was interesting in its own right. With this in mind, the MC has shifted its primary emphasis toward the issues relevant to a Neutrino Factory. There is also considerable international activity on Neutrino Factories, with international conferences held at Lyon in 1999, Monterey in 2000 [21], Tsukuba in 2001 [22], and another planned for London in 2002.

  14. A Low-cost, Portable, Ruggedized Cosmic Muon Detector Prototype for Geological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguayo Navarrete, E.; Bonneville, A.

    2012-12-01

    Muons, neutrons and protons observed at the Earth's surface are generated by cosmic ray primaries causing cascades in the atmosphere. Cosmic muon tomography is a cost effective real time monitoring technique that can be applied to determine large scale displacement of reservoir fluids induced by injection of liquid or gas. Such technique would need a detector array with an overall sensitivity tailored to the monitored volume and the expected density change in the target geological formation over the projected injection time. A scalable detector system, able to withstand the harsh conditions of underground deployment is a must for the evaluation of this promising technique. This paper presents the design and construction of a portable muon flux monitor, known as the μ-Witness. The detector is based on coincidence counts between two scintillator panels to be used as an indicator of density-dependent attenuation of cosmic muon flux. The Muon Witness detector (μ-Witness) has been designed to be able to measure cosmic muon flux for periods of time of up to 40 days, using battery power. The prototype has been mounted in a ruggedized case to enable measurements in underground environments. The purpose of this prototype is to evaluate the feasibility of using 3D density tomography in geological applications. The efficiency of the detector has been experimentally determined to be 57±3%. This measurement was performed by comparing the detector response to the response of a larger and more efficient muon counter in the same location. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the cosmic muon flux, and the measured efficiency, the projected sensitivities for density changes in large underground monitored volumes are presented as well as the results of a test run in a shallow underground facility. Along with a detector prototype, a model of the muon attenuation inversion must be developed in order to take into account the different energy and angular distribution of the cosmic muons

  15. R&D for Future Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Frank

    Research & development for future accelerators are reviewed. First, I discuss colliding hadron beams, in particular upgrades to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This is followed by an overview of new concepts and technologies for lepton ring colliders, with examples taken from VEPP-2000, DAFNE-2, and Super-KEKB. I then turn to recent progress and studies for the multi-TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Some generic linear-collider research, centered at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility, is described next. Subsequently, I survey the neutrino factory R&D performed in the framework of the US feasibility study IIa, and I also comment on a novel scheme for producing monochromatic neutrinos from an electron-capture beta beam. Finally, I present innovative ideas for a high-energy muon collider and I consider recent experimental progress on laser and plasma acceleration.

  16. R&D for Future Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Research & development for future accelerators are reviewed. First, I discuss colliding hadron beams, in particular upgrades to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This is followed by an overview of new concepts and technologies for lepton ring colliders, with examples taken from VEPP-2000, DAFNE-2, and Super-KEKB. I then turn to recent progress and studies for the multi-TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Some generic linear-collider research, centered at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility, is described next. Subsequently, I survey the neutrino factory R&D performed in the framework of the US feasibility study IIa, and I also comment on a novel scheme for producing monochromatic neutrinos from an electron-capture beta beam. Finally, I present innovative ideas for a high-energy muon collider and I consider recent experimental progress on laser and plasma acceleration.

  17. Muons in minimum bias events from the first CMS data

    SciTech Connect

    Barbone, Lucia

    2010-12-22

    Muon signatures are extremely important in the challenging environment of collisions at the LHC. Understanding the observed muon yield from Standard Model processes is the first task for all analyses involving muons. Basic muon kinematical observables are presented for the first CMS data at {radical}(s) = 7 TeV and compared with Monte Carlo expectations. The muon sample composition is studied by using the MC truth in terms of muons from heavy flavours, muons from light hadron decays and hadron punch-through is studied from MC truth.

  18. nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; Coney, L.; Pascoli, S.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

    2012-06-01

    The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

  19. SNM detection by active muon interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, Andrew J; Miyadera, Haruo; Turchi, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Muons are charged particles with mass between the electron and proton and can be produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged-particle beam with a target. There are several distinct features of the muon interaction with matter attractive as a probe for detection of SNM at moderate ranges. These include muon penetration of virtually any amount of material without significant nuclear interaction until stopped by ionization loss in a short distance. When stopped, high-energy penetrating x-rays (in the range of 6 MeV for uranium,) unique to isotopic composition are emitted in the capture process. The subsequent interaction with the nucleus produces additional radiation useful in assessing SNM presence. A focused muon beam can be transported through the atmosphere, at a range limited mainly by beam-size growth through scattering. A muonbeam intensity of > 10{sup 9} /second is required for efficient interrogation and, as in any other technique, dose limits are to be respected. To produce sufficient muons a high-energy (threshold {approx}140 MeV) high-intensity (<1 mA) proton or electron beam is needed implying the use of a linear accelerator to bombard a refractory target. The muon yield is fractionally small, with large angle and energy dispersion, so that efficient collection is necessary in all dimensions of phase space. To accomplish this Los Alamos has proposed a magnetic collection system followed by a unique linear accelerator that provides the requisite phase-space bunching and allows an energy sweep to successively stop muons throughout a large structure such as a sea-going vessel. A possible maritime application would entail fitting the high-gradient accelerators on a large ship with a helicopter-borne detection system. We will describe our experimental results for muon effects and particle collection along with our current design and program for a muon detection system.

  20. Perspectives of a mid-rapidity dimuon program at the RHIC: a novel and compact muon telescope detector

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Ruan, L.; Lin, G.; Xu, Z.; Asselta, K.; Chen, H.F.; Christie, W.; Crawford, H.k.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Hallman, T.J.; Li, C.; Liu, J.; Llope, W.J.; Majka, R.; Nussbaum, T.; Scheblein, J.; Shao, M.; Soja, R.; Sun, Y.; Tang, Z.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.

    2009-07-17

    We propose a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) at mid-rapidity for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) and for the next generation of detectors at a possible electron-ion collider. We utilize large Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers with long readout strips (long-MRPC) in the detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam tests show the intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a long-MRPC are 60-70 ps and {approx} 1 cm, respectively. The performance of the prototype muon telescope detector at STAR indicates that muon identification at a transverse momentum of a few GeV/c can be achieved by combining information from track matching with the MTD, ionization energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber, and time-of-flight measurements. A primary muon over secondary muon ratio of better than 1/3 can be achieved. This provides a promising device for future quarkonium programs and primordial dilepton measurements at RHIC. Simulations of the muon efficiency, the signal-to-background ratio of J/{psi}, the separation of {Upsilon} 1S from 2S+3S states, and the electron-muon correlation from charm pair production in the RHIC environment are presented.

  1. Muon anomaly and dark parity violation.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Lee, Hye-Sung; Marciano, William J

    2012-07-20

    The muon anomalous magnetic moment exhibits a 3.6σ discrepancy between experiment and theory. One explanation requires the existence of a light vector boson, Z(d) (the dark Z), with mass 10-500 MeV that couples weakly to the electromagnetic current through kinetic mixing. Support for such a solution also comes from astrophysics conjectures regarding the utility of a U(1)(d) gauge symmetry in the dark matter sector. In that scenario, we show that mass mixing between the Z(d) and ordinary Z boson introduces a new source of "dark" parity violation, which is potentially observable in atomic and polarized electron scattering experiments. Restrictive bounds on the mixing (m(Z(d))/m(Z))δ are found from existing atomic parity violation results, δ2<2×10(-5). Combined with future planned and proposed polarized electron scattering experiments, a sensitivity of δ2∼10(-6) is expected to be reached, thereby complementing direct searches for the Z(d) boson. PMID:22861837

  2. Delayed muons in extensive air showers and double-front showers

    SciTech Connect

    Beisembaev, R. U.; Vavilov, Yu. N. Vildanov, N. G.; Kruglov, A. V.; Stepanov, A. V.; Takibaev, J. S.

    2009-11-15

    The results of a long-term experiment performed in the period between 1995 and 2006 with the aid of the MUON-T underground (20 mwe) scintillation facility arranged at the Tien Shan mountain research station at an altitude of 3340 m above sea level are presented. The time distribution of delayed muons with an energy in excess of 5 GeV in extensive air showers of energy not lower than 106 GeV with respect to the shower front was obtained with a high statistical significance in the delay interval between 30 and 150 ns. An effect of the geomagnetic field in detecting delayed muons in extensive air showers was discovered. This effect leads to the asymmetry of their appearance with respect to the north-south direction. The connection between delayed muons and extensive air showers featuring two fronts separated by a time interval of several tens of to two hundred nanoseconds is discussed. This connection gives sufficient grounds to assume that delayed muons originate from the decays of pions and kaons produced in the second, delayed, front of extensive air showers.

  3. Measurement of the muon charge asymmetry from W boson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2007-09-01

    We present a measurement of the muon charge asymmetry from W boson decays using 0.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected at {radical}s = 1.96 GeV between 2002 and 2004 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. We compare our findings with expectations from next-to-leading-order calculations performed using the CTEQ6.1M and MRST04 NLO parton distribution functions. Our findings can be used to constrain future parton distribution function fits.

  4. Cosmic muon detector using proportional chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Dezső; Gál, Zoltán; Hamar, Gergő; Sára Molnár, Janka; Oláh, Éva; Pázmándi, Péter

    2015-11-01

    A set of classical multi-wire proportional chambers was designed and constructed with the main purpose of efficient cosmic muon detection. These detectors are relatively simple to construct, and at the same time are low cost, making them ideal for educational purposes. The detector layers have efficiencies above 99% for minimum ionizing cosmic muons, and their position resolution is about 1 cm, that is, particle trajectories are clearly observable. Visualization of straight tracks is possible using an LED array, with the discriminated and latched signal driving the display. Due to the exceptional operating stability of the chambers, the design can also be used for cosmic muon telescopes.

  5. Systematic muon capture rates in PQRPA

    SciTech Connect

    Samana, A. R.; Sande, D.; Krmpotić, F.

    2015-05-15

    In this work we performed a systematic study of the inclusive muon capture rates for several nuclei with A < 60 using the Projected Random Quasi-particle Phase Approximation (PQRPA) as nuclear model, because it is the only RPA model that treats the Pauli Principle correctly. We reckon that the comparison between theory and data for the inclusive muon capture is not a fully satisfactory test on the nuclear model that is used. The exclusive muon transitions are more robust for such a purpose.

  6. Density tomography using cosmic ray muons: feasibility domain and field applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, N.; Gibert, D.; Marteau, J.; Déclais, Y.; Carbone, D.; Galichet, E.

    2010-12-01

    Muons are continuously produced when the protons forming the primary cosmic rays decay during their interactions with the molecules of the upper atmosphere. Both their short cross-section and their long life-time make the muons able to cross hectometers and even kilometers of rock before disintegrating. The flux of muons crossing a geological volume strongly depends on the quantity of matter encountered along their trajectories and, depending on both its size and its density, the geological object appears more or less opaque to muons. By measuring the muon flux emerging from the studied object and correcting for its geometry, the density structure can be deduced. The primary information obtained is the density averaged along muons trajectories and, to recover the 3D density distribution. The detector has to be moved around the target to acquire multi-angle images of the density structure. The inverse problem to be solved shares common features with seismic travel-time tomography and X-ray medical scans, but it also has specificities like Poissonian statistics, low signal-to-noise ratio and scattering which are discussed. Muon telescopes have been designed to sustain installations in harsh conditions such as might be encountered on volcanoes. Data acquired in open sky at various latitude and altitude allow to adjust the incoming muon flux model and to observe its temporal variations. The muon interactions with matter and the underground flux are constrained with data sets acquired inside the underground laboratory of the Mont Terri. The data analysis and the telescope model development are detailed. A model of the muon flux across a volcano is confronted to first measurements on La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano. The model takes into account a priori informations and solving kernels are computed to deduce the spatial resolution in order to define the elements size of the model heterogeneities. The spatio-temporal resolution of the method is in relation with the

  7. Radiative muon capture in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Doebeli, M.; Doser, M.; van Elmbt, L.; Schaad, M.W.; Truoel, P.; Bay, A.; Perroud, J.P.; Imazato, J.; Ishikawa, T.

    1988-04-01

    The energy spectra of photons following negative muon absorption in /sup 12/C, /sup 16/O, /sup 27/Al, /sup 40/Ca, /sup nat/Fe, /sup 165/Ho, and /sup 209/Bi have been measured with two NaI spectrometers. The branching ratios for the emission of high energy photons give information on the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant g/sub P/ in nuclear matter. The data for light nuclei are in agreement with the theoretical calculations using the nucleonic value of g/sub P/approx. =7g/sub A/ predicted by the partially conserved axial vector current hypothesis, while significantly lower values of g/sub P/ are required to fit the data of the heavier elements with presently existing theoretical predictions. Disregarding the remaining theoretical uncertainties, these results can be interpreted as a further indication of the renormalization of the nucleonic form factors inside the nucleus.

  8. New Techniques: Muon Glaciology and Ultrasonic Logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirkin, D.; Allen, J.; Bay, R. C.; Bramall, N.; Price, P. B.

    2003-12-01

    The strain rate of cold glacial ice depends mainly on the stress tensor, temperature, grain size, and crystal habit. Lab measurements cannot be made at both the low stresses and low temperatures relevant to flow of cold glacial ice. Field studies with inclinometers measure only the horizontal components of flow. We have developed a new method for measuring the 3D strain-rate field at -40o to -15oC, using the AMANDA neutrino-detecting array frozen into deep ice at South Pole. Each strain detector consists of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) in its pressure vessel. AMANDA has ˜600 PMTs at depths 1500 to 2300 m in a ˜0.02 km3 volume. The coordinates of each PMT relative to a coordinate system moving down slope at 9 m yr-1 can be measured with s.d. <1 m in 1 day by mapping trajectories of down-going cosmic-ray muons that pass through the array. The PMTs record the arrival times of the Cherenkov light emitted along the muon trajectory. Use of maximum likelihood for 105 muon tracks allows PMT positions to be determined; their positions are then updated at six-month intervals. We will report results of strain-rate measurements in three dimensions, made in 2000, 2001, and 2002 at T ≈ -30oC. Applying the same technique to the future 1 km3 IceCube array, by averaging over subsets of the 5000 detectors, values of the strain-rate tensor as small as 3x 10-5 yr-1 can be measured as a function of temperature and lateral position. The vertical strain rate due to snow accumulation, estimated to be ˜ 3x 10-5 yr-1, can be measured and will serve as a check on the method. The second new method is designed to measure mean grain size in the ice surrounding a borehole. We will adapt an all-digital logging tool originally developed by Advanced Logic Technology (Luxembourg) for geophysics prospecting in rock boreholes. A 1.3 MHz transducer emits acoustic pulses horizontally into the ice in increments of 5o in azimuth and records the wave train back-scattered from grain boundaries. For

  9. Atmospheric muons and neutrinos, and the neutrino-induced muon flux underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liland, A.

    1985-01-01

    The diffusion equation for neutrino-induced cosmic ray muons underground was solved. The neutrino-induced muon flux and charge ratio underground have been calculated. The calculated horizontal neutrino-induced muon flux in the energy range 0.1 - 10000 GeV is in agreement with the measured horizontal flux. The calculated vertical flux above 2 GeV is in agreement with the measured vertical flux. The average charge ratio of neutrino-induced muons underground was found to be mu+/mu- = 0.40.

  10. PULSED-FOCUSING RECIRCULATING LINACS FOR MUON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland PAUL

    2014-12-31

    Since the muon has a short lifetime, fast acceleration is essential for high-energy applications such as muon colliders, Higgs factories, or neutrino factories. The best one can do is to make a linear accelerator with the highest possible accelerating gradient to make the accelerating time as short as possible. However, the cost of such a single linear accelerator is prohibitively large due to expensive power sources, cavities, tunnels, and related infrastructure. As was demonstrated in the Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), an elegant solution to reduce cost is to use magnetic return arcs to recirculate the beam through the accelerating RF cavities many times, where they gain energy on each pass. In such a Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA), the magnetic focusing strength diminishes as the beam energy increases in a conventional linac that has constant strength quadrupoles. After some number of passes the focusing strength is insufficient to keep the beam from going unstable and being lost. In this project, the use of fast pulsed quadrupoles in the linac sections was considered for stronger focusing as a function of time to allow more successive passes of a muon beam in a recirculating linear accelerator. In one simulation, it was shown that the number of passes could be increased from 8 to 12 using pulsed magnet designs that have been developed and tested. This could reduce the cost of linac sections of a muon RLA by 8/12, where more improvement is still possible. The expense of a greater number of passes and corresponding number of return arcs was also addressed in this project by exploring the use of ramped or FFAG-style magnets in the return arcs. A better solution, invented in this project, is to use combined-function dipole-quadrupole magnets to simultaneously transport two beams of different energies through one magnet string to reduce costs of return arcs by almost a factor of

  11. MIGHTY MURINES: NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT VERY HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    An overview is given of the potential for neutrino physics studies through parasitic use of the intense high energy neutrino beams that would be produced at future many-TeV muon colliders. Neutrino experiments clearly cannot compete with the collider physics. Except at the very highest energy muon colliders, the main thrust of the neutrino physics program would be to improve on the measurements from preceding neutrino experiments at lower energy muon colliders, particularly in the fields of B physics, quark mixing and CP violation. Muon colliders at the 10 TeV energy scale might already produce of order 10{sup 8} B hadrons per year in a favorable and unique enough experimental environment to have some analytical capabilities beyond any of the currently operating or proposed B factories. The most important of the quark mixing measurements at these energies might well be the improved measurements of the important CKM matrix elements {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} and {vert_bar}V{sub cb}{vert_bar} and, possibly, the first measurements of {vert_bar}V{sub td}{vert_bar} in the process of flavor changing neutral current interactions involving a top quark loop. Muon colliders at the highest center-of-mass energies that have been conjectured, 100--1,000 TeV, would produce neutrino beams for neutrino-nucleon interaction experiments with maximum center-of-mass energies from 300--1,000 GeV. Such energies are close to, or beyond, the discovery reach of all colliders before the turn-on of the LHC. In particular, they are comparable to the 314 GeV center-of-mass energy for electron-proton scattering at the currently operating HERA collider and so HERA provides a convenient benchmark for the physics potential. It is shown that these ultimate terrestrial neutrino experiments, should they eventually come to pass, would have several orders of magnitude more luminosity than HERA. This would potentially open up the possibility for high statistics studies of any exotic particles, such as

  12. Muon calculations for the polarized proton beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of the muon intensities due to the new polarized proton beam using the program CASIM are reported. Results are reported in terms of tissue absorbed dose per incident proton. (LEW)

  13. Mapping Overburden and Cave Networks with Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Titus, T. N.; Boston, P. J.; Koontz, S. L.; Miller, R. S.

    2015-10-01

    We describe the use of highly-penetrating muons produced by cosmic ray showers to measure overburden and image the rock formation around terrestrial/extraterrestrial caves, and implications for cave science, exploration, and habitation.

  14. MUON ACCELERATION WITH THE RACETRACK FFAG

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; EBERHARD, K.; SESSLER, A.

    2007-06-25

    Muon acceleration for muon collider or neutrino factory is still in a stage where further improvements are likely as a result of further study. This report presents a design of the racetrack non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) accelerator to allow fast muon acceleration in small number of turns. The racetrack design is made of four arcs: two arcs at opposite sides have a smaller radius and are made of closely packed combined function magnets, while two additional arcs, with a very large radii, are used for muon extraction, injection, and RF accelerating cavities. The ends of the large radii arcs are geometrically matched at the connections to the arcs with smaller radii. The dispersion and both horizontal and vertical amplitude fictions are matched at the central energy.

  15. Topcolor and the First Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.T.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a class of models of electroweak symmetry breaking that involve strong dynamics and top quark condensation. A new scheme based upon a seesaw mechanism appears particularly promising. Various implications for the first-stage muon collider are discussed.

  16. Development of a Portable Muon Witness System

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Since understanding and quantifying cosmic ray induced radioactive backgrounds in copper and germanium are important to the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, methods are needed for monitoring the levels of such backgrounds produced in materials being transported and processed for the experiment. This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop a muon witness system as a one way of monitoring induced activities. The operational goal of this apparatus is to characterize cosmic ray exposure of materials. The cosmic ray flux at the Earth’s surface is composed of several types of particles, including neutrons, muons, gamma rays and protons. These particles induce nuclear reactions, generating isotopes that contribute to the radiological background. Underground, the main mechanism of activation is by muon produced spallation neutrons since the hadron component of cosmic rays is removed at depths greater than a few tens of meters. This is a sub-dominant contributor above ground, but muons become predominant in underground experiments. For low-background experiments cosmogenic production of certain isotopes, such as 68Ge and 60Co, must be accounted for in the background budgets. Muons act as minimum ionizing particles, depositing a fixed amount of energy per unit length in a material, and have a very high penetrating power. Using muon flux measurements as a “witness” for the hadron flux, the cosmogenic induced activity can be quantified by correlating the measured muon flux and known hadronic production rates. A publicly available coincident muon cosmic ray detector design, the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector (BLCRD), assembled by Juniata College, is evaluated in this work. The performance of the prototype is characterized by assessing its muon flux measurements. This evaluation is done by comparing data taken in identical scenarios with other cosmic ray telescopes. The prototype is made of two plastic scintillator paddles with

  17. Muon dynamics in a toroidal sector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Fernow, R.; Palmer, R.B.

    1997-09-17

    The present scenario for the cooling channel in a high brightness muon collider calls for a quasi-continuous solenoidal focusing channel. The beam line consists of a periodic array of rf cavities and approximately 2 cm long LiH absorbers immersed in a solenoid with alternating focusing field (FOFO). The authors present a Hamiltonian formulation of muon dynamics in toroidal sector solenoids (bent solenoid).

  18. Designing and constructing of a two scintillator crystal rotatable telescope for muon flux variation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghamdi, Abdullrahman; Maghrabi, Abdullrahman H.; Almutari, Mohammed M.

    2014-07-01

    A rotatable muon detection telescope with two layers of scintillators was designed and constructed at the physics detector laboratory at KACST, Saudi Arabia. The objective of this system is to study the zenith angle dependence of high energy cosmic ray muons. The system has the flexibility to rotate in all directions to cover the zenith angle from 0- 900 for muon distribution studies, as well as the azimuth angle from 0-3590 to observe the geomagnetic field effects on it. In this paper, the designing and the construction works as well as the calibration procedures for the detection system will be given. Some of the preliminarily results and some of the future experiments and possible modifications will be outlined.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation for background study of geophysical inspection with cosmic-ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Taketa, Akimichi; Miyamoto, Seigo; Kasahara, Katsuaki

    2016-05-01

    Several attempts have been made to obtain a radiographic image inside volcanoes using cosmic-ray muons (muography). Muography is expected to resolve highly heterogeneous density profiles near the surface of volcanoes. However, several prior works have failed to make clear observations due to contamination by background noise. The background contamination leads to an overestimation of the muon flux and consequently a significant underestimation of the density in the target mountains. To investigate the origin of the background noise, we performed a Monte Carlo simulation. The main components of the background noise in muography are found to be low-energy protons, electrons and muons in case of detectors without particle identification and with energy thresholds below 1 GeV. This result was confirmed by comparisons with actual observations of nuclear emulsions. This result will be useful for detector design in future works, and in addition some previous works of muography should be reviewed from the view point of background contamination.

  20. A lattice for the muon collider demonstration ring in the RHIC tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Palmer, R.B.; Courant, E.D.; Gallardo, J.; Peggs, S.; Tepikian, S.; Ng, K.Y.

    1997-07-01

    The future {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} Muon Collider should have a luminosity of the order of 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}, and the energy of 2 x 2 TeV. The authors present here a demonstration machine at a lower energy to test the feasibility of all components involved, which could be placed inside the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) tunnel. The maximum energy of the muons in the RHIC tunnel depends on the maximum attainable field in the dipoles. The maximum energy in the existing RHIC rings for protons is 250 GeV, where the strength of the magnetic field in the dipoles is 3.5 T. A design of the storage ring lattice for a 50 GeV muon demonstration machine is also presented.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation for background study of geophysical inspection with cosmic-ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Taketa, Akimichi; Miyamoto, Seigo; Kasahara, Katsuaki

    2016-08-01

    Several attempts have been made to obtain a radiographic image inside volcanoes using cosmic-ray muons (muography). Muography is expected to resolve highly heterogeneous density profiles near the surface of volcanoes. However, several prior works have failed to make clear observations due to contamination by background noise. The background contamination leads to an overestimation of the muon flux and consequently a significant underestimation of the density in the target mountains. To investigate the origin of the background noise, we performed a Monte Carlo simulation. The main components of the background noise in muography are found to be low-energy protons, electrons and muons in case of detectors without particle identification and with energy thresholds below 1 GeV. This result was confirmed by comparisons with actual observations of nuclear emulsions. This result will be useful for detector design in future works, and in addition some previous works of muography should be reviewed from the view point of background contamination.

  2. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Hart, T. L.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Oliveros, S. J.; Perera, L. P.; Neuffer, D. V.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 µs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift in the ring until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87 %.

  3. High intensity muon beam source for neutrino beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham

    2015-09-01

    High intensity muon beams are essential for Muon accelerators like Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. In this study we report on a global optimization of the muon beam production and capture based on end-to-end simulations of the Muon Front End. The study includes the pion beam production target geometry, capture field profile, and forming muon beam into microbunches for further acceleration. The interplay between the transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics during the capture and transport of muon beam is evaluated and discussed. The goal of the optimization is to provide a set of design parameters that delivers high intensity muon beam that could be fit within the acceptance of a muon beam accelerator.

  4. Scintillation Light from Cosmic-Ray Muons in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, Denver Wade; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2015-11-13

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  5. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, D.; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a composite model. Both models find τT = 1.52 μs for the decay time constant of the Ar2* triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the ``early'' light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE ≈ 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS ≈ 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value ~0.3 found by dark matter and double β-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  6. Modular detector for deep underwater registration of muons and muon groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demianov, A. I.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Sinyov, N. B.; Varadanyan, I. N.; Yershov, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Registration and identification of muons and muon groups penetrating into the ocean depth, can be performed using a modular multilayer detector with high resolution bidimensional readout - deep underwater calorimeter (project NADIR). Laboratory testing of a prototype sensor cell with liquid scintillator in light-tight casing, testifies to the practicability of the full-scale experiment within reasonable expences.

  7. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2011-03-20

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in R&D towards a neutrino factory and muon collider. The U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) has been formed recently to expedite the R&D efforts. This paper will review the U.S. MAP R&D programs for a neutrino factory and muon collider. Muon ionization cooling research is the key element of the program. The first muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment, MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment), is under construction now at RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) in the UK. The current status of MICE will be described.

  8. Photochemical studies in low Earth orbit for organic compounds related to small bodies, Titan and Mars. Current and future facilities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottin, H.; Saiagh, K.; Nguyen, D.; Grand, N.; Bénilan, Y.; Cloix, M.; Coll, P.; Gazaux, M.-C.; Fray, N.; Khalaf, D.; Raulin, F.; Stalort, F.; Carrasco, N.; Szopa, C.; Chaput, D.; Bertrand, M.; Westall, F.; Mattioda, A.; Quinn, R.; Ricco, A.; Santos, O.; Baratta, G. A.; Strazzulla, G.; Palumbo, M. E.; Le Postollec, A.; Dobrijevic, M.; Coussot, G.; Vigier, F.; Vandenabeele-Trambouze, O.; Incerti, S.; Berger, T.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the evolution of organic matter subjected to space conditions, and more specifically to solar photons in the vacuum ultraviolet range (120-200 nm) has been undertaken in low Earth Orbit since the 90's, and implemented on various space platforms. The most recent exposure facilities are BIOPAN outside the Russian automatic capsules FOTON, and EXPOSE-E & -R (1&2) outside the International Space Station. They allow the photolysis of many different samples simultaneously, and provide us with valuable data about the formation and evolution of organic matter in the Solar System (meteorites, comets, Titan's atmosphere, the Martian surface...) and in the Interstellar Medium. They have been used by European teams in the recent past(ORGANIC on BIOPAN V-FOTON M2 and UVolution on BIOPAN VI-FOTON M3, PROCESS on EXPOSE-E, AMINO and ORGANICS on EXPOSE-R), and a new EXPOSE set is currently exposed outside the ISS (PSS on EXPOSE-R2). These existing tools are very valuable; however, they have significant limitations that limit their capabilities and scientific return. One of the most critical issues for current studies is the lack of any in-situ analysis of the evolution of the samples as a function of time. Only two measurements are available for the experiment: one before and one after the exposure. A significant step forward has been achieved with the O/OREOS NASA nanosatellite and the OREOcube ESA project with onboard UV-visible measurements. However, for organic samples, following the evolution of the samples would be more informative and provide greater insight with infrared measurements, which display specific patterns characteristic of major organic functionalities in the mid-infrared range (4000-1000 cm-1).

  9. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Loiacono, Laura Jean

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  10. Proposal for the study of thermophysical properties of high-energy-density matter using current and future heavy-ion accelerator facilities at GSI Darmstadt.

    PubMed

    Tahir, N A; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E; Gryaznov, V; Hoffmann, D H H; Kulish, M; Lomonosov, I V; Mintsev, V; Ni, P; Nikolaev, D; Piriz, A R; Shilkin, N; Spiller, P; Shutov, A; Temporal, M; Ternovoi, V; Udrea, S; Varentsov, D

    2005-07-15

    The subject of high-energy-density (HED) states in matter is of considerable importance to numerous branches of basic as well as applied physics. Intense heavy-ion beams are an excellent tool to create large samples of HED matter in the laboratory with fairly uniform physical conditions. Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, is a unique worldwide laboratory that has a heavy-ion synchrotron, SIS18, that delivers intense beams of energetic heavy ions. Construction of a much more powerful synchrotron, SIS100, at the future international facility for antiprotons and ion research (FAIR) at Darmstadt will lead to an increase in beam intensity by 3 orders of magnitude compared to what is currently available. The purpose of this Letter is to investigate with the help of two-dimensional numerical simulations, the potential of the FAIR to carry out research in the field of HED states in matter. PMID:16090748

  11. Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Alex

    2011-10-01

    Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

  12. Novel active signal compression in low-noise analog readout at future X-ray FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghisoni, M.; Comotti, D.; Gaioni, L.; Lodola, L.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the design of a low-noise front-end implementing a novel active signal compression technique. This feature can be exploited in the design of analog readout channels for application to the next generation free electron laser (FEL) experiments. The readout architecture includes the low-noise charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with dynamic signal compression, a time variant shaper used to process the signal at the preamplifier output and a 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The channel will be operated in such a way to cope with the high frame rate (exceeding 1 MHz) foreseen for future XFEL machines. The choice of a 65 nm CMOS technology has been made in order to include all the building blocks in the target pixel pitch of 100 μm. This work has been carried out in the frame of the PixFEL Project funded by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Italy.

  13. Assessment of present and future radwaste generation in Saudi Arabia for the design of treatment and storage facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Majid, S.; Kutbi, I.I.; Al-Marshad, A.I.

    1996-12-31

    Radwastes are produced in medical, industrial and educational institutions in Saudi Arabia. In medical centers many of the unsealed sources were low beta/gamma emitters of low radio-toxicity and less than about 4 months half-life. Significant radionuclides in this category were: {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 125}I, {sup 123}I, {sup 111}In, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 67}Ga and some of others. Longer lived sources such as {sup 57}Co, {sup 3}H, and {sup 14}C were also found in appreciable quantity. Delay and decay procedure followed by release to the sewerage or municipal landfill has been practiced for short-lived radwaste. Pretreatment and temporary storage were encouraged at large centers. Industrial sealed sources used primarily in radiography and well logging were mainly: {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 241}Am, {sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 252}Cf. It was agreed that radwastes whose half lives are above 138.4 days, the half life of {sup 210}Po, should be subject to conditioning treatment and permanent storage. It was anticipated that two main parameters affect the increase in radwaste in the future. The first is the increase of radionuclides use in hospitals in diagnosis and therapy in the country. The second is the increase in population which should be associated with increase in medical services in general. The annual long lived waste that need treatment, conditioning and storage as a function of time is expected to follow the relation: V= 10+0.48t{sup 2}, where V is the waste volume in m{sup 3} and t is the time in years after 1995. The expected long lived cumulative treated, conditioned, and liquid wastes in that year if not subject to volume reduction in m{sup 3} are expected to be: 500, 75, and 100 respectively. Comparisons were made with IAEA waste volume expectations for countries of similar conditions: the cumulative radwastes in m{sup 3} in 2020 are expected to be: 800, 125 and 175 respectively.

  14. X-ray Production By Cosmic Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrdja, D.; Bikit, I.; Aničin, I.; Vesković, M.; Forkapić, S.

    2007-04-01

    Muons have a small cross section for interactions and high energy, so they are very penetrating and give the significant contribution to the gamma spectra of Ge detectors, even in deep underground laboratories. One of the muon interaction effects with material is X-rays production. Having in mind that gold is often used as a detectors component, in this paper the production of X-rays in gold sample is analyzed by using an coincidence system based on plastic scintillation detector and Ge detector. The Au disc-shaped sample with mass of 40.6 g, radius 3.34 cm and 0.06 cm thickness was inside 12 cm thick lead shield of extended range HPGe detector. The plastic detector of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.05 m dimensions was placed above the lead shield at the distance of 32 cm from detector endcap. The producing rate of Kα rays per Au mass unit from coincidence gamma spectrum is determined as R ~7.1 × 10-4 g-1s-1. Taking in account the measured muon flux of Φ=54 s-1m-2, the muon cross section σKα~ 43 Barn, for Au Kα X-rays production is calculated. Also, the cross sections of X-ray production by cosmic muons in lead and tungsten are measured. Unexpectedly, the results obtained did not reveal Z dependence in the Z= 74-82 region.

  15. Showering cosmogenic muons in a large liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Marco; Evslin, Jarah; Ciuffoli, Emilio; Zhang, Xinmin

    2014-09-01

    We present the results of FLUKA simulations of the propagation of cosmogenic muons in a 20 kton spherical liquid scintillator detector underneath 700 to 900 meters of rock. A showering muon is one which deposits at least 3 GeV in the detector in addition to ionization energy. We find that 20 percent of muons are showering and a further 11 percent of muon events are muon bundles, of which more than one muon enters the detector. In this range the showering and bundle fractions are robust against changes in the depth and topography, thus the total shower and bundle rate for a given experiment can be obtained by combining our results with an estimate for the total muon flux. One consequence is that a straightforward adaptation of the full detector showering muon cuts used by KamLAND to JUNO or RENO 50 would yield a nearly vanishing detector efficiency.

  16. Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Guidman, K.K.; Strait, J.B.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Optimization of pion and muon production/collection for neutrino factories and muon colliders is described along with recent developments of the MARS15 code event generators and effects influencing the choice of the optimal beam energy.

  17. Studies of muon-induced radioactivity at NuMI

    SciTech Connect

    Boehnlein, David j.; Leveling, A.F.; Mokhov, N.V.; Vaziri, K.; Iwamoto, Y.; Kasugai, Y.; Matsuda, N.; Nakashima, H.; Sakamoto, Y.; Hagiwara, M.; Iwase, Hiroshi; /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyoto U., KURRI /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Shimizu, Tokyo /Tohoku U.

    2009-12-01

    The JASMIN Collaboration has studied the production of radionuclides by muons in the muon alcoves of the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. Samples of aluminum and copper are exposed to the muon field and counted on HpGe detectors when removed to determine their content of radioactive isotopes. We compare the results to MARS simulations and discuss the radiological implications for neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  18. Muon (g-2) Technical Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, J.

    2015-01-27

    The Muon (g-2) Experiment, E989 at Fermilab, will measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment a factor-of-four more precisely than was done in E821 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS. The E821 result appears to be greater than the Standard-Model prediction by more than three standard deviations. When combined with expected improvement in the Standard-Model hadronic contributions, E989 should be able to determine definitively whether or not the E821 result is evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. After a review of the physics motivation and the basic technique, which will use the muon storage ring built at BNL and now relocated to Fermilab, the design of the new experiment is presented. This document was created in partial fulfillment of the requirements necessary to obtain DOE CD-2/3 approval.

  19. Muon Fluence Measurements for Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Borgardt, James D.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2010-08-10

    This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to better characterize aspects of backgrounds in RPMs deployed for homeland security purposes. Two polyvinyl toluene scintillators were utilized with supporting NIM electronics to measure the muon coincidence rate. Muon spallation is one mechanism by which background neutrons are produced. The measurements performed concentrated on a broad investigation of the dependence of the muon flux on a) variations in solid angle subtended by the detector; b) the detector inclination with the horizontal; c) depth underground; and d) diurnal effects. These tests were conducted inside at Building 318/133, outdoors at Building 331G, and underground at Building 3425 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  20. Muon Tracking to Detect Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwellenbach, D.; Dreesen, W.; Green, J. A.; Tibbitts, A.; Schotik, G.; Borozdin, K.; Bacon, J.; Midera, H.; Milner, C.; Morris, C.; Perry, J.; Barrett, S.; Perry, K.; Scott, A.; Wright, C.; Aberle, D.

    2013-03-18

    Previous experiments have proven that nuclear assemblies can be imaged and identified inside of shipping containers using vertical trajectory cosmic-ray muons with two-sided imaging. These experiments have further demonstrated that nuclear assemblies can be identified by detecting fission products in coincidence with tracked muons. By developing these technologies, advanced sensors can be designed for a variety of warhead monitoring and detection applications. The focus of this project is to develop tomographic-mode imaging using near-horizontal trajectory muons in conjunction with secondary particle detectors. This will allow imaging in-situ without the need to relocate the objects and will enable differentiation of special nuclear material (SNM) from other high-Z materials.

  1. PROTON BEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2009-12-11

    Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider place stringent demands on the proton beam used to generate the desired beam of muons. Here we discuss the advantages and challenges of muon accelerators and the rationale behind the requirements on proton beam energy, intensity, bunch length, and repetition rate. Example proton driver configurations that have been considered in recent years are also briefly indicated.

  2. Noninvasive Reactor Imaging Using Cosmic-Ray Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, H.; Fujita, K.; Karino, Y.; Kume, N.; Nakayama, K.; Sano, Y.; Sugita, T.; Yoshioka, K.; Morris, C. L.; Bacon, J. D.; Borozdin, K. N.; Perry, J. O.; Mizokami, S.; Otsuka, Y.; Yamada, D.

    2015-10-01

    Cosmic-ray-muon imaging is proposed to assess the damages to the Fukushima Daiichi reactors. Simulation studies showed capability of muon imaging to reveal the core conditions.The muon-imaging technique was demonstrated at Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly, where the uranium-dioxide fuel assembly was imaged with 3-cm spatial resolution after 1 month of measurement.

  3. Higgs boson and Z physics at the first muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.; Han, T.

    1998-01-01

    The potential for the Higgs boson and Z-pole physics at the first muon collider is summarized, based on the discussions at the ``Workshop on the Physics at the First Muon Collider and at the Front End of a Muon Collider``.

  4. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; et al.,

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  5. Jet production in muon-proton and muon-nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates from Muon-Proton Muon- Nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates are defined by the JADE clustering algorithm. Rates in Muon-Proton deep-inelastic scattering are compared to perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (PQCD) and Monte Carlo model predictions. We observe hadronic (2+1)-jet rates which are a factor of two higher than PQCD predictions at the partonic level. Preliminary results from jet production on heavy targets, in the shadowing region, show a suppression of the jet rates as compared to deuterium. The two- forward jet sample present higher suppression as compared to the one-forward jet sample.

  6. Constraints on muon-specific dark forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; McKeen, David; Pospelov, Maxim

    2014-10-01

    The recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen allows for the most precise extraction of the charge radius of the proton which is currently in conflict with other determinations based on e-p scattering and hydrogen spectroscopy. This discrepancy could be the result of some new muon-specific force with O(1-100) MeV force carrier—in this paper we concentrate on vector mediators. Such an explanation faces challenges from the constraints imposed by the g-2 of the muon and electron as well as precision spectroscopy of muonic atoms. In this work we complement the family of constraints by calculating the contribution of hypothetical forces to the muonium hyperfine structure. We also compute the two-loop contribution to the electron parity-violating amplitude due to a muon loop, which is sensitive to the muon axial-vector coupling. Overall, we find that the combination of low-energy constraints favors the mass of the mediator to be below 10 MeV and that a certain degree of tuning is required between vector and axial-vector couplings of new vector particles to muons in order to satisfy constraints from muon g-2. However, we also observe that in the absence of a consistent standard model embedding high-energy weak-charged processes accompanied by the emission of new vector particles are strongly enhanced by (E/mV)2, with E a characteristic energy scale and mV the mass of the mediator. In particular, leptonic W decays impose the strongest constraints on such models completely disfavoring the remainder of the parameter space.

  7. Numerical study of a bucked-coil system for muon transport and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys; Alekou, Androula; Neuffer, David; Pasternak, Jaroslaw; Rogers, Chris T.

    2012-12-21

    A Neutrino Factory, which can deliver an intense flux of {approx}10{sup 21} neutrinos per year from a multi-GeV stored muon-beam is seemingly the ideal tool for studying neutrino oscillations and CP-violations for leptons. The front-end of this facility plays a critical role in determining the number of muons that can be accepted by the downstream accelerators. Delivering peak performance requires transporting the muon beams through long sections of a beam channel containing high-gradient rf cavities and strong focusing solenoids. Here, we propose a novel scheme to improve the performance of the cavities, thereby increasing the number of muons within the acceptance of the accelerator chain. The key element of our new scheme is to apply a set of bucked coils along the lattice, thus forcing the external magnetic field to drop substantially within the cavity. We incorporate this idea into a new lattice design for a Neutrino Factory, and detail its performance numerically.

  8. Muon production in extended air shower simulations.

    PubMed

    Pierog, T; Werner, K

    2008-10-24

    Whereas air shower simulations are very valuable tools for interpreting cosmic ray data, there is a long-standing problem: it is difficult to accommodate at the same time the longitudinal development of air showers and the number of muons measured on the ground. Using a new hadronic interaction model (EPOS) in air shower simulations produces much more muons, in agreement with results from the HiRes-MIA experiment. We find that this is mainly due to a better description of (anti) baryon production in hadronic interactions. This is an aspect of air shower physics which has been neglected so far. PMID:18999734

  9. Stochastic cooling requirements for a muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1993-12-31

    The most severe limitation to the muon production for a large-energy muon collider is the short time allowed for cooling the beam to dimensions small enough to provide reasonably high luminosity. The limitation is caused by the short lifetime of the particles. It appears to be desirable to accelerate the beam quickly in very short bunches. This paper describes the requirements of single-pass, fast stochastic cooling for very short bunches. Bandwidth, amplifier gain and Schottky power do not seem to be of major concern. Problems do arise with the ultimate low emittance that can be achieved, the value of which is seriously affected by the front-end noise.

  10. A COMPLETE SCHEME FOR A MUON COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    PALMER,R.B.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; KIRK, H.G.; ALEXAHIN, Y.; NEUFFER, D.; KAHN, S.A.; SUMMERS, D.

    2007-09-01

    A complete scheme for production, cooling, acceleration, and ring for a 1.5 TeV center of mass muon collider is presented, together with parameters for two higher energy machines. The schemes starts with the front end of a proposed neutrino factory that yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling in long-period helical lattices reduces the longitudinal emittance until it becomes possible to merge the trains into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in all dimensions is applied to the single bunches in further helical lattices. Final transverse cooling to the required parameters is achieved in 50 T solenoids.

  11. Energy loss measurement of cosmic ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Joseph

    1993-02-01

    Measurements of energy losses of high energy cosmic ray muons in an ionization chamber are presented. The chamber consists of 16 single gap layers, and the liquid tetra methyl silane (TMS) was used as active medium. The absolute energy loss and the relativistic rise were measured and compared with theoretical calculations. The importance of the measurements within the framework of the cosmic ray experiment KASCADE (German acronym for Karlsruhe Shower Core and Array Detector) are discussed, especially with respect to energy calibration of hadrons and high energy muons above 1 TeV.

  12. Large muon electric dipole moment from flavor?

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, Gudrun; Huitu, Katri; Rueppell, Timo; Laamanen, Jari

    2010-11-01

    We study the prospects and opportunities of a large muon electric dipole moment (EDM) of the order (10{sup -24}-10{sup -22}) ecm. We investigate how natural such a value is within the general minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model with CP violation from lepton flavor violation in view of the experimental constraints. In models with hybrid gauge-gravity-mediated supersymmetry breaking, a large muon EDM is indicative for the structure of flavor breaking at the Planck scale, and points towards a high messenger scale.

  13. FFAG Designs for Muon Collider Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. Scott

    2014-01-13

    I estimate FFAG parameters for a muon collider with a 70mm longitudinal emittance. I do not discuss the lower emittance beam for a Higgs factory. I produce some example designs, giving only parameters relevant to estimating cost and performance. The designs would not track well, but the parameters of a good design will be close to those described. I compare these cost estimates to those for a fast-ramping synchrotron and a recirculating linear accelerator. I conclude that FFAGs do not appear to be cost-effective for the large longitudinal emittance in a high-energy muon collider.

  14. Report on Workshop on Future Directions for Accelerator R&D at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Church, M.; Spentzouris, P.; Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Accelerator R&D has played a crucial role in enabling scientific discovery in the past century and will continue to play this role in the years to come. In the U.S., the Office of High Energy Physics of DOE's Office of Science is developing a plan for national accelerator R&D stewardship. Fermilab undertakes accelerator research, design, and development focused on superconducting radio-frequency (RF), superconducting magnet, beam cooling, and high intensity proton technologies. In addition, the Lab pursues comprehensive integrated theoretical concepts and simulations of complete future facilities on both the energy and intensity frontiers. At present, Fermilab (1) supplies integrated design concept and technology development for a multi-MW proton source (Project X) to support world-leading programs in long baseline neutrino and rare processes experiments; (2) plays a leading role in the development of ionization cooling technologies required for muon storage ring facilities at the energy (multi-TeV Muon Collider) and intensity (Neutrino Factory) frontiers, and supplies integrated design concepts for these facilities; and (3) carries out a program of advanced accelerator R&D (AARD) in the field of high quality beam sources, and novel beam manipulation techniques.

  15. Exclusive Muon-Neutrino Charged Current Muon Plus Any Number of Protons Topologies In ArgoNeuT

    SciTech Connect

    Partyka, Kinga Anna

    2013-01-01

    Neutrinos remain among the least understood fundamental particles even after decades of study. As we enter the precision era o f neutrino measurements bigger and more sophisticated detectors have emerged. The leading candidate among them is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC ) detector technology due to its bubble-like chamber imaging, superb background rejection and scalability. I t is a perfect candidate that w ill aim to answer the remaining questions of the nature o f neutrino and perhaps our existence. Studying neutrinos with a detector that employs detection via beautiful images o f neutrino interactions can be both illuminating and surprising. The analysis presented here takes the full advantage of the LArTPC power by exploiting the first topological analysis of charged current muon neutrino p + N p , muon and any number of protons, interactions with the ArgoNeuT LArTPC experiment on an argon target. The results presented here are the first that address the proton multiplicity at the vertex and the proton kinematics. This study also addresses the importance o f nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. Furthermore, the developed here reconstruction techniques present a significant step forward for this technology and can be employed in the future LArTPC detectors.

  16. Exclusive Muon-Neutrino Charged Current muon plus any number of protons topologies in ArgoNeuT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partyka, Kinga Anna

    Neutrinos remain among the least understood fundamental particles even after decades of study. As we enter the precision era of neutrino measurements bigger and more sophisticated detectors have emerged. The leading candidate among them is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) detector technology due to its bubble-like chamber imaging, superb background rejection and scalability. It is a perfect candidate that will aim to answer the remaining questions of the nature of neutrino and perhaps our existence. Studying neutrinos with a detector that employs detection via beautiful images of neutrino interactions can be bath illuminating and surprising. The analysis presented here takes the full advantage of the LArTPC power by exploiting the first topological analysis of charged current muon neutrino mu + Np, muon and any number of protons, interactions with the ArgoNeuT LArTPC experiment on an argon target. The results presented here are the first that address the proton multiplicity at the vertex and the proton kinematics. This study also addresses the importance of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. Furthermore, the developed here reconstruction techniques present a significant step forward for this technology and can be employed in the future LArTPC detectors.

  17. Search for muon EDM with ultra-cold muon beam at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mibe, Tsutomu; J-PARC muon g-2/EDM Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The J-PARC experiment E34 aims to measure the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) and electric dipole moment (EDM) of the positive muon with a novel technique utilizing an ultra-cold muons accelerated to 300 MeV/ c and a 66 cm-diameter compact muon storage ring without focusing-electric field. This measurement will be complementary to the previous BNL E821 experiment and upcoming FNAL E989 experiment with the muon beam at the magic momentum 3.1 GeV/ c in a 14 m-diameter storage ring. The experiment aims to achieve the sensitivity down to 0.1 ppm for g-2, and 10-21 e . cm for EDM. In this presentation, I'd like to discuss the technical achievements and prospects for realization of the experiment.

  18. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: MICE and Neutrino Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemire, Ben

    2010-03-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an accelerator and particle physics experiment aimed at demonstrating the technique of ionization cooling on a beam of muons. Ionization cooling is the process by which muons are sent through an absorbing material, thereby losing energy and decreasing their normalized emittance. The muons are then reaccelerated in the appropriate direction with radio frequency (RF) cavities. This produces an overall reduction in transverse emittance of the muon beam. Ionization cooling could be a key technique in the design of a high intensity Neutrino Factory.

  19. Low-energy negative muon interaction with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danev, Petar; Adamczak, Andrzej; Bakalov, Dimitar; Mocchiutti, Emiliano; Stoilov, Mihail; Vacchi, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Using simulated data, obtained with the FLUKA code, we derive empirical regularities about the propagation and stopping of low-energy negative muons in hydrogen and selected solid materials. The results are intended to help the preliminary stages of the set-up design for experimental studies of muon capture and muonic atom spectroscopy. Provided are approximate expressions for the parameters of the the momentum, spatial and angular distribution of the propagating muons. In comparison with the available data on the stopping power and range of muons (with which they agree in the considered energy range) these results have the advantage to also describe the statistical spread of the muon characteristics of interest.

  20. Steps towards the hyperfine splitting measurement of the muonic hydrogen ground state: pulsed muon beam and detection system characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczak, A.; Baccolo, G.; Bakalov, D.; Baldazzi, G.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Campana, R.; Carbone, R.; Cervi, T.; Chignoli, F.; Clemenza, M.; Colace, L.; Curioni, A.; Danailov, M.; Danev, P.; D'Antone, I.; De Bari, A.; De Vecchi, C.; De Vincenzi, M.; Furini, M.; Fuschino, F.; Gadedjisso-Tossou, K. S.; Guffanti, D.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishida, K.; Iugovaz, D.; Labanti, C.; Maggi, V.; Margotti, A.; Marisaldi, M.; Mazza, R.; Meneghini, S.; Menegolli, A.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moretti, M.; Morgante, G.; Nardò, R.; Nastasi, M.; Niemela, J.; Previtali, E.; Ramponi, R.; Rachevski, A.; Rignanese, L. P.; Rossella, M.; Rossi, P. L.; Somma, F.; Stoilov, M.; Stoychev, L.; Tomaselli, A.; Tortora, L.; Vacchi, A.; Vallazza, E.; Zampa, G.; Zuffa, M.

    2016-05-01

    The high precision measurement of the hyperfine splitting of the muonic-hydrogen atom ground state with pulsed and intense muon beam requires careful technological choices both in the construction of a gas target and of the detectors. In June 2014, the pressurized gas target of the FAMU experiment was exposed to the low energy pulsed muon beam at the RIKEN RAL muon facility. The objectives of the test were the characterization of the target, the hodoscope and the X-ray detectors. The apparatus consisted of a beam hodoscope and X-rays detectors made with high purity Germanium and Lanthanum Bromide crystals. In this paper the experimental setup is described and the results of the detector characterization are presented.

  1. Tau physics at future facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1994-12-01

    This paper dicusses and projects the tau research which may be carried out at CESR, at BEPC, at the SLC, in the next few years at LEP I, at the asymmetric B-factories under construction in Japan and the United States and, if built, a tau-charm factory. As the size of tau data sets increases, there is an increasing need to reduce the effects of systematic errors on the precision and search range of experiments. In most areas of tau physics there is a large amount of progress to be made, but in a few areas it will be difficult to substantially improve the precision of present measurements.

  2. Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

  3. ICOOL: A TOOL FOR MUON COLLIDER SIMULATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNOW,R.C.

    2001-09-28

    Current ideas for designing neutrino factories [ 1,2] and muon colliders [3] require unique configurations of fields and materials to prepare the muon beam for acceleration. This so-called front end system must accomplish the goals of phase rotation, bunching and cooling. We have continued the development of a 3-D tracking code, ICOOL [4], for examining possible muon collider front end configurations. A system is described in terms of a series of longitudinal regions with associated material and field properties. The tracking takes place in a coordinate system that follows a reference orbit through the system. The code takes into account decays and interactions of {approx}50-500 MeV/c muons in matter. Material geometry regions include cylinders and wedges. A number of analytic models are provided for describing the field configurations. Simple diagnostics are built into the code, including calculation of emittances and correlations, longitudinal traces, histograms and scatter plots. A number of auxiliary codes can be used for pre-processing, post-processing and optimization.

  4. Neutrino masses, Majorons, and muon decay

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria, A.; Bernabeu, J.; Pich, A.

    1987-09-01

    The contributions to the parameters xi, delta, rho, and eta in muon decay coming from double Majoron emission, Majorana neutrino masses, and effects of charged scalars are evaluated in the scalar-triplet model. The relevance of these effects for planned experiments is discussed.

  5. Multi-muon events at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Ptochos, F.; /Cyprus U.

    2009-07-01

    We report a study of multi-muon events produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and recorded by the CDF II detector. In a data set acquired with a dedicated dimuon trigger and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2100 pb{sup -1}, we isolate a significant sample of events in which at least one of the identified muons has large impact parameter and is produced outside the beam pipe of radius 1.5 cm. We are unable to fully account for the number and properties of the events through standard model processes in conjunction with our current understanding of the CDF II detector, trigger and event reconstruction. Several topological and kinematic properties of these events are also presented. In contrast, the production cross section and kinematics of events in which both muon candidates are produced inside the beam pipe are successfully modeled by known QCD processes which include heavy flavor production. The presence of these anomalous multi-muon events offers a plausible resolution to long-standing inconsistencies related to b{bar b} production and decay.

  6. Target studies for surface muon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, F.; Desorgher, L.; Fuchs, A.; Hajdas, W.; Hodge, Z.; Kettle, P.-R.; Knecht, A.; Lüscher, R.; Papa, A.; Rutar, G.; Wohlmuther, M.

    2016-02-01

    Meson factories are powerful drivers of diverse physics programs. With beam powers already in the MW-regime attention has to be turned to target and beam line design to further significantly increase surface muon rates available for experiments. For this reason we have explored the possibility of using a neutron spallation target as a source of surface muons by performing detailed Geant4 simulations with pion production cross sections based on a parametrization of existing data. While the spallation target outperforms standard targets in the backward direction by more than a factor 7 it is not more efficient than standard targets viewed under 90°. Not surprisingly, the geometry of the target plays a large role in the generation of surface muons. Through careful optimization, a gain in surface muon rate of between 30% and 60% over the standard "box-like" target used at the Paul Scherrer Institute could be achieved by employing a rotated slab target. An additional 10% gain could also be possible by utilizing novel target materials such as, e.g., boron carbide.

  7. Commissioning of CMS Endcap Muon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, Elizabeth

    2009-05-01

    This talk is as an overview of the evolution and current state of commissioning work on the CMS endcap muon system. I intend to highlight the progress in operating the detector, some problems encountered and solutions developed, lessons learned in the process, points which still require action to be taken, and data taking results.

  8. Gamma rays from muons from WIMPs: Implementation of radiative muon decays for dark matter analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaffidi, Andre; Freese, Katherine; Li, Jinmian; Savage, Christopher; White, Martin; Williams, Anthony G.

    2016-06-01

    Dark matter searches in gamma ray final states often make use of the fact that photons can be produced from final state muons. Modern Monte Carlo generators and dark matter codes include the effects of final state radiation from muons produced in the dark matter annihilation process itself, but neglect the O (1 %) radiative correction that arises from the subsequent muon decay. After implementing this correction we demonstrate the effect that it can have on dark matter phenomenology by considering the case of dark matter annihilation to four muons via scalar mediator production. We first show that the AMS-02 positron excess can no longer easily be made consistent with this final state once the Fermi-LAT dwarf limits are calculated with the inclusion of radiative muon decays, and we next show that the Fermi-LAT galactic center gamma excess can be improved with this final state after inclusion of the same effect. We provide code and tables for the implementation of this effect in the popular dark matter code micrOMEGAs, providing a solution for any model producing final state muons.

  9. Novel approach to imaging by cosmic-ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikit, Istvan; Mrdja, Dusan; Bikit, Kristina; Slivka, Jaroslav; Jovancevic, Nikola; Oláh, László; Hamar, Gergő; Varga, Dezső

    2016-03-01

    Cosmic-ray muons can be used for imaging of large structures, or high-density objects with high atomic number. The first task can be performed by measurement of muon absorption within very thick material layers, while the second approach is based on muon multiple scattering. However, the muon imaging of small structures with low atomic number and density was not yet solved appropriately. Here we show the first results of cosmic-ray muon imaging of small objects made of elements of low atomic number. This novel approach includes detection of secondary particles produced by muons, which were not used at all in previous muon imaging methods. Thus, the list of elements, as well as the range of dimensions of objects which can be imaged are significantly expanded.

  10. Identification of Low PT Muon with the Atlas Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usai, G.

    2005-02-01

    A method for the identification of muons with the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is presented and its efficiency and mis-tagging fraction are discussed. It is demonstrated that the Tile Calorimeter can identify muons with good efficiency down to 2 GeV/c transverse momentum, where the stand-alone Muon Spectrometer has zero efficiency. This kinematic region is important for study of B meson physics and in the particular for the CP violating decay channels. The effectiveness of this method is tested, in particular, in the case of bbar {b} events at low LHC luminosity (1033cm-1s-2) with full simulation of experimental conditions. The muon identification with the Tile Calorimeter is fast and can be used for muon selection at the trigger level. A method of exploiting the information available in other ATLAS sub-detectors in order to reduce spurious muon-tag and measure the candidate muon momentum is discussed.

  11. Corrections for temperature effect for ground-based muon hodoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, A. N.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Timashkov, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Influence of atmospheric temperature on muon flux at sea level is considered. Results of calculations of muon spectrum for normal atmospheric conditions, differential temperature coefficients (DTC) for muons at different zenith angles and threshold energies are presented. In calculations, a six-layer stationary spherical model of atmosphere is used, contributions of both pions and kaons as well as dependence of muon energy loss on muon energy are taken into account. Comparison of muon spectrum calculations and experimental data in a wide range of zenith angles and momentums shows a good agreement. Comparison of results of DTC calculations with results of earlier works exhibits only qualitative agreement; possible sources of differences are analyzed. Some practical questions of the use of DTC for muon hodoscope data analysis are discussed.

  12. A new X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for extraterrestrial materials using a muon beam.

    PubMed

    Terada, K; Ninomiya, K; Osawa, T; Tachibana, S; Miyake, Y; Kubo, M K; Kawamura, N; Higemoto, W; Tsuchiyama, A; Ebihara, M; Uesugi, M

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of the intense pulsed muon source at J-PARC MUSE, Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex/MUon Science Establishment (10(6) s(-1) for a momentum of 60 MeV/c), enabled us to pioneer a new frontier in analytical sciences. Here, we report a non-destructive elemental analysis using µ(-) capture. Controlling muon momentum from 32.5 to 57.5 MeV/c, we successfully demonstrate a depth-profile analysis of light elements (B, C, N, and O) from several mm-thick layered materials and non-destructive bulk analyses of meteorites containing organic materials. Muon beam analysis, enabling a bulk analysis of light to heavy elements without severe radioactivation, is a unique analytical method complementary to other non-destructive analyses. Furthermore, this technology can be used as a powerful tool to identify the content and distribution of organic components in future asteroidal return samples. PMID:24861282

  13. Simulations of a Gas-Filled Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    K. Yonehara; D.M. Kaplan; K. Beard; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev; R.P. Johnson; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts

    2005-05-16

    A helical cooling channel (HCC) has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. The HCC is composed of a series of RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas that acts as the energy absorber for ionization cooling and suppresses RF breakdown in the cavities. Magnetic solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole coils outside of the RF cavities provide the focusing and dispersion needed for the emittance exchange for the beam as it follows a helical equilibrium orbit down the HCC. In the work presented here, two Monte Carlo programs have been developed to simulate a HCC to compare with the analytic predictions and to begin the process of optimizing practical designs that could be built in the near future. We discuss the programs, the comparisons with the analytical theory, and the prospects for a HCC design with the capability to reduce the six-dimensional phase space emittance of a muon beam by a factor of over five orders of magnitude in a linear channel less than 100 meters long.

  14. Feasibility Study of Compact Gas-Filled Storage Ring for 6D Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    A. Garren, J. Kolonlo

    2005-10-31

    The future of elementary particle physics in the USA depends in part on the development of new machines such as the International Linear Collider, Muon Collider and Neutrino Factories which can produce particle beams of higher energy, intensity, or particle type than now exists. These beams will enable the continued exploration of the world of elementary particles and interactions. In addition, the associated development of new technologies and machines such as a Muon Ring Cooler is essential. This project was to undertake a feasibility study of a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams. The ultimate goal, in Phase III, was to build, test, and operate a demonstration storage ring. The preferred lattice for the storage ring was determined and dynamic simulations of particles through the lattice were performed. A conceptual design and drawing of the magnets were made and a study of the RF cavity and possible injection/ejection scheme made. Commercial applications for the device were investigated and the writing of the Phase II proposal completed. The research findings conclude that a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams is possible with further research and development.

  15. Tests of the MICE Electron Muon Ranger frontend electronics with a small scale prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognini, D.; Bene, P.; Blondel, A.; Cadoux, F.; Debieux, S.; Giannini, G.; Graulich, J. S.; Lietti, D.; Masciocchi, F.; Prest, M.; Rothenfusser, K.; Vallazza, E.; Wisting, H.

    2011-08-01

    The MICE experiment is being commissioned at RAL to demonstrate the feasibility of the muon ionization cooling technique for future applications such as the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. The cooling will be evaluated by measuring the emittance before and after the cooling channel with two 4 T spectrometers; to distinguish muons from the background, a multi-detector particle identification system is foreseen: three Time of Flight stations, two Cherenkov counters and a calorimetric system consisting of a pre-shower layer and a fully active scintillator detector (EMR) are used to discriminate muons from pions and electrons. EMR consists of 48 planes of triangular scintillating bars coupled to WLS fibers readout by single PMTs on one side and MAPMTs on the other; each plane sensible area is 1 m 2. This article deals with a small scale prototype of the EMR detector which has been used to test the MAPMT frontend electronics based on the MAROC ASIC; the tests with cosmic rays using both an analog mode and a digital readout mode are presented. A very preliminary study on the cross talk problem is also shown.

  16. Studies of thermophysical properties of high-energy-density states in matter using intense heavy ion beams at the future FAIR accelerator facilities: The HEDgeHOB collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Gryaznov, V.; Deutsch, C.; Fortov, V. E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Ni, P.; Piriz, A. R.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D.; Wouchuk, G.

    2006-06-01

    Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are believed to be a very efficient and novel tool to create states of High-Energy-Density (HED) in matter. This paper shows with the help of numerical simulations that the heavy ion beams that will be generated at the future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR)[W.F. Henning, Nucl. Instr. Meth. B 214, 211 (2004)] will allow one to use two different experimental schemes to study HED states in matter. First scheme named HIHEX (Heavy Ion Heating and EXpansion), will generate high-pressure, high-entropy states in matter by volumetric isochoric heating. The heated material will then be allowed to expand isentropically. Using this scheme, it will be possible to study important regions of the phase diagram that are either difficult to access or are even unaccessible using traditional methods of shock compression. The second scheme would allow one to achieve low-entropy compression of a sample material like hydrogen or water to produce conditions that are believed to exist in the interiors of the giant planets. This scheme is named LAPLAS (LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences).

  17. Prediction equations for corrosion rates of a A-537 and A-516 steels in Double Shell Slurry, Future PUREX, and Hanford Facilities Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; Mackey, D.B.; Bates, D.J.; Pool, K.H.

    1985-06-01

    Even though the interest in the corrosion of radwaste tanks goes back to the mid-1940's when waste storage was begun, and a fair amount of corrosion work has been done since then, the changes in processes and waste types have outpaced the development of new data pertinent to the new double shell tanks. As a consequence, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began a development of corrosion data on a broad base of waste compositions in 1980. The objective of the program was to provide operations personnel with corrosion rate data as a function of waste temperature and composition. The work performed in this program examined A-537 tank steel in Double Shell Slurry and Future PUREX Wastes, at temperatures between 40 and 180/sup 0/C as well as in Hanford Facilities Waste at 25 and 50/sup 0/C. In general, the corrosion rates were less than 1 mpy (0.001 in./y) and usually less than 0.5 mpy. Excessive corrosion rates (>1 mpy) were only found in dilute waste compositions or in concentrated caustic compositions at temperatures above 140/sup 0/C. Stress corrosion cracking was only observed under similar conditions. The results are presented as polynomial prediction equations with examples of the output of existing computer codes. The codes are not provided in the text but are available from the authors. 12 refs., 5 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source.

    PubMed

    Lord, J S; McKenzie, I; Baker, P J; Blundell, S J; Cottrell, S P; Giblin, S R; Good, J; Hillier, A D; Holsman, B H; King, P J C; Lancaster, T; Mitchell, R; Nightingale, J B; Owczarkowski, M; Poli, S; Pratt, F L; Rhodes, N J; Scheuermann, R; Salman, Z

    2011-07-01

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument. PMID:21806196

  19. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  20. Volcanoes muon imaging using Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, O.; Del Santo, M.; Mineo, T.; Cusumano, G.; Maccarone, M. C.; Pareschi, G.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of a volcano inner structure is one of the key-points for the volcanic hazards evaluation. To this aim, in the last decade, geophysical radiography techniques using cosmic muon particles have been proposed. By measuring the differential attenuation of the muon flux as a function of the amount of rock crossed along different directions, it is possible to determine the density distribution of the interior of a volcano. Up to now, a number of experiments have been based on the detection of the muon tracks crossing hodoscopes, made up of scintillators or nuclear emulsion planes. Using telescopes based on the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique, we propose a new approach to study the interior of volcanoes detecting of the Cherenkov light produced by relativistic cosmic-ray muons that survive after crossing the volcano. The Cherenkov light produced along the muon path is imaged as a typical annular pattern containing all the essential information to reconstruct particle direction and energy. Our new approach offers the advantage of a negligible background and an improved spatial resolution. To test the feasibility of our new method, we have carried out simulations with a toy-model based on the geometrical parameters of ASTRI SST-2M, i.e. the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope currently under installation onto the Etna volcano. Comparing the results of our simulations with previous experiments based on particle detectors, we gain at least a factor of 10 in sensitivity. The result of this study shows that we resolve an empty cylinder with a radius of about 100 m located inside a volcano in less than 4 days, which implies a limit on the magma velocity of 5 m/h.

  1. Characterising encapsulated nuclear waste using cosmic-ray muon tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, A.; Hamilton, D. J.; Hoek, M.; Ireland, D. G.; Johnstone, J. R.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Lumsden, S.; Mahon, D. F.; McKinnon, B.; Murray, M.; Nutbeam-Tuffs, S.; Shearer, C.; Yang, G.; Zimmerman, C.

    2015-03-01

    Tomographic imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons have been shown previously to successfully identify and characterise low- and high-Z materials within an air matrix using a prototype scintillating-fibre tracker system. Those studies were performed as the first in a series to assess the feasibility of this technology and image reconstruction techniques in characterising the potential high-Z contents of legacy nuclear waste containers for the U.K. Nuclear Industry. The present work continues the feasibility study and presents the first images reconstructed from experimental data collected using this small-scale prototype system of low- and high-Z materials encapsulated within a concrete-filled stainless-steel container. Clear discrimination is observed between the thick steel casing, the concrete matrix and the sample materials assayed. These reconstructed objects are presented and discussed in detail alongside the implications for future industrial scenarios.

  2. The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon at Fermilab

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Logashenko, I.

    2015-06-17

    The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is one of the most precisely measured quantities in experimental particle physics. Its latest measurement at Brookhaven National Laboratory deviates from the Standard Model expectation by approximately 3.5 standard deviations. The goal of the new experiment, E989, now under construction at Fermilab, is a fourfold improvement in precision. Furthermore, we discuss the details of the future measurement and its current status.

  3. The Measurement of the Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon at Fermilab a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logashenko, I.; Grange, J.; Winter, P.; Carey, R. M.; Hazen, E.; Kinnaird, N.; Miller, J. P.; Mott, J.; Roberts, B. L.; Crnkovic, J.; Morse, W. M.; Sayed, H. Kamal; Tishchenko, V.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Shatunov, Y. M.; Bjorkquist, R.; Chapelain, A.; Eggert, N.; Frankenthal, A.; Gibbons, L.; Kim, S.; Mikhailichenko, A.; Orlov, Y.; Rider, N.; Rubin, D.; Sweigart, D.; Allspach, D.; Barzi, E.; Casey, B.; Convery, M. E.; Drendel, B.; Freidsam, H.; Johnstone, C.; Johnstone, J.; Kiburg, B.; Kourbanis, I.; Lyon, A. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Morgan, J. P.; Nguyen, H.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Para, A.; Polly, C. C.; Popovic, M.; Ramberg, E.; Rominsky, M.; Soha, A. K.; Still, D.; Walton, T.; Yoshikawa, C.; Jungmann, K.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Debevec, P.; Leo, S.; Pitts, K.; Schlesier, C.; Anastasi, A.; Babusci, D.; Corradi, G.; Hampai, D.; Palladino, A.; Venanzoni, G.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrari, C.; Fioretti, A.; Gabbanini, C.; Di Stefano, R.; Marignetti, S.; Iacovacci, M.; Mastroianni, S.; Di Sciascio, G.; Moricciani, D.; Cantatore, G.; Karuza, M.; Giovanetti, K.; Baranov, V.; Duginov, V.; Khomutov, N.; Krylov, V.; Kuchinskiy, N.; Volnykh, V.; Gaisser, M.; Haciomeroglu, S.; Kim, Y.; Lee, S.; Lee, M.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Won, E.; Fatemi, R.; Gohn, W.; Gorringe, T.; Bowcock, T.; Carroll, J.; King, B.; Maxfield, S.; Smith, A.; Teubner, T.; Whitley, M.; Wormald, M.; Wolski, A.; Al-Kilani, S.; Chislett, R.; Lancaster, M.; Motuk, E.; Stuttard, T.; Warren, M.; Flay, D.; Kawall, D.; Meadows, Z.; Syphers, M.; Tarazona, D.; Chupp, T.; Tewlsey-Booth, A.; Quinn, B.; Eads, M.; Epps, A.; Luo, G.; McEvoy, M.; Pohlman, N.; Shenk, M.; de Gouvea, A.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Schellman, H.; Abi, B.; Azfar, F.; Henry, S.; Gray, F.; Fu, C.; Ji, X.; Li, L.; Yang, H.; Stockinger, D.; Cauz, D.; Pauletta, G.; Santi, L.; Baessler, S.; Frlez, E.; Pocanic, D.; Alonzi, L. P.; Fertl, M.; Fienberg, A.; Froemming, N.; Garcia, A.; Hertzog, D. W.; Kammel, P.; Kaspar, J.; Osofsky, R.; Smith, M.; Swanson, E.; Lynch, K.

    2015-09-01

    The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is one of the most precisely measured quantities in experimental particle physics. Its latest measurement at Brookhaven National Laboratory deviates from the Standard Model expectation by approximately 3.5 standard deviations. The goal of the new experiment, E989, now under construction at Fermilab, is a fourfold improvement in precision. Here, we discuss the details of the future measurement and its current status.

  4. The Measurement of the Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Logashenko, I.; et al.

    2015-06-17

    The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is one of the most precisely measured quantities in experimental particle physics. Its latest measurement at Brookhaven National Laboratory deviates from the Standard Model expectation by approximately 3.5 standard deviations. The goal of the new experiment, E989, now under construction at Fermilab, is a fourfold improvement in precision. Here, we discuss the details of the future measurement and its current status.

  5. World-Wide Experience with SRF Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Hutton, Adam Carpenter

    2011-03-01

    The speaker will review and analyze the performance of existing SRF facilities in the world, addressing issues of usage and availability for different customers (HEP research, material sciences, ADS). Lessons learned should be summarized for proposed future facilities (ILC, Project X, Muon Collider). The first use of superconducting cavities for accelerating beams was at HEPL, Stanford University in the early sixties. Rather quickly, other laboratories followed suit, notably the University of Illinois at Champagne, Urbana and Cornell University. There were two main uses, which still persist today. The first is to provide accelerated particles as an injector or for fixed target experiments. The second is to maintain circulating beams, either for synchrotron light sources or for colliding beam experiments. Given the differing requirements, these two uses led to rather different implementations and, in particular, different average operating gradients. A second difference in the implementation is the speed of the particle being accelerated. Electrons are sufficiently relativistic at low beam energies (> {approx} 5 MeV) that cavities designed for relativistic beams can also function acceptably at low energy. This is not the case for protons or ion accelerators so, until recently, copper cavities were used to cover the first {approx} 100 MeV. Superconducting cavities are now also being proposed to cover this energy range as well using a series of superconducting cavities, each of which is matched to the particle velocity.

  6. Modeled Differential Muon Flux Measurements for Monitoring Geological Storage of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, M. L.; Naudet, C. J.; Gluyas, J.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, we published the first, theoretical feasibility study of the use of muon tomography to monitor injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into a geological storage reservoir for carbon storage (Kudryavtsev et al., 2012). Our initial concept showed that attenuation of the total muon downward flux, which is controlled effectively by its path-length and the density of the material through which it passes, could quantify the replacement in a porous sandstone reservoir of relatively dense aqueous brine by less dense supercritical carbon dioxide (specific gravity, 0.75). Our model examined the change in the muon flux over periods of about one year. However, certainly, in the initial stages of carbon dioxide injection it would be valuable to examine its emplacement over much shorter periods of time. Over a year there are small fluctuations of about 2% in the flux of high energy cosmic ray muons, because of changes in pressure and temperature, and therefore density, of the upper atmosphere (Ambrosio, 1997). To improve precision, we developed the concept of differential muon monitoring. The muon flux at the bottom of the reservoir is compared with the incident flux at its top. In this paper we present the results of three simulations. In all of them, as in our previous modeling exercise, we assume a 1000 sq. m total area of muon detectors, but in this case both above and below a 300 m thick sandstone bed, with 35% porosity, capped by shale and filled initially with a dense brine (specific gravity, 1.112). We assume high sweep efficiency, since supercritical CO2 and water are miscible, and therefore that 80% of the water will be replaced over a period of injection spanning 10 years. In the first two cases the top of the reservoir is at 1200 m and the overburden is either continuous shale or a 100m shale horizon beneath a sandstone aquifer, respectively. In the third case, which is somewhat analogous to the FutureGen 2.0 site in Illinois (FutureGen Industrial

  7. Rotating band pion production targets for muon colliders and neutrino factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B. J.

    2000-08-01

    An update is presented on a conceptual design for a pion production target station using a rotating cupronickel band and that was originally proposed for use at a muon collider facility with a 4 MW pulsed proton beam. After reviewing the salient design features and motivations for this target, ongoing studies are described that are attempting to benchmark the thermal stresses and radiation damage on the target band using data from the Fermilab antiproton source and other operating targets. Possible parameter optimizations and alternative technologies for the rotating band are surveyed, including discussion on the the various proton beam parameters that might be encountered for rotating band targets at either muon colliders or neutrino factories. Finally, an outline is proposed for a possible R&D path towards capability for the actual construction of rotating band pion production targets.

  8. Imaging a vertical shaft from a tunnel using muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.; Dorsey, D. J.; Schwellenbach, D.; Green, A.; Smalley, D.

    2015-12-01

    We use muon technology to image a vertical shaft from a tunnel. The density of the materials through which cosmic ray muons pass influences the flux of muons because muons are more attenuated by higher density material. Additionally, muons can travel several kilometers allowing measurements through deep rock. Density maps are generated from muon flux measurements to locate subsurface features like tunnel structures and ore bodies. Additionally, muon data can be jointly inverted with other data such as gravity and seismic to produce higher quality earth models than produced from a single method. We collected several weeks of data in a tunnel to image a vertical shaft. The minimum length of rock between the vertical shaft and the detector is 120 meters and the diameter of the vertical shaft is 4.6 meters. The rock the muons traveled through consists of Tertiary age volcanic tuff and steeply dipping, small-displacement faults. Results will be presented for muon flux in the tunnel and Monte-Carlo simulations of this experiment. Simulations from both GEANT4 (Geometry And Tracking version 4) and MCNP6 (Monte-Carlo N-Particle version 6) models will be compared. The tunnel overburden from muon measurements is also estimated and compared with actual the overburden. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Studies on muon tomography for archaeological internal structures scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, H.; Carloganu, C.; Gibert, D.; Jacquemier, J.; Karyotakis, Y.; Marteau, J.; Niess, V.; Katsanevas, S.; Tonazzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    Muon tomography is a potential non-invasive technique for internal structure scanning. It has already interesting applications in geophysics and can be used for archaeological purposes. Muon tomography is based on the measurement of the muon flux after crossing the structure studied. Differences on the mean density of these structures imply differences on the detected muon rate for a given direction. Based on this principle, Monte Carlo simulations represent a useful tool to provide a model of the expected muon rate and angular distribution depending on the composition of the studied object, being useful to estimate the expected detected muons and to better understand the experimental results. These simulations are mainly dependent on the geometry and composition of the studied object and on the modelling of the initial muon flux at surface. In this work, the potential of muon tomography in archaeology is presented and evaluated with Monte Carlo simulations by estimating the differences on the muon rate due to the presence of internal structures and its composition. The influence of the chosen muon model at surface in terms of energy and angular distributions in the final result has been also studied.

  10. PARAMETER SETS FOR 10 TEV AND 100 TEV MUON COLLIDERS, AND THEIR STUDY AT THE HEMC 99 WORKSHOP

    SciTech Connect

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    A focal point for the HEMC'99 workshop was the evaluation of straw-man parameter sets for the acceleration and collider rings of muon colliders at center of mass energies of 10 TeV and 100 TeV. These self-consistent parameter sets are presented and discussed. The methods and assumptions used in their generation are described and motivations are given for the specific choices of parameter values. The assessment of the parameter sets during the workshop is then reviewed and the implications for the feasibility of many-TeV muon colliders are evaluated. Finally, a preview is given of plans for iterating on the parameter sets and, more generally, for future feasibility studies on many-TeV muon colliders.

  11. Database and interactive monitoring system for the photonics and electronics of RPC Muon Trigger in CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiacek, Daniel; Kudla, Ignacy M.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Bunkowski, Karol

    2005-02-01

    The main task of the RPC (Resistive Plate Chamber) Muon Trigger monitoring system design for the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment (at LHC in CERN Geneva) is the visualization of data that includes the structure of electronic trigger system (e.g. geometry and imagery), the way of its processes and to generate automatically files with VHDL source code used for programming of the FPGA matrix. In the near future, the system will enable the analysis of condition, operation and efficiency of individual Muon Trigger elements, registration of information about some Muon Trigger devices and present previously obtained results in interactive presentation layer. A broad variety of different database and programming concepts for design of Muon Trigger monitoring system was presented in this article. The structure and architecture of the system and its principle of operation were described. One of ideas for building this system is use object-oriented programming and design techniques to describe real electronics systems through abstract object models stored in database and implement these models in Java language.

  12. SuperB Muon Detector Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    The test objective is to optimize the muon identification in an experiment at a Super B Factory. To accomplish this, experimenters will study the muon identification capability of a detector with different iron configurations at different beam energies. The detector is a full scale prototype, composed of a stack of iron tiles. The segmentation of the iron allows the study of different configurations. Between the tiles, one or two extruded scintillator slabs can be inserted to test two different readout options; a Binary Readout and a Time Readout. In the Binary Readout option the two coordinates are given by the two orthogonal scintillator bars, and the spatial resolution is driven by the bar width. In the Time Readout option one coordinate is determined by the scintillator position and the other by the arrival time of the signal read with a TDC.

  13. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Spencer R.; Mikkelsen, Rune E.; Becker Tjus, Julia

    2013-12-20

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 10{sup 13} keV cm{sup –1}. At gradients above 1.6 keV cm{sup –1}, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  14. High luminosity muon scattering at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Bazizi, K. ); Conrad, J.; Fang, G. ); Erdmann, M. ); Geesaman, D.; Jackson, H. ); Guyot, C.; Virchaux, M. ); Holmgren, H. ); Malensek, A.; Melanson, H.; Morfin

    1990-02-01

    The charge of this group was to evaluate the physics that can be done with a high luminosity {mu} scattering experiment at FNAL using the upgraded Tevatron muon beam, and consider the apparatus required. In this report, the physics that can be accomplished with a high luminosity {mu} scattering experiment is evaluated. The CERN and FNAL {mu} beams are compared in the context of such an experiment. The expected muon flux with the upgraded machine is estimated. Two possible detectors are compared: the air-core toroid experiment proposed by Guyot et al., and an upgraded version of the E665 double-diode apparatus now in place at FNAL. The relative costs of the detectors are considered. A list of detailed questions that need to be answered regarding the double-diode experiment has be compiled. 2 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Lithium lenses based muon cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Valeri I. Balbekov

    2003-05-28

    A linear ionization cooling channel for neutrino factory or muon collider is considered. It includes short Li lenses, matching solenoids, and 201 MHz RF cavities. The basic challenge is a suppression of chromatic effects in a wide energy range typical for muon beams. A special lattice is proposed to reach this, and methodic of an optimization is developed to minimize the chromatic aberrations by suppression of several betatron resonances. The most engineering constraint is a high field of matching solenoids. A channel with less of 10 T field is considered in detail. It is capable to cool transverse emittance of a beam from 2-3 mm to 0.5 mm at the channel length of about 130 m. Because there is no emittance exchange, longitudinal emittance increases in the process from 10 to 20 mm at transmission of about 90%.

  16. Muon RLA - design status and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, K. B.; Bogacz, S. A.; Morozov, V. S.; Roblin, Y. R.

    2013-02-01

    The Neutrino Factory baseline design involves a complex chain of accelerators beginning with a linac. This first pre-linac follows the capture and bunching section and accelerates the muons from about 244 to 900 MeV and must accept a high emittance beam about 30 cm wide with a 10% energy spread. It uses counterwound, shielded superconducting solenoids and 201 MHz superconducting cavities, and currently consists of 24 3 m and 24 5 m long cryomodules. The next stage is a 1st dogbone-shaped RLA that takes the total energy from 900 MeV to 3.6 GeV in 4.5 passes, followed by a 2nd RLA that takes the energy from 3.6 to 12.6 GeV in 4.5 passes. Simulations are in progress to optimize the optics and determine the radiation loads from beam loss and muon decay.

  17. The muon g - 2 and degenerate supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debtosh; Patel, Ketan M.; Tata, Xerxes; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    2016-04-01

    A degenerate supersymmetric particle spectrum can escape constraints from flavor physics and at the same time evade limits from the direct searches. If such a spectrum is light enough, it can also account for the observed value of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Inspired by this, we consider a scenario where all the soft terms have approximately a common mass scale while allowing for small splittings. We study this scenario considering the constraints from Higgs mass, various B meson decays and the dark matter relic density. We find that, with superpartners ~ 800 - 1000 GeV, it is still possible to escape the present limits from the first run of LHC and flavor physics and can account for muon g - 2 within 2σ.

  18. Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

  19. Underground muons from Cygnus X-3

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    Underground detectors, intended for searches for nucleon decay and other rare processes, have recently begun searching for evidence of astrophysical sources, particularly Cygnus X-3, in the cosmic ray muons they record. Some evidence for signals from Cygnus X-3 has been reported. The underground observations are reported here in the context of previous (surface) observations of the source at high energies. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Recent results from COMPASS muon scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Capozza, Luigi [Irfu Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2012-10-23

    A sample of recent results in muon scattering measurements from the COMPASS experiment at CERN will be reviewed. These include high energy processes with longitudinally polarised proton and deuteron targets. High energy polarised measurements provide important constraints for studying the nucleon spin structure and thus permit to test the applicability of the theoretical framework of factorisation theorems and perturbative QCD. Specifically, latest results on longitudinal quark polarisation, quark helicity densities and gluon polarisation will be reviewed.

  1. Analytical calculation of muon intensities under deep sea-water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inazawa, H.; Kobayakawa, K.

    1985-01-01

    The study of the energy loss of high energy muons through different materials, such as rock and sea-water can cast light on characteristics of lepton interactions. There are less ambiguities for the values of atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) in sea-water than in rock. Muon intensities should be measured as fundamental data and as background data for searching the fluxes of neutrino. The average range energy relation in sea-water is derived. The correction factors due to the range fluctuation is also computed. By applying these results, the intensities deep under sea are converted from a given muon energy spectra at sea-level. The spectra of conventional muons from eta, K decays have sec theta enhancement. The spectrum of prompt muons from charmed particles is almost isotropic. The effect of prompt muons is examined.

  2. Seasonal modulations of the underground cosmic-ray muon energy

    SciTech Connect

    Malgin, A. S.

    2015-08-15

    The parameters of the seasonal modulations in the intensity of muons and cosmogenic neutrons generated by them at a mean muon energy of 280 GeV have been determined in the LVD (Large Volume Detector) experiment. The modulations of muons and neutrons are caused by a temperature effect, the seasonal temperature and density variations of the upper atmospheric layers. The analysis performed here leads to the conclusion that the variations in the mean energy of the muon flux are the main source of underground cosmogenic neutron variations, because the energy of muons is more sensitive to the temperature effect than their intensity. The parameters of the seasonal modulations in the mean energy of muons and the flux of cosmogenic neutrons at the LVD depth have been determined from the data obtained over seven years of LVD operation.

  3. SSC detector muon sub-system beam tests

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.; Errede, S.; Gauthier, A.; Haney, M.; Karliner, I.; Liss, T.; O`Halloran, T.; Sheldon, P.; Simiatis, V.; Thaler, J.; Wiss, J.; Green, D.; Martin, P.; Morfin, J.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A.; Okusawa, T.; Takahashi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Asano, Y.; Mann, T.; Davisson, R.; Liang, G.; Lubatti, H.; Wilkes, R.; Zhao, T.; Carlsmith, D.

    1993-08-01

    We propose to start a test-beam experiment at Fermilab studying the problems associated with tracking extremely high energy muons through absorbers. We anticipate that in this energy range the observation of the muons will be complicated by associated electromagnetic radiation Monte Carlo simulations of this background need to be tuned by direct observations. These beam tests are essential to determine important design parameters of a SSC muon detector, such as the choice of the tracking, geometry, hardware triggering schemes, the number of measuring stations, the amount of iron between measuring stations, etc. We intend to begin the first phase of this program in November of 1990 utilizing the Tevatron muon beam. We plan to measure the multiplicity, direction, and separation of secondary particles associated with the primary muon track as it emerges from an absorber. The second phase of beam test in 1992 or later will be a full scale test for the final design chosen in our muon subsystem proposal.

  4. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron

  5. Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Frederick

    2015-10-01

    A new experiment at Fermilab will measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon with a precision of 140 parts per billion (ppb). This measurement is motivated by the results of the Brookhaven E821 experiment that were first released more than a decade ago, which reached a precision of 540 ppb. As the corresponding Standard Model predictions have been refined, the experimental and theoretical values have persistently differed by about 3 standard deviations. If the Brookhaven result is confirmed at Fermilab with this improved precision, it will constitute definitive evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. The experiment observes the muon spin precession frequency in flight in a well-calibrated magnetic fi eld; the improvement in precision will require both 20 times as many recorded muon decay events as in E821 and a reduction by a factor of 3 in the systematic uncertainties. This paper describes the current experimental status as well as the plans for the upgraded magnet, detector and storage ring systems that are being prepared for the start of beam data collection in 2017.

  6. Next Generation Muon g-2 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, David W.

    2015-12-02

    I report on the progress of two new muon anomalous magnetic moment experiments, which are in advanced design and construction phases. The goal of Fermilab E989 is to reduce the experimental uncertainty of $a_\\mu$ from Brookhaven E821 by a factor of 4; that is, $\\delta a_\\mu \\sim 16 \\times 10^{-11}$, a relative uncertainty of 140~ppb. The method follows the same magic-momentum storage ring concept used at BNL, and pioneered previously at CERN, but muon beam preparation, storage ring internal hardware, field measuring equipment, and detector and electronics systems are all new or upgraded significantly. In contrast, J-PARC E34 will employ a novel approach based on injection of an ultra-cold, low-energy, muon beam injected into a small, but highly uniform magnet. Only a small magnetic focusing field is needed to maintain storage, which distinguishes it from CERN, BNL and Fermilab. E34 aims to roughly match the previous BNL precision in their Phase~1 installation.

  7. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  8. Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.; Alsharo'a, Mohammad; Hanlet, Pierrick M.; Hartline, Robert; Kuchnir, Moyses; Paul, Kevin; Roberts, Thomas J.; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Barzi, Emanuela; Del Frate, Licia; Gonin, Ivan; Moretti, Alfred; Neuffer, David; Popovic, Milorad; Romanov, Gennady; Turrioni, Daniele; Yarba, Victor; Beard, Kevin; Bogacz, S. Alex; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2006-03-20

    Eight new ideas are being developed under SBIR/STTR grants to cool muon beams for colliders, neutrino factories, and muon experiments. Analytical and simulation studies have confirmed that a six-dimensional (6D) cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas can provide effective beam cooling. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and helical sextupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange and achieve 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m segment. Four such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse physical dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost five orders of magnitude. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, then can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that can be used as MANX, an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  9. Next Generation Muon g - 2 Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzog, David W.

    2016-04-01

    I report on the progress of two new muon anomalous magnetic moment experiments, which are in advanced design and construction phases. The goal of Fermilab E989 is to reduce the experimental uncertainty of aμ from Brookhaven E821 by a factor of 4; that is, δaμ ˜ 16 × 10-11, a relative uncertainty of 140 ppb. The method follows the same magic-momentum storage ring concept used at BNL, and pioneered previously at CERN, but muon beam preparation, storage ring internal hardware, field measuring equipment, and detector and electronics systems are all new or upgraded significantly. In contrast, J-PARC E34 will employ a novel approach based on injection of an ultra-cold, low-energy, muon beam injected into a small, but highly uniform magnet. Only a small magnetic focusing field is needed to maintain storage, which distinguishes it from CERN, BNL and Fermilab. E34 aims to roughly match the previous BNL precision in their Phase 1 installation.

  10. Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rolland P. Johnson; Mohammad Alsharo'a; Charles Ankenbrandt; Emanuela Barzi; Kevin Beard; S. Alex Bogacz; Yaroslav Derbenev; Licia Del Frate; Ivan Gonin; Pierrick M. Hanlet; Robert Hartline; Daniel M. Kaplan; Moyses Kuchnir; Alfred Moretti; David Neuffer; Kevin Paul; Milorad Popovic; Thomas J. Roberts; Gennady Romanov; Daniele Turrioni; Victor Yarba; and Katsuya Yonehara

    2006-03-01

    Eight new ideas are being developed under SBIR/STTR grants to cool muon beams for colliders, neutrino factories, and muon experiments. Analytical and simulation studies have confirmed that a six-dimensional (6D) cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas can provide effective beam cooling. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and helical sextupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange and achieve 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m segment. Four such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse physical dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost five orders of magnitude. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, then can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that can be used as MANX, an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  11. Advances in Beam Cooling for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev

    2006-09-01

    A six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas is the basis for the latest plans for muon colliders. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields, where emittance exchange is achieved by using a continuous homogeneous absorber. Momentum-dependent path length differences in the dense hydrogen energy absorber provide the required correlation between momentum and ionization loss to accomplish longitudinal cooling. Recent studies of an 800 MHz RF cavity pressurized with hydrogen, as would be used in this application, show that the maximum gradient is not limited by a large external magnetic field, unlike vacuum cavities. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, will be employed to further reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that is being developed for an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment. The status of the designs, simulations, and tests of the cooling components for a high luminosity, low emittance muon collider will be reviewed.

  12. Applications of Cosmic Ray Muon Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardincerri, E.; Durham, J. M.; Morris, C. L.; Rowe, C. A.; Poulson, D. C.; Bacon, J. D.; Plaud-Ramos, K.; Morley, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Dome of Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence Cathedral, was built between 1420 and 1436 by architect Filippo Brunelleschi and it is now cracking under its own weight. Engineering efforts are underway to model the dome's structure and reinforce it against further deterioration. According to some scholars, Brunelleschi might have built reinforcement structures into the dome itself; however, the only confirmed known subsurface reinforcement is a chain of iron and stone around the dome's base. Tomography with cosmic ray muons is a non-destructive imaging method that can be used to image the interior of the wall and therefore ascertain the layout and status of any iron substructure in the dome. We will show the results from a muon tomography measurement of iron hidden in a mockup of the dome's wall performed at Los Alamos National Lab in 2015. The sensitivity of this technique, and the status of this project will be also discussed. At last, we will show results on muon attenuation radiography of larger shallow targets.

  13. The Muon Detector at the HERA-B experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiges, V.; Fominykh, B.; Khasanov, F.; Kvaratscheliia, T.; Laptin, L.; Tchoudakov, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Buchler, M.; Harr, R. F.; Karchin, P. E.; Nam, S.; Shiu, J. G.; Gilitsky, Yu.; Takach, S. F.

    2001-04-01

    The HERA-B experiment is designed to study beauty particle production and decay using the HERA 920 GeV proton beam interactions with an internal target. The Muon detector provides identification for muons having momenta greater than 5 GeV/c and triggering on the muon pair from J/ ψ decay. Three different chamber types are employed for operation in a high-rate environment. The overall design, performance and current status are discussed.

  14. Superconducting magnets for muon capture and phase rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Weggel, R.J.

    1999-07-26

    There are two key systems that must operate efficiently, in order for a muon collider to be a viable option for high energy physics. These systems are the muon production and collection system and the muon cooling system. Both systems require the use of high field superconducting solenoid magnets. This paper describes the supcrconducting solenoid system used for the capture and phase rotation of the pions that are produced on a target in a high intensity proton beam.

  15. Muons in Air Showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, M.

    We present measurements of muons in air showers at ultra-high energies with the Pierre Auger Observatory. The number of muons at the ground in air showers detected at large zenith angles is determined as a function of energy and the results are compared to air shower simulations. Furthermore, using data collected at zenith angles smaller than 60°, rescaling factors are derived that quantify the deficit of muon production in air shower simulations.

  16. RF system concepts for a muon cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.; Corlett, J.N.; Li, D.; Moretti, A.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B.; Zhao, Y.

    1998-06-01

    The feasibility of muon colliders for high energy physics experiments has been under intensive study for the past few years and recent activity has focused on defining an R and D program that would answer the critical issues. An especially critical issue is developing practical means of cooling the phase space of the muons once they have been produced and captured in a solenoidal magnetic transport channel. Concepts for the rf accelerating cavities of a muon cooling experiment are discussed.

  17. Jet production in muon scattering at Fermilab E665

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates from Muon-Nucleon and Muon-Nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates are defined by the JADE clustering algorithm. Rates in Muon-Nucleon deep-inelastic scattering are compared to Monte Carlo model predictions. Preliminary results from jet production on heavy targets, in the shadowing region, show a higher suppression of two-forward jets as compared to one-forward jet production.

  18. An OPERA-3D Model of Muon Injection in the Muon g - 2 Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallina, Lia

    2014-03-01

    The muon g - 2 experiment at Fermilab will measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon to 140 parts-per-billion. The modern experimental technique utilizes a superconducting storage ring to produce an extremely uniform magnetic field. Since the experimental systematic uncertainties scales with the non-uniformity of the magnetic field, care must be taken to minimize distortions to the field. The injection point of the muon beam into the storage ring requires special attention. In this talk, the experimental concept and the use of a superconducting inflector magnet at the injection point will be outlined. Our efforts to model this critical region in the electromagnetic simulation software, OPERA, will be described.

  19. Muon Bunching and Phase-Energy Rotation for a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuffer, David; Yoshikawa, Cary

    2008-04-01

    We have developed scenarios for capture, bunching and phase-energy rotation of muons from a proton source, using high-frequency rf systems. The method captures a maximal number of muons into a string of rf bunches with initial application in the neutrino factory design studies. For a muon collider, these bunches must be recombined for maximal luminosity, and our initial design produced a relatively long bunch train. In this paper we present more compact scenarios that obtain a smaller number of bunches, and, after some optimization, obtain cases that are better for both neutrino-factory and collider scenarios. We also consider further modification by incorporating hydrogen gas-filled rf cavities for bunching and cooling. We describe these examples and consider variations toward an optimal factory + collider scenario.

  20. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  1. Muon g-2 Calorimeter Prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Polly, Chris; /Fermilab

    2010-05-03

    The proposed design is a tungsten-scintillating fiber calorimeter with 35 segments, each read out by a separate PMT. Tungsten, which is significantly denser than lead, produces compact showers. This is necessary, in order to improve shower separation in analysis and to fully contain the showers within a calorimeter that satisfies the strict space constraints of the experiment. A single calorimeter segment (4 x 6 x 15 cm{sup 3}) has been constructed in order establish the feasibility of the new design and study its properties. Initial tests of the detector segment at the Paul Scherrer Institute were conducted with a low energy < 400 MeV/c electron beam. A higher-energy test with electrons up to a few GeV/c was performed at the Test Beam Facility under the experimental number T-967. All data from that test have been analyzed and published, and the tungsten-scintillating fiber calorimeter still appears to be a viable candidate. For this test beam run, a larger calorimeter (15 x 15 x 11 cm{sup 3}) has been constructed and an emphasis will be placed on understanding shower leakage and the ability to separate pileup events with a more granular readout. The experimenters will measure the energy resolution, linearity, and shower size of the calorimeter segment. This will provide important information for finalizing decisions on the angle of the fibers relative to the incoming electrons and the optimal granularity of the readout.

  2. Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Steven Derek

    2014-03-01

    The Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) is an operating deep underground research facility with six active projects, and greater than 50 trained researchers. KURF is 30 minutes from the Virginia Tech (VT) campus in an operating limestone mine with drive-in access (eg: roll-back truck, motor coach), over 50 miles of drifts (all 40' × 20 +' the current lab is 35' × 22' × 100'), and 1700' of overburden (1450m.w.e.). The laboratory was built in 2007 and offers fiber optic internet, LN2, 480/220/110 V power, ample water, filtered air, 55 F constant temp, low Rn levels, low rock background activity, and a muon flux of only ~0.004 muons per square meter, per second, per steradian. The current users are funded by NSF, DOE, and NNSA. Current user group: 1) mini-LENS (VT, Louisiana State University, BNL); 2) Double Beta Decay to Excited States (Duke University); 3) HPGe Low-Background Screening (University of North Carolina (UNC), VT); 4) MALBEK (UNC); 5&6) Watchman - 5) Radionuclide Detector and 6) MARS detector (LLNL, SNL, UC-Davis, UC-Berkeley, UH, Hawaii Pacific, UC-Irvine, VT).

  3. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  4. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  5. Multiple muons of conventional and exotic origin in DUMAND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grieder, K. F.

    1985-01-01

    A first summary of results from a theoretical analysis, based on hadron - muon cascade calculations, that yield relative intensities of very high energy multiple muons originating from ultra high energy interactions initiated by primary protons and iron nuclei in the atmosphere, under consideration of normal as well as direct and exotic production channels is presented. Lateral density distributions and target diagrams will be presented which show that only very large detectors, such as DUMAND, will be able to record multiple muons of conventional origin reliably. This, however, is a prerequisite for any primary mass determination based on multiple muon data.

  6. Asymmetry of Charge Ratio for Low Energetic Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrica, Bogdan

    2008-01-24

    The WILLI calorimeter, installed in NIPNE Bucharest, is operated since several years for measuring charge ratio of atmospheric muons at low energies (E<1 GeV), particularly exploring its directional dependence. Measurements of the muon flux are compared with Monte-Carlo simulation with CORSIKA code. Recently WILLI detector is proposed to get extended with a by mini-array of 12 scintillators (WILLI-EAS) in order to measure muon charge ratio of the muon density of EAS lateral distributions. Experimental studies of this kind could provide detailed information on the shower development under the influence of the geomagnetic field and also on features of the hadronic interaction.

  7. The Muon system of the run II D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Acharya, B.S.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Anosov, V.A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bardon, O.; Bartlett, J.F.; Baturitsky, M.A.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bodyagin, V.; Butler, J.M.; Cease, H.; Chi, E.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Diehl, H.T.; Doulas, S.; Dugad, S.R.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Tata Inst. /Dubna, JINR /Moscow, ITEP /Moscow State U. /Serpukhov, IHEP /St. Petersburg, INP /Arizona U. /Florida State U. /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U. /Indiana U. /Boston U. /Northeastern U. /Brookhaven /Washington U., Seattle /Minsk, Inst. Nucl. Problems

    2005-03-01

    The authors describe the design, construction and performance of the upgraded D0 muon system for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Significant improvements have been made to the major subsystems of the D0 muon detector: trigger scintillation counters, tracking detectors, and electronics. The Run II central muon detector has a new scintillation counter system inside the iron toroid and an improved scintillation counter system outside the iron toroid. In the forward region, new scintillation counter and tracking systems have been installed. Extensive shielding has been added in the forward region. A large fraction of the muon system electronics is also new.

  8. A COMPLETE SCHEME FOR IONIZATION COOLING FOR A MUON COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    PALMER,R.B.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; KIRK, H.G.; ALEXAHIN, Y.; NEUFFER, D.; KAHN, S.A.; SUMMERS, D.

    2007-06-25

    A complete scheme for production and cooling a muon beam for three specified muon colliders is presented. Parameters for these muon colliders are given. The scheme starts with the front end of a proposed neutrino factory that yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Emittance exchange cooling in slow helical lattices reduces the longitudinal emittance until it becomes possible to merge the trains into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in all dimensions is applied to the single bunches in further slow helical lattices. Final transverse cooling to the required parameters is achieved in 50 T solenoids using high TC superconductor at 4 K. Preliminary simulations of each element are presented.

  9. Muon SR Newsletter, No. 29, April 5, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, K.M.; Portis, A.M.; Yamazaki, T.

    1984-04-05

    Muon SR stands for Muon Spin Relaxation, Rotation, Resonance, Research, or what have you. The intention of the mnemonic acronym is to draw attention to the analogy with NMR and ESR, the range of whose applications is well known. Any study of the interactions of the muon spin by virtue of the asymmetric decay is considered ..mu..SR, but this definition is not intended to exclude any peripherally related phenomena, especially if relevant to the use of the muon's mganetic moment as a delicate probe of matter. Abstracts of individual items from this issue were prepared separately for the data base.

  10. The muon system of the Run II DØ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Acharya, B. S.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Anosov, V. A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bardon, O.; Bartlett, J. F.; Baturitsky, M. A.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bodyagin, V.; Butler, J. M.; Cease, H.; Chi, E.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Doulas, S.; Dugad, S. R.; Dvornikov, O. V.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Fortner, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Gershtein, Y.; Golovtsov, V.; Gómez, B.; Goodwin, R.; Gornushkin, Yu. A.; Green, D. R.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Haggerty, H.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hazen, E.; Hedin, D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Ito, A. S.; Jayanti, R.; Johns, K.; Jouravlev, N.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalmani, S. D.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirsch, N.; Komissarov, E. V.; Korablev, V. M.; Kostritsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, M.; Kravchuk, N. P.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Kuchinsky, N. A.; Kuleshov, S.; Kupco, A.; Larwill, M.; Leitner, R.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lubatti, H. J.; Machado, E.; Maity, M.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Marcus, M.; Marshall, T.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCroskey, R.; Merekov, Y. P.; Mikhailov, V. A.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Nagaraj, P.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nozdrin, A. A.; Oshinowo, B.; Parashar, N.; Parua, N.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Porokhovoi, S. Y.; Prokhorov, I. K.; Rao, M. V. S.; Raskowski, J.; Reddy, L. V.; Regan, T.; Rotolo, C.; Russakovich, N. A.; Sabirov, B. M.; Satyanarayana, B.; Scheglov, Y.; Schukin, A. A.; Shankar, H. C.; Shishkin, A. A.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Smith, G.; Smolek, K.; Soustruznik, K.; Stefanik, A.; Steinberg, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Stutte, L.; Temple, J.; Terentyev, N.; Teterin, V. V.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tompkins, D.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Vorobyov, A.; Vysotsky, V. B.; Willutzki, H.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Yamada, R.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yoffe, F.; Zanabria, M.; Zhao, T.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zvyagintsev, S. A.

    2005-11-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of the upgraded DØ muon system for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Significant improvements have been made to the major subsystems of the DØ muon detector: trigger scintillation counters, tracking detectors, and electronics. The Run II central muon detector has a new scintillation counter system inside the iron toroid and an improved scintillation counter system outside the iron toroid. In the forward region, new scintillation counter and tracking systems have been installed. Extensive shielding has been added in the forward region. A large fraction of the muon system electronics is also new.

  11. Measurement of cosmic-ray muons and muon-induced neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, S. C.; Chan, Y. L.; Chen, X. C.; Chu, M. C.; Cui, K. X.; Hahn, R. L.; Ho, T. H.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lau, Y. P.; Leung, J. K. C.; Leung, K. Y.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, Y. C.; Luk, K. B.; Luk, W. H.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngan, S. Y.; Pun, C. S. J.; Shih, K.; Tam, Y. H.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wang, C. H.; Wong, C. M.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, K. K.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, B. J.; Aberdeen Tunnel Experiment Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We have measured the muon flux and production rate of muon-induced neutrons at a depth of 611 m water equivalent. Our apparatus comprises three layers of crossed plastic scintillator hodoscopes for tracking the incident cosmic-ray muons and 760 L of a gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator for producing and detecting neutrons. The vertical muon intensity was measured to be Iμ=(5.7 ±0.6 )×10-6 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 . The yield of muon-induced neutrons in the liquid scintillator was determined to be Yn=(1.19 ±0.08 (stat)±0.21 (syst))×10-4 neutrons /(μ .g .cm-2 ) . A fit to the recently measured neutron yields at different depths gave a mean muon energy dependence of ⟨Eμ⟩ 0.76 ±0.03 for liquid-scintillator targets.

  12. Measurement of cosmic-ray muons and muon-induced neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel Underground Laboratory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yeh, M.; Chan, Y. L.; Chen, X. C.; Chu, M. C.; Cui, K. X.; Hahn, R. L.; Ho, T. H.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Kwan, K. K.; et al

    2016-04-07

    In this study, we have measured the muon flux and production rate of muon-induced neutrons at a depth of 611 m water equivalent. Our apparatus comprises three layers of crossed plastic scintillator hodoscopes for tracking the incident cosmic-ray muons and 760 L of a gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator for producing and detecting neutrons. The vertical muon intensity was measured to be Iμ = (5.7±0.6)×10–6 cm–2 s–1 sr–1. The yield of muon-induced neutrons in the liquid scintillator was determined to be Yn = (1.19 ± 0.08(stat) ± 0.21(syst)) × 10–4 neutrons/(μ•g•cm–2). A fit to the recently measured neutron yields at different depthsmore » gave a mean muon energy dependence of < Eμ >0.76±0.03 for liquid-scintillator targets.« less

  13. The application of the NeXus data format to ISIS muon data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flannery, D.; Cottrell, S. P.; King, P. J. C.

    2003-02-01

    The NeXus data format was originally developed as a common format for storing data collected during neutron and X-ray experiments. It is based on the freely available and widely used hierarchical data format (HDF) (a portable, binary and extensible format that is self-describing) and many general tools are already in existence to manipulate these files. This paper explores the use of NeXus as a data format for storing ISIS muon data files and considers its more general suitability as a common μSR file format for data storage. The design of the structure and content of the muon NeXus files will be considered and the implementation of a program to convert the present ISIS raw data format to the NeXus format discussed. Finally, plans for the future development of the NeXus data format as a method of storing μSR data will be considered.

  14. Design and performance simulation of a segmented-absorber based muon detection system for high energy heavy ion collision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Bhaduri, P. P.; Jahan, H.; Senger, A.; Adak, R.; Samanta, S.; Prakash, A.; Dey, K.; Lebedev, A.; Kryshen, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Senger, P.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Ghosh, S. K.; Raha, S.; Irfan, M.; Ahmad, N.; Farooq, M.; Singh, B.

    2015-03-01

    A muon detection system (MUCH) based on a novel concept using a segmented and instrumented absorber has been designed for high-energy heavy-ion collision experiments. The system consists of 6 hadron absorber blocks and 6 tracking detector triplets. Behind each absorber block a detector triplet is located which measures the tracks of charged particles traversing the absorber. The performance of such a system has been simulated for the CBM experiment at FAIR (Germany) that is scheduled to start taking data in heavy ion collisions in the beam energy range of 6-45 A GeV from 2019. The muon detection system is mounted downstream to a Silicon Tracking System (STS) that is located in a large aperture dipole magnet which provides momentum information of the charged particle tracks. The reconstructed tracks from the STS are to be matched to the hits measured by the muon detector triplets behind the absorber segments. This method allows the identification of muon tracks over a broad range of momenta including tracks of soft muons which do not pass through all the absorber layers. Pairs of oppositely charged muons identified by MUCH could therefore be combined to measure the invariant masses in a wide range starting from low mass vector mesons (LMVM) up to charmonia. The properties of the absorber (material, thickness, position) and of the tracking chambers (granularity, geometry) have been varied in simulations of heavy-ion collision events generated with the UrQMD generator and propagated through the setup using the GEANT3, the particle transport code. The tracks are reconstructed by a Cellular Automaton algorithm followed by a Kalman Filter. The simulations demonstrate that low mass vector mesons and charmonia can be clearly identified in central Au+Au collisions at beam energies provided by the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR).

  15. Density dependent stopping power and muon sticking in muon catalyzed D-T fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rafelski, H.E.; Mueller, B.

    1988-12-27

    The origin of the experimentally observed (1) density dependence of the muon alpha sticking fraction ..omega../sub s/ in muon catalyzed deuterium- tritium fusion is investigated. We show that the reactivation probability depends sensitively on the target stopping power at low ion velocities. The density dependence of the stopping power for a singly charged projectile in liquid heavy hydrogen is parametrized to simulate possible screening effects and a density dependent effective ionization potential. We find that, in principle, a description of the measured density dependence is possible, but the required parameters appear too large. Also, the discrepancy with observed (He..mu..) X-ray data widens.

  16. Studies on Muon Induction Acceleration and an Objective Lens Design for Transmission Muon Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artikova, Sayyora; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Naito, Fujio

    Muon acceleration will be accomplished by a set of induction cells, where each increases the energy of the muon beam by an increment of up to 30 kV. The cells are arranged in a linear way resulting in total accelerating voltage of 300 kV. Acceleration time in the linac is about hundred nanoseconds. Induction field calculation is based on an electrostatic approximation. Beam dynamics in the induction accelerator is investigated and final beam focusing on specimen is realized by designing a pole piece lens.

  17. The Muon Portal Project: A large-area tracking detector for muon tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggi, F.

    2016-05-01

    The Muon Portal Project [1] is a joint initiative between research and industrial partners, aimed at the construction of a real size detector protoype to search for hidden high-Z fissile materials inside containers by the muon scattering technique. The detector is based on a set of 48 detection modules (1 m × 3 m), so as to provide four X-Y detection planes, two placed above and two below the container to be inspected. After a research and development phase, which led to the choice and test of the individual components, the construction of the full size detector has already started and will be completed in a few months.

  18. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary project was approved by the DOE

  19. Measurement of muon g-2 and EDM with an ultra-cold muon beam at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mibe, Tsutomu; J-PARC g-2 Collaboration

    2011-09-01

    A new measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment ( g-2) and electric dipole moment (EDM) of the positive muon is proposed with a novel technique utilizing an ultra-cold muons accelerated to 300 MeV/c and a 66 cm-diameter compact muon storage ring without focusing-electric field. It requires an intense source of muonium to achieve the design intensity of the ultra-cold muon beam. Test experiments at TRIUMF aims to measure the muonium production rate as well as its space-time distribution in the vacuum for the development of the intense muonium source.

  20. Construction and Test of a Prototype Chamber for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, B.; Dubbert, J.; Kroha, H.; Loeben, J. v.; Schwegler, P.

    Monitored drift tube chambers are used as precision tracking detectors in the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC at CERN. These chambers provide a spatial resolution of 35 μm and a tracking efficiency of close to 100% up to background rates of 0.5 kHz/cm2, the former being limited at higher rates mainly due to space-charge effects and the latter due to the maximum drift time of 700 ns. For LHC upgrades, a faster drift tube chamber has been developed, using drift tubes with a diameter of 15 mm instead of 30 mm. The increased channel density and shorter drift time of about 200 ns raise the rate capability to about 10 kHz/cm2, while retaining the spatial resolution. A prototype chamber with trapezoidal shape consisting of 2 x 8 layers of 15 mm diameter drift tubes with an active surface of 0.8 m2 has been constructed. The prototype chamber has been tested at CERN with a 180 GeV muon beam at a SPS beam line and with cosmic ray muons at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at high γ radiation rates.

  1. Experimental Analysis of Gaseous Chambers for the ATLAS Muon sub-detector Upgrade R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Emmanuel; Wotschack, Joerg

    2011-11-01

    CERN, the world's largest particle accelerator facility, has begun its ambitious Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program which is and will remain as the world energy frontier until at least 2030. ATLAS, one of the LHC experiments designed to search for new physics, has been taking data for two years. ATLAS has been investigating the necessary changes to its sub-detectors to withstand much higher instantaneous luminosity and to operate after 3000 fb-1 of integrated data. The goal is to achieve the same or better performance (spatial resolution, etc.) despite the large increase in event rate and final integrated dose. The current ATLAS Muon sub-detector will not be able to handle the increased luminosity of a factor of ten. This makes it necessary to replace the current muon sub-detector by possible new gaseous chambers that push their performance to limits never tested before. This talk will focus on the different lab experiments performed at CERN, including a test beam run, and the exciting results on two of the latest chamber prototypes (R19M and R19G) developed by the ATLAS Muon detector upgrade R&D team. This is the research project the author did at CERN during summer 2011.

  2. Experimental Analysis of Gaseous Chambers for the ATLAS Muon sub-detector Upgrade R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Emmanuel

    2012-11-01

    CERN, the world's largest particle accelerator facility, has begun its ambitious Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program which is and will remain as the world energy frontier until at least 2030. ATLAS, one of the LHC experiments designed to search for new physics, has been taking data for two years. ATLAS has been investigating the necessary changes to its sub-detectors to withstand much higher instantaneous luminosity and to operate after 3000 fb-1 of integrated data. The goal is to achieve the same or better performance (spatial resolution, etc.) despite the large increase in event rate and final integrated dose. The current ATLAS Muon sub-detector will not be able to handle the increased luminosity of a factor of ten. This makes it necessary to replace the current muon sub-detector by possible new gaseous chambers that push their performance to limits never tested before. This talk will focus on the different lab experiments performed at CERN during the summers of 2011 and 2012, including functional uniformity results of a new ``T-series'' chamber design developed by the ATLAS Muon detector upgrade R&D team. As a result, a new visual mapping design was developed by the author that enabled an easier way to find anomalies in the chambers. This work has been presented to ATLAS Weekly Micromegas Meeting's 6 times during the summers of 2011 and 2012.

  3. Muon to electron conversion: how to find an electron in a muon haystack.

    PubMed

    Kurup, A

    2010-08-13

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics describes how the Universe works at a fundamental level. Even though this theory has proven to be very successful over the past 50 years, we know it is incomplete. Many theories that go beyond the SM predict the occurrence of certain processes that are forbidden by the SM, such as muon to electron conversion. This paper will briefly review the history of muon to electron conversion and focus on the high-precision experiments currently being proposed, COMET (Coherent Muon to Electron Transition) and Mu2e, and a next-generation experiment, PRISM. The PRISM experiment intends to use a novel type of accelerator called a fixed-field alternating-gradient (FFAG) accelerator. There has recently been renewed interest in FFAGs for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider, and because they have applications in many areas outside of particle physics, such as energy production and cancer therapy. The synergies between these particle physics experiments and other applications will also be discussed. PMID:20603374

  4. The g - 2 muon anomaly in di-muon production with the torsion in LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syromyatnikov, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    It was considered within the framework of the conformal gauge gravitational theory CGTG coupling of the standard model fermions to the axial torsion and preliminary discusses the impact of extra dimensions, in particular, in a five-dimensional space-time with Randall-Sundrum metric, where the fifth dimension is compactified on an S1/Z 2 orbifold, which as it turns out is conformally to the fifth dimension flat Euclidean space with permanent trace of torsion, with a compactification radius R in terms of the radius of a CGTG gravitational screening, through torsion in a process Z → μ+μ‑ and LHC data. In general, have come to the correct set of the conformal calibration curvature the Faddeev-Popov diagram technique type, that follows directly from dynamics. This leads to the effect of restrictions on neutral spin currents of gauge fields by helicity and the Regge’s form theory. The diagrams reveals the fact of opening of the fine spacetime structure in a process pp → γ/Z/T → μ+μ‑ with a center-of-mass energy of 14TeV, indicated by dotted lines and texture columns, as a result of p-p collision on 1.3 ṡ 10‑18cm scales from geometric shell gauge bosons of the SM continued by the heavy axial torsion resonance, and even by emerging from the inside into the outside of the ultra-light (freely-frozen in muon’s spin) axial torsion. We then evaluate the contribution of the torsion to the muon anomaly to derive new constraints on the torsion parameters. It was obtained that on the πN scattering through the exchange of axial torsion accounting, the nucleon anomalous magnetic moment in the eikonal phase leads to additive additives which is responsible for the spin-flip in the scattering process, the scattering amplitude is classical and characterized by a strong the torsion coupling ηT≅1. So the scattering of particles, occurs as on the Coulomb center with the charge fT This is the base model which is the g‑2 muon anomaly. The muon anomaly contribution

  5. Triple-GEM Detectors for the Innermost Region of the LHCb Muon Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Poli Lener, M

    2005-10-12

    We present in this paper the mechanical construction procedures, the tools and the relative quality check of a triple-GEM detector. This kind of detector is the result of R and D activity performed for the study of detectors for the hard radiation environment of the innermost region, around the beam pipe, of the first muon station of the LHCb experiment. We also present the performances of the chamber final design, operated with Ar/CO2/CF4 (45/15/40) gas mixture, obtained at PS beam facility at CERN.

  6. Muon energy reconstruction in the Antarctic muon and neutrino detector array (AMANDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miocinovic, Predrag

    AMANDA is an optical Cerenkov detector designed for observation of high-energy neutrinos (E ≳ 100 GeV) and is located deep inside the South Polar ice cap. The neutrinos that undergo charged-current interaction in or near the detector can be observed by the telltale Cerenkov light generated by the resulting lepton and its secondaries. The presence of insoluble particulates in the ice increases the light scattering, which in turn increases the light containment inside the detector. This enhances the light collection efficiency, allowing for a calorimetry-like measurement of energy deposited by the neutrino-induced leptons. In this work, I developed a probabilistic method for measuring the energy of non-contained muons detected by AMANDA-B10 (1997 configuration). The knowledge of muon energy opens a large window of discovery since it helps to determine whether the parent neutrino has a terrestrial or extraterrestrial origin. The method is based on finding the muon energy that will most likely produce the observed detector response. The energy likelihood is generated by combining the average light-emission profiles of muons with different energies and the models of light distribution in ice and detector response to light. Event reconstruction results in an energy resolution of ˜0.35 in log(E/GeV) over the 1 TeV--1 PeV range. Below 1 TeV, the light produced is insufficient to reliably determine the muon energy, while above 1 PeV, the AMANDA-B10 response to energy saturates, due to the finite detector size and limitations in its hardware. Stochastic variations in muon energy loss and photon propagation are the dominant sources that limit the reconstructed energy resolution. I showed that in such case, a Bayesian unfolding technique improves the reconstruction of the underlying muon energy spectrum. The unfolding also corrects for known systematic effects such as saturation, directional reconstruction bias, data "cleaning", and others. My analysis of 1997 data shows

  7. Helical channel design and technology for cooling of muon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K; Derbenev, Y.S.; Johnson, R.P.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-08-01

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  8. Helical Channel Design and Technology for Cooling of Muon Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonehara, K.; Derbenev, Y. S.; Johnson, R. P.

    2010-11-01

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  9. Muon Production in Relativistic Cosmic-Ray Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Spencer R.

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic-rays with energies up to 3×1020eV have been observed. The nuclear composition of these cosmic rays is unknown but if the incident nuclei are protons then the corresponding center of mass energy is s=700TeV. High energy muons can be used to probe the composition of these incident nuclei. The energy spectra of high-energy (>1TeV) cosmic ray induced muons have been measured with deep underground or under-ice detectors. These muons come from pion and kaon decays and from charm production in the atmosphere. Terrestrial experiments are most sensitive to far-forward muons so the production rates are sensitive to high-x partons in the incident nucleus and low-x partons in the nitrogen/oxygen targets. Muon measurements can complement the central-particle data collected at colliders. This paper will review muon production data and discuss some non-perturbative (soft) models that have been used to interpret the data. I will show measurements of TeV muon transverse momentum (p) spectra in cosmic-ray air showers from MACRO, and describe how the IceCube neutrino observatory and the proposed Km3Net detector will extend these measurements to a higher p region where perturbative QCD should apply. With a 1 km2 surface area, the full IceCube detector should observe hundreds of muons/year with p in the pQCD regime.

  10. Helical Channel Design and Technology for Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Derbenev, Y. S.; Johnson, R. P.

    2010-11-04

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  11. MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: Diagnostic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan D.; Hart, Terrence Lee; /IIT, Chicago

    2008-06-24

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment will make detailed measurements of muon ionization cooling using a new constructed low-energy muon beam at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The experiment is a single-particle experiment and utilizes many detector techniques from high energy physics experiments. To characterize and monitor the muon beamline, newly developed scintillating fiber profile monitors and scintillator paddle rate monitors are employed. In order to monitor the purity of the beam and tag the arrival time of individual muons, a dual aerogel Cherenkov system is used, and a plastic scintillator time-of-flight system will be used. The phase-space vectors of the muons will be measured by two identical spectrometer systems (one before and one after the cooling apparatus) which employ a fiber tracker system, and electron and muon calorimeters are used to tag outgoing muons. We will discuss the design of the MICE diagnostic systems, the operation, and give the first results from beam measurements in the MICE experimental hall.

  12. Study of atmospheric muons using a cosmic ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, S.; Bahmanabadi, M.; Purmohammad, D.

    2013-02-01

    The charge ratio of cosmic muons holds important information for both the atmospheric neutrino anomaly and hadronic interaction models. In this paper we measured the muon charge ratio (R_{\\mu }=N_{\\mu ^{+}}/N_{\\mu ^{-}}) in the cosmic ray flux in the momenta range 0.76-1.60 GeV/c by using a cosmic ray telescope. The delayed coincidence method is used based on the reduced mean lifetime of negative muons due to nuclear capture in matter. The systematic time-dependent effects of the muon charge ratio are considered by grouping the decay data into different time intervals. We compared the experimental data with the predictions of CORSIKA simulations using a high energy interaction model (QGSJET-II) and two low energy interaction models (UrQMD and GHEISHA) in the energy range 1011-1016 eV for primary particles. In addition, by considering the muon flux in different zenithal and azimuthal angles, the muon angular distribution is obtained as I(θ) = I(0)cos nθ with average n = 1.91 ± 0.07. Dependence of the muon flux on the azimuth angle (the East-West effect) is also observed, due to the influence of the geomagnetic field in particular on low energy muons.

  13. Characteristics of neutrons produced by muons in a standard rock

    SciTech Connect

    Malgin, A. S.

    2015-10-15

    Characteristics of cosmogenic neutrons, such as the yield, production rate, and flux, were determined for a standard rock. The dependences of these quantities on the standard-rock depth and on the average muon energy were obtained. These properties and dependences make it possible to estimate easy the muon-induced neutron background in underground laboratories for various chemical compositions of rock.

  14. Stochastic processes in muon ionization cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errede, D.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Johnstone, C. J.; Van Ginneken, A.

    2004-02-01

    A muon ionization cooling channel consists of three major components: the magnet optics, an acceleration cavity, and an energy absorber. The absorber of liquid hydrogen contained by thin aluminum windows is the only component which introduces stochastic processes into the otherwise deterministic acceleration system. The scattering dynamics of the transverse coordinates is described by Gaussian distributions. The asymmetric energy loss function is represented by the Vavilov distribution characterized by the minimum number of collisions necessary for a particle undergoing loss of the energy distribution average resulting from the Bethe-Bloch formula. Examples of the interplay between stochastic processes and deterministic beam dynamics are given.

  15. The forward muon detector of L3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alarcon, J.; Alberdi, J.; Alexandrov, V.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Anderhub, H.; Ariza, M.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakker, F.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barcala, J.; Becker, U.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Betev, B. L.; Biland, A.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borissov, V.; Bosseler, K.; Bouvier, Ph.; Brambilla, E.; Burger, J. D.; Burgos, C.; Buskens, J.; Carlier, J. C.; Carlino, G.; Casaus, J.; Cavallo, N.; Cerjak, I.; Cerrada, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, H. S.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Chvatchkine, V.; Daniel, M.; de Asmundis, R.; Decreuse, G.; Deiters, K.; Djambazov, L.; Duraffourg, P.; Erné, F. C.; Esser, H.; Ezekiev, S.; Faber, G.; Fabre, M.; Fernandez, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Fritschi, M.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Haller, Ch.; Herold, W. D.; Herrmann, J.; Hervé, A.; Hofer, H.; Hofer, H.; Hofer, M.; Hofer, T.; Homma, J.; Horisberger, U.; Horvath, I.; Ingenito, P.; Innocente, V.; Ioudine, I.; Jaspers, M.; de Jong, P.; Kaestli, W.; Kaspar, H.; Kitov, V.; König, A. C.; Koutsenko, V.; Lanzano, S.; Lapoint, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lecomte, P.; Lista, L.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, J. M.; Milesi, M.; Molinero, A.; Montero, A.; Moore, R.; Nahn, S.; Navarrete, J.; Okle, M.; Orlinov, I.; Ostojic, D.; Pandoulas, D.; Paolucci, P.; Parascandolo, P.; Passeggio, G.; Patricelli, S.; Peach, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pigni, L.; Postema, H.; Puras, C.; Ren, D.; Rewiersma, P.; Rietmeyer, A.; Riles, K.; Risco, J.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Roeser, U.; Romero, L.; van Rossum, W.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sassowsky, M.; Schegelsky, V.; Scholz, N.; Schultze, K.; Schuylenburg, H.; Sciacca, C.; Seiler, P. G.; Siedenburg, T.; Siedling, R.; Smith, B.; Soulimov, V.; Sudhakar, K.; Syben, O.; Tonutti, M.; Udovcic, A.; Ulbricht, J.; Veillet, L.; Vergain, M.; Viertel, G.; von Gunten, H. P.; Vorobyov, An. A.; Vrankovic, V.; de Waard, A.; Waldmeier-Wicki, S.; Wallraff, W.; Walter, H. C.; Wang, J. C.; Wei, Z. L.; Wetter, R.; Weverling, I.; Willmott, C.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wu, R. J.; Yang, K. S.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Y.; Zuang, H. L.

    1996-02-01

    The forward-backward muon detector of the L3 experiment is presented. Intended to be used for LEP 200 physics, it consists of 96 self-calibrating drift chambers of a new design enclosing the magnet pole pieces of the L3 solenoid. The pole pieces are toroidally magnetized to form two independent analyzing spectrometers. A novel trigger is provided by resistive plate counters attached to the drift chambers. Details about the design, construction and performance of the whole system are given together with results obtained during the 1995 running at LEP.

  16. Leptomeson contribution to the muon g -2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuridov, Dmitry

    2016-02-01

    Many models on the market allow for particles carrying both lepton number and color, e.g., leptoquarks and leptogluons. Some of the models with this feature can also accommodate color-singlet leptohadrons. We have found that the long-standing discrepancy between the experimental result and the Standard Model prediction for the muon anomalous magnetic moment can be explained by the effect of leptomesons with masses of a few hundred GeV and couplings to the leptons and mesons either of O (1 0-2) (vector-meson case) or of O (1 ) (scalar case). These new particles are testable at the current run of the LHC.

  17. Atmospheric effects on the underground muon intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, A. G.; Fenton, K. B.; Humble, J. E.; Hyland, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    It has previously been reported that the barometric pressure coefficient observed for muons at Poatina (vertical absorber depth 357 hg/sq cm) appears to be appreciably higher than would be expected from atmospheric absorption alone. There is a possibility that the effect is due to an upper atmospheric temperature effect arising from an inverse correlation of surface pressure with stratospheric temperature. A new proportional telescope is discussed which has been operating at Poatina since about the beginning of 83 and which has a long term stability suitable for studying variations of atmospheric origin.

  18. Noise reduction in muon tomography for detecting high density objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benettoni, M.; Bettella, G.; Bonomi, G.; Calvagno, G.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Cortelazzo, G.; Cossutta, L.; Donzella, A.; Furlan, M.; Gonella, F.; Pegoraro, M.; Rigoni Garola, A.; Ronchese, P.; Squarcia, S.; Subieta, M.; Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zanuttigh, P.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2013-12-01

    The muon tomography technique, based on multiple Coulomb scattering of cosmic ray muons, has been proposed as a tool to detect the presence of high density objects inside closed volumes. In this paper a new and innovative method is presented to handle the density fluctuations (noise) of reconstructed images, a well known problem of this technique. The effectiveness of our method is evaluated using experimental data obtained with a muon tomography prototype located at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The results reported in this paper, obtained with real cosmic ray data, show that with appropriate image filtering and muon momentum classification, the muon tomography technique can detect high density materials, such as lead, albeit surrounded by light or medium density material, in short times. A comparison with algorithms published in literature is also presented.

  19. Cosmic rays muon flux measurements at Belgrade shallow underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Veselinović, N. Dragić, A. Maletić, D. Joković, D. Savić, M. Banjanac, R. Udovičić, V. Aničin, I.

    2015-02-24

    The Belgrade underground laboratory is a shallow underground one, at 25 meters of water equivalent. It is dedicated to low-background spectroscopy and cosmic rays measurement. Its uniqueness is that it is composed of two parts, one above ground, the other bellow with identical sets of detectors and analyzing electronics thus creating opportunity to monitor simultaneously muon flux and ambient radiation. We investigate the possibility of utilizing measurements at the shallow depth for the study of muons, processes to which these muons are sensitive and processes induced by cosmic rays muons. For this purpose a series of simulations of muon generation and propagation is done, based on the CORSIKA air shower simulation package and GEANT4. Results show good agreement with other laboratories and cosmic rays stations.

  20. 6D Muon Ionization Cooling with an Inverse Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Bracker, S. B.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Palmer, R. B.

    2006-03-20

    A large admittance sector cyclotron filled with LiH wedges surrounded by helium or hydrogen gas is explored. Muons are cooled as they spiral adiabatically into a central swarm. As momentum approaches zero, the momentum spread also approaches zero. Long bunch trains coalesce. Energy loss is used to inject the muons into the outer rim of the cyclotron. The density of material in the cyclotron decreases adiabatically with radius. The sector cyclotron magnetic fields are transformed into an azimuthally symmetric magnetic bottle in the center. Helium gas is used to inhibit muonium formation by positive muons. Deuterium gas is used to allow captured negative muons to escape via the muon catalyzed fusion process. The presence of ionized gas in the center may automatically neutralize space charge. When a bunch train has coalesced into a central swarm, it is ejected axially with an electric kicker pulse.

  1. Improved limit on the muon electric dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G. W.; Brown, H. N.; Bunce, G.; Danby, G. T.; Larsen, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Meng, W.; Mi, J.; Morse, W. M.; Nikas, D.; Prigl, R.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Warburton, D.; Bousquet, B.; Cushman, P.; Duong, L.; Giron, S.; Kindem, J.; Kronkvist, I.; Qian, T.

    2009-09-01

    Three independent searches for an electric dipole moment (EDM) of the positive and negative muons have been performed, using spin precession data from the muon g-2 storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Details on the experimental apparatus and the three analyses are presented. Since the individual results on the positive and negative muons, as well as the combined result, d{sub {mu}}=(0.0{+-}0.9)x10{sup -19}e cm, are all consistent with zero, we set a new muon EDM limit, |d{sub {mu}}|<1.8x10{sup -19}e cm (95% C.L.). This represents a factor of 5 improvement over the previous best limit on the muon EDM.

  2. Screening of a positive muon by a semion gas

    SciTech Connect

    McMullen, T.; Jena, P.; Khanna, S.N. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-06-01

    {mu}SR is one of the experimental techniques used to search for manifestation of the broken T and P symmetries predicted by some theories of highly correlated electron systems. When T and P are broken, the screening of the positively charged muon by the electron system generates a magnetic field in addition to any intrinsic magnetic field that may be present. The authors estimate the magnetic field that is induced at a muon site when the muon is screened by the fractional statistics gas. In this paper, the value depends on the distance between the muon and the anyon plane, and a simple theoretical approach to the calculation of the minimum energy muon sites is outlined and some results for Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} are presented.

  3. Production of muons for fusion catalysis using a migma configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, George F.; Moir, Ralph W.

    1988-08-01

    Muon-catalyzed fusion requires a very efficient means of producing muons. We describe a muon-producing magnetic-mirror scheme with triton migma that may be more energy efficient than any heretofore proposed. If one could catalyze 200 fusions per muon and employ a uranium blanket that would multiply the neutron energy by a factor of 10, one might produce electricity with an overall plant efficiency (ratio of electric energy produced to nuclear energy released) approaching 30%. The self-colliding arrangement of triton orbits will result in many π-'s being produced near the axis of the magnetic mirror. The pions quickly decay into muons, which are transported into a small (few cm diameter) reactor chamber producing approximately 1 MW/m2 neutron flux on the chamber walls.

  4. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research - conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e{sup +}3{sup {minus}} linear colliders.

  5. Design and characterization of a small muon tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Woo Jin; An, Su Jung; Kim, Hyun-Il; Lee, Chae Young; Chung, Heejun; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Muon tomography is a useful method for monitoring special nuclear materials (SNMs) because it can provide effective information on the presence of high-Z materials, has a high enough energy to deeply penetrate large amounts of shielding, and does not lead to any health risks and danger above background. We developed a 2-D muon detector and designed a muon tomography system employing four detector modules. Two top and two bottom detectors are, respectively, employed to record the incident and the scattered muon trajectories. The detector module for the muon tomography system consists of a plastic scintillator, wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber arrays placed orthogonally on the top and the bottom of the scintillator, and a position-sensitive photomultiplier (PSPMT). The WLS fiber arrays absorb light photons emitted by the plastic scintillator and re-emit green lights guided to the PSPMT. The light distribution among the WLS fiber arrays determines the position of the muon interaction; consequently, 3-D tomographic images can be obtained by extracting the crossing points of the individual muon trajectories by using a point-of-closest-approach algorithm. The goal of this study is to optimize the design parameters of a muon tomography system by using the Geant4 code and to experimentally evaluate the performance of the prototype detector. Images obtained by the prototype detector with a 420-nm laser light source showed good agreement with the simulation results. This indicates that the proposed detector is feasible for use in a muon tomography system and can be used to verify the Z-discrimination capability of the muon tomography system.

  6. Study of the Production of Radioactive Isotopes through Cosmic Muon Spallation in KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    KamLAND Collaboration; Abe, S.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Busenitz, J.; Classen, T.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Leonard, D. S.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Gray, F.; Guardincerri, E.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Lendvai, C.; Luk, K.-B.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D. A.; Jillings, C.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Vogel, P.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Foster, J.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Dazeley, S.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2009-06-30

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare event detection in {nu} detectors, double-beta-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of {sup 11}C. Data from the Kamioka Liquid scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillator, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and Geant4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be (2.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -4} n/({mu} {center_dot} (g/cm{sup 2})). For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  7. Production of radioactive isotopes through cosmic muon spallation in KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.

    2010-02-15

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare-event detection in nu detectors, double-beta-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of {sup 11}C. Data from the Kamioka liquid-scintillator antineutrino detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillators, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and GEANT4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be Y{sub n}=(2.8+-0.3)x10{sup -4} mu{sup -1} g{sup -1} cm{sup 2}. For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  8. Fitting the annual modulation in DAMA with neutrons from muons and neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2014-08-22

    The DAMA/LIBRA experiment searches for evidence of dark matter scattering off nuclei. Data from DAMA show 9.2 σ evidence for an annual modulation, consistent with dark matter having a cross section around 2 × 10(-40) cm(2). However, this is excluded by other direct detection experiments. We propose an alternative source of annual modulation in the form of neutrons, which have been liberated from material surrounding the detector by a combination of (8)B solar neutrinos and atmospheric muons. The phase of the muon modulation lags 30 days behind the data; however, we show that adding the modulated neutrino component shifts the phase of the combined signal forward. In addition, we estimate that neutrinos and muons need ∼ 1000 m(3) of scattering material in order to generate enough neutrons to constitute the signal. With current data, our model gives as good a fit as dark matter, and we discuss prospects for future experiments to discriminate between the two. PMID:25192085

  9. The Search for Muon Neutrinos from Northern HemisphereGamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer; Achterberg, A.

    2007-05-08

    We present the results of the analysis of neutrino observations by the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) correlated with photon observations of more than 400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the Northern Hemisphere from 1997 to 2003. During this time period, AMANDA's effective collection area for muon neutrinos was larger than that of any other existing detector. Based on our observations of zero neutrinos during and immediately prior to the GRBs in the dataset, we set the most stringent upper limit on muon neutrino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts. Assuming a Waxman-Bahcall spectrum and incorporating all systematic uncertainties, our flux upper limit has a normalization at 1 PeV of E{sup 2}{Phi}{sub {nu}} {le} 6.0 x 10{sup -9} GeV cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}sr{sup -1}, with 90% of the events expected within the energy range of {approx}10 TeV to {approx}3 PeV. The impact of this limit on several theoretical models of GRBs is discussed, as well as the future potential for detection of GRBs by next generation neutrino telescopes. Finally, we briefly describe several modifications to this analysis in order to apply it to other types of transient point sources.

  10. The Search for Muon Neutrinos from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achterberg, A.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Ahrens, J.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bahcall, J. N.; Bai, X.; Baret, B.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Becka, T.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bolmont, J.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Braun, J.; Burgess, C.; Burgess, T.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Davour, A.; Day, C. T.; De Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Edwards, W. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Filimonov, K.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Gozzini, R.; Griesel, T.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, D.; Hardtke, R.; Hart, J. E.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hauschildt, T.; Hays, D.; Heise, J.; Helbing, K.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G. C.; Hodges, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hommez, B.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Hughey, B.; Hulth, P. O.; Hülss, J.-P.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Inaba, M.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Jones, A.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kawai, H.; Kelley, J. L.; Kitamura, N.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kuehn, K.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Leich, H.; Leier, D.; Liubarsky, I.; Lundberg, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McCauley, T.; McParland, C. P.; Meli, A.; Messarius, T.; Mészáros, P.; Miyamoto, H.; Mokhtarani, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morey, A.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Münich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Ögelman, H.; Olivas, A.; Patton, S.; Peña-Garay, C.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Pohl, A. C.; Porrata, R.; Pretz, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Razzaque, S.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Robbins, S.; Roth, P.; Rott, C.; Rutledge, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, A. J.; Solarz, M.; Song, C.; Sopher, J. E.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Steffen, P.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoufer, M. C.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sumner, T. J.; Taboada, I.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Tluczykont, M.; Toale, P. A.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Overloop, A.; Viscomi, V.; Voigt, B.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Waldmann, H.; Walter, M.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wendt, C.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zornoza, J. D.; Interplanetary Network, The

    2008-02-01

    We present the results of the analysis of neutrino observations by the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) correlated with photon observations of more than 400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the northern hemisphere from 1997 to 2003. During this time period, AMANDA's effective collection area for muon neutrinos was larger than that of any other existing detector. After the application of various selection criteria to our data, we expect ~1 neutrino event and <2 background events. Based on our observations of zero events during and immediately prior to the GRBs in the data set, we set the most stringent upper limit on muon neutrino emission correlated with GRBs. Assuming a Waxman-Bahcall spectrum and incorporating all systematic uncertainties, our flux upper limit has a normalization at 1 PeV of E2Φν <= 6.3 × 10-9 GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1, with 90% of the events expected within the energy range of ~10 TeV to ~3 PeV. The impact of this limit on several theoretical models of GRBs is discussed, as well as the future potential for detection of GRBs by next-generation neutrino telescopes. Finally, we briefly describe several modifications to this analysis in order to apply it to other types of transient point sources.

  11. The muon collider (Sandro`s snake)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-12-31

    This paper describes a feasibility study for the design of a muon collider. Recognized the fact that the particle lifetime increases linearly with the energy, we have adopted a scheme where steps of cooling and acceleration are entwined. We have indeed found convenient to accelerate the beam as fast as possible to increase its chances of survival, and necessary to dilute the action of cooling throughout the entire accelerating process to make it more effective and affordable. All acceleration and cooling steps are executed in a single pass essentially along a curvilinear and open path. We do not believe it is possible to handle the beam otherwise in circular and closed rings, as it has been proposed in the past. The example shown in this paper describes a muon collider at the energy of 250 GeV per beam and a luminosity of 4 {times} 10{sup 28} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. We have adopted an extrapolation of the stochastic cooling method for the reduction of the beam emittance.

  12. Geological investigation of Mars using muon radiography - Target selection and priorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, F.; Kedar, S.; Plaut, J.; Jones, C.; Naudet, C.

    2012-04-01

    Muon radiography has the potential to reveal the interior structure of a number of geological features on the surface of Mars, addressing key questions in geologic history, climate, biologic potential and the nature of current activity. Among the targets are caves and caverns, glacial and periglacial features such as putative pingoes - ice-cored mounds formed by the freezing of pressurized groundwater, and mid-latitude ice-masses ("lobate debris aprons") that have been penetrated by sounding radar and likely represent remnants of glaciers from a different climate epoch. Another possible target class is mesas in so-called "chaos" regions that were the source of massive outflow water floods and may currently contain confined aquifers. Volcanic structures have been imaged with the technique on Earth, and numerous features on Mars are potential targets, including small volcanic edifices associated with recent platy lava flows of Elysium Planitia that may suggest ongoing activity. We will discuss the merits of each of these classes of geological targets and their alignment with NASA's long-term priorities and missions for the exploration of Mars outlined in NASA's Planetary Science Decadal Survey and Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group report. We will also discuss the challenges and advantages that each class of targets poses to a muon radiography mission, their suitability for a rover versus a lander mission, and constraints they impose on mass, power, and mission operations. Particular attention will be paid to using muon radiography as a potential precursory mission to identify and characterize subsurface environments for future in situ life-seeking missions, and to a scenario in which muon radiography is a secondary payload on a NASA Discovery Mars lander mission.

  13. Measurement of the magnetic moment of the positive muon by a stroboscopic muon-spin-rotation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Klempt, E.; Schulze, R.; Wolf, H.; Camani, M.; Gygax, F.N.; Rueegg, W.; Schenck, A.; Schilling, H.

    1982-02-01

    A new determination of the magnetic moment of the positive muon in units of the magnetic moment of the proton is presented. The Larmor precession of positive muons in liquid bromine was observed by a stroboscopic technique in a field of 0.75 T and combined with concomitant proton NMR measurements in the same chemical environment. The stroboscopic method allows use of the full muon stopping rate available at the Schweizerisches Institut fuer Nuklearforschung (SIN) muon channel. Moreover, it permits an intrinsically precise determination of muon Larmor frequency and proton NMR frequency measuring the magnetic field by comparison with the stable reference frequency of the SIN accelerator (..delta cap omega../..cap omega..roughly-equal10/sup -8/). Two different bromine targets were used which allowed an unambiguous determination of the chemical field shift experienced by the muons. One target contained pure and water-free liquid bromine (Br/sub 2/), where stopped muons form (..mu../sup +/e/sup -/)Br molecules. The other target was slightly contaminated with water; there a chemical reaction chain places the muons into (..mu../sup +/e/sup -/)HO molecules. The diamagnetic shielding of protons in the analogous molecules HBr and H/sub 2/O in liquid bromine was measured by high-resolution NMR. Values for the isotopic shift of the diamagnetic shielding, when protons are replaced by muons, are available from quantum chemical calculations. After application of the chemical-shift corrections, the results from the two different bromine targets are consistent. The final result is ..mu../sub ..mu..//..mu../sub p/ = 3.183 344 1(17) (or +- 0.53 ppm). This value agrees with other recent precision determinations of ..mu../sub ..mu..//..mu../sub p/. For the muon mass the present result implies m/sub ..mu..//m/sub e/ = 206.768 35(11) ( +- 0.53 ppm).

  14. High energy muon induced radioactive nuclides in nickel plate and its use for 2-D muon-beam image profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurebayashi, Y.; Sakurai, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Doshita, N.; Kikuchi, S.; Tokanai, F.; Horiuchi, K.; Tajima, Y.; Oe, T.; Sato, T.; Gunji, S.; Inui, E.; Kondo, K.; Iwata, N.; Sasaki, N.; Matsuzaki, H.; Kunieda, S.

    2015-11-01

    Target materials were exposed to a muon beam with an energy of 160 GeV/c at the COMPASS experiment line in CERN-SPS to measure the production cross-sections for muon-induced radionuclides. A muon imager containing four nickel plates, each measuring 100 mm×100 mm, exposed to the IP plate successfully detected the muon beam image during an irradiation period of 33 days. The contrasting density rate of the nickel plate was (5.2±0.7)×10-9 PSL/muon per one-day exposure to IP. The image measured 122 mm and 174 mm in horizontal and vertical lengths, respectively, in relation to the surface of the base, indicating that 50±6% of the muon beam flux is confined to an area of 18% of the whole muon beam. The number of muons estimated from the PSL value in the total beam image area (0.81±0.1)×1013 was comparable to the total muon counts of the ion-chamber at the M2 beam line in the CERN-SPS. The production cross-sections of Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-58 in nickel were 0.19±0.08, 0.34±0.06, 0.5±0.05, 3.44±0.07, 0.4±0.03 in the unit of mb, respectively, reducing muon associated particles effects. They are approximately 10 times smaller than that a proceeding study by Heisinger et al.

  15. Meeting the State's Future Needs through a Competitive Higher Education Facility and Technology Infrastructure. Second Report on the Condition of Higher Education in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The First Condition Report provided policymakers and the general public a snapshot of where Ohio stands in providing the higher education services Ohio needs to be competitive in today's world. This Second Report focuses on facilities and technology. Five questions form the core of The Condition Report. These are: (1) Are Ohio's higher education…

  16. Towards a compensatable Muon Collider calorimeter with manageable backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-04-01

    Muon Collider detectors pose very challenging problems in detector technology due to extremely large backgrounds present in the detector volume as a result of muon decays. Current designs of a 750 GeV/c per beam Muon Collider envisage 4.28 x 10{sup 5} muon decays per meter in the beam pipe close to the interaction region. The decay electrons after intense shielding still manage to produce large backgrounds in the detector volume of low energy photons, neutrons and higher energy Bethe Heitler muons. There are 170/184/6.8/177 TeVs energy entering the detector volume per crossing due to EM particles/Muons/Mesons/Baryons respectively. We investigate the capabilities of an iron calorimeter with pixelated readout where each pixel gives a yes/no answer as to whether a charged particle passed through it or not, to solve this problem. Each pixel is individually triggered by a 'travelling gate trigger' with a gate of 2 ns where the beginning of the gate is the time of arrival of a light signal from the interaction region to the pixel. We show that such a calorimeter is compensatable and propose two schemes to compensate the digital output in software to improve the resolution of the calorimeter. We show that such a calorimeter is capable of digitizing physics signals from the interaction region and as a result, the backgrounds from the muon decays are much reduced and under control.

  17. Feasibility of using backscattered muons for archeological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Use of nondestructive methods to accurately locate and characterize underground objects such as rooms and tools found at archeological sites is ideal to preserve these historic sites. High-energy cosmic ray muons are very sensitive to density variation and have been used to image volcanoes and archeological sites such as the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids. Muons are subatomic particles produced in the upper atmosphere that penetrate the earth's crust up to few kilometers. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and the detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, muon tomography can resolve features to the sub-meter scale making it useful for this type of work. However, the muon detector must be placed below the target of interest. For imaging volcanoes, the upper portion is imaged when the detector is placed on the earth's surface at the volcano's base. For sites of interest beneath the ground surface, the muon detector would need to be placed below the site in a tunnel or borehole. Placing the detector underground can be costly and may disturb the historical site. We will assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upward traveling muons, to eliminate the current constraint of positioning the detector below the target. This work consists of three parts 1) determine the backscattered flux rate from theory, 2) distinguish backscattered from forward scattered muons at the detector, and 3) validate the theoretical results with field experimentation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Where to place the positive muon in the Periodic Table?

    PubMed

    Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2015-03-14

    In a recent study it was suggested that the positively charged muon is capable of forming its own "atoms in molecules" (AIM) in the muonic hydrogen-like molecules, composed of two electrons, a muon and one of the hydrogen's isotopes, thus deserves to be placed in the Periodic Table [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, 16, 6602]. In the present report, the capacity of the positively charged muon in forming its own AIM is considered in a large set of molecules replacing muons with all protons in the hydrides of the second and third rows of the Periodic Table. Accordingly, in a comparative study the wavefunctions of both sets of hydrides and their muonic congeners are first derived beyond the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) paradigm, assuming protons and muons as quantum waves instead of clamped particles. Then, the non-BO wavefunctions are used to derive the AIM structures of both hydrides and muonic congeners within the context of the multi-component quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The results of the analysis demonstrate that muons are generally capable of forming their own atomic basins and the properties of these basins are not fundamentally different from those AIM containing protons. Particularly, the bonding modes in the muonic species seem to be qualitatively similar to their congener hydrides and no new bonding model is required to describe the bonding of muons to a diverse set of neighboring atoms. All in all, the positively charged muon is similar to a proton from the structural and bonding viewpoint and deserves to be placed in the same box of hydrogen in the Periodic Table. This conclusion is in line with a large body of studies on the chemical kinetics of the muonic molecules portraying the positively charged muon as a lighter isotope of hydrogen. PMID:25684734

  19. An experiment of muon radiography at Mt Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Gibert, Dominique; Marteau, Jacques; Diament, Michel; Zuccarello, Luciano; Galichet, Emmanuelle

    2014-02-01

    Interactions of conduit geometry with gas-liquid flows control volcanic activity, implying that the evaluation of volcanic hazards requires quantitative understanding of the inner structure of the volcano. The more established geophysical imaging techniques suffer from inherent ambiguity, may require spatially dense measurements in active areas and may not provide sufficient spatial resolution in the uppermost part of the conduit system. It is thus desirable to develop new imaging techniques allowing a better spatial resolution of a volcano's upper feeding system, with reduced ambiguity and a low level of risk for operators. Muon particles can be utilized to image the internal density distribution of volcanic structures. The principle of muon radiography is essentially the same as X-ray radiography, except for substituting penetrating particles in place of photons. Muons are more attenuated by higher density parts inside the target and thus information about its inner structure are obtained from the differential muon absorption. We report on a muon-imaging experiment that was conducted at Mt Etna in 2010. The target structure was one of the summit craters of the volcano. This experiment was performed using a muon telescope suitably designed to withstand the harsh conditions in the summit zone of a high volcano. We found a marked difference between synthetic and observed attenuation of muons through the target. This discrepancy is likely due to the bias on the observed flux, arising from false muon tracks. They are caused by low-energy particles that, by chance, hit simultaneously the two matrixes of the telescope, leading to detection of a false positive. We separated the useful from the unwanted signal through a first-order model of the background noise. The resulting signal is compared with the corresponding synthetic flux. Eventually, we found regions of higher- and lower-than-expected muon flux, that are possibly related to inner features of the target crater.

  20. Muon g - 2 in the aligned two Higgs doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Kang, Sin Kyu; Sayre, Joshua

    2016-02-01

    We study the Two-Higgs-Doublet Model with the aligned Yukawa sector (A2HDM) in light of the observed excess measured in the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We take into account the existing theoretical and experimental constraints with up-to-date values and demonstrate that a phenomenologically interesting region of parameter space exists. With a detailed parameter scan, we show a much larger region of viable parameter space in this model beyond the limiting case Type X 2HDM as obtained before. It features the existence of light scalar states with masses 3 GeV ≲ m H ≲ 50 GeV, or 10 GeV ≲ m A ≲ 130 GeV, with enhanced couplings to tau leptons. The charged Higgs boson is typically heavier, with 200 GeV ≲ m H + ≲ 630 GeV. The surviving parameter space is forced into the CP-conserving limit by EDM constraints. Some Standard Model observables may be significantly modified, including a possible new decay mode of the SMlike Higgs boson to four taus. We comment on future measurements and direct searches for those effects at the LHC as tests of the model.