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1

Inspiring Future Scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In an integrated science/language arts/technology unit called "How Scientists Learn," students researched famous scientists from the past and cutting-edge modern-day scientists. Using biography trade books and the internet, students collected and recorded data on charts, summarized important information, and inferred meaning from text. Then they compared their own methods of learning with those of scientists past and present. The results? The students discovered that anyone can be a scientist! Researching "how scientists learn" proved to be incredibly motivating to students and truly inspired them to consider science careers. This article describes their investigations during the six-day unit.

Betteley, Pat; Jr., Richard E.

2009-04-01

2

Physics for Scientists and Engineers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This companion website to the book "Physics for Scientists and Engineers" by Serway, Beichner, and Jewett is intended mainly for student use. It includes items such as background reviews, tutorials, solutions, and supplemental readings.

Serway, Raymond A.; Beichner, Robert J.; Jewett, John W.

2003-12-05

3

Mathematical Education for Scientists and Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mathematical education for scientists and engineers is defined as including not only the education required to understand currently accepted theories, but also the mathematical background which may become useful in future research. This broader requirement is confronted with the dilemma that the professional academic mathematicians emphasize the axiomatic and rigorously deductive aspects of their work. On the other hand, it

Hyman Serbin

1966-01-01

4

Looking out for future scientists  

PubMed Central

Proposals to reduce the number of students who do PhDs are misguided, writes Eve Marder, because they would exclude young scientists with qualities that do not show up in exam results and interviews. PMID:25291257

2014-01-01

5

Looking out for future scientists.  

PubMed

Proposals to reduce the number of students who do PhDs are misguided, writes Eve Marder, because they would exclude young scientists with qualities that do not show up in exam results and interviews. PMID:25291257

Marder, Eve

2014-01-01

6

How Middle Schoolers Draw Engineers and Scientists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The perceptions young students have of engineers and scientists are often populated with misconceptions and stereotypes. Although the perceptions that young people have of engineers and of scientists have been investigated separately, they have not been systematically compared. The research reported in this paper explores the question "How are…

Fralick, Bethany; Kearn, Jennifer; Thompson, Stephen; Lyons, Jed

2009-01-01

7

NASA Space Science Days: An Out of School Program Using National Partnerships to Further Influence Future Scientists and Engineers.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Math and Science Initiative states that American students are falling behind in the essential subjects of math and science, putting our position in the global economy at risk a foreboding statement that has caused the U.S. to re-evaluate how we view STEM education. Developing science and engineering related out of school programs that expose middle school students to math and science in a nontraditional university environment has the potential to motivate young students to look at the physical sciences in an exciting out of the norm environment.

Galindo, Charles; Allen, Jaclyn; Garcia, Javier; Hrrera, Stephanie

2012-01-01

8

Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1995 Profile  

NSF Publications Database

... United States: 1995 Profile Hypertext Format Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States ... Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States series are available on the publication ...

9

Gender Differences in the Careers of Academic Scientists and Engineers  

NSF Publications Database

... Gender Differences in the Careers of Academic Scientists and Engineers Hypertext Format Gender ... Differences in the Careers of Academic Scientists and Engineers Portable Document Format (.pdf ...

10

Future Climate Engineering Solutions  

E-print Network

Future Climate Engineering Solutions Joint report 13 engineering participating engeneering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Engineering Solutions ­ A Climate call from engineers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Summaries of National Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Summary of The Climate Plan

11

Communicating Science: Tools for Scientists and Engineers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scientists and engineers who foster information-sharing and respect between science and the public are essential for the public communication of and engagement with science. Although traditional scientific training typically does not prepare scientists and engineers to be effective communicators outside of academia, funding agencies are increasingly encouraging researchers to extend beyond peer-reviewed publishing and communicate their results directly to the greater public.Includes links to webinars, how-to tips for media interviews, strategies for identifying public outreach opportunities, and more.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS;)

2008-07-07

12

Emeritus Scientists, Mathematicians and Engineers (ESME) program  

SciTech Connect

The Emeritus Scientists, Mathematicians and Engineers (ESME) program matches retired scientists and engineers with wide experience with elementary school children in order to fuel the children's natural curiosity about the world in which they live. The long-range goal is to encourage students to maintain the high level of mathematical and science capability that they exhibit at an early age by introducing them to the fun and excitement of the world of scientific investigation and engineering problem solving. Components of the ESME program are the emeriti, established teacher-emeriti teams that work to produce a unit of 6 class hours of demonstration or hands-on experiments, and the encounter by students with the world of science/engineering through the classroom sessions and a field trip to a nearby plant or laboratory.

Sharlin, H.I.

1992-09-01

13

SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS STATISTICAL DATA SYSTEM (SESTAT)  

EPA Science Inventory

SESTAT is a comprehensive and integrated system of information about the employment, educational, and demographic characteristics of scientists and engineers (S&E) in the United States. In concept it covers those with a bachelor's degree or higher who either work in or are educat...

14

Scientist and Engineer Shortage: Myth or Reality?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With clockwork regularity, the real or perceived shortage of scientists and engineers in the US pops up as a topic of debate in academic and industry circles. Discussions of an imminent shortage have deep impact for education, career prospects, immigration, and "The American Dream." The purpose of this article is twofold. First, it poses a…

Post, Jan F.

2006-01-01

15

Modern Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recommends a change in the way mathematics is taught to engineers and scientists. Espouses a shift away from traditional methods to an approach that makes significant use of algebra packages. Suggests that teaching the language comprised of the notation and grammar of mathematics would be of more use and more accessible than focusing entirely on…

Ward, J. P.

2003-01-01

16

Differential forms for scientists and engineers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper is a review of a number of mathematical concepts from differential geometry and exterior calculus that are finding increasing application in the numerical solution of partial differential equations. The objective of the paper is to introduce the scientist/ engineer to some of these ideas via a number of concrete examples in 2, 3, and 4 dimensions. The goal is not to explain these ideas with mathematical precision but to present concrete examples and enable a physical intuition of these concepts for those who are not mathematicians. The objective of this paper is to provide enough context so that scientist/engineers can interpret, implement, and understand other works which use these elegant mathematical concepts.

Blair Perot, J.; Zusi, Christopher J.

2014-01-01

17

Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians in the United States: 1998  

NSF Publications Database

... Engineers, and Technicians in the United States: 1998 Detailed Statistical Tables Hypertext Format ... Technicians in the United States: 1998 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Scientists, Engineers, and ...

18

How to teach basic quantum mechanics to computer scientists and electrical engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of the rapid development of quantum computation and of quantum technologies in general, computer scientists and electrical engineers will have to learn quantum mechanics (QM) in the near future. Although the teaching methods of QM are well established in both undergraduate and graduate physics courses, an effective method for teaching QM to computer scientists and electrical engineers is still

Bernardo Cuenca Grau

2004-01-01

19

Engineers Week: Future City  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Engineers Week Future City Competition provides âÂÂa fun and exciting educational engineering program for seventh- and eighth-grade students that combines a stimulating engineering challenge with a âÂÂhands-onâ application to present their vision of a city of the future.â The competition is intended to foster engineering skills, such as teamwork, communication and problem solving skills, as well as to inspire students to explore future careers in engineering. Using the commercial software SIMCITY to design their ideal city, students interact with each other, and with teachers and engineer mentors and also learn about the multi-disciplines within the engineering profession. The website has more information about the competition, as well as a handbook providing helpful tips and techniques. Examples of accomplishments from previous competitions are posted and CD-ROM video is available from regional coordinators to give more background on the competition.

20

Business planning for scientists and engineers  

SciTech Connect

Business Planning for Scientists and Engineers is a combination text/workbook intended for use by individuals and firms having received Phase II SBIR funding (Small Business Innovation Research). It is used to best advantage in combination with other aspects of the Commercialization Assistance Project developed by Dawnbreaker for the US Department of Energy. Although there are many books on the market which indicate the desired contents of a business plan, there are none which clearly indicate how to find the needed information. This book focuses on the how of business planning: how to find the needed information; how to keep yourself honest about the market potential; how to develop the plan; how to sell and use the plan.

Servo, J.C.; Hauler, P.D.

1992-03-01

21

Young Engineers and Scientists: a Mentorship Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Program is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and local high schools in San Antonio Texas (USA). It provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real-world research experiences in physical sciences and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics computers and the Internet careers science ethics and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year; and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year students publicly present and display their work acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has been highly successful during the past 10 years. All YES graduates have entered college several have worked for SwRI and three scientific publications have resulted. Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors.

Boice, Daniel C.; Wuest, Martin; Marilyn, Koch B.

22

The Young Engineers and Scientists Mentorship Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Program is a ommunity partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA). It provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real-world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science and astronomy) and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year; and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has been highly successful during the past 10 years. All YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, and three scientific publications have resulted. Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors. We gratefully acknowledge partial funding for the YES Program from a NASA EPO grant.

Boice, D. C.; Jahn, J.; Hummel, P.

2003-12-01

23

Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians in Trade and Regulated Industries: 1994  

NSF Publications Database

... Industries: 1994 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians in Trade ... in hypertext and Portable Document Format (.pdf). See Help for more information about viewing ...

24

Researchers Dispute Notion that America Lacks Scientists and Engineers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers who track the American labor market told Congress last week that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the United States has more than enough scientists and engineers and that federal agencies and universities should reform the way they train young scientists to better match the supply of scientists with the demand for researchers. At a…

Monastersky, Richard

2007-01-01

25

Women Scientists and Engineers Employed in Industry: Why So Few.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The conference provided a forum for women scientists and engineers to share data and personal experiences to uncover the principal causes of underrepresentation of scientific and engineering (S&E) women in industry and to explore effective strategies for ...

1994-01-01

26

The Secret Life of Scientists & Engineers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The website that accompanies PBS's NOVA television series is called NOVA Science Now, and it offers many fun and engaging ways to better understand science and scientists. The Secret Life of Scientists is a web-exclusive series from NOVA which helps the public understand how and why scientists study what they do as well as "what happens when the lab coats come off." Sixteen scientists are currently highlighted on the site, and visitors can visit each scientist's videos and blog posts, as well as ask a question of any of the scientists. Scrolling over the pictures of each of the scientists reveals the scientific area they work in, as well as what they do in their secret life. One of the scientists is Adrienne Block, an African-American geologist who has spent time in the Antarctic and playing the bassoon is "her secret", while Geologist Alexandra Bowman "secret" is performing Native American dance. Overall, the site is an interesting and entertaining look into the lives of scientists.

27

The Master of Engineering Administration Degree provides practicing engineers, scientists and other technical professionals with  

E-print Network

and mathematical methods. A variety of practical graduate level courses in engineering administration, technologyThe Master of Engineering Administration Degree provides practicing engineers, scientists and other management, industrial and systems engineering, business and operations management is available to qualified

Virginia Tech

28

When Software Engineers Met Research Scientists: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a case study of software engineers developing a library of software components for a group of research scientists, using a traditional, staged, document-led methodology. The case study reveals two problems with the use of the methodology. The first is that it demands an upfront articulation of require- ments, whereas the scientists had experience, and hence expectations, of

Judith Segal; Marvin Zelkowitz

2005-01-01

29

A systems engineering primer for every engineer and scientist  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Engineering (SE) staff at LBNL has generated the following artifacts to assist projects with implementing a systems approach: (1) The present document that focuses on the what, why, and when of SE. It also provides a simple case-study to illustrate several SE tasks. (2) A web site with primary emphasis on the project life-cycle and workflow, (http://www-eng.LBNL.gov/Systems/index.html). It includes: SE guidelines and principles; A list of in-house tools; Templates; Case studies with ''how to'' examples; and Links to useful SE material. These sources are living documents to be updated as necessary. The viewpoint adopted in this document is that what LBNL engineers and scientists need is a set of principles and guiding practices for developing R and D systems rather than a ''cookbook''. There are many excellent ''how to'' resources such as the ''INCOSE Systems Engineering Handbook'' to guide those in search of more details. The SE staff is another resource available to consult and support projects. This document specifies SE principles and activities that are applicable to all LBNL projects independent of their specific differences. Each project should tailor the SE implementation to meet its individual needs and culture including project-specific resources, procedures, products, and tools.

Edwards, William R.

2001-12-10

30

Training scientists and engineers for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a transcript of testimony by Alvin W. Trivelpiece, director of ORNL, before Congressional Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space. Dr. Trivelpiece discusses the importance of training scientist and engineers for the year 2000. (FSD)

Trivelpiece, A.W.

1990-05-08

31

Computer Interfacing: An Undergraduate Course for Scientists and Engineers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is an undergraduate course of computer interfacing for scientists and engineers which incorporates the use of digital computers and associated interfacing elements with experiments and special projects performed in an on-line environment in the laboratory. (SL)

Peters, Philip B.; Settle, Frank A.

1976-01-01

32

An Effective Faculty of Practicing Scientists and Engineers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses a continuing education program designed for employed scientists and engineers by the Applied Physics Laboratory Evening College Center of the Johns Hopkins University. Included are questionnaire results obtained from students and nine-year statistics for program growth. (CC)

Edwards, Paul B.

1973-01-01

33

TOUGH Short Course for Scientists and Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The TOUGH family of codes is a suite of computer programs for the simulation of multiphase fluid and heat flows in porous and fractured media with applications to geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste disposal in geologic formations, geologic carbon sequestration, gas hydrate research, vadose zone hydrology, environmental remediation, oil and gas reservoir engineering, and other mass transport and energy transfer

Michael B. Kowalsky; Stefan Finsterle

2006-01-01

34

Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1997  

NSF Publications Database

... Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1997 Detailed Statistical Tables Hypertext ... Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1997 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Characteristics ...

35

Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 2001  

NSF Publications Database

... Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 2001 Detailed Statistical Tables ... Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 2001 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Characteristics ...

36

Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1999  

NSF Publications Database

... Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1999 Detailed Statistical Tables Hypertext ... Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1999 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Characteristics ...

37

Gender Differences in the Careers of Academic Scientists and Engineers: A Literature Review  

NSF Publications Database

... Gender Differences in the Careers of Academic Scientists and Engineers: A Literature Review Special ... Hypertext Format Gender Differences in the Careers of Academic Scientists and Engineers: A ...

38

George V. Chilingarian (or Chilingar) Engineer and Scientist  

E-print Network

, National (USA), 1965 · Fellow of Geological Society of America and the American Institute of Chemists-Union Petroleum Institute of Scientific-Geological-Exploration; founded in 1929) · Honorary Fellow of DTMS (Design1 George V. Chilingarian (or Chilingar) Engineer and Scientist Petroleum Engineering and Geology

Bardet, Jean-Pierre

39

Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States. 1975 Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report focuses primarily on the 1975 employment status of 1930-1974 recipients of doctorates in science and engineering residing in the United States. Approximately 63,400 persons of the 314,000 individuals on the 1975 Roster of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers compiled by the National Research Council were sampled. A variable sampling ratio…

National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Human Resources.

40

Age distribution among NASA scientists and engineers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The loss of technical expertise through attrition in NASA and the aerospace industry is discussed. This report documents historical age-related information for scientific and engineering personnel in general and the NASA Lewis Research Center in particular, for 1968 through 1987. Recommendations are made to promote discussion and to establish the groundwork for action.

Ciancone, Michael L.

1989-01-01

41

Summer 2011 Engineering Our Future  

E-print Network

of Engineering I have been enjoying the last six months here in Lubbock since my arrival in Texas Tech for the Bob L. Herd Department of Petroleum Engineering. We will raze the existing Health, Exercise, and Sport" (page 15). Outreach to future engineers is an important part of our duty as engineers. The college has

Gelfond, Michael

42

A Recipe for Invention Scientist (and Engineer) Biographies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this case study, designed to help break down stereotypes about scientists and engineers, students research the personal and professional lives of researchers in their field. The case was designed for use in high school to graduate courses in a variety of scientific disciplines, including molecular biology, biochemistry, geology, chemistry, psychology, mathematics, computer science, engineering, and anthropology. In the teaching notes, the authors provide lists of scientists for each of these disciplines as well as suggestions for classroom activities that can be used in various combinations to build on the students’ biographical research.

Morris, Traci E.; Gal, Susannah

2003-01-01

43

TOUGH Short Course for Scientists and Engineers  

SciTech Connect

The TOUGH family of codes is a suite of computer programs for the simulation of multiphase fluid and heat flows in porous and fractured media with applications to geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste disposal in geologic formations, geologic carbon sequestration, gas hydrate research, vadose zone hydrology, environmental remediation, oil and gas reservoir engineering, and other mass transport and energy transfer problems in complex geologic settings. TOUGH has been developed in the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Many modifications and enhancements have been made to TOUGH (at LBNL and elsewhere) from the time it was first released in 1987. TOUGH and its various descendants (such as iTOUGH2, T2VOC, TMVOC, EWASG, TOUGHREACT, TOUGH+ and many more) are currently in use in approximately 300 research laboratories, private companies, and universities in 33 countries. The LBNL group, headed by Karsten Pruess, serves as custodian of the code. The TOUGH simulators were developed for problems involving strongly heat-driven flow. To describe these phenomena a multi-phase approach to fluid and heat flow is used, which fully accounts for the movement of gaseous and liquid phases, their transport of latent and sensible heat, and phase transitions between liquid and vapor. TOUGH takes account of fluid flow in both liquid and gaseous phases--and, in certain modules, a non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL)--occurring under pressure, viscous, and gravity forces according to Darcy's law. Interference between the phases is represented by means of relative permeability functions. The code includes Klinkenberg effects and binary diffusion in the gas phase, and capillary and phase adsorption effects for the liquid phase. Heat transport occurs by means of conduction (with thermal conductivity dependent on water saturation), convection, and binary diffusion, which includes both sensible and latent heat. The goal of this training course is to teach participants with limited numerical modeling experience the fundamental concepts of modeling with the TOUGH family of codes. The material to be covered includes the following: Introduction to the TOUGH family of codes and applications; Underlying physics, mathematical models, and numerical approaches; Program structure and code installation; and Explanation of input and output files. The course will revolve around sample problems that are meant to familiarize users with TOUGH modeling concepts, such as grid generation, specification of material properties, initial and boundary conditions, and program control The most common equation of state (EOS) modules will be considered for a variety of applications and levels of complexity (ranging from isothermal problems with a single component and phase, to non-isothermal problems with multiple components and phases) Examples of advanced applications from the TOUGH family of codes, will be presented.

Kowalsky, Michael B.; Finsterle, Stefan

2006-08-01

44

Survey of Continuing Education Activities for Engineers and Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was done to provide baseline data on the continuing education opportunities that colleges, universities, and professional societies offer engineers and scientists and to determine how programs and courses are developed. Although degree credit courses were included, the focus was on noncredit education designed to increase or update…

Klus, John P.; Jones, Judy A.

45

Teaching with Engineers and Scientists: What Role for Sociology?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores whether or not sociology may be integrated into courses on technology and values at the college level. Sociologists are interested in collaborating with scientists and engineers because many of the most urgent social issues of the late 20th century seem to lie at the interface of social values and technological change. The…

Kolack, Shirley; MacDougall, John

46

Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians in the United States: 2001  

NSF Publications Database

This report is available in hypertext (.htm) and Portable Document Format (.pdf). See Help for more information about viewing publications in different formats. Links to additional reports in the Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians in Industry series are available on the publication series page.

47

Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians in the United States: 1999  

NSF Publications Database

This report is available in hypertext (.htm) and Portable Document Format (.pdf). See Help for more information about viewing publications in different formats. Links to additional reports in the Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians in Industry series are available on the publication series page.

48

Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians in the United States: 2000  

NSF Publications Database

This report is available in hypertext (.htm) and Portable Document Format (.pdf). See Help for more information about viewing publications in different formats. Links to additional reports in the Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians in Industry series are available on the publication series page.

49

Healthy Economy Yields Even Lower Unemployment Rate for Doctoral Scientists and Engineers  

NSF Publications Database

... Scientists and Engineers (April 15, 1999) This data brief provides summary findings from the 1997 ... data on the demographic and employment characteristics of the Nation's doctoral scientists and ...

50

Educating the Future Engineer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a new course in engineering science for pre-university students in England and Wales. The course outline, laboratory work, and evaluation procedures are discussed. The new course has been accepted by British universities as an entry qualification for degree courses in engineering and physics. (LC)

Sayer, Michael

1970-01-01

51

Nonstandard Work Arrangements among Women and Men Scientists and Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper draws on a sample of 48,444 scientists and engineers in the United States to analyze nonstandard work arrangements\\u000a among women and men, 8,773 of whom worked in such arrangements. With few exceptions, women were overrepresented in these arrangements\\u000a and particularly in those characterized by lower wages and benefits, but their overrepresentation in the worst arrangements\\u000a failed to explain

Anastasia H. Prokos; Irene Padavic; S. Ashley Schmidt

2009-01-01

52

SESTAT: A Tool for Studying Scientists and Engineers in the United States  

NSF Publications Database

... Studying Scientists and Engineers in the United States Hypertext Format SESTAT: A Tool for Studying ... Document Format (.pdf) SESTAT: A Tool for Studying Scientists and Engineers in the United States ...

53

The future of complexity engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Complexity Engineering encompasses a set of approaches to engineering systems which are typically composed of various interacting entities often exhibiting self-* behaviours and emergence. The engineer or designer uses methods that benefit from the findings of complexity science and often considerably differ from the classical engineering approach of "divide and conquer". This article provides an overview on some very interdisciplinary and innovative research areas and projects in the field of Complexity Engineering, including synthetic biology, chemistry, artificial life, self-healing materials and others. It then classifies the presented work according to five types of nature-inspired technology, namely: (1) using technology to understand nature, (2) nature-inspiration for technology, (3) using technology on natural systems, (4) using biotechnology methods in software engineering, and (5) using technology to model nature. Finally, future trends in Complexity Engineering are indicated and related risks are discussed.

Frei, Regina; Di Marzo Serugendo, Giovanna

2012-06-01

54

Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 5th edition - Volume 1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For nearly 30 years, Paul Tipler's Physics for Scientists and Engineers has set the standard in the introductory calculus-based physics course for clarity, accuracy, and precision. In this fifth edition, Paul has recruited Gene Mosca to bring his years of teaching experience to bear on the text, to scrutinize every explanation and example from the perspective of the freshman student. The result is a teaching tool that retains its precision and rigor, but offers struggling students the support they need to solve problems strategically and to gain real understanding of physical concepts.

Tipler, Paul A.; Mosca, Gene P.

55

Manpower assessment brief: Employment of energy related doctoral scientists and engineers increased between 1981 and 1985  

SciTech Connect

In 1985, the nearly 45,000 energy-related doctoral scientists and engineers represented 11% of all employed doctoral scientists and engineers. Engineers comprised 40%, physical scientists, 21%, and earth scientists, almost 10% of those involved in energy-related activities - a significantly different distribution than occurs among all Ph.D. scientists and engineers. Between 1981 and 1985, by far the largest increase in energy-related Ph.D.'s occurred in employment in the life sciences - up over 120%. Employment in the social sciences and pyschology (primarily the latter) grew by 17% and in engineering by 7%.

Not Available

1987-01-01

56

Predicting the performance and innovativeness of scientists and engineers.  

PubMed

A study of 644 scientists and engineers from 5 corporate research and development organizations investigated hypotheses generated from an interactionist framework of 4 individual characteristics as longitudinal predictors of performance and innovativeness. An innovative orientation predicted 1-year-later and 5-years-later supervisory job performance ratings and 5-years-later counts of patents and publications. An internal locus of control predicted 5-years-later patents and publications, and self-esteem predicted performance ratings for both times and patents. Team-level nonroutine tasks moderated the individual-level relationships between an innovative orientation and performance ratings and patents such that the relationships were stronger in a nonroutine task environment. Implications for an interactionist framework of performance and innovativeness for knowledge workers are discussed. PMID:21875172

Keller, Robert T

2012-01-01

57

Next Generation Lunar Scientists and Engineers Group: EPO for the NextGen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the recent lunar missions and increase in funding opportunities for lunar science, the number of early career lunar scientists and engineers has grown substantially in the last few years. With plans for future US and international orbital and landed spacecraft, the Moon will continue to be a place of intense scientific scrutiny. The Next Generation Lunar Scientists and Engineers (NGLSE) is a grass-roots effort at fostering the growing community of early career lunar scientists and engineers. We are fortunate to be in a position to develop the next generation of lunar enthusiasts with the support of the first generation of lunar scientists and engineers, ensuring continuity of a base of lunar knowledge. The need to foster the next generation of lunar scientists is recognized within NASA and the international community (e.g., International Lunar Exploration Working Group, Lunar Explorers Society, and the Canadian Lunar Research Network). A primary goal of the NASA Lunar Science Institute is to support “...the development of the lunar science community and training the next generation of lunar science researchers.” Additionally, NASA’s Optimizing Science and Exploration Working Group, which is comprised of representatives from several NASA Directorates and Centers, is tasked with the integration of science and engineering for the successful exploration of the Moon. In much the same way, the NGLSE aims to bring early career scientists and engineers together in order to create and support a network of next generation lunar scientists and engineers who will be able to work effectively together. Currently with over 150 members from academia, industry, and NASA, the NGLSE is building a representative cross-section of the lunar science and engineering communities. The NGLSE has received NASA funding to host workshops in association with major lunar conferences, most recently the 2010 NLSI Lunar Science Forum. At this workshop, participants worked with science educators on how to effectively craft presentations for students and how to effectively communicate our exciting science and engineering endeavors to the public. The workshop also provided opportunities for participants to network, to communicate their science and engineering to each other, and to interact with NASA leaders and established members of the science and engineering communities. Building a community of active participants who are not only dedicated to becoming productive members of the lunar science and engineering communities but also trained in effective science communication to their peers and the public, writing winning proposals, and leading effective education and public outreach efforts is fundamentally important in building a sustainable, long-lived, and publicly supported lunar science and exploration program. We will report on the progress of the NGLSE group and our workshops, including the needs and interests of this community as identified through our efforts.

Petro, N. E.; Bleacher, L.; Bleacher, J. E.; Santiago, D.; Noble, S. K.

2010-12-01

58

The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) mentorship program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Program is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA). It provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real-world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science and astronomy) and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year; and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has been highly successful during the past 11 years. All YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, and three scientific publications have resulted. Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors.

Boice, D. C.; Clarac, T.

59

The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Mentorship Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Program is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA). It provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real-world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science and astronomy) and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year; and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has been highly successful during the past 11 years. All YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, and three scientific publications have resulted. Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors. We acknowledge funding from local charitable foundations and the NASA E/PO program.

Boice, D. C.; Clarac, T.; Lin, C.

2004-11-01

60

Outreach to Scientists and Engineers at the Hanford Technical Library  

SciTech Connect

Staff at the Hanford Technical Library has developed a suite of programs designed to help busy researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) make better use of library products and services. Programs include formal training classes, one-on-one consultations, and targeted email messages announcing new materials to researchers in specific fields. A staple of outreach has been to teach classes to library clients covering research tools in their fields. These classes started out in the library classroom and then expanded to other venues around PNNL. Class surveys indicated that many researchers desired a practical approach to learning rather than the traditional lecture format. The library instituted “Library Learning Day” and hosted classes in the PNNL computer training room to provide lab employees with a hands-on learning experience. Classes are generally offered at noon and lab staff attends classes on their lunch hour. Many just do not have time to spend a full hour in training. Library staff added some experimental half-hour mini classes in campus buildings geared to the projects and interests of researchers there to see if this format was more appealing. As other programs have developed librarians are teaching fewer classes but average attendance figures has remained fairly stable from 2005-2007. In summer of 2004 the library began the Traveling Librarian program. Librarians call-on groups and individuals in 24 buildings on the Richland Washington campus. Five full-time and two part-time librarians are involved in the program. Librarians usually send out email announcements prior to visits and encourage scientists and engineers to make appointments for a brief 15 minute consultation in the researcher’s own office. During the meeting lab staff learn about products or product features that can help them work more productively. Librarians also make cold calls to staff that do not request a consultation and may not be making full use of the library. Scientists and engineers who require longer sessions can arrange half-hour training appointments in the researcher’s own office or at the library. Since the program was implemented staff made 165 visits to 1249 laboratory staff including some repeat consultation requests. New acquisitions lists are sent to individuals and groups that would be interested in recent journal, database, and books purchases. These lists are topic specific and targeted to groups and individuals with an interest in the field. For example newly acquired engineering resources are targeted at engineering groups. The new acquisitions list for engineering began mid year in 2005. An analysis of circulation statistics for engineering books in fiscal year 2005, 2006, and 2007 show that circulation increased each year with 2007 circulation nearly double that of 2005. This took place when overall circulation rose in FY06 but fell slightly in FY07. Outreach strategies tailored and individualized can be effective. Offering multiple outreach options offers researchers different ways to interact with library staff and services.

Buxton, Karen A.

2008-06-17

61

Engaging Students in Space Research: Young Engineers and Scientists 2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA) during the past 16 years. The YES program provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science) and engineering. YES consists of an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI and a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their professional mentors during the academic year. During the summer workshop, students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has developed a website for topics in space science from the perspective of high school students, including NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) (http://yesserver.space.swri.edu). Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors. Over the past 16 years, all YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, one business has started, and three scientific publications have resulted. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge funding and support from the NASA MMS Mission, Texas Space Grant Consortium, Northside Independent School District, SwRI, and several local charitable foundations.

Boice, D. C.; Asbell, H. E.; Reiff, P. H.

2008-12-01

62

Semiconductors: Still a Wide Open Frontier for Scientists/Engineers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 1995 Business Week article described several features of the explosive use of semiconductor chips today: ``Booming'' personal computer markets are driving high demand for microprocessors and memory chips; (2) New information superhighway markets will `ignite' sales of multimedia and communication chips; and (3) Demand for digital-signal-processing and data-compression chips, which speed up video and graphics, is `red hot.' A Washington Post article by Stan Hinden said that technology is creating an unstoppable demand for electronic elements. This ``digital pervasiveness'' means that a semiconductor chip is going into almost every high-tech product that people buy - cars, televisions, video recorders, telephones, radios, alarm clocks, coffee pots, etc. ``Semiconductors are everywhere.'' Silicon and compound semiconductors are absolutely essential and are pervasive enablers for DoD operations and systems. DoD's Critical Technologies Plan of 1991 says that ``Semiconductor materials and microelectronics are critically important and appropriately lead the list of critical defense technologies.'' These trends continue unabated. This talk describes some of the frontiers of semiconductors today and shows how scientists and engineers can effectively contribute to its advancement. Cooperative, multidisciplinary efforts are increasing. Specific examples will be given for scanning capacitance microscopy and thin-film metrology.

Seiler, David G.

1997-10-01

63

The future look in rocket engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Main Engine and an Aerospike engine for the Space Tug illustrate the rocket engines of the future. This paper includes a description of design features leading to high performance, long life, and low cost. Computer control of the engine, turnaround maintenance plans, and engine development plans are also discussed.

Sanchini, D. J.; Kirby, F. M.

1973-01-01

64

International Mobility of Scientists and Engineers to the United States - Brain Drain or Brain Circulation?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Science Foundation issue brief examines the destination of foreign born scientists and engineers who study in the United States. The brief presents figures for the distribution among US education, industry, and government employers; stay rate; and percentages of scientists and engineers with firm plans, as well as offers, to remain in the US.

Johnson, Jean M.; Regets, Mark C.

1998-01-01

65

An Experimental Course in Information Gathering for Scientists and Engineers. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A one day course was developed to train and inform working scientists and engineers in the most direct and efficient means of seeking and acquiring scientific and technical information related to their day-to-day professional activities. The course was given three times to groups of forty Federally-employed scientists and engineers in the middle…

Herner, Saul

66

Senior scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A small task force of volunteer senior scientists and engineers was organized recently under the aegis of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) “to utilize its collective talents for the betterment of society and to provide opportunities for individual personal accomplishment and enrichment.” Among the projects under consideration are assisting the Washington, D.C., school system to improve its science and mathematics instruction and assessing the impact of technology on older persons.One of the task force's first projects is to develop a roster of retired scientists and engineers in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area to garner volunteer talent for future projects.

67

Inspiring the Next Generation of Engineers and Scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Students are usually not excited about abstract concepts, and teachers struggle to inject "pizzazz" into many of their lessons. K-12 teachers need opportunities and the associated pedagogical training to bring meaningful and authentic learning to their students. The professional educator community needs to develop a learning environment which connects desired content knowledge with science and engineering practices that students need to be successful future technology leaders. Furthermore, this environment must foster student exploration and discovery by encouraging them to use their natural creativity with newly acquired technical skills to complete assigned projects. These practices are explicitly listed in the US "Next Generation Science Standards" document that is due for final publication in the very near future. Education in America must unleash students' desires to create and make with their hands, using their intellect, and growing academic knowledge. In this submission I will share various student projects that I have created and implemented for middle and high school. For each project, students were required to learn and implement engineering best practices while designing, building, and testing prototype models, according to pre-assigned teacher specifications. As in all real-world engineering projects, students were required to analyze test data, re-design their models accordingly, and iterate the design process several times to meet specifications. Another key component to successful projects is collaboration between student team members. All my students come to realize that nothing of major significance is ever accomplished alone, that is, without the support of a team. I will highlight several projects that illustrate key engineering practices as well as lessons learned, for both student and teacher. Projects presented will include: magnetically levitated vehicles (maglev) races, solar-powered and mousetrap-powered cars and boats, Popsicle stick catapults and bridges, egg drop "lunar landers", egg-passenger car crashes, cardboard boat races (with human passengers), and working roller coasters made with only paper and tape. Each project requires minimal, low-cost materials commonly found at home or in local stores. I will share the most common student misperceptions about inquiry and problem-solving I have observed while working alongside my students during these projects.

Tambara, Kevin

2013-04-01

68

The Macroeconomist as Scientist and Engineer N. Gregory Mankiw  

E-print Network

Waldman, and Noam Yuchtman for helpful comments. #12;Economists like to strike the pose of a scientist. I and ideology (or so we like to think). Having recently spent two years in Washington as an economic adviser and foremost, problem- solvers. By contrast, the goal of scientists is to understand how the world works

Tesfatsion, Leigh

69

Reflections on the current and future roles of clinician-scientists.  

PubMed

"Clinician-scientists" is an all-inclusive term for board-certified specialists who engage in patient care and laboratory-based (biomedical) research, patient-based (clinical) research, or population-based (epidemiological) research. In recent years, the number of medical graduates who choose to combine patient care and research has declined, generating concerns about the future of medical research. This paper reviews: a) the various current categories of clinician-scientists, b) the reasons proposed for the declining number of medical graduates who opt for a career as clinician-scientists, c) the various interventions aimed at reversing this trend, and d) the projections for the future role of clinician-scientists. Efforts to encourage students to combine patient care and research include providing financial and institutional support, and reducing the duration of the training of clinician-scientists. However, recent advances in clinical and biomedical knowledge have increased the difficulties in maintaining the dual role of care-providers and scientists. It was therefore suggested that rather than expecting clinician-scientists to compete with full-time clinicians in providing patient care, and with full-time investigators in performing research, clinician-scientists will increasingly assume the role of leading/coordinating interdisciplinary teams. Such teams would focus either on patient-based research or on the clinical, biomedical and epidemiological aspects of specific clinical disorders, such as hypertension and diabetes. PMID:25269336

Baumal, Reuben; Benbassat, Jochanan; Van, Julie A D

2014-08-01

70

Labor supply of engineers and scientists for nuclear electric utilities, 1987-1992  

Microsoft Academic Search

An assessment of the adequacy of the supply of health physicists, nuclear engineers, and other engineers for the nuclear electric utility industry is based on job openings for scientists and engineers in broader nuclear-power-related fields, which include engineering and design, manufacturing, fabrication, supporting services, and government. In assessing the likely adequacy of labor supplies for commercial nuclear power job openings

Blair

1988-01-01

71

Young Engineers & Scientists (YES) - Engaging Teachers in Space Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Program is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and local high schools in San Antonio. It provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real world, research experiences in physical sciences, information sciences, and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) An intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, C++ programming, the Internet, careers, science ethics, social impact of technology, and other topics; and select their individual research project with their mentor (SwRI staff member) to be completed during the academic year; and 2) A collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors and teachers during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has been highly successful during the past nineteen (19) years. A total of 258 students have completed or are currently enrolled in YES. Of these students, 38% are females and 57% are ethnic minorities, reflecting the local diversity of the San Antonio area. All YES graduates have entered college, several work or have worked for SwRI, two businesses have formed, and three scientific publications have resulted. Sixteen (16) teacher participants have attended the YES workshop and have developed classroom materials based on their experiences in research at SwRI in the past three (3) years. In recognition of its excellence, YES received the Celebrate Success in 1996 and the Outstanding Campus Partner-of-the-Year Award in 2005, both from Northside Independent School District (San Antonio, Texas). Acknowledgments: We are grateful for support from the NASA MMS Mission E/PO Grant, SwRI, Northside Independent School District, and local charitable foundations.

Boice, D. C.; Reiff, P. H.

2011-12-01

72

A National Study of Mathematics Requirements for Scientists and Engineers. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Study of Mathematics Requirements for Scientists and Engineers is concerned with establishing the mathematics experiences desired for the many specializations in science and engineering, such as microbiology, organic chemistry, electrical engineering, and molecular physics. An instruction and course content sheet and a course…

Miller, G. H.

73

Preparing Tomorrow's Scientists and Engineers for the Challenges of the 21st Century  

E-print Network

Preparing Tomorrow's Scientists and Engineers for the Challenges of the 21st Century Special. The main questions to be addressed are: How do we integrate research and education? What we, scientists Fradkov (IPME, Russian Academy of Sciences) Graham Goodwin (University of Newcastle) Vladimir Havlena

Pasik-Duncan, Bozenna

74

Summer 2010 Engineering Our Future  

E-print Network

Sammons Artie Limmer Joey Hernandez James R. Evans ALUMNI UPDATES www.TTUalum.com #12;Engineering Our is directed by Mary Baker, an associate professor in engineering, and Michael O'Boyle, a professor in human a unique perspective by utilizing scientific and engineering methods. "Both Mary and Michael want to help

Gelfond, Michael

75

Major Declines in Admissions of Immigrant Scientists and Engineers in Fiscal Year 1994  

NSF Publications Database

... Scientists and Engineers in Fiscal Year 1994(June 18, 1997) This Data Brief presents newly released ... technicians admitted to the United States in 1994 on permanent visas. Hypertext Format Portable ...

76

Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1999 (Early Release Tables)  

NSF Publications Database

... by phone, especially those (such as field of degree and field of occupation) that require ... by field of doctorate: 1999 Table 3 Doctoral scientists and engineers, by field of doctorate and sex ...

77

International Mobility of Scientists and Engineers to the United States - Brain Drain or Brain Circulation?  

NSF Publications Database

... of Scientists and Engineers to the United States - Brain Drain or Brain Circulation? (June 22, 1998 ... doctoral recipients who remain in the United States for postdoctoral study as well as long-term ...

78

Employment of Scientists and Engineers Reaches 3.2 Million in 1995  

NSF Publications Database

Employment of Scientists and Engineers Reaches 3.2 Million in 1995 (August 13, 1998) This Data Brief ... workforce. Topics covered include: employment, unemployment, salaries, and the relationship between ...

79

The McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs for Scientists and Engineers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs at The Colorado School of Mines (CSM), instituted in 1978, is an award-winning exemplar in the liberal arts which provides a select number of CSM engineering students an opportunity to cross the boundaries of their technical expertise in engineering and applied science, and to gain the understanding and appreciation of the contexts in which engineering and applied science and all human systems reside, and specifically to explore and integrate the social, cultural, ethical and environmental implications of their future professional judgments and their roles as citizens in varied and complex settings. The 27 semester-hour program of seminars, courses, and off-campus activities features small seminars; a cross-disciplinary approach; and opportunities for one-on-one faculty tutorials, instruction and practice in oral and written communication, a Washington, D.C. public policy seminar, a practicum experience (internship or foreign study). Circumstances external to the McBride Program itself, which include the development and growth of the field of Public Affairs nationally and the persistence of legacy courses, have created the need to revitalize and refocus the historically cross-departmental Program. A recent curriculum reform effort has achieved a more thoroughly interdisciplinary learning experience to educate engineers and scientists who, as called for in the National Academy of Engineering's The Engineer of 2020 "will assume leadership positions from which they can serve as positive influences in the making of public policy and in the administration of government and industry". In this presentation we showcase best practices in curriculum reform, exemplified by a seminar in National policy analysis where students and faculty have recently investigated federal science funding decisions in support of natural hazards including earthquakes, tsunamis, wildland fires, and pandemic disease.

Harrison, W. J.; Miller, R. L.; Olds, B. M.; Sacks, A. B.

2006-12-01

80

Big Data Analytics Retour vers le Futur -3 -De Statisticien Data Scientist  

E-print Network

Big Data Analytics ­ Retour vers le Futur - 3 - De Statisticien à Data Scientist Philippe Besse and velocity, of big data. Keywords : Data mining ; biological high throughput data ; high di- mension ; bioinformatics ; statistical learning ; big data. Université de Toulouse ­ INSA, Institut de Mathématiques, UMR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

81

A Career Planning Center for Beginning Scientists and Engineers (CPC)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, provided by the US National Academy of Sciences, is a gateway to a large amount of information regarding careers for beginning scientists. It is divided into nine topical sections at this time, including information on trends in the job market, links to career guidance, and an advice center where new scientists can request a mentor and experienced professionals can volunteer to be mentors. The highlight of the site, from the point of view of employment seeking, is the Employment and Research Funding Center, with annotated links to employment, internship, fellowship, postdoctoral, and research funding opportunity information. In addition, there is a selected list of available jobs. Note that the site is free but requests registration.

1998-01-01

82

316 Chemical Engineering Education ehavioral scientists classify thought processes into  

E-print Network

with student attitude. For many stu- dents, college challenges their level of motivation and the academic motivation, self-confidence, perception of engineering, performance, and retention.[3] The same group also external to the engineering curriculum (high school GPA, SAT scores, IQ, etc.), they were not academically

Newell, James A.

83

The MY NASA DATA Project: Preparing Future Earth and Environmental Scientists, and Future Citizens  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the past 5 years, the MY NASA DATA (MND) project at NASA Langley has developed and adapted tools and materials aimed at enabling student access to real NASA Earth science satellite data. These include web visualization tools including Google Earth capabilities, but also GPS and graphing calculator exercises, Excel spreadsheet analyses, and more. The project team, NASA scientists, and

L. H. Chambers; C. S. Phelps; M. Phipps; M. Holzer; P. Daugherty; E. Poling; S. Vanderlaan; P. C. Oots; S. W. Moore; D. D. Diones

2008-01-01

84

Lived Experiences and Perceptions on Mentoring among Latina Scientists and Engineers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this qualitative study was to reveal the lived mentoring experiences of Latinas in science and engineering. The study also sought to understand how Latina scientists and engineers achieved high-level positions within their organizations and the impediments they encountered along their professional journey. The theoretical framework…

San Miguel, Anitza M.

2010-01-01

85

Impact of Entrepreneurship Teaching in Higher Education on the Employability of Scientists and Engineers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the impact effective entrepreneurship teaching has on the employability of scientists and engineers. Business teaching, guest speakers and work placements are part of many science and engineering degrees and this research indicates that entrepreneurship and related issues are also being addressed in a variety of ways and having…

O'Leary, Simon

2012-01-01

86

The Impact of Technology on the Mathematics Education of Engineers and Scientists  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mathematics education of engineers has been a source of concern for many years. In this century we can find many articles addressing the issue (for example, Fry, 1941; Anderson, 1951; Searl, 1964). In the industrialised countries in the last century many institutions were established outside their conventional universities to provide training for engineers and scientists and that training included

J. W. Searl

87

Energy-related doctoral scientists and engineers in the United States, 1975  

SciTech Connect

The pursuit of a vigorous research and development program to provide renewable and other resources to meet U. S. energy needs in the next century is an important objective of President Carter's National Energy Plan. A highly educated and motivated pool of engineers and scientists must be available for energy research and development if this objective is to be achieved. This report provides, for the first time, information about the number and characteristics of doctoral-level engineers and scientists in primarily energy-related activities. These data for the year 1975 will become part of the data base for a program of continuing studies on the employment and utilization of all scientists and engineers involved in energy-related activities. Information is provided for employment in the following fields: mathematics; physics/astronomy; chemistry; Earth, Environment, and Marine Sciences; Engineering; Life Sciences; Psychology; Social Sciences; Arts and Humanities; and Education and Business.

Not Available

1977-11-01

88

Envision your future in engineering  

E-print Network

, an organization that has been in place for almost three decades EMPower is dedicated to fostering the academic that their compelling stories will inspire you and motivate you to think about studying engineering, computer science for Reckitt Benckiser in New Jersey. What is your favorite type of music? My favorite kind of music is pop

Dyer, Bill

89

The technical communication practices of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communication practices of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies had the same five objectives: first, to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communication to their professions; second, to determine the use and production of technical communication by aerospace engineers and scientists; third, to seek their views about the appropriate content of the undergraduate course in technical communication; fourth, to determine aerospace engineers' and scientists' use of libraries, technical information centers, and on-line databases; and fifth, to determine the use and importance of computer and information technology to them. A self administered questionnaire was distributed to Russian aerospace engineers and scientists at the Central Aero-Hydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI) and to their U.S. counterparts at the NASA Ames Research Center and the NASA Langley Research Center. The completion rates for the Russian and U.S. surveys were 64 and 61 percent, respectively. Responses of the Russian and U.S. participants to selected questions are presented in this paper.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Keene, Michael L.; Flammia, Madelyn; Kennedy, John M.

1993-01-01

90

Reshaping the Graduate Education of Scientists and Engineers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a report that suggests a broader scope of education for graduate students in science and engineering based on the increasing diversity of career choices. The lack of information available regarding employment rates makes it difficult for current students to make well informed choices regarding their career. This report suggests methods for better education and guidance for graduate students.

2008-09-24

91

Hierarchical Learning Ensembles: Team Building for Undergraduate Scientists and Engineers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the design and implementation of the Hierarchical Learning Ensemble (HLE) model, a pedagogy that assembles interdisciplinary teams of graduate, undergraduate, and secondary-level students to solve science and engineering problems. Our goals is to sensitize undergraduates to working in heterogeneous groups and thus better prepare them for the workplace.

Dilisi, Gregory A.; Upton, Jan; Eppell, Steven J.

2006-03-01

92

The Square Kilometre Array Fact sheet for scientists and engineers  

E-print Network

with the world's largest radio telescope What is the SKA? The SKA will be a revolutionary radio telescope in the cosmos, the nature of gravity, and studies in astro-biology. And, if history is any guide, the SKA. Major site selection criteria include the current and future radio quietness of the sites

Jarrett, Thomas H.

93

Big Data Retour vers le Futur -3 -De Statisticien Data Scientist  

E-print Network

Big Data ­ Retour vers le Futur - 3 - De Statisticien à Data Scientist Philippe Besse Aurélien ; statistical learning ; big data. Université de Toulouse ­ INSA, Institut de Mathématiques, UMR CNRS 5219 omiques la décennie suivante ; ­ avènement récent et très médiatisé du big data. Nous terminons en

Besse, Philippe

94

Genotyping the future: scientists' expectations about race/ ethnicity after BiDil.  

PubMed

The ongoing debate about the FDA approval of BiDil in 2005 demonstrates how the first racially/ethnically licensed drug is entangled in both Utopian and dystopian future visions about the continued saliency of race/ethnicity in science and medicine. Drawing on the sociology of expectations, this paper analyzes how scientists in the field of pharmacogenetics are constructing certain visions of the future with respect to the use of social categories of race/ethnicity and the impact of high-throughput genotyping technologies that promise to transform scientific practices. PMID:18840237

Tutton, Richard; Smart, Andrew; Martin, Paul A; Ashcroft, Richard; Ellison, George T H

2008-01-01

95

Nonlinear dynamics and chaos: Geometrical methods for engineers and scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fundamental principles of nonlinear dynamics are introduced, and a number of applications to specific physical and engineering problems are examined. Topics presented include nonlinear phenomena in damped and undamped, forced and unforced oscillators; point attractors and limit cycles in autonomous systems; periodic attractors in driven oscillators; chaotic attractors in forced oscillators; stability and bifurcations of equilibria and cycles; and iterated maps as dynamical systems. Consideration is given to the geometry of recurrence, the Lorenz system, Roessler's band, bifurcation geometry, the subharmonic resonances of an offshore structure, chaotic motions of an impacting system, the particle accelerator and Hamiltonian dynamics, and experimental observations of order and chaos.

Thompson, J. M. T.; Stewart, H. B.

96

Doctoral scientists and engineers working in energy-related activities, 1985  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the responses of doctoral level scientists and engineers to a national survey conducted by the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council and funded by the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Energy, and other Federal agencies. Data concerning the numbers and characteristics of Ph.D.'s who devoted a significant portion of their professional work to energy- or fuel-related activities are presented for 1985. Historical data from previous survey years are also presented; and, within the context of recent funding, policy, and economic trends, the five-year outlook for energy-related Ph.D. scientists and engineers is examined.

Not Available

1987-05-01

97

Connecting Ocean Scientists with Future Educators - COSEE Florida's Research Experience for Pre-Service Teachers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To bring real world ocean science into the classroom, COSEE Florida's Research Experience for Pre-Service Teachers (REPT) program provides an opportunity for future science teachers to work with marine scientists on research projects. In 2011 and 2012, eleven middle school education majors at Indian River State College in Fort Pierce, FL, participated in a seven week summer experience. Scientist teams at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute of Florida Atlantic University, the Smithsonian Marine Station, and the Ocean Research & Conservation Association each mentored two students for 20 hours of research per week with 5 hours of support from Indian River State College (IRSC) faculty. Mentors helped students develop a scientific poster describing their research and guided them in the production of a video vignette called a CSTAR (COSEE Student Teachers as Researchers). The CSTAR videos address a 'nature of science' Florida state standard, have been shown to a variety of audiences in and out of the classroom and are expected to be a more frequently used educational product than a single lesson plan. To showcase the REPT intern accomplishments, an 'end-of-program' symposium open to the COSEE and IRSC communities was held at IRSC. Evaluation data indicate that the first two iterations of the COSEE Florida REPT program have given future teachers an authentic and deeper understanding of scientific practices and have provided ocean scientists with a meaningful opportunity to contribute to ocean science education.

Cook, S.; Cetrulo, B.; Capers, J.

2012-12-01

98

Emeritus Scientists, Mathematicians and Engineers (ESME) program. Summary of activities for school year 1991--1992  

SciTech Connect

The Emeritus Scientists, Mathematicians and Engineers (ESME) program matches retired scientists and engineers with wide experience with elementary school children in order to fuel the children`s natural curiosity about the world in which they live. The long-range goal is to encourage students to maintain the high level of mathematical and science capability that they exhibit at an early age by introducing them to the fun and excitement of the world of scientific investigation and engineering problem solving. Components of the ESME program are the emeriti, established teacher-emeriti teams that work to produce a unit of 6 class hours of demonstration or hands-on experiments, and the encounter by students with the world of science/engineering through the classroom sessions and a field trip to a nearby plant or laboratory.

Sharlin, H.I.

1992-09-01

99

Eye of the Forehead and Eye of the Mind: How Engineers and Scientists See  

SciTech Connect

Public radio host Dr. John Lienhard gives a talk titled "Eye of the Forehead and Eye of the Mind: How Engineers and Scientists See". Lienhard contends that spatial visualization is the subtlest of abilities. In his talk, he traces its evolution through the past five centuries and explains how remarkable aids to seeing may have been placing mental visualization under threat.

John Lienhard

2004-07-12

100

Themes of the symposium The symposium seeks to bring together computer scientists, hydrologists, water engineers,  

E-print Network

, water engineers, and environmental scientists, to explore the key issues governing the successful application of machine learning (e.g. data-driven models and optimisation techniques) to water systems. Papers, particularly those that investigate one or more of the following issues within the context of water systems

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

101

Sharing Science with Children: A Survival Guide for Scientists and Engineers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The first of three Sharing Science with Children Guides produced by the North Carolina Museum of Life and Science. This guide is written for scientists and engineers interested in making effective classroom presentations. Teaching tips, a list of typical science topics studied, and a chart describing the thinking and learning capabilities of K-8 students are all included.

102

Computer scientists and engineers design and implement efficient software and hardware solutions  

E-print Network

64 Computer scientists and engineers design and implement efficient software and hardware solutions to computer-solvable problems. They are involved in the development of areas such as high-speed networks, multimedia and creative technologies, systems design, virtual reality, and robotics. The Computer Science

Rohs, Remo

103

Computer scientists and engineers design and implement efficient software and hardware  

E-print Network

62 Computer scientists and engineers design and implement efficient software and hardware solutions to computer-solvable problems. They are involved in the development of areas such as high-speed networks, multimedia and creative technologies, systems design, video game development, and robotics. The Computer

Rohs, Remo

104

Computer scientists and engineers design and implement efficient software and hardware  

E-print Network

62 Computer scientists and engineers design and implement efficient software and hardware solutions to computer-solvable problems. They are involved in the development of areas such as high-speed networks, internet technologies, social networks, systems design, computer graphics, video game development

Rohs, Remo

105

GNG4120: Technology entrepreneurship for engineers and computer scientists Course description  

E-print Network

covers career choice, building a team, venture capital, and boards of advisers. #12;· Project deliverable issues about how to finance such a high-technology venture. Week 5 (Oct. 4th ) Marketing Guest speaker 4GNG4120: Technology entrepreneurship for engineers and computer scientists Course description

Petriu, Emil M.

106

Energy-Related Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States - 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides information about the number and characteristics of doctoral level engineers and scientists in primarily energy-related activities for 1975. The data included are part of an attempt to monitor the supply and demand of energy technology professionals. Chapter titles which indicate the types and arrangement of data are: (1)…

Blair, Larry M.

107

Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1997  

NSF Publications Database

This report is available in hypertext (.htm) and Portable Document Format (.pdf). See Help for more information about viewing publications in different formats. Links to additional reports in the Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States series are available on the publication series page.

108

PREFACE: PAGES 1st Young Scientists Meeting (YSM) - 'Retrospective views on our planet's future'  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

'Retrospective views on our planet's future' - This was the theme of a tandem of meetings held by Past Global Changes (PAGES; http://www.pages-igbp.org), a project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP). It reflects the philosophy of PAGES and its community of scientists that the past holds the key to better projections of the future. Climatic and environmental evidence from the past can be used to sharpen future projections of global change, thereby informing political and societal decisions on mitigation and adaptation. Young scientists are critical to the future of this endeavour, which we call 'paleoscience'. Their scientific knowledge, interdisciplinarity, international collaboration, and leadership skills will be required if this field is to continue to thrive. Meanwhile, it is also important to remember that science develops not only by applying new strategies and new tools to make new observations, but also by building upon existing knowledge. Modern research in paleoscience began around fifty years ago, and one could say that the third generation of researchers is now emerging. It is a wise investment to ensure that existing skills and knowledge are transferred to this generation. This will enable them to lead the science towards new accomplishments, and to make important contributions towards the wider field of global change science. Motivated by such considerations, PAGES organized its first Young Scientists Meeting (YSM), held in Corvallis (Oregon, USA) in July 2009 (http://www.pages-osm.org/ysm/index.html). The meeting took place immediately before the much larger 3rd PAGES Open Science Meeting (OSM; http://www.pages-osm.org/osm/index.html). The YSM brought together 91 early-career scientists from 21 different nations. During the two-day meeting, PhD students, postdoctoral researchers, and new faculty met to present their work and build networks across geographical and disciplinary borders. Several experienced and well-recognized researchers tutored this conference, and gave assistance to young scientists by offering advice on publication, promotion, outreach processes, and data management. At the subsequent OSM, the young scientists had the opportunity to present their results to a larger community, and to build networks with their senior colleagues. In a friendly and classroom-like atmosphere, the research presented during the YSM was of a remarkably high quality, and merited publication in this special issue. The 23 short proceedings papers are first-authored by YSM attendees, and based on their presented work and the associated discussions. Consistent with the spirit of the YSM, the core of the guest editor team consisted of YSM early-career scientists, while members of the wider scientific community reviewed the papers. Studies presented in this issue cover a large range of topics. Paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental research is always seeking new natural archives and improved proxies, and so some papers focus on reconstruction methodologies and the interpretation and calibration of proxies. Other papers present a variety of modeling approaches, such as climate system modeling, forward modeling, or ecosystem modeling. Still others focus on reconstructions from marine (foraminifera, diatoms, corals) or continental (tree rings, speleothems, ice cores) archives, or on understanding the dynamics of the Earth system and the feedbacks between its various components. The studies presented span timescales ranging from the past 200,000 years to the last few decades, and consider changes in natural phenomena such as the hydrological cycle and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, as well as local- and regional-scale interaction of humans with the environment. The papers presented in this special issue therefore reflect current challenges in paleoscience research: understanding natural variability on both long and short time scales, and monitoring anthropogenic impacts which range from historic landscaping to more recent pollution. The concept and format of the 1st PAGES YSM worked very well, and

Cléroux, Caroline; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer; Phipps, Steven; Rupper, Summer; Williams, Branwen; Kiefer, Thorsten

2010-03-01

109

High School Engineering: Pre-Engineering for Future Engineers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a course that bridges the gap between pure science and pure technology called Pre-Engineering. This course gives junior and senior students a chance to investigate the possibility of choosing engineering as a major in college as well as to experience hands-on activities, projects, laboratories, problem solving, and computer simulations…

Sutter, Gary R.

1998-01-01

110

"The Future of Materials Science and Engineering  

E-print Network

· Devices and components designed with adapted technology are dependent on stability of technology and owner"The Future of Materials Science and Engineering: An Industry Perspective" Michael E Tompkins VP-Technology-RheologicalFluid · Vacuumsuspension Industry Technology #12;· O&P Industry estimated market to be between $6B and $10B · R

Li, Mo

111

Inspiring the Next Generation of Naval Scientists and Engineers in Mississippi and Louisiana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2011, the American Institute of Physics ranked Mississippi 50th out of 50 states in preparing students for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) careers. Louisiana placed 48th on the list. [1] The Naval Research Laboratory - Stennis Space Center detachment (NRL-SSC) is located on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, approximately 2 miles from the Louisiana state line. In response to a growing need for NRL-SSC to sustain recruitment and retention of the best and brightest scientists and engineers (S&Es), NRL-SSC became a National Defense Education Program (NDEP) site in August 2009. NDEP's mission is to support a new generation of S&Es who will apply their talents in U.S. Defense laboratories. As an NDEP site, NRL-SSC receives funding to promote STEM at K-12 institutions geographically local to NRL-SSC. NDEP funding allows present Department of Defense civilian S&Es to collaborate with teachers to enrich student learning in the classroom environment through various programs, events, training and activities. Since NRL-SSC's STEM program's inception, more than 30 S&Es have supported an array of STEM outreach activities in over 30 different local schools. An important part of the K-12 outreach from NRL-SSC is to provide professional development opportunities for local teachers. During the summer of 2012, in collaboration with STEM programs sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), we provided a series of professional development opportunities for 120 local science and mathematics teachers across K-12. The foundation of NRL-SSC STEM programs includes MATHCOUNTS, FIRST and SeaPerch—all nationally recognized, results-driven programs. We will discuss the breadth of participation in these programs and how these programs will support NRL-SSC future recruitment goals.

Breland-Mensi, S.; Calantoni, J.

2012-12-01

112

Primary-School Children's Attitudes towards Science, Engineering and Technology and Their Images of Scientists and Engineers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The attitudes of Year 5 primary-school children towards science, engineering and technology (SET) were examined prior to studying the effects of the Horsham Greenpower Goblin Challenge (HGGC), a hands-on SET project. The data collection centred on pupil, parent and teacher questionnaires using Likert scales and picture/word images of scientists…

Silver, Anne; Rushton, Brian S.

2008-01-01

113

Future prospects for tissue engineered lung transplantation  

PubMed Central

The shortage of donor lungs for transplantation causes a significant number of patient deaths. The availability of laboratory engineered, functional organs would be a major advance in meeting the demand for organs for transplantation. The accumulation of information on biological scaffolds and an increased understanding of stem/progenitor cell behavior has led to the idea of generating transplantable organs by decellularizing an organ and recellularizing using appropriate cells. Recellularized solid organs can perform organ-specific functions for short periods of time, which indicates the potential for the clinical use of engineered solid organs in the future.   The present review provides an overview of progress and recent knowledge about decellularization and recellularization-based approaches for generating tissue engineered lungs. Methods to improve decellularization, maturation of recellularized lung, candidate species for transplantation and future prospects of lung bioengineering are also discussed. PMID:24488093

Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Rocco, Kevin; Nanashima, Atsushi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Niklason, Laura E

2014-01-01

114

Scientists versus regulators: precaution, novelty & regulatory oversight as predictors of perceived risks of engineered nanomaterials.  

PubMed

Engineered nanoscale materials (ENMs) present a difficult challenge for risk assessors and regulators. Continuing uncertainty about the potential risks of ENMs means that expert opinion will play an important role in the design of policies to minimize harmful implications while supporting innovation. This research aims to shed light on the views of 'nano experts' to understand which nanomaterials or applications are regarded as more risky than others, to characterize the differences in risk perceptions between expert groups, and to evaluate the factors that drive these perceptions. Our analysis draws from a web-survey (N?=?404) of three groups of US and Canadian experts: nano-scientists and engineers, nano-environmental health and safety scientists, and regulatory scientists and decision-makers. Significant differences in risk perceptions were found across expert groups; differences found to be driven by underlying attitudes and perceptions characteristic of each group. Nano-scientists and engineers at the upstream end of the nanomaterial life cycle perceived the lowest levels of risk, while those who are responsible for assessing and regulating risks at the downstream end perceived the greatest risk. Perceived novelty of nanomaterial risks, differing preferences for regulation (i.e. the use of precaution versus voluntary or market-based approaches), and perceptions of the risk of technologies in general predicted variation in experts' judgments of nanotechnology risks. Our findings underscore the importance of involving a diverse selection of experts, particularly those with expertise at different stages along the nanomaterial lifecycle, during policy development. PMID:25222742

Beaudrie, Christian E H; Satterfield, Terre; Kandlikar, Milind; Harthorn, Barbara H

2014-01-01

115

Future heavy duty trucking engine requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Developers of advanced heavy duty diesel engines are engaged in probing the opportunities presented by new materials and techniques. This process is technology driven, but there is neither assurance that the eventual users of the engines so developed will be comfortable with them nor, indeed, that those consumers will continue to exist in either the same form, or numbers as they do today. To ensure maximum payoff of research dollars, the equipment development process must consider user needs. This study defines motor carrier concerns, cost tolerances, and the engine parameters which match the future projected industry needs. The approach taken to do that is to be explained and the results presented. The material to be given comes basically from a survey of motor carrier fleets. It provides indications of the role of heavy duty vehicles in the 1998 period and their desired maintenance and engine performance parameters.

Strawhorn, L. W.; Suski, V. A.

1985-01-01

116

Biomedical engineering continues to make the future.  

PubMed

Biomedical engineering (BME) continues to make the future, not just respond to the present, by anticipating the needs of interface engineering and clinical medicine. In many respects, BME is the educational mode of the future, fostering collaboration among disciplines at its core by building on basic concepts in engineering and biology. We strive to educate where the needs, opportunities, and jobs are and will be in the future. The bridge between engineering, biology, and medicine is a growing link, and there is no sign that this interface will slow. With an aging population, dynamic changes in health care, as well as global economies and related themes upon us, we are only at the very beginning of the impact that BME will have on medicine and the quality of life. Those of us in BME are excited to be setting this agenda and welcome your participation. In part, this is why we have designed our BME major to cover both the depth and breadth, always a challenge, but one that we are committed to. The depth of the design projects, research experience, coursework, study abroad options, and internships all convenes to establish a solid foundation for our students as they embark on their career paths. PMID:21791406

Fantini, Sergio; Bennis, Caoimhe; Kaplan, David

2011-01-01

117

Foreign students and foreign-born scientists and engineers in the US work force  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes some earlier findings regarding the stay rate of foreign students and then addresses two questions about which we have scant information at present. One question is concerning the geographic origin of foreign nationals working in the United States. The second is related to the stay rate of foreign students: What is the emigration rate of foreign-born scientists and engineers once they have become a part of the US work force.

Finn, M.G.

1987-01-01

118

Knowledge Engineering for Preservation and Future use of Institutional Knowledge  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Project has two main thrusts-preservation of special knowledge and its useful representation via computers. NASA is losing the expertise of its engineers and scientists who put together the great missions of the past. We no longer are landing men on the moon. Some of the equipment still used today (such as the RL-10 rocket) was designed decades ago by people who are now retiring. Furthermore, there has been a lack, in some areas of technology, of new projects that overlap with the old and that would have provided opportunities for monitoring by senior engineers of the young ones. We are studying this problem and trying out a couple of methods of soliciting and recording rare knowledge from experts. One method is that of Concept Maps which produces a graphical interface to knowledge even as it helps solicit that knowledge. We arranged for experienced help in this method from John Coffey of the Institute of Human and Machine Technology at the University of West Florida. A second method which we plan to try out in May, is a video-taped review of selected failed missions (e.g., the craft tumbled and blew up). Five senior engineers (most already retired from NASA) will, as a team, analyze available data, illustrating their thought processes as they try to solve the problem of why a space craft failed to complete its mission. The session will be captured in high quality audio and with at least two video cameras. The video can later be used to plan future concept mapping interviews and, in edited form, be a product in itself. Our computer representations of the amassed knowledge may eventually, via the methods of expert systems, be joined with other software being prepared as a suite of tools to aid future engineers designing rocket engines. In addition to representation by multimedia concept maps, we plan to consider linking vast bodies of text (and other media) by hypertexting methods.

Moreman, Douglas; Dyer, John

1996-01-01

119

A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Careers in action  

SciTech Connect

This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

Not Available

1991-12-31

120

A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

Not Available

1991-01-01

121

Designers' Perspectives on Effective Professional Development for Scientist- and Engineer-Educators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While preparing a formal description of the CfAO's Professional Development Program (PDP), some of the PDP's designers and instructors described its core values and unique aspects, for internal reference. However, these ideas are worth sharing, as they represent the insiders' perspectives on what makes the PDP successful. No single attribute described is completely unique to the PDP, but taken together these values and aspects combine and inter-relate to strengthen and distinguish the program. These attributes include: (1) the PDP's main participants, who are practicing scientists and engineers rather than pre-service teachers; (2) the importance of community among these participants; (3) the interdisciplinarity of the participants and the interdisciplinary nature of science/engineering education itself; (4) respect for education research and best practices; (5) a focus on diversity and equity in science/engineering education; (6) the university-level science/engineering lab (as opposed to the lecture) as a venue for innovation; (7) a focus on inquiry as an exemplar of effective science/engineering education; (8) an emphasis on being intentional with one's choices as an educator; (9) a cycle of experience-reflection-innovation-reflection; and (10) the agility of the PDP program and staff to nimbly try new ideas and/or respond to participants' needs. The authors believe that the PDP's unique combination of these values and aspects leads to such successes as high return-participation and over-subscription rates, and contributes to the program's success overall.

Seagroves, S.; Metevier, A. J.; Hunter, L.; Porter, J.; Brown, C.; Jonsson, P.; Kluger-Bell, B.; Raschke, L.

2010-12-01

122

UCS-PROMOVE: The engineer of the future  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Universidade de Caxias do Sul (UCS) elaborated the cooperative project called ‘The engineer of the future’, with the objective of promoting science and engineering among high school teachers and students. This project aims to improve the quality of the teaching and to increase the interest of students in technological areas, leading to a future career in engineering. The activities

V. Villas-Boas

2010-01-01

123

NASA GSFC Science Communication Working Group: Addressing Barriers to Scientist and Engineer Participation in Education and Public Outreach Activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Science Communication Working Group (SCWG) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been in existence since late 2007. The SCWG is comprised of education and public outreach (E/PO) professionals, public affairs specialists, scientists, and engineers. The goals of the SCWG are to identify barriers to scientist and engineer engagement in E/PO activities and to enable those scientists and engineers who wish to contribute to E/PO to be able to do so. SCWG members have held meetings with scientists and engineers across GSFC to determine barriers to their involvement in E/PO. During these meetings, SCWG members presented examples of successful, ongoing E/PO projects, encouraged active research scientists and engineers to talk about their own E/PO efforts and what worked for them, discussed the E/PO working environment, discussed opportunities for getting involved in E/PO (particularly in high-impact efforts that do not take much time), handed out booklets on effective E/PO, and asked scientists and engineers what they need to engage in E/PO. The identified barriers were consistent among scientists in GSFC's four science divisions (Earth science, planetary science, heliophysics, and astrophysics). Common barriers included 1) lack of time, 2) lack of funding support, 3) lack of value placed on doing E/PO by supervisors, 4) lack of training on doing appropriate/effective E/PO for different audiences, 5) lack of awareness and information about opportunities, 6) lack of understanding of what E/PO really is, and 7) level of effort required to do E/PO. Engineers reported similar issues, but the issues of time and funding support were more pronounced due to their highly structured work day and environment. Since the barriers were identified, the SCWG has taken a number of steps to address and rectify them. Steps have included holding various events to introduce scientists and engineers to E/PO staff and opportunities including an E/PO Open House, brown bag seminars on various E/PO topics, and an E/PO proposal writing workshop. SCWG members have also worked to incorporate information about E/PO, including what it is, points of contact, and opportunities for participation, into ongoing training sessions at GSFC, such as New Employee Orientation, Road to Mission Success, and Project Scientist Training. In addition, SCWG members have met with GSFC's upper management to voice barriers and concerns raised by scientists and engineers. We will expand on the barriers, efforts to address them, and the results of those efforts.

Bleacher, L.; Hsu, B. C.; Campbell, B. A.; Hess, M.

2011-12-01

124

Key Future Engineering Capabilities for Human Capital Retention  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Projected record retirements of Baby Boomer generation engineers have been predicted to result in significant losses of mission-critical knowledge in space, national security, and future scientific ventures vital to high-technology corporations. No comprehensive review or analysis of engineering capabilities has been performed to identify threats related to the specific loss of mission-critical knowledge posed by the increasing retirement of tenured engineers. Archival data from a single diversified Fortune 500 aerospace manufacturing engineering company's engineering career database were analyzed to ascertain whether relationships linking future engineering capabilities, engineering disciplines, and years of engineering experience could be identified to define critical knowledge transfer models. Chi square, logistic, and linear regression analyses were used to map patterns of discipline-specific, mission-critical knowledge using archival data of engineers' perceptions of engineering capabilities, key developmental experiences, and knowledge learned from their engineering careers. The results from the study were used to document key engineering future capabilities. The results were then used to develop a proposed human capital retention plan to address specific key knowledge gaps of younger engineers as veteran engineers retire. The potential for social change from this study involves informing leaders of aerospace engineering corporations on how to build better quality mentoring or succession plans to fill the void of lost knowledge from retiring engineers. This plan can secure mission-critical knowledge for younger engineers for current and future product development and increased global competitiveness in the technology market.

Sivich, Lorrie

125

How Do Engineering Scientists Think? Model-Based Simulation in Biomedical Engineering Research Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Designing, building, and experimenting with physical simulation models are central problem-solving practices in the engineering sciences. Model-based simulation is an epistemic activity which includes exploration, generation and testing of hypotheses, explanation, and inference. This paper argues that to interpret and understand how these simulation models function in creating knowledge and technologies requires construing problem solving as accomplished by a researcher

Nancy J. Nersessian

2009-01-01

126

Comparison: Direct thrust nuclear engine, nuclear electric engine, and a chemical engine for future space missions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need for an advanced direct thrust nuclear rocket propulsion engine has been identified in Project Forecast 2, Air Force Systems Command report which looks into future Air Force needs. The Air Force Astronautical Laboratory (AFAL) has been assigned responsibility for developing the nuclear engine, and they in turn have requested support from teams of contractors who have the full

J. H. Ramsthaler; T. K. Sulmeisters

1988-01-01

127

Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States: 1995  

NSF Publications Database

... of Doctoral Scientists and Engineersin the United States: 1995 Hypertext Format Characteristics of ... United States: 1995 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists and ...

128

Winter 2011-2012 Engineering Our Future  

E-print Network

competition (page 3), and the ChemE Car Team won the safety award (page 3). A team of electrical and computer, construction engineering and engineering technology, electrical and computer engineering, and industrial engineering. I have placed a high importance on safety within laboratories and facilities in the college as we

Gelfond, Michael

129

Connecting to the future: How the perception of future impacts engineering undergraduate students' learning and performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to examine how engineering students' conceptualization of their future is related to the factors which have been studied related to students' retention. Two Future Time Perspective (FTP) constructs, Connectedness and Perceived Instrumentality, were included to measure students' conceptualization of their future. The results indicated that students who tended to connect their present to engineering

Wen-Ting Chung; Jieun Lee; Jenefer Husman; Glenda Stump; Cecelia Maez; Aaron Done

2009-01-01

130

Next generation of scientists and engineers: Who`s in the pipeline  

SciTech Connect

Our ability to produce the next generation of scientists and engineers is dependent upon two important demographic changes: the trends in the number of births and the increasingly diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds of those already born. The number of births dropped 25% from 1956 to 1976. As a consequence, the number of high school graduates dropped from 3.1 million in 1977 to 2.4 million in 1992 and will not reach the 1977 high until after 2000. More than half of these graduates are women, and one of every four is a member of minority group. Women now make up more than half of all undergraduates and almost half of all graduate students, but are underrepresented in the natural science and engineering fields. Minority students are about half as likely to be enrolled in college as white students. About 32% of all precollege students and 20% of all college students are members of minority groups. Based on current graduate enrollment figures in natural science and engineering, there will be little increase in women`s share of doctorates in the next several years. The number of PhDs earned by American minorities continues to be very small. Not known is when our economy will require more professionals trained in science and engineering. But any serious attempt to increase the number of students eligible to choose college majors in science or engineering must take both sex and race/ethnicity into account. The nation cannot afford to waste the talent in two-thirds of our increasingly diverse population.

Babco, E.L.

1995-12-31

131

Role of military scientists and engineers in space (1980-2000)  

SciTech Connect

The Space Transportation System provides military scientists and engineers exciting new capabilities to conduct a variety of pioneering experiments on orbit, taking unique advantage of the space environment itself or observing the planet firsthand from the vantage point of space. The reusable Shuttle/Spacelab configuration permits a more effective use of the human and material resources being committed to the space program in the next decade, and ensures the presence of man in space on a routine basis. However, full-scale exploitation of space for national defense will depend to a great extent on the skillful and successful utilization of the military payload specialists, who will fly and operate various Shuttle-based DoD experiments. This paper explores the doctrine, role, function, and training requirements for DoD payload specialists. The unique advantage of man-in-the-loop activities and the orbiting military scientist conducting experiments in situ is addressed in light of previous US manned space flight experience and the projected capabilities of the Shuttle. 4 figures.

Angelo, J.A. Jr

1981-01-01

132

Statistics for nuclear engineers and scientists. Part 1. Basic statistical inference  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended for the use of engineers and scientists working in the nuclear industry, especially at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. It serves as the basis for several Bettis in-house statistics courses. The objectives of the report are to introduce the reader to the language and concepts of statistics and to provide a basic set of techniques to apply to problems of the collection and analysis of data. Part 1 covers subjects of basic inference. The subjects include: descriptive statistics; probability; simple inference for normally distributed populations, and for non-normal populations as well; comparison of two populations; the analysis of variance; quality control procedures; and linear regression analysis.

Beggs, W.J.

1981-02-01

133

Italy's contribution, from a medical standpoint, to the space safety of payload scientists, and perspectives for the future  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Italy, the selection of the Italian payload scientists has been performed according to the Spacelab Program of ESA. Twenty-four subjects underwent a screening performed by the Health Service of Italian Air Force. They were requested to pass an exercise test on treadmill and another ten-minute test on centrifuge, subject to the effect of + 3 G z. The authors briefly describe the results of the test. Noteworthy is the determination of Central Flicker Fusion Frequency. This parameter makes it possible to assess the endurance level of the subject, much earlier than other techniques (e.g. EKG). The importance of an accurate preliminary screening is emphasized as well as of successive training periods. Future studies will be undertaken to compare evoked cortical potentials with behaviour parameters of space safety, with a view to setting up a subtle tool of evaluation for both future candidates and payload scientists.

Rotondo, G.; Ramacci, G. A.; Meineri, G.; Modugno, G. C.; Monesi, F.

134

Comparison: Direct thrust nuclear engine, nuclear electric engine, and a chemical engine for future space missions  

SciTech Connect

The need for an advanced direct thrust nuclear rocket propulsion engine has been identified in Project Forecast 2, Air Force Systems Command report which looks into future Air Force needs. The Air Force Astronautical Laboratory (AFAL) has been assigned responsibility for developing the nuclear engine, and they in turn have requested support from teams of contractors who have the full capability to assist in the development of the nuclear engine. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has formed a team of experts with Martin Marietta for mission analysis. Science Applications International (SAIC) for flight safety analysis, Westinghouse for the nuclear subsystem, and Rocketdyne for the engine system. INEL is the overall program manager and manager for test facility design, construction and operation. The INEL team has produced plans for both the engine system and the ground test facility. AFAL has funded the INEL team to perform mission analyses to evaluate the cost, performance and operational advantages for a nuclear rocket engine in performing Air Force Space Missions. For those studies, the Advanced Nuclear Rocket Engine (ANRE), a scaled down NERVA derivative, was used as the baseline nuclear engine to compare against chemical engines and nuclear electric engines for performance of orbital transfer and maneuvering missions. 3 tabs.

Ramsthaler, J.H.; Sulmeisters, T.K.

1988-01-01

135

Teaching the Next Generation of Scientists and Engineers the NASA Design Process  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Integrated Product Team (IPT) program, led by The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), is a multidisciplinary, multi-university, multi-level program whose goal is to provide opportunities for high school and undergraduate scientists and engineers to translate stakeholder needs and requirements into viable engineering design solutions via a distributed multidisciplinary team environment. The current program supports three projects. The core of the program is the two-semester senior design experience where science, engineering, and liberal arts undergraduate students from UAH, the College of Charleston, Southern University at Baton Rouge, and Ecole Suprieure des Techniques Aronautiques et de Construction Automobile (ESTACA) in Paris, France form multidisciplinary competitive teams to develop system concepts of interest to the local aerospace community. External review boards form to provide guidance and feedback throughout the semester and to ultimately choose a winner from the competing teams. The other two projects, the Innovative Student Project for the Increased Recruitment of Engineering and Science Students (InSPIRESS) Level I and Level II focus exclusively on high school students. InSPIRESS Level I allows high schools to develop a payload to be accommodated on the system being developed by senior design experience teams. InSPIRESS Level II provides local high school students first-hand experience in the senior design experience by allowing them to develop a subsystem or component of the UAH-led system over the two semesters. This program provides a model for NASA centers to engage the local community to become more involved in design projects.

Caruso, Pamela W.; Benfield, Michael P. J.; Justice, Stefanie H.

2011-01-01

136

Arts, Sciences and Engineering--Planning for the Future Introduction  

E-print Network

Arts, Sciences and Engineering--Planning for the Future Introduction Over the past two and a half years, Arts, Sciences and Engineering has been developing a plan to shape our future during the coming decade. The provisional plan presented here arose from the insightful work of faculty, students and staff

Cantlon, Jessica F.

137

Comprehensive approach to photonics education for technicians, engineers, and scientists in 4+2+2 programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper outlines a curricular plan for the education of photonics technicians, engineers, and scientists in 4 + 2 + 2 programs. These programs begin at the 9th grade in high school and end either at the 14th grade (4 + 2 programs) with an associate of applied science degree, or at the 16th grade (4 + 2 + 2 programs) with a bachelor of science degrees. Beginning with comprehensive lists of appropriate tasks for photonics technicians - as identified by phonics-related industries - extrapolation is made to specific courses, sequences of courses, and suggested programs. The foundations are set in place first in four-year high school programs, with emphasis on basics in mathematics, science, communications and introductory technology courses. The postsecondary level programs, through the 13th and 14th year, present the breadth and depth of skills required for the development of entry-level photonics technicians. Finally articulated programs from two-year colleges on to four-year colleges are outlined for those who opt to continue on for a bachelor of science degree and who plan to enter the phonics workforce with concentration in electrical engineering and/or optics.

Pedrotti, Leno S.; Massa, Nicholas J.; Soulsby, Eric P.; Enderle, John; Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

1995-10-01

138

Reinventing Manufacturing Engineering: Refocusing and Exploring Future Opportunities for Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Reinventing Manufacturing Engineering: Refocusing and Exploring Future Opportunities for Students explores the issues of outsourcing and the decline in enrollment in manufacturing engineering and technology programs by examining current manufacturing programs in engineering and technology within the context of the new realities in American manufacturing. Current and future strategies for revising and promoting manufacturing education, and careers, are explored. An accompanying Adobe PDF file (S0500096) is also available in the MERC database.

Davis, Beverly; Jack, Hugh

2010-02-26

139

Preparing a New Generation of Citizens and Scientists to Face Earth's Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As the research interests and the focus of traditional earth scientists are transformed, so too must education in earth system science at colleges and universities across the country change. The required change involves not only the methods used to teach this new science, but also the essential place of the earth sciences in the panoply of…

Bralower, Timothy J.; Feiss, P. Geoffrey; Manduca, Cathryn A.

2008-01-01

140

AGU education and public outreach programs: Empowering future Earth and space scientists  

Microsoft Academic Search

The staff and leadership of AGU are committed to fostering excellence in Earth and space science education. While AGU's Strategic Plan does not specifically highlight primary or secondary education among its objectives, outreach in this area plays a significant role in developing and nurturing the next generation of Earth and space scientists. Several educational goals along with specific strategies will

Bethany Adamec; Pranoti Asher

2011-01-01

141

Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) - Engaging Students and Teachers in Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) has been a community partnership between local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA), and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) for the past 20 years. The goals of YES are to increase the number of high school students, especially those from underrepresented groups, seeking careers in science and engineering and to enhance their success in entering the college and major of their choice. This is accomplished by expanding career awareness, including information on "hot" career areas through seminars and laboratory tours by SwRI staff, and allowing students to interact on a continuing basis with role models at SwRI in a real-world research experiences in physical sciences (including astronomy), information sciences, and a variety of engineering fields. YES consists of two parts: 1) An intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of SwRI mentors during the academic year. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. Twenty-one YES 2012 students developed a website for the Dawn Mission (yesserver.space.swri.edu) and five high school science teachers are developing space-related lessons for classroom presentation. Partnerships between research institutes, local high schools, and community foundations, like the YES Program, positively affect students’ preparation for STEM careers via real-world research experiences with mentorship teams consisting of professional staff and qualified teachers. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge support from the NASA MMS Mission, SwRI, and local charitable foundations.

Boice, Daniel C.; Reiff, P.

2012-10-01

142

Math 530. Mathematics for Scientists and Engineers Course Website: www.math.colostate.edu/~shipman/math530  

E-print Network

Math 530. Mathematics for Scientists and Engineers Fall 2013 Course Website: www.math.colostate.edu/~shipman/math530 Instructor: Patrick Shipman Office: Weber, Room 121 Office Hours: TBA. Email: shipman@math.colostate.edu; Website: www.math.colostate.edu/~shipman Phone: (970) 491-6488 The Goals of the course are to � gain

143

This book is intended for a wide readership including engineers, ap plied mathematicians, computer scientists, and graduate students who  

E-print Network

Preface This book is intended for a wide readership including engineers, ap� plied mathematicians, computer scientists, and graduate students who seek a comprehensive view of the main results on the Lyapunov matrix equation. The book presents different techniques for solving and ana� lyzing the algebraic

Gajic, Zoran

144

Volume 2, Issue 1 Engineering the Future  

E-print Network

Engineering 11 Honours & Awards 14 Meet the Combustion Expert 16 Smart Cities 18 Facts & Figures 20 Free, resulting in reliable pensions for workers, better endowments for universities,and most importantly

Sun, Yu

145

Symposium:Future of Engineering Education  

E-print Network

.m. with a tour of this high-tech, eco-friendly facility. * Through your eyes. Engineering as art. Calling on all ­ 24 Homecoming - a time of celebration for McMaster alumni. We invite you back to campus

Thompson, Michael

146

The future center as an urban innovation engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Purpose,– The purpose,of this article is to describe,a future center as an urban innovation engine for the knowledge city, to understand the success factors of a future center and how this success can be replicated systematically,in the implementation,and development,of future centers in the future. Design\\/methodology\\/approach,– Nine future centers,were,visited and,a longitudinal,action research-based,case,study,was,conducted,at the regional Be’er Sheva PISGA Future Center in

Ron Dvir; Yael Schwartzberg; Haya Avni; Carol Webb; Fiona Lettice

2006-01-01

147

Twenty NSF-Nominated Scientists and Engineers Receive Top Presidential Honor  

NSF Publications Database

... Computing Earth & Environment Education Engineering Mathematics Nanoscience People & Society ... engineering Peter J. Delfyett Jr., University of Central Florida, optics and electrical engineering ...

148

Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) 2010 - Engaging Teachers in Space Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the past 18 years, Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) has been a community partnership between local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA), and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). The goals of YES are to increase the number of high school students, especially those from underrepresented groups, seeking careers in science and engineering, to enhance their success in entering the college and major of their choice, and to promote teacher development in STEM fields. This is accomplished by allowing students and teachers to interact on a continuing basis with role models at SwRI in real-world research experiences in physical sciences (including space science), information sciences, and a variety of engineering fields. A total of 239 students have completed YES or are currently enrolled. Of these students, 38% are females and 56% are ethnic minorities, reflecting the local ethnic diversity, and 67% represent underserved groups. Presently, there are 21 students and 9 secondary school teachers enrolled in the YES 2010/2011 Program. YES consists of an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students and teachers experience the research environment and a collegial mentorship where they complete individual research projects under the guidance of SwRI mentors during the academic year. YES students develop a website (yesserver.space.swri.edu) for topics in space science (this year was ESA's Rosetta Mission) and high school STEM teachers develop space-related lessons for classroom presentation. Teachers participate in an in-service workshop to share their developed classroom materials and spread awareness of space-related research. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. Partnerships between research institutes, local high schools, and community foundations, like the YES Program, can positively affect students’ preparation for STEM careers via real-world research experiences with mentorship teams consisting of professional staff and qualified teachers. Acknowledgements: We acknowledge support from the NASA MMS Mission, Texas Space Grant Consortium, SwRI, and local charitable foundations.

Boice, D. C.; Reiff, P. H.

2010-12-01

149

Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) 2009 - Engaging Students and Teachers in Space Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the past 17 years, Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) has been a community partnership between local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA), and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). The goals of YES are to increase the number of high school students, especially those from underrepresented groups, seeking careers in science and engineering, to enhance their success in entering the college and major of their choice, and to promote teacher development in STEM fields. This is accomplished by allowing students and teachers to interact on a continuing basis with role models at SwRI in real-world research experiences in physical sciences (including space science), information sciences, and a variety of engineering fields. A total of 218 students have completed YES or are currently enrolled. Of these students, 37% are females and 56% are ethnic minorities, reflecting the local ethnic diversity, and 67% represent underserved groups. Presently, there are 20 students and 3 teachers enrolled in the YES 2009/2010 Program. YES consists of an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students and teachers experience the research environment and a collegial mentorship where they complete individual research projects under the guidance of SwRI mentors during the academic year. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. Teachers participate in an in-service workshop to share classroom materials and spread awareness of space-related research. YES students develop a website (yesserver.space.swri.edu) for topics in space science (this year was NASA's MMS Mission) and high school science teachers develop space-related lessons for classroom presentation. Partnerships between research institutes, local high schools, and community foundations, like the YES Program, can positively affect students’ preparation for STEM careers via real-world research experiences with mentorship teams consisting of professional staff and qualified teachers. Acknowledgements. We acknowledge support from the NASA MMS Mission, Texas Space Grant Consortium, SwRI, and local charitable foundations.

Boice, D. C.; Reiff, P. H.

2009-12-01

150

Patrick Woo Research Scientist Hitachi High Technologies Canada Title: "Recent and Future Trends in Scanning Electron Microscopy: Imaging, Analytical and In-situ  

E-print Network

Patrick Woo ­ Research Scientist Hitachi High Technologies Canada Title: "Recent and Future Trends in Scanning Electron Microscopy: Imaging, Analytical of the presentation will show some recent trends of in-situ microscopy techniques

Garmestani, Hamid

151

The Internet Engineering Task Force and The Future of Internet  

E-print Network

and deployment of Internet protocols, it was initially open only for US government funded researchers. Early 1987The Internet Engineering Task Force and The Future of Internet E. Baccelli1 , T. Clausen1 , and P regarding the Internet are being confronted, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF [1]) is unavoid- able

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

152

THE FUTURE OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION III. DEVELOPING CRITICAL SKILLS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the first paper in this series, we proposed that our goals as engineering educators should include equipping our students with problem-solving, communication, teamwork, self-assessment, change management and lifelong learning skills. These goals are consistent with ABET Engineering Criteria 2000,, a consideration of great importance in the United States currently and (we predict) in other countries in the near future.

Donald R. Woods; Richard M. Felder; James E. Stice

2000-01-01

153

Future subsonic transport engine technology improvements and resultant propulsion alternatives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major contenders for engines to power future subsonic transports include the conventional high bypass turbofan, the geared turbofan of somewhat higher bypass ratio, and the high disk loading turboprop. Typical designs involving projected advancements in technology are described and compared to a current turbofan. The key technology features for each of the advanced engines are identified and their relative

R. E. Neitzel

1977-01-01

154

BUILDING THE FUTURE of MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

CORNER DINING FACILITY East Hall Engineering Living Learning Community Stephen C. O'Connell Center #12-edge research in: · biologically inspired morphing and flapping winged flying machines · cars that autonomously others. This breadth of activity is currently disbursed throughout six buildings and the solar energy

Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

155

Career opportunities--Engineer your future!  

E-print Network

.financialaid.iastate.edu. Iowa State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin all around you-- your body converting food to energy, the degradation of biodegradable products in the environment, and ingredients mixing and bonding together to make your favorite recipe. Chemical engineers

Lin, Zhiqun

156

The Challenge: Context "Future Engineers Summer Camp"  

E-print Network

structures ­ human binary tree, sort the students ­ Parallel garbage collection (SIGCSE '07) · Benefit-term engagement? ­ Assessment with control group Module: Overall Structure · Intro lecture: ­ Role of CS Engineering 2 tbsp cocoa 1 tsp baking pwdr 3 eggs 1 ¼ c flour ¾ tsp salt ½ c butter ½ c sugar 1 lb chocolate

Sivilotti, Paul

157

Technological Innovation and Technical Communications: Their Place in Aerospace Engineering Curricula. A Survey of European, Japanese and US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on results from 260 aerospace engineers and scientists in United States, Europe, and Japan regarding their opinions about professional importance of technical communications; generation and utilization of technical communications; and relevant content of an undergraduate course in technical communications. The fields of cryogenics,…

Pinelli, Thomas E.; And Others

1991-01-01

158

Reinventing Manufacturing Engineering: Refocusing and Exploring Future Opportunities for Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Reinventing Manufacturing Engineering: Refocusing and Exploring Future Opportunities for Students explores the issues of outsourcing and the decline in enrollment in manufacturing engineering and technology programs by examining current manufacturing programs in engineering and technology within the context of the new realities in American manufacturing. Current and future strategies for revising and promoting manufacturing education, and careers, are explored. An accompanying PowerPoint presentation (S0500097) is also available in the MERC database. Note: This material is included in MERC based on the recommendations from peers and not as part of our external review process.

Davis, Beverly; Jack, Hugh

2009-07-16

159

Current and future opportunities in aeronautical engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current demand for aeronautical engineers is approximately balanced with supply, with some shortfall in certain specialties. In the near term (5 years), demand will exceed supply of new graduates. A number of factors have brought on the state of imbalance: (1) the cyclic nature of the demand of our defense requirements; (2) drastic changes in DOD aircraft procurement; (3) the emergence of the space age; (4) evolution of social attitudes toward technology with resultant decline in enrollments; and (5) the universities themselves through their influences in the direction of careers selected by engineers. These factors have been counteracted somewhat by increased DOD emphasis on aircraft development programs but more importantly by the favorable growth in civil aircraft requirements.

Brizendine, J. C.

1975-01-01

160

Engineering photorespiration: current state and future possibilities.  

PubMed

Reduction of flux through photorespiration has been viewed as a major way to improve crop carbon fixation and yield since the energy-consuming reactions associated with this pathway were discovered. This view has been supported by the biomasses increases observed in model species that expressed artificial bypass reactions to photorespiration. Here, we present an overview about the major current attempts to reduce photorespiratory losses in crop species and provide suggestions for future research priorities. PMID:23121076

Peterhansel, C; Krause, K; Braun, H-P; Espie, G S; Fernie, A R; Hanson, D T; Keech, O; Maurino, V G; Mielewczik, M; Sage, R F

2013-07-01

161

Engineering the Future: The Social Necessity of Communicative Engineers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is a long and winding road from invention to innovation. Starting from this observation, this paper presents a historical perspective on the capabilities engineers should possess to do their work. The importance of the "communicative competence" involved in creating a social base for innovation is underpinned. We will present a theoretical…

Ravesteijn, Wim; De Graaff, Erik; Kroesen, Otto

2006-01-01

162

Engineering the Future: Embedding Engineering Permanently across the School-University Interface  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of an educational program. Engineering the Future (EtF) sought to promote a permanent, informed awareness within the school community of high-level engineering by embedding key aspects of engineering within the education curriculum. The Scottish education system is used for a case…

MacBride, G.; Hayward, E. L.; Hayward, G.; Spencer, E.; Ekevall, E.; Magill, J.; Bryce, A. C.; Stimpson, B.

2010-01-01

163

Rube Goldbergineering: Lessons In Teaching Engineering Design To Future Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hands-on learning experiences and interactive learning environments can be effective in teaching K-12 students. Design, in essence, is an interactive, hands-on experience. Engineering design can be taught in the classroom using innovative hands-on projects, such as designing and building serve to teach design, promote creativity, and provide opportunities for hands-on problem solving, in addition to giving students experience working in

Shawn Jordan; Nielsen Pereira

2009-01-01

164

How Chinese scientists discovered qinghaosu (artemisinin) and developed its derivatives? What are the future perspectives?  

PubMed

Since the middle of this century and especially since the 1960s and 1970s. Chinese scientists have put considerable effort and resources into the search for new antimalarial compounds extracted from Chinese traditional herbs. Archaeological findings indicate that qinghao (Artemisia annua L.) has been used as a traditional remedy in China for over two thousand years. Its antimalarial principle was finally isolated in 1971 and named artemisinin or qinghaosu (meaning the principle of qinghao in Chinese). Its rapid action, low toxicity and powerful effect against falciparum malaria made it a favored subject for research. In 1976, the unique structure of the molecule, characterized by an endoperoxide and an alternative O-C-O-C segment, was identified. The specific lactone reduction discovered during the determination of the structure opened the way for the synthesis of qinghaosu derivatives, and thereafter a series of more active and more oil- or water-soluble derivatives was developed. Subsequent studies of the structure/activity relationship led to the discovery of dihydroartemisinin, artemether and artesunate. Now qinghaosu and these three derivatives are being used around the world as effective new antimalarial drugs in the fight against falciparum malaria, including multi-drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. At the present time new qinghaosu analogues or derivatives are being developed and studies of their structure/activity relationships, their antimalarial mechanisms, their interaction with ferrous ions and the DNA damage associated with these processes are being actively pursued. In addition, recent studies also indicate that some qinghaosu derivatives have other bioactivities, including antiparasitic (against Schistosoma japonicum, Toxoplasma gondii and so on) and anticancer activities. Research into qinghaosu and its derivatives has already produced and will no doubt continue to produce results of the utmost importance in the fight against malaria and other diseases. PMID:10212890

Li, Y; Wu, Y L

1998-01-01

165

This book is intended for engineers, mathematicians, physicists, and computer scientists interested in control theory and its applications. The book studies a  

E-print Network

Preface This book is intended for engineers, mathematicians, physicists, and computer scientists published during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s in both mathematics and engineering. The approaches taken in engineering during the 1970s and 1980s were based on the expansion methods (power series, asymptotic

Gajic, Zoran

166

Inspiring future scientists in middle-schools through synergy between classroom learning and water cycle research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water is at the core of many issues in environmental change from local to global scales, and learning about the water cycle offers students an opportunity to explore core scientific concepts and their local environment. In climate research, there are significant uncertainties in the role water plays in the climate system. Water also acts as a central theme that provides opportunities for experiential science education at all levels. The "Water Spotters" program underway at University of Colorado exploits the synergy between needs for enrichment of middle-school science education and the needs for water sample collection to provide primary data for climate research. The program takes advantage of the prominent agricultural landscape of the region in eastern Colorado, which is a poignant example of how society influences the climate through irrigation, evaporation/transpiration and run-off and whose productivity is influenced by the climate system. Both natural grasslands and alpine ecosystems in the surrounding regions serve as examples of the native landscape. In coordination with the St. Vrain Valley School District MESA (Math Engineering Science Achievement) program, middle-school students collect rain water samples that are analyzed and used as a core component of the research goals. In concert, new lessons have been developed in coordination with science teachers that emphasize both core scientific standards and application learning about the water cycle. We present the new curriculum modules developed for the program and that are distributed to middle-school teachers. The modules include original lessons and lessons with expanded original material to teach about water and water isotopes. Curriculum packages that include media resources are increasingly important to teachers. The Water Spotters program uses video to teach collection protocols and give background on the project. Weather station data from schools are disseminated online alongside the rainwater collection protocols. We highlight the value of citizen science in obtaining needed research quality data while also meeting national needs to improve science education.

Noone, D. C.; Kellagher, E.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Raudzens Bailey, A.; Kaushik, A.

2012-12-01

167

Computer-aided software engineering: present status and future directions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examine the current status of Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) and discuss the benefits it promises to deliver in the future. First, an extended life-cycle model is presented. Next, basic functions of a CASE environment and the authors' classification scheme for analyzing CASE products are discussed. Following this, the authors draw implications from the results of empirical CASE studies

Minder Chen; J. F. Nunamaker Jr.; E. Sue Weber

1989-01-01

168

Going synthetic: how scientists and engineers imagine and build a new biology.  

E-print Network

??Synthetic biology practitioners look through an engineer's lens at the incredibly complex, sensitive and seemingly endless resource of living reproductive material and contemplate turning biology… (more)

Cockerton, Caitlin

2011-01-01

169

Intending to Stay: Images of Scientists, Attitudes Toward Women, and Gender as Influences on Persistence among Science and Engineering Majors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contemporary research on gender and persistence in undergraduate education in science and engineering has routinely focused on why students leave their majors rather than asking why students stay. This study compared three common ways of measuring persistence-commitment to major, degree aspirations, and commitment to a science or engineering career-and emphasized factors that would encourage students to persist, including positive images of scientists and engineers, positive attitudes toward gender equity in science and engineering, and positive classroom experiences. A survey was administered in classrooms to a total of 285 female and male students enrolled in two required courses for majors. The results indicate that the different measures of persistence were sensitive to different influences but that students' gender did not interact with their images, attitudes, and experiences in predicted ways. The study concludes that an individual student's gender may be a more important factor in explaining why some female students leave their science and engineering majors than in explaining why others stay.

Wyer, Mary

170

Asian and Pacific Islander women scientists and engineers: A narrative exploration of model minority, gender, and racial stereotypes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This qualitative study uses narrative methodology to understand what becoming a scientist or engineer entails for women stereotyped as model minorities. Interviews with four Chinese and Japanese women focused on the social contexts in which science is encountered in classrooms, families, and community. Interpretation was guided by theories that individuals construct personal narratives mediated by cultural symbolic systems to make meaning of experiences. Narratives revealed that Confucian cultural scripts shaped gender expectations even in families several generations in America. Regardless of parents' level of education, country of birth, and number of children, educational expectations, and resources were lower for daughters. Parents expected daughters to be compliant, feminine, and educated enough to be marriageable. Findings suggest K-12 gender equity science practices encouraged development of the women's interests and abilities but did not affect parental beliefs. The author's 1999 study of Hawaiians/Pacific Islander and Filipina female engineers is included in implications for teacher education programs sensitive to gender, culture, ethnicity, and language.

Chinn, Pauline W. U.

2002-04-01

171

Curiosity + Kindergarten = Future Scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Carefully crafted experiences in the early childhood classroom can create learning opportunities for children that allow one curiosity to lead to another. Learning how to find out answers to fascinating questions is what science is all about. In fact, it

Flannagan, Jenny S.; Rockenbaugh, Liesl

2010-12-01

172

A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To understand the diffusion of aerospace knowledge, it is necessary to understand the communications practices and the information-seeking behaviors of those involved in the production, transfer, and use of aerospace knowledge at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels. In this paper, we report selected results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on communications practices and information-seeking behaviors in the workplace. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communications, use of libraries, the use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. The responses of the survey respondents are placed within the context of the Japanese culture. We assume that differences in Japanese and U.S. cultures influence the communications practices and information-seeking behaviors of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Holloway, Karen; Sato, Yuko; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1996-01-01

173

Regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering: what the future holds?  

PubMed

The work performed by researchers in regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering over the last decades has been superb; however, many questions remain to be answered. The basic biologic mechanisms must be elucidated that will allow the development of dental pulp and dentin in situ. Stress must be placed on the many questions that will lead to the design of effective, safe treatment options and therapies. This article discusses those questions, the answers to which may become the future of regenerative endodontics. The future remains bright, but proper support and patience are required. PMID:22835545

Goodis, Harold E; Kinaia, Bassam Michael; Kinaia, Atheel M; Chogle, Sami M A

2012-07-01

174

3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers, Fall 2003  

E-print Network

The class will cover mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and ...

Carter, W. Craig

175

Career Issues and Laboratory Climates: Different Challenges and Opportunities for Women Engineers and Scientists (survey of Fiscal Year 1997 Powre Awardees)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A survey of fiscal year 1997 POWRE (Professional Opportunities for Women in Research and Education) awardees from the National Science Foundation revealed that women engineers and scientists face similar issues, challenges, and opportunities and think that the laboratory climate has similar impacts on their careers. Separating responses of women scientists from those of women engineers revealed that 70% of both groups listed balancing work with family responsibilities as the most difficult issue. Discrepancies in percentages of women, coupled with differences among disciplinary and subdisciplinary cultures within science, engineering, mathematics, and technology fields, complicate work climates and their impact on women's careers. More frequently than women scientists, women engineers listed issues such as (a) low numbers of women leading to isolation, (b) lack of camaraderie and mentoring, (c) gaining credibility/respect from peers and administrators, (d) time management, (e) prioritizing responsibilities due to disproportionate demands, and (f) learning the rules of the game to survive in a male-dominated environment. Women engineers also listed two positive issues more frequently than women scientists: active recruitment/more opportunities for women and impact of successful women in the profession. The small number of women engineers may explain these results and suggests that it may be inappropriate to group them with other women scientists for analysis, programs, and policies.

Rosser, Sue V.; Zieseniss, Mireille

176

The diesel engine for cars -- Is there a future?  

SciTech Connect

The diesel engine is known as the most fuel efficient combustion engine. Its acceptance for use in passenger cars, however, varies geographically. Today, the diesel car plays an important role in Europe; in France, for instance, it is achieving a remarkable market share of about 42%, while in the US its market penetration can be neglected. Many questions are expressed concerning the future of diesel powered cars. The question affecting market acceptance is as follows: can the significantly better fuel efficiency of a diesel car outweigh perceived detrimental characteristics? Such unfavorable properties are thought to be low specific power, objectionable noise, higher exhaust emissions (including smoke), and higher vehicle price. These features are closely influenced by the state of passenger car diesel engine technology. This technology state and its potential must be evaluated with respect to current and future demands, for instance, tighter exhaust emission regulations. In addition, the commercial value and consumer acceptance of high fuel economy must be evaluated. It is clear that the ultimate result of weighing the pros and cons will depend not only on technological factors, but also on political factors such as fuel taxation. Regarding the state of technology, the diesel car is very promising. First, by employing a direct injection combustion system, the fuel efficiency can be improved by about 15% over current swirl chamber engines. Furthermore, the specific power (hp/ltr) can be increased by efficient supercharging to achieve values of today`s gasoline engines. By tuning the combustion system, low noise engine design features and incorporation of careful noise reduction measures on the vehicle, the noise behavior of a spark ignited vehicle can be reached. Exhaust emissions can currently be reduced to a level to satisfy today`s European and US Tier 1 emission limits. However, significant development effort remains. More stringent emission levels (California US, Tier 2 ULEV, and Stage 3 in Europe) require further advancements in diesel combustion. The strong development potential of 4-valve engines and new unique injection systems is evident. In addition, there are promising developments with lean NO{sub x} catalysts and regenerative particulate filters. These technologies offer the potential to meet the very stringent future emission standards.

Pischinger, F.F. [GmbH and Co. KG, Aachen (Germany). FEV Motorentechnik

1998-07-01

177

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 16: A comparison of the technical communications practices of Russian and US aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies have the same five objectives: first, to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communications to their profession; second, to determine the use and production of technical communications by aerospace engineers and scientists; third, to seek their views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications; fourth, to determine aerospace engineers' and scientists' use of libraries, technical information centers, and on-line data bases; and fifth, to determine the use and importance of computer and information technology to them. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to aerospace engineers and scientists at the Central Aero-Hydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI), NASA ARC, and NASA LaRC. The completion rates for the Russian and U.S. surveys were 64 and 61 percent, respectively. The responses of the Russian and U.S. participants, to selected questions, are presented in this report.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

1993-01-01

178

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 17: A comparison of the technical communication practices of Dutch and US aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies have the same seven objectives: first, to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communications to their profession; second, to determine the use and production of technical communications by aerospace engineers and scientists; third, to seek their views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications; fourth, to determine aerospace engineers' and scientists' use of libraries, technical information centers, and on-line data bases; fifth, to determine the use and importance of computer and information technology to them; sixth, to determine their use of electronic networks; and seventh, to determine their use of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to aerospace engineers and scientists at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR), and NASA Ames Research Center, and the NASA Langley Research Center. The completion rates for the Dutch and U.S. surveys were 55 and 61 percent, respectively. Responses of the Dutch and U.S. participants to selected questions are presented.

Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

1993-01-01

179

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 18: A comparison of the technical communication practices of aerospace engineers and scientists in India and the United States  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, two studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of India and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies have the same seven objectives: first, to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communications to their profession; second, to determine the use and production of technical communications by aerospace engineers and scientists; third, to seek their views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications; fourth, to determine aerospace engineers' and scientists' use of libraries, technical information centers, and on-line data bases; fifth, to determine the use and importance of computer and information technology to them; sixth, to determine their use of electronic networks; and seventh, to determine their use of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to aerospace engineers and scientists at the Indian Institute of Science and the NASA Langley Research Center. The completion rates for the India and U.S. surveys were 48 and 53 percent, respectively. Responses of the India and U.S. participants to selected questions are presented in this report.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1993-01-01

180

Managed learning for engineers\\/scientists in a corporate university setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Corporate education in engineering firms is valued with varying degree depending on the nature of the economic sector, the climate of the firm, and the perspective of the leadership team. Organizations must cope with new customer demands, shifting employment pools, cyclical economic pressures, and their own internal needs to acquire the technical competencies to capture new business and deliver on

Jack Gregg

2005-01-01

181

THE CURRENT EMPLOYMENT MARKET FOR ENGINEERS, SCIENTISTS, AND TECHNICIANS, OCTOBER 1965.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

DATA ON JOB OPENINGS FOR SELECTED ENGINEERING, SCIENTIFIC, AND TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONS, PROVIDED BY THE BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY AFFILIATES FROM FIELD REPORTS ON JUNE 1965 CONDITIONS IN 30 MAJOR LABOR AREAS, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS SEMIANNUAL REPORT. NATIONWIDE DEMAND IN THESE JOB CATEGORIES INCREASED AND BACKLOGS OF APPLICANTS DECREASED BECAUSE…

AUSMUS, NORMA F.; SAILE, ALVIN W.

182

THE CURRENT EMPLOYMENT MARKET FOR ENGINEERS, SCIENTISTS, AND TECHNICIANS, DECEMBER 1966.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

FIELD REPORTS ON JUNE 1966 CONDITIONS IN 30 MAJOR LABOR AREAS FOR ENGINEERING, SCIENTIFIC, AND TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONS, PROVIDED BY AFFILIATES OF THE BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY, WERE THE BASIS FOR THIS SEMIANNUAL REPORT. THE NUMBER OF APPLICANTS HAD DECLINED 48 PERCENT TO A NEW 8-YEAR LOW, WHILE OPENINGS HAD RISEN TO 9,600, 58 PERCENT OVER THE…

AUSMUS, NORMA F.; AND OTHERS

183

Advanced mathematical methods for scientists and engineers I: asymptotic methods and perturbation theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book gives a clear, practical and self-contained presentation of the methods of asymptotics and perturbation theory and explains how to use these methods to obtain approximate analytical solutions to differential and difference equations. These methods allow one to analyze physics and engineering problems that may not be solvable in closed form and for which brute-force numerical methods may not

1999-01-01

184

The Barrett Foundation: Undergraduate Research Program for Environmental Engineers and Scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new program sponsored by The Barrett Foundation in the University of Vermont College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences (UVM) supports undergraduate students in Environmental Engineering, Earth and Environmental Sciences to pursue independent summer research projects. The Barrett Foundation, a non-profit organization started by a UVM Engineering alum, provided a grant to support undergraduate research. Students must work with at least two different faculty advisors to develop project ideas, then independently prepare a research proposal and submit it to a faculty panel for review. The program was structured as a scholarship to foster a competitive application process. In the last three years, fourteen students have participated in the program. The 2007 Barrett Scholars projects include: - Using bacteria to change the chemistry of subsurface media to encourage calcite precipitation for soil stability and pollutant sequestration - Assessing structural weaknesses in a historic post and beam barn using accelerometers and wireless data collection equipment - Using image processing filters to 1) evaluate leaf wetness, a leading indicator of disease in crops and 2) assess the movement of contaminants through building materials. - Investigating the impact of increased water temperature on cold-water fish species in two Vermont streams. - Studying the impacts of light duty vehicle tailpipe emissions on air quality This program supports applied and interdisciplinary environmental research and introduces students to real- world engineering problems. In addition, faculty from different research focuses are presented the opportunity to establish new collaborations around campus through the interdisciplinary projects. To date, there is a successful publication record from the projects involving the Barrett scholars, including students as authors. One of the objectives of this program was to provide prestigious, competitive awards to outstanding undergraduate engineers who wish to pursue a specific research project under the mentorship of faculty members who are leading scholars in their fields. We not only wanted to create a valuable experience for the undergraduate engineers, but also felt that creating a competitive and prestigious award would create excitement and convince other undergraduate engineers to pursue research experiences.

Rizzo, D. M.; Paul, M.; Farmer, C.; Larson, P.; Matt, J.; Sentoff, K.; Vazquez-Spickers, I.; Pearce, A. R.

2007-12-01

185

Engineering and Computer  

E-print Network

L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science #12;ENGINEERING THE FUTURE The engineers and computer scientists who will be tomorrow's leaders--and not "just" engineers--require more than roots with Syracuse University's vast opportunities, the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer

McConnell, Terry

186

Real cases study through computer applications for futures Agricultural Engineers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the huge concerns on the higher engineer education is the lag of real cases study that the future professionals need in the work and corporation market. This concern was reflected in Bologna higher education system including recommendations in this respect. The knowhow as why this or other methodology is one of the keys to resolve this problem. In the last courses given in Department of Crop Production, at the Agronomy Engineer School of Madrid (Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos, UPM) we have developed more than one hundred applications in Microsoft Excel®. Our aim was to show different real scenarios which the future Agronomic Engineers can be found in their professional life and with items related to crop production field. In order to achieve our target, each application in Excel presents a file text in which is explained the theoretical concepts and the objectives, as well as some resources used from Excel syntax. In this way, the student can understand and use of such application, even they can modify and customize it for a real case presented in their context and/or master project. This electronic monograph gives an answer to the need to manage data in several real scenarios showed in lectures, calculus resolution, information analysis and manage worksheets in a professional and student level.

Moratiel, R.; Durán, J. M.; Tarquis, A. M.

2010-05-01

187

Twenty NSF-Supported Young Scientists and Engineers Receive Presidential Early Career Awards  

NSF Publications Database

The 2004 PECASE awards announced today include six engineers: Jennifer A. Jay, University of California, Los Angeles; Michael J. Garvin II, Columbia University; Michael A. Bevan, Texas A&M University; Martin L. Culpepper, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Wei Li, University of Washington; and Jun Jiao, Portland State University. In the mathematical and physical sciences, Frank L.H. Brown, University of California, Santa Barbara; Oscar D. Dubon Jr., University of California, Berkeley; ...

188

CCF Young Computer Scientists & Engineers Forum for Graduate Students 2003 12 23 ( )14:00-17: 30  

E-print Network

�йú¼��ã»ú�§»á�à�ê¼��ã»ú¿�¼¼���³�о¿�ú·����³ CCF Young Computer Scientists & Engineers Forum for Graduate Students YOCSEF-GS �� 2003 �ê 12 �� 23 �� (Ð���¶þ )14:00-17: 30 �����ñ´ó�§¶à�½�å½��§�¥ (½��§ 4 � Professor£¬ the State University of New York ±¨¸æ���Ý 1. Why and what is database/KDD research? · Practice

189

Technical communications in aerospace - An analysis of the practices reported by U.S. and European aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flow of scientific and technical information (STI) at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels is studied. The responses of U.S and European aerospace engineers and scientists to questionnaires concerning technical communications in aerospace are examined. Particular attention is given to the means used to communicate information and the social system of the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. Demographic data about the survey respondents are provided. The methods used to communicate technical data and the sources utilized to solve technical problems are described. The importance of technical writing skills and the use of computer technology in the aerospace field are discussed. The derived data are useful for R&D and information managers in order to improve access to and utilization of aerospace STI.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Myron

1990-01-01

190

Engineering for a ChangingWorld A Roadmap to the Future of  

E-print Network

Engineering for a ChangingWorld A Roadmap to the Future of Engineering Practice, Research (R&D,tax,IP) Applied sciences Eng,Med,Ag,Arch Business Plan Corporate Management #12;i Engineering for a ChangingWorld A Roadmap to the Future of Engineering Practice, Research, and Education James J. Duderstadt

191

Engineering Change Towards a sustainable future in the developing world The Royal Academy of Engineering 73  

E-print Network

the goals of sustainable development. The human species is living an unsustainable existence. The scientificEngineering Change Towards a sustainable future in the developing world The Royal Academy to grow from 6 billion today to 9 billion by 2050, and living standards are predicted to increase

Cambridge, University of

192

Tissue engineering for the management of chronic wounds: current concepts and future perspectives.  

PubMed

Chronic wounds constitute a significant and growing biomedical burden. With the increasing growth of populations prone to dysfunctional wound healing, there is an urgent and unmet need for novel strategies to both prevent and treat these complications. Tissue engineering offers the potential to create functional skin, and the synergistic efforts of biomedical engineers, material scientists, and molecular and cell biologists have yielded promising therapies for non-healing wounds. However, traditional paradigms for wound healing focus largely on the role of inflammatory cells and fail to incorporate more recent research highlighting the importance of stem cells and matrix dynamics in skin repair. Approaches to chronic wound healing centred on inflammation alone are inadequate to guide the development of regenerative medicine-based technologies. As the molecular pathways and biologic defects underlying non-healing wounds are further elucidated, multifaceted bioengineering systems must advance in parallel to exploit this knowledge. In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts in tissue engineering for chronic wounds and speculate on areas for future research in this increasingly interdisciplinary field. PMID:22742728

Wong, Victor W; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

2012-10-01

193

Genetically engineered plants and foods: a scientist's analysis of the issues (part II).  

PubMed

Genetic engineering provides a means to introduce genes into plants via mechanisms that are different in some respects from classical breeding. A number of commercialized, genetically engineered (GE) varieties, most notably canola, cotton, maize and soybean, were created using this technology, and at present the traits introduced are herbicide and/or pest tolerance. In 2007 these GE crops were planted in developed and developing countries on more than 280 million acres (113 million hectares) worldwide, representing nearly 10% of rainfed cropland. Although the United States leads the world in acres planted with GE crops, the majority of this planting is on large acreage farms. In developing countries, adopters are mostly small and resource-poor farmers. For farmers and many consumers worldwide, planting and eating GE crops and products made from them are acceptable and even welcomed; for others GE crops raise food and environmental safety questions, as well as economic and social issues. In Part I of this review, some general and food issues related to GE crops and foods were discussed. In Part II, issues related to certain environmental and socioeconomic aspects of GE crops and foods are addressed, with responses linked to the scientific literature. PMID:19400729

Lemaux, Peggy G

2009-01-01

194

A Review of Engine Seal Performance and Requirements for Current and Future Army Engine Platforms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sand ingestion continues to impact combat ground and air vehicles in military operations in the Middle East. The T-700 engine used in Apache and Blackhawk helicopters has been subjected to increased overhauls due to sand and dust ingestion during desert operations. Engine component wear includes compressor and turbine blades/vanes resulting in decreased engine power and efficiency. Engine labyrinth seals have also been subjected to sand and dust erosion resulting in tooth tip wear, increased clearances, and loss in efficiency. For the current investigation, a brief overview is given of the history of the T-700 engine development with respect to sand and dust ingestion requirements. The operational condition of labyrinth seals taken out of service from 4 different locations of the T-700 engine during engine overhauls are examined. Collaborative efforts between the Army and NASA to improve turbine engine seal leakage and life capability are currently focused on noncontacting, low leakage, compliant designs. These new concepts should be evaluated for their tolerance to sand laden air. Future R&D efforts to improve seal erosion resistance and operation in desert environments are recommended

Delgado, Irebert R.; Proctor, Margaret P.

2008-01-01

195

The graduate education of scientists and engineers: Myths, facts, and recommendations  

SciTech Connect

The graduate schools of the United States have served as a model for the world. However, changes in science and in the needs of employers are placing new stresses on the system. Critics emphasize the excess of graduate students to job opportunities. Statistical data is provided on employment of graduate students and the major areas of employment at present. The author describes how we got to the current situation and what should be done to improve the future for students of science and technology.

Griffiths, P.A.

1995-12-31

196

Pathways to space: A mission to foster the next generation of scientists and engineers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first education project funded under the Australian Government's Australian Space Research Program (ASRP), Pathways to Space was a unique project combining education, science communication research and research in astrobiology and robotics. It drew upon the challenges of space exploration to inspire students to consider study and careers in science and engineering. A multi-faceted program, Pathways to Space provided hands-on opportunities for high school and university students to participate in realistic simulations of a robotic Mars exploration mission for astrobiology. Its development was a collaboration between the Australian Centre for Astrobiology (University of New South Wales), the Australian Centre for Field Robotics (University of Sydney), the Powerhouse Museum and industry partner, Cisco. Focused on students in Years 9-10 (15-16 years of age), this program provided them with the opportunity to engage directly with space engineers and astrobiologists, while carrying out a simulated Mars mission using the digital learning facilities available at the Powerhouse Museum. As a part of their program, the students operated robotic mini-rovers in the Powerhouse Museum's “Mars Yard”, a highly accurate simulation of the Martian surface, where university students also carry out the development and testing of experimental Mars roving vehicles. This aspect of the program has brought real science and engineering research into the public space of the museum. As they undertook the education program, the students participated in a research study aimed at understanding the effectiveness of the project in achieving its key objective - encouraging students to consider space related courses and careers. This paper outlines the development and operation of the Pathways to Space project over its 3-year funding period, during which it met and exceeded all the requirements of its ASRP grant. It will look at the goals of the project, the rationale behind the education and science communications research, the challenges of developing such a multi-faceted education project in collaboration with several partners and the results that have already been achieved within the study.

Dougherty, Kerrie; Oliver, Carol; Fergusson, Jennifer

2014-06-01

197

Comparison of Compensation paid scientists and engineers in research and development. DOE National Survey of Compensation, 1980 data  

SciTech Connect

Several compensation characteristics of DOE contractor-operated laboratories are compared with those reported in the 1980 National Survey of Compensation Paid Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development Activities. The data are as of August 1, 1980. A total of 339 establishments (industry, Federal laboratories, Federal contract research centers, nonprofit research institutes, educational institutions) and 18 DOE laboratories are included in the survey. Characteristics of DOE laboratories such as salaries by field of degree, maturity, and management levels are shown and are compared with the National Survey patterns. Approximately 8 out of 10 S and E's at DOE Laboratories (84.8%) held a degree in one of four fields: engineering, chemistry, physics, or mathematics/statistics. In the National Survey, 78.5% of all S and E's held degrees in these fields. The average DOE Laboratory S and E salary increased 6.6% between 1979 and 1980, while the average salary in the National Survey advanced by 7.5%. The National Survey percentage increase over the year was greater at each degree level than among DOE Laboratories.

None

1981-01-01

198

Increasing Awareness of Sustainable Water Management for Future Civil Engineers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are more than 1.2 billion people around the world that do not have access to drinking water. While there are plans under the United Nations Millennium Development Goals to halve this number by 2015, there are a number of regions that will be exposed to water scarcity in the coming future. Providing sufficient water for future development is a great challenge for planners and designers of water supply systems. In order to design sustainable water supplies for the future, it is important to learn how people consume water and how water consumption can be reduced. The education of future civil engineers should take into account not only technical aspects of the water supply but also the accompanying social and economical issues, and appreciated the strengths and weaknesses of traditional solutions. The Faculty of Civil Engineering, at the University of Rijeka, has begun incorporating a series of activities that engage undergraduate students and the local community to develop a mutual understanding of the future needs for sustainable management. We present one of the activities, collaboration with the Lancaster Environment Centre at Lancaster University in the UK through the field course Water and environmental management in Mediterranean context. The course, which is designed for the Lancaster University geography students, features a combination of field trips and visits to provide an understanding of the socio-economic and environmental context of water management in two counties (Istra and Primorsko-Goranska). Students from Lancaster visit the Croatian water authority and a regional water company, where they learn about current management practices and problems in managing water supplies and demand through the year. They make their own observations of current management practices in the field and learn about water consumption from the end users. One day field visit to a village in the area that is still not connected to the main water supply system is organised together with civil engineering students from the University of Rijeka. The aims of this field visit are: to learn about traditional water supply from an underground storage of rain water called cisterna; and to find out from inhabitants about their current water usage habits and expectations, and how these might change when they get water from the main water supply system. This joint activity has been beneficial for both groups of students. The engineering students become aware of the importance of the social aspects in designing the water supply system, while the geography students learn about the engineering challenges entailed. Both groups learn that water consumption increases with the provision of water through pipeline systems and that this needs to be taken into account in the design of water supply and management of water resources. Importantly, they learn the benefits of traditional sustainable water supply methods, which could be implemented as primary or additional sources of water supply in other areas.In summary, both groups of students develop their professional knowledge and skills as well as generic and transferable skills, which are very important for those who will continue to a career in the design and management of water systems.

Ilic, Suzana; Karleusa, Barbara; Deluka-Tibljas, Aleksandra

2010-05-01

199

Advanced mathematical methods for scientists and engineers I: asymptotic methods and perturbation theory.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This book gives a clear, practical and self-contained presentation of the methods of asymptotics and perturbation theory and explains how to use these methods to obtain approximate analytical solutions to differential and difference equations. These methods allow one to analyze physics and engineering problems that may not be solvable in closed form and for which brute-force numerical methods may not converge to useful solutions. The objective of this book is to teaching the insights and problem-solving skills that are most useful in solving mathematical problems arising in the course of modern research. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, the book assumes only a limited familiarity with differential equations and complex variables. The presentation begins with a review of differential and difference equations; develops local asymptotic methods for differential and difference equations; explains perturbation and summation theory; and concludes with a an exposition of global asymptotic methods, including boundary-layer theory, WKB theory, and multiple-scale analysis. Emphasizing applications, the discussion stresses care rather than rigor and relies on many well-chosen examples to teach the reader how an applied mathematician tackles problems. There are 190 computer-generated plots and tables comparing approximate and exact solutions; over 600 problems, of varying levels of difficulty; and an appendix summarizing the properties of special functions.

Bender, Carl M., Orszag, Steven A.

200

How well-rewarded is inter-firm mobility in the labour market for scientists and engineers? New evidence from the UK and France  

Microsoft Academic Search

As firms have come under increasing competitive pressure to acquire and make effective use of knowledge that has been generated beyond their own boundaries, they are making increasing use of external recruitment of experienced scientists and engineers (SEs) who bring with them skills and knowledge gained in the process of working for other firms. This paper explores the impact of

Geoff Mason; Hiroatsu Nohara

2010-01-01

201

National science policy and scientific manpower: Funding effects on job mobility of scientists and engineers in the United States, 1958--1972  

Microsoft Academic Search

Science policy in the United States between 1958 and 1972 was intended to influence the research and development (R D) labor force indirectly, through government funding. An event history analysis of professional R D jobs in five scientific disciplines shows that, while federal funding influences the job mobility of scientists and engineers, other social and economic factors are also significant

Lyman

1993-01-01

202

Culture and Workplace Communications: A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Japanese (n=94) and U.S. (n=340) aerospace scientists/engineers described time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, importance of technical communication courses, and the use of libraries, computer networks, and technical reports. Japanese respondents had greater language fluency; U.S. respondents spent more time with…

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Sato, Yuko; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1997-01-01

203

Successful companies recognize that it is essential to supplement the technical training of their engineers and scientists with knowledge about how companies operate to broaden their business  

E-print Network

, Forecasting, etc.) · Innovation Imperative · Business Model Versus Technological Innovation · Frameworks of their engineers and scientists with knowledge about how companies operate to broaden their business knowledge business decisions. This prestigious certificate program, offered by the Office of Executive Education

Stanford, Kyle

204

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 41: Technical communication practices of Dutch and US aerospace engineers and scientists: International perspective on aerospace  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. The studies had the following objectives: (1) to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communication to their professions, (2) to determine the use and production of technical communication by aerospace engineers and scientists, (3) to investigate their use of libraries and technical information centers, (4) to investigate their use of and the importance to them of computer and information technology, (5) to examine their use of electronic networks, and (6) to determine their use of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. Self-administered (mail) questionnaires were distributed to Dutch aerospace engineers and scientists at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR) in the Netherlands, the NASA Ames Research Center in the U.S., and the NASA Langley Research Center in the U.S. Responses of the Dutch and U.S. participants to selected questions are presented in this paper.

Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

1994-01-01

205

Factors affecting the demand for natural scientists and engineers in the United States, 1985-2010: a review of existing knowledge  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge about the labor market for doctoral natural scientists and engineers (NSE's) over the next 25 years. R and D spending and the employment of doctorate NSE's, and the demand for PhD teachers, are discussed. The question of foreign students in US doctoral programs is considered. (DLC)

Finn, M.G.

1986-01-01

206

The NASA Suborbital Center of Excellence - preparing the next generation of scientists and engineers (ESA SE-058)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA Suborbital Center of Excellence (SCE) is charting new territory. From an idea to promote science and engineering education and outreach, the SCE is working toward the objective of increasing numbers of college graduates choosing a career in suborbital programs. Educational outreach initiatives for young children to university students are presented. These include hands-on experiments, demonstrations, and suborbital educational materials. Approaches to excite university students to want to pursue these careers through relevant and useful work experiences are also presented. A key component of this is the SCE co-op program. Future programs and initiatives are presented. The SCE is evolving, meeting the needs to promote science and engineering education and outreach.

Merritt, Bernice; Hottman, Steve; Hansen, Kathy; Cathey, Henry M., Jr.

2003-08-01

207

Reinventing Manufacturing Engineering: Refocusing and Exploring Future Opportunities for Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Open any newspaper today, search current news service websites, or turn on the television and one finds negative images of outsourcing, the closure of factories, and the loss of manufacturing jobs in our country. Many corporations find it profitable to move operations overseas seeking less expensive labor. There is outrage in our nation as we see manufacturing and product design careers and opportunities disappear. In addition, many Manufacturing Engineering and Technology programs in this country are seeing an alarming decline in enrollments. In most cases (if not all), the remaining twenty five ABET accredited manufacturing engineering programs in the U.S are shrinking as the numbers of incoming students dwindle. If our students are indeed basing their academic choices on negative information and images promoted by mass media, it is up to educators to appeal to students and revitalize the image by promoting the positive future of manufacturing education and prepare for the opportunities of outsourcing. Educators must be prepared for this phenomenon and prepare students adequately for the new world that faces them. Moreover, we must revise our programs to reflect the new reality of manufacturing as a global enterprise where our graduates are likely to design products locally to be produced in another part of the world.

Davis, Beverly; Jack, Hugh

2009-07-16

208

John Mather public policy internship: Perspectives on science policy as an intern at Scientists and Engineers for America (SEA) and Congressman Bill Foster's office  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the summer of 2010, I participated in the John Mather public policy internship through AIP and SPS. I spent six weeks as an intern at Scientists and Engineers for America (SEA), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that encourages technically-trained citizens to become more engaged in US politics and the policy-making process, and six weeks as an intern for Congressman Bill Foster (D-Il 14) in the House of Representatives. These internships offered two distinct perspectives on how American science policy is crafted and showed me many ways in which scientists can be engaged in the political process.

Tuna, Alexander

2011-04-01

209

Volunteer senior scientists wanted  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The American Association for the Advancement of Science plans to establish a nationwide program to involve older scientists as volunteers in public education, business, and government.The Senior Scientists and Engineers (SSE) program was originated by AAAS in response to projected shortages of experienced scientists in many fields, and to draw on the large and rapidly growing population of post-retirement professional scientists. SSE began in 1988 as a pilot program in the Washington D.C. area run in conjunction with the American Association of Retired Persons.

210

A life scientist, an engineer and a social scientist walk into a lab: challenges of dual-use engagement and education in synthetic biology.  

PubMed

The discussion of dual-use education is often predicated on a discrete population of practicing life scientists exhibiting certain deficiencies in awareness or expertise. This has lead to the claim that there is a greater requirement for awareness raising and education amongst this population. However, there is yet to be an inquiry into the impact of the 'convergent' nature of emerging techno-sciences upon the prospects of dual-use education. The field of synthetic biology, although often portrayed as homogeneous, is in fact composed of various sub-fields and communities. Its practitioners have diverse academic backgrounds. The research institutions that have fostered its development in the UK often have their own sets of norms and practices in engagement with ethical, legal and social issues associated with scientific knowledge and technologies. The area is also complicated by the emergence of synthetic biologists outside traditional research environments, the so called 'do-it-yourself' or 'garage biologists'. This paper untangles some of the complexities in the current state of synthetic biology and addresses the prospects for dual-use education for practitioners. It provides a short overview of the field and discusses identified dual-use issues. There follows a discussion of UK networks in synthetic biology, including their engagement with ethical, legal, social and dual-use issues and limited educational efforts in relation to these. It concludes by outlining options for developing a more systematic dual-use education strategy for synthetic biology. PMID:22606757

Edwards, Brett; Kelle, Alexander

2012-01-01

211

Spotlight on Scientists Videos  

Cancer.gov

NCI scientists, from postdoctoral fellows to principal investigators, discuss various topics including their personal backgrounds, how they came to be in the field of cancer research, their current projects, and a look to the future of medical oncology.

212

The Stirling Engine: A Wave of the Future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This video describes the Stirling engine, an external combustion engine which creates heat energy to power the motor, and can use many types of fuel. It can be used for both stationary and propulsion purposes and has advantages of better fuel economy and cleaner exhaust than internal combustion engines. The engine is shown being road tested at Langley Air Force Base.

1992-01-01

213

Scientist Connections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For scientists desiring to become more involved in education, the COSEE Mid-Atlantic is dedicated to establishing meaningful and productive collaborations between scientists and educators. This web site is meant to help scientists produce a worthwhile education project that complements and enriches their research. The information is broken down by how much time the scientist is willing to dedicate to education and public outreach.

214

[NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 4:] Technical communications in aerospace: An analysis of the practices reported by US and European aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two pilot studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of U.S. and European aerospace engineers and scientists. Both studies had the same five objectives: (1) solicit opinions regarding the importance of technical communications; (2) determine the use and production of technical communications; (3) seek views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications; (4) determine use of libraries, information centers, and online database; (5) determine use and importance of computer and information technology to them. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to randomly selected aerospace engineers and scientists, with a slightly modified version sent to European colleagues. Their responses to selected questions are presented in this paper.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Myron

1990-01-01

215

Developmental Potential among Creative Scientists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The world of creative scientists is dramatically different in the 21st century than it was during previous centuries. Whether biologists, chemists, physicists, engineers, mathematicians, or computer scientists, the livelihood of research scientists is dependent on their abilities of creative expression. The view of a solitary researcher who…

Culross, Rita R.

2008-01-01

216

J-2X, The Engine of the Future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

My project was two-fold, with both parts involving the J-2X Upper Stage engine (which will be used on both the Ares I and V). Mainly, I am responsible for using a program called Iris to create visual represen tations of the rocket engine's telemetry data. Also, my project includes the application of my newly acquired Pro Engineer skills in develo ping a 3D model of the engine's nozzle.

Smith, Gail

2009-01-01

217

Turbine Engine Clearance Control Systems: Current Practices and Future Directions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor (HPC) and high pressure turbine (HPT) can provide dramatic reductions in specific fuel consumption (SFC), time-on-wing, compressor stall margin, and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities. Maintenance costs to overhaul large commercial gas turbine engines can easily exceed 1M. Engine removal from service is primarily due

Scott B. Lattime; Bruce M. Steinetz

2002-01-01

218

CIVIL ENGINEERING "Our future as a nation will be closely tied to space, energy, the  

E-print Network

CIVIL ENGINEERING Memphisat "Our future as a nation will be closely tied to space, energy, the environment, and our ability to interact with and compete in the global economy. As a civil engineer, you, or management ­ civil engineering offers you a wide range of career choices." -American Society of Civil

Dasgupta, Dipankar

219

Diversity and Equity in the Lab: Preparing Scientists and Engineers for Inclusive Teaching in Courses and Research Environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite high attrition rates in college-level science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses, with even higher rates for women and underrepresented minorities, not enough attention has been given to higher education STEM classroom practices that may limit the retention of students from diverse backgrounds. The Professional Development Program (PDP) has developed a range of professional development activities aimed at helping participants learn about diversity and equity issues, integrate inclusive teaching strategies into their own instructional units, and reflect on their own teaching practices. In the PDP, all participants develop and teach a STEM laboratory activity that enables their students to practice scientific inquiry processes as they gain an understanding of scientific concepts. In addition, they are asked to consider diversity and equity issues in their activity design and teaching. The PDP supports participants in this challenging endeavor by engaging them in activities that are aligned with a PDP-defined Diversity & Equity Focus Area that includes five emphases: 1) Multiple ways to learn, communicate and succeed; 2) Learners' goals, interests, motivation, and values; 3) Beliefs and perceptions about ability to achieve; 4) Inclusive collaboration and equitable participation; 5) Social identification within STEM culture. We describe the PDP Diversity & Equity focus, the five emphases, and the supporting activities that have been designed and implemented within the PDP, as well as future directions for our diversity and equity efforts.

Hunter, L.; Seagroves, S.; Metevier, A. J.; Kluger-Bell, B.; Raschke, L.; Jonsson, P.; Porter, J.; Brown, C.; Roybal, G.; Shaw, J.

2010-12-01

220

Engineering Education in the United States: Past, Present, and Future  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past half-century, engineering education in the United States has undergone a profound transformation, from a strong focus on engineering practice and design before World War II to the current emphasis on scientific fundamentals and mathematical analysis. This change was driven by the Cold War and the accompanying major federal investment in university research, which also produced a major

John W. Prados

221

The future of electrical and computer engineering education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors will briefly describe how some of today's innovations and advancements might provide potential for improving the efficiency, effectiveness, and quality of contemporary teaching methods. A model curriculum proposed in this paper merges the disciplines of mathematics, science, engineering, and computing. It also addresses the growing need for exposing aspiring engineers to the human, cultural, and professional aspects of

Frederick C. Berry; Philip S. DiPiazza; Susan L. Sauer

2003-01-01

222

Current status and future trends in computational wind engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

The difficulty of Computational Wind Engineering (hereafter CWE) is described from the viewpoints of Computational Fluid Dynamics (hereafter CFD) technique. The rapid growth of CFD applications to wind engineering is presented. The new trends in turbulence models for applying CWE are noted. The advantages of dynamic subgrid scale (hereafter SGS) models in Large Eddy Simulation (hereafter LES) are clarified.

Shuzo Murakami

1997-01-01

223

Engineering Education: The Key to a Sustainable Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is obvious that engineering played a significant role in the development of the world. Many contributions engineers have given are visible in the world and in people's daily lives. Unfortunately, humans often learn through trial and error, and much of the world has been developed in ways that did not contribute to the well-being of the planet…

Thomas, Jason

2012-01-01

224

ENIFAIR — EU research into engine integration on future transport aircraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following on from previous EU research programmes, ENIFAIR has extended the study of engine-airframe aerodynamic integration problems to the cases of Very High- and Ultra High-Bypass Ratio engine installations on representative modern aircraft. This article provides an overview of the work carried out and presents examples of the results achieved.

Wolfgang Burgsmüller; Heinz Hoheisel

2000-01-01

225

Life cycle cost assessment of future low heat rejection engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Adiabatic Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) represents a project which has the objective to accelerate the development of highway truck engines with advanced technology aimed at reduced fuel consumption. The project comprises three steps, including the synthesis of a number of engine candidate designs, the coupling of each with a number of systems for utilizing exhaust gas energy, and the evaluation of each combination in terms of desirability. Particular attention is given to the employed evaluation method and the development of this method. The objective of Life Cycle Cost (LCC) evaluation in the ADECD program was to select the best from among 42 different low heat rejection engine (LHRE)/exhaust energy recovery system configurations. The LCC model is discussed along with a maintenance cost model, the evaluation strategy, the selection of parameter ranges, and a full factorial analysis.

Petersen, D. R.

1986-01-01

226

The gate studies: Assessing the potential of future small general aviation turbine engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four studies were completed that explore the opportunities for future General Aviation turbine engines (GATE) in the 150-1000 SHP class. These studies forecasted the potential impact of advanced technology turbine engines in the post-1988 market, identified important aircraft and missions, desirable engine sizes, engine performance, and cost goals. Parametric evaluations of various engine cycles, configurations, design features, and advanced technology elements defined baseline conceptual engines for each of the important missions identified by the market analysis. Both fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft, and turboshaft, turboprop, and turbofan engines were considered. Sizable performance gains (e.g., 20% SFC decrease), and large engine cost reductions of sufficient magnitude to challenge the reciprocating engine in the 300-500 SHP class were predicted.

Strack, W. C.

1979-01-01

227

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 36: Technical uncertainty as a correlate of information use by US industry-affiliated aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reports the results of an exploratory study that investigated the influence of technical uncertainty on the use of information and information sources by U.S. industry-affiliated aerospace engineers and scientists in completing or solving a project, task, or problem. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Survey participants were U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists whose names appeared on the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) mailing list. The results support the findings of previous research and the following study assumptions. Information and information-source use differ for projects, problems, and tasks with high and low technical uncertainty. As technical uncertainty increases, information-source use changes from internal to external and from informal to formal sources. As technical uncertainty increases, so too does the use of federally funded aerospace research and development (R&D). The use of formal information sources to learn about federally funded aerospace R&D differs for projects, problems, and tasks with high and low technical uncertainty.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Glassman, Nanci A.; Affelder, Linda O.; Hecht, Laura M.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

1994-01-01

228

Turbine Engine Clearance Control Systems: Current Practices and Future Directions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor (HPC) and high pressure turbine (HPT) can provide dramatic reductions in specific fuel consumption (SFC), time-on-wing, compressor stall margin, and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities. Maintenance costs to overhaul large commercial gas turbine engines can easily exceed 1M. Engine removal from service is primarily due to spent exhaust gas temperature (EGT) margin caused mainly by the deterioration of HPT components. Increased blade tip clearance is a major factor in hot section component degradation. As engine designs continue to push the performance envelope with fewer parts and the market drives manufacturers to increase service life, the need for advanced sealing continues to grow. A review of aero gas turbine engine HPT performance degradation and the mechanisms that promote these losses are discussed. Benefits to the HPT due to improved clearance management are identified. Past and present sealing technologies are presented along with specifications for next generation engine clearance control systems.

Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

2002-09-01

229

Turbine Engine Clearance Control Systems: Current Practices and Future Directions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor (HPC) and high pressure turbine (HPT) can provide dramatic reductions in specific fuel consumption (SFC), time-on-wing, compressor stall margin, and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities. Maintenance costs to overhaul large commercial gas turbine engines can easily exceed $1M. Engine removal from service is primarily due to spent exhaust gas temperature (EGT) margin caused mainly by the deterioration of HPT components. Increased blade tip clearance is a major factor in hot section component degradation. As engine designs continue to push the performance envelope with fewer parts and the market drives manufacturers to increase service life, the need for advanced sealing continues to grow. A review of aero gas turbine engine HPT performance degradation and the mechanisms that promote these losses are discussed. Benefits to the HPT due to improved clearance management are identified. Past and present sealing technologies are presented along with specifications for next generation engine clearance control systems.

Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

2002-01-01

230

Agricultural scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What are agricultural scientists, and what do they actually do? This is the introductory page for a set of materials about agricultural science as a career. Here the job of an agricultural scientist is defined and described. In the rest of the resource, students can examine two specialized job titles associated with agricultural scientists: organic specialist/assistant professor and senior research associate. Students can read narratives that are a few paragraphs in length about an organic specialist and a senior research associate. In addition, the senior research associate poses a challenge to students that calls on them to investigate corn's resistance to insects. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

Project, Iowa P.

2002-01-01

231

Organizational stress and individual strain: A social-psychological study of risk factors in coronary heart disease among administrators, engineers, and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is hypothesized that organizational stresses, such as high quantitative work load, responsibility for persons, poor relations with role senders, and contact with alien organizational territories, may be associated with high levels of psychological and physiological strain which are risk factors in coronary heart disease. It is further hypothesized that persons with coronary-prone Type A personality characteristics are most likely to exhibit strain under conditions of organizational stress. Measures of these stresses, personality traits, and strains were obtained from 205 male NASA administrators, engineers, and scientists. Type A personality measures included sense of time urgency, persistence, involved striving, leadership, and preference for competitive and environmentally overburdening situations.

Caplan, R. D.

1971-01-01

232

Small engine technology payoffs for future commuter aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High payoff technologies for a year 2000 regenerative cycle turboprop engine were identified for a 19 passenger commuter aircraft application. A series of engines incorporating eight levels of advanced technologies were studied and their impact on aircraft performance was evaluated. Four advanced technologies are recommended to achieve a potential reduction in fuel burn of 38.3 percent. At $1.00 per gallon fuel price, a potential direct operating cost (DOC) benefit of 12.5 percent is obtained. At $2.00 per gallon, the potential DOC benefit increases to 17.0 percent.

Kaehler, H.; Schneider, W.

1986-01-01

233

Introducing Future Engineers to Sustainable Ecology Problems: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The problem of Earth environmental destruction by human activities is becoming dangerous. Engineers responsible for the production of any goods should be well aware of the negative influence of their activities on the state of the planet. This is why the understanding of ecological problems is essential for people responsible for production and…

Filipkowski, A.

2011-01-01

234

Computational wind engineering: Past achievements and future challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper reviews the current state of the art in computational wind engineering, particularly as it relates to applications of numerical flow modelling for the evaluation of wind effects on buildings and their environment. The variability of computational results is presented and compared with that of wind tunnel measurements. Concerns are expressed regarding the current application of the numerical approach

Theodore Stathopoulos

1997-01-01

235

Automation and Engineering Psychology: A Look to the Future.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various aspects of automation are explained to differentiate it from technology and mechanization and to show the difference between using equipment to help humans and using equipment to replace humans. Five reasons are given for engineering psychology to focus its attention on automation. Automation issues in a number of areas are discussed,…

Parsons, H. McIlvaine

236

Jalal Rastegary Research Scientist  

E-print Network

), Reviewer for Basic Research Journal of Agricultural Science Review (BRJASR) #12;Jalal Rastegary Research Scientist Collage of Engineering Institute for Energy and the Environment Obispo, CA 1987 M.S. Agriculture, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 2007 Ph

Johnson, Eric E.

237

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 31: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 SME mail survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists affiliated with, not necessarily belonging to, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME).

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1994-01-01

238

Engineering for a Changing World: A Roadmap to the Future of Engineering Practice, Research, and Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Powerful forces, including demographics, globalization, and rapidly evolving technologies are driving profound changes in the role of engineering in society. The changing workforce and technology needs of a global knowledge economy are dramatically changing the nature of engineering practice, demanding far broader skills than simply the mastery of scientific and technological disciplines. The growing awareness of the importance of technological innovation to economic competitiveness and national security is demanding a new priority for application-driven basic engineering research. The nonlinear nature of the flow of knowledge between fundamental research and engineering application, the highly interdisciplinary nature of new technologies, and the impact of cyber infrastructure demand new paradigms in engineering research and development. Moreover, challenges such as the off-shoring of engineering jobs, the decline of student interest in scientific and engineering careers, immigration restrictions, and inadequate social diversity in the domestic engineering workforce are also raising serious questions about the adequacy of our current national approach to engineering.

Duderstadt, James J., 1942-

2010-01-12

239

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 52: A comparison of the technical communications practices of Japanese and US aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To understand the diffusion of aerospace knowledge, it is necessary to understand the communications practices and the information-seeking behaviors of those involved in the production, transfer, and use of aerospace knowledge at the individual, organizational, national, and international levels. In this paper, we report selected results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on communications practices and information-seeking behaviors in the workplace. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communications, use of libraries, the use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. The responses of the survey respondents are placed within the context of the Japanese culture. We assume that differences in Japanese and U.S. cultures influence the communications practices and information-seeking behaviors of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Holloway, Karen; Sato, Yuko; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1995-01-01

240

[NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 4:] Technical communications in aerospace: An analysis of the practices reported by US and European aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are reported from pilot surveys on the use of scientific and technical information (STI) by U.S. and NATO-nation aerospace scientists and engineers, undertaken as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. The survey procedures and the demographic characteristics of the 67 scientists and engineers who responded to the survey are summarized, and the results are presented in a series of tables and discussed in detail. Findings emphasized include: (1) both U.S. and NATO respondents spend around 60 percent of their work week producing or using STI products; (2) NATO respondents are more likely than their U.S. counterparts to use 'formal' STI products (like technical reports and papers) and the services of librarians and online data bases; (3) most of the respondents use computers and information technology in preparing STI products; and (4) respondents who had taken courses in technical communication agreed on the value and ideal subject matter of such courses.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Myron

1990-01-01

241

The future of high performance computers in science and engineering  

SciTech Connect

Spurred by a number of innovations from both the industrial and academic research establishments made possible by VLSI and parallelism. The author expects the next generation of scientific and engineering computing to be the most diverse and exciting one yet. Some of the research accomplishments have been stimulated by DARPA's Strategic Computing Initiative (SCI). Other progress is a result of the evolution of understanding the technology of multiple vector-processing computers (i.e., supercomputers). However, without the scientific base, creative talent, understanding and demanding users, and infrastructure to design complex VLSI chips, these innovative machines would not be possible. A variety of established and newly formed companies have organized to exploit the new technology. This work lists the number of companies building high performance computers for control and artificial intelligence applications, and traditional supercomputers for scientific and engineering applications.

Bell, G. (Ardent Computer Co., Sunnyvale, CA (US))

1989-09-01

242

Tissue engineering on matrix: future of autologous tissue replacement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tissue engineering aims at the creation of living neo-tissues identical or close to their native human counterparts. As basis\\u000a of this approach, temporary biodegradable supporter matrices are fabricated in the shape of a desired construct, which promote\\u000a tissue strength and provide functionality until sufficient neo-tissue is formed. Besides fully synthetic polymer-based scaffolds,\\u000a decellularized biological tissue of xenogenic or homogenic origin

Benedikt Weber; Maximilian Y. Emmert; Roman Schoenauer; Chad Brokopp; Laura Baumgartner; Simon P. Hoerstrup

2011-01-01

243

Recruiting Future Engineers Through Effective Guest Speaking In Elementary School Classrooms  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the author describes how engineers can increase the number of future engineers by volunteering as guest speakers in the elementary school classroom. The paper is divided into three main subjects. First, the importance of engineers speaking directly with young students is discussed. Next, several best practice techniques for speaking with young students are described. Finally, information on getting started as a guest speaker is presented, and a list of resources available to guest speakers is provided. The guest engineer speaking to an elementary school audience (ages 6-11) performs a critical role in encouraging young students to pursue a career in engineering. Often, he or she is the first engineer these students meet in person, providing a crucial first impression of the engineering career field and a positive visual image of what an engineer really looks like. A dynamic speaker presenting a well-delivered talk creates a lasting, positive impression on students, influencing their future decisions to pursue careers in engineering. By reaching these students early in life, the guest speaker will help dispel the many prevailing stereotypes about engineers which discourage so many students, especially young women, from considering this career. The guest speaker can ensure young students gain a positive first impression of engineers and the engineering career field by following some best practice techniques in preparing for and delivering their presentation. The author, an electrical engineer, developed these best practice techniques over the past 10 years while presenting over 350 talks on engineering subjects to elementary school students as a volunteer speaker with the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory’s Speakers Bureau. Every engineer can make a meaningful contribution toward reversing the predicted shortfall of future engineers by volunteering to speak with young students at the elementary school level. Elementary school teachers typically have a limited education in engineering and are eager to have career engineers speak with their students. As an engineer, there are many opportunities to get involved with guest speaking at the elementary school level. If you have a young child, start by meeting with her or his teacher and volunteering to give a presentation on engineering to the class. Many organizations have formal speakers bureaus. If your organization does not have one, consider starting one. There are several excellent resources on the Internet, such as the IEEE Center for Pre-University Engineering Education’s TryEngineering.org Web site. This site is designed for young students, teachers and parents, giving information on engineering careers and engineering activities the guest speaker can use to prepare a dynamic and informative presentation. Young students who have experienced a positive interaction with an engineer are more likely to pursue a career in engineering. Effective guest speaking by engineers in elementary school classrooms today will increase the likelihood these young students will become the desperately needed engineers of our future.

Kevin Young

2007-11-01

244

Energy supplies and future engines for land, sea, and air.  

PubMed

The years 2012 and beyond seem likely to record major changes in energy use and power generation. The Japanese tsunami has resulted in large countries either scaling back or abolishing the future use of nuclear energy. The discovery of what seems like vast amounts of economically deliverable natural gas has many forecasting a rapid switch from coal- to gas-fired generating plants. On the other hand, environmentalists have strong objections to the production of natural gas and of petroleum by hydraulic fracturing from shale, or by extraction of heavy oil. They believe that global warming from the use of fossil fuels is now established beyond question. There has been rapid progress in the development of alternative energy supplies, particularly from on-shore and off-shore wind. Progress toward a viable future energy mix has been slowed by a U.S. energy policy that seems to many to be driven by politics. The author will review the history of power and energy to put all of the above in context and will look at possible future developments. He will propose what he believes to be an idealized energy policy that could result in an optimum system that would be arrived at democratically. PMID:22788100

Wilson, David Gordon

2012-06-01

245

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 13: Source selection and information use by US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of a telephone survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A telephone survey of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists belonging to the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) was conducted between December 4, 1991 and January 5, 1992. The survey was undertaken to (1) validate the telephone survey as an appropriate technique for collecting data from U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists; (2) collect information about how the results of NASA/DoD aerospace research are used in the R&D process; (3) identify those selection criteria which affect the use of federally-funded aerospace R&D; and (4) obtain information that could be used to develop a self-administered mail questionnaire for use with the same population. The average rating of importance of U.S. government technical reports was 2.5 (on a 4-point scale); The mean/median number of times U.S. government technical reports were used per 6 months was 8/2. Factors scoring highest for U.S. government technical reports were technical accuracy (2.9), reliable data and technical information (2.8), and contains comprehensive data and information (2.7) on a 4-point system. The factors scoring highest for influencing the use of U.S. government technical reports were relevance (3.1), technical accuracy (3.06), and reliable data/information (3.02). Ease of use, familiarity, technical accuracy, and relevance correlated with use of U.S. government technical reports. Survey demographics, survey questionnaire, and the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project publications list are included.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Glassman, Nanci A.

1992-01-01

246

Nuclear scientists as assassination targets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five scientists and engineers connected with Iran’s nuclear program have been killed or injured in recent confirmed or possible assassination attempts. It is unclear who is responsible, but the attacks raise unique policy questions about motives, effectiveness, repercussions, and legal and moral standards. Past assassination plots—including a US plan to kidnap or kill a German atomic scientist in World War

William Tobey

2012-01-01

247

Playing Scientist  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engaging students in the study of genetics is essential to building a deep understanding of heredity, a core idea in the life sciences (NRC 2012). By integrating into the curriculum the stories of famous scientists who studied genetics (e.g., Mendel, Franklin, Watson, and Crick), teachers remind their students that science is a human endeavor.…

Campbell, Ashley

2012-01-01

248

Civil Engineering Feasibility Studies for Future Ring Colliders at CERN  

E-print Network

CERN civil engineers are studying the feasibility of several potential ring colliders to complement the LHC: an 80km circular tunnel to house the TLEP and VHE-LHC, and the ring-ring and linac-ring options for the LHeC. The feasibility of these projects is largely dependent on civil design and geotechnical and environmental risks. As civil infrastructure works typically represent one third of the cost of major physics projects, it is critical that the construction costs are well understood from the conceptual stage. This proceeding presents the first results of the feasibility studies for the 80km tunnel and the linac-ring LHeC. Presented at IPAC'13 Shanghai, 12-17 May 2013

Bruning, O; Myers, S; Osborne, J; Rossi, L; Waaijer, C; Zimmermann, F

2013-01-01

249

Access and Success for African American Engineers and Computer Scientists: A Case Study of Two Predominantly White Public Research Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past decade, three rationales have emerged for emphasizing the reinforcement of the United States' science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) pipeline. The first rationale pertains to U.S. global competitiveness, the second revolves around the benefits of a diverse workforce, and the third argument points to social justice…

Newman, Christopher Bufford

2011-01-01

250

Tissue engineering of urinary bladder - current state of art and future perspectives  

PubMed Central

Introduction Tissue engineering and biomaterials science currently offer the technology needed to replace the urinary tract wall. This review addresses current achievements and barriers for the regeneration of the urinary blad- der based on tissue engineering methods. Materials and methods Medline was search for urinary bladder tissue engineering regenerative medicine and stem cells. Results Numerous studies to develop a substitute for the native urinary bladder wall us- ing the tissue engineering approach are ongoing. Stem cells combined with biomaterials open new treatment methods, including even de novo urinary bladder construction. However, there are still many issues before advances in tissue engineering can be introduced for clinical application. Conclusions Before tissue engineering techniques could be recognize as effective and safe for patients, more research stud- ies performed on large animal models and with long follow–up are needed to carry on in the future. PMID:24579029

Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Drewa, Tomasz

2013-01-01

251

National science policy and scientific manpower: Funding effects on job mobility of scientists and engineers in the United States, 1958--1972  

SciTech Connect

Science policy in the United States between 1958 and 1972 was intended to influence the research and development (R D) labor force indirectly, through government funding. An event history analysis of professional R D jobs in five scientific disciplines shows that, while federal funding influences the job mobility of scientists and engineers, other social and economic factors are also significant in explaining mobility patterns. Federal funding significantly decreases the rates of job mobility in all disciplines during the period, stabilizing the employment structure. Indicators of reward-resource arguments-salary, age, and education-significantly affect job mobility. Consistent with human capital and job matching arguments, salary and age significantly reduce mobility. Education is significant only in life science, physical science, and engineering, where higher education leads to increased mobility. Indicators of limited opportunity arguments-socioeconomic background, sex, and ethnicity-show mixed empirical results. Labour markets also significantly affect mobility. In engineering and physical science, a neo-institutional model, which accounts for the degree of government oversight, fits the data best. Social science and life science are best fit by performance sectors, which highlight the importance of universities as employers for these disciplines. Mathematical science is best fit by a model of industrial sectors, consistent with differential expansion of the economy that disproportionately affected this discipline. Federal funding has acted to institutionalize R D in the economy and stabilize employment; it has not insulated workers from general socioeconomic factors such as human capital, discrimination and labour markets.

Lyman, K.L.

1993-01-01

252

Engineering America's Future in Space: Systems Engineering Innovations for Sustainable Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews systems engineering innovations for Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles. The contents include: 1) NASA's Exploratoin Roadmap; 2) Launch Vehicle Comparisons; 3) Designing the Ares I and Ares V in House; 4) Exploring the Moon; and 5) Systems Engineering Adds Value Throughout the Project Lifecycle.

Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Caruso, Pamela W.; Jones, Carl P.

2008-01-01

253

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 53: From student to entry-level professional: Examining the technical communications practices of early career-stage US aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Studies indicate that communications and information-related activities take up a substantial portion of an engineer's work week; therefore, effective communications and information-use skills are one of the key engineering competencies that early career-stage aerospace engineers and scientists must possess to be successful. Feedback from industry rates communications and information-use skills high in terms of their importance to engineering practice; however, this same feedback rates the communications and information-use skills of early career-stage engineers low. To gather adequate and generalizable data about the communications and information-related activities of entry-level aerospace engineers and scientists, we surveyed 264 members of the AIAA who have no more than 1-5 years of aerospace engineering work experience. To learn more about the concomitant communications norms, we compared the results of this study with data (1,673 responses) we collected from student members of the AIAA and with data (341 responses) we collected from a study of aerospace engineering professionals. In this paper, we report selected results from these studies that focused on the communications practices and information-related activities of early career-stage U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists in the workplace.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Holloway, Karen; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1995-01-01

254

Investing in the Best and Brightest: Increased Fellowship Support for American Scientists and Engineers. Discussion Paper 2006-09  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is widespread concern that the United States faces a problem in maintaining its position as the scientific and technological leader in the world and that loss of leadership threatens future economic well-being and national security. Business, science, and education groups have issued reports that highlight the value to the country of…

Freeman, Richard B.

2006-01-01

255

Engineering Engineering  

E-print Network

-solving skills engineers and engineering technologist need, but also the "people" skills (teamwork, communication" skills (teamwork, communication, and leadership) necessary for success in your future career. We look

Maroncelli, Mark

256

Culture and Workplace Communications: A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The advent of global markets elevates the role and importance of culture as a mitigating factor in the diffusion of knowledge and technology and in product and process innovation. This is especially true in the large commercial aircraft (LCA) sector where the production and market aspects are becoming increasingly international. As firms expand beyond their national borders, using such methods as risk-sharing partnerships, joint ventures, outsourcing, and alliances, they have to contend with national and corporate cultures. Our focus is on Japan, a program participant in the production of the Boeing Company's 777. The aspects of Japanese culture and workplace communications will be examined: (1) the influence of Japanese culture on the diffusion of knowledge and technology in aerospace at the national and international levels; (2) those cultural determinants-the propensity to work together, a willingness to subsume individual interests to a greater good, and an emphasis on consensual decision making-that have a direct bearing on the ability of Japanese firms to form alliances and compete in international markets; (3) and those cultural determinants thought to influence the information-seeking behaviors and workplace communication practices of Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists. In this article, we report selective results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on workplace communications. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communication, use of libraries, use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports.

Pinelli, Thomas E. (Editor); Sato, Yuko (Editor); Barclay, Rebecca O. (Editor); Kennedy, John M. (Editor)

1997-01-01

257

Engineering for a Changing World: Introduction The Future of Engineering Practice  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The changing workforce and technology needs of a global knowledge economy are changing engineering practice demanding far broader skills. Importance of technological innovation to economic competitiveness and national security is driving a new priority for application-driven basic engineering research. Challenges such as out sourcing and off shoring, decline of student interest in STEM careers, inadequate social diversity, and immigration constraints are raising serious questions about the adequacy of current national approach to engineering. This resource is a supplemental presentation to MERE Online resources S0800661 and S0800664.

2009-10-21

258

The Academy for Future Science Faculty: randomized controlled trial of theory-driven coaching to shape development and diversity of early-career scientists  

PubMed Central

Background Approaches to training biomedical scientists have created a talented research community. However, they have failed to create a professional workforce that includes many racial and ethnic minorities and women in proportion to their representation in the population or in PhD training. This is particularly true at the faculty level. Explanations for the absence of diversity in faculty ranks can be found in social science theories that reveal processes by which individuals develop identities, experiences, and skills required to be seen as legitimate within the profession. Methods/Design Using the social science theories of Communities of Practice, Social Cognitive Career Theory, identity formation, and cultural capital, we have developed and are testing a novel coaching-based model to address some of the limitations of previous diversity approaches. This coaching intervention (The Academy for Future Science Faculty) includes annual in-person meetings of students and trained faculty Career Coaches, along with ongoing virtual coaching, group meetings and communication. The model is being tested as a randomized controlled trial with two cohorts of biomedical PhD students from across the U.S., one recruited at the start of their PhDs and one nearing completion. Stratification into the experimental and control groups, and to coaching groups within the experimental arms, achieved equal numbers of students by race, ethnicity and gender to the extent possible. A fundamental design element of the Academy is to teach and make visible the social science principles which highly influence scientific advancement, as well as acknowledging the extra challenges faced by underrepresented groups working to be seen as legitimate within the scientific communities. Discussion The strategy being tested is based upon a novel application of the well-established principles of deploying highly skilled coaches, selected and trained for their ability to develop talents of others. This coaching model is intended to be a complement, rather than a substitute, for traditional mentoring in biomedical research training, and is being tested as such. PMID:25084625

2014-01-01

259

Surfing Scientist  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At this Australian Broadcasting Corporation website, Ruben Meerman, the surfing scientist, offers a large number of entertaining experiments to excite students about science. At the science tricks link, users can discover how to balance nine nails on the head of a 10th, make a balloon shish kebab, make a super-strength straw, and much more. After each trick, the website offers information on how and why it worked. Everyone will have fun with the primary science lesson plans, demonstrations, and challenging conundrums. The activities are easy to do and use materials that are readily available.

260

Trend and future of diesel engine: Development of high efficiency and low emission low temperature combustion diesel engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stringent emission policy has put automotive research & development on developing high efficiency and low pollutant power train. Conventional direct injection diesel engine with diffused flame has reached its limitation and has driven R&D to explore other field of combustion. Low temperature combustion (LTC) and homogeneous charge combustion ignition has been proven to be effective methods in decreasing combustion pollutant emission. Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) and Particulate Matter (PM) formation from combustion can be greatly suppressed. A review on each of method is covered to identify the condition and processes that result in these reductions. The critical parameters that allow such combustion to take place will be highlighted and serves as emphasis to the direction of developing future diesel engine system. This paper is written to explore potential of present numerical and experimental methods in optimizing diesel engine design through adoption of the new combustion technology.

Ho, R. J.; Yusoff, M. Z.; Palanisamy, K.

2013-06-01

261

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 24: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 SAE mail survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists affiliated with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE).

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1994-01-01

262

SET for the Future: Working towards Inclusive Science, Engineering and Technology Curricula in Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"SET (Science, Engineering, and Technology) for the Future," a research/action project at Scotland's Heriot-Watt University, surveyed SET students' education experience, compared information with previous research, and used results to modify two SET modules to increase the participation of women students and improve their experiences. Discusses…

Cronin, Catherine; Foster, Maureen; Lister, Elizabeth

1999-01-01

263

Biodiesel production from genetically engineered microalgae: Future of bioenergy in Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current biomass sources for energy production in Iran include sewerage as well as agricultural, animal, food industry and municipal solid wastes, and are anticipated to account for about 14% of national energy consumption in near future. However, due to the considerable progress made in genetic engineering of various plants in Iran during the last decade and the great potentials of

Meisam Tabatabaei; Masoud Tohidfar; Gholamreza Salehi Jouzani; Mohammadreza Safarnejad; Mohammad Pazouki

2011-01-01

264

Software Engineering for Mobility: Reflecting on the Past, Peering into the Future  

E-print Network

blocks. In 2000, when we put forth a research "roadmap" for software engineering for mobility on the past and peering into the future of the lively and exciting research area of mobility. Further, we ask to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. FOSE '14, May 31 ­ June 7, 2014, Hyderabad

Musolesi, Mirco

265

Fuel Cells: Thermodynamic Engine to a Sustainable Energy Future Richard T. Carlin  

E-print Network

9.00am Fuel Cells: Thermodynamic Engine to a Sustainable Energy Future Richard T. Carlin Office sustainable, reliable electrical grids and micro-grids. Integration of fuel cell systems with renewable of Naval Research Abstract Fuel cells operating on hydrogen and other appropriate fuels provide many

Levi, Anthony F. J.

266

Future Consequences for Potential Persons and Our Parental Obligations Regarding Human Germline Engineering  

E-print Network

to save a life. Huntington's disease is a fatal genetic disorder characterized by progressive dementia the moral permissibility of human germline engineering for the treatment of Huntington's disease. The widely for the treatment of Huntington's disease in virtue of the future consequences that will result from a parent

California at Santa Cruz, University of

267

Future prospects for tissue engineered lung transplantation: decellularization and recellularization-based whole lung regeneration.  

PubMed

The shortage of donor lungs for transplantation causes a significant number of patient deaths. The availability of laboratory engineered, functional organs would be a major advance in meeting the demand for organs for transplantation. The accumulation of information on biological scaffolds and an increased understanding of stem/progenitor cell behavior has led to the idea of generating transplantable organs by decellularizing an organ and recellularizing using appropriate cells. Recellularized solid organs can perform organ-specific functions for short periods of time, which indicates the potential for the clinical use of engineered solid organs in the future.   The present review provides an overview of progress and recent knowledge about decellularization and recellularization-based approaches for generating tissue engineered lungs. Methods to improve decellularization, maturation of recellularized lung, candidate species for transplantation and future prospects of lung bioengineering are also discussed. PMID:24488093

Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Rocco, Kevin; Nanashima, Atsushi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Niklason, Laura E

2014-01-01

268

Tribopolymerization: An advanced lubrication concept for automotive engines and systems of the future  

SciTech Connect

Advanced lubrication technologies based on the concept of tribopolymerization as a mechanism of boundary lubrication are described. Advantages of this approach as well as potential applications which could have an impact on the design, manufacture, and performance of existing and future automotive engines are presented and discussed. Tribopolymerization, a novel concept of molecular design developed by Furey and Kajdas, involves the continuous formation of thin polymeric films on rubbing surfaces; the protective films formed are self-replenishing. The antiwear compounds developed from this technology are effective with metals as well as ceramics and in the liquid as well as vapor phases. Furthermore, they are ashless and contain no harmful phosphorus or sulfur; and many are biodegradable. Thus, potential applications of this technology are diverse and include a variety of cost/performance/energy/environmental advantages. Examples include the following: (a) machining and cutting applications using thin films to reduce friction and ceramic tool wear; (b) the lubrication of ceramic engines (e.g., low heat rejection diesel engines) or ceramic components; (c) the development of ashless lubricants for existing and future automotive engines to reduce exhaust catalyst poisoning and environmental emissions; (d) ashless antiwear or ``lubricity`` additives for fuels, including gasoline, diesel and jet fuel; (e) vapor phase applications of this technology to high temperature gaseous systems or to fuel injector wear problems associated with the use of natural gas engines; and (f) the use of the concept of tribopolymerization as an enabling technology in the development of new engines and new automotive propulsion systems.

Furey, M.J. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Kajdas, C. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology, Plock (Poland); Kaltenbach, K.W. [Triad Investors Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1997-12-31

269

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 21: Technological innovation and technical communications: Their place in aerospace engineering curricula. A survey of European, Japanese, and US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerospace engineers and scientists from Western Europe, Japan, and the United States were surveyed as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Questionnaires were used to solicit their opinions regarding the following: (1) the importance of technical communications to their profession; (2) the use and production of technical communications; and (3) their views about the appropriate content of an undergraduate course in technical communications. The ability to communicate technical information effectively was very important to the aerospace engineers and scientists who participated in the study. A considerable portion of their working week is devoted to using and producing technical information. The types of technical communications used and produced varied within and among the three groups. The type of technical communication product used and produced appears to be related to respondents' professional duties. Respondents from the three groups made similar recommendations regarding the principles, mechanics, and on-the-job communications to be included in an undergraduate technical communications course for aerospace majors.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Holland, Maurita Peterson; Keene, Michael L.; Kennedy, John M.

1991-01-01

270

The Scientist  

E-print Network

|Next Machining the Body Rapid prototyping techniques promise better design and fabrication of tissue, who is designing rapid prototyping machines that print cells, scaffold materials, and growth factors fabrication (SFF) and rapid prototyping (RP) methods have been used for more than a decade in engineering

Sun, Wei

271

University/Science Center Collaborations (A Science Center Perspective): Developing an Infrastructure of Partnerships with Science Centers to Support the Engagement of Scientists and Engineers in Education and Outreach for Broad Impact  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science centers, professional associations, corporations and university research centers share the same mission of education and outreach, yet come from ``different worlds.'' This gap may be bridged by working together to leverage unique strengths in partnership. Front-end evaluation results for the development of new resources to support these (mostly volunteer-based) partnerships elucidate the factors which lead to a successful relationship. Maintaining a science museum-scientific community partnership requires that all partners devote adequate resources (time, money, etc.). In general, scientists/engineers and science museum professionals often approach relationships with different assumptions and expectations. The culture of science centers is distinctly different from the culture of science. Scientists/engineers prefer to select how they will ultimately share their expertise from an array of choices. Successful partnerships stem from clearly defined roles and responsibilities. Scientists/engineers are somewhat resistant to the idea of traditional, formal training. Instead of developing new expertise, many prefer to offer their existing strengths and expertise. Maintaining a healthy relationship requires the routine recognition of the contributions of scientists/engineers. As professional societies, university research centers and corporations increasingly engage in education and outreach, a need for a supportive infrastructure becomes evident. Work of TryScience.org/VolTS (Volunteers TryScience), the MRS NISE Net (Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network) subcommittee, NRCEN (NSF Research Center Education Network), the IBM On Demand Community, and IEEE Educational Activities exemplify some of the pieces of this evolving infrastructure.

Marshall, Eric

2009-03-01

272

The Scientist: The News Journal for the Life Scientist  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided with the cooperation of the Institute for Science Information (ISI) and the University of Pennsylvania, The Scientist (last discussed in the September 15, 1999 Scout Report for Science & Engineering) is a free newsletter for life scientists. Each issue features a variety of science news stories, focusing on recent developments, as well as commentary, opinion, "Hot Papers," professional information, commercial products and services, and jobs. Users can browse and search back issues and also subscribe to a free email notification service.

273

SURGICAL SCIENTIST PROGRAM Department of Surgery  

E-print Network

SURGICAL SCIENTIST PROGRAM Department of Surgery McGill University The purpose of the Surgical Scientist Program of the Department of Surgery is to develop surgical scientists who will be the future leaders in academic surgery both at McGill and in other university Departments of Surgery. Application

Shoubridge, Eric

274

Structural integrity and durability for Space Shuttle main engine and future reusable space propulsion systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is conducting a program which will establish a technology base for the orderly evolution of reusable space propulsion systems. As part of that program, NASA initiated a Structural Integrity and Durability effort for advanced high-pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket engine technology. That effort focuses on the development of: (1) accurate analytical models to describe flow fields; aerothermodynamic loads; structural responses; and fatigue/fracture, from which life prediction codes can be evolved; and (2) advanced instrumentation with capabilities to verify the codes in an SSME-like environment as well as the potential for future use as diagnostic sensors for real-time condition monitoring of critical engine components.

Marsik, S. J.; Gawrylowicz, H. T.

1986-01-01

275

Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use.

NONE

1995-08-01

276

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 33: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 AIAA mail survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who are members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA).

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1995-01-01

277

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 34: How early career-stage US aerospace engineers and scientists produce and use information  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the production and use of information by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who had changed their American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) membership from student to professional in the past five years.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1995-01-01

278

Identification of future engineering-development needs of alternative concepts for magnetic-fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

A qualitative identification of future engineering needs of alternative fusion concepts (AFCs) is presented. These needs are assessed relative to the similar needs of the tokamak in order to emphasize differences in required technology with respect to the well documented mainline approach. Although nearly thirty AFCs can be identified as being associated with some level of reactor projection, redirection, refocusing, and general similarities can be used to generate a reduced AFC list that includes only the bumpy tori, stellarators, reversed-field pinches, and compact toroids. Furthermore, each AFC has the potential of operating as a conventional (low power density, superconducting magnets) or a compact, high-power-density (HPD) system. Hence, in order to make tractable an otherwise difficult task, the future engineering needs for the AFCs are addressed here for conventional versus compact approaches, with the latter being treated as a generic class and the former being composed of bumpy tori, stellarators, reversed-field pinches, and compact toroids.

Krakowski, R.A.

1982-01-01

279

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 1: The value of scientific and technical information (STI), its relationship to Research and Development (R/D), and its use by US aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper is based on the premise that scientific and technical information (STI), its use by aerospace engineers and scientists, and the aerospace research and development (R&D) process are related. We intend to support this premise with data gathered from numerous studies concerned with STI, the relationship of STI to the performance and management of R&D activities, and the information use and seeking behavior of engineers in general and aerospace engineers and scientists in particular. We intend to develop and present a synthesized appreciation of how aerospace R&D managers can improve the efficacy of the R&D process by understanding the role and value of STI in this process.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Glassman, Myron; Oliu, Walter E.

1990-01-01

280

SED Alumni---breeding ground for scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1943 the US Army established the Special Engineering Detachment (SED), in which mostly drafted young soldiers possessing some scientific credentials (though usually quite minimal) were reassigned from other duties to the Manhattan Project to assist in various research and development aspects of nuclear weapons. The Los Alamos contingent, never more than a few hundred GIs, worked with more senior scientists and engineers, often assuming positions of real responsibility. An unintended consequence of this circumstance was the fact that being in the SEDs turned out to be a fortuitous breeding ground for future physicists, chemists, and engineers. SEDs benefited from their close contacts with established scientists, working with them side by side, attended lectures by luminaries, and gained invaluable experience that would help them establish academic and industrial careers later in life. I will discuss some of these individuals (I list only those of whom I am personally aware). These include Henry ``Heinz'' Barschall*, Richard Bellman*-RAND Corporation, Murray Peshkin-ANL, Peter Lax-Courant Institute, NYU, William Spindel*-NRC,NAS, Bernard Waldman- Notre Dame, Richard Davisson*-U of Washington, Arnold Kramish- RAND, UNESCO, Josef Hofmann- Acoustic Research Corp, Val Fitch- Princeton U. *deceased

Bederson, Benjamin

2006-04-01

281

Teach Engineering: Students as Scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This curriculum unit for middle school features two lessons in which students design experiments to test their own hypotheses. In the first lesson, students gather and record simple data about drops of different fluids -- but that is not the primary point of the activity. Instead, students must analyze their own findings and generate plausible explanations based upon the evidence. In the second lesson, students develop testable hypotheses about the amount of mass lost in gum after chewing. They test both sugared and sugar-free gums. Again, the main point is not data collection. This experiment promotes understanding of the importance of a control in a scientific experimentation. Editor's Note: This curricular unit is offered in segments. The entire unit takes about two weeks, but may be parceled into smaller modules requiring 2-3 days for completion.

Hebrank, Mary

2010-10-18

282

Developing Global Scientists and Engineers  

NSF Publications Database

... of Polar Programs 47.049 --- Mathematical and Physical Sciences 47.050 --- Geosciences 47.041 --- ... work on the etiology, diagnosis or treatment of physical or mental disease, abnormality, or ...

283

Finding Meaningful Roles for Scientists in science Education Reform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Successful efforts to achieve reform in science education require the active and purposeful engagement of professional scientists. Working as partners with teachers, school administrators, science educators, parents, and other stakeholders, scientists can make important contributions to the improvement of science teaching and learning in pre-college classrooms. The world of a practicing university, corporate, or government scientist may seem far removed from that of students in an elementary classroom. However, the science knowledge and understanding of all future scientists and scientifically literate citizens begin with their introduction to scientific concepts and phenomena in childhood and the early grades. Science education is the responsibility of the entire scientific community and is not solely the responsibility of teachers and other professional educators. Scientists can serve many roles in science education reform including the following: (1) Science Content Resource, (2) Career Role Model, (3) Interpreter of Science (4) Validator for the Importance of Learning Science and Mathematics, (5) Champion of Real World Connections and Value of Science, (6) Experience and Access to Funding Sources, (7) Link for Community and Business Support, (8) Political Supporter. Special programs have been developed to assist scientists and engineers to be effective partners and advocates of science education reform. We will discuss the rationale, organization, and results of some of these partnership development programs.

Evans, Brenda

284

Intestinal Tissue Engineering: Current Concepts and Future Vision of Regenerative Medicine in the Gut  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose Functional tissue engineering of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex process aiming to aid the regeneration of structural layers of smooth muscle, intrinsic enteric neuronal plexuses, specialized mucosa and epithelial cells as well as interstitial cells. The final tissue engineered construct is intended to mimic the native GI tract anatomically and physiologically. Physiological functionality of tissue engineered constructs is of utmost importance while considering clinical translation. The construct comprises of cellular components as well as biomaterial scaffolding components. Together, these determine the immune-response a tissue engineered construct would elicit from a host upon implantation. Over the last decade, significant advances have been made to mitigate adverse host reactions. These include a quest for identifying autologous cell sources like embryonic and adult stem cells, bone marrow-derived cells, neural crest-derived cells and muscle-derived stem cells. Scaffolding biomaterials have been fabricated with increasing biocompatibility and biodegradability. Manufacturing processes have advanced to allow for precise spatial architecture of scaffolds in order to mimic in vivo milieu closely and achieve neovascularization. This review will focus on the current concepts and the future vision of functional tissue engineering of the diverse neuromuscular structures of the GI tract from the esophagus to the internal anal sphincter. PMID:22188325

Bitar, Khalil N.; Raghavan, Shreya

2011-01-01

285

Genetically engineered bacteria: an emerging tool for environmental remediation and future research perspectives.  

PubMed

This minireview explores the environmental bioremediation mediated by genetically engineered (GE) bacteria and it also highlights the limitations and challenges associated with the release of engineered bacteria in field conditions. Application of GE bacteria based remediation of various heavy metal pollutants is in the forefront due to eco-friendly and lesser health hazards compared to physico-chemical based strategies, which are less eco-friendly and hazardous to human health. A combination of microbiological and ecological knowledge, biochemical mechanisms and field engineering designs would be an essential element for successful in situ bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated sites using engineered bacteria. Critical research questions pertaining to the development and implementation of GE bacteria for enhanced bioremediation have been identified and poised for possible future research. Genetic engineering of indigenous microflora, well adapted to local environmental conditions, may offer more efficient bioremediation of contaminated sites and making the bioremediation more viable and eco-friendly technology. However, many challenges are to be addressed concerning the release of genetically engineered bacteria in field conditions. There are possible risks associated with the use of GE bacteria in field condition, with particular emphasis on ways in which molecular genetics could contribute to the risk mitigation. Both environmental as well as public health concerns need to be addressed by the molecular biologists. Although bioremediation of heavy metals by using the genetically engineered bacteria has been extensively reviewed in the past also, but the bio-safety assessment and factors of genetic pollution have been never the less ignored. PMID:21402131

Singh, Jay Shankar; Abhilash, P C; Singh, H B; Singh, Rana P; Singh, D P

2011-07-01

286

Engineered skeletal muscle tissue for soft robotics: fabrication strategies, current applications, and future challenges.  

PubMed

Skeletal muscle is a scalable actuator system used throughout nature from the millimeter to meter length scales and over a wide range of frequencies and force regimes. This adaptability has spurred interest in using engineered skeletal muscle to power soft robotics devices and in biotechnology and medical applications. However, the challenges to doing this are similar to those facing the tissue engineering and regenerative medicine fields; specifically, how do we translate our understanding of myogenesis in vivo to the engineering of muscle constructs in vitro to achieve functional integration with devices. To do this researchers are developing a number of ways to engineer the cellular microenvironment to guide skeletal muscle tissue formation. This includes understanding the role of substrate stiffness and the mechanical environment, engineering the spatial organization of biochemical and physical cues to guide muscle alignment, and developing bioreactors for mechanical and electrical conditioning. Examples of engineered skeletal muscle that can potentially be used in soft robotics include 2D cantilever-based skeletal muscle actuators and 3D skeletal muscle tissues engineered using scaffolds or directed self-organization. Integration into devices has led to basic muscle-powered devices such as grippers and pumps as well as more sophisticated muscle-powered soft robots that walk and swim. Looking forward, current, and future challenges include identifying the best source of muscle precursor cells to expand and differentiate into myotubes, replacing cardiomyocytes with skeletal muscle tissue as the bio-actuator of choice for soft robots, and vascularization and innervation to enable control and nourishment of larger muscle tissue constructs. PMID:24319010

Duffy, Rebecca M; Feinberg, Adam W

2014-01-01

287

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 17: The relationship between seven variables and the use of US government technical reports by US aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the use of U.S. government technical reports by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists and seven selected sociometric variables. Data were collected by means of a self-administered mail survey which was distributed to a randomly drawn sample of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) members. Two research questions concerning the use of conference meeting papers, journal articles, in-house technical reports, and U.S. government technical reports were investigated. Relevance, technical quality, and accessibility were found to be more important determinants of the overall extent to which U.S. government technical reports and three other information products were used by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Nanci; Demerath, Loren

1991-01-01

288

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 12: The diffusion of federally funded aerospace research and development (R/D) and the information seeking behavior of US aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper, the diffusion of federally funded aerospace R&D is explored from the perspective of the information-seeking behavior of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. The following three assumptions frame this exploration: (1) knowledge production, transfer, and utilization are equally important components of the aerospace R&D process; (2) the diffusion of knowledge resulting from federally funded aerospace R&D is indispensable for the U.S. to remain a world leader in aerospace; and (3) U.S. government technical reports, produced by NASA and DOD, play an important, but as yet undefined, role in the diffusion of federally funded aerospace R&D. A conceptual model for federally funded aerospace knowledge diffusion, one that emphasizes U.S. goverment technical reports, is presented. Data regarding three research questions concerning the information-seeking behavior of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists are also presented.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

1991-01-01

289

Fluvial geomorphology and river engineering: future roles utilizing a fluvial hydrosystems framework  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

River engineering is coming under increasing public scrutiny given failures to prevent flood hazards and economic and environmental concerns. This paper reviews the contribution that fluvial geomorphology can make in the future to river engineering. In particular, it highlights the need for fluvial geomorphology to be an integral part in engineering projects, that is, to be integral to the planning, implementation, and post-project appraisal stages of engineering projects. It should be proactive rather than reactive. Areas in which geomorphologists will increasingly be able to complement engineers in river management include risk and environmental impact assessment, floodplain planning, river audits, determination of instream flow needs, river restoration, and design of ecologically acceptable channels and structures. There are four key contributions that fluvial geomorphology can make to the engineering profession with regard to river and floodplain management: to promote recognition of lateral, vertical, and downstream connectivity in the fluvial system and the inter-relationships between river planform, profile, and cross-section; to stress the importance of understanding fluvial history and chronology over a range of time scales, and recognizing the significance of both palaeo and active landforms and deposits as indicators of levels of landscape stability; to highlight the sensitivity of geomorphic systems to environmental disturbances and change, especially when close to geomorphic thresholds, and the dynamics of the natural systems; and to demonstrate the importance of landforms and processes in controlling and defining fluvial biotopes and to thus promote ecologically acceptable engineering. Challenges facing fluvial geomorphology include: gaining full acceptance by the engineering profession; widespread utilization of new technologies including GPS, GIS, image analysis of satellite and airborne remote sensing data, computer-based hydraulic modeling and geophysical techniques; dovetailing engineering approaches to the study of river channels which emphasize reach-scale flow resistance, shear stresses, and material strength with catchment scale geomorphic approaches, empirical predictions, bed and bank processes, landform evolution, and magnitude-frequency concepts; producing accepted river channel typologies; fundamental research aimed at producing more reliable deterministic equations for prediction of bed and bank stability and bedload transport; and collaboration with aquatic biologists to determine the role and importance of geomorphologically and hydraulically defined habitats.

Gilvear, David J.

1999-12-01

290

2014 future Earth young scientists conference on integrated science and knowledge co-production for ecosystems and human well-being.  

PubMed

Effective integration in science and knowledge co-production is a challenge that crosses research boundaries, climate regions, languages and cultures. Early career scientists are crucial in the identification of, and engagement with, obstacles and opportunities in the development of innovative solutions to complex and interconnected problems. On 25-31 May 2014, International Council for Science and International Social Science Council, in collaboration with the International Network of Next-Generation Ecologists and Institute for New Economic Thinking: Young Scholars Initiative, assembled a group of early career researchers with diverse backgrounds and research perspectives to reflect on and debate relevant issues around ecosystems and human wellbeing in the transition towards green economy, funded by the German Research Foundation, at Villa Vigoni, Italy. As a group of young scientists, we have come to a consensus that collaboration and communication among a diverse group of peers from different geographic regions could break down the barriers to multi-disciplinary research designed to solve complex global-scale problems. We also propose to establish a global systematic thinking to monitor global socio-ecological systems and to develop criteria for a "good" anthropocene. Finally, we aim to bridge gaps among research, the media, and education from a governance perspective linking with "sustainable development goals". PMID:25390795

Shiue, Ivy; Samberg, Leah; Kulohoma, Benard; Dogaru, Diana; Wyborn, Carina; Hamel, Perrine; Jørgensen, Peter Søgaard; Lussier, Paul; Sundaram, Bharath; Lim, Michelle; Tironi, Antonio

2014-01-01

291

NewScientist.com: Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The NewScientist magazine archive features articles on a variety of science topics. The search engine accepts a keyword or title. Quick links to back issues are provided, and magazines can also be browsed by selecting one of ten predetermined subject categories.

292

Tribological Limitations in Gas Turbine Engines: A Workshop to Identify the Challenges and Set Future Directions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following report represents a compendium of selected speaker presentation materials and observations made by Prof O. Pinkus at the NASA/ASME/Industry sponsored workshop entitled "Tribological Limitations in Gas Turbine Engines" held on September 15-17, 1999 in Albany, New York. The impetus for the workshop came from the ASME's Research Committee on Tribology whose goal is to explore new tribological research topics which may become future research opportunities. Since this subject is of current interest to other industrial and government entities the conference received cosponsorship as noted above. The conference was well attended by government, industrial and academic participants. Topics discussed included current tribological issues in gas turbines as well as the potential impact (drawbacks and advantages) of future tribological technologies especially foil air bearings and magnetic beatings. It is hoped that this workshop report may serve as a starting point for continued discussions and activities in oil-free turbomachinery systems.

DellaCorte, Chris; Pinkus, Oscar

2000-01-01

293

THE LIBRARY OF THE FUTURE --RIGHT NOW The new James B. Hunt Jr. Library is redefining the engineering study experience  

E-print Network

THE LIBRARY OF THE FUTURE -- RIGHT NOW The new James B. Hunt Jr. Library is redefining. Hunt Jr. Library is redefining the engineering study experience. 20 GIFTS THAT LAST LIFETIMES Endowment of the figures that shape the College of Engineering. ON THE COVER: The new James B. Hunt Jr. Library, which

Young, R. Michael

294

National Science Board, Citing Census Stats on Foreign-Born Scientists and Engineers, Releases Workforce Report with New Sense of Urgency  

NSF Publications Database

... Science and Engineering Workforce - Realizing America's Potential. Appearing with him were three ... Science and Engineering Workforce - Realizing America's Potential, see: http://www.nsf.gov/nsb ...

295

Multi-Disciplinary Analysis for Future Launch Systems Using NASA's Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new engineering environment constructed for the purposes of analyzing and designing Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs) is presented. The new environment has been developed to allow NASA to perform independent analysis and design of emerging RLV architectures and technologies. The new Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is both collaborative and distributed. It facilitates integration of the analyses by both vehicle performance disciplines and life-cycle disciplines. Current performance disciplines supported include: weights and sizing, aerodynamics, trajectories, propulsion, structural loads, and CAD-based geometries. Current life-cycle disciplines supported include: DDT&E cost, production costs, operations costs, flight rates, safety and reliability, and system economics. Involving six NASA centers (ARC, LaRC, MSFC, KSC, GRC and JSC), AEE has been tailored to serve as a web-accessed agency-wide source for all of NASA's future launch vehicle systems engineering functions. Thus, it is configured to facilitate (a) data management, (b) automated tool/process integration and execution, and (c) data visualization and presentation. The core components of the integrated framework are a customized PTC Windchill product data management server, a set of RLV analysis and design tools integrated using Phoenix Integration's Model Center, and an XML-based data capture and transfer protocol. The AEE system has seen production use during the Initial Architecture and Technology Review for the NASA 2nd Generation RLV program, and it continues to undergo development and enhancements in support of its current main customer, the NASA Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program.

Monell, Donald; Mathias, Donovan; Reuther, James; Garn, Michelle

2003-01-01

296

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 15: Technical uncertainty and project complexity as correlates of information use by US industry-affiliated aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of an exploratory investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An exploratory study was conducted that investigated the influence of technical uncertainty and project complexity on information use by U.S. industry-affiliated aerospace engineers and scientists. The study utilized survey research in the form of a self-administered mail questionnaire. U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists on the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) mailing list served as the study population. The adjusted response rate was 67 percent. The survey instrument is appendix C to this report. Statistically significant relationships were found to exist between technical uncertainty, project complexity, and information use. Statistically significant relationships were found to exist between technical uncertainty, project complexity, and the use of federally funded aerospace R&D. The results of this investigation are relevant to researchers investigating information-seeking behavior of aerospace engineers. They are also relevant to R&D managers and policy planners concerned with transferring the results of federally funded aerospace R&D to the U.S. aerospace industry.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Glassman, Nanci A.; Affelder, Linda O.; Hecht, Laura M.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

1993-01-01

297

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 45; The Technical Communications Practices of US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 3 US Aerospace Engineering Educators Survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. Little is also known about the intermediary-based system that is used to transfer the results of federally funded R&D to the U.S. aerospace industry. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports, present a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communication practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and identified themselves as educators.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1996-01-01

298

Scientists and Science Education: Working at the Interface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"Are we alone?" "Where did we come from?" "What is our future?" These questions lie at the juncture of astronomy and biology: astrobiology. It is intrinsically interdisciplinary in its study of the origin, evolution and future of life on Earth and beyond. The fundamental concepts of origin and evolution--of both living and non-living systems--are central to astrobiology, and provide powerful themes for unifying science teaching, learning, and appreciation in classrooms and laboratories, museums and science centers, and homes. Research scientists play a key role in communicating the nature of science and joy of scientific discovery with the public. Communicating the scientific discoveries with the public brings together diverse professionals: research scientists, graduate and undergraduate faculty, educators, journalists, media producers, web designers, publishers and others. Working with these science communicators, research scientists share their discoveries through teaching, popular articles, lectures, broadcast and print media, electronic publication, and developing materials for formal and informal education such as textbooks, museum exhibits and documentary television. There's lots of activity in science communication. Yet, the NSF and NASA have both identified science education as needing improvement. The quality of schools and the preparation of teachers receive national attention via "No Child Left Behind" requirements. The number of students headed toward careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) is not sufficient to meet national needs. How can the research community make a difference? What role can research scientists fulfill in improving STEM education? This talk will discuss the interface between research scientists and science educators to explore effective roles for scientists in science education partnerships. Astronomy and astrobiology education and outreach projects, materials, and programs will provide the context for this discussion.

DeVore, E. K.

2004-05-01

299

please recycle. Without talented, passionate environmental scientists,  

E-print Network

is academic. The bright, passionate young scientists who feel called to environmental research and careers in academia as PhDs are critical for a sustainable future. These are the men and women who will forge new of these young scientists. Our accomplished faculty members share their passion, commitment and spirit of inquiry

Reif, John H.

300

Educating the Next Generation of Agricultural Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Committee on Evaluation of Trends in Agricultural Research at the Doctoral and Postdoctoral Level was established to analyze issues related to the next generation of agricultural scientists. This report contains the findings, conclusions, and recommendations regarding the status and future needs of agricultural scientists. This report focuses…

National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Agriculture.

301

Cranial neural crest cell contribution to craniofacial formation, pathology, and future directions in tissue engineering.  

PubMed

This review provides an overview of the state and future directions of development and pathology in the craniofacial complex in the context of Cranial Neural Crest Cells (CNCC). CNCC are a multipotent cell population that is largely responsible for forming the vertebrate head. We focus on findings that have increased the knowledge of gene regulatory networks and molecular mechanisms governing CNCC migration and the participation of these cells in tissue formation. Pathology due to aberrant migration or cell death of CNCC, termed neurocristopathies, is discussed in addition to craniosynostoses. Finally, we discuss tissue engineering applications that take advantage of recent advancements in genome editing and the multipotent nature of CNCC. These applications have relevance to treating diseases due directly to the failure of CNCC, and also in restoring tissues lost due to a variety of reasons. Birth Defects Research (Part C) 102:324-332, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25227212

Snider, Taylor Nicholas; Mishina, Yuji

2014-09-01

302

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math: AGU's Commitment to the Next Generation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AGU is committed to the progress of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) educational programming for the next generation of scientists. STEM ensures the future of science and technology by providing academic and professional support to students in these fields.

Howard, Claire

2014-03-01

303

Biologically inspired robotic inspectors: the engineering reality and future outlook (Keynote address)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Human errors have long been recognized as a major factor in the reliability of nondestructive evaluation results. To minimize such errors, there is an increasing reliance on automatic inspection tools that allow faster and consistent tests. Crawlers and various manipulation devices are commonly used to perform variety of inspection procedures that include C-scan with contour following capability to rapidly inspect complex structures. The emergence of robots has been the result of the need to deal with parts that are too complex to handle by a simple automatic system. Economical factors are continuing to hamper the wide use of robotics for inspection applications however technology advances are increasingly changing this paradigm. Autonomous robots, which may look like human, can potentially address the need to inspect structures with configuration that are not predetermined. The operation of such robots that mimic biology may take place at harsh or hazardous environments that are too dangerous for human presence. Biomimetic technologies such as artificial intelligence, artificial muscles, artificial vision and numerous others are increasingly becoming common engineering tools. Inspired by science fiction, making biomimetic robots is increasingly becoming an engineering reality and in this paper the state-of-the-art will be reviewed and the outlook for the future will be discussed.

Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

2005-04-01

304

Impact of future fuel properties on aircraft engines and fuel systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From current projections of the availability of high-quality petroleum crude oils, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the specifications for hydrocarbon jet fuels may have to be modified. The problems that are most likely to be encountered as a result of these modifications relate to engine performance, component durability and maintenance, and aircraft fuel-system performance. The effect on engine performance will be associated with changes in specific fuel consumption, ignition at relight limits, at exhaust emissions. Durability and maintenance will be affected by increases in combustor liner temperatures, carbon deposition, gum formation in fuel nozzles, and erosion and corrosion of turbine blades and vanes. Aircraft fuel-system performance will be affected by increased deposits in fuel-system heat exchangers and changes in the pumpability and flowability of the fuel. The severity of the potential problems is described in terms of the fuel characteristics most likely to change in the future. Recent data that evaluate the ability of current-technology aircraft to accept fuel specification changes are presented, and selected technological advances that can reduce the severity of the problems are described and discussed.

Rudey, R. A.; Grobman, J. S.

1978-01-01

305

The Responsibility of Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses several kinds of responsibilities scientists have, including moral/ethical responsibilities related to research methodology. Areas addressed include use of science in war, approaches to decision-making, scientists and smoking, importance of education related to social responsibility. (JN)

Williams, W. F.

1983-01-01

306

Shaping the Future, Volume II: Perspectives on Undergraduate Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology  

NSF Publications Database

... in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology MS WORD VERSIONS | TEXT VERSIONS | PDF VERSIONS ... in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology (54K) View the entire document in TEXT, Shaping ...

307

Notre Dame scientists study lake pollution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scientists and engineers at the University of Notre Dame will test and evaluate possible methods of reducing pollution in Stone Lake, near Cassopolis, Michigan, under a $46,335 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency.Mark W. Tenney, Associate Professor of civil engineering, explained that a group of five researchers has been studying Stone Lake since 1966, when the nearby town removed a

Anonymous

1971-01-01

308

Cleantech to Market ScientiStS +  

E-print Network

sciences, nanotechnology, computer sciences, mechanical engineering, building technologies and moreCleantech to Market StudentS + ScientiStS + ProfeSSionalS = innovation H A A S S C H O O L O F B U. StudentS C2M then engages top graduate students from Business, Engineering, Science, Law, and the Energy

Kammen, Daniel M.

309

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 37: The impact of political control on technical communications: A comparative study of Russian and US aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Until the recent dissolution of the Soviet Union, the Communist Party exerted a strict control of access to and dissemination of scientific and technical information (STI). This article presents models of the Soviet-style information society and the Western-style information society and discusses the effects of centralized governmental control of information on Russian technical communication practices. The effects of political control on technical communication are then used to interpret the results of a survey of Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists concerning the time devoted to technical communication, their collaborative writing practices and their attitudes toward collaboration, the kinds of technical documents they produce and use, and their use of computer technology, and their use of and the importance to them of libraries and technical information centers. The data are discussed in terms of tentative conclusions drawn from the literature. Finally, we conclude with four questions concerning government policy, collaboration, and the flow of STI between Russian and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.; Flammia, Madelyn; Kennedy, John M.

1994-01-01

310

Graphic Analysis of American and British Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine Performance Trends (Current and Future)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report presents a compilation of static sea-level data on existing or designed American and British axial-flow turbojet engines in terms of basic engine parameters such as thrust and air flow. In the data presented, changes in the over-U engine performance with time sre examined as well as the relation of the various engine parameters to each other.

Cesaro, Richard S.; Lazar, James

1951-01-01

311

Looking beyond the last 50 years: The future of materials science and engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

things that have been constant over time are human innovation and creativity, the engineer’s ability to address societal needs, and the entrepreneurial spirit of engineering. I believe that going forward, one thing we can bet on is the human ability to innovate and address societal needs. During the last seven decades, the mainstream materials science and engineering (MSE) community has

Diran Apelian

2007-01-01

312

Structural Analysis and Optimization of a Composite Fan Blade for Future Aircraft Engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper addresses the structural analysis and optimization of a composite sandwich ply lay-up of a NASA baseline solid metallic fan blade comparable to a future Boeing 737 MAX aircraft engine. Sandwich construction with a polymer matrix composite face sheet and honeycomb aluminum core replaces the original baseline solid metallic fan model made of Titanium. The focus of this work is to design the sandwich composite blade with the optimum number of plies for the face sheet that will withstand the combined pressure and centrifugal loads while the constraints are satisfied and the baseline aerodynamic and geometric parameters are maintained. To satisfy the requirements a sandwich construction for the blade is proposed with composite face sheets and a weak core made of honeycomb aluminum material. For aerodynamic considerations, the thickness of the core is optimized where as the overall blade thickness is held fixed in order not to alter the original airfoil geometry. Weight reduction is taken as the objective function by varying the core thickness of the blade within specified upper and lower bounds. Constraints are imposed on radial displacement limitations and ply failure strength. From the optimum design, the minimum number of plies, which will not fail, is back-calculated. The ply lay-up of the blade is adjusted from the calculated number of plies and final structural analysis is performed. Analyses were carried out by utilizing the OpenMDAO Framework, developed at NASA Glenn Research Center combining optimization with structural assessment.

Coroneos, Rula M.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

2012-09-01

313

The Design of Large-Scale Complex Engineered Systems: Present Challenges and Future Promise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Model-Based Systems Engineering techniques are used in the SE community to address the need for managing the development of complex systems. A key feature of the MBSE approach is the use of a model to capture the requirements, architecture, behavior, operating environment and other key aspects of the system. The focus on the model differentiates MBSE from traditional SE techniques that may have a document centric approach. In an effort to assess the benefit of utilizing MBSE on its flight projects, NASA Langley has implemented a pilot program to apply MBSE techniques during the early phase of the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X). MISSE-X is a Technology Demonstration Mission being developed by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist i . Designed to be installed on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS), MISSE-X will host experiments that advance the technology readiness of materials and devices needed for future space exploration. As a follow-on to the highly successful series of previous MISSE experiments on ISS, MISSE-X benefits from a significant interest by the

Bloebaum, Christina L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas

2012-01-01

314

On Becoming a Scientist ONE NORMALLY BECOMES A SCIENTIST THROUGH A SERIES OF APPRENTICESHIPS, PURSUING  

E-print Network

, PURSUING research in laboratories directed by established scientists. My own scientific mentors were and function as a scientist. Both from them, and by making my own mistakes,* I learned how to identify much of one's scientific future is shaped by early experiences, it is critical that beginning

Movileanu, Liviu

315

Mentoring Among Scientists: Implications of Interpersonal Relationships within a Formal Mentoring Program  

SciTech Connect

Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protégé relationship significantly influences a protégé’s learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protégé relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry.

Bryan D. Maughan

2006-11-01

316

Mentoring among scientists: Implications of interpersonal relationships within a formal mentoring program  

SciTech Connect

Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protege relationship significantly influences a protege's learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protege relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry. (authors)

Maughan, B. D. [Univ. of Idaho, 1784 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

2006-07-01

317

Reproductive cloning, genetic engineering and the autonomy of the child: the moral agent and the open future.  

PubMed

Some authors have argued that the human use of reproductive cloning and genetic engineering should be prohibited because these biotechnologies would undermine the autonomy of the resulting child. In this paper, two versions of this view are discussed. According to the first version, the autonomy of cloned and genetically engineered people would be undermined because knowledge of the method by which these people have been conceived would make them unable to assume full responsibility for their actions. According to the second version, these biotechnologies would undermine autonomy by violating these people's right to an open future. There is no evidence to show that people conceived through cloning and genetic engineering would inevitably or even in general be unable to assume responsibility for their actions; there is also no evidence for the claim that cloning and genetic engineering would inevitably or even in general rob the child of the possibility to choose from a sufficiently large array of life plans. PMID:17264194

Mameli, M

2007-02-01

318

MAD Scientist Network: Ask  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The MAD Scientist Network is a collection of scientists from all over the country available to answer any of your science questions. Search the archive of over 25,000 questions, explore the MadSci Library for resources, demos and science fair project ideas, or read the FAQ that answers common questions, like why is the sky blue? Scientists will not answer homework questions, medical questions, or science fair project questions.

319

Methods & Strategies: Sculpt-a-Scientist  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary science experiences help develop students' views of science and scientific interests. As a result, teachers have been charged with the task of inspiring, cultivating, recruiting, and training the scientists needed to create tomorrow's innovations and solve future problems (Business Roundtable 2005). Who will these future…

Jackson, Julie; Rich, Ann

2014-01-01

320

Tissue Engineering, Stem Cells, and Cloning: Current Concepts and Future Trends  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tissue engineering efforts are currently underway for virtually every type of tissue and organ within the human body. As tissue\\u000a engineering incorporates the fields of cell transplantation, materials science, and engineering, personnel who have mastered\\u000a the techniques of cell harvest, culture, expansion, transplantation, as well as polymer design are essential for the successful\\u000a application of this technology. Various engineered tissues

C. J. Koh; A. Atala

321

Future Generation Computer Systems 19 (2003) 12991307 The synergistic integration of mathematics, software engineering,  

E-print Network

: Education; Computational science and engineering; Pervasive computing and mechatronics 1. Introduction Computational science and engineering (CSE) has evolved into a discipline in its own right and its role, electronic and computer engineering to the design of industrial products. The MCI at the University

Melnik, Roderick

322

Engineering a Renaissance A celebration of the past, present, and future  

E-print Network

- #12;On behalf of everyone at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, thank you; and an A.B. from Har- vard College. Everhart came to Caltech from the University of Illinois at Urbana 1979 to 1984 he served as dean of the College of Engineering and professor of Electrical Engineering

323

Perceptions of Engineers Regarding Successful Engineering Team Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The perceptions of engineers and scientists at NASA Langley Research Center toward engineering design teams were evaluated. A sample of 49 engineers and scientists rated 60 team behaviors in terms of their relative importance for team success. They also c...

R. H. Nowaczyk

1998-01-01

324

Astronomy Olympiads a Challenge for Future Scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contests in astronomy for secondary school pupils, very often called "Astronomy Olympiads", have acquired a general recognition in many countries. They are regarded in various manners: as the best way to attract to science young talented people in general, the possibility to discriminate the most successful participants, who are then in position to be offered to become students of famous universities which is viewed as the beginning of a nice career, the possibility of affirmation of astronomy in secondary schools, the way to put together young amateur astronomers from various parts of the world, etc. On the other hand, there are some organisational problems which follow such events; they concern the relationship with the International Astronomical Union, outreach of the contests in different countries and many others. Serbia has been a member in the Astronomy-Olympiad Movement from 2002.

Ninkovic, S.

2013-05-01

325

What do Future Senators, Scientists, Social Workers,  

E-print Network

author = Vice President of Dairy MAX, a regional dairy council. (Fair disclosure: Study funded by NIH, not Dairy MAX) What was the size of the effect? Reduction of just under 2% in BMI percentile for each

Utts, Jessica

326

The Science Committee. A Report by the Committee on the Utilization of Young Scientists and Engineers in Advisory Services to Government. Appendixes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes the history, nature, purpose, and operation of committees assisting the government in matters lying generally within engineering or the physical, medical, and life sciences. Principal findings and recommendations presented in the first volume deal with the establishment and operation of committees; the identification,…

National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

327

Employment of Scientists and Engineers Increased Between 1976 and 1978 but Declined in Some Science Fields. Science Resources Studies Highlights, March 19, 1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The data presented in this report are estimates based on information produced by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Scientific and Technical Personnel Characteristics System (STPCS) and other systems of the Foundation, other government agencies and private organizations. Information includes: (1) the U.S. science/engineering force grew by 2%…

National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

328

Scientists Shaping the Discussion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific studies which directly impact the larger society require an engagement between the scientists and the larger public. With respect to research on climate change, many third-party groups report on scientific findings and thereby serve as an intermediary between the scientist and the public. In many cases, the third-party reporting misinterprets the findings and conveys inaccurate information to the media and the public. To remedy this, many scientists are now taking a more active role in conveying their work directly to interested parties. In addition, some scientists are taking the further step of engaging with the general public to answer basic questions related to climate change - even on sub-topics which are unrelated to scientists' own research. Nevertheless, many scientists are reluctant to engage the general public or the media. The reasons for scientific reticence are varied but most commonly are related to fear of public engagement, concern about the time required to properly engage the public, or concerns about the impact to their professional reputations. However, for those scientists who are successful, these engagement activities provide many benefits. Scientists can increase the impact of their work, and they can help society make informed choices on significant issues, such as mitigating global warming. Here we provide some concrete steps that scientists can take to ensure that their public engagement is successful. These steps include: (1) cultivating relationships with reporters, (2) crafting clear, easy to understand messages that summarize their work, (3) relating science to everyday experiences, and (4) constructing arguments which appeal to a wide-ranging audience. With these steps, we show that scientists can efficiently deal with concerns that would otherwise inhibit their public engagement. Various resources will be provided that allow scientists to continue work on these key steps.

Abraham, J. A.; Weymann, R.; Mandia, S. A.; Ashley, M.

2011-12-01

329

The History of Winter: teachers as scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The History of Winter (HOW) is a NASA Goddard Space Flight Center-funded teacher enrichment program that was started by Dr. Peter Wasilewski (NASA), Dr. Robert Gabrys (NASA) and Dr. Tony Gow (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, or CRREL) in 2001 and continues with support and involvement of scientists from both the NASA Cryospheric Sciences Laboratory and CREEL. The program brings educators mostly from middle and high schools but also from state parks, community colleges and other institutions from across the US to the Northwood School (a small, private boarding school) in Lake Placid, NY for one week to learn about several facets of winter, polar, and snow research, including the science and history of polar ice core research, lake ice formation and structure, snow pack science, winter ecology, and remote sensing including current and future NASA cryospheric missions. The program receives support from the Northwood School staff to facilitate the program. The goal of the program is to create 'teachers as scientists' which is achieved through several hands-on field experiences in which the teachers have the opportunity to work with polar researchers from NASA, CRREL and partner Universities to dig and sample snow pits, make ice thin sections from lake ice, make snow shelters, and observe under-ice lake ecology. The hands-on work allows the teachers to use the same tools and techniques used in polar research while simultaneously introducing science concepts and activities to support their classroom work. The ultimate goal of the program is to provide the classroom teachers with the opportunity to learn about current and timely cryospheric research as well as to engage in real fieldwork experiences. The enthusiasm generated during the week-long program is translated into classroom activities with guidance from scientists, teachers and educational professionals. The opportunity to engage with polar researchers, both young investigators and renowned veterans in the field, is a unique experience for many of the teachers. Here we present lessons learned throughout the lifetime of the program, including successes and improvements made, and present our vision for the future of HOW.

Koenig, L.; Courville, Z.; Wasilewski, P. J.; Gow, T.; Bender, K. J.

2013-12-01

330

Scientists Like Me: Faces of Discovery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the International Year of Astronomy, Pacific Science Center is hosting a photography exhibit: Scientists Like Me: Faces of Discovery. The exhibit contains photographs of real, current astronomers and scientists working in astronomy and aerospace-related fields from many races, genders, cultural affiliations and walks of life. The photographs were taken and posters designed by Alyssa Trinh and Sarah Culp, high school interns in Discovery Corps, Pacific Science Center's youth development program. The direct contact between the scientists and the interns helps the intended audience of teachers and families personally connect with scientists. The finished posters from this exhibit are available online (http://pacificsciencecenter.org/scientists) for teachers to use in their classrooms, in addition to being displayed at Pacific Science Center and becoming part of Pacific Science Center's permanent art rotation. The objective of this project was to fill a need for representative photographs of scientists in the world community. It also met two of the goals of International Year of Astronomy: to provide a modern image of science and scientists, and to improve the gender-balanced representation of scientists at all levels and promote greater involvement by all people in scientific and engineering careers. We would like to build on the success of this project and create an annual summer internship, with different interns, focusing on creating posters for different fields of science.

Enevoldsen, A. A. G.; Culp, S.; Trinh, A.

2010-08-01

331

Quantum Computing Computer Scientists  

E-print Network

Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists Noson S. Yanofsky and Mirco A. Mannucci #12;© May 2007 Noson S. Yanofsky Mirco A. Mannucci #12;Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists Noson S. Yanofsky of Vector Spaces 3 The Leap From Classical to Quantum 3.1 Classical Deterministic Systems 3.2 Classical

Yanofsky, Noson S.

332

Stories of Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents three biographical sketches of scientists including John Wesley Powell (first to explore the geology of the Grand Canyon), Joseph von Fraunhofer (his work in optics led to the science of spectroscopy), and Gregor Mendel (of Mendelian genetics fame). Other scientists are mentioned along with sources for additional biographical information.…

Mascazine, John R.

2001-01-01

333

Growing Seeds and Scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How do young children develop their ideas about science and scientists' work in their first year of school? How do we teach them to believe they are real scientists? In this article, the authors--a university science educator, a kindergarten teacher, and a

Culp, Alicia M.; Smith, Deborah C.; Cowan, Jessica L.

2009-09-01

334

Scientists in Africa.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nigeria and Kenya have pressed the development of scientific capacities within their nations. The challenges to which the first generation of scientists responded are being displaced by the need to consolidate advancements and justify investment in science and higher education. Thus, scientists are or will be scrutinized in this context.…

Eisemon, Thomas Owen

1980-01-01

335

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 12: The diffusion of federally funded aerospace Research and Development (R&D) and the information seeking behavior of US aerospace engineers and scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present exploration of the diffusion of federally-funded R&D via the information-seeking behavior of scientists and engineers proceeds under three assumptions: (1) that knowledge transfer and utilization is as important as knowledge production; (2) that the diffusion of knowledge obtained through federally-funded R&D is necessary for the maintenance of U.S. preeminence in the aerospace field; and (3) that federally-funded NASA and DoD technical reports play an important, albeit as-yet undefined, role in aerospace R&D diffusion. A conceptual model is presented for the process of knowledge diffusion that stresses the role of U.S. government-funded technical reports.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

1991-01-01

336

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 64: Culture and Workplace Communications: A Comparison of the Technical Communications Practices of Japanese and US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The advent of global markets elevates the role and importance of culture as a mitigating factor in the diffusion of knowledge and technology and in product and process innovation. This is especially true in the large commercial aircraft (LCA) sector where the production and market aspects are becoming increasingly international. As firms expand beyond their national borders, using such methods as risk-sharing partnerships, joint ventures, outsourcing, and alliances, they have to contend with national and corporate cultures. Our focus is on Japan, a program participant in the production of the Boeing Company's 777. The aspects of Japanese culture and workplace communications will be examined: 1.) the influence of Japanese culture on the diffusion of knowledge and technology in aerospace at the national and international levels; 2.) those cultural determinants-the propensity to work together, a willingness to subsume individual interests to a greater good, and an emphasis on consensual decision making-that have a direct bearing on the ability of Japanese firms to form alliances and compete in international markets; 3.) and those cultural determinants thought to influence the information-seeking behaviors and workplace communication practices of Japanese aerospace engineers and scientists. In this article, we report selective results from a survey of Japanese and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists that focused on workplace communications. Data are presented for the following topics: importance of and time spent communicating information, collaborative writing, need for an undergraduate course in technical communication, use of libraries, use and importance of electronic (computer) networks, and the use and importance of foreign and domestically produced technical reports.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Sato, Yuko; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1997-01-01

337

AMTD: Update of Engineering Specifications Derived from Science Requirements for Future UVOIR Space Telescopes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

AMTD is using a Science Driven Systems Engineering approach to develop Engineering Specifications based on Science Measurement Requirements and Implementation Constraints. Science requirements meet the needs of both Exoplanet and General Astrophysics science. Engineering Specifications are guiding our effort to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review.

Stahl, H. Philip

2014-01-01

338

445 N (100-lbf) LO 2/LCH 4 reaction control engine technology development for future space vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have identified liquid oxygen (LO2)/liquid methane (LCH4) propulsion systems as promising options for some future space vehicles. NASA issued a contract to Aerojet to develop a 445 N (100-lbf) LO 2/LCH 4 Reaction Control Engine (RCE) aimed at reducing the risk of utilizing a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) on a space vehicle. Aerojet utilized innovative design solutions to develop an RCE that can ignite reliably over a broad range of inlet temperatures, perform short minimum impulse bits (MIB) at small electrical pulse widths (EPW), and produce excellent specific impulse (Isp) across a range of engine mixture ratios (MR). These design innovations also provide a start transient with a benign mixture ratio (MR), ensuring good thrust chamber compatibility and long life. In addition, this RCE can successfully operate at MRs associated with main engines, enabling the RCE to provide emergency backup propulsion to minimize vehicle propellant load and overall system mass.

Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Smith, Timothy D.

2010-03-01

339

Mechanical Engineering Curricula: A Follow-up Study for the Future Effects of ABET EC2000  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as the sole agency responsible for accreditation of educational programs leading to degrees in engineering, engineering technology, and related engineering areas. In the late 1990s, engineering programs began transitioning to a new Engineering Criteria 2000 (EC2000). By 2001, all engineering programs were required to be accredited under the new criteria. The philosophy of Engineering Criteria 2000 is to allow institutions and programs to define their mission and objectives to meet the needs of their constituents and enable program differentiation. Emphasis is placed on continuous improvement of programs based on the input of constituents and a process that links outcomes and assessment to program objectives. This current paper is a follow-up study to a preliminary study conducted by the author in 2000 that looked at the initial effects of ABET EC2000. The earlier study examined selected mechanical engineering programs to discern the impact of EC2000 on curriculum development during the initial implementation phase of the new criteria. Data on the layout and composition of mechanical engineering curricula for nine schools in the United States with Ph.D. programs and nine schools without Ph.D. programs was presented and is updated in this current work. Current results are also compared to a study by Robert E. Mates from the State University of New York at Buffalo entitled a Survey of Undergraduate ME Programs, conducted in 1987. The conclusions identify changes that have occurred in mechanical engineering curricula as the EC2000 assessment process has matured.

Whiteman, Wayne

2009-09-09

340

Bioinspired Engineering of Exploration Systems (BEES) - its Impact on Future Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes an overview of our "Bioinspired Engineering of Exploration Systems for Mars" ( "BEES for Mars") project. The BEES approach distills selected biologically inspired strategies utilizing motion cues/optic flow, bioinspired pattern recognition, biological visual and neural control systems, bioinspired sensing and communication techniques, and birds of prey inspired search and track algorithmic systems. Unique capabilities so enabled, provide potential solutions to future autonomous robotic space and planetary mission applications. With the first series of tests performed in September 2003, August 2004 and September 2004, we have demonstrated the BEES technologies at the El Mirage Dry Lakebed site in the Mojave Desert using Delta Wing experimental prototypes. We call these test flyers the "BEES flyer", since we are developing them as dedicated test platform for the newly developed bioinspired sensors, processors and algorithmic strategies. The Delta Wing offers a robust airframe that can sustain high G launches and offers ease of compact stowability and packaging along with scaling to small size and low ReynOld's number performance for a potential Mars deployment. Our approach to developing light weight, low power autonomous flight systems using concepts distilled from biology promises to enable new applications, of dual use to NASA and DoD needs. Small in size (0.5 -5 Kg) BEES Flyers are demonstrating capabilities for autonomous flight and sensor operability in Mars analog conditions. The BEES project team spans JPL, NASA Ames, Australian National University (ANU), Brigham Young University(BYU), DC Berkeiey, Analogic Computers Inc. and other institutions. The highlights from our recent flight demonstrations exhibiting new Mission enabling capabilities are described. Further, this paper describes two classes of potential new missions for Mars exploration: (1) the long range exploration missions, and (2) observation missions, for real time imaging of critical ephemeral phenomena, that can be enabled by use of BEES flyers. For example, such flyers can serve as a powerful black-box for critical descent and landing data and enablers for improved science missions complementing and supplementing the existing assets like landers and rovers by providing valuable exploration and quick extended low-altitude aerial coverage of the sites of interest by imaging them and distributing instruments to them. Imaging done by orbiters allows broad surface coverage at limited spatial resolution. Low altitude air-borne exploration of Mars offers a means for imaging large areas, perhaps up to several hundred kilometers, quickly and efficiently, providing a close-up birds-eye view of the planetary terrain and close-up approach to constrained difficult areas like canyons and craters. A novel approach to low-mass yet highly capable flyers is enabled by small aircraft equipped using sensors and processors and algorithms developed using BEES technology. This project is focused towards showing the direct impact of blending the best of artificial intelligence attributes and bioinspiration to create a leap beyond existing capability for our future Missions.

Thakoor, Sarita; Hine, Butler; Zornetzer, Steve

2004-01-01

341

Journal Review: Biomolecular Engineering, Bioengineering, Biochemicals, and Food Directed Evolution: Past, Present, and Future  

E-print Network

Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 DOI 10.1002/aic.13995 Published and widespread tools in basic and applied biology. From its roots in classical strain engineering and adaptive practitioners of these techniques could exhibit control only on the screening of target organisms for desired

Zhao, Huimin

342

The Education of Future Aeronautical Engineers: Conceiving, Designing, Implementing and Operating  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper will outline answers to the two central questions regarding improving engineering education: (1) What is the full set of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that engineering students should possess as they leave the university, and at what level of proficiency?; and (2) How can we do better at ensuring that students learn these skills? The…

Crawley, Edward F.; Brodeur, Doris R.; Soderholm, Diane H.

2008-01-01

343

Invisible Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Questionnaire to ask ``mention three names of scientists you know'' and ``three names of engineers you know'' was conducted and the answers from 140 adults were analyzed. The results indicated that the image of scientists is represented by Nobel laureates and that of engineers by great inventors like Thomas Edison and industry founders like Soichiro Honda. In order to reveal

Hideo Ohashi

2008-01-01

344

Tissue Engineering of Blood Vessels: Functional Requirements, Progress, and Future Challenges  

PubMed Central

Vascular disease results in the decreased utility and decreased availability of autologus vascular tissue for small diameter (< 6 mm) vessel replacements. While synthetic polymer alternatives to date have failed to meet the performance of autogenous conduits, tissue-engineered replacement vessels represent an ideal solution to this clinical problem. Ongoing progress requires combined approaches from biomaterials science, cell biology, and translational medicine to develop feasible solutions with the requisite mechanical support, a non-fouling surface for blood flow, and tissue regeneration. Over the past two decades interest in blood vessel tissue engineering has soared on a global scale, resulting in the first clinical implants of multiple technologies, steady progress with several other systems, and critical lessons-learned. This review will highlight the current inadequacies of autologus and synthetic grafts, the engineering requirements for implantation of tissue-engineered grafts, and the current status of tissue-engineered blood vessel research. PMID:23181145

Kumar, Vivek A.; Brewster, Luke P.; Caves, Jeffrey M.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

2012-01-01

345

Ask-A-Scientist  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ask-A-Scientist is a Windows to the Universe feature that provides answers to users' submitted science questions. Users can check out the most recent questions answered on the first page of the Ask-A-Scientist section of Windows to the Universe, search the Ask-A-Scientist Archives to peruse questions on topics such as Earth, the Sun, the Moon, the Solar System, the Universe, physics, and biology, and send their own science questions to the Windows to the Universe scientists. Windows to the Universe is a user-friendly learning system pertaining to the Earth and Space sciences. The objective of this project is to develop an innovative and engaging web site that spans the Earth and Space sciences and includes a rich array of documents, including images, movies, animations, and data sets that explore the Earth and Space sciences and the historical and cultural ties between science, exploration and the human experience.

Johnson, Roberta

2000-07-01

346

Today's Authors, Tomorrow's Scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Although not all teachers can invite scientists into classrooms on a regular basis, they can invite them into their students' worlds through literature. Here the author shares how she used the nonfiction selection, Science to the Rescue (Markle 1

Porter, Diana

2009-10-01

347

COSEE Southeast: Scientist's Niche  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Scientists can get help engaging in K-16 education efforts from this resource. It provides information and publications on how researchers can get involved in education, and contains a link to the Southern Association of Marine Laboratories (SAML).

348

Ask a Climate Scientist  

NASA Video Gallery

Have a question that's always confounded you about Earth's climate? Wonder why it matters that the climate is changing now if it has changed before? Or how scientists know changes seen in recent de...

349

Investigation into the past and future of women in science and engineering.  

PubMed

Covering the Ancient Greek era, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the 19th and 20th C., this paper explores the visions of the abilities of women, their access to education, and their roles in these epochs. Recent data on the participation rate of women in science and engineering, the culture in these fields, and strategies to increase their presence are discussed. The paper ends with a discussion on how science and engineering could benefit from integrating and valuing a blend of masculine and feminine perspectives. Biomedical engineering as a field frequently chosen by women is mentioned. PMID:19965142

Frize, M

2009-01-01

350

NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project: Report 43: The Technical Communication Practices of U.S. Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 1 Mail Survey -- Manufacturing and Production Perspective  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communication practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were members of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1996-01-01

351

Building the Future SERIES Seismic Engineering research infrastructures for European synergies  

E-print Network

synergies 1 W k h J l 14 20091st Workshop, July 14, 2009 Iasi, Romania Experimental needs for thep future the Future Objectives of Eurocode 8 In the event of earthquakes:In the event of earthquakes: Human lives ­ Nuclear Power Plants, OffshoreSpecial structures Nuclear Power Plants, Offshore structures, Large Dams

352

Shaping the Future: New Expectations for Undergraduate Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 1996 NSF report suggested standards for education in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. The needs of a broad range of students are considered. A second volume of the report is also available.

2007-08-31

353

Impact of broad-specification fuels on future jet aircraft. [engine components and performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects that broad specification fuels have on airframe and engine components were discussed along with the improvements in component technology required to use broad specification fuels without sacrificing performance, reliability, maintainability, or safety.

Grobman, J. S.

1978-01-01

354

Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolic engineering: current progress and future challenges.  

PubMed

Cytochromes P450 catalyze a broad range of regiospecific, stereospecific and irreversible steps in the biosynthetic routes of plant natural metabolites with important applications in pharmaceutical, cosmetic, fragrance and flavour, or polymer industries. They are consequently essential drivers for the engineered bioproduction of such compounds. Two ground-breaking developments of commercial products driven by the engineering of P450s are the antimalarial drug precursor artemisinic acid and blue roses or carnations. Tedious optimizations were required to generate marketable products. Hurdles encountered in P450 engineering and their potential solutions are summarized here. Together with recent technical developments and novel approaches to metabolic engineering, the lessons from this pioneering work should considerably boost exploitation of the amazing P450 toolkit emerging from accelerated sequencing of plant genomes. PMID:24709279

Renault, Hugues; Bassard, Jean-Etienne; Hamberger, Björn; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

2014-06-01

355

U.S. Ethnic Scientists and Entrepreneurs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Immigrants are exceptionally important for U.S. technology development, accounting for almost half of the country's Ph.D. workforce in science and engineering. Most notably, the contribution of Chinese and Indian scientists and entrepreneurs in U.S. high-technology sectors increased dramatically in the 1990s. These ethnic scientific communities…

Kerr, William R.

2007-01-01

356

Build a Scientist! From elementary school  

E-print Network

plenty of good press, but it's not how the three research- ers featured in this issue made their dreams will incite you to lay the ground- work you need to make your own dreams a reality. For years, MagLab engineer surprise you to know that some scientists, such as researcher Art Edison, start out as artists. Art

McQuade, D. Tyler

357

Student transformations: are they computer scientists yet?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine the changes in the ways computing students view their field as they learn, as reported by the students themselves in short written biographies. In many ways, these changes result in students thinking and acting more like computer scientists and identifying more with the computing community. Most of the changes are associated with programming and software engineering, rather than

Carol Zander; Jonas Boustedt; Robert McCartney; Jan Erik Moström; Kate Sanders; Lynda Thomas

2009-01-01

358

The future in Agricultural Engineering: news degrees in the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bologna process is to improve the quality of education, mobility, diversity and the competitiveness and involves three fundamental changes: transform of the structure of titles, changing in methods of teaching and implementation of the systems of quality assurance. Engineer Agronomist at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) has been offered as a degree of five years with a total of 400 credits and seven optional orientations: Crop Production, Plant and Breeding Protection, Environment, Agricultural Economics, Animal Production, Rural Engineering and Food Technology. Actually, the Bologna plan creates three new degrees: Engineering and Science Agronomic, Food Engineering and Agro-Environmental Engineering, with 240 ECTS each one of them and with specific professional characteristics. The changes that involve the introduction of these new degrees is perhaps the largest occurred never at the Spanish university system, not only by the drastic transformation in the structure of titles, but also by the new changes that lie ahead in teaching methods. Among others we will comment the following ones: -A year decreased duration of studies and therefore incorporation into the market. - Elimination of the seven current guidelines to create three specific qualifications of degree. -Decrease of optional subjects and increase in credits for the basic subjects. - Inclusion of business practices. - Increase in the number of credits of final project. - Changes in methodologies and a higher involvement of teachers and students in the education.

Cartagena, M. Carmen; Tarquis, A. M.; Vázquez, J.; Serrano, A.; Arce, A.

2010-05-01

359

Goddard Visiting Scientist Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Under this Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract, USRA was expected to provide short term (from I day up to I year) personnel as required to provide a Visiting Scientists Program to support the Earth Sciences Directorate (Code 900) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The Contractor was to have a pool, or have access to a pool, of scientific talent, both domestic and international, at all levels (graduate student to senior scientist), that would support the technical requirements of the following laboratories and divisions within Code 900: 1) Global Change Data Center (902); 2) Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 910); 3) Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics (Code 920); 4) Space Data and Computing Division (Code 930); 5) Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes (Code 970). The research activities described below for each organization within Code 900 were intended to comprise the general scope of effort covered under the Visiting Scientist Program.

2000-01-01

360

Tribological Limitations in Gas Turbine Engines: A Workshop to Identify the Challenges and Set Future Directions. Revised  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following report represents a compendium of selected speaker presentation materials and observations made by Prof. O. Pinkus at the NASA/ASME/Industry sponsored workshop entitled "Tribological Limitations in Gas Turbine Engines" held on September 15-17, 1999 in Albany, New York. The impetus for the workshop came from the ASME's Research Committee on tribology whose goal is to explore new tribological research topics which may become future research opportunities. Since this subject is of current interest to other industrial and government entities the conference received cosponsorship as noted above. The conference was well attended by government, industrial, and academic participants. Topics discussed included current tribological issues in gas turbines as well as the potential impact (drawbacks and advantages) of future tribological technologies especially foil air bearings and magnetic bearings. It is hoped that this workshop report may serve as a starting point for continued discussions and activities in oil-free turbomachinery systems.

DellaCorte, Chris; Pinkus, Oscar

2002-01-01

361

Developing a Consensus-Driven, Core Competency Model to Shape Future Audio Engineering Technology Curriculum: A Web-Based Modified Delphi Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this online study was to create a ranking of essential core competencies and technologies required by AET (audio engineering technology) programs 10 years in the future. The study was designed to facilitate curriculum development and improvement in the rapidly expanding number of small to medium sized audio engineering technology…

Tough, David T.

2009-01-01

362

Tutorial Proposal MapReduce for Scientist  

E-print Network

Tutorial Proposal MapReduce for Scientist using FutureGrid Gregor von Laszewski Assist. Director will in this tutorial outline the concept of MapReduce, introduce criteria on which applications can successfully useGrid. 2 Description 2.1 Overview and Goals of the tutorial (takeaways for the audience) Map

363

Scientists, Spirituality and Education for Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In August 1985, almost 300 scientists and science educators came together in Bangalore, India, from over 70 different countries, including both developed and developing nations, to take part in a conference on science and technology, education, and future human needs. The conference is described. (RM)

Harlen, Wynne

1986-01-01

364

Review Article: Tissue Engineering of Semilunar Heart Valves: Current Status and Future Developments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heart valve replacement represents the most com- mon surgical therapy for end-stage valvular heart diseases. One major drawback that all heart valve replacements have in common is the lack of growth, repair, and remodeling capability once implanted into the body. The emerging field of tissue engineer- ing is focusing on the in-vitro generation of func- tional, living semilunar heart valve

Anita Mol; Carlijn V. C. Bouten; Frank P. T. Baaijens; Gregor Zünd; Marko I. Turina; Simon P. Hoerstrup

2004-01-01

365

Engineering Education for International Sustainability: Curriculum Design Under the Sustainable Futures Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002, the global community has been striving to meet the Millennium Development Goals, a blueprint for improving the quality of life and health of the world's poorest. These goals specifically address poverty, education, health, gender equality, environmental sustainability and global partnerships. The engineering profession must be able to participate and provide leadership

Valerie J. Fuchs; James R. Mihelcic

366

Shaping the Future: New Expectations for Undergraduate Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This book, presented by the National Science Foundation and the Science Education Resource Center at Carleton College offers innovative ideas and suggested standards for education in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. The needs of a broad range of students are considered. The companion to this book is available online.

2008-07-07

367

K-12 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Education for America's Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The success of the United States in the 21st century will depend on the ideas and skills of its population. These have always been the nation's most important assets. As the world becomes increasingly technological, the value of these national assets will be determined by the effectiveness of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics…

Tech Directions, 2011

2011-01-01

368

Prepare and Inspire: K-12 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Education for America's Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The success of the United States in the 21st century will depend on the ideas and skills of its population. These have always been the nation's most important assets. As the world becomes increasingly technological, the value of these national assets will be determined by the effectiveness of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics…

Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2010

2010-01-01

369

Software Design and Architecture The once and future focus of software engineering  

E-print Network

by a wide range of stake- holders, acting throughout most of a system's lifecycle, making a set of key consider what software engineering is, namely a practice directed at the production of software systems challenges for design will thus continuously arise. #12;Materials, Tools, and Mechanisms Goals and Dreams

van der Hoek, André

370

A Joint Learning Activity in Process Control and Distance Collaboration between Future Engineers and Technicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A joint learning activity in process control is presented, in the context of a distance collaboration between engineering and technical-level students, in a similar fashion as current practices in the industry involving distance coordination and troubleshooting. The necessary infrastructure and the setup used are first detailed, followed by a…

Deschênes, Jean-Sebastien; Barka, Noureddine; Michaud, Mario; Paradis, Denis; Brousseau, Jean

2013-01-01

371

Using Reference Models for Business Engineering - State-of-the-Art and Future Developments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conceptual models play an increasingly important role in all phases of the information systems life cycle. For instance, they are used for business process engineering, information systems development, and customizing of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Despite conceptual modeling being a vital instrument for developing information systems, the modeling process often is resource-consuming and faulty. As a way to overcome

Peter Fettke; Peter Loos

2006-01-01

372

Closed-Loop Modeling in Future Automation System Engineering and Validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new framework for design and validation of industrial automation systems based on systematic application of formal methods. The engineering methodology proposed in this paper is based on the component design of automated manufacturing systems from intelligent mechatronic components. Foundations of such componentspsila information infrastructure are the new IEC 61499 architecture and the automation object concept. It

Valeriy Vyatkin; Hans-Michael Hanisch; Cheng Pang; Chia-Han Yang

2009-01-01

373

The Amateur Scientist.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes experiments using fluidyne engines. These engines (which have liquid pistons), started by external heat sources, are used primarily for pumping water. Examples of various engines built from U-shaped tubes or from coiled tubes in fruit jars are provided. (DH)

Walker, Jearl

1985-01-01

374

2222NDNDNDND JAPANESE-RUSSIANJAPANESE-RUSSIANJAPANESE-RUSSIANJAPANESE-RUSSIAN YOUNG SCIENTISTS CONFERENCEYOUNG SCIENTISTS CONFERENCEYOUNG SCIENTISTS CONFERENCEYOUNG SCIENTISTS CONFERENCE  

E-print Network

2222NDNDNDND JAPANESE-RUSSIANJAPANESE-RUSSIANJAPANESE-RUSSIANJAPANESE-RUSSIAN YOUNG SCIENTISTS. The "1st Russian-Japanese Young Scientists Conference on Nano-technologies and Nano-materials" was held of the 2nd Japanese-Russian Young Scientists Conference on Nano-Materials andYoung Scientists Conference

Maruyama, Shigeo

375

Early Primary Invasion Scientists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"We really need to get the government involved," said one student, holding his graph up to USDA scientist Steve Seefeldt. Dr. Steve studies methods to control "invasive" plants, plants that have been introduced to an area by humans and have potential to spread rapidly and negatively affect ecosystems. The first grader and his classmates had become…

Spellman, Katie V.; Villano, Christine P.

2011-01-01

376

Developing Scientists' "Soft" Skills  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A great deal of professional advice directed at undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and even early-career scientists focuses on technical skills necessary to succeed in a complex work environment in which problems transcend disciplinary boundaries. Collaborative research approaches are emphasized, as are cross-training and gaining nonacademic experiences [Moslemi et al., 2009].

Gordon, Wendy

2014-02-01

377

Becoming a Spider Scientist  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this integrated unit, third grade students become spider scientists as they observe spiders in their classroom to debunk some common misconceptions about these intimidating creatures. "Charlotte's Web" is used to capture students' interest. In addition to addressing philosophical topics such as growing-up, death, and friendship; E.B. White's…

Patrick, Patricia; Getz, Angela

2008-01-01

378

Early Primary Invasion Scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"We really need to get the government involved," said one student, holding his graph up to USDA scientist Steve Seefeldt. Dr. Steve studies methods to control invasive plants, plants that have been introduced to an area by humans and have potenti

Villano, Christine P.; Spellman, Katie V.

2011-01-01

379

Scientists and disaster management  

Microsoft Academic Search

When disasters, even natural ones, have a chemical or nuclear dimension, scientists play a major role in their management. Presents the results of research on Canadian disasters, and includes other cases of disasters that occurred around the world. Discusses the experts? role in decisions related to the response: how to identify a specific product, its impact on health, for example,

Hélène Denis

1995-01-01

380

Scientists on Biodiversity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Produced by the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, this book is a collection of essays by leading scientists and researchers in the field of biodiversity. Topics include the importance of biodiversity, extinctions, threats to biodiversity, and strategies and solutions. Introduction by Michael J. Novacek. Can be ordered free of charge in multiple copies.

381

Scientists in the Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

High school science is often the first time students are presented with the scientific method as a tool to assist discovery. I aim to help students `think like a scientist', through my role as a graduate student NSF GK-12 fellow in the Ocean and Coastal Interdisciplinary Science (OACIS) program, where I am paired with a high school science teacher and

J. Lundin

2009-01-01

382

Curriculum Vitae Physical Scientist  

E-print Network

Abbott (COAS). 2009-2011 Student Services, U.S. Geological Sur- vey, Corvallis, Oregon Regional climate un- der climate change. in prep Hostetler, S.W., Alder, J.R. and Allan, A.M., 2011, DynamicallyJay Alder Curriculum Vitae Physical Scientist U.S. Geological Survey College of Earth, Ocean

383

Bringing Scientists to Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author describes how he brings scientists to life when he visits schools. Having retired from teaching Drama and Theatre Studies in Liverpool for more than thirty years, the author set up his one-man Theatre-in-Education company, Blindseer Productions, and now takes his portrayals of Darwin, Galileo and Einstein to schools…

Casey, Peter

2010-01-01

384

Teaming Up with Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces the Science Education Leadership Fellows (SELF) program which is an innovative cooperation program between teachers and scientists. Engages teachers in subject areas such as microbiology, molecular biology, immunology, and other professional development activities. Presents an activity in which students observe bacteria cultures and…

Moreno, Nancy P.; Chang, Kimberly A.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Denk, James P.; Roberts, J. Kyle; Cutler, Paula H.; Rahmati, Sonia

2001-01-01

385

Becoming a computer scientist  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that women are significantly underrepresented in scientific fields in the United States, and computer science is no exception. As of 1987- 1988, women constituted slightly more than half of the U.S. population and 45% of employed workers in the U.S., but they made up only 30% of employed computer scientists. Moreover, they constituted only 10% of

Amy Pearl; Martha E. Pollack; Eve A. Riskin; Elizabeth Wolf; Becky Thomas; Alice Wu

1990-01-01

386

Jeffrey Sachs Scientists &  

E-print Network

lofty. It is lofty. But a poverty of ambition isn't going to prevent the deaths of 30,000 children daily & Entertainers Builders & Titans Heroes & Icons Introduction Essay FROM THE ARCHIVE Scientists & Thinkers from might be able to change the world we inhabit. The title of his new book, The End of Poverty, sounds

Khatiwala, Samar

387

Scientists in the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High school science is often the first time students are presented with the scientific method as a tool to assist discovery. I aim to help students ‘think like a scientist’, through my role as a graduate student NSF GK-12 fellow in the Ocean and Coastal Interdisciplinary Science (OACIS) program, where I am paired with a high school science teacher and their classes for the year. To help students gain a familiarity and understanding of how scientists approach research, I will (1) utilize technology, including youtube, powerpoint, and research modeling applications; (2) bring in experts from the University to demonstrate the diversity of the science community; (3) connect with the classroom research from meetings, journals and reports. The goal is to broaden the scope of how research science is conducted, but also to allow individual students to be involved in projects, from developing a hypothesis to presenting their data. A survey at the beginning of the academic year and a survey before the AGU Fall meeting will be compared to assess the influence of having a research scientist present. Results will include how students view of science and scientists has changed, feedback on how successfully technology has improved students’ comprehension, and ideas for making science approachable for diverse high school learners.

Lundin, J.

2009-12-01

388

AMTD: update of engineering specifications derived from science requirements for future UVOIR space telescopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND provide a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To give the science community options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. A key task is deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicles and their mass and volume constraints. A key finding of this effort is that the science requires an 8 meter or larger aperture telescope.

Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Mosier, Gary; Smith, W. Scott; Blaurock, Carl; Ha, Kong; Stark, Christopher C.

2014-08-01

389

AMTD: Update of Engineering Specifications Derived from Science Requirements for Future UVOIR Space Telescopes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND provide a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To give the science community options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. A key task is deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicles and their mass and volume constraints. A key finding of this effort is that the science requires an 8 meter or larger aperture telescope

Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Mosier, Gary; Smith, W. Scott; Blaurock, Carl; Ha, Kong; Stark, Christopher C.

2014-01-01

390

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report No. 36: The Technical Communications Practices of US Aerospace Engineers and Scientists: Results of the Phase 1 NASA Langley Research Center Mail Survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who were assigned to the Research and Technology Group (RTG) at the NASA Langley Research Center in September 1995.

Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

1995-01-01

391

Future fuels and engines for railroad locomotives. Volume 2: Technical document  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential for reducing the dependence of railroads on petroleum fuel, particularly Diesel No. 2 was studied. The study takes two approaches: to determine the use of Diesel No. 2 can be reduced through increased efficiency and conservation, and to use fuels other than Diesel No. 2 both in Diesel and other types of engines. Synthetic hydrocarbon fuels, probably derived from oil shale, will be needed if present diesel-electric locomotives continue to be used.

Liddle, S. G.

1981-01-01

392

Advanced LOX/H sub 2 engine technologies for future OTVs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The optimization methods and trade studies which were used to define a 1980 state-of-the-art design of orbital transfer vehicles are summarized. The advanced thrust chamber, turbomachinery, and engine power cycle technologies recommended for development and verification during the 1980's are discussed. The state-of-the-art design serves as one of the reference points for evaluation of the advanced technology concepts. A second reference point is provided by the 1960 state-of-the-art RL-10 engine. Advanced heat energy extraction concepts in the combustor and injector are presented that will permit the high chamber pressures expected of the advanced expander cycle engine concept. Advanced turbomachinery concepts are selected that will help utilize efficiently the heat energy extracted in the thrust chamber and aid in uprating chamber pressures to values five times those realized with 1960 to 1980 technologies. The higher chamber pressure benefits are maximized with nozzle concepts that will package within a short retracted length and extend to the very high expansion area ratios required for specific impulse values significantly higher than those now realized by operational systems. Control system component concepts studied will allow utilization of the high turbine drive energy levels in a reliable repeatable manner that will reduce program risk and enhance overall space transportation system mission life cycle cost.

Glass, J.; Martinez, A.

1983-01-01

393

Engaging Scientists in Educator Professional Development Workshops: Lessons Learned from E/PO Professionals, and Tips for Scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientists are often asked to speak at workshops for educators, because Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) professionals and other facilitators who organize and lead professional development workshops really like to include them. Scientists are an incredibly valuable asset to workshops - when they come prepared. We will present tips for E/PO professionals who would like to include scientists in their next workshop, and tips for scientists who have been asked or would like to give presentations at educator workshops, in order to make sure the science presentations are as valuable and enjoyable to both the scientist and the audience as possible. These recommendations come from lessons learned by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) E/PO team after years of including scientists and engineers in the highly successful teacher professional development program, the Lunar Workshops for Educators (LWEs). Talks by scientists and engineers are consistently reported as a highlight of the workshops in participant surveys. We will present tips along with examples and relevant evaluation data from the LWEs, which we will use as a case study for how scientists can be effectively integrated into educator workshops. Noah Petro, an Associate Project Scientist for LRO, discusses the formation and evolution of the Moon with middle school science teachers participating in LRO's Lunar Workshops for Educators. John Keller, LRO's Project Scientist, discusses the latest science results from LRO with LWE teachers.

Jones, A. P.; Hsu, B. C.; Hessen, K.

2013-12-01

394

Online Workspace to Connect Scientists with NASA's Science E/PO Efforts and Practitioners  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is a growing awareness of the need for a scientifically literate public in light of challenges facing society today, and also a growing concern about the preparedness of our future workforce to meet those challenges. Federal priorities for science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education call for improvement of teacher training, increased youth and public engagement, greater involvement of underrepresented populations, and investment in undergraduate and graduate education. How can planetary scientists contribute to these priorities? How can they “make their work and findings comprehensible, appealing, and available to the public” as called for in the Planetary Decadal Survey?NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) workspace provides the SMD E/PO community of practice – scientists and educators funded to conduct SMD E/PO or those using NASA’s science discoveries in E/PO endeavors - with an online environment in which to communicate, collaborate, and coordinate activities, thus helping to increase effectiveness of E/PO efforts. The workspace offers interested scientists avenues to partner with SMD E/PO practitioners and learn about E/PO projects and impacts, as well as to advertise their own efforts to reach a broader audience. Through the workspace, scientists can become aware of opportunities for involvement and explore resources to improve professional practice, including literature reviews of best practices for program impact, mechanisms for engaging diverse audiences, and large- and small-scale program evaluation. Scientists will find “how to” manuals for getting started and increasing impact with public presentations, classroom visits, and other audiences, as well as primers with activity ideas and resources that can augment E/PO interactions with different audiences. The poster will introduce the workspace to interested scientists and highlight pathways to resources of interest that can help scientists more effectively contribute to national STEM education priorities. Visitors are encouraged to explore the growing collection of resources at http://smdepo.org.

Shipp, Stephanie; Bartolone , Lindsay; Peticolas, Laura; Woroner, Morgan; Dalton, Heather; Schwerin, Theresa; Smith, Denise

2014-11-01

395

Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa), to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module) where it is intended to remain at least 50 years. The present situation for radioactive waste management in Romania is reviewed in the present paper. Focus will be done on existent disposal facilities but, also, on future facilities planned for storage / disposal of radioactive wastes. Considering specific data for Romanian radioactive waste inventory, authors are reviewing the advance in the radioactive waste management in Romania considering its particularities. The team tries to highlight the expected limitations and unknown data related with cementitious engineered barriers that has to be faced in the near future incase of interim storage or for the upcoming long periods of disposal.

Fako, R.; Barariu, Gh.; Toma, R.; Georgescu, R.; Sociu, F.

2013-07-01

396

Space Engineering Model Cryogen Free ADR for Future ESA Space Missions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The design of an engineering model ADR system to cool cryogenic detectors to 50-30 mK is presented which is designed to be cooled via a 4-5 K space cryocooler. The system will be subjected to vibration qualification suitable for an Ariane 5 launch. The ADR is of a double ADR form comprising a chromic potassium alum (CPA) low temperature stage and dysprosium gallium garnet (DGG) high temperature stage. Details of the 3 Tesla (< 2.5 Amp) magnet system and the magnetic shielding for the detector focal plane and potential spacecraft are given with modelled results.

Hepburn, I. D.; Brockley-Blatt, C.; Coker, P.; Crofts, E.; Winter, B.; Milward, S.; Stafford-Allen, R.; Hunt, R.; Brownhill, M.; Rando, N.; Linder, M.

2004-06-01

397

Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering for Marine Carotenoids: New Opportunities and Future Prospects  

PubMed Central

Carotenoids are a class of diverse pigments with important biological roles such as light capture and antioxidative activities. Many novel carotenoids have been isolated from marine organisms to date and have shown various utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. In this review, we summarize the pathways and enzymes of carotenoid synthesis and discuss various modifications of marine carotenoids. The advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for carotenoid production are also reviewed, in hopes that this review will promote the exploration of marine carotenoid for their utilizations. PMID:25233369

Wang, Chonglong; Kim, Jung-Hun; Kim, Seon-Won

2014-01-01

398

Current and future regenerative medicine — Principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine  

PubMed Central

This paper provides a bird’s-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine. The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds, and their potential therapeutic use in horses are rudimentary at present. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation has been proclaimed from several equine tissues in the past few years. Based on the criteria of the International Society for Cellular Therapy, most of these cells are more correctly referred to as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, unless there is proof that they exhibit the fundamental in vivo characteristics of pluripotency and the ability to self-renew. That said, these cells from various tissues hold great promise for therapeutic use in horses. The 3 components of tissue engineering — cells, biological factors, and biomaterials — are increasingly being applied in equine medicine, fuelled by better scaffolds and increased understanding of individual biofactors and cell sources. The effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies and most tissue engineering concepts has not been demonstrated sufficiently in controlled clinical trials in equine patients to be regarded as evidence-based medicine. In the meantime, the medical mantra “do no harm” should prevail, and the application of stem cell-based therapies in the horse should be done critically and cautiously, and treatment outcomes (good and bad) should be recorded and reported. Stem cell and tissue engineering research in the horse has exciting comparative and equine specific perspectives that most likely will benefit the health of horses and humans. Controlled, well-designed studies are needed to move this new equine research field forward. PMID:19412395

Koch, Thomas G.; Berg, Lise C.; Betts, Dean H.

2009-01-01

399

Everyone Knows What a Scientist Looks Like: The Image of a Modern Scientist  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Children are inspired to follow career paths when they can imagine themselves there. Seeing pictures of adult individuals who look like them working in a given career can provide this spark to children's imaginations. Most (though not all) of the current available posters of scientists are of Einstein, and Einstein-like scientists. This is not representative of the current face of science. To change this, Pacific Science Center will host a photography exhibit: photographs of real, current scientists from all races, genders, beliefs, and walks of life. Photos will be taken and short biographies written by Discovery Corps Interns (Pacific Science Center's youth development program) to increase the amount of direct contact between students and scientists, and to give the exhibit an emotional connection for local teachers and families. We plan to make the photographs from this exhibit available to teachers for use in their classrooms, in addition to being displayed at Pacific Science Center during the International Year of Astronomy. The objectives of this project are to fill a need for representative photographs of scientists in the world community and to meet two of the goals of the International Year of Astronomy: to provide a modern image of science and scientists, and to improve the gender-balanced representation of scientists at all levels and promote greater involvement by under-represented minorities in scientific and engineering careers.

Enevoldsen, A. A. G.

2008-11-01

400

Identity Matching to Scientists: Differences That Make a Difference?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' images of science and scientists are generally assumed to influence their related subject choices and aspirations for tertiary education within science and technology. Several research studies have shown that many young people hold rather stereotypical images of scientists, making it hard for them to see themselves as future…

Andersen, Hanne Moeller; Krogh, Lars Brian; Lykkegaard, Eva

2014-01-01

401

Genetically engineered virus-resistant plants in developing countries: current status and future prospects.  

PubMed

Plant viruses cause severe crop losses worldwide. Conventional control strategies, such as cultural methods and biocide applications against arthropod, nematode, and plasmodiophorid vectors, have limited success at mitigating the impact of plant viruses. Planting resistant cultivars is the most effective and economical way to control plant virus diseases. Natural sources of resistance have been exploited extensively to develop virus-resistant plants by conventional breeding. Non-conventional methods have also been used successfully to confer virus resistance by transferring primarily virus-derived genes, including viral coat protein, replicase, movement protein, defective interfering RNA, non-coding RNA sequences, and protease, into susceptible plants. Non-viral genes (R genes, microRNAs, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, dsRNAse, RNA modifying enzymes, and scFvs) have also been used successfully to engineer resistance to viruses in plants. Very few genetically engineered (GE) virus resistant (VR) crops have been released for cultivation and none is available yet in developing countries. However, a number of economically important GEVR crops, transformed with viral genes are of great interest in developing countries. The major issues confronting the production and deregulation of GEVR crops in developing countries are primarily socio-economic and related to intellectual property rights, biosafety regulatory frameworks, expenditure to generate GE crops and opposition by non-governmental activists. Suggestions for satisfactory resolution of these factors, presumably leading to field tests and deregulation of GEVR crops in developing countries, are given. PMID:20109667

Reddy, D V R; Sudarshana, M R; Fuchs, M; Rao, N C; Thottappilly, G

2009-01-01

402

The Education of Future Aeronautical Engineers: Conceiving, Designing, Implementing and Operating  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper will outline answers to the two central questions regarding improving engineering education: (1) What is the full set of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that engineering students should possess as they leave the university, and at what level of proficiency? (2) How can we do better at ensuring that students learn these skills? The suggested answers lie within an innovative educational framework, the CDIO (conceive-design-implement-operate) Initiative. This initiative will be described along with the needs it meets, its goals, context, vision and pedagogical foundation. The first question is answered by the CDIO Syllabus and the process for reaching stakeholder consensus on the level of proficiency that students should attain in a given program. The second question is addressed through a best practice framework, which discusses curriculum design, design-implement experiences, teaching and learning, student assessment, program evaluation and faculty competence. Examples are provided of the implementation of best practices within the CDIO program in Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Crawley, Edward F.; Brodeur, Doris R.; Soderholm, Diane H.

2008-04-01

403

Advanced mathematical methods for scientists and engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book gives a self-contained presentation of the methods of asymptotics and perturbation theory, methods useful for obtaining approximate analytical solutions to differential and difference equations. Parts and chapter titles are as follows: fundamentals - ordinary differential equations, difference equations; local analysis - approximate solution of linear differential equations, approximate solution of nonlinear differential equations, approximate solution of difference equations,

C. M. Bender; S. A. Orszag

1978-01-01

404

[The critical scientists' voice].  

PubMed

The intricate debate over genetically modified organisms (GMOs) involves powerful economic interests, as well as ethical, legal, emotional and scientific aspects, some of which are dealt with in this paper.(It is possible to identify two main groups of scientists across the GMOs divide: the triumphalist and the critical group.) Scientists in the triumphalist group state that GMOs and their derivatives are safe for the environment and do not offer health hazards any more than similar, non-genetically modified, products. This view is disputed by the critical scientists, who are prompted by the scarcity of studies on the environmental impacts and toxicity of GMOs, and who point out flaws in tests performed by the same companies which hold the patents. They are also critical of the current state of the process of gene transference, lacking accuracy, a fact which, coupled with the scant knowledge available about 97% of the genome functions, may produce unforseeable effects with risks for the environment and public health yet to be assessed. Examples of such effects are: the transference of alien genes [??] to other species, the emergence of toxins, the creation of new viruses, the impacts on beneficial insects and on biodiversity in general. PMID:16683329

Lewgoy, F

2000-01-01

405

Marshall Space Flight Center Engineering Directorate Overview: Launching the Future of Science and Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Marshall Small Business Association (MSBA) serves as a central point of contact to inform and educate small businesses interested in pursuing contracting and subcontracting opportunities at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The MSBA meets quarterly to provide industry with information about how to do business with Marshall and to share specific information about Marshall s mission, which allows private businesses to envision how they might contribute. For the February 19 meeting, the Engineering Directorate will give an overview of its unique capabilities and how it is organized to provide maximum support for the programs and projects resident at Marshall, for example, the Space Shuttle Propulsion Office, Ares Projects Office, and Science and Mission Systems Office. This briefing provides a top-level summary of the work conducted by Marshall s largest organization, while explaining how resources are deployed to perform the volume of work under Marshall s purview.

Miley, Steven C.

2009-01-01

406

Bridging the Gap Between Scientists and Classrooms: Scientist Engagement in the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Teachers in today s classrooms need to find creative ways to connect students with science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) experts. These STEM experts can serve as role models and help students think about potential future STEM careers. They can also help reinforce academic knowledge and skills. The cost of transportation restricts teachers ability to take students on field trips exposing them to outside experts and unique learning environments. Additionally, arranging to bring in guest speakers to the classroom seems to happen infrequently, especially in schools in rural areas. The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program [1], facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate Education Program at the NASA Johnson Space Center has created a way to enable teachers to connect their students with STEM experts virtually. These virtual connections not only help engage students with role models, but are also designed to help teachers address concepts and content standards they are required to teach. Through EEAB, scientists are able to actively engage with students across the nation in multiple ways. They can work with student teams as mentors, participate in virtual student team science presentations, or connect with students through Classroom Connection Distance Learning (DL) Events.

Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K. J.; Runco, S.

2012-01-01

407

Precision engineering for future propulsion and power systems: a perspective from Rolls-Royce.  

PubMed

Rolls-Royce today is an increasingly global business, supplying integrated power systems to a wide variety of customers for use on land, at sea and in the air. Its reputation for 'delivering excellence' to these customers has been built largely on its gas turbine technology portfolio, and this reputation relies on the quality of the company's expertise in design, manufacture and delivery of services. This paper sets out to examine a number of examples, such as the high-pressure turbine blade, of the company's reliance on precision design and manufacture, highlighting how this precision contributes to customer satisfaction with its products. A number of measures the company is taking to accelerate its competitiveness in precision manufacture are highlighted, not least its extensive relationships with the academic research base. The paper finishes by looking briefly at the demands of the company's potential future product portfolio. PMID:22802505

Beale, Sam

2012-08-28

408

COMPUTER SCIENTIST (PROG. DIR), AD-1550- 4 (CISE/CNS) (Closes: 06/29/2005)  

NSF Publications Database

... Computer Scientist (Program Director), AD-1550-4. LOCATION: Directorate for Computer and Information ... a Ph.D. or equivalent experience in computer science, computer engineering, computational science ...

409

Computer Scientist (Prog. Dir.), AD-1550-04 (CISE/CNS (Closes: 10/31/2005)  

NSF Publications Database

... Computer Scientist (Program Director), AD-1550-4. LOCATION: Directorate for Computer and Information ... a Ph.D. or equivalent experience in computer science, computer engineering, computational science ...

410

Exploring scientists' working timetable: Do scientists often work overtime?  

E-print Network

A novel method is proposed to monitor and record scientists' working timetable. We record the downloads information of scientific papers real-timely from Springer round the clock, and try to explore scientists' working habits. As our observation demonstrates, many scientists are still engaged in their research after working hours every day. Many of them work far into the night, even till next morning. In addition, research work also intrudes into their weekends. Different working time patterns are revealed. In the US, overnight work is more prevalent among scientists, while Chinese scientists mostly have busy weekends with their scientific research.

Wang, Xianwen; Peng, Lian; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Chuanli; Zhang, Chunbo; Wang, Xianbing; 10.1016/j.joi.2012.07.003

2012-01-01

411

Career Explorations: Solar Scientist  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an activity about science careers. Learners will answer questions prior to and after viewing an online video about careers for solar scientists and astronomers. This activity requires access to the Internet and, ideally, a method of projecting the video onto a screen and for playing the audio. This activity is from the Stanford Solar Center's All About the Sun: Sun and Stars activity guide for Grades 2-4 and can also accompany the Stanford Solar Center's Build Your Own Spectroscope activity.

412

Eisenhower, Scientists, and Sputnik  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On October 4, 1957, the Russians launched a 184-pound satellite into Earth orbit. This event had a tremendous impact on Americans as it called into question the capability of U. S. science v'is-a-v'is that of the Russians. President Dwight D. Eisenhower called ``his scientists'' to the Oval Office and a meeting took place that Hans Bethe has called an ``unforgettable hour.'' I. I. Rabi, Chairman of the Science Advisory Committee made several proposals to President Eisenhower which the President accepted immediately. Today, 50-years later, we are still living with the legacy of Sputnik.

Rigden, John S.

2007-04-01

413

The Scientist - Multimedia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Scientist magazine is written for life science professionals, but promises it to be "concise, accurate, accessible, and entertaining." The magazine's online version has a great Multimedia section on its website that has "Videos," "Slideshows," and "Infographics." Visitors shouldn't miss the story titled "Bat Hunt" from the January 2012 issue, which profiles a mammologist working in the South Sudan. The photographs in included this story are excellent, and visitors will be amazed by the photo of the wide-eyed fruit bat cradling its baby. Back on the homepage, the Infographics section contains stories accompanied by colorful, easy-to-follow diagrams, and it is also well worth a look.

2012-01-20

414

Soviet scientists speak out  

SciTech Connect

In this article, Russian bomb designers answer the KGB's claim that espionage, not science, produced the Soviet bomb. Yuli Khariton and Yuri Smirnov wholly reject the argument that Soviet scientists can claim little credit for the first Soviet bomb. In a lecture delivered at the Kurchatov Institute, established in 1943 when Igor Kurchatov became the director of the Soviet nuclear weapons project, Khariton and Smironov point to the work done by Soviet nuclear physicists before 1941 and refute assertions that have been made in Western literature regarding the hydrogen bomb.

Holloway, D. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

1993-05-01

415

The Dismal Scientist  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Dismal Scientist, provided by Dismal Sciences, is a web site aimed at college students interested in the US economy. The site provides a "quick summary of major economic releases, along with an economist's perspective on its implications" and a summary table of the main indicators. It also contains regional data for all 50 states, Washington D.C., and 257 metro areas which can be ranked by different criteria. Other features include historical and forecast information for various geographical level variables and an economic data series dictionary.

1997-01-01

416

Students as Scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Through two lessons and their associated activities, students do the work of scientists by designing their own experiments to answer questions they generate. Through a simple activity involving surface tension, students learn what a hypothesis isâand isn'tâand why generating a hypothesis is an important aspect of the scientific method. In the second activity, with bubble gum to capture their interest, students learn to design and conduct controlled experiments to answer their own questions about the amounts of sugar (or artificial sweetener) in bubble or chewing gum.

Engineering K-Ph.d. Program

417

The Neurolab mission and biomedical engineering: a partnership for the future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over the last five years, with the advent of flights of U.S. Shuttle/Spacelab missions dedicated entirely to life sciences research, the opportunities for conducting serious studies that use a fully outfitted space laboratory to better understand basic biological processes have increased. The last of this series of Shuttle/Spacelab missions, currently scheduled for 1998, is dedicated entirely to neuroscience and behavioral research. The mission, named Neurolab, includes a broad range of experiments that build on previous research efforts, as well as studies related to less mature areas of space neuroscience. The Neurolab mission provides the global scientific community with the opportunity to use the space environment for investigations that exploit microgravity to increase our understanding of basic processes in neuroscience. The results from this premier mission should lead to a significant advancement in the field as a whole and to the opening of new lines of investigation for future research. Experiments under development for this mission will utilize human subjects as well as a variety of other species. The capacity to carry out detailed experiments on both human and animal subjects in space allows a diverse complement of studies that investigate functional changes and their underlying molecular, cellular, and physiological mechanisms. In order to conduct these experiments, a wide array of biomedical instrumentation will be used, including some instruments and devices being developed especially for the mission.

Liskowsky, D. R.; Frey, M. A.; Sulzman, F. M.; White, R. J.; Likowsky, D. R.

1996-01-01

418

Another Kind of Scientist Activism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a well-cited 1996 editorial in "Science," "The Activist Scientist," Jaleh Daie calls for scientists to take an assertive role in educating politicians and the public about the importance of government support for research. She writes that most scientists are reluctant to become involved in political lobbying for a variety of reasons--time…

Marino, Lori

2009-01-01

419

NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 6: The relationship between the use of US government technical reports by US aerospace engineers and scientists and selected institutional and sociometric variables. Ph.D. Thesis - Indiana Univ., Nov. 1990 No. 6  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The relationship between the use of U.S. government technical reports by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists and selected institutional and sociometric variables was investigated. The methodology used for this study was survey research. Data were collected by means of a self-administered mail questionnaire. The approximately 34,000 members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronauts (AIAA) served as the study population. The response rate for the survey was 70 percent. A dependent relationship was found to exist between the use of U.S. government technical reports and three of the institutional variables (academic preparation, years of professional aerospace work experience, and technical discipline). The use of U.S. government technical reports was found to be independent of all of the sociometric variables. The institutional variables best explain the use of U.S. government technical reports by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

Pinelli, Thomas E.

1991-01-01

420

Kimberly D. Tanner Evaluation of Scientist-Teacher Partnerships: Benefits to Scientists  

E-print Network

of staff coordination; however, these models are all premised on close collaboration and partnership as professional scientists, their attitudes toward teaching and learning as future educators, and their personal and quantitative methods including classroom observations, interviews, surveys, and pre- and post

421

Meissl Memorial Senior Scientist  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beginning in 1976, the Committee on Geodesy of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council has administered a Senior Scientist Program supported by the National Geodetic Survey of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Under this program, awardees have spent up to a year in residence at the National Geodetic Survey, conducting research in geodesy and related fields. Through the summer of 1984, 15 prominent scientists have participated, producing more than 20 papers published in a NOAA publications series or in professional journals.The second awardee was Peter Meissl, Professor of Geodesy at the Technical University of Graz, Austria, who spent 8 months during 1977 at the National Geodetic Survey. His work, “A Priori Prediction of Roundoff Error Accumulation in the Solution of a Super-Large Geodetic Normal Equation System,” was released as a NOAA professional paper, published hardbound as an acknowledgment of the permanence of the achievement. His contribution was so outstanding that he was invited to return for the summer of 1982. But, tragically, in May 1982 he was killed in a mountain-climbing accident near Graz.

422

SCIENTIST DEMONSTRATES PLACING A "RABBIT CATCHER" INTO ONE OF THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

SCIENTIST DEMONSTRATES PLACING A "RABBIT CATCHER" INTO ONE OF THE VERTICAL TEST HOLES AT THE TOP OF THE MTR. CONTROL ROD DRIVES ARE BEHIND HIM TOWARDS LEFT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-513. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 2/13/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

423

Ask a Scientist  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) is able to attract many of the top scientists from around the world. It makes sense that they would also draw upon this collective acumen to help young people learn about what they do. Visitors can submit their own questions for these professionals or look at questions that have already been answered. First-time visitors can start with the Top Ten Questions to get started on their journey. There are actually sixty questions answered here, as there are six sections, including Animals, General Biology, Evolution, and Genetics. The questions answered here are a diverse lot, ranging from "Why is there no mammal with green fur?" to "Why is memory affected by age?" The answers are lucid, well-written, and quite thorough. The generally curious will not be disappointed by this site.

2012-01-01

424

The Accidental Scientist: Cooking  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Another great Web site from the Exploratorium in San Francisco (last mentioned in the August 16, 2002 NSDL MET Report), The Accidental Scientist: Cooking is the first in a series of "Web-based projects focusing on the science behind everyday life." Offering a mind-boggling array of food-related information and activities, foodies and science-lovers alike should find this Web site extremely engaging. Life science-related material includes an exploration of taste and smell; the biological properties of meat; microbe action in pickling, fermentation, and leavening; and much more. The site's other features not directly related to the life sciences shouldn't be missed. Users can find recipes and cooking tips, fun projects, and live Web casts starting in November 2002 that explore the science and culture of cooking, "just in time for picking up cooking tips for the holiday season."

1969-12-31

425

Helicopters for the future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology needed to provide the basis for creating a widening rotary wing market include: well defined and proven design; reductions in noise, vibration, and fuel consumption; improvement of flying and ride quality; better safety; reliability; maintainability; and productivity. Unsteady transonic flow, yawed flow, dynamic stall, and blade vortex interaction are some of the problems faced by scientists and engineers in the helicopter industry with rotorcraft technology seen as an important development for future advanced high speed vehicle configurations. Such aircraft as the Boeing Vertol medium lift Model 360 composite aircraft, the Sikorsky Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) aircraft, the Bell Textron XV-15 Tilt Rotor Aircraft, and the X-wing rotor aircraft are discussed in detail. Even though rotorcraft technology has become an integral part of the military scene, the potential market for its civil applications has not been fully developed.

Ward, J. F.

1984-01-01

426

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Responses to Questions on the Future of University Nuclear Science and Engineering Programs  

E-print Network

Science and Engineering Programs by Professor Daniel M. Kammen University of California, Berkeley 1. Ms of these would be nuclear engineers? As described below, my estimate for the number of new engineers needed is under 1,000. At present 20% of nuclear engineering graduates enter the commercial nuclear energy work

Kammen, Daniel M.

427

The Amateur Scientist.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a student investigation of a reverse flame in a atmosphere of methane that won second place in the physics division of the International Science and Engineering Fair. Includes a discussion of falling and fracturing behavior, specifically dealing with chimneys, trees, pencil point, stirring rods, and chalk. (BT)

Walker, Jearl

1979-01-01

428

Which Are My Future Career Priorities and What Influenced My Choice of Studying Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics? Some Insights on Educational Choice--Case of Slovenia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is addressing the problem of under-representation of young people in general, and females in particular, in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in Slovenia. It has two main objectives: (1) to identify which priorities male and female STEM students in Slovenia seek in their future careers, and (2) to…

Cerinsek, Gregor; Hribar, Tina; Glodez, Natasa; Dolinsek, Slavko

2013-01-01

429

Which are my Future Career Priorities and What Influenced my Choice of Studying Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics? Some Insights on Educational Choice—Case of Slovenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is addressing the problem of under-representation of young people in general, and females in particular, in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in Slovenia. It has two main objectives: (1) to identify which priorities male and female STEM students in Slovenia seek in their future careers, and (2) to identify different important factors (i.e. key

Gregor Cerinsek; Tina Hribar; Natasa Glodez; Slavko Dolinsek

2012-01-01

430

MediaResource: Linking Journalists and Scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Given the importance of communicating complex scientific ideas, theories, and advances to a sometimes indifferent public, the services provided the Media Resource Service will be quite useful to journalists. Since 1980, the non-profit Media Resource Service is not only a valuable data bank, it is also a database of 30,000 scientists, engineers, physicians, and policy-makers who have agreed to provide information on short notice to print and broadcast journalists. This service is provided by Sigma Xi, an interdisciplinary, non-profit honor society, that represents all of science and engineering. Utilizing this website, journalists can submit their requests for assistance, along with perusing the Science in the News area which culls together the top science news stories on a weekly basis. Equally helpful is the SciStacks area, which contains links to other resources in biology, chemistry, earth sciences, engineering, and other related fields that will be of assistance to journalists.

431

S.E.E.ing the Future: Science, Engineering and Education. Commentary from the Scientific Grassroots. A White Paper on the Issues and Need for Public Funding of Basic Science and Engineering Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports on the results of an ad hoc workshop called "S.E.E.ing the Future: Science Engineering and Education" Held at Dartmouth College in November of 2000 and sponsored by Dartmouth, the National Science Foundation, the Dow Chemical Company, and Science Service of Washington, DC. This transdisciplinary conference was one of a series…

Jemison, Mae C., Ed.

432

The Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Engineering announced the Go Viral to Improve Health challenge to promote interaction among  

E-print Network

Health challenge to promote interaction among future health professionals, engineers, and scientists and to spur interest in harnessing new technologies and data to solve vexing health issues. The challenge calls on university and college students studying engineering, computer science, and health disciplines

Mohaghegh, Shahab

433

The Secret Life of Scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The website that accompanies PBS's NOVA television series is called NOVA Science Now, and it offers many fun and engaging ways to better understand science and scientists. The Secret Life of Scientists is a web-exclusive series from NOVA which helps the public understand how and why scientists study what they do as well as "what happens when the lab coats come off." Sixteen scientists are currently highlighted on the site, and visitors can visit each scientist's videos and blog posts, as well as ask a question of any of the scientists. Scrolling over the pictures of each of the scientists reveals the scientific area they work in, as well as what they do in their secret life. One of the scientists is Adrienne Block, an African-American geologist who has spent time in the Antarctic and playing the bassoon is "her secret", while Geologist Alexandra Bowman "secret" is performing Native American dance. Overall, the site is an interesting and entertaining look into the lives of scientists.

2010-06-21

434

The Society for Amateur Scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Society for Amateur Scientists created this website to present its goal "to create unique collaborations between world-class professionals and citizen scientists and to remove the roadblocks that prevent ordinary people from participating in extraordinary science." The website features The Citizen Scientist, a weekly publication presenting news and projects from amateur scientists. Students can learn about the educational program, LABRats. Photographers can submit interesting images to the Society' Gallery. With so many tools and resources, everyone interested in science should visit this website.

435

Advocacy is scientists' responsibility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In reading S. Fred Singer's comments in Forum (Eos, May 21, 1991) on the earlier letter by Kaula and Anderson on AGU's proper role in society (Eos, April 9, 1991), I find myself entirely in agreement with his admonition that AGU positions, in this case specifically on global warming, must add “a certain amount of political sophistication.” But while I cannot disagree with the view that geophysicists should confine their advice to matters in which they have expertise, I also wonder if any of us deserves criticism when, noting the difficulty political leaders have in connecting causes with effects, we yield occasionally to the temptation to stray beyond mere facts and spell out potentially unfavorable connections. Early linking of complex but subtly related phenomena is one of the areas in which we have some credibility, is it not?Even as scientists we are, after all, compelled to share destinies with the other passengers crammed into the stairwells of the national vehicle, a bus tailgating an oil tanker careening right and left at high speed down the global highway, driven by a crew of politicians drunk on paleozoic distillate and trained in the Alfred E. Newman College of Navigation, where the principal graduation requirement is an intense desire to sit in front and steer.

Greenstadt, Gene

436

Everyone Knows What a Scientist Looks Like: The Image of a Modern Scientist  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Children are inspired to follow career paths when they can imagine themselves there. Seeing pictures of adult individuals who look like them working in a given career can provide this spark to children's imaginations. Most (though not all) of the current available posters of scientists are of Einstein, and Einstein-like scientists. This is not representative of the current face of science. To change this, Pacific Science Center is hoping to host a photography exhibit: photographs of real, current scientists from all races, genders, beliefs, walks of life, and branches of science. Photos will be taken and short biographies written by Discovery Corps Interns (Pacific Science Center's youth development program) to increase the amount of direct contact between students and scientists, and to give the exhibit an emotional connection for local teachers and families. We hope to make the photographs from this exhibit available to teachers for use in their classrooms, in addition to being displayed at Pacific Science Center during the International Year of Astronomy. The objectives of this project are to fill a need for representative photographs of scientists in the world community and to meet two of the goals of International Year of Astronomy: to provide a modern image of science and scientists, and to improve the gender-balanced representation of scientists at all levels and promote greater involvement by underrepresented minorities in scientific and engineering careers. In this session I will present our preliminary plan for creating the photographs and working with the Discovery Corps youth, which will be available to other institutions interested in creating a similar project. I will also present more detail on the distribution plan for the photographs, so interested members and institutions can discuss contributing images to the project, or learn how they could receive copies of the photographs during IYA and beyond.

Enevoldsen, Alice

2008-05-01

437

What would surgeons like from materials scientists?  

PubMed

Surgery involves the repair, resection, replacement, or improvement of body parts and functions and in numerous ways, surgery should be considered human engineering. There are many areas in which surgical materials could be improved, but surgeons are generally unaware of materials available for use, while materials scientists do not know what surgeons require. This article will review some of the areas where surgeons and materials scientists have interacted in the past and will discuss some of the most pressing problems which remain to be solved. These include better implant materials for hernia repair, breast reconstruction, the treatment of diabetes, vascular stenting and reconstruction, and electrical pacing devices. The combination of tissue engineering and nanomaterials has great potential for application to nearly every aspect of surgery. Tissue engineering will allow cells or artificial organs to be grown for specific uses while nanotechnology will help to ensure maximal biocompatibility. Biosensors will be combined with improved electrodes and pacing devices to control impaired neurological functions. PMID:23533092

Grundfest-Broniatowski, Sharon

2013-01-01

438

STEM Education in Jordan Applicable to Developing Future Geophysicists: An Example Combining Electrical Engineering and Medical Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students in developing countries interested in STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering & math) often choose majors that will improve their job opportunities in their home country when they graduate, e.g. engineering or medicine. Geoscience might be chosen as a sub-discipline of civil engineering, but rarely as a primary major unless there are local economic natural resources. The Institute of International

A. Fraiwan; L. Khadra; W. Shahab; D. L. Olgaard

2010-01-01

439

Science/Engineering: Open Doors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Trends in American society are changing the role of women in science and engineering, but all the elements in our society change at different rates. Women, like men, must choose during their teenage years to continue their training in math or science, or they close the door that can lead them to futures in the interesting and satisfying fields of science and engineering. The key is to keep girls involved in the hard sciences through the adolescent crisis. Many mentoring and outreach programs exist to help young women cross this threshold. These programs include hands-on science experiences, mentoring or putting young women in contact with women scientists and engineers, and internships, Viewpoints and histories of contemporary women engineers are discussed.

White, Susan; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

1999-01-01

440

Will scientists cast their votes?  

PubMed

With science and technology high on the agenda of the new US administration, scientists should welcome the opportunity to influence policy. However, few academic scientists seem to be noticing proposals posted for public comment on the Federal Register that concern the application of science to society. PMID:19450505

Maxmen, Amy

2009-05-15

441

Donald F. Hornig, scientist who  

E-print Network

Donald F. Hornig, scientist who helped develop the atomic bomb, dies at 92 By Matt Schudel, was designed to produce an atomic bomb. Dr. Hornig led a team that developed a device called the "X unit, Published: January 23 Donald F. Hornig, who as a young scientist once "babysat" the world's first atomic

Colorado at Boulder, University of

442

Scientists and Sociologists of Science -- Friends or Foes?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Science Wars may have made it falsely appear as if sociologists and scientists were natural enemies. In fact, the relations between sociology of science and scientists have been mutually supportive (e.g., in 1961, Bernard Barber got over 500 reprint requests for his Science article "Resistance of scientists to scientific discovery"). And it was scientists who took the initiative to STS (Science and Technology Studies). It is the newer paradigm of sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) that has seemingly redefined the relationship. However, as is clear from "insider" criticism, e.g. The Hard Program in the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge (Schmaus, Segerstrale and Jesseph, 1992), SSK's "causal" or "behaviorist" explanatory model is in fact outside mainstream sociology. Unlike SSK, mainstream sociologists typically attempt to reconcile actors' and analysts' accounts. It is high time for the sociology of science to bring the scientist back in. Cooperation is crucial for the elucidation of such things as operative norms and standards for "good science." Recently, in a paradoxical-seeming move, SSKers have presented themselves not as sociologists, but as bona fide scientists doing science. However, scientists do not recognize the results of SSK sociologists' case studies. This situation could fruitfully result in a future discussion between SSK sociologists and scientists about the very criteria for 'science' -- assuming that SSKers are indeed interested in understanding science. At present, they seem to be rather using science as a convenient site for studying knowledge and society instead.

Segerstrale, Ullica

1998-04-01

443

Estimation of the Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance contribution to future sea level rise using the regional climate model MAR (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the aim of estimating the sea level rise (SLR) coming from Surface Mass Balance (SMB) changes over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS), we report future projections obtained with the regional climate model MAR, forced by outputs of three CMIP5 General Circulation Models (GCMs). Our results indicate that in warmer climates, the mass gained due to increased winter snowfall over GrIS does not compensate the mass lost through increased meltwater run-off in summer. All the MAR projections shows similar non-linear melt increases with rising temperatures as a result of the positive surface albedo feedback, because no change is projected in the general atmospheric circulation over Greenland. Nevertheless, MAR exhibits a large range in its future projections. By coarsely estimating the GrIS SMB changes from CMIP5 GCMs outputs, we show that the uncertainty coming from the GCM-based forcing represents about half of projected SMB changes. In 2100, the CMIP5 ensemble mean projects a SLR, resulting from a GrIS SMB decrease, estimated to be 4±2 cm and 9±4 cm for the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios, respectively. However, these future projections do not consider the positive melt-elevation feedback. Sensitivity MAR experiments using perturbed ice sheet topographies consistent with the projected SMB changes highlight the importance of coupling climate models to an ice sheet model. Such a coupling will allow to consider the future response of both surface processes and ice-dynamic changes, and their mutual feedbacks to rising temperatures.

Fettweis, Xavier; Gallée, Hubert; van den Broeke, Michiel; Tedesco, Marco; van Angelen, Jan; Lenaerts, Jan; Erpicum, Michel

2013-04-01

444

The Computer Scientist: Computer Languages for the Amateur Scientist.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews diverse types of computer programing languages and provides examples of representative programs from the most significant languages in use. Matches programing languages most suitable for various types of experimental applications for the amateur scientist. (JJK)

Barden, William, Jr.

1991-01-01

445

How Do Scientists Determine Earthquake Probabilities?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This provides many links to articles, graphics, scientific papers and podcasts to help students understand how scientists determine probabilities for earthquake occurrences. Topics include the locations of faults and how much they need to move in order to release the strain that accumulates; the study of past earthquakes on each fault to predict the size of possible earthquakes that could occur in the future; and using information on how long it's been since the last earthquake to estimate the probability that an earthquake will occur in the next few years. Links to additional information are embedded in the text.

446

Bruce R. Ward Fisheries Scientist  

E-print Network

fish tagging and electronic enumeration, fish culture and stocking evaluations, hatchery) committees and workshops, fish-forestry interactions, aquaculture forums, national climate change working, and a recognized level of cooperation with local, national, and international fisheries scientists. This work has

447

SCIENCE, SCIENTISTS, AND POLICY ADVOCACY  

EPA Science Inventory

Effectively resolving the typical ecological policy issue requires providing an array of scientific information to decision-makers. In my experience, the ability of scientists (and scientific information) to inform constructively ecological policy deliberations has been diminishe...

448

Developing Nurse Scientist Course Login  

Cancer.gov

Privacy  |   Disclaimer  |   Help  |   Logout      Developing Nurse Scientist Course User Login / Registration Returning Users Email: Password: Having trouble logging in? New User Registration If you are entering the course for the first time, you must

449

Ames Scientists Develop MSL Instrument  

NASA Video Gallery

David Blake, a research scientist at NASA Ames, led the development of CheMin, one of ten scientific instruments onboard Curiosity, the Mars Scientific Laboratory. The Powder X-Ray Diffraction tool...

450

Telling Your Story: Ocean Scientists in the K-12 Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most scientists and engineers are accustomed to presenting their research to colleagues or lecturing college or graduate students. But if asked to speak in front of a classroom full of elementary school or junior high school students, many feel less comfortable. TERC, as part of its work with The Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence-New England (COSEE-NE) has designed a workshop to help ocean scientists and engineers develop skills for working with K-12 teachers and students. We call this program: Telling Your Story (TYS). TYS has been offered 4 times over 18 months for a total audience of approximately 50 ocean scientists. We will discuss the rationale for the program, the program outline, outcomes, and what we have learned. ne.net/edu_project_3/index.php

McWilliams, H.

2006-12-01

451

ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP  

E-print Network

ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP Where did we come from? Where are we going? How do we get · If it works but no one knows why, it's ENGINEERING #12;The scientist explains that which exists; The engineer creates that which never was. Theodore von Karman #12;Engineer - Noun (from French "to contrive

Eagar, Thomas W.

452

Young Scientist in Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bringing space exploration recent results and future challenges and opportunities to the knowledge of students has been a preoccupation of educators and space agencies for quite some time. The will to foster student’s interest and reawaken their interest for science topics and in particular research is something occupying the minds of educators in all corners of the globe. But the challenge is growing literally at the speed of light. We are in the age of “Big Data”. Information is available, opportunities to build smart algorithms flourishing. The problem at hand is how we are going to make use of all this possibilities. How can we prepare students to the challenges already upon them? How can we create a scientifically literate and conscious new generation? They are the future of mankind and therefore this is a priority and should quickly be recognized as such. Empowering teachers for this challenge is the key to face the challenges and hold the opportunities. Teachers and students need to learn how to establish fruitful collaboration in the pursuit of meaningful teaching and learning experiences. Teachers need to embrace the opportunities this ICT world is offering and accompany student’s path as tutors and not as explorers themselves. In this training session we intend to explore tools and repositories that bring real cutting edge science to the hands of educators and their students. A full space exploration will be revealed. Planetarium Software - Some tools tailored to prepare an observing session or to explore space mission’s results will be presented in this topic. Participants will also have the opportunity to learn how to plan an observing session. This reveals to be an excellent tool to teach about celestial movements and give students a sense of what it means to explore for instance the Solar System. Robotic Telescopes and Radio Antennas - Having planned an observing session the participants will be introduced to the use of robotic telescopes, a very powerful tool that allows educators to address a diversity of topics ranging from ICT tools to the Exploration of our Universe. Instead of using traditional methods to teach about certain subjects for instance: stellar spectra, extra-solar planets or the classification of galaxies, they can use these powerful tools. Among other advantages a clear benefit of such tool is that teachers can use telescopes during regular classroom hours, provided they choose one located in the opposite part of the planet, where it is night time. Participants will also have the opportunity to use one of the radio antennas devoted for education from the EUHOU Consortium (European Hands-on Universe). A map of the arms of our galaxy will be built during the training session. Image Processing - After acquiring the images participants will be introduced to Salsa J, an image processing software that allows educators to explore the potential of astronomical images. The first example will be a simple measurement task: measuring craters on the Moon. Further exploration will guide them from luminosity studies to the construction of colour images, from making movies exhibiting the circular motion of the Sun to Jupiter Moons dance around the planet. e-learning repositories - In the ICT age it is very important that educators have support and know where to find meaningful and curriculum adapted resources for the construction of modern lessons. Some repositories will be presented in this session. Examples of such repositories are: Discover the Cosmos and EUHOU or a congregator of such repositories with quite advanced possibilities to support the work of teachers, the Open Discovery Space portal. This type of sessions are being successfully implemented by the Galileo Teacher Training Program team in Portugal under the scope of the EC funded GO-LAB project. This is a project devoted to demonstrate innovative ways to involve teachers and students in e-Science through the use of virtual labs, that simulate experiments, in order to spark young people’s interest in science and in following scie

Doran, Rosa

453

Making Crystals from Crystals: A Solid-State Route to the Engineering of Crystalline Materials, Polymorphs, Solvates and Co-Crystals; Considerations on the Future of Crystal Engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Making crystals by design is the paradigm of crystal engineering. The main goal is that of obtaining and controlling the collective properties of a crystalline material from the convolution of the physical and chemical properties of the individual building blocks (whether molecules, ions, or metal atoms and ligands) with crystal periodicity and symmetry. Crystal engineering encompasses nowadays all traditional sectors of chemistry from organic to inorganic, organometallic, biological and pharmaceutical chemistry and nanotechnology. The investigation and characterization of the products of a crystal engineering experiment require the utilization of solid state techniques, including theoretical and advanced crystallography methods. Moreover, reactions between crystalline solids and/or between a crystalline solid and a vapour can be used to obtain crystalline materials, including new crystal forms, solvates and co-crystals. Indeed, crystal polymorphism, resulting from different packing arrangements of the same molecular or supramolecular entity in the crystal structure, represents a challenge to crystal makers.

Braga, Dario; Curzi, Marco; Dichiarante, Elena; Giaffreda, Stefano Luca; Grepioni, Fabrizia; Maini, Lucia; Palladino, Giuseppe; Pettersen, Anna; Polito, Marco

454

Future Flights!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is an exciting conclusion to the airplanes unit that encourages students to think creatively. After a review of the concepts learned, students will design their own flying machine based on their knowledge of the forces involved in flight, the properties of available materials, and the ways in which their flying machine could benefit society. Students will also learn how the brainstorming process helps in creative thinking and inventing and that scientists and engineers use this technique to come up with new products or modify and improve existing products.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

455

Involving Practicing Scientists in K-12 Science Teacher Professional Development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Science Teacher Education Program (STEP) offered a unique framework for creating professional development courses focused on Arctic research from 2006-2009. Under the STEP framework, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training was delivered by teams of practicing Arctic researchers in partnership with master teachers with 20+ years experience teaching STEM content in K-12 classrooms. Courses based on the framework were offered to educators across Alaska. STEP offered in-person summer-intensive institutes and follow-on audio-conferenced field-test courses during the academic year, supplemented by online scientist mentorship for teachers. During STEP courses, teams of scientists offered in-depth STEM content instruction at the graduate level for teachers of all grade levels. STEP graduate-level training culminated in the translation of information and data learned from Arctic scientists into standard-aligned lessons designed for immediate use in K-12 classrooms. This presentation will focus on research that explored the question: To what degree was scientist involvement beneficial to teacher training and to what degree was STEP scientist involvement beneficial to scientist instructors? Data sources reveal consistently high levels of ongoing (4 year) scientist and teacher participation; high STEM content learning outcomes for teachers; high STEM content learning outcomes for students; high ratings of STEP courses by scientists and teachers; and a discussion of the reasons scientists indicate they benefited from STEP involvement. Analyses of open-ended comments by teachers and scientists support and clarify these findings. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze teacher and scientist qualitative feedback. Comments were coded and patterns analyzed in three databases. The vast majority of teacher open-ended comments indicate that STEP involvement improved K-12 STEM classroom instruction, and the vast majority of scientist open-ended comments focus on the benefits scientists received from networking with K-12 teachers. The classroom lessons resulting from STEP have been so popular among teachers, the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development recently contracted with the PI to create a website that will make the STEP database open to teachers across Alaska. When the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development launched the new website in August 2011, the name of the STEP program was changed to the Alaska K-12 Science Curricular Initiative (AKSCI). The STEP courses serving as the foundation to the new AKSCI site are located under the "History" tab of the new website.

Bertram, K. B.

2011-12-01

456

QCSEE - The key to future short-haul air transport. [Quiet, Clean, Short-Haul Experimental Engine program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper describes the design and test procedure for the QCSEE (quiet, clean, short-haul experimental engine). The engines designed for the YC-14 and YC-15 STOL aircraft, both use a very low fan pressure ratio to keep jet-flap noise about 3 dB below total system noise. Other noise reducing features discussed are the low tip speed fans and a carefully selected number of fan blades and vanes with adequate spacing between them. Attention is also given to the development of a low emissions combustor, and reduction of fan frame weight, through the use of graphite/epoxy material. The YC-15 engine also employs variable pitch fans to provide thrust reversal, thus saving weight. Finally, it is noted that the tests have proven that the engines could be configurated to meet the needs of a powered lift system without excessively compromising performance or weight.

Ciepluch, C. C.; Willis, W. S.

1979-01-01

457

Re-Engineered Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1? (SDF) and the Future of Translatable Angiogenic Polypeptide Design  

PubMed Central

Smaller engineered analogs of angiogenic cytokines may provide translational advantages including enhanced stability and function, ease of synthesis, lower cost, and most importantly the potential for modulated delivery via engineered biomaterials. In order to create such a peptide, computational molecular modeling and design was employed to engineer a minimized, highly efficient polypeptide analog of the SDF molecule. After removal of the large, central ?-sheet region, a designed diproline linker connected the native N-terminus (responsible for receptor activation and binding) and C-terminus (responsible for extracellular stabilization). This yielded energetic and conformational advantages resulting in a small, low molecular weight engineered SDF polypeptide analog (ESA) that was shown to have angiogenic activity comparable to or better than recombinant human SDF both in vitro and in a murine model of ischemic heart failure. PMID:22902182

Hiesinger, William; Goldstone, Andrew B.; Woo, Y. Joseph

2014-01-01

458

The Futures Channel  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created in 1999, the goal of The Futures Channel (TFC) is to use "new media technologies to create a channel between the scientists, engineers, explorers and visionaries who are shaping the future, and today's learners who will one day succeed them." The site provides visitors with access to new movies and educator favorites at no charge, and visitors can also purchase compilations of past programs online here as well. In the "Featured Movies" area, visitors can learn how baseball bats are tested, the intricacies involved with making dolls, and the daily life of a weather forecaster. On the right-hand side of the homepage, visitors can also sign up to receive the free weekly newsletter. Visitors looking for more specific short videos can click on one of the thirteen subject areas on the left-hand side of the homepage. The site is rounded out by some special features, like "Behind the Sound of TFC" which features an interview with Stephen Jay, the composer of the music for these innovative films.

459

Ph. D. in Engineering Engineering Physics Track  

E-print Network

SCH) PHYS 510/ENGR 641 Mathematical Methods for Scientists and Engineers (Fall) STAT 505 Statistics Mathematical Modeling MEEN 549 Computational Fluid Dynamics MEMT 508 Finite Element Methods * CoursesPh. D. in Engineering Engineering Physics Track Recommended Plan of Study (09/2007) Degree Codes

Selmic, Sandra

460

Do scientists trace hot topics?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Do scientists follow hot topics in their scientific investigations? In this paper, by performing analysis to papers published in the American Physical Society (APS) Physical Review journals, it is found that papers are more likely to be attracted by hot fields, where the hotness of a field is measured by the number of papers belonging to the field. This indicates that scientists generally do follow hot topics. However, there are qualitative differences among scientists from various countries, among research works regarding different number of authors, different number of affiliations and different number of references. These observations could be valuable for policy makers when deciding research funding and also for individual researchers when searching for scientific projects.

Wei, Tian; Li, Menghui; Wu, Chensheng; Yan, Xiao-Yong; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru; Wu, Jinshan

2013-07-01

461

Do scientists trace hot topics?  

PubMed Central

Do scientists follow hot topics in their scientific investigations? In this paper, by performing analysis to papers published in the American Physical Society (APS) Physical Review journals, it is found that papers are more