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Sample records for future stratospheric ozone

  1. The Future of the Stratosphere and the Ozone Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, P. A.; Oman, L.; Pawson, S.; Fleming, E. L.; Li, F.; Jackman, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Stratospheric ozone has been slightly depleted (2-4 % globally) by emissions of ozone depleting substances (ODSs). The landmark 1987 Montreal Protocol led to the end of most these ODS emissions, and total levels of ODSs have been declining since the late 1990s. The interim replacements for these ODSs were hydroclorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), but these HCFCs have also now been regulated. The period in which stratospheric change has been dominated by CFC-induced ozone loss (the "CFC era") is now coming to an end, as a period begins when the impacts of stratospheric circulation and chemistry changes induced by Greenhouse Gas increases (the "GHG era"). The stratosphere GHG-era will be characterized by continued decreases of ODSs and increases of CO2, N2O, and CH4. In this talk, we will describe how these factors will modify stratospheric ozone levels and the basic stratospheric climatology: CO2 and CH4 increases will increase stratospheric ozone, while N2O increases will decrease stratospheric ozone. In particular, GHG increases and the associated warming of the troposphere will modify stratospheric transport and cool the upper stratosphere. We will quantitatively show the contributions by various GHGs to these changes and the specifics of the chemical, dynamical, and radiative changes. Further, we will show how the stratosphere evolves under future GHG projections from the various Representative Concentration Pathways, illustrating the different changes in stratospheric ozone caused by the concurrent radiative, chemical and dynamical impacts of GHG changes.

  2. Recent and Future Evolution of the Stratospheric Ozone Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dameris, Martin; Loyola, Diego

    Since the early 1980s significant depletion of the ozone layer in the stratosphere, in other words the ozone hole, has been observed every year over the South Pole area in Antarctic spring. In the meantime destruction of stratospheric ozone has been detected globally. Emissions of man-made halogenated chemicals play a dominant role in ozone loss. Combined analyses of observations and numerical modeling help to understand the complex interplay of the dynamic and chemical processes involved. Evaluated models provide a base for predicting the future recovery of the ozone layer expected for the middle of this century.

  3. The contribution of ozone to future stratospheric temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maycock, A. C.

    2016-05-01

    The projected recovery of ozone from the effects of ozone depleting substances this century will modulate the stratospheric cooling due to CO2, thereby affecting the detection and attribution of stratospheric temperature trends. Here the impact of future ozone changes on stratospheric temperatures is quantified for three representative concentration pathways (RCPs) using simulations from the Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). For models with interactive chemistry, ozone trends offset ~50% of the global annual mean upper stratospheric cooling due to CO2 for RCP4.5 and 20% for RCP8.5 between 2006-2015 and 2090-2099. For RCP2.6, ozone trends cause a net warming of the upper and lower stratosphere. The misspecification of ozone trends for RCP2.6/RCP4.5 in models that used the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC)/Stratosphere-troposphere Processes and their Role in Climate (SPARC) Ozone Database causes anomalous warming (cooling) of the upper (lower) stratosphere compared to chemistry-climate models. The dependence of ozone chemistry on greenhouse gas concentrations should therefore be better represented in CMIP6.

  4. IMPACT ON OZONE ATTAINMENT OF CFC (CHLOROFLUOROCARBON) CONTROLS USED TO PREVENT FUTURE DEPLETION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the impact on ozone attainment of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) controls used to prevent future depletion of stratospheric ozone. It has been decided that allocated quotas offer the most attractive approach to limiting the use of CFCs and brominated compounds (halo...

  5. Future aircraft and potential effects on stratospheric ozone and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to extend the recent research examining the global environmental effects from potential fleets of subsonic and supersonic commercial aircraft. Initial studies with LLNL models of global atmospheric chemical, radiative, and transport processes have indicated that substantial decreases in stratospheric ozone concentrations could result from emissions of NO{sub x} from aircraft flying in the stratosphere, depending on fleet size and magnitude of the engine emissions. These studies used homogeneous chemical reaction rates (e.g. gas-phase chemistry). Recent evidence indicates that reactions on particles in the stratosphere may be important. Heterogeneous chemical reactions, for instance, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}and ClONO{sub 2} on background sulfuric acid aerosols, convert NO{sub x}(NO and NO{sub 2}) molecules to HNO{sub 3}. This decreases the odd oxygen loss from the NO{sub x} catalytic cycle and increases the odd oxygen loss from the Cl{sub x} catalytic cycle. By including these heterogeneous reactions in the LLNL model, the relative partitioning of odd oxygen loss between these two families changes, with the result that emissions of NO{sub x} from proposed aircraft fleets flying in the stratosphere now increase zone. Having these heterogeneous processes present also increases ozone concentration in the troposphere relative to gas-phase only chemistry calculations for emissions of NO{sub x} from subsonic aircraft. 26 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Impact on ozone attainment of CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) controls used to prevent future depletion of stratospheric ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, D.L.; Smith, N.D.

    1988-04-01

    This paper discusses the impact on ozone attainment of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) controls used to prevent future depletion of stratospheric ozone. It has been decided that allocated quotas offer the most-attractive approach to limiting the use of CFCs and brominated compounds (halons). This approach should provide for economically efficient reductions. It involves a minimum of administrative costs, is the most easily enforced option, and does not raise any potential legal issues that might result from other options. Control options that might be used by industry to achieve the necessary CFC reductions are evaluated in the Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA). The most likely long-term control option which may be adopted by most application areas is a chemical substitute. With this option, it may be possible to eliminate 90% or more of the ozone-depleting CFC emissions. A variety of control options hold promise for short-term applicability. Some of the engineering controls may still be applied even after new chemical substitutes (e.g., HFC-134a and HCFC-123) are in use, since the higher cost of these substitutes may justify recovery. EPA is also considering the development of specific regulations limiting CFC and halon use for particular industries to supplement allocated quotas.

  7. Ozone and the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, Tatsuo

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the stratospheric ozone is effective in absorbing almost all radiation below 300 nm at heights below 300 km. The distribution of global ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, and the latitudinal variations of the total ozone column over four seasons are considered. The theory of the ozone layer production is discussed together with catalytic reactions for ozone loss and the mechanisms of ozone transport. Special attention is given to the anthropogenic perturbations, such as SST exhaust gases and freon gas from aerosol cans and refrigerators, that may cause an extensive destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer and thus have a profound impact on the world climate and on life.

  8. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  9. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  10. Sensitivity of stratospheric ozone to present and possible future aircraft emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Kinnison, D.E.

    1990-08-01

    The aircraft industry is showing renewed interest in the development of supersonic, high flying aircraft for intercontinental passenger flights. There appears to be confidence that such high-speed civil transports can be designed, and that aircraft will be economically viable as long as they are also environmentally acceptable. As such, it is important to establish the potential for such environmental problems early in the aircraft design. Initial studies with LLNL models of global atmospheric chemical, radiative, and transport processes have indicated that substantial decreases in stratospheric ozone concentrations could result from emissions of NO{sub x} from aircraft flying the stratosphere, depending on the fleet size and magnitude of the engine emissions. The purpose of this study is to build on previous analyses of potential aircraft emission effects on ozone in order to better define the sensitivity of ozone to such emissions. In addition to NO{sub x}, the effects of potential emissions of carbon monoxide and water vapor are also examined. More realistic scenarios for the emissions as a function of altitude, latitude, and season are examined in comparison to prior analyses. These studies indicate that the effects on ozone are sensitive to the altitude and latitude, as well as the magnitude, of the emissions.

  11. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    measurements. Therefore a laboratory prototype of an instrument to measure ClONO _2 concentrations in situ was developed, adapting techniques recently developed in this research group to measure ClO concentrations at the part-per-trillion level. The detection scheme involves heating a flowing air sample to almost 500K, thermally dissociating ClONO _2 into ClO and NO_2 , and measuring the resulting ClO concentration by titrating with NO to produce Cl atoms, which are detected by resonance fluoresence. The calibration of this technique is very sensitive to flow parameters (temperature, pressure, flow velocity, added NO concentration, and homogeneity of flow). The issues developed in this thesis contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of stratospheric ozone depletion and its potential global impact. It is becoming increasingly apparent that our ability to predict the future course of global ozone depletion is critically dependent on our ability to reproduce in situ and remote measurements with numerical models.

  12. Impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere - Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Jia, W.; Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Dubey, M. K.; Rockett, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    The prospective future adoption of molecular hydrogen (H2) to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question of whether the adoption would have adverse effects on the stratospheric ozone. The possibility of undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050) H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and chemistry, especially on the stratospheric ozone, with the MOZART (Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers) model. Since future growth is highly uncertain, we evaluate the impact of two world evolution scenarios, one based on an IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) high-emitting scenario (A1FI) and the other on an IPCC low-emitting scenario (B1), as well as two technological options: H2 fuel cells and H2 internal combustion engines. We assume a H2 leakage rate of 2.5% and a complete market penetration of H2 vehicles in 2050. The model simulations show that a H2-based road transportation sector would reduce stratospheric ozone concentrations as a result of perturbed catalytic ozone destruction cycles. The magnitude of the impact depends on which growth scenario evolves and which H2 technology option is applied. For the evolution growth scenario, stratospheric ozone decreases more in the H2 fuel cell scenarios than in the H2 internal combustion engine scenarios because of the NOx emissions in the latter case. If the same technological option is applied, the impact is larger in the A1FI emission scenario. The largest impact, a 0.54% decrease in annual average global mean stratospheric column ozone, is found with a H2 fuel cell type road transportation sector in the A1FI scenario; whereas the smallest impact, a 0.04% increase in stratospheric ozone, is found with applications of H2 internal combustion engine vehicles in the B1 scenario. The impacts of the other two scenarios fall

  13. Ultraviolet Radiation and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R.

    2003-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun produces ozone in the stratosphere and it participates in the destruction of ozone. Absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone is the primary heating mechanism leading to the maximum in temperature at the stratopause. Variations of solar ultraviolet radiation on both the 27-day solar rotation period and the 11-year solar cycle affect ozone by several mechanisms. The temperature and ozone in the upper stratosphere respond to solar uv variations as a coupled system. An increase in uv leads to an increase in the production of ozone through the photolysis of molecular oxygen. An increase in uv leads to an increase in temperature through the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in temperature leads to a partially-offsetting decrease in ozone through temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficients. The ozone variation modulates the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in ozone at solar maximum enhances the uv heating. The processes are understood and supported by long-term data sets. Variation in the upper stratospheric temperatures will lead to a change in the behavior of waves propagating upward from the troposphere. Changes in the pattern of wave dissipation will lead to acceleration or deceleration of the mean flow and changes in the residual or transport circulation. This mechanism could lead to the propagation of the solar cycle uv variation from the upper stratosphere downward to the lower stratosphere. This process is not well-understood and has been the subject of an increasing number of model studies. I will review the data analyses for solar cycle and their comparison to model results.

  14. Climate impact of stratospheric ozone recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, S.; Rap, A.; Poulain, V.; Dhomse, S.; Marchand, M.; Lefevre, F.; Forster, P. M.; Szopa, S.; Chipperfield, M. P.

    2013-06-01

    stratospheric ozone depletion has acted to cool the Earth's surface. As the result of the phase-out of anthropogenic halogenated compounds emissions, stratospheric ozone is projected to recover and its radiative forcing (RF-O3 ~ -0.05 W/m2 presently) might therefore be expected to decay in line with ozone recovery itself. Using results from chemistry-climate models, we find that, although model projections using a standard greenhouse gas scenario broadly agree on the future evolution of global ozone, they strongly disagree on RF-O3 because of a large model spread in ozone changes in a narrow (several km thick) layer, in the northern lowermost stratosphere. Clearly, future changes in global stratospheric ozone cannot be considered an indicator of its overall RF. The multi-model mean RF-O3 estimate for 2100 is +0.06 W/m2 but with a range such that it could remain negative throughout this century or change sign and reach up to ~0.25 W/m2.

  15. Total Ozone Prediction: Stratospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Kawa, S. Ramdy; Douglass, Anne R.

    2003-01-01

    The correct prediction of total ozone as a function of latitude and season is extremely important for global models. This exercise tests the ability of a particular model to simulate ozone. The ozone production (P) and loss (L) will be specified from a well- established global model and will be used in all GCMs for subsequent prediction of ozone. This is the "B-3 Constrained Run" from M&MII. The exercise mostly tests a model stratospheric dynamics in the prediction of total ozone. The GCM predictions will be compared and contrasted with TOMS measurements.

  16. Understanding Differences in Chemistry Climate Model Projections of Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to project future evolution of stratospheric ozone as concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM projections exhibit not only many common features but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone return to 1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to ODS concentration change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower stratospheric ozone to chlorine change Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine is a near-linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine into its reservoirs; both inorganic chlorine and its partitioning are largely controlled by lower stratospheric transport. CCMs with best performance on transport diagnostics agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035, differences in Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM projections as the anthropogenic contribution to inorganic chlorine becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change Delta Ozone/Delta T due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with its own temperature dependence. Ozone decrease in the tropical lower stratosphere caused by a projected speedup in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by ozone increases in the middle- and high-latitude lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. This balance, or lack thereof, contributes most to the spread in late 21st century projections.

  17. STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION: IMPLICATIONS FOR MARINE ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stratospheric ozone layer shields the earth from biologically damaging solar ultraviolet radiation. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), used in refrigerants, etc. and halons, used in fire extinguishers, escape into the lower atmosphere and migrate to the stratosphere, destroying the ...

  18. Potential impact of combined NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions from future high speed civil transport aircraft on stratospheric aerosols and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, S.; Pyle, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    A two-dimensional sulfate aerosol model is used to assess the impact of combined NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions from future High Speed Civil Transports on stratospheric aerosols and ozone. The model predicts that SO[sub x] emitted by this fleet of supersonics may double the aerosol surface area and the number of optically active particles below 20 km in the northern lower stratosphere. When the heterogeneous conversion of N[sub 2]O[sub 5] to HNO[sub 3] on sulfate aerosols is taken into account, the predicted ozone changes due to future HSCTs emissions are smaller than those calculated when SO[sub x] and the subsequent increase in aerosol loading are neglected. It is worth noting that the doubling of the aerosol surface area may lead not only to a reduction in predicted ozone sensitivity to NO[sub x], but also to an enhancement in ozone sensitivity to chlorine in the lower stratosphere. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Stratospheric ozone depletion and future levels of atmospheric chlorine and bromine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael J.; Watson, Robert T.

    1990-01-01

    The rise in atmospheric chlorine levels caused by the emission of chlorofluorocarbons and other halocarbons is thought to be the main cause of the appearance of the Antarctic ozone 'hole' in the late 1970s, and the more modest ozone depletion observed over parts of the Northern Hemisphere. Atmospheric bromine, also associated with halocarbon emissions, is believed to contribute to ozone depletion. Over the next decade, further increases in these compounds are inevitable. Model calculations show that by the end of the next century, atmospheric chlorine and bromine levels may return to those prevalent before the onset of the ozone hole, but only if more stringent regulations are applied to halocarbon production than those currently proposed.

  20. Attribution of Recovery in Lower-stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eun-Su; Cunnold, Derek M.; Salawitch, Ross J.; McCormick, M. Patrick; Russell, James, III; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Oltmans, Samuel; Newchurch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Multiple satellite and ground-based observations provide consistent evidence that the thickness of Earth's protective ozone layer has stopped declining since 1997, close to the time of peak stratospheric halogen loading. Regression analyses with Effective Equivalent Stratospheric Chlorine (EESC) in conjunction with further analyses using more sophisticated photochemical model calculations constrained by satellite data demonstrate that the cessation of ozone depletion between 18-25 km altitude is consistent with a leveling off of stratospheric abundances of chlorine and bromine, due to the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. However, ozone increases in the lowest part of the stratosphere, from the tropopause to 18 km, account for about half of the improvement in total column ozone during the past 9 years at northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. The increase in ozone for altitudes below 18 km is most likely driven by changes in transport, rather than driven by declining chlorine and bromine. Even with this evidence that the Montreal Protocol and its amendments are having the desired, positive effect on ozone above 18 km, total column ozone is recovering faster than expected due to the apparent transport driven changes at lower altitudes. Accurate prediction of future levels of stratospheric ozone will require comprehensive understanding of the factors that drive temporal changes at various altitudes, and partitioning of the recent transport-driven increases between natural variability and changes in atmospheric structure perhaps related to anthropogenic climate change.

  1. Stratospheric ozone reactive chemicals generated by space launches worldwide

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, B.B.; Fournier, E.W.; Martin, L.R.; Cohen, R.B.

    1994-11-01

    We report quantities of inorganic chlorine compounds and aluminum oxide particles (Al203) deposited in the stratosphere and troposphere by solid rocket propelled launch vehicles. Totals are presented by launch vehicle type, summarized on an annual basis, and projected to the year 2010 using standard mission models. Data are given for Air Force, NASA (shuttle and expendable vehicles), the European Space Agency (ESA) (Ariane 5), and the Japanese Space Agency (H-1 and H-2). Whereas inorganic chlorine compounds released by solid rockets are directly related to stratospheric ozone depletion, much uncertainty surrounds reactivity of aluminum oxide particles. We also compare current and future effects of space launch on stratospheric ozone depletion with those of Ozone Depleting Chemicals (ODCs). As a baseline, we use projections of future ODC use by SMC, Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC), and the world. Relevant stratospheric chemistry is considered to make a legitimate comparison of ODC and solid rocket exhaust.

  2. SSTs, nitrogen fertiliser and stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.; Poppoff, I. G.; Capone, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A recently revised model of the stratosphere is used to show that a substantial enhancement in the ozone layer could accompany worldwide SST fleet operations and that water vapor may be an important factor in SST assessments. Revised rate coefficients for various ozone-destroying reactions are employed in calculations which indicate a slight increase in the total content of stratospheric ozone for modest-sized fleets of SSTs flying below about 25 km. It is found that water-vapor chemical reactions can negate in large part the NOx-induced ozone gains computed below 25 km and that increased use of nitrogen fertilizer might also enhance the ozone layer.

  3. Stratospheric Cooling and Arctic Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.

    1998-01-01

    We present sensitivity studies using the AER( box model for an idealized parcel in the lower stratosphere at 70 N during winter/spring with different assumed stratospheric coolings and chlorine loadings. Our calculations show that stratospheric cooling could further deplete ozone via increased polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and retard its expected recovery even with the projected chlorine loading decrease. We introduce the concept of chlorine-cooling equivalent and show that a 1 K cooling could provide the same local ozone depletion as an increase of chlorine by 0.4-0.7 ppbv for the scenarios considered. Thus, sustained stratospheric cooling could further reduce Arctic ozone content and delay the anticipated ozone recovery in the Northern Hemisphere even with the realization of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments.

  4. Stratospheric Cooling and Arctic Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.

    1998-01-01

    We present sensitivity studies using the AER box model for an idealized parcel in the lower stratosphere at 70 deg N during winter/spring with different assumed stratospheric cooling and chlorine loadings. Our calculations show that stratospheric cooling could further deplete ozone via increased polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and retard its expected recovery even with the projected chlorine loading decrease. We introduce the concept of chlorine-cooling equivalent and show that a 1 K Cooling could provide the same local ozone depletion as an increase of chlorine by 0.4-0.7 ppbv for the scenarios considered. Thus, sustained stratospheric cooling could further reduce Arctic ozone content and delay the anticipated ozone recovery in the Northern Hemisphere even with the realization of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments.

  5. The stratosphere: Present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, R. D. (Editor); Reed, E. I. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The present status of stratospheric science is discussed. The three basic elements of stratospheric science-laboratory measurements, atmospheric observations, and theoretical studies are presented along with an attempt to predict, with reasonable confidence, the effect on ozone of particular anthropogenic sources of pollution.

  6. Y-12 Plant Stratospheric Ozone Protection plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant staff is required by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) (formerly Martin Marietta Energy Systems) standard ESS-EP-129 to develop and implement a Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program which will minimize emissions of ozone-depleting substances to the environment and maximize the use of ozone-safe alternatives in order to comply with Title VI of the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments and the implementing regulations promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This plan describes the requirements, initiatives, and accomplishments of the Y-12 Plant Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program.

  7. The chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, A.

    1997-01-01

    In the early 1980`s the Antarctic ozone hole was discovered. The ozone loss was 50 percent in the lower stratosphere during springtime, which is made possible by the conditions over Antarctica in winter. The absence of sunlight in the stratosphere during polar winter causes the stratospheric air column there to cool and sink, drawing air from lower latitudes into the upper stratosphere. This lower-latitude air gets closer to the Earth`s axis of rotation as it moves poleward and is accelerated by the need to conserve angular momentum to greater and greater westerly wind speeds forming a vortex bounded by the polar night jet stream. The air entering the vortex contains reactive ozone-destroying species. The observed ozone losses occurred concurrently with increases of chlorofluorocarbon increases.

  8. Role of Methane in Antarctic Stratospheric Ozone Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Natalia; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Palmeiro, Froila

    2014-05-01

    Observational and modeling studies have shown the impact of changes in Antarctic stratospheric ozone on tropospheric climate in austral spring and summer. In the future, effects of increasing greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances oppose each other. Projections show potential impact of ozone recovery on precipitation, carbon uptake in the Southern Hemisphere ocean, Antarctic ice sheets and Southern Hemisphere sea ice. In order to quantify properly the tropospheric impacts of ozone recovery, future Antarctic ozone changes in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere region and the role (if any) of increasing greenhouse gases in ozone recovery need to be evaluated. To do so, we use the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Earth System Model, CESM, with the high-top version of the atmospheric component, CESM(WACCM), which is a fully coupled chemistry climate model. Three climate change scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) of 3 simulations each from 2005 to 2065 are analyzed. In scenario RCP2.6, the largest ozone recovery is simulated in October and November at 50hPa and it is followed by the largest response in temperature in November and December at 70hPa. While the response in RCP4.5 in ozone and temperature is almost identical to that in RCP2.6 in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region, scenario RCP8.5 shows significantly stronger ozone recovery and warming than the other two scenarios, particularly in November and December at 70hPa in ozone and 100hPa in temperature. We show that this is due to larger amounts of methane in RCP8.5 compared to the other two scenarios, which reduces catalytic ozone loss locally. Differences across scenarios in advection of ozone from the source region in the tropical stratosphere do not play a significant role.

  9. Quantifying stratospheric ozone trends: Complications due to stratospheric cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLinden, C. A.; Fioletov, V.

    2011-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that ozone turnaround (the second stage of ozone recovery) is near. Determining precisely when this occurs, however, will be complicated by greenhouse gas-induced stratospheric cooling as ozone trends derived from profile data in different units and/or vertical co-ordinates will not agree. Stratospheric cooling leads to simultaneous trends in air density and layer thicknesses, confounding the interpretation of ozone trends. A simple model suggests that instruments measuring ozone in different units may differ as to the onset of turnaround by a decade, with some indicting a continued decline while others an increase. This concept was illustrated by examining the long-term (1979-2005) ozone trends in the SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) time series. Trends from SAGE, which measures number density as a function of altitude, and SBUV, which measures partial column as a function of pressure, are known to differ by 4-6%/decade in the upper stratosphere. It is shown that this long-standing difference can be reconciled to within 2%/decade when the trend in temperature is properly accounted for.

  10. Impacts of stratospheric ozone depletion and recovery on wave propagation in the boreal winter stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dingzhu; Tian, Wenshou; Xie, Fei; Wang, Chunxiao; Zhang, Jiankai

    2015-08-01

    This paper uses a state-of-the-art general circulation model to study the impacts of the stratospheric ozone depletion from 1980 to 2000 and the expected partial ozone recovery from 2000 to 2020 on the propagation of planetary waves in December, January, and February. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH), the stratospheric ozone depletion leads to a cooler and stronger Antarctic stratosphere, while the stratospheric ozone recovery has the opposite effects. In the Northern Hemisphere (NH), the impacts of the stratospheric ozone depletion on polar stratospheric temperature are not opposite to that of the stratospheric ozone recovery; i.e., the stratospheric ozone depletion causes a weak cooling and the stratospheric ozone recovery causes a statistically significant cooling. The stratospheric ozone depletion leads to a weakening of the Arctic polar vortex, while the stratospheric ozone recovery leads to a strengthening of the Arctic polar vortex. The cooling of the Arctic polar vortex is found to be dynamically induced via modulating the planetary wave activity by stratospheric ozone increases. Particularly interesting is that stratospheric ozone changes have opposite effects on the stationary and transient wave fluxes in the NH stratosphere. The analysis of the wave refractive index and Eliassen-Palm flux in the NH indicates (1) that the wave refraction in the stratosphere cannot fully explain wave flux changes in the Arctic stratosphere and (2) that stratospheric ozone changes can cause changes in wave propagation in the northern midlatitude troposphere which in turn affect wave fluxes in the NH stratosphere. In the SH, the radiative cooling (warming) caused by stratospheric ozone depletion (recovery) produces a larger (smaller) meridional temperature gradient in the midlatitude upper troposphere, accompanied by larger (smaller) zonal wind vertical shear and larger (smaller) vertical gradients of buoyancy frequency. Hence, there are more (fewer) transient waves

  11. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Toon, O.B. ); Turco, R.P. )

    1991-06-01

    During the Antarctic winter, strange and often invisible clouds form in the stratosphere over the pole. These clouds of ice and frozen nitric acid play a crucial role in the chemical cycle responsible for the recent appearance of the annual ozone hole. Their chemistry removes compounds that would normally trap ozone-destroying free chlorine produced by the breakdown of CFCs. The paper describes these clouds, their formation, and the mechanisms by which these clouds help chlorine destroy ozone.

  12. Climate and Ozone Response to Increased Stratospheric Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, Drew T.

    2001-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor abundance affects ozone, surface climate, and stratospheric temperatures. From 30-50 km altitude, temperatures show global decreases of 3-6 K over recent decades. These may be a proxy for water vapor increases, as the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model reproduces these trends only when stratospheric water vapor is allowed to increase. Observations suggest that stratospheric water vapor is indeed increasing, however, measurements are extremely limited in either spatial coverage or duration. The model results suggest that the observed changes may be part of a global, long-term trend. Furthermore, the required water vapor change is too large to be accounted for by increased production within the stratosphere, suggesting that ongoing climate change may be altering tropospheric input. The calculated stratospheric water vapor increase contributes an additional approximately equals 24% (approximately equals 0.2 W/m(exp 2)) to the global warming from well-mixed greenhouse gases over the past two decades. Observed ozone depletion is also better reproduced when destruction due to increased water vapor is included. If the trend continues, it could increase future global warming and impede stratospheric ozone recovery.

  13. Arctic "ozone hole" in a cold volcanic stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Tabazadeh, A; Drdla, K; Schoeberl, M R; Hamill, P; Toon, O B

    2002-03-01

    Optical depth records indicate that volcanic aerosols from major eruptions often produce clouds that have greater surface area than typical Arctic polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). A trajectory cloud-chemistry model is used to study how volcanic aerosols could affect springtime Arctic ozone loss processes, such as chlorine activation and denitrification, in a cold winter within the current range of natural variability. Several studies indicate that severe denitrification can increase Arctic ozone loss by up to 30%. We show large PSC particles that cause denitrification in a nonvolcanic stratosphere cannot efficiently form in a volcanic environment. However, volcanic aerosols, when present at low altitudes, where Arctic PSCs cannot form, can extend the vertical range of chemical ozone loss in the lower stratosphere. Chemical processing on volcanic aerosols over a 10-km altitude range could increase the current levels of springtime column ozone loss by up to 70% independent of denitrification. Climate models predict that the lower stratosphere is cooling as a result of greenhouse gas built-up in the troposphere. The magnitude of column ozone loss calculated here for the 1999--2000 Arctic winter, in an assumed volcanic state, is similar to that projected for a colder future nonvolcanic stratosphere in the 2010 decade. PMID:11854461

  14. Nitrogen fertiliser and stratospheric ozone - Latitudinal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Capone, L. A.; Riegel, C. A.; Turco, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    Substantial increases in atmospheric N2O resulting from the increased use of nitrogen fertilizers might cause large (to 10%) decreases in the stratospheric ozone content. Such ozone decreases would be caused by catalytic reaction cycles involving odd-nitrogen that is formed by N2O decomposition in the upper stratosphere. Turco et al. (1978), using a background chlorine level of 2 ppbv, have shown that if the measured values of specified reactions are used a 50% increase in N2O would lead to a 2.7% increase in the stratospheric column density, although the ozone content above 30 km would be reduced by more than 5%; they also estimated (unpublished data) that the change in the ozone column density caused by doubling the N2O abundance would be very close to zero (within about 0.1%). The present paper extends these calculations of N2O/ozone effects to two dimensions, thereby identifying the latitude dependence expected for such ozone perturbations. The effects of changes in stratospheric chlorine levels on predicted ozone changes are also discussed.

  15. Stratospheric Ozone Predictions For The Late 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Olsen, M. A.; Stolarski, R. S.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L.

    2013-12-01

    temperature change contribute to lower stratospheric variation among CCMs. Simulated fields of long-lived gases and comparisons with observed quantities such as the annual cycle of the middle latitude HCl column evolve as circulation changes in a future atmosphere, giving insight into the differences among simulated predictions. By 2080 predictions for the ozone change since 1980 range from ~0 to +11 DU, comparable to the observed change due to chlorine increase between 1980 and present. Understanding the differences in the CCM responses to climate change is a necessary step towards decreasing uncertainty in prediction.

  16. Human Health Effects of Ozone Depletion From Stratospheric Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chowen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report presents EPA's initial response to NASA's request to advise on potential environmental policy issues associated with the future development of supersonic flight technologies. Consistent with the scope of the study to which NASA and EPA agreed, EPA has evaluated only the environmental concerns related to the stratospheric ozone impacts of a hypothetical HSCT fleet, although recent research indicates that a fleet of HSCT is predicted to contribute to climate warming as well. This report also briefly describes the international and domestic institutional frameworks established to address stratospheric ozone depletion, as well as those established to control pollution from aircraft engine exhaust emissions.

  17. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  18. Reducing Uncertainty in Chemistry Climate Model Predictions of Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to predict the future evolution of stratospheric ozone as ozone-depleting substances decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM predictions exhibit many common features, but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone-return-to-1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to chlorine change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower atmosphere ozone to chlorine change deltaO3/deltaCly is a near linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine (Cly) into its reservoirs; both Cly and its partitioning are controlled by lower atmospheric transport. CCMs with realistic transport agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035 differences in response to chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM results as the anthropogenic contribution to Cly becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change deltaO3/deltaT due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with their own temperature dependence. In the lower atmosphere, tropical ozone decreases caused by a predicted speed-up in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by middle and high latitude increases, contributing most to the spread in late 21st century predictions.

  19. Atmospheric bromine and ozone perturbations in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Y. L.; Pinto, J. P.; Watson, R. T.; Sander, S. P.

    1980-01-01

    The role of bromine compounds in the photochemistry of the natural and perturbed stratosphere has been reexamined using an expanded reaction scheme and the results of recent laboratory studies of several key reactions. The most important finding is that through the reaction BrO + ClO yielding Br + Cl + O2 there is a synergistic effect between bromine and chlorine which results in an efficient catalytic destruction of ozone in the lower stratosphere. One-dimensional photochemical model results indicate that BrO is the major bromine species throughout the stratosphere, followed by BrONO2, HBr, HOBr and Br. It is shown from the foregoing that bromine is more efficient than chlorine as a catalyst for destroying ozone, and the implications for stratospheric ozone of possible future growth in the industrial and agricultural use of bromine are discussed. Bromine concentrations of 20 pptv (2 x 10 to the -11th power), as suggested by recent observations, can decrease the present-day integrated ozone column density by 2.4%, and can enhance ozone depletion from steady-state chlorofluoromethane release at 1973 rates by a factor of 1.1-1.2.

  20. Stratospheric Ozone: Transport, Photochemical Production and Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Jackman, C. H.

    2003-01-01

    Observations from various satellite instruments (e.g., Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)) specify the latitude and seasonal variations of total ozone and ozone as a function of altitude. These seasonal variations change with latitude and altitude partly due to seasonal variation in transport and temperature, partly due to differences in the balance between photochemical production and loss processes, and partly due to differences in the relative importance of the various ozone loss processes. Comparisons of modeled seasonal ozone behavior with observations test the following: the seasonal dependence of dynamical processes where these dominate the ozone tendency; the seasonal dependence of photochemical processes in the upper stratosphere; and the seasonal change in the balance between photochemical and dynamical processes.

  1. SUCCESS OF EPA'S STRATOSPHERIC OZONE ENGINEERING RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes recent successes in, as well as work in progress (with the cooperation of industry) on, EPA's stratospheric ozone engineering research. he Montreal Protocol and U.S. regulations implementing the Protocol necessitate that engineering solutions be found and imp...

  2. STRATOSPHERIC OZONE PROTECTION: AN EPA ENGINEERING PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine released into the atmosphere is a major factor in the depletion of the protective stratospheric ozone layer. The Montreal Protocol, as amended in 1990, and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, address the limits and reduction schedules to be placed on chlorine- and brom...

  3. Stratospheric ozone measurements at the equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilyas, Mohammad

    1994-01-01

    A balloon-borne project for ozone layer measurements was undertaken using the MAST ozone sondes and ASTOR radiosondes. Previously published data on this series (Ilyas, 1984) was recently re-analyzed using a rigorous technique to evaluate correction factors (ranging between 1.2 to 1.4). The revised data presented here, show that at the tropospheric and lower stratospheric levels, the ozone concentrations at the equator are much lower than the mid-latitude concentrations. The layer of peak concentration is found to be shifted upward compared to the mid-latitude profile and above this the two profiles get closer.

  4. Predicted aircraft effects on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Wofsy, Steve; Kley, Dieter; Zhadin, Evgeny A.; Johnson, Colin; Weisenstein, Debra; Prather, Michael J.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility that the current fleet of subsonic aircraft may already have caused detectable changes in both the troposphere and stratosphere has raised concerns about the impact of such operations on stratospheric ozone and climate. Recent interest in the operation of supersonic aircraft in the lower stratosphere has heightened such concerns. Previous assessments of impacts from proposed supersonic aircraft were based mostly on one-dimensional model results although a limited number of multidimensional models were used. In the past 15 years, our understanding of the processes that control the atmospheric concentrations of trace gases has changed dramatically. This better understanding was achieved through accumulation of kinetic data and field observations as well as development of new models. It would be beneficial to start examining the impact of subsonic aircraft to identify opportunities to study and validate the mechanisms that were proposed to explain the ozone responses. The two major concerns are the potential for a decrease in the column abundance of ozone leading to an increase in ultraviolet radiation at the ground, and redistribution of ozone in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere leading to changes in the Earth's climate. Two-dimensional models were used extensively for ozone assessment studies, with a focus on responses to chlorine perturbations. There are problems specific to the aircraft issues that are not adequately addressed by the current models. This chapter reviews the current status of the research on aircraft impact on ozone with emphasis on immediate model improvements necessary for extending our understanding. The discussion will be limited to current and projected commercial aircraft that are equipped with air-breathing engines using conventional jet fuel. The impacts are discussed in terms of the anticipated fuel use at cruise altitude.

  5. Scientific assessment of stratospheric ozone: 1989, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    A scientific review is presented of the current understanding of stratospheric ozone. There have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's protective ozone layer. There are four major findings that each heighten the concern that chlorine and bromine containing chemicals can lead to a significant depletion of stratospheric ozone: (1) Antarctic ozone hole (the weight of evidence indicates that chlorinated and brominated chemicals are responsible for the ozone hole); (2) Perturbed arctic chemistry (the same potentially ozone destroying processes were identified in the Arctic stratosphere); (3) Long term ozone decreases; and (4) Model limitations (gaps in theoretical models used for assessment studies).

  6. Scientific assessment of stratospheric ozone: 1989, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A scientific review is presented of the current understanding of stratospheric ozone. There have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's protective ozone layer. There are four major findings that each heighten the concern that chlorine and bromine containing chemicals can lead to a significant depletion of stratospheric ozone: (1) Antarctic ozone hole (the weight of evidence indicates that chlorinated and brominated chemicals are responsible for the ozone hole; (2) Perturbed arctic chemistry (the same potentially ozone destroying processes were identified in the Arctic stratosphere); (3) Long term ozone decreases; and (4) Model limitations (gaps in theoretical models used for assessment studies).

  7. Quantifying Uncertainty in Projections of Stratospheric Ozone Over the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton-Perez, A. J.; Hawkins, E.; Eyring, V.; Cionni, I.; Bodeker, G. E.; Kinnison, D. E.; Akiyoshi, H.; Frith, S. M.; Garcia, R.; Gettelman, A.; Lamarque, J. F.; Nakamura, T.; Pawson, S.; Yamashita, Y.; Bekki, S.; Braesicke, P.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Dhomse, S.; Marchand, M.; Mancini, E.; Morgenstern, O.; Pitari, G.; Plummer, D.; Pyle, J. A.; Rozanov, E.

    2010-01-01

    Future stratospheric ozone concentrations will be determined both by changes in the concentration of ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and by changes in stratospheric and tropospheric climate, including those caused by changes in anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs). Since future economic development pathways and resultant emissions of GHGs are uncertain, anthropogenic climate change could be a significant source of uncertainty for future projections of stratospheric ozone. In this pilot study, using an ensemble of opportunity of chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations, the contribution of scenario uncertainty from different plausible emissions pathways for 10 ODSs and GHGs to future ozone projections is quantified relative to the contribution from model uncertainty and internal variability of the chemistry-climate system. For both the global, annual mean ozone concentration and for ozone in specific geographical regions, differences between CCMs are the dominant source of uncertainty for the first two-thirds of the 21 st century, up-to and after the time when ozone concentrations 15 return to 1980 values. In the last third of the 21st century, dependent upon the set of greenhouse gas scenarios used, scenario uncertainty can be the dominant contributor. This result suggests that investment in chemistry-climate modelling is likely to continue to refine projections of stratospheric ozone and estimates of the return of stratospheric ozone concentrations to pre-1980 levels.

  8. Effects of stratospheric ozone recovery on photochemistry and ozone air quality in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wu, S.; Huang, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2014-04-01

    There has been significant stratospheric ozone depletion since the late 1970s due to ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). With the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, stratospheric ozone is expected to recover towards its pre-1980 level in the coming decades. In this study, we examine the implications of stratospheric ozone recovery for the tropospheric chemistry and ozone air quality with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). With a full recovery of the stratospheric ozone, the projected increases in ozone column range from 1% over the low latitudes to more than 10% over the polar regions. The sensitivity factor of troposphere ozone photolysis rate, defined as the percentage changes in surface ozone photolysis rate for 1% increase in stratospheric ozone column, shows significant seasonal variation but is always negative with absolute value larger than one. The expected stratospheric ozone recovery is found to affect the tropospheric ozone destruction rates much more than the ozone production rates. Significant decreases in surface ozone photolysis rates due to stratospheric ozone recovery are simulated. The global average tropospheric OH decreases by 1.7%, and the global average lifetime of tropospheric ozone increases by 1.5%. The perturbations to tropospheric ozone and surface ozone show large seasonal and spatial variations. General increases in surface ozone are calculated for each season, with increases by up to 0.8 ppbv in the remote areas. Increases in ozone lifetime by up to 13% are found in the troposphere. The increased lifetimes of tropospheric ozone in response to stratospheric ozone recovery enhance the intercontinental transport of ozone and global pollution, in particular for the summertime. The global background ozone attributable to Asian emissions is calculated to increase by up to 15% or 0.3 ppbv in the Northern Hemisphere in response to the projected stratospheric ozone recovery.

  9. Ozone density measurements in the troposphere and stratosphere of Natal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.; Motta, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    Ozone densitities were measured in the troposphere and stratosphere of Natal using ECC sondes launches on balloons. The data analyzed so far show tropospheric densities and total ozone contents larger than expected.

  10. Modulations of stratospheric ozone by volcanic eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchette, Christian; Mcconnell, John C.

    1994-01-01

    We have used a time series of aerosol surface based on the measurements of Hofmann to investigate the modulation of total column ozone caused by the perturbation to gas phase chemistry by the reaction N2O5(gas) + H2O(aero) yields 2HNO3(gas) on the surface of stratospheric aerosols. We have tested a range of values for its reaction probability, gamma = 0.02, 0.13, and 0.26 which we compared to unperturbed homogeneous chemistry. Our analysis spans a period from Jan. 1974 to Oct. 1994. The results suggest that if lower values of gamma are the norm then we would expect larger ozone losses for highly enhanced aerosol content that for larger values of gamma. The ozone layer is more sensitive to the magnitude of the reaction probability under background conditions than during volcanically active periods. For most conditions, the conversion of NO2 to HNO3 is saturated for reaction probability in the range of laboratory measurements, but is only absolutely saturated following major volcanic eruptions when the heterogeneous loss dominates the losses of N2O5. The ozone loss due to this heterogeneous reaction increases with the increasing chlorine load. Total ozone losses calculated are comparable to ozone losses reported from TOMS and Dobson data.

  11. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. ); Anderson, J.G.; Toohey, D.W. ); Fahey, D.W.; Kawa, S.R. ); Jones, R.L. ); McKenna, D.S. ); Poole, L.R. )

    1991-05-31

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. most of the available chlorine (HCl and ClONO{sub 2}) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl{sub 2}O{sub 2} throughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO{sub 3}, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15% at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8% losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50% over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  12. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, W. H.; Anderson, J. G.; Toohey, D. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Poole, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. Most of the available chlorine (CHl and ClONO2) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl2O2 thoroughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO3, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15 percent at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8 percent losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50 percent over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  13. Tropospheric and stratospheric ozone from assimilation of Aura data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Chang, L.-P.; Hayashi, H.; Pawwson, S.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2006-01-01

    Ozone is an atmospheric trace gas with multiple impacts on the environment. Global ozone fields are needed for air quality predictions, estimation of the ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface, climate-radiation studies, and may also have an impact on longer-term weather predictions. We estimate global ozone fields in the stratosphere and troposphere by combining the data from EOS Aura satellite with an ozone model using data assimilation. Ozone exhibits a large temporal variability in the lower stratosphere. Our previous work showed that assimilation of satellite data from limb-sounding geometry helps constrain ozone profiles in that region. We assimilated ozone data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) into the ozone system at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). Ozone is transported within a general circulation model (GCM) which includes parameterizations for stratospheric photochemistry, tropospheric chemistry, and a simple scheme for heterogeneous ozone loss. The focus of this study is on the representation of ozone in the lower stratosphere and tropospheric ozone columns. We plan to extend studies of tropospheric ozone distribution through assimilation of ozone data from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). Comparisons with ozone sondes and occultation data show that assimilation of Aura data reproduces ozone gradients and variability in the lower stratosphere well. We proceed by separating the contributions to temporal changes in the ozone field into those that are due to the model and those that are due to the assimilation of Aura data. The impacts of Aura data are illustrated and their role in the representation of ozone variability in the lower stratosphere and troposphere is shown.

  14. The Impact of Geoengineering Aerosols on Stratospheric Temperature and Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckendorn, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Fueglistaler, S.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Schraner, M.; Peter, T.; Thomason, L. W.

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are warming the global climate at an unprecedented rate. Significant emission reductions will be required soon to avoid a rapid temperature rise. As a potential interim measure to avoid extreme temperature increase, it has been suggested that Earth's albedo be increased by artificially enhancing stratospheric sulfate aerosols. We use a 3D chemistry climate model, fed by aerosol size distributions from a zonal mean aerosol model, to simulate continuous injection of 1-10 Mt/a into the lower tropical stratosphere. In contrast to the case for all previous work, the particles are predicted to grow to larger sizes than are observed after volcanic eruptions. The reason is the continuous supply of sulfuric acid and hence freshly formed small aerosol particles, which enhance the formation of large aerosol particles by coagulation and, to a lesser extent, by condensation. Owing to their large size, these particles have a reduced albedo. Furthermore, their sedimentation results in a non-linear relationship between stratospheric aerosol burden and annual injection, leading to a reduction of the targeted cooling. More importantly, the sedimenting particles heat the tropical cold point tropopause and, hence, the stratospheric entry mixing ratio of H2O increases. Therefore, geoengineering by means of sulfate aerosols is predicted to accelerate the hydroxyl catalyzed ozone destruction cycles and cause a significant depletion of the ozone layer even though future halogen concentrations will be significantly reduced.

  15. The Impact of Geoengineering Aerosols on Stratospheric Temperature and Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckendorn, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Fueglistaler, S.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Schraner, M.; Thomason, L. W.; Peter, T.

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are warming the global climate at an unprecedented rate. Significant emission reductions will be required soon to avoid a rapid temperature rise. As a potential interim measure to avoid extreme temperature increase, it has been suggested that Earth's albedo be increased by artificially enhancing stratospheric sulfate aerosols. We use a 3D chemistry climate model, fed by aerosol size distributions from a zonal mean aerosol model. to simulate continuous injection of 1-10 Mt/a into the lower tropical stratosphere. In contrast to the case for all previous work, the particles are predicted to grow to larger sizes than are observed after volcanic eruptions. The reason is the continuous supply of sulfuric acid and hence freshly formed small aerosol particles, which enhance the formation of large aerosol particles by coagulation and, to a lesser extent, by condensation. Owing to their large size, these particles have a reduced albedo. Furthermore, their sedimentation results in a non-linear relationship between stratospheric aerosol burden and annual injection, leading to a reduction of the targeted cooling. More importantly, the sedimenting particles heat the tropical cold point tropopause and, hence, the stratospheric entry mixing ratio of H2O increases. Therefore, geoengineering by means of sulfate aerosols is predicted to accelerate the hydroxyl catalyzed ozone destruction cycles and cause a significant depletion of the ozone layer even though future halogen concentrations will he significantly reduced.

  16. Ozone in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, M.J.

    1981-06-20

    A detailed photochemical model of the upper stratosphere and mesosphere is compared with three extensive sets of ozone observations: Atmospheric Explorer-E backscattered ultraviolet experiment (BUV), Nimbus-4 BUV, and rocket flights from Wallops Flight Center (ROCOZ). The Nimbus-4 and rocket observations are most sensitive to ozone between 30 and 50 km, whereas observations from AE-E measure the abundance of ozone up to 70 km. The photochemical model accurately reproduces the observed relationship between BUV intensity and local solar zenith angle, although the absolute calibration on AE-E appears to be in error. The AE-E observations and the model both exhibit a morning-afternoon asymmetry, with more ozone in the morning owing to the build up of HO/sub x/ species in the afternoon. Seasonal changes in atmospheric temperature produce an annual maximum in tropical mesospheric ozone during June-July-August. The amplitude of the observed effect is somewhat larger than calculated by the model. Some problems appear to remain with the presently accepted kinetic rates for HO/sub x/ species in the atmosphere. 71 references, 19 figures, 6 tables.

  17. No alarming ozone loss from stratospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-08-01

    At sufficiently low temperatures, water vapor in the lowermost stratosphere can cause ambient sulfate aerosol to grow, providing surfaces on which chlorine can activate to a form that destroys ozone. Ozone depletion in the stratosphere can allow harmful ultraviolet radiation to reach Earth's surface.

  18. Stratospheric ozone: Impact of human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Michael B.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    1989-12-01

    Current knowledge of the chemistry of the stratosphere is reviewed using measurements from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment to test the accuracy of our treatment of processes at mid-latitudes, and results from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) to examine our understanding of processes for the polar environment. It is shown that, except for some difficulties with N 2O 5 and possibly ClNO 3, gas phase models for nitrogen and chlorine species at 30°N in spring are in excellent agreement with the data from ATMOS. Heterogeneous processes may have an influence on the concentrations of NO 2, N 2O 5, HNO 3, and ClNO 3 for the lower stratosphere at 48°S in fall. Comparison of model and observed concentrations of O 3 indicate good agreement at 30°N, with less satisfactory results at 48°S. The discrepancy between the loss rate of O 3 observed over the course of the AAOE mission in 1987 and loss rates calculated using measured concentrations of ClO and BrO is found to be even larger than that reported by Anderson et al. (1989, J. geophys. Res.94, 11480). There appear to be loss processes for removal of O 3 additional to the HOC1 mechanism proposed by Solomon et al. (1986, Nature321, 755), the ClO-BrO scheme favored by McElroy et al. (1986, Nature321, 759), and the ClO dimer mechanism introduced by Molina and Molina (1987, J. phys. Chem.91, 433). There is little doubt that industrial halocarbons have a significant impact on stratospheric O 3. Controls on emissions more stringent than those defined by the Montreal Protocol will be required if the Antarctic Ozone Hole is not to persist as a permanent feature of the stratosphere.

  19. Chlorofluoromethanes in the stratosphere and some possible consequences for ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Inert chlorofluoromethanes are used by man as refrigerants and aerosol propellants. These substances eventually escape and diffuse upward into the stratosphere. At great enough heights, UV sunlight can photodissociate these chlorofluorocarbons into chlorine atoms which will catalytically destroy ozone molecules. Chlorofluoromethane production has been increasing steadily in recent years to its present level of about a megaton per year, and chlorofluorocarbon usage will probably continue to grow in the future. Calculations with a one-dimensional time-dependent atmospheric model suggests that, if projected increases in chlorofluoromethane use materialize and there is no tropospheric destruction mechanism for these gases, the total global abundance of ozone may be reduced by more than 20 per cent over the next 50 years. If the residence times for these fluorocarbons in the troposphere are in the range of 10-30 years, however, predicted ozone depletions would be significantly smaller.

  20. Global variations of zonal mean ozone during stratospheric warming events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William J.

    1993-01-01

    Eight years of Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) ozone data are examined to study zonal mean variations associated with stratospheric planetary wave (warming) events. These fluctuations are found to be nearly global in extent, with relatively large variations in the tropics, and coherent signatures reaching up to 50 deg in the opposite (summer) hemisphere. These ozone variations are a manifestation of the global circulation cells associated with stratospheric warming events; the ozone responds dynamically in the lower stratosphere to transport, and photochemically in the upper stratosphere to the circulation-induced temperature changes. The observed ozone variations in the tropics are of particular interest because transport is dominated by zonal-mean vertical motions (eddy flux divergences and mean meridional transports are negligible), and hence, substantial simplifications to the governing equations occur. The response of the atmosphere to these impulsive circulation changes provides a situation for robust estimates of the ozone-temperature sensitivity in the upper stratosphere.

  1. The ozone hole - The role of polar stratospheric cloud particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.

    1988-01-01

    The role of polar stratospheric clouds in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole is considered. Several researchers have suggested that the decrease in ozone over Antarctica is related to the polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) which had been observed in the antarctic winter stratosphere. Some of the pertinent characteristics of polar stratospheric clouds are discussed, and it is shown how these clouds may participate in the ozone destruction process. The satellite data for PSCs is analyzed, and statistical information regarding the number and maximum extinctions of these clouds is presented. Evidence that the polar stratospheric clouds are composed of frozen nitric acid is considered. It is suggested that the evaporation of the clouds, in late August and September, will release HOCl and HNO3 to the environment. This could be followed by the photodissociation of HOCl to OH and Cl, which would very effectively destroy ozone. However, the ozone destruction mechanism could be halted when enough of the evaporated nitric acid is photolized.

  2. Effects of Volcanic Eruptions on Stratospheric Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer associated with the Mt. Pinatubo volcano and future volcanic eruptions on the recovery of the ozone layer is studied with an interactive two-dimensional photochemical model. The time varying chlorine loading and the stratospheric cooling due to increasing carbon dioxide have been taken into account. The computed ozone and temperature changes associated with the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in 1991 agree well with observations. Long model runs out to the year 2050 have been carried out, in which volcanoes having the characteristics of the Mount Pinatubo volcano were erupted in the model at 10-year intervals starting in the year 2010. Compared to a non-volcanic run using background aerosol loading, transient reductions of globally averaged column ozone of 2-3 percent were computed as a result of each of these eruptions, with the ozone recovering to that computed for the non-volcanic case in about 5 years after the eruption. Computed springtime Arctic column ozone losses of from 10 to 18 percent also recovered to the non-volcanic case within 5 years. These results suggest that the long-term recovery of ozone would not be strongly affected by infrequent volcanic eruptions with a sulfur loading approximating Mt. Pinatubo. Sensitivity studies in which the Arctic lower stratosphere was forced to be 4 K and 10 K colder resulted in transient ozone losses of which also recovered to the non-volcanic case in 5 years. A case in which a volcano five times Mt. Pinatubo was erupted in the year 2010 led to maximum springtime column ozone losses of 45 percent which took 10 years to recover to the background case. Finally, in order to simulate a situation in which frequent smaller volcanic eruptions result in increasing the background sulfate loading, a simulation was made in which the background aerosol was increased by 10 percent per year. This resulted in a delay of the recovery of column ozone to 1980 values of more than 10 years.

  3. Scientific assessment of stratospheric ozone: 1989, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented of the current understanding of stratospheric ozone (SO). The focus is on four major current aspects of SO: (1) polar ozone; (2) global trends; (3) theoretical predictions; and (4) halocarbon ozone depleting materials and global warming potentials. Other ozone related topics are also discussed: (1) the trends of stratospheric temperature, stratospheric aerosols, source gases, and surface ultraviolet radiation; and (2) the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere as it pertains to the lifetimes of ozone related chemicals. There have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's protective ozone layer. There are four major findings that each heighten the concern that chlorine and bromine containing chemicals can lead to a significant depletion of SO: (1) Antarctic Ozone Hole; (2) Perturbed Arctic Chemistry; (3) Long-term Ozone Decreases; and (4) Model Limitations.

  4. Stratospheric Ozone Intercomparison Campaign (STOIC) 1989: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margitan, J. J.; Barnes, R. A.; Brothers, G. B.; Butler, J.; Burris, J.; Connor, B. J.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kerr, J. B.; Komhyr, W. D.; McCormick, M. P.; McDermid, I. S.; McElroy, C. T.; McGee, T. J.; Miller, A. J.; Owens, M.; Parrish, A. D.; Parsons, C. L.; Torres, A. L.; Tsou, J. J.; Walsh, T. D.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Upper Atmosphere Research Program organized a Stratospheric Ozone Intercomparison Campaign (STOIC) held in July-August 1989 at the Table Mountain Facility (TMF) of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The primary instruments participating in this campaign were several that had been developed by NASA for the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change: the JPL ozone lidar at TMF, the Goddard Space Flight Center trailer-mounted ozone lidar which was moved to TMF for this comparison, and the Millitech/LaRC microwave radiometer. To assess the performance of these new instruments, a validation/intercomparison campaign was undertaken using established techniques: balloon ozonesondes launched by personnel from the Wallops Flight Facility and from NOAA Geophysical Monitoring for Climate Change (GMCC) (now Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory), a NOAA GMCC Dobson spectrophotometer, and a Brewer spectrometer from the Atmospheric Environment Service of Canada, both being used for column as well as Umkehr profile retrievals. All of these instruments were located at TMF and measurements were made as close together in time as possible to minimize atmospheric variability as a factor in the comparisons. Daytime rocket measurements of ozone were made by Wallops Flight Facility personnel using ROCOZ-A instruments launched from San Nicholas Island. The entire campaign was conducted as a blind intercomparison, with the investigators not seeing each others data until all data had been submitted to a referee and archived at the end of the 2-week period (July 20 to August 2, 1989). Satellite data were also obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE 2) aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aboard Nimbus 7. An examination of the data has found excellent agreement among the techniques, especially in the 20- to 40-km range. As expected, there was little atmospheric variability during the

  5. Stratospheric ozone - Impact of human activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, Michael B.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    1989-01-01

    The current knowledge of the chemistry of the stratosphere is reviewed, with particular consideration given to the measurements from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment and from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. Analysis of the ATMOS data at 30 deg N suggests that the current understanding of the contemporary-stratosphere chemistry at mid-latitudes is relatively complete, except for possible problems with the diurnal variations of N2O5 at low altitudes, and with ClNO3 at higher altitudes. Except for some difficulties with these two compounds, the data from ATMOS agree well with the gas phase models for nitrogen and chlorine species at 30 deg N in spring. It is emphasized that, in addition to the HOCl mechanism proposed by Solomon et al. (1986), the ClO-BrO scheme proposed by McElroy et al. (1986), and the ClO dimer mechanism introduced by Molina and Molina (1987), other processes exist that are responsible for ozone removal.

  6. Detection of stratospheric ozone intrusions by windprofiler radars.

    PubMed

    Hocking, W K; Carey-Smith, T; Tarasick, D W; Argall, P S; Strong, K; Rochon, Y; Zawadzki, I; Taylor, P A

    2007-11-01

    Stratospheric ozone attenuates harmful ultraviolet radiation and protects the Earth's biosphere. Ozone is also of fundamental importance for the chemistry of the lowermost part of the atmosphere, the troposphere. At ground level, ozone is an important by-product of anthropogenic pollution, damaging forests and crops, and negatively affecting human health. Ozone is critical to the chemical and thermal balance of the troposphere because, via the formation of hydroxyl radicals, it controls the capacity of tropospheric air to oxidize and remove other pollutants. Moreover, ozone is an important greenhouse gas, particularly in the upper troposphere. Although photochemistry in the lower troposphere is the major source of tropospheric ozone, the stratosphere-troposphere transport of ozone is important to the overall climatology, budget and long-term trends of tropospheric ozone. Stratospheric intrusion events, however, are still poorly understood. Here we introduce the use of modern windprofiler radars to assist in such transport investigations. By hourly monitoring the radar-derived tropopause height in combination with a series of frequent ozonesonde balloon launches, we find numerous intrusions of ozone from the stratosphere into the troposphere in southeastern Canada. On some occasions, ozone is dispersed at altitudes of two to four kilometres, but on other occasions it reaches the ground, where it can dominate the ozone density variability. We observe rapid changes in radar tropopause height immediately preceding these intrusion events. Such changes therefore serve as a valuable diagnostic for the occurrence of ozone intrusion events. Our studies emphasize the impact that stratospheric ozone can have on tropospheric ozone, and show that windprofiler data can be used to infer the possibility of ozone intrusions, as well as better represent tropopause motions in association with stratosphere-troposphere transport. PMID:17994096

  7. About ozone depletion in stratosphere over Brazil in last decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Inácio M.; Imai, Takeshi; Seguchi, Tomio

    The depletion of stratospheric ozone, resulting from the emission of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), has become a major issue since 1980. The decrease in stratospheric ozone over the polar regions has been pronounced at the South Pole than at the North Pole. In mid-latitude and equatorial regions, ozone depletion becomes less important; it depends on seasonal effects and on the characteristics of a particular region. The detailed mechanism by which the polar ozone holes form is different from that for the mid-latitude thinning, but the most important process in both trends is the catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic chlorine and bromine. The main source of these halogen atoms in the stratosphere is photodissociation of CFC compounds, commonly called freons, and of bromofluorocarbon compounds known as halons. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere after being emitted at the surface. Both ozone depletion mechanisms strengthened as emissions of CFCs and halons increased [1]. Measurements of stratospheric ozone carried out on several locations in Brazil and on the South Pole in the last decade (1996-2005), using detectors placed on ground, stratospheric balloons and Earth Probe TOMS satellites, are presented here. Detailed series analysis from 1980 up to the present describes a mean ozone depletion of 4[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozone/depletion.

  8. Predicted rocket and shuttle effects on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, Robert S.; Karol, Igor L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Qiu, Lian-Xiong; Prather, Michael J.; Pyle, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The major chemical effluents of either solid- or liquid-fueled rockets that can potentially perturb stratospheric ozone include chlorine compounds (HCl), nitrogen compounds (NO(x)), and hydrogen compounds (H2 and H2O). Radicals (Cl, ClO, H, OH, HO2, NO, and NO2) formed directly or indirectly from rocket exhaust can cause the catalytic destruction of ozone. Other exhaust compounds that could presumably lead to ozone destruction either by direct reaction with ozone or by providing a surface for heterogeneous processes include the particulates Al2O3, ice, and soot. These topics are discussed in terms of the possible effects of rocket exhausts on stratospheric ozone.

  9. Stratospheric Cooling and Arctic Ozone Recovery. Appendix L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    1998-01-01

    We present sensitivity studies using the AER box model for an idealized parcel in the lower stratosphere at 70 deg N during winter/spring with different assumed stratospheric cooling and chlorine loadings. Our calculations show that stratospheric cooling could further deplete ozone via increased polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and retard its expected recovery even with the projected chlorine loading decrease. We introduce the concept of chlorine-cooling equivalent and show that a 1 K cooling could provide the same local ozone depletion as an increase of chlorine by 0.4 - 0.7 ppbv for the scenarios considered. Thus, sustained stratospheric cooling could further reduce Arctic ozone content and delay the anticipated ozone recovery in the Northern Hemisphere even with the realization of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments.

  10. Understanding the Tropospheric Ozone Response to Changes in the Stratospheric Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, J. L.; Kinnison, D. E.; Glanville, A. S.; Lee, M.; Walker, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Chemistry-climate models robustly predict increases in the large-scale stratospheric circulation and stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) in response to increasing greenhouse gases. Our previous work has shown that current variability in the stratospheric circulation and stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux driven by a combination of El Niño /Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the stratospheric Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) provides a "natural experiment" that may reduce uncertainties in predictions of the tropospheric ozone response to future changes in stratospheric transport. Using six years of measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) onboard NASA's Aura satellite, we found that interannual variability in the stratospheric circulation of ~±40% leads to changes of ~±2% in northern midlatitude tropospheric ozone (equaling ~1/2 the total observed interannual variability). Here, we further explore the relationship between the stratospheric circulation and tropospheric ozone variability using two models: the Whole Atmosphere Chemistry-Climate Model (WACCM) and the GEOS-Chem chemistry-transport model (CTM). With the WACCM model, we further explore and untangle the roles of ENSO and the QBO in driving circulation changes and examine small but important differences in the response of the residual vertical velocity and the transport velocity (as measured by the water vapor tape recorder) to these cycles. We also diagnose large differences in the relationship between stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in the specified dynamics and free-running versions of WACCM. With the GEOS-Chem CTM, we use a 30-year simulation to examine the stability of our satellite-derived diagnostics over longer time periods and their sensitivity to changes in meteorology and emissions. We also apply our diagnostics to a 6-year joint 3Dvar assimilation of TES and MLS observations in GEOS-Chem and examine whether the assimilation

  11. Stratospheric Ozone in the Post-CFC Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, F.; Stolarski, R. S.; Newman, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    Vertical and latitudinal changes in the stratospheric ozone in the post-chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) era are investigated using simulations of the recent past and the 21st century with a coupled chemistry-climate model. Model results reveal that, in the 2060s when the stratospheric halogen loading is projected to return to its 1980 values, the extratropical column ozone is significantly higher than that in 1975-1984, but the tropical column ozone does not recover to 1980 values. Upper and lower stratospheric ozone changes in the post-CFC era have very different patterns. Above 15 hPa ozone increases almost latitudinally uniformly by 6 Dobson Unit (DU), whereas below 15 hPa ozone decreases in the tropics by 8 DU and increases in the extratropics by up to 16 DU. The upper stratospheric ozone increase is a photochemical response to greenhouse gas induced strong cooling, and the lower stratospheric ozone changes are consistent with enhanced mean advective transport due to a stronger Brewer-Dobson circulation. The model results suggest that the strengthening of the Brewer-Dobson circulation plays a crucial role in ozone recovery and ozone distributions in the post-CFC era.

  12. Stratospheric ozone in the post-CFC era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Stolarski, R. S.; Newman, P. A.

    2008-12-01

    Vertical and latitudinal changes in the stratospheric ozone in the post-chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) era are investigated using simulations of the recent past and the 21st century with a coupled chemistry-climate model. Model results reveal that, in the 2060s when the stratospheric halogen loading is projected to return to its 1980 values, the extratropical column ozone is significantly higher than that in 1975-1984, but the tropical column ozone does not recover to 1980 values. Upper and lower stratospheric ozone changes in the post-CFC era have very different patterns. Above 15 hPa ozone increases almost latitudinally uniformly by 6 Dobson Unit (DU), whereas below 15 hPa ozone decreases in the tropics by 8 DU and increases in the extratropics by up to 16 DU. The upper stratospheric ozone increase is a photochemical response to greenhouse gas induced strong cooling, and the lower stratospheric ozone changes are consistent with enhanced mean advective transport due to a stronger Brewer-Dobson circulation. The model results suggest that the strengthening of the Brewer-Dobson circulation plays a crucial role in ozone recovery and ozone distributions in the post-CFC era.

  13. Stratospheric ozone in the post-CFC era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Stolarski, R. S.; Newman, P. A.

    2009-03-01

    Vertical and latitudinal changes in the stratospheric ozone in the post-chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) era are investigated using simulations of the recent past and the 21st century with a coupled chemistry-climate model. Model results reveal that, in the 2060s when the stratospheric halogen loading is projected to return to its 1980 values, the extratropical column ozone is significantly higher than that in 1975-1984, but the tropical column ozone does not recover to 1980 values. Upper and lower stratospheric ozone changes in the post-CFC era have very different patterns. Above 15 hPa ozone increases almost latitudinally uniformly by 6 Dobson Unit (DU), whereas below 15 hPa ozone decreases in the tropics by 8 DU and increases in the extratropics by up to 16 DU. The upper stratospheric ozone increase is a photochemical response to greenhouse gas induced strong cooling, and the lower stratospheric ozone changes are consistent with enhanced mean advective transport due to a stronger Brewer-Dobson circulation. The model results suggest that the strengthening of the Brewer-Dobson circulation plays a crucial role in ozone recovery and ozone distributions in the post-CFC era.

  14. Stratospheric Ozone in the Post-CFC Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feng; Solarski, Richard S.; Newman, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Vertical and latitudinal changes in the stratospheric ozone in the post-chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) era are investigated using simulations of the recent past and the 21st century with a coupled chemistry-climate model. Model results reveal that, in the 2060s when the stratospheric halogen loading is projected to return to its 1980 values, the extratropical column ozone is significantly higher than that in 1975-1984, but the tropical column ozone does not recover to 1980 values. Upper and lower stratospheric ozone changes in the post- CFC era have very different patterns. Above 15 hPa ozone increases almost latitudinally uniformly by 6 Dobson Unit (DU), whereas below 15 hPa ozone decreases in the tropics by 8 DU and increases in the extratropics by up to 16 DU. The upper stratospheric ozone increase is a photochemical response to greenhouse gas induced strong cooling, and the lower stratospheric ozone changes are consistent with enhanced mean advective transport due to a stronger Brewer-Dobson circulation. The model results suggest that the strengthening of the Brewer-Dobson circulation plays a crucial role in ozone recovery and ozone distributions in the post-CFC era.

  15. Stratospheric ozone measurement with an infrared heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Kostiuk, T.; Mumma, M. J.; Buhl, D.; Kunde, V. G.; Brown, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of a stratospheric ozone concentration profile are made by detecting infrared absorption lines with a heterodyne spectrometer. The infrared spectrometer is based on a line-by-line tunable CO2 lasers, a liquid-nitrogen cooled HgCdTe photomixer, and a 64-channel spectral line receiver. The infrared radiation from the source is mixed with local-oscillator radiation. The difference frequency signal in a bandwidth above and below the local-oscillator frequency is detected. The intensity in each sideband is found by subtracting sideband contributions. It is found that absolute total column density is 0.32 plus or minus 0.02 cm-atm with a peak mixing ratio at about 24 km. The (7,1,6)-(7,1,7) O3 line center frequency is identified as 1043.1772/cm. Future work will involve a number of ozone absorption lines and measurements of diurnal variation. Completely resolved stratospheric lines may be inverted to yield concentration profiles of trace constituents and stratospheric gases.

  16. Natural and anthropogenic perturbations of the stratospheric ozone layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reviews potential causes for reduction in the ozone abundance. The response of stratospheric ozone to solar activity is discussed. Ozone changes are simulated in relation with the potential development of a fleet of high-speed stratospheric aircraft and the release in the atmosphere of chlorofluorocarbons. The calculations are performed by a two-dimensional chemical-radiative-dynamical model. The importance of heterogeneous chemistry in polar stratospheric clouds and in the Junge layer (sulfate aerosol) is emphasized. The recently reported ozone trend over the last decade is shown to have been largely caused by the simultaneous effects of increasing concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons and heterogeneous chemistry. The possibility for a reduction in stratospheric ozone following a large volcanic eruption such as that of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 is discussed.

  17. Mass and Ozone Fluxes from the Lowermost Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Olsen, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Net mass flux from the stratosphere to the troposphere can be computed from the heating rate along the 380K isentropic surface and the time rate of change of the mass of the lowermost stratosphere (the region between the tropopause and the 380K isentrope). Given this net mass flux and the cross tropopause diabatic mass flux, the residual adiabatic mass flux across the tropopause can also be estimated. These fluxes have been computed using meteorological fields from a free-running general circulation model (FVGCM) and two assimilation data sets, FVDAS, and UKMO. The data sets tend to agree that the annual average net mass flux for the Northern Hemisphere is about 1P10 kg/s. There is less agreement on the southern Hemisphere flux that might be half as large. For all three data sets, the adiabatic mass flux is computed to be from the upper troposphere into the lowermost stratosphere. This flux will dilute air entering from higher stratospheric altitudes. The mass fluxes are convolved with ozone mixing ratios from the Goddard 3D CTM (which uses the FVGCM) to estimate the cross-tropopause transport of ozone. A relatively large adiabatic flux of tropospheric ozone from the tropical upper troposphere into the extratropical lowermost stratosphere dilutes the stratospheric air in the lowermost stratosphere. Thus, a significant fraction of any measured ozone STE may not be ozone produced in the higher Stratosphere. The results also illustrate that the annual cycle of ozone concentration in the lowermost stratosphere has as much of a role as the transport in the seasonal ozone flux cycle. This implies that a simplified calculation of ozone STE mass from air mass and a mean ozone mixing ratio may have a large uncertainty.

  18. Quantifying isentropic stratosphere-troposphere exchange of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huang; Chen, Gang; Tang, Qi; Hess, Peter

    2016-04-01

    There is increased evidence that stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) of ozone has a significant impact on tropospheric chemistry and radiation. Traditional diagnostics of STE consider the ozone budget in the lowermost stratosphere (LMS) as a whole. However, this can only render the hemispherically integrated ozone flux and therefore does not distinguish the exchange of ozone into low latitudes from that into high latitudes. The exchange of ozone at different latitudes may have different tropospheric impacts. This present study extends the traditional approach from the entire LMS to individual isentropic layers in the LMS and therefore gives the meridional distribution of STE by the latitudes where each isentropic surface intersects the tropopause. The specified dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model is used to estimate the STE ozone flux on each isentropic surface. It is found that net troposphere-to-stratosphere ozone transport occurs in low latitudes along the 350-380 K isentropic surfaces and that net stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone transport takes place in the extratropics along the 280-350 K isentropes. Particularly, the seasonal cycle of extratropical STE ozone flux in the Northern Hemisphere displays a maximum in late spring and early summer, following the seasonal migration of the upper tropospheric jet and associated isentropic mixing. Furthermore, differential diabatic heating and isentropic mixing tend to induce STE ozone fluxes in opposite directions, but the net effect results in a spatiotemporal pattern similar to the STE ozone flux associated with isentropic mixing.

  19. Contrasting fast precipitation responses to tropospheric and stratospheric ozone forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIntosh, C. R.; Allan, R. P.; Baker, L. H.; Bellouin, N.; Collins, W.; Mousavi, Z.; Shine, K. P.

    2016-02-01

    The precipitation response to radiative forcing (RF) can be decomposed into a fast precipitation response (FPR), which depends on the atmospheric component of RF, and a slow response, which depends on surface temperature change. We present the first detailed climate model study of the FPR due to tropospheric and stratospheric ozone changes. The FPR depends strongly on the altitude of ozone change. Increases below about 3 km cause a positive FPR; increases above cause a negative FPR. The FPR due to stratospheric ozone change is, per unit RF, about 3 times larger than that due to tropospheric ozone. As historical ozone trends in the troposphere and stratosphere are opposite in sign, so too are the FPRs. Simple climate model calculations of the time-dependent total (fast and slow) precipitation change, indicate that ozone's contribution to precipitation change in 2011, compared to 1765, could exceed 50% of that due to CO2 change.

  20. Stratospheric Ozone destruction by the Bronze-Age Minoan eruption (Santorini Volcano, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoux, Anita; Scaillet, Bruno; Bekki, Slimane; Oppenheimer, Clive; Druitt, Timothy H.

    2015-07-01

    The role of volcanogenic halogen-bearing (i.e. chlorine and bromine) compounds in stratospheric ozone chemistry and climate forcing is poorly constrained. While the 1991 eruption of Pinatubo resulted in stratospheric ozone loss, it was due to heterogeneous chemistry on volcanic sulfate aerosols involving chlorine of anthropogenic rather than volcanogenic origin, since co-erupted chlorine was scavenged within the plume. Therefore, it is not known what effect volcanism had on ozone in pre-industrial times, nor what will be its role on future atmospheres with reduced anthropogenic halogens present. By combining petrologic constraints on eruption volatile yields with a global atmospheric chemistry-transport model, we show here that the Bronze-Age ‘Minoan’ eruption of Santorini Volcano released far more halogens than sulfur and that, even if only 2% of these halogens reached the stratosphere, it would have resulted in strong global ozone depletion. The model predicts reductions in ozone columns of 20 to >90% at Northern high latitudes and an ozone recovery taking up to a decade. Our findings emphasise the significance of volcanic halogens for stratosphere chemistry and suggest that modelling of past and future volcanic impacts on Earth’s ozone, climate and ecosystems should systematically consider volcanic halogen emissions in addition to sulfur emissions.

  1. Stratospheric Ozone destruction by the Bronze-Age Minoan eruption (Santorini Volcano, Greece)

    PubMed Central

    Cadoux, Anita; Scaillet, Bruno; Bekki, Slimane; Oppenheimer, Clive; Druitt, Timothy H.

    2015-01-01

    The role of volcanogenic halogen-bearing (i.e. chlorine and bromine) compounds in stratospheric ozone chemistry and climate forcing is poorly constrained. While the 1991 eruption of Pinatubo resulted in stratospheric ozone loss, it was due to heterogeneous chemistry on volcanic sulfate aerosols involving chlorine of anthropogenic rather than volcanogenic origin, since co-erupted chlorine was scavenged within the plume. Therefore, it is not known what effect volcanism had on ozone in pre-industrial times, nor what will be its role on future atmospheres with reduced anthropogenic halogens present. By combining petrologic constraints on eruption volatile yields with a global atmospheric chemistry-transport model, we show here that the Bronze-Age ‘Minoan’ eruption of Santorini Volcano released far more halogens than sulfur and that, even if only 2% of these halogens reached the stratosphere, it would have resulted in strong global ozone depletion. The model predicts reductions in ozone columns of 20 to >90% at Northern high latitudes and an ozone recovery taking up to a decade. Our findings emphasise the significance of volcanic halogens for stratosphere chemistry and suggest that modelling of past and future volcanic impacts on Earth’s ozone, climate and ecosystems should systematically consider volcanic halogen emissions in addition to sulfur emissions. PMID:26206616

  2. Stratospheric Ozone destruction by the Bronze-Age Minoan eruption (Santorini Volcano, Greece).

    PubMed

    Cadoux, Anita; Scaillet, Bruno; Bekki, Slimane; Oppenheimer, Clive; Druitt, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    The role of volcanogenic halogen-bearing (i.e. chlorine and bromine) compounds in stratospheric ozone chemistry and climate forcing is poorly constrained. While the 1991 eruption of Pinatubo resulted in stratospheric ozone loss, it was due to heterogeneous chemistry on volcanic sulfate aerosols involving chlorine of anthropogenic rather than volcanogenic origin, since co-erupted chlorine was scavenged within the plume. Therefore, it is not known what effect volcanism had on ozone in pre-industrial times, nor what will be its role on future atmospheres with reduced anthropogenic halogens present. By combining petrologic constraints on eruption volatile yields with a global atmospheric chemistry-transport model, we show here that the Bronze-Age 'Minoan' eruption of Santorini Volcano released far more halogens than sulfur and that, even if only 2% of these halogens reached the stratosphere, it would have resulted in strong global ozone depletion. The model predicts reductions in ozone columns of 20 to >90% at Northern high latitudes and an ozone recovery taking up to a decade. Our findings emphasise the significance of volcanic halogens for stratosphere chemistry and suggest that modelling of past and future volcanic impacts on Earth's ozone, climate and ecosystems should systematically consider volcanic halogen emissions in addition to sulfur emissions. PMID:26206616

  3. Chlorofluorocarbon production scenarios: possible changes to stratospheric ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Tarp, R.L.; Nold, A.; Wood, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    As one aspect of the regulatory process, the Environmental Protection Agency has derived a series of scenarios for future atmospheric emission rates of the chlorofluorocarbons CFCl/sub 3/ (also referred to as F-11), CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ (F-12), CCl/sub 2/FCClF/sub 2/(F-113), CClF/sub 2/CClF/sub 2/(F-114), and CClF/sub 2/CF/sub 3/ (F-115). These scenarios are based on potential industrial production and commercial applications, and the eventual release of these chemicals into the atmosphere. In this study, the potential effect on stratospheric ozone resulting from future chlorofluorocarbon emissions as suggested by these scenarios is examined. Assessments are based upon model calculations using the one-dimensional coupled transport and chemical kinetics model of the troposphere and stratosphere developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The change in total ozone column calculated for the seven scenarios as a function of time is given. (JGB)

  4. Research on mitigation of stratospheric ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, A.Y. )

    1994-08-01

    Chlorine atoms released from CFCs by solar Ultraviolet (UV) radiation and from natural sources, are effective catalytic agents for the destruction of stratospheric ozone. Research into large-scale mitigation methods is based on charging the chlorine radical, converting it into negative ions of low reactivity. Generation of charges-and subsequent removal of chlorine ions by atmospheric platforms and electromagnetic waves are described. This method is generally applicable to all halogens. This research is guided by the principle that the solution should be as non-intrusive environmentally as possible; i.e. no chemicals are to be injected. The large-scale mitigation requires the process to be energy efficient and to utilize energy sources already present in the atmosphere. Because of the wide variety of remediation concepts, each is being tested using a combination of laboratory and field experiments together with computer modeling. The first laboratory demonstration of ozone depletion and subsequent recovery due to charge injection is presented. [copyright][ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics

  5. The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss on Southern Hemisphere stratospheric circulation and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeble, J.; Braesicke, P.; Abraham, N. L.; Roscoe, H. K.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss resulting from chlorine activation on polar stratospheric clouds is examined using a pair of model integrations run with the fully coupled chemistry climate model UM-UKCA. Suppressing chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions is found to produce modelled ozone differences consistent with observed ozone differences between the present and pre-ozone hole period. Statistically significant high-latitude Southern Hemisphere (SH) ozone loss begins in August and peaks in October-November, with > 75% of ozone destroyed at 50 hPa. Associated with this ozone destruction is a > 12 K decrease of the lower polar stratospheric temperatures and an increase of > 6 K in the upper stratosphere. The heating components of this temperature change are diagnosed and it is found that the temperature dipole is the result of decreased short-wave heating in the lower stratosphere and increased dynamical heating in the upper stratosphere. The cooling of the polar lower stratosphere leads, through thermal wind balance, to an acceleration of the polar vortex and delays its breakdown by ~ 2 weeks. A link between lower stratospheric zonal wind speed, the vertical component of the Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux, Fz and the residual mean vertical circulation, w*, is identified. In November and December, increased westerly winds and a delay in the breakup of the polar vortex lead to increases in Fz, indicating increased wave activity entering the stratosphere and propagating to higher altitudes. The resulting increase in wave breaking, diagnosed by decreases to the EP flux divergence, drives enhanced downwelling over the polar cap. Many of the stratospheric signals modelled in this study propagate down to the troposphere, and lead to significant surface changes in December.

  6. A New Connection Between Greenhouse Warming and Stratospheric Ozone Depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R.

    1998-01-01

    The direct radiative effects of the build-up of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have led to a gradual cooling of the stratosphere with largest changes in temperature occurring in the upper stratosphere, well above the region of peak ozone concentration.

  7. On the surface impact of Arctic stratospheric ozone extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, N.; Polvani, L. M.; Solomon, S.

    2015-09-01

    A comprehensive stratosphere-resolving atmospheric model, with interactive stratospheric ozone chemistry, coupled to ocean, sea ice and land components is used to explore the tropospheric and surface impacts of large springtime ozone anomalies in the Arctic stratosphere. Coupling between the Antarctic ozone hole and Southern Hemisphere climate has been identified in numerous studies, but connections of Arctic ozone loss to surface climate have been more difficult to elucidate. Analyzing an ensemble of historical integrations with all known natural and anthropogenic forcings specified over the period 1955-2005, we find that extremely low stratospheric ozone changes are able to produce large and robust anomalies in tropospheric wind, temperature and precipitation in April and May over large portions of the Northern Hemisphere (most notably over the North Atlantic and Eurasia). Further, these ozone-induced surface anomalies are obtained only in the last two decades of the 20th century, when high concentrations of ozone depleting substances generate sufficiently strong stratospheric temperature anomalies to impact the surface climate. Our findings suggest that coupling between chemistry and dynamics is essential for a complete representation of surface climate variability and climate change not only in Antarctica but also in the Arctic.

  8. Decline in the tropospheric abundance of halogen from halocarbons: Implications for stratospheric ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Montzka, S.A.; Butler, J.H.; Myers, R.C.

    1996-05-31

    Analyses of air sampled from remote locations across the globe reveal that tropospheric chlorine attributable to anthropogenic halocarbons peaked near the beginning of 1994 and was decreasing at a rate of 25 {+-} parts per trillion per year by mid-1995. Although bromine from halons was still increasing in mid-1995, the summed abundance of these halogens in the troposphere is decreasing. To assess the effect of this trend on stratospheric ozone, estimates of the future stratospheric abundance of ozone-depleting gases were made for mid-latitude and polar regions on the basis of these tropospheric measurements. These results suggest that the amount of reactive chlorine and bromine will reach a maximum in the stratosphere between 1997 and 1999 and will decline thereafter if limits outlined in the adjusted and amended Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer are not exceeded in future years. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss on Southern Hemisphere stratospheric circulation and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeble, J.; Braesicke, P.; Abraham, N. L.; Roscoe, H. K.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss resulting from chlorine activation on polar stratospheric clouds is examined using a pair of model integrations run with the fully coupled chemistry climate model UM-UKCA. Suppressing chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions is found to produce modelled ozone differences consistent with observed ozone differences between the present and pre-ozone hole period. Statistically significant high latitude Southern Hemisphere (SH) ozone loss begins in August and peaks in October-November, with >75% of ozone destroyed at 50 hPa. Associated with this ozone destruction is a >12 K decrease of the lower polar stratospheric temperatures and an increase of >6 K in the upper stratosphere. The heating components of this temperature change are diagnosed and it is found that the temperature dipole is the result of decreased shortwave heating in the lower stratosphere and increased dynamical heating in the upper stratosphere. The cooling of the polar lower stratosphere leads, through thermal wind balance, to an acceleration of the polar vortex and delays its breakdown by ~2 weeks. A link between lower stratospheric zonal wind speed, the vertical component of the EP flux, Fz, and the residual mean vertical circulation, w*, is identified. In December and January, increased westerly winds lead to increases in Fz, associated with an increase in tropopause height. The resulting increase in wavebreaking leads to enhanced downwelling/reduced upwelling over the polar cap. Many of the stratospheric signals modelled in this study propagate down to the troposphere, and lead to significant surface changes in December.

  10. Examination of stratospheric ozone photochemistry in light of recent data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natarajan, Murali; Callis, Linwood B.

    1989-01-01

    The consistency of stratospheric ozone photochemistry is examined using data from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) and LIMS experiments. The ATMOS experiment measured vertical profiles of important trace constituents and temperature in the stratosphere during 1985. These observations have been used to constrain the levels of odd nitrogen and odd chlorine in a photochemical model. This model yields O3 mixing ratios that are in good agreement with the observations. The deviation in ozone is less than 20 percent except near 52 km. The updated model has also been used in conjunction with the LIMS data to simulate the stratospheric photochemistry corresponding to the 1979 time period.

  11. Measurements of stratospheric ozone and aerosols above Spitsbergen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuber, Roland; Beyerle, Georg; Schrems, Otto; Fabian, Rolf; Vondergathen, Peter; Krueger, Bernd C.

    1994-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone and aerosol data recorded at Spitsbergen (79 deg N, 12 deg E) from 1988 to 1992 are presented. Strong dynamical influences like seasonal variations and annual cycles in the ozone concentrations are described. Polar Stratospheric Clouds were detected above Spitsbergen in January 1989 and 1990, but not in the next two years. Volcanic aerosols, attributed to the Mt. Pinatubo eruption, appeared as early as August 1991 above Spitsbergen and were a constant feature of the lower Arctic stratosphere in winter 1991/92.

  12. Fluorine photochemistry in the stratosphere. [effect on ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Rundel, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    The photochemistry of fluorine in the stratosphere is surveyed in order to estimate the effect on ozone of fluorine atoms released by the breakdown of chlorofluoromethanes. The catalytic efficiency for ozone destruction by fluorine is found to be less than .0001 that of chlorine in the altitude range from 25 to 50 km.

  13. LINKAGE BETWEEN CLIMATE CHANGE AND STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two primary areas link the issue of stratospheric ozone depletion to global climate change: atmospheric processes and ecological processes. tmospheric processes establish a linkage through the dual roles of certain trace gases in promoting global warming and in depleting the ozon...

  14. Stratospheric cooling and polar ozone loss due to H2 emissions of a global hydrogen economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feck, T.; Grooß, J.-U.; Riese, M.; Vogel, B.

    2009-04-01

    "Green" hydrogen is seen as a major element of the future energy supply to reduce greenhouse gas emissions substantially. However, due to the possible interactions of hydrogen (H2) with other atmospheric constituents there is a need to analyse the implications of additional atmospheric H2 that could result from hydrogen leakage of a global hydrogen infrastructure. Emissions of molecular H2 can occur along the whole hydrogen process chain which increase the tropospheric H2 burden. Across the tropical tropopause H2 reaches the stratosphere where it is oxidised and forms water vapour (H2O). This causes increased IR-emissions into space and hence a cooling of the stratosphere. Both effects, the increase of stratospheric H2O and the cooling, enhances the potential of chlorine activation on liquid sulfate aerosol and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which increase polar ozone destruction. Hence a global hydrogen economy could provoke polar ozone loss and could lead to a substantial delay of the current projected recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. Our investigations show that even if 90% of the current global fossil primary energy input could be replaced by hydrogen and approximately 9.5% of the product gas would leak to the atmosphere, the ozone loss would be increased between 15 to 26 Dobson Units (DU) if the stratospheric CFC loading would retain unchanged. A consistency check of the used approximation methods with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) shows that this additional ozone loss can probably be treated as an upper limit. Towards more realistic future H2 leakage rate assumptions (< 3%) the additional ozone loss would be rather small (? 10 DU). However, in all cases the full damage would only occur if stratospheric CFC-levels would retain unchanged. Due to the CFC-prohibition as a result of the Montreal Protocol the forecasts suggest a decline of the stratospheric CFC loading about 50% until 2050. In this case our calculations

  15. Stratospheric ozone variations in the equatorial region as seen in Stratospheric and Gas Experiment data

    SciTech Connect

    Masato Shiotani; Fumio Hasebe

    1994-07-20

    An analysis is made of equatorial ozone variations for 5 years, 1984-1989, using the ozone profile data derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument. Attention is focused on the annual cycle and also on interannual variability, particularly the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variations in the lower stratosphere, where the largest contribution to total column ozone takes place. The annual variation in zonal mean total ozone around the equator is composed of symmetric and asymmetric modes with respect to the equator, with maximum contributions being around 19 km for the symmetric mode and around 25 km for the asymmetric mode. The persistent zonal wavenumber 1 structure observed by the total ozone mapping spectrometer over the equator is almost missing in the SAGE-derived column amounts integrated in the stratosphere, suggesting a significant contribution from tropospheric ozone. Interannual variations in the equatorial ozone are dominated by the QBO above 20 km and the ENSO-related variation below 20 km. The ozone QBO is characterized by zonally uniform phase changes in association with the zonal wind QBO in the equatorial lower stratosphere. The ENSO-related ozone variation consists of both the east-west vacillation and the zonally uniform phase variation. During the El Nino event, the east-west contrast with positive (negative) deviations in the eastern (western) hemisphere is conspicuous, while the decreasing tendency of the zonal mean values is maximum at the same time. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Quantifying Isentropic Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange (STE) of Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Chen, G.; Tang, Q.; Hess, P. G. M.

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) of ozone can have a significant impact on the interannual variability and long- term trend of the tropospheric chemistry and radiation budget. Traditional diagnostics of STE ozone flux consider the ozone budget of the lowermost stratosphere by coupling the residual circulation and ozone. However, this method can only provide information of the hemispheric mean ozone flux, and therefore it does not distinguish the exchange of ozone into the tropics from the exchange of ozone into the midlatitudes that may have different tropospheric impacts. This present study extends the traditional approach from the entire lowermost stratosphere to individual isentropic layers in the lower stratosphere, and therefore distinguishes the meridional location of STE. The specified dynamics (SD) version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) is used for the estimate of isentropic STE flux. The diagnosed meridional structure of ozone flux is generally consistent with studies with other methods (e.g., tracer trajectories or the budget of tropospheric ozone). Different seasonal cycles of ozone STE are found at different isentropic surfaces, emphasizing different tropospheric impacts from ozone STE over different meridional regions. For isentropes between 350K and 380K, net troposphere-to-stratosphere ozone STE flux peaks in summer. For isentropes between 330K and 350K, the net ozone STE flux peaks in summer too, but it is from stratosphere to troposphere. For isentropes between 280K and 330K, larger net stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone STE flux is found in the Northern Hemisphere and peaks in spring, whereas little seasonal variability is detected in the Southern Hemisphere. Furthermore, the diagnostic enables a partition that links the variability in the STE flux to specific dynamic processes. In particular, the air mass STE flux component associated with the isentropic mixing is found

  17. Pathways for Communicating the Effects of Stratospheric Ozone to Northern Hemisphere Stratospheric Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, John Robert

    The central objective of this thesis is to establish a framework for understanding how zonally asymmetric ozone (ZAO) and zonal-mean ozone combine to communicate changes in stratospheric ozone to the Earth's climate system. Achieving this objective revolves around three major research tasks. Tasks one and two use a mechanistic chemistry-dynamical model, while the third task incorporates the NOGAPS general circulation model. The first task develops a generalized framework for understanding how ZAO affects planetary wave driving and circulation of the middle atmosphere. The second task uses this framework to analyze how ozone loss and recovery "precondition" planetary waves as they propagate upwards through the lower stratosphere, thereby generating large circulation changes in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. The final task utilizes the hypotheses developed in tasks one and two within the context of a general circulation model with interactive stratospheric chemistry. As part of task one, a mechanistic model that couples quasigeostrophic dynamics, radiative transfer, ozone transport, and ozone photochemistry was developed to study the effects of ZAO on the Northern Hemisphere (NH) polar vortex. ZAO affects the vortex via two pathways. The first pathway (P1) hinges on modulation of the propagation and damping of a planetary wave by ZAO; the second pathway (P2) hinges on modulation of the wave-ozone flux convergences by ZAO. In the steady state, both P1 and P2 play important roles in modulating the zonal-mean circulation. The relative importance of wave propagation versus wave damping in P1 is diagnosed using an ozone-modified refractive index and an ozone-modified vertical energy flux. In the lower stratosphere, ZAO causes wave propagation and wave damping to oppose each other. The result is a small change in planetary wave drag but a large reduction in wave amplitude. Thus in the lower stratosphere, ZAO "preconditions'' the wave before it propagates into

  18. Influence of Stratospheric Ozone Distribution on Tropospheric Circulation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barodka, Siarhei; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Mitskevich, Yaroslav; Shalamyansky, Arkady

    2015-04-01

    In the present study we investigate the cause-and-effect relationship between the stratospheric ozone distribution and tropospheric circulation, focusing our attention mainly on the possible "top-down" side of this interaction: the impact of the stratosphere on tropospheric circulation patterns and the associated weather and climate conditions. Proceeding from analysis of several decades of observational data performed at the A.I. Voeikov Main Geophysical Observatory, which suggests a clear relation between the stratospheric ozone distribution, temperature field of the lower stratosphere and air-masses boundaries in the upper troposphere, we combine atmospheric reanalyzes and ground-based observations with numerical simulations to identify features of the general circulation that can be traced back to anomalies in the stratospheric ozone field. Specifically, we analyze the time evolution of instantaneous position of the stationary upper-level atmospheric fronts, defining the boundaries of global tropospheric air masses associated with basic cells of general circulation. We assume that stratospheric heating in ozone-related processes can exert its influence on the location of stationary fronts and characteristics of general circulation cells by displacing the tropopause, which itself is defined by a dynamical equilibrium between tropospheric vertical convection and stratospheric radiative heating. As an example, we consider the Spring season of 2013. Unusually high total ozone column (TOC) values observed in Northern Hemisphere (NH) at the beginning of 2013 induced low tropopause level in the Atlantic region and southward displacement of the polar front, leading to an anomalously cold Spring in Europe. Furthermore, we study manifestations of this mechanism in the aftermath of sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events. In particular, the November 2013 SSW over Eastern Siberia, which is characterized by abrupt stratospheric temperatures change in the course of one day

  19. Stratospheric ozone - Fragile shield. [SST exhausts and Freons impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffert, M. I.; Stewart, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Atmospheric models that have been used in major studies on the possible impact of SST exhausts and Freons on stratospheric ozone are discussed and compared. An overview is given of ozone-reduction estimates that they produce, together with an assessment of possible effects of atmospheric testing of thermonuclear bombs in an attempt to find direct observational evidence for ozone depletion resulting from human activities. It is concluded that clear validation of atmospheric-model predictions is lacking.

  20. An Ozone Increase in the Antarctic Summer Stratosphere: A Dynamical Response to the Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Douglass, A. R.; Gupta, M.; Newman, P. A.; Pawson, S.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Nielsen, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Profiles of ozone concentration retrieved from the SBUV series of satellites show an increase between 1979 and 1997 in the summertime Antarctic middle stratosphere (approx. 25-10 hPa). Data over the South Pole from ozone sondes confirm the increase. A similar ozone increase is produced in a chemistry climate model that allows feedback between constituent changes and the stratospheric circulation through radiative heating. A simulation that excludes the radiative coupling between predicted ozone and the circulation does not capture this ozone increase. We show that the ozone increase in our model simulations is caused by a dynamical feedback in response to the changes in the stratospheric wind fields forced by the radiative perturbation associated with the Antarctic ozone hole.

  1. Drivers of changes in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone between year 2000 and 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, A.; Maycock, A. C.; Archibald, A. T.; Abraham, N. L.; Telford, P.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    A stratosphere-resolving configuration of the Met Office's Unified Model (UM) with the United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols (UKCA) scheme is used to investigate the atmospheric response to changes in (a) greenhouse gases and climate, (b) ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) and (c) non-methane ozone precursor emissions. A suite of time-slice experiments show the separate, as well as pairwise, impacts of these perturbations between the years 2000 and 2100. Sensitivity to uncertainties in future greenhouse gases and aerosols is explored through the use of the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. The results highlight an important role for the stratosphere in determining the annual mean tropospheric ozone response, primarily through stratosphere-troposphere exchange of ozone (STE). Under both climate change and reductions in ODSs, increases in STE offset decreases in net chemical production, leading to overall increases in the tropospheric ozone burden. This opposes the effects of projected decreases in ozone precursors through measures to improve air quality, which act to reduce the ozone burden. The global tropospheric lifetime of ozone (τO3) does not change significantly under climate change at RCP4.5, but it decreases at RCP8.5. This opposes the increases in τO3 simulated under reductions in both ODSs and ozone precursor emissions. The additivity of the changes in ozone is examined by comparing the sum of the responses in the single-forcing experiments to those from equivalent combined-forcing experiments. Whilst the ozone responses to most forcing combinations are found to be approximately additive, non-additive changes are found in both the stratosphere and troposphere when a large climate forcing (RCP8.5) is combined with the effects of ODSs.

  2. Drivers of changes in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone between year 2000 and 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Antara; Maycock, Amanda C.; Archibald, Alexander T.; Abraham, N. Luke; Telford, Paul; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John A.

    2016-03-01

    A stratosphere-resolving configuration of the Met Office's Unified Model (UM) with the United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols (UKCA) scheme is used to investigate the atmospheric response to changes in (a) greenhouse gases and climate, (b) ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) and (c) non-methane ozone precursor emissions. A suite of time-slice experiments show the separate, as well as pairwise, impacts of these perturbations between the years 2000 and 2100. Sensitivity to uncertainties in future greenhouse gases and aerosols is explored through the use of the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. The results highlight an important role for the stratosphere in determining the annual mean tropospheric ozone response, primarily through stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) of ozone. Under both climate change and reductions in ODSs, increases in STE offset decreases in net chemical production and act to increase the tropospheric ozone burden. This opposes the effects of projected decreases in ozone precursors through measures to improve air quality, which act to reduce the ozone burden. The global tropospheric lifetime of ozone (τO3) does not change significantly under climate change at RCP4.5, but it decreases at RCP8.5. This opposes the increases in τO3 simulated under reductions in ODSs and ozone precursor emissions. The additivity of the changes in ozone is examined by comparing the sum of the responses in the single-forcing experiments to those from equivalent combined-forcing experiments. Whilst the ozone responses to most forcing combinations are found to be approximately additive, non-additive changes are found in both the stratosphere and troposphere when a large climate forcing (RCP8.5) is combined with the effects of ODSs.

  3. Longitudinal Variations in Stratospheric Ozone: Effects on "Downward Control"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, T. R.; Cordero, E. C.

    2008-12-01

    The wave drag associated with the damping and breaking of vertically propagating planetary waves in the stratosphere has far-reaching consequences for the global circulation and climate. The planetary wave drag (PWD) exerts non-local control over the extratropical stratosphere that manifests as a wave-driven equator- to-pole meridional circulation, termed the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC). In the steady state, the BDC can exert "downward control," whereby the body force exerted by the PWD causes a mean meridional circulation and a simultaneous mass adjustment in the surface pressure. Thus any changes in the PWD in the stratosphere will produce a balanced response in the region below. The downward influence exerted by longitudinal variations in stratospheric ozone is examined using a mechanistic chemistry-dynamical model (CDM) of the extratropical atmosphere. The CDM is one-dimensional in height and self-consistently couples dynamics, radiative transfer, and the transport and photochemistry of ozone. The longitudinal variations in ozone induce a zonal-mean body force that affects the residual circulation via the PWD. Under steady-state conditions, for which the "downward control" principle applies, a WKB analysis yields an analytical expression that shows the direct connection between the residual vertical velocity and the transport and photochemistry of ozone. Because the one-dimensional model framework confines the waves to propagate solely in the vertical, a stratospheric reflecting surface is required for the planetary wave-induced ozone heating in the stratosphere to produce non-local changes in that are manifested in the troposphere. These results underscore the importance of longitudinal variations in ozone as a pathway for communicating, via the combined effects of "downward control" and planetary wave reflection, natural and human-caused changes in stratospheric ozone to changes in tropospheric climate.

  4. Stratospheric temperature trends: impact of ozone variability and the QBO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Amico, Mauro; Gray, Lesley J.; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Scaife, Adam A.; Shine, Keith P.; Stott, Peter A.

    2010-02-01

    In most climate simulations used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2007 fourth assessment report, stratospheric processes are only poorly represented. For example, climatological or simple specifications of time-varying ozone concentrations are imposed and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of equatorial stratospheric zonal wind is absent. Here we investigate the impact of an improved stratospheric representation using two sets of perturbed simulations with the Hadley Centre coupled ocean atmosphere model HadGEM1 with natural and anthropogenic forcings for the 1979-2003 period. In the first set of simulations, the usual zonal mean ozone climatology with superimposed trends is replaced with a time series of observed zonal mean ozone distributions that includes interannual variability associated with the solar cycle, QBO and volcanic eruptions. In addition to this, the second set of perturbed simulations includes a scheme in which the stratospheric zonal wind in the tropics is relaxed to appropriate zonal mean values obtained from the ERA-40 re-analysis, thus forcing a QBO. Both of these changes are applied strictly to the stratosphere only. The improved ozone field results in an improved simulation of the stepwise temperature transitions observed in the lower stratosphere in the aftermath of the two major recent volcanic eruptions. The contribution of the solar cycle signal in the ozone field to this improved representation of the stepwise cooling is discussed. The improved ozone field and also the QBO result in an improved simulation of observed trends, both globally and at tropical latitudes. The Eulerian upwelling in the lower stratosphere in the equatorial region is enhanced by the improved ozone field and is affected by the QBO relaxation, yet neither induces a significant change in the upwelling trend.

  5. How do changes in the stratospheric circulation impact ozone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, Hella; Dameris, Martin; Bodeker, Greg; Grewe, Volker; Stenke, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC) and tropical upwelling in the lower stratosphere are predicted to increase with increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations by most climate models and chemistry-climate models (CCMs). This change in the meridional circulation is likely to alter the transport of trace gases, and in particular ozone. In addition, ozone is affected by other processes such as changes in stratospheric temperatures that act to change the reaction rates of ozone-relevant chemistry. These climate-change related modifications of the ozone amount and distribution are superimposed on the depletion and recovery of the ozone layer due to stratospheric halogen loading. To assess the recovery of ozone correctly, it is important to understand the processes that affect ozone in a changing climate. In this study, multiple transient numerical simulations and complementary sensitivity studies with the E39CA CCM are used to disentangle the direct effect of changes in GHG concentrations, the indirect effect of GHG-induced sea surface temperature (SST) changes, and changes in CFC concentrations. It is shown that the increase in tropical upwelling is driven by the changes in SSTs rather than by the direct radiative effect of increased GHG concentrations. Therefore, the sensitivity simulations that separate the direct effect of increased amounts of GHGs and the indirect effect via increased SSTs can be used to separate the impact of the increase in tropical upwelling and the impact of stratospheric cooling on ozone. It is shown that the changes in the meridional circulation cause weak negative trends in the tropical lower stratosphere and associated positive trends in the extra-tropical lower stratosphere. Stratospheric cooling, on the other hand, causes a broad increase in ozone in the stratosphere. To study the processes that lead to changes in the ozone distribution in more detail, different diagnostics that can separate the changes in chemistry (production or

  6. Model Simulations of Ozone in the Summer Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Kawa, S. R.

    1998-01-01

    The Goddard 3D chemistry and transport model (CTM) uses winds and temperatures from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS); thus CTM simulations can be compared directly with observations from satellite, balloon and aircraft. In general, aspects of these comparisons show remarkable agreement between observation and model. One significant difference is that the model ozone is high biased below the ozone peak. The bias is apparently largest at high latitudes during the summer months. At the same time, comparisons with HALOE observations show that at mid to high latitudes, the ozone mixing ratio peak appears persistently at a lower altitude than observed by HALOE; the peak mixing ratio is also overestimated by the model. Both transport and photochemistry are possible contributors to the biased ozone in the lower stratosphere - excessive downward motion would increase lower stratospheric ozone, as would a too large vertical gradient in ozone. On the other hand, comparisons of model N2O and NOy with observations suggest transport deficiencies in the opposite sense, i.e., model N2O can be high relative to observations (particularly during winter), suggesting the need for stronger downward transport. Sensitivity studies have been carried out using parameterizations for ozone production and loss, NOy production and loss, and N2O loss. The goal of these studies is to clarify how problems in the photochemical scheme at and above the ozone peak influence the lower stratospheric ozone.

  7. Evidence for slowdown in stratospheric ozone loss: First stage of ozone recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, M. J.; Yang, Eun-Su; Cunnold, D. M.; Reinsel, C.; Zawodny, J. M.; Russell, James M., III

    2003-01-01

    Global ozone trends derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment I and II (SAGE I/II) combined with the more recent Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) observations provide evidence of a slowdown in stratospheric ozone losses since 1997. This evidence is quantified by the cumulative sum of residual differences from the predicted linear trend. The cumulative residuals indicate that the rate of ozone loss at 35- 45 km altitudes globally has diminished. These changes in loss rates are consistent with the slowdown of total stratospheric chlorine increases characterized by HALOE HCI measurements. These changes in the ozone loss rates in the upper stratosphere are significant and constitute the first stage of a recovery of the ozone layer.

  8. Impact of Stratospheric Ozone Distribution on Features of Tropospheric Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barodka, Siarhei; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Mitskevich, Yaroslav; Shalamyansky, Arkady

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study connections between stratospheric ozone distribution and general circulation patterns in the troposphere and aim to investigate the causal relationship between them, including the practical side of the influence of stratospheric ozone on tropospheric medium-range weather and regional climate. Analysis of several decades of observational data, which has been performed at the A.I. Voeikov Main Geophysical Observatory, suggests a clear relation between the stratospheric ozone distribution, upper stratospheric temperature field and planetary-scale air-masses boundaries in the troposphere [1]. Furthermore, it has been shown that each global air-mass, which can be attributed to the corresponding circulation cell in a conceptual model of tropospheric general circulation, has a distinct "regime" of ozone vertical distribution in the stratosphere [1-3]. Proceeding from atmospheric reanalyses combined with satellite and ground-based observations, we study time evolution of the upper-level frontal zones (stationary fronts) with the relevant jet streams, which can be treated as boundaries of global air-masses, in connection with the tropopause height and distribution of ozone in the stratosphere. For that, we develop an algorithm for automated identification of jet streams, stationary fronts and tropopause surface from gridded data (reanalyses or modelling results), and apply it for several cases associated with rapid changes in the stratospheric temperature and ozone fields, including SSW events over Eastern Siberia. Aiming to study the causal relationship between the features of tropospheric circulation and changes in the stratospheric ozone field, we estimate the time lag between these categories of processes on different time scales. Finally, we discuss the possibility to use the elementary circulation mechanisms classification (by B.L. Dzerdzeevski) in connection with analysis of the stratospheric ozone field and the relevant stratosphere

  9. Recent Stratospheric Ozone Measurements over Ankara-Turkey and Evaluation of Ozone Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkizilkaya, O.; Incecik, S.; Kahya, C.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite, spectrophotometer and ozonesonde measurement systems are widely used to determine total column of ozone and its properties in troposphere and stratosphere. The differences between these measurement systems are the main research areas in terms of their techniques and results. The present study deals with to compare of satellite total ozone measurements from OMI and SEVIRI instruments, Brewer MKIII spectrophotometer and ECC ozonesonde total ozone measurements and to make an assessment of the ozone in troposphere and stratosphere using ECC and Brewer ozone profiles over Ankara (39o55´N; 32o55´E) located at the centre of Anatolia. In this study, Brewer MKIII, OMI and SEVIRI total ozone data of Ankara for the period January -December 2007 were used to make an intercomparison of monthly average total ozone measurements. The percentage differences between the data sets were calculated. It is aimed to define which remote sensing measurement techniques give the most accurate and reliable results. In order to verify the data obtained by remote sensing methods, 21 daily ECC total ozone measurements for the same period were used. Brewer, OMI and SEVIRI measurements available for the corresponding days were taken into account. Furthermore, in order to understand atmospheric ozone content, a total ozone retrieval algorithm from ECC sounding was applied to both troposphere and stratosphere to determine the ozone contents. According to the comparisons, it was found that Brewer and OMI monthly average total ozone measurements show good agreement but SEVIRI overestimates; maximum differences between the measurements occur mostly between July and October. Maximum percentage differences between Brewer and OMI, SEVIRI and Brewer, SEVIRI and OMI were found -7.3%, 17% and 17% respectively. The mean absolute differences between Brewer and OMI were calculated as 2.4%; on the other hand SEVIRI has 10.4% mean absolute difference from Brewer and OMI. The results of the comparison

  10. Variability and trends in total and vertically resolved stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, D.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Wohltmann, I.; Bodeker, G. E.

    2006-07-01

    Trends in ozone columns and vertical distributions were calculated for the period 1979-2004 based on the three-dimensional ozone data set CATO (Candidoz Assimilated Three-dimensional Ozone) using a multiple linear regression model. CATO has been reconstructed from TOMS, GOME and SBUV total column ozone observations in an equivalent latitude and potential temperature framework and offers a pole to pole coverage of the stratosphere on 15 potential temperature levels. The regression model includes explanatory variables describing the influence of the quasi-biennial oscillation, volcanic eruptions, the solar cycle, the Brewer-Dobson circulation, Arctic ozone depletion, and the increase in stratospheric chlorine. The effects of displacements of the polar vortex and jet streams due to planetary waves, which may significantly affect trends at a given geographical latitude, are eliminated in the equivalent latitude framework. Ozone variability is largely explained by the QBO and stratospheric aerosol loading and the spatial structure of their influence is in good agreement with previous studies. The solar cycle signal peaks at about 30 to 35 km altitude which is lower than reported previously, and no negative signal is found in the tropical lower stratosphere. The Brewer-Dobson circulation shows a dominant contribution to interannual variability at both high and low latitudes and accounts for some of the ozone increase seen in the northern hemisphere since the mid-1990s. Arctic ozone depletion significantly affects the high northern latitudes between January and March and extends its influence to the mid-latitudes during later months. The vertical distribution of the ozone trend shows distinct negative trends at about 18 km in the lower stratosphere with largest declines over the poles, and above 35 km in the upper stratosphere. A narrow band of large negative trends extends into the tropical lower stratosphere. Assuming that the observed negative trend before 1995

  11. Millimeter-wave ozone measurements for the network for the detection of stratospheric change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, Brian J.; Parrish, Alan

    1990-01-01

    The primary research objective is to initiate long-term monitoring of stratospheric ozone with a ground-based millimeter-wave spectrometer, the first of several such instruments projected to be part of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change. The ultimate goal of this monitoring is twofold. First, to detect any secular trend in stratospheric ozone abundance, whether of natural or anthropogenic origin and, second, to provide ground-truth validation for existing and future satellite measurements of ozone. With this goal in mind, a more immediate objective is to validate the millimeter-wave measurements by tests of the instrument, internal consistency tests on the data, and most importantly, by intercomparison with all other available ozone measurements. The validation process is expected to lead to refinements in the instrument and its operating procedures and in the data analysis. The final objective is to perform short-term scientific studies with the data, including studies of the ozone diurnal and seasonal variations, and comparison of ozone variations with changes in other geophysical parameters, notably temperature and water vapor. Routine observations are now ongoing; these will allow continuing intercomparisons with the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II) and one of the lidars, which is permanently on site. The experience gained during the Stratospheric Ozone Intercomparison (STOIC) caused us to refine our calibration procedures and identify the need for internal shielding of the millimeter receiver from radio frequency interference. Installation of this shielding is planned for the near future and should allow improvements in the instrument calibration and a higher signal-to-noise ratio, both of which will result in improved measurement precision.

  12. Ozone Hole Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (Pre-Flight)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The first segment of this video gives an overview of the Ozone Hole Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, an international effort using balloon payloads, ground based instruments, and airborne instruments to study ozone depletion and the hole in the ozone over Antarctica which occurs every spring. False color imagery taken from NASA's Nimbus 7 satellite which documents daily changes in ozone is also shown. The second segment of this video shows actual take-off and flight footage of the two aircraft used in the experiment: the DC-8 Flying Laboratory and the high flying ER-2.

  13. Antarctic Stratospheric Ozone from the Assimilation of Occultation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Wargan, Krzysztof

    2004-01-01

    Ozone data from the solar occultation Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III instrument are included in the ozone assimilation system at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, which uses Solar Backscatter UItraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument data. Even though POAM data are available at only one latitude in the southern hemisphere on each day, their assimilation leads to more realistic ozone distribution throughout the Antarctic region, especially inside the polar vortex. Impacts of POAM data were evaluated by comparisons of assimilated ozone profiles with independent ozone sondes. Major improvements in ozone representation are seen in the Antarctic lower stratosphere during austral Winter and spring in 1998. Limitations of assimilation of sparse occultation data are illustrated by an example.

  14. Thomas calls stratospheric ozone depletion rate alarming; urges CFC, halon phaseout

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    US Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lee M. Thomas on September 28 called for even greater efforts in halting the depletion of stratospheric ozone by asking all nations to ratify the Montreal Protocol and then move toward a complete phaseout of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons. We must go further than a 50-percent reduction in these chemicals in order to stabilize ozone levels. The Protocol has been signed by 45 nations, but still needs ratification by the European nations and the European Economic Community in order to enter into force next January. It is increasingly clear that we as a global environmental community must use the Protocol to go even further to eliminate these chemicals which damage the stratospheric-ozone layer and threaten our future.

  15. Wintertime Polar Ozone Evolution during Stratospheric Vortex Break-Down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tweedy, O.; Limpasuvan, V.; Smith, A. K.; Richter, J. H.; Orsolini, Y.; Stordal, F.; Kvissel, O.

    2011-12-01

    Stratospheric Sudden Warming (SSW) is characterized by the rapid warming of the winter polar stratosphere and the weakening of the circumpolar flow. During the onset of a major SSW (when the circumpolar flow reverses direction), the warm stratopause layer (SL) descends from its climatological position to the mid-stratosphere level. As the vortex recovers from SSW, a "new" SL forms in the mid-mesosphere region before returning to its typical level. This SL discontinuity appears in conjunction with enhanced downward intrusion of chemical species from the lower thermosphere/upper mesosphere to the stratosphere. The descended species can potentially impact polar ozone. In this study, the NCAR's Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) is used to investigate the behavior of polar ozone related to major SSWs. Specifically, dynamical evolution and chemistry of NOx, CO, and O3 are examined during three realistic major SSWs and compared with a non-SSW winter season. The simulated (zonal-mean) polar ozone distribution exhibits a "primary" maximum near 40 km, a "secondary" maximum between 90-105 km, and a "tertiary" maximum near 70 km. The concentration of the secondary maximum reduces by ~1.5 parts per million by volume (ppmv) as the vortex recovers and the upper mesospheric polar easterlies return. Enhanced downwelling above the newly formed SL extends up to just above this secondary maximum (~110 km). With an averaged concentration of 2 ppmv, the tertiary ozone maximum layer displaces upward with enhanced upwelling during SSW in conjunction with the lower mesospheric cooling. The downward propagation of the stratospheric wind reversal is accompanied by CO intrusion toward the lowermost stratosphere and anomalous behavior in the primary ozone maximum. Overall, the major SSW, SL, and polar ozone evolution mimic recently reported satellite observations.

  16. Impact of Stratospheric Ozone Zonal Asymmetries on the Tropospheric Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedy, Olga; Waugh, Darryn; Li, Feng; Oman, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The depletion and recovery of Antarctic ozone plays a major role in changes of Southern Hemisphere (SH) tropospheric climate. Recent studies indicate that the lack of polar ozone asymmetries in chemistry climate models (CCM) leads to a weaker and warmer Antarctic vortex, and smaller trends in the tropospheric mid-latitude jet and the surface pressure. However, the tropospheric response to ozone asymmetries is not well understood. In this study we report on a series of integrations of the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOS CCM) to further examine the effect of zonal asymmetries on the state of the stratosphere and troposphere. Integrations with the full, interactive stratospheric chemistry are compared against identical simulations using the same CCM except that (1) the monthly mean zonal mean stratospheric ozone from first simulation is prescribed and (2) ozone is relaxed to the monthly mean zonal mean ozone on a three day time scale. To analyze the tropospheric response to ozone asymmetries, we examine trends and quantify the differences in temperatures, zonal wind and surface pressure among the integrations.

  17. The impact of the stratospheric ozone distribution on large-scale tropospheric systems over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, L. A.; Vieira, L. A.; Prestes, A.; Pacini, A. A.; Rigozo, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    Most of the large-scale changes of the climate can be attributed to the cumulative impact of the human activities since the beginning of the industrial revolution. However, the impact of natural drivers to the present climate change is still under debate, especially on regional scale. These regional changes over South America can potentially affect large vulnerable populations in the near future. Here, we show that the distribution of the stratospheric ozone can affect the climate patterns over South America and adjoin oceans. The impact of the stratospheric ozone distribution was evaluated employing the Global Atmospheric-Ocean Model developed by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS Model E). We conducted two numerical experiments. In the first experiment we used a realistic distribution of the stratospheric ozone, while in the second experiment we employed a uniform longitudinal distribution. We have integrated each model over 60 years. We find that the distribution of stratospheric ozone has a strong influence on the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ). However, the Upper Tropospheric Cyclonic Vortex (UTCV) is not affected by the ozone's distribution.

  18. Climate change and atmospheric chemistry: how will the stratospheric ozone layer develop?

    PubMed

    Dameris, Martin

    2010-10-25

    The discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica in 1985 was a surprise for science. For a few years the reasons of the ozone hole was speculated about. Soon it was obvious that predominant meteorological conditions led to a specific situation developing in this part of the atmosphere: Very low temperatures initiate chemical processes that at the end cause extreme ozone depletion at altitudes of between about 15 and 30 km. So-called polar stratospheric clouds play a key role. Such clouds develop at temperatures below about 195 K. Heterogeneous chemical reactions on cloud particles initiate the destruction of ozone molecules. The future evolution of the ozone layer will not only depend on the further development of concentrations of ozone-depleting substances, but also significantly on climate change. PMID:20922727

  19. Changes in tropospheric composition and air quality due to stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Keith R; Tang, Xiaoyan; Wilson, Stephen R; Zanis, Prodromos; Bais, Alkiviadis F

    2003-01-01

    Increased UV-B through stratospheric ozone depletion leads to an increased chemical activity in the lower atmosphere (the troposphere). The effect of stratospheric ozone depletion on tropospheric ozone is small (though significant) compared to the ozone generated anthropogenically in areas already experiencing air pollution. Modeling and experimental studies suggest that the impacts of stratospheric ozone depletion on tropospheric ozone are different at different altitudes and for different chemical regimes. As a result the increase in ozone due to stratospheric ozone depletion may be greater in polluted regions. Attributable effects on concentrations are expected only in regions where local emissions make minor contributions. The vertical distribution of NOx (NO + NO2), the emission of volatile organic compounds and the abundance of water vapor, are important influencing factors. The long-term nature of stratospheric ozone depletion means that even a small increase in tropospheric ozone concentration can have a significant impact on human health and the environment. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and chlorodifluoroacetic acid (CDFA) are produced by the atmospheric degradation of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). TFA has been measured in rain, rivers, lakes, and oceans, the ultimate sink for these and related compounds. Significant anthropogenic sources of TFA other than degradation HCFCs and HFCs have been identified. Toxicity tests under field conditions indicate that the concentrations of TFA and CDFA currently produced by the atmospheric degradation of HFCs and HCFCs do not present a risk to human health and the environment. The impact of the interaction between ozone depletion and future climate change is complex and a significant area of current research. For air quality and tropospheric composition, a range of physical parameters such as temperature, cloudiness and atmospheric transport will modify the impact of UV-B. Changes in the

  20. How sensitive is the recovery of stratospheric ozone to changes in concentrations of very short-lived bromocarbons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Abraham, N. L.; Archibald, A. T.; Braesicke, P.; Keeble, J.; Telford, P. J.; Warwick, N. J.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    Naturally produced very short-lived substances (VSLS) account for almost a quarter of the current stratospheric inorganic bromine, Bry. Following VSLS oxidation, bromine radicals (Br and BrO) can catalytically destroy ozone. The extent to which possible increases in surface emissions or transport of these VSLS bromocarbons to the stratosphere could counteract the effect of halogen reductions under the Montreal Protocol is an important policy question. Here, by using a chemistry-climate model, UM-UKCA, we investigate the impact of a hypothetical doubling (an increase of 5 ppt Bry) of VSLS bromocarbons on ozone and how the resulting ozone changes depend on the background concentrations of chlorine and bromine. Our model experiments indicate that for the 5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the ozone decrease in the lowermost stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) may reach up to 10% in the annual mean; the ozone decrease in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is smaller (4-6%). The largest impact on the ozone column is found in the Antarctic spring. There is a significantly larger ozone decrease following the doubling of the VSLS burden under a high stratospheric chlorine background than under a low chlorine background, indicating the importance of the inter-halogen reactions. For example, the decline in the high-latitude, lower-stratospheric ozone concentration as a function of Bry is higher by about 30-40% when stratospheric Cly is ~ 3 ppb (present day), compared with Cly of ~ 0.8 ppb (a pre-industrial or projected future situation). Bromine will play an important role in the future ozone layer. However, even if bromine levels from natural VSLS were to increase significantly later this century, changes in the concentration of ozone will likely be dominated by the decrease in anthropogenic chlorine. Our calculation suggests that for a 5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the Antarctic ozone hole recovery date could be delayed by approximately 6-8 years, depending on Cly

  1. Ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Robert D. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This is the second of a 2-part Conference Publication. This document contains papers presented at the 1992 Quadrennial Ozone Symposium held at Charlottesville, Virginia, from June 4-13, 1992. The papers cover topics in both Tropospheric and Stratospheric research. These topics include ozone trends and climatology, ground based, aircraft, balloon, rocket and satellite measurements, Arctic and Antarctic research, global and regional modeling, and volcanic effects.

  2. Ozone in the Troposphere and Stratosphere, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    This is the first part of a 2-part Conference Publication. This document contains papers presented at the 1992 Quadrennial Ozone Symposium held at the Charlottesville, Virginia, from June 4-13, 1992. The papers cover topics in both Tropospheric and Stratospheric research. These topics include ozone trends and climatology, ground based, aircraft, balloon, rocket and satellite measurements, Arctic and Antarctic research, global and regional modeling, and volcanic effects.

  3. Ozone Production and Loss Rate Measurements in the Middle Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jucks, Kenneth W.; Johnson, David G.; Chance, K. V.; Traub, Wesley A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Stachnik, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    The first simultaneous measurements of HO(x), NO(x), and Cl(x) radicals in the middle stratosphere show that NO(x) catalytic cycles dominate loss of ozone (O3) for altitudes between 24 and 38 km; Cl(x) catalytic cycles are measured to be less effective than previously expected; and there is no 'ozone deficit' in the photochemically dominated altitude range from 31 and 38 km, contrary to some previous theoretical studies.

  4. Distribution of total ozone and stratospheric ozone in the tropics - Implications for the distribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack; Larsen, Jack C.

    1987-01-01

    Climatologies of total columnar ozone and integrated stratospheric ozone amounts at low latitudes (15 deg N to 15 deg S), derived from satellite observations, are presented. A significant longitudinal variability in total ozone is present, with highest values generally located between 60 deg W and 60 deg E. The integrated stratospheric component of total ozone, on the other hand, does not exhibit a longitudinal preference for high values. Therefore it is hypothesized that the climatological longitudinal distribution of total ozone reflects the variability of the abundance of tropospheric ozone at low latitudes. Furthermore, it is speculated that in situ photochemical production of ozone resulting from biomass burning may be responsible for the observed enhancement of total ozone at these longitudes.

  5. Understanding differences in upper stratospheric ozone response to changes in chlorine and temperature as computed using CCMVal-2 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.

    2012-08-01

    Projections of future ozone levels are made using models that couple a general circulation model with a representation of atmospheric photochemical processes, allowing interactions among photochemical processes, radiation, and dynamics. Such models are known as coupled chemistry-climate models (CCMs). Although developed from common principles and subject to the same boundary conditions, simulated ozone time series vary among models for scenarios for ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and greenhouse gases. Photochemical processes control the upper stratospheric ozone level, and there is broad agreement among CCMs in that ozone increases as ODSs decrease and temperature decreases due to greenhouse gas increase. There are quantitative differences in the ozone sensitivity to chlorine and temperature. We obtain insight into differences in sensitivity by examining the relationship between the upper stratospheric seasonal cycles of ozone and temperature as produced by fourteen CCMs. All simulations conform to expectation in that ozone is less sensitive to temperature when chlorine levels are highest because chlorine catalyzed loss is nearly independent of temperature. Analysis reveals differences in simulated temperature, ozone and reactive nitrogen that lead to differences in the relative importance of ozone loss processes and are most obvious when chlorine levels are close to background. Differences in the relative importance of loss processes underlie differences in simulated sensitivity of ozone to composition change. This suggests 1) that the multimodel mean is not a best estimate of the sensitivity of upper stratospheric ozone to changes in ODSs and temperature; and 2) that the spread of values is not an appropriate measure of uncertainty.

  6. Tunguska meteor fall of 1908: effects on stratospheric ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, R.P.; Toon, O.B.; Park, C.; Whitten, R.C.; Pollack, J.B.; Noerdlinger, P.

    1981-10-02

    In 1908, when the giant Tunguska meteor disintegrated in the earth's atmosphere over Siberia, it may have generated as much as 30 million metric tons of nitric oxide (NO) in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The photochemical aftereffects of the event have been simulated using a comprehensive model of atmospheric trace composition. Calculations indicate that up to 45 percent of the ozone in the Northern Hemisphere may have been depleted by Tunguska's nitric oxide cloud early in 1909 and large ozone reductions may have persisted until 1912. Measurements of atmospheric transparency by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for the years 1909 to 1911 show evidence of a steady ozone recovery from unusually low levels in early 1909, implying a total ozone deficit of 30 +- 15 percent. The coincidence in time between the observed ozone recovery and the Tungska meteor fall indicates that the event may provide a test of current ozone depletion theories.

  7. High solar cycle spectral variations inconsistent with stratospheric ozone observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. T.; Haigh, J. D.; Rozanov, E. V.; Kuchar, A.; Sukhodolov, T.; Tummon, F.; Shapiro, A. V.; Schmutz, W.

    2016-03-01

    Solar variability can influence surface climate, for example by affecting the mid-to-high-latitude surface pressure gradient associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation. One key mechanism behind such an influence is the absorption of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation by ozone in the tropical stratosphere, a process that modifies temperature and wind patterns and hence wave propagation and atmospheric circulation. The amplitude of UV variability is uncertain, yet it directly affects the magnitude of the climate response: observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite show broadband changes up to three times larger than previous measurements. Here we present estimates of the stratospheric ozone variability during the solar cycle. Specifically, we estimate the photolytic response of stratospheric ozone to changes in spectral solar irradiance by calculating the difference between a reference chemistry-climate model simulation of ozone variability driven only by transport (with no changes in solar irradiance) and observations of ozone concentrations. Subtracting the reference from simulations with time-varying irradiance, we can evaluate different data sets of measured and modelled spectral irradiance. We find that at altitudes above pressure levels of 5 hPa, the ozone response to solar variability simulated using the SORCE spectral solar irradiance data are inconsistent with the observations.

  8. Effects on stratospheric ozone from high-speed civil transport: Sensitivity to stratospheric aerosol loading

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenstein, D.K.; Ko, M.K.W.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Sze, N.

    1993-12-01

    The potential impact of high-speed civil transport (HSCT) aircraft emissions on stratospheric ozone and the sensitivity of these results to changes in aerosol loading are examined with a two-dimensional model. With aerosols fixed at background levels, calculated ozone changes due to HSCT aircraft emissions range from negligible up to 4-6% depletions in column zone at northern high latitudes. The magnitude of the ozone change depends mainly on the NO(x) increase due to aircraft emissions, which depends on fleet size, cruise altitude, and engine design. The partitioning of the odd nitrogen species in the lower stratosphere among NO, NO2, N2O5, is strongly dependent on the concentration of sulfuric acid aerosol particles, and thus the sensitivity of O3 to NO(x) emissions changes when the stratospheric aerosol loading changes. Aerosol concentrations 4 times greater than background levels have not been unusual in the last 2 decades. Our model results show that a factor of 4 increase in aerosol loading would significantly reduce the calculated ozone depletion due to HSCT emissions. Because of the neutral variabiltiy of stratospheric aerosols, the possible impact of HSCT emissions on ozone must be viewed as a range of possible results.

  9. ASSESSMENT OF THE CONTRIBUTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE TO GROUND-LEVEL OZONE CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This assessment is concerned with the possible contributions of ozone transported from the stratosphere through the troposphere down to ground level to the episodic and longer term ozone concentrations measured in urban and rural areas. The episodic impacts would be of concern wi...

  10. Effects of stratospheric ozone recovery on tropospheric chemistry and air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wu, S.; Wang, Y.

    2013-08-01

    The stratospheric ozone has decreased greatly since 1980 due to ozone depleting substances (ODSs). As a result of the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, stratospheric ozone is expected to recover towards its pre-1980 level in the coming decades. We examine the implications of stratospheric ozone recovery for the tropospheric chemistry and ozone air quality with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). Significant decreases in surface ozone photolysis rates due to stratospheric ozone recovery are simulated. Increases in ozone lifetime by up to 7% are calculated in the troposphere. The global average OH decreases by 1.74% and the global burden of tropospheric ozone increases by 0.78%. The perturbations to tropospheirc ozone and surface ozone show large seasonal and spatial variations. General increases in surface ozone are calculated for each season, with increases by up to 5% for some regions.

  11. Impacts of Stratospheric Ozone Change on Tropospheric Chemistry and Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Zhang, H.

    2013-05-01

    The stratospheric ozone has decreased greatly since 1980 due to ozone depleting substances (ODSs). As a result of the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments and Adjustments, stratospheric ozone is expected to recover towards its pre-1980 level in the coming decades. We examine the implications of stratospheric ozone recovery for the tropospheric chemistry and ozone air quality with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). Significant decreases in surface ozone photolysis rates due to stratospheric ozone recovery are simulated. Increases in ozone lifetime by up to 7% are calculated in the troposphere. The global average OH decreases by 1.74% and the global burden of tropospheric ozone increased by 0.78%. The perturbations to tropospheirc ozone and surface ozone show large seasonal and spatial variations. General increases in surface ozone are calculated for each season, with increases by up to 5% for some regions.

  12. EFFECTS OF STRATOSPHERE OZONE DEPLETION ON AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a result of stratospheric ozone depletion, UV-Bradiation (290-320 nm) leaching aquatic environments is likely to increase over the next few decades. vailable information suggests that UV-B radiation can have a variety of deleterious effects on marine and freshwater ecosystems....

  13. Stratospheric ozone response to a solar irradiance reduction in a quadrupled CO2 environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.

    2014-07-01

    We used the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) global two-dimensional (2D) atmospheric model to investigate the stratospheric ozone response to a proposed geoengineering activity wherein a reduced top-of-atmosphere (TOA) solar irradiance is imposed to help counteract a quadrupled CO2 atmosphere. This study is similar to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Experiment G1. Three primary simulations were completed with the GSFC 2D model to examine this possibility: (A) a pre-industrial atmosphere with a boundary condition of 285 ppmv CO2 (piControl); (B) a base future atmosphere with 1140 ppmv CO2 (abrupt4xCO2); and (C) a perturbed future atmosphere with 1140 ppmv CO2 and a 4% reduction in the TOA total solar irradiance (G1). We found huge ozone enhancements throughout most of the stratosphere (up to 40%) as a result of a large computed temperature decrease (up to 18 K) when CO2 was quadrupled (compare simulation abrupt4xCO2 to piControl). Further, we found that ozone will additionally increase (up to 5%) throughout most of the stratosphere with total ozone increases of 1-2.5% as a result of a reduction in TOA total solar irradiance (compare simulation G1 to abrupt4xCO2). Decreases of atomic oxygen and temperature are the main drivers of this computed ozone enhancement from a reduction in TOA total solar irradiance.

  14. Examination of stratospheric ozone photochemistry in light of recent data

    SciTech Connect

    Natarajan, M. ); Callis, L.B. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors examine in this paper the consistency of stratospheric ozone photochemistry using data from ATMOS and LIMS experiments. The ATMOS experiment measured vertical profiles of important trace constituents and temperature in the stratosphere during 1985. These observations have been used to constrain the levels of odd nitrogen and odd chlorine in a photochemical model. This model using current recommendations for the photochemical data yields O{sub 3} mixing ratios that are in good agreement with the observations. The deviation in ozone is less than 20% except near 52 km. The updated model has also been used in conjunction with the LIMS data to simulate the stratospheric photochemistry corresponding to the 1979 time period.

  15. Stratospheric ozone in the 21st Century: The chlorofluorocarbon problem

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, F.S. )

    1991-04-01

    Ozone (O{sub 3}) exists in a dynamic equilibrium in the stratosphere, balanced between formation by solar ultraviolet photolysis ({lambda} < 242 nm) of molecular O{sub 2} (O + O{sub 2} {yields} O{sub 3}) and destruction by various chemical processes including several chain reaction sequences triggered by HO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and ClO{sub x} radicals. The ozone dissipates over Antarctica by November through northward mixing, only to begin reappearing in late August of the following year. Substantial ozone losses have also appeared, although not as spectacularly as over Antarctica, in the Northern Hemisphere's temperate and polar regions. The primary cause for the Antarctic ozone loss, and the probable cause for the northern losses, is the increasing concentration in the stratosphere of anthropogenic chlorine, especially chlorine released by solar UV photolysis from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds such as CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} (CFC-12), CCl{sub 3}F (CFC-11) and CCl{sub 2}FCClF{sub 2} (CFC-113). Because these molecules have average atmospheric lifetimes of many decades, excess anthropogenic chlorine will persist in the stratosphere for comparable time periods, and the Antarctic ozone hole will be an important atmospheric phenomenon throughout the 21st century.

  16. Upper-Stratospheric Ozone Trends 1979-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, M. J.; Cunnold, Derek; Bishop, Lane; Flynn, Lawrence E.; Godin, Sophie; Frith, Stacey Hollandsworth; Hood, Lon; Miller, Alvin J.; Oltmans, Sam; Randel, William

    2002-01-01

    Extensive analyses of ozone observations between 1978 and 1998 measured by Dobson Umkehr, Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) I and II, and Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet (SBUV) and (SBUV)/2 indicate continued significant ozone decline throughout the extratropical upper stratosphere from 30-45 km altitude. The maximum annual linear decline of -0.8 +/- 0.2 %/yr(2sigma) occurs at 40 km and is well described in terms of a linear decline modulated by the 11-year solar variation. The minimum decline of -0.110.1% yr-1(2o) occurs at 25 km in midlatitudes, with remarkable symmetry between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres at 40 km altitude. Midlatitude upper-stratospheric zonal trends exhibit significant seasonal variation (+/- 30% in the Northern Hemisphere, +/- 40% in the Southern Hemisphere) with the most negative trends of -1.2%/yr occurring in the winter. Significant seasonal trends of -0.7 to -0.9%/yr occur at 40 km in the tropics between April and September. Subjecting the statistical models used to calculate the ozone trends to intercomparison tests on a variety of common data sets yields results that indicate the standard deviation between trends estimated by 10 different statistical models is less than 0.1%/yr in the annual-mean trend for SAGE data and less than 0.2%/yr in the most demanding conditions (seasons with irregular, sparse data) [World Meteorological Organization (WMO), 1998]. These consistent trend results between statistical models together with extensive consistency between the independent measurement-system trend observations by Dobson Umkehr, SAGE I and II, and SBUV and SBUV/2 provide a high degree of confidence in the accuracy of the declining ozone amounts reported here. Additional details of ozone trend results from 1978 to 1996 (2 years shorter than reported here) along with lower-stratospheric and tropospheric ozone trends, extensive intercomparisons to assess relative instrument drifts, and retrieval algorithm details are

  17. In situ stratospheric ozone measurements by long path UV absorption - Developments and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, E. M.; Schiller, C. M.; Anderson, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    A high-sensitivity, in situ UV absorption ozone sensor has been developed for use in the stratosphere. The instrument couples 254-nm radiation from a low-pressure mercury discharge lamp into a 40-pass White cell to attain a high-sensitivity ozone absorption measurement. Preflight/postflight laboratory tests utilizing an ozone source coupled to a laboratory UV ozone photometer in a fast-flow system as well as in-flight diagnostics verify the successful operation of the instrument. Evidence is presented to verify that in situ UV absorption ozone photometers can measure stratospheric ozone with better than 3 percent precision and 5 percent accuracy, provided proper attention is given to both the thermal field surrounding the gondola and the ambient pressure measurements. Ozone data are compared with modeled profiles in the 28- to 40-km region. An assessment of the disagreement between observations and modeled profiles is given along with suggestions for future experiments designed to constrain photochemical models.

  18. Efficiency of short-lived halogens at influencing climate through depletion of stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossaini, R.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Montzka, S. A.; Rap, A.; Dhomse, S.; Feng, W.

    2015-03-01

    Halogens released from long-lived anthropogenic substances, such as chlorofluorocarbons, are the principal cause of recent depletion of stratospheric ozone, a greenhouse gas. Recent observations show that very short-lived substances, with lifetimes generally under six months, are also an important source of stratospheric halogens. Short-lived bromine substances are produced naturally by seaweed and phytoplankton, whereas short-lived chlorine substances are primarily anthropogenic. Here we used a chemical transport model to quantify the depletion of ozone in the lower stratosphere from short-lived halogen substances, and a radiative transfer model to quantify the radiative effects of that ozone depletion. According to our simulations, ozone loss from short-lived substances had a radiative effect nearly half that from long-lived halocarbons in 2011 and, since pre-industrial times, has contributed a total of about -0.02 W m-2 to global radiative forcing. We find natural short-lived bromine substances exert a 3.6 times larger ozone radiative effect than long-lived halocarbons, normalized by halogen content, and show atmospheric levels of dichloromethane, a short-lived chlorine substance not controlled by the Montreal Protocol, are rapidly increasing. We conclude that potential further significant increases in the atmospheric abundance of short-lived halogen substances, through changing natural processes or continued anthropogenic emissions, could be important for future climate.

  19. Contributions to Future Stratospheric Climate Change: An Idealized Chemistry-Climate Model Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of an idealized model sensitivity study, three of the main contributors to future stratospheric climate change are evaluated: increases in greenhouse gas concentrations, ozone recovery, and changing sea surface temperatures (SSTs). These three contributors are explored in combination and separately, to test the interactions between ozone and climate; the linearity of their contributions to stratospheric climate change is also assessed. In a simplified chemistry-climate model, stratospheric global mean temperature is most sensitive to CO2 doubling, followed by ozone depletion, then by increased SSTs. At polar latitudes, the Northern Hemisphere (NH) stratosphere is more sensitive to changes in CO2, SSTs and O3 than is the Southern Hemisphere (SH); the opposing responses to ozone depletion under low or high background CO2 concentrations, as seen with present-day SSTs, are much weaker and are not statistically significant under enhanced SSTs. Consistent with previous studies, the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation is found to increase in an idealized future climate; SSTs contribute most to this increase in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region, while CO2 and ozone changes contribute most in the stratosphere and mesosphere.

  20. Ozone Temperature Correlations in the Upper Stratosphere as a Measure of Chlorine Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Ann R.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Gille, John C.

    2012-01-01

    We use data from the Nimbus-7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) for the 1978-1979 period together with data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder (UARS MLS) for the years 1993 to 1999, the Aura MLS for the years 2004 to 2011, and the Aura High Resolution Infrared Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) for the years 2005 to 2007 to examine ozone-temperature correlations in the upper stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that the sensitivity coefficient of the ozone response to temperature (Delta ln(O3)/Delta.(l/T)) decreases as chlorine has increased in the stratosphere and should increase in the future as chlorine decreases. The data are in agreement with our simulation of the past. We also find that the sensitivity coefficient does not change in a constant-chlorine simulation. Thus the change in the sensitivity coefficient depends on the change in chlorine, but not on the change in greenhouse gases. We suggest that these and future data can be used to track the impact of chlorine added to the stratosphere and also to track the recovery of the stratosphere as chlorine is removed under the provisions of the Montreal Protocol.

  1. Ozone temperature correlations in the upper stratosphere as a measure of chlorine content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Gille, John C.

    2012-05-01

    We use data from the Nimbus-7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) for the 1978-1979 period together with data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder (UARS MLS) for the years 1993 to 1999, the Aura MLS for the years 2004 to 2011, and the Aura High Resolution Infrared Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) for the years 2005 to 2007 to examine ozone-temperature correlations in the upper stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that the sensitivity coefficient of the ozone response to temperature (Δln(O3)/Δ(1/T)) decreases as chlorine has increased in the stratosphere and should increase in the future as chlorine decreases. The data are in agreement with our simulation of the past. We also find that the sensitivity coefficient does not change in a constant-chlorine simulation. Thus the change in the sensitivity coefficient depends on the change in chlorine, but not on the change in greenhouse gases. We suggest that these and future data can be used to track the impact of chlorine added to the stratosphere and also to track the recovery of the stratosphere as chlorine is removed under the provisions of the Montreal Protocol.

  2. Prediction of Dynamical Impact of Changes in Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek M.

    1998-01-01

    Under this grant one paper by Lou et al and a second paper by Kindler et al is in journal. These papers both describe N2O simulations using UKMO and Goddard assimilated wind fields and comparisons of the results against CLAES N2O observations. The results of these studies indicate some of the difficulties of using the assimilated wind fields, and the vertical motions in particular, in simulating long term variations in trace gases in the stratosphere. On the other hand, qualitatively the results possess a number of features of the observations even on time scales longer than a month or two. More recently we have started to examine results obtained using NCAR models a 3D version of which also uses the UKMO assimilated wind fields. Calculations have already been made with their 2D model with emphasis on the seasonal cycle in ozone at high latitudes in the upper stratosphere. Simultaneously trends in stratospheric ozone have been studied in detail from SAGE and UARS observations. Moreover, observations of the trends since 1984 do not show a significant interhemispheric asymmetry in upper stratospheric ozone. Therefore any asymmetry in the trends must have occurred prior to the mid-eighties and would most likely have been related to interhemispheric differences in upper stratospheric temperature trends. Another activity has been to compile an ozone climatology from UARS and SAGE observations. This effort has been performed as part of a UARS team activity to assemble a climatology of all the UARS long-lived trace gases for 1992-1993.

  3. Quantifying the Summertime Austral Jet Stream and Hadley Cell Response to Stratospheric Ozone and Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, E. P.; Son, S.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of anthropogenic forcing on the austral jet stream and Hadley Cell in summer is assessed across three comprehensive climate model datasets, the Chemistry Climate Model Validation Activity 2 (CCMVal2) and Coupled Model Intercomparison Projects, Phases 3 and 5 (CMIP3,5). Changes in stratospheric ozone and greenhouse gases impact the troposphere in this season, and a simple framework based on temperature trends in the lower polar stratosphere and upper tropical troposphere is developed to separate their effects. It suggests that Southern Hemisphere circulation trends are driven by changes in upper troposphere/lower stratosphere temperature gradients: the subtropical and extratropical jets respond similarly when the tropics warm or the polar stratosphere cools. The mean circulation response to greenhouse gases and ozone is fairly comparable across the three multimodel datasets; consistent with previous studies, ozone has dominated changes in recent decades, while in the future, ozone and greenhouse gases will largely offset each other. The multimodel mean perspective, however, masks considerable spread between individual models. Uncertainty resulting from differences in temperature trends is separated from differences in the circulation response to a given temperature change. Both sources of uncertainty contribute equally to model spread. Uncertainty in temperature trends is dominated by differences in the polar stratosphere, not the tropics, suggesting that reducing uncertainty in models' climate sensitivity may not narrow the spread in subtropical and extratropical circulation trends in this season. Rather, the ozone forcing must be constrained. Even if the temperature trends could be perfectly constrained, however, models' 'circulation sensitivity,' differences in the response of the circulation to the same thermal forcing, must be addressed in order to narrow spread in climate projections.

  4. Validation of GOMOS ozone precision estimates in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofieva, V. F.; Tamminen, J.; Kyrölä, E.; Laeng, A.; von Clarmann, T.; Dalaudier, F.; Hauchecorne, A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Barrot, G.; Blanot, L.; Fussen, D.; Vanhellemont, F.

    2014-07-01

    Accurate information about uncertainties is required in nearly all data analyses, e.g., inter-comparisons, data assimilation, combined use. Validation of precision estimates (viz., the random component of estimated uncertainty) is important for remote sensing measurements, which provide the information about atmospheric parameters by solving an inverse problem. For the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument, this is a real challenge, due to the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio (and thus precision estimates) on stellar properties, small number of self-collocated measurements, and growing noise as a function of time due to instrument aging. The estimated ozone uncertainties are small in the stratosphere for bright star occultations, which complicates validation of precision values, given the natural ozone variability. In this paper, we discuss different methods for geophysical validation of precision estimates and their applicability to GOMOS data. We propose a simple method for validation of GOMOS precision estimates for ozone in the stratosphere. This method is based on comparisons of differences in sample variance with differences in uncertainty estimates for measurements from different stars selected in a region of small natural variability. For GOMOS, the difference in sample variances for different stars at tangent altitudes 25-45 km is well explained by the difference in squared precisions, if the stars are not dim. Since this is observed for several stars, and since normalized χ2 is close to 1 for these occultations in the stratosphere, we conclude that the GOMOS precision estimates are realistic in occultations of sufficiently bright stars. For dim stars, errors are overestimated due to improper accounting of the dark charge correction uncertainty in the error budget. The proposed method can also be applied to stratospheric ozone data from other instruments, including multi-instrument analyses.

  5. Stratospheric ozone chemistry in the Antarctic: what determines the lowest ozone values reached and their recovery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooß, J.-U.; Brautzsch, K.; Pommrich, R.; Solomon, S.; Müller, R.

    2011-12-01

    Balloon-borne observations of ozone from the South Pole Station have been reported to reach ozone mixing ratios below the detection limit of about 10 ppbv at the 70 hPa level by late September. After reaching a minimum, ozone mixing ratios increase to above 1 ppmv on the 70 hPa level by late December. While the basic mechanisms causing the ozone hole have been known for more than 20 yr, the detailed chemical processes determining how low the local concentration can fall, and how it recovers from the minimum have not been explored so far. Both of these aspects are investigated here by analysing results from the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS). As ozone falls below about 0.5 ppmv, a balance is maintained by gas phase production of both HCl and HOCl followed by heterogeneous reaction between these two compounds in these simulations. Thereafter, a very rapid, irreversible chlorine deactivation into HCl can occur, either when ozone drops to values low enough for gas phase HCl production to exceed chlorine activation processes or when temperatures increase above the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) threshold. As a consequence, the timing and mixing ratio of the minimum ozone depends sensitively on model parameters, including the ozone initialisation. The subsequent ozone increase between October and December is linked mainly to photochemical ozone production, caused by oxygen photolysis and by the oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane.

  6. How sensitive is the recovery of stratospheric ozone to changes in concentrations of very short lived bromocarbons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Abraham, N. L.; Archibald, A. T.; Braesicke, P.; Keeble, J.; Telford, P.; Warwick, N. J.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Naturally produced very short-lived substances (VSLS), like bromocarbons, account for almost a quarter of the current stratospheric inorganic bromine, Bry. Following VSLS oxidation, bromine radicals (Br and BrO) can catalytically destroy ozone. The extent to which possible increases in surface emissions or transport of these VSLS bromocarbons to the stratosphere could counteract the effect of halogen reductions under the Montreal Protocol is an important policy question. Here by using a chemistry-climate model, UM-UKCA, we investigate the impact of a hypothetical increase in VSLS on ozone and how that impact depends on the background concentrations of chlorine and bromine. Our model experiments indicate that for a ~5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the local ozone loss in the lowermost stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) may reach up to 10% in the annual mean; the ozone loss in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is smaller (4-6%). There is more ozone loss following an increase in VSLS burden under a high stratospheric chlorine background than under a low chlorine background indicating the importance of the inter-halogen reactions. For example, the rate of decline of the stratospheric ozone concentration as a function of Bry is higher by about 30-40% when stratospheric Cly is ~3 ppb (present day) compared with Cly of ~0.8 ppb (apre-industrial or projected future situation). Although bromine plays an important role in destroying ozone, inorganic chlorine is the dominant halogen compound. Even if bromine levels from natural VSLS were to increase significantly later this century, changes in the concentration of ozone will be dominated by the recovery of anthropogenic chlorine. Our calculation suggests that for a 5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the Antarctic ozone hole recover date could be delayed by approximately 7 years.

  7. Ozone laminae near the edge of the stratospheric polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, S. J.; Vaughan, Geraint

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of ozonesonde data collected at high northern latitudes in winter and spring shows that laminae of enhanced and depleted ozone are associated with the polar vortex. In January and February, they are most common at all latitudes in the potential temperature range 370-430 K, but are abundant up to 500 K between 60 and 70 deg N. In March and April they occur most frequently northward of 75 deg N, and are abundant up to 520 K, whereas they are largely confined to the range 320-440 K at lower latitudes. Analysis of ozone lidar data obtained during AASE-1 depicts clearly the extrusion of laminae of enhanced ozone concentration from the polar regions in the altitude range 13-15 km. These extrusions form a class of laminae which transport ozone equatorward in the lowest levels of the stratosphere.

  8. Reductions in ozone at high concentrations of stratospheric halogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, M. J.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Wofsy, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    An increase in the concentration of inorganic chlorine to levels comparable to that of oxidized reactive nitrogen could cause a significant change in the chemistry of the lower stratosphere leading to a reduction potentially larger than 15 percent in the column density of ozone. This could occur, for example by the middle of the next century, if emissions of man-made chlorocarbons were to grow at a rate of 3 percent per year. Ozone could be further depressed by release of industrial bromocarbon.

  9. Stratospheric ozone measurement with an infrared heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Kostiuk, T.; Mumma, M. J.; Buhl, D.; Kunde, V. G.; Brown, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    A stratospheric ozone absorption line in the 10 microns band was measured and resolved completely, using an infrared heterodyne spectrometer with spectral resolution of 5 MHz (0.000167 cm to -1 power). The vertical concentration profile of stratospheric ozone was obtained through an analytical inversion of the measured spectral line profile. The absolute total column density was 0.34 cm atm with a peak mixing ratio occurring at approximately 24 km. The (7,1,6) to (7,1,7) O3 line center frequency was found to be 1043.1775 + or - 0.00033 cm to toe -1 power, or 430 + or - 10 MHz higher than the P(24) CO2 laser line frequency.

  10. Stratospheric ozone measurement with an infrared heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Kostiuk, T.; Mumma, M. J.; Buhl, D.; Kunde, V. G.; Brown, L. W.; Spears, D.

    1978-01-01

    A stratospheric ozone absorption line in the 10 micron band was measured and resolved completely, using an infrared heterodyne spectrometer with a spectral resolution of 5 MHz. The vertical concentration profile of stratospheric ozone was obtained through an analytical inversion of the measured spectra line profile. The absolute total column density was 0.32 plus or minus 0.02 cm-atm with a peak mixing ratio occurring at approximately 24 km. The (7,1,6) - (7,1,7) O3 line center frequency was found to be 1043.1772 plus or minus 0.00033 cm/1 or 420 plus or minus 10 MHz higher than the P(24) CO2 laser line frequency.

  11. Stratospheric ozone: a major (long neglected) anthropogenic forcing of the climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polvani, L. M.

    2013-03-01

    As a consequence of the Montreal Protocol, the depletion stratospheric ozone by CFCs, which occurred primarily in the last decades of the 20th Century, has noticeably slowed down in recent years. For instance, the ozone hole in 2012 has been measured to be the smallest in 20 years. In view of this, it has long been thought that the ozone hole is a ``solved problem.'' What has not been appreciated until very recently is that the large man-made perturbation of stratospheric ozone has had profound consequences on the climate system in the Southern Hemisphere. In fact, a lot of evidence is now at hand strongly suggesting that ozone depletion, not increasing greenhouse gases, have been been the major driver of observed atmospheric circulation changes in the Southern Hemisphere in the second half of the 20th Century. Furthermore, climate models robustly show that the closing of the ozone hole in the next half century will actually oppose the impact of increasing greenhouse gases, and project large cancellations between these two anthropogenic forcings resulting in greatly reduced future trends in the Southern Hemisphere.

  12. The effect of ozone depletion on the Southern Annular Mode and stratosphere-troposphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, Fraser; McDonald, Adrian; Morgenstern, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of ozone depletion and recovery on the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and stratosphere-troposphere coupling. Using the NIWA-UKCA chemistry-climate model, we compare reference runs with forcing due to greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances to sensitivity simulations in which ozone depleting substances are fixed at their 1960 levels. We find that ozone depletion leads to an increased frequency of extreme anomalies and increased persistence of the SAM in the stratosphere as well as stronger, more persistent stratosphere-troposphere coupling. This change in the strength of the stratosphere-troposphere coupling has implications for extended range weather forecasting. Currently the stratosphere provides an appreciable amount of predictability to the troposphere on time scales of one or two months, however we find that this effect reduces over time as stratospheric ozone recovers to pre-ozone hole levels towards the latter part of this century.

  13. Impact of ozone mini-holes on the heterogeneous destruction of stratospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Stenke, A; Grewe, V

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive study of ozone mini-holes over the mid-latitudes of both hemispheres is presented, based on model simulations with the coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM representing atmospheric conditions in 1960, 1980, 1990 and 2015. Ozone mini-holes are synoptic-scale regions of strongly reduced total ozone, directly associated with tropospheric weather systems. Mini-holes are supposed to have chemical and dynamical impacts on ozone levels. Since ozone levels over northern mid-latitudes show a negative trend of approximately -4%/decade and since it exists a negative correlation between total column ozone and erythemally active solar UV-radiation reaching the surface it is important to understand and assess the processes leading to the observed ozone decline. The simulated mini-hole events are validated with a mini-hole climatology based on daily ozone measurements with the TOMS (total ozone mapping spectrometer) instrument on the satellite Nimbus-7 between 1979 and 1993. Furthermore, possible trends in the event frequency and intensity over the simulation period are assessed. In the northern hemisphere the number of mini-hole events in early winter decreases between 1960 and 1990 and increases towards 2015. In the southern hemisphere a positive trend in mini-hole event frequency is detected between 1960 and 2015 in spring associated with the increasing Antarctic Ozone Hole. Finally, the impact of mini-holes on the stratospheric heterogeneous ozone chemistry is investigated. For this purpose, a computer-based detection routine for mini-holes was developed for the use in ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM. This method prevents polar stratospheric cloud formation and therefore heterogeneous ozone depletion inside mini-holes. Heterogeneous processes inside mini-holes amount to one third of heterogeneous ozone destruction in general over northern mid- and high-latitudes during winter (January-April) in the simulation. PMID:12653290

  14. Trends in stratospheric ozone profiles using functional mixed models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, A. Y.; Guillas, S.; Petropavlovskikh, I.

    2013-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the modeling of altitude-dependent patterns of ozone variations over time. Umkher ozone profiles (quarter of Umkehr layer) from 1978 to 2011 are investigated at two locations: Boulder (USA) and Arosa (Switzerland). The study consists of two statistical stages. First we approximate ozone profiles employing an appropriate basis. To capture primary modes of ozone variations without losing essential information, a functional principal component analysis is performed as it penalizes roughness of the function and smooths excessive variations in the shape of the ozone profiles. As a result, data driven basis functions are obtained. Secondly we estimate the effects of covariates - month, year (trend), quasi biennial oscillation, the Solar cycle, arctic oscillation and the El Niño/Southern Oscillation cycle - on the principal component scores of ozone profiles over time using generalized additive models. The effects are smooth functions of the covariates, and are represented by knot-based regression cubic splines. Finally we employ generalized additive mixed effects models incorporating a more complex error structure that reflects the observed seasonality in the data. The analysis provides more accurate estimates of influences and trends, together with enhanced uncertainty quantification. We are able to capture fine variations in the time evolution of the profiles such as the semi-annual oscillation. We conclude by showing the trends by altitude over Boulder. The strongly declining trends over 2003-2011 for altitudes of 32-64 hPa show that stratospheric ozone is not yet fully recovering.

  15. A Global Ozone Climatology from Ozone Soundings via Trajectory Mapping: A Stratospheric Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. J.; Tarasick, D. W.; Fioletov, V. E.; McLinden, C.; Zhao, T.; Gong, S.; Sioris, G.; Jin, J. J.; Liu, G.; Moeini, O.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores a domain-filling trajectory approach to generate a global ozone climatology from sparse ozonesonde data. Global ozone soundings of 51,898 profiles at 116 stations over 44 years (1965-2008) are used, from which forward and backward trajectories are performed for 4 days, driven by a set of meteorological reanalysis data. Ozone mixing ratios of each sounding from the surface to 26 km altitude are assigned to the entire path along the trajectory. The resulting global ozone climatology is archived monthly for five decades from the 1960s to the 2000s with grids of 5 degree 5 degree 1 km (latitude, longitude, and altitude). It is also archived yearly from 1965 to 2008. This climatology is validated at 20 ozonesonde stations by comparing the actual ozone sounding profile with that found through the trajectories, using the ozone soundings at all the stations except one being tested. The two sets of profiles are in good agreement, both individually with correlation coefficients between 0.975 and 0.998 and root mean square (RMS) differences of 87 to 482 ppbv, and overall with a correlation coefficient of 0.991 and an RMS of 224 ppbv. The ozone climatology is also compared with two sets of satellite data, from the Satellite Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) and the Optical Spectrography and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS). Overall, the ozone climatology compares well with SAGE and OSIRIS data by both seasonal and zonal means. The mean difference is generally under 20 above 15 km. The comparison is better in the northern hemisphere, where there are more ozonesonde stations, than in the southern hemisphere; it is also better in the middle and high latitudes than in the tropics, where assimilated winds are imperfect in some regions. This ozone climatology can capture known features in the stratosphere, as well as seasonal and decadal variations of these features. Furthermore, it provides a wealth of detail about longitudinal variations in the stratosphere such

  16. The 2010 Antarctic ozone hole: Observed reduction in ozone destruction by minor sudden stratospheric warmings

    PubMed Central

    de Laat, A. T. J.; van Weele, M.

    2011-01-01

    Satellite observations show that the 2010 Antarctic ozone hole is characterized by anomalously small amounts of photochemical ozone destruction (40-60% less than the 2005-2009 average). Observations from the MLS instrument show that this is mainly related to reduced photochemical ozone destruction between 20-25 km altitude. Lower down between 15-20 km the atmospheric chemical composition and photochemical ozone destruction is unaffected. The modified chemical composition and chemistry between 20-25 km altitude in 2010 is related to the occurrence of a mid-winter minor Antarctic Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW). The measurements indicate that the changes in chemical composition are related to downward motion of air masses rather than horizontal mixing, and affect stratospheric chemistry for several months. Since 1979, years with similar anomalously small amounts of ozone destruction are all characterized by either minor or major SSWs, illustrating that their presence has been a necessary pre-condition for reduced Antarctic stratospheric ozone destruction. PMID:22355557

  17. The 2010 Antarctic ozone hole: observed reduction in ozone destruction by minor sudden stratospheric warmings.

    PubMed

    de Laat, A T J; van Weele, M

    2011-01-01

    Satellite observations show that the 2010 Antarctic ozone hole is characterized by anomalously small amounts of photochemical ozone destruction (40-60% less than the 2005-2009 average). Observations from the MLS instrument show that this is mainly related to reduced photochemical ozone destruction between 20-25 km altitude. Lower down between 15-20 km the atmospheric chemical composition and photochemical ozone destruction is unaffected. The modified chemical composition and chemistry between 20-25 km altitude in 2010 is related to the occurrence of a mid-winter minor Antarctic Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW). The measurements indicate that the changes in chemical composition are related to downward motion of air masses rather than horizontal mixing, and affect stratospheric chemistry for several months. Since 1979, years with similar anomalously small amounts of ozone destruction are all characterized by either minor or major SSWs, illustrating that their presence has been a necessary pre-condition for reduced Antarctic stratospheric ozone destruction. PMID:22355557

  18. Understanding Differences in Upper Stratospheric Ozone Response to Changes in Chlorine and Temperature as Computed Using CCMVal Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.

    2012-01-01

    Projections of future ozone levels are made using models that couple a general circulation model with a representation of atmospheric photochemical processes, allowing interactions among photochemical processes, radiation, and dynamics. Such models are known as chemistry and climate models (CCMs). Although developed from common principles and subject to the same boundary conditions, simulated ozone time series vary for projections of changes in ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and greenhouse gases. In the upper stratosphere photochemical processes control ozone level, and ozone increases as ODSs decrease and temperature decreases due to greenhouse gas increase. Simulations agree broadly but there are quantitative differences in the sensitivity of ozone to chlorine and to temperature. We obtain insight into these differences in sensitivity by examining the relationship between the upper stratosphere annual cycle of ozone and temperature as produced by a suite of models. All simulations conform to expectation in that ozone is less sensitive to temperature when chlorine levels are highest because chlorine catalyzed loss is nearly independent of temperature. Differences in sensitivity are traced to differences in simulated temperature, ozone and reactive nitrogen when chlorine levels are close to background. This work shows that differences in the importance of specific processes underlie differences in simulated sensitivity of ozone to composition change. This suggests a) the multi-model mean is not a best estimate of the sensitivity of upper ozone to changes in ODSs and temperature; b) the spread of values is not an appropriate measure of uncertainty.

  19. Ozone-temperature relationships in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. J.; Nagatani, R. M.; Frederick, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    Utilizing independent estimates of ozone and temperature fields from the SBUV (Nimbus 7) and NOAA operational satellites, respectively, for the period 1978-1981, the coefficient of variation between the two parameters is determined. This coefficient is defined as A = Delta-O3 x (T)/Delta T x (O3) wehre Delta is an incremental change in either temperature or ozone and the bracket is a mean state. In practice, A is determined on a daily basis by regression of ozone mixing ratio versus temperature around a latitude circle during the winter season and the bracket value is the daily zonal average. This has the advantage of keeping the solar zenith angle fixed for a daily value while allowing it to change during the season. This is done at 30, 10, 5, 2, and 1 mb from 20 deg to 60 deg latitude in both hemispheres. The results are summarized and compared with those determined from a one-dimensional photochemical model applied to different latitudes.

  20. Stratospheric ozone depletion and animal health.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S J

    1992-08-01

    There is an increasing concern over ozone depletion and its effects on the environment and human health. However, the increase in ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) that would result from significant losses of ozone is also potentially harmful to animals. Any increase in disease in domestic species would not only have serious animal welfare implications but may also be economically important. The diseases which are likely to increase if ozone depletion continues include the squamous cell carcinomas of the exposed, non-pigmented areas of cats, cattle, sheep and horses. Uberreiter's syndrome in dogs is also associated with exposure to UV-B and may be expected to increase, as may the severity of conditions such as infectious keratoconjunctivitis (New Forest eye) in cattle. Aquaculture systems in which fish often have little or no protection by shading may also be at risk. Cataracts and skin lesions have been associated with the exposure of farmed fish to ultraviolet radiation and have resulted in significant losses. PMID:1529513

  1. Future chlorine-bromine loading and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael J.; Ibrahim, Abdel Moneim; Sasaki, Toru; Stordal, Frode; Visconti, Guido

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of future ozone requires three elements: (1) a scenario for the net emissions of chemically and radiatively active trace gases from the land and oceans; (2) a global atmospheric model that projects the accumulation of these gases; and (3) a chemical transport model that describes the distribution of ozone for a prescribed atmospheric composition and climate. This chapter, of necessity, presents models for all three elements and focuses on the following: (1) atmospheric abundance of chlorine and bromine in the form of halocarbons; and (2) the associated perturbations to stratospheric ozone.

  2. The impact of tropospheric planetary wave variability on stratospheric ozone

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, Michael B.; Schneider, Hans R.

    2002-06-25

    The goal of this project was to improve understanding of the role of the stratosphere in inducing long-term variations of the chemical composition of the troposphere. Changes in stratospheric transport occur on decadel timescales in response to changes in the structure of planetary wave patterns, forced in the troposphere. For many important tracers, such as column amounts of ozone, this variability of the transport leads to changes with signatures very similar to those induced by anthropogenic releases of chemicals into the atmosphere. During this project, a new interactive two-dimensional model of the dynamics, chemistry and radiation of the stratosphere was developed. The model was used to interpret available data of tracers. It was found that a fairly coherent picture of tracer distributions is obtained when a layer of reduced gravity wave drag is assumed for the lower stratosphere. The results suggest that the power of models to predict variability in tracer transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere is limited until current theories of gravity wave breaking have been refined.

  3. Stratospheric Ozone Changes and Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) Trends Observed in SBUV Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLand, M. T.; Thomas, G. E.; Shettle, E. P.; Olivero, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) are observed at 80-85 km altitude and high latitudes (typically > 50°) only during summer months. It has been suggested that long-term variations of PMC occurrence frequency and brightness are indicators of global climate change as represented through changes in mesospheric temperature and water vapor. The Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) series of satellite instruments, although designed to measure stratospheric profile and total column ozone, have made global observations of bright PMCs since November 1978. Previous analysis of SBUV data found that long-term variations in PMC brightness and occurrence frequency were anti-correlated with solar activity, and that a positive secular trend was present at most latitudes. The limited database of mesospheric temperature and water vapor data has precluded further determination of the source of this trend. Motivated by recent studies with the LIMA general circulation model [Berger and Lübken 2011], which relate mesospheric temperature trends to changes in stratospheric ozone, we have investigated the use of stratospheric ozone changes as a proxy for changes in mesospheric heating and temperature. The decrease in ozone from 1979 to the mid-1990s leads to a cooler mesosphere, and is thus consistent with the rise in PMC ice water content observed in the SBUV record during this period. Similarly, stratospheric ozone changes are smaller from the mid-1990s to the present, and PMC ice water content trends are also reduced in recent years. We will discuss these results and their implications for both previous (before 1979) and future PMC behavior.

  4. [Biomedical and economic consequences of stratosphere ozone depletion].

    PubMed

    Strzhizhovskiĭ, A D

    1998-01-01

    Information on possible human health-changes associated with stratosphere ozone depletion and amplification factor (% increase of the stick rate by 1% decrease of ozone) values for acute (erythema, keratitis, cataract, immunosuppression) and chronic (skin cancer, cataract) effects of natural UV-radiation was analysed. Amplification factor (AF) values for acute UV-effects increase with degree of ozone depletion. For degrees less than 12.5% they are independent of latitude and equal to 1.9 for erythema, 1.3-1.5 for keratitis, 1.7-2.3 for cataract and 0.9-1.1 for immunosuppression. AF values for incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer are independent of age, higher in males than females, and higher for squamous cell carcinoma, than for basal cell carcinoma. Their optimal estimations for whites equal to 2.7 for basal cell and 4.6 for squamous cell carcinoma. AF values for incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma range between 1 and 2, for melanoma mortality--between 0.3 and 2. AF values for incidence of cataract range between 0.3 and 1.2 with optimal estimations between 0.6 and 0.8. Prognosis of non-melanoma skin cancer and cataract incidences, melanoma mortality and economic loss for different scenarios of stratosphere ozone depletion are presented. PMID:9633627

  5. Stratospheric ozone affects mesospheric temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Since 1961, temperatures in the summer mesosphere have undergone a series of reversals. From 1961 to 1979 the atmospheric layer that stretches from roughly 50- to 100-kilometer altitude cooled by 0.5 K per decade. In the subsequent 2 decades the rate of cooling escalated to -3 to -5 K per decade, while the next 10 years saw a mild recovery. Though these temperature flips are seen in the observational record, they have never been reliably re-created in computer models of the middle atmosphere. Unlike the troposphere or stratosphere, for which there are extensive records, observations of mesospheric temperature are limited to point-source detections, making accurate modeling particularly important.

  6. Stratospheric Ozone Trends Inferred from the OSIRIS Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenstein, Doug; Bourassa, Adam; Roth, Chris

    2016-04-01

    The OSIRIS instrument onboard the Odin platform has been making high quality, vertically resolved ozone measurements since the autumn of 2001. These measurements, that span an altitude range that covers the cloud tops to 60 km, have been used within multiple studies to determine stratospheric ozone trends. In particular the OSIRIS measurements are an important component of the HARMOZ data set produced within the ESA ozone_cci program and the OSIRIS measurements have been merged with similar SAGE II measurements to produce ozone trend results that cover the period from the launch of SAGE II up to the present. As OSIRIS is the longest lived instrument that currently measures vertical ozone profiles, as long as the results remain of sufficiently high quality, its data products become exponentially more important every year. This paper will detail recent advancements in the OSIRIS ozone retrieval algorithm that have made the results more robust. A recent pointing correction will also be discussed. This correction has resulted in a reduction in magnitude of the positive trends reported recently by groups using the OSIRIS data record. These new results will be verified through comparison with trends derived using MLS measurements merged with SAGE II data where the merging process for the SAGE II - OSIRIS and SAGE II - MLS data sets was done in an identical fashion.

  7. Do stratospheric ozone measurements show large tropical width changes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sean; Hassler, Birgit; Rosenlof, Karen

    2016-04-01

    The total column ozone amount varies with latitude, in part due to the difference in tropopause height between the tropics and midlatitudes. This dependency of column ozone on latitude has been exploited by several studies to identify tropical edge latitudes and to compute their trends. The tropical widening trend over the past several decades from this method is greater than 3° latitude decade‑1, a rate which is significantly larger than most other tropical widening estimates. We assess the robustness of the previously used methodology by comparing it to a new objective gradient-based method of total column ozone. The total column ozone methodologies are then compared to a diagnostic based on vertically resolved satellite ozone data from the Stratospheric Water and OzOne Satellite Homogenized (SWOOSH) data set. Our results indicate a general lack of robustness of the previous estimates, and are more in line with other tropical widening estimates indicating poleward expansion rates of < 1° latitude decade‑1.

  8. Sensitivity of Ozone to Bromine in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Kovalenko, L. J.; Sioris, C. E.; Wennberg, P. O.; Chance, K.; Ko, M. K. W.; McLinden, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of BrO suggest that inorganic bromine (Br(sub y)) at and above the tropopause is 4 to 8 ppt greater than assumed in models used in past ozone trend assessment studies. This additional bromine is likely carried to the stratosphere by short-lived biogenic compounds and their decomposition products, including tropospheric BrO. Including this additional bromine in an ozone trend simulation increases the computed ozone depletion over the past approx.25 years, leading to better agreement between measured and modeled ozone trends. This additional Br(sub y) (assumed constant over time) causes more ozone depletion because associated BrO provides a reaction partner for ClO, which increases due to anthropogenic sources. Enhanced Br(sub y) causes photochemical loss of ozone below approx.14 km to change from being controlled by HO(sub x) catalytic cycles (primarily HO2+O3) to a situation where loss by the BrO+HO2 cycle is also important.

  9. Nonlinear response of modelled stratospheric ozone to changes in greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances in the recent past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meul, S.; Oberländer-Hayn, S.; Abalichin, J.; Langematz, U.

    2015-06-01

    In the recent past, the evolution of stratospheric ozone (O3) was affected by both increasing ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The impact of the single forcings on O3 is well known. Interactions between the simultaneously increased GHG and ODS concentrations, however, can occur and lead to nonlinear O3 changes. In this study, we investigate if nonlinear processes have affected O3 changes between 1960 and 2000. This is done with an idealised set of time slice simulations with the chemistry-climate model EMAC. Due to nonlinearity the past ozone loss is diminished throughout the stratosphere, with a maximum reduction of 1.2 % at 3 hPa. The total ozone column loss between 1960 and 2000 that is mainly attributed to the ODS increase is mitigated in the extra-polar regions by up to 1.1 % due to nonlinear processes. A separation of the O3 changes into the contribution from chemistry and transport shows that nonlinear interactions occur in both. In the upper stratosphere a reduced efficiency of the ClOx-catalysed O3 loss chiefly causes the nonlinear O3 increase. An enhanced formation of halogen reservoir species through the reaction with methane (CH4) reduces the abundance of halogen radicals significantly. The temperature-induced deceleration of the O3 loss reaction rate in the Chapman cycle is reduced, which leads to a nonlinear O3 decrease and counteracts the increase due to ClOx. Nonlinear effects on the NOx abundance cause hemispheric asymmetric nonlinear changes of the O3 loss. Nonlinear changes in O3 transport occur in particular in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) during the months September to November. Here, the residual circulation is weakened in the lower stratosphere, which goes along with a reduced O3 transport from the tropics to high latitudes. Thus, O3 decreases in the SH polar region but increases in the SH midlatitudes. The existence of nonlinearities implies that future ozone change due to ODS decline slightly depends on the

  10. 76 FR 41747 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Extension of Global Laboratory and Analytical Use Exemption...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... that Deplete the Ozone Layer. The exemption allows persons in the United States to produce and import... further information about EPA's Stratospheric Ozone Protection regulations, the science of ozone layer... Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Montreal Protocol) is the international agreement...

  11. Chemistry Climate Model Simulations of Polar Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakebusch, Matthias

    Stratospheric ozone (O3) plays a crucial role in protecting organisms on Earth from lethal shortwave solar radiation. Because it is radiatively active, O3 also determines the temperature structure of the stratosphere, so its distribution affects the circulation. For these reasons, understanding polar stratospheric O3 has been a high priority of the scientific community for decades. Of primary interest in recent years is explaining and predicting variations in O3 in a changing climate. Stratospheric O3 distributions are affected by both chemistry and transport, which in turn are controlled by temperature, circulation, and dynamics. Hence, investigations of polar stratospheric O3 require the separation of these intertwined processes, and an understanding of the relevant feedbacks. Investigations of these processes require global observations as well as coupled chemistry climate model simulations. This thesis focuses on chemical O 3 loss due to halogen and odd nitrogen (NOX) catalytic cycles, and utilizes satellite measurements from several instruments and the Specified Dynamics Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (SD-WACCM). The science questions are: (1) Is SD-WACCM a tool sophisticated enough for quantitative O3 evolution investigations? (2) How much O 3 loss can be accurately attributed to the stratospheric O3 loss processes induced by halogens, energetic particle precipitation, and NOX individually? (3) Why is the observed O 3 in the Arctic 2010/2011 winter exceptionally low, despite high dynamical variability, which is usually associated with less O3 loss? The questions are addressed by: (1) iteratively evaluating and improving SD-WACCM simulations of the Arctic 2004/2005 winter through comparisons with satellite observations; (2) comparing multiple experimental SD-WACCM simulations of the Antarctic 2005 winter omitting individual O3 loss processes to a reference simulation; (3) testing a hypothesis by means of a comprehensive model simulation of the Arctic

  12. Large climate-induced changes in ultraviolet index and stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, Michaela I.; Shepherd, Theodore G.

    2009-10-01

    Now that stratospheric ozone depletion has been controlled by the Montreal Protocol, interest has turned to the effects of climate change on the ozone layer. Climate models predict an accelerated stratospheric circulation, leading to changes in the spatial distribution of stratospheric ozone and an increased stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux. Here we use an atmospheric chemistry climate model to isolate the effects of climate change from those of ozone depletion and recovery on stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux and the clear-sky ultraviolet radiation index-a measure of potential human exposure to ultraviolet radiation. We show that under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change moderate emissions scenario, global stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux increases by 23% between 1965 and 2095 as a result of climate change. During this time, the clear-sky ultraviolet radiation index decreases by 9% in northern high latitudes-a much larger effect than that of stratospheric ozone recovery-and increases by 4% in the tropics, and by up to 20% in southern high latitudes in late spring and early summer. The latter increase in the ultraviolet index is equivalent to nearly half of that generated by the Antarctic `ozone hole' that was created by anthropogenic halogens. Our results suggest that climate change will alter the tropospheric ozone budget and the ultraviolet index, which would have consequences for tropospheric radiative forcing, air quality and human and ecosystem health.

  13. Parametric Analyses of Potential Effects on Upper Tropospheric/Lower Stratospheric Ozone Chemistry by a Future Fleet of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Type Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Mayurakshi; Patten, Kenneth O.; Wuebbles,Donald J.

    2005-01-01

    This report analyzed the potential impact of projected fleets of HSCT aircraft (currently not under development) through a series of parametric analyses that examine the envelope of potential effects on ozone over a range of total fuel burns, emission indices of nitrogen oxides, and cruise altitudes.

  14. Development of a Climate Record of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Column Ozone from Satellite Remote Sensing: Evidence of an Early Recovery of Global Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Jerald R.; Chandra, Sushil

    2012-01-01

    Ozone data beginning October 2004 from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are used to evaluate the accuracy of the Cloud Slicing technique in effort to develop long data records of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone and for studying their long-term changes. Using this technique, we have produced a 32-yr (1979-2010) long record of tropospheric and stratospheric column ozone from the combined Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and OMI. Analyses of these time series suggest that the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) is the dominant source of inter-annual variability of stratospheric ozone and is clearest in the Southern Hemisphere during the Aura time record with related inter-annual changes of 30- 40 Dobson Units. Tropospheric ozone for the long record also indicates a QBO signal in the tropics with peak-to-peak changes varying from 2 to 7 DU. The most important result from our study is that global stratospheric ozone indicates signature of a recovery occurring with ozone abundance now approaching the levels of year 1980 and earlier. The negative trends in stratospheric ozone in both hemispheres during the first 15 yr of the record are now positive over the last 15 yr and with nearly equal magnitudes. This turnaround in stratospheric ozone loss is occurring about 20 yr earlier than predicted by many chemistry climate models. This suggests that the Montreal Protocol which was first signed in 1987 as an international agreement to reduce ozone destroying substances is working well and perhaps better than anticipated.

  15. Observations of Ozone-aerosol Correlated Behaviour in the Lower Stratosphere During the EASOE Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digirolamo, P.; Cacciani, M.; Disarra, A.; Fiocco, G.; Fua, D.; Joergensen, T. S.; Knudsen, B.; Larsen, N.

    1992-01-01

    The question of possible interactions between ozone and stratospheric aerosol has been open for a long time. Measurements carried out after the Mt. Agung and El Chicon eruptions showed evidence of negative correlations between the presence of volcanic stratospheric aerosols and ozone concentration. Evidence for negative correlations in the polar winter has been also found. It is only after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole that catalytic effects related to low temperature heterogeneous chemistry have become the object of much investigation, now extended to the role of volcanic aerosol in the ozone reduction. These phenomena can be the object of various interpretations, not mutually exclusive, including the effect of transport, diffuse radiation as well as heterogeneous chemistry. The present paper provides preliminary results of simultaneous measurements of ozone and aerosol, carried out at Thule, Greenland, during the winter 1991-92. The European Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) was aimed at monitoring the winter Arctic stratosphere in order to obtain a deeper insight of the ozone destruction processes taking place in the polar regions. A large amount of aerosol was injected into the lower stratosphere by the recent eruption of Volcano Pinatubo. A lidar system, already operational in Thule since November 1990, has provided detailed measurements of the stratospheric aerosol concentration during EASOE. In the same period, a large number of ozonesondes were launched. Although no PSC formation was detected over Thule, the simultaneous measurement of the stratospheric aerosol and ozone profiles give the possibility to study interactions occurring in the stratosphere between these two constituents.

  16. Can Assimilation of Satellite Ozone Data Contribute to the Understanding of the Lower Stratospheric Ozone?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Pawson, S.; Hayashi, H.; Chang, L.-P.; Rood, R.

    2004-01-01

    We study the quality of lower stratospheric ozone fields from a three- dimensional global ozone assimilation system. Ozone in this region is important for the forcing of climate, but its global distribution is not fully known because of its large temporal and vertical variability. Modeled fields often have biases due to the inaccurate representation of transport processes in this region with strong gradients. Accurate ozonesonde or satellite occultation measurements have very limited coverage. Nadir measurements, such as those from the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument that provide wide latitudinal coverage, lack the vertical resolution needed to represent sharp vertical features. Limb measurements, such as those from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS), provide a finer vertical resolution. We show that assimilation of MIPAS data in addition to SBUV/2 data leads to better estimates of ozone in comparison with independent high quality satellite, aircraft, and ozone sonde measurements. Other modifications to the statistical analysis that have an impact on the lower stratospheric ozone will be mentioned: error covariance modeling and data selection. Direct and indirect impacts of transport and chemistry models will be discussed. Implications for multi-year analyses and short-tern prediction will be addressed.

  17. Analysis of stratospheric ozone, temperature, and minor constituent data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Jackman, Charles H.; Kaye, Jack A.; Rood, Richard B.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to use available satellite measurements of temperature and constituent concentrations to test the conceptual picture of stratospheric chemistry and transport. This was originally broken down into two sub-goals: first, to use the constituent data to search for critical tests of our understanding of stratospheric chemistry and second, to examine constituent transport processes emphasizing interactions with chemistry on various time scales. A third important goal which has evolved is to use the available solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data from Nimbus 7 to describe the morphology of recent changes in Antarctic and global ozone with emphasis on searching for constraints to theories. The major effort now being pursued relative to the two original goals is our effort as a theoretical team for the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition (AASE). Our effort for the AASE is based on the 3D transport and chemistry model at Goddard. Our goal is to use this model to place the results from the mission data in a regional and global context. Specifically, we set out to make model runs starting in late December and running through March of 1989, both with and without heterogeneous chemistry. The transport is to be carried out using dynamical fields from a 4D data assimilation model being developed under separate funding from this task. We have successfully carried out a series of single constituent transport experiments. One of the things demonstrated by these runs was the difficulty in obtaining observed low N2O abundances in the vortex without simultaneously obtaining very high ozone values. Because the runs start in late December, this difficulty arises in the attempt to define consistent initial conditions for the 3D model. To accomplish a consistent set of initial conditions, we are using the 2D photochemistry-transport model of Jackman and Douglass and mapping in potential temperature

  18. The effect of ozone depletion on the Southern Annular Mode and stratosphere-troposphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, Fraser W.; McDonald, Adrian J.; Morgenstern, Olaf

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of ozone depletion and recovery on the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and stratosphere-troposphere coupling. Using the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research-United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols chemistry-climate model, we compare reference runs that include forcing due to greenhouse gases and ozone-depleting substances to sensitivity simulations in which ozone-depleting substances are fixed at their 1960 levels. We find that ozone depletion leads to an increased frequency of extreme anomalies and increased persistence of the SAM in the stratosphere as well as stronger, more persistent stratosphere-troposphere coupling. Currently, the stratosphere provides an appreciable amount of predictability to the troposphere on timescales of 1 or 2 months; however, we find that this effect reduces over time as stratospheric ozone recovers to preozone hole levels toward the latter part of this century.

  19. Chlorine monoxide radical, ozone, and hydrogen peroxide: stratospheric measurements by microwave limb sounding

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, J.W.; Hardy, J.C.; Jarnot, R.F.; Pickett, H.M.

    1981-10-02

    Profiles of stratospheric ozone and chlorine monoxide radical (ClO) were obtained from balloon measurements of atmospheric limb thermal emission at millimeter wavelengths. The ClO measurements, important for assessing the predicted depletion of stratospheric ozone by chlorine from industrial sources, are in close agreement with present theory. The predicted decrease of ClO at sunset was measured. A tentative value for the stratospheric abundance of hydrogen peroxide was also determined.

  20. Chlorine monoxide radical, ozone, and hydrogen peroxide - Stratospheric measurements by microwave limb sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Hardy, J. C.; Jarnot, R. F.; Pickett, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    Profiles of stratospheric ozone and chlorine monoxide radical (ClO) have been obtained from balloon measurements of atmospheric limb thermal emission at millimeter wavelengths. The ClO measurements, important for assessing the predicted depletion of stratospheric ozone by chlorine from industrial sources, are in close agreement with present theory. The predicted decrease of ClO at sunset was measured. A tentative value for the stratospheric abundance of hydrogen peroxide was also determined.

  1. Visualization of stratospheric ozone depletion and the polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treinish, Lloyd A.

    1995-01-01

    Direct analysis of spacecraft observations of stratospheric ozone yields information about the morphology of annual austral depletion. Visual correlation of ozone with other atmospheric data illustrates the diurnal dynamics of the polar vortex and contributions from the upper troposphere, including the formation and breakup of the depletion region each spring. These data require care in their presentation to minimize the introduction of visualization artifacts that are erroneously interpreted as data features. Non geographically registered data of differing mesh structures can be visually correlated via cartographic warping of base geometries without interpolation. Because this approach is independent of the realization technique, it provides a framework for experimenting with many visualization strategies. This methodology preserves the fidelity of the original data sets in a coordinate system suitable for three-dimensional, dynamic examination of atmospheric phenomena.

  2. Delayed climate change in the Southern Hemisphere induced by stratospheric ozone recovery, as projected by the CMIP5 models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polvani, L. M.; Barnes, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Stratospheric ozone is expected to recover in the second half of this century, due to the regulation of ozone depleting substances by the Montreal Protocol. Targeted modeling studies have suggested that the climate response to ozone recovery will greatly oppose the climate response to increasing greenhouse-gases (GHG); owever, the extent of this cancellation remains unclear, as few such studies are available. Here, we analyze the much larger set of models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5), all of which include stratospheric ozone depletion and recovery. We show that the closing of the ozone hole will cause a delay in summer-time (DJF) Southern Hemisphere climate change, between now and mid-century. Specifically, we find that the position of the jet stream, the width of the subtropical dry-zones, the seasonality of surface temperatures, and sea ice concentrations all exhibit significantly reduced summer-time trends over the first half of the 21st Century as a consequence of ozone recovery. Beyond mid-century, forcing from GHG emissions begins to dominate the climate response. We also compare the relative influences of future GHG emissions and historic ozone depletion, and find that the simulated DJF tropospheric circulation changes in the Southern Hemisphere between 1965-2005 -- driven primarily by ozone depletion -- are larger than the projected changes in any future scenario over the entire 21st Century.

  3. The Goddard Three Dimensional Chemistry and Transport Model-A Waystation on the Road to Predicting the Future of Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne

    1999-01-01

    The Goddard 3D Chemistry and Transport Model (CTM) is an off-line model which includes a full description of stratospheric photochemistry and calculates constituent transport using winds and temperatures from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System. The model can be used to understand and quantify the photochemical and transport processes which produce observed constituent evolution and variability. Data from any platform - ground based, aircraft, balloon, satellite - can play a role. Since any measurement systems has its own set of advantages and disadvantages (e.g., good temporal sampling but poor spatial sampling; good spatial and temporal sampling but poor vertical resolution; high vertical resolution and spatial sampling but poor temporal sampling), using data from disparate sources and a CTM can provide a more complete picture of atmospheric processes.

  4. Multimodel Assessment of the Factors Driving Stratospheric Ozone Evolution over the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, L. D.; Plummer, D. A.; Waugh, D. W.; Austin, J.; Scinocca, J. F.; Douglass, A. R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Canty, T.; Akiyoshi, H.; Bekki, S.; Braesicke, P.; Butchart, N.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Cugnet, D.; Dhomse, S.; Eyring, V.; Frith, S.; Hardiman, S. C.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Mancini, E.; Marchand, M.; Michou, M.; Morgenstern, O.; Nakamura, T.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of stratospheric ozone from 1960 to 2100 is examined in simulations from 14 chemistry-climate models, driven by prescribed levels of halogens and greenhouse gases. There is general agreement among the models that total column ozone reached a minimum around year 2000 at all latitudes, projected to be followed by an increase over the first half of the 21st century. In the second half of the 21st century, ozone is projected to continue increasing, level off, or even decrease depending on the latitude. Separation into partial columns above and below 20 hPa reveals that these latitudinal differences are almost completely caused by differences in the model projections of ozone in the lower stratosphere. At all latitudes, upper stratospheric ozone increases throughout the 21st century and is projected to return to 1960 levels well before the end of the century, although there is a spread among models in the dates that ozone returns to specific historical values. We find decreasing halogens and declining upper atmospheric temperatures, driven by increasing greenhouse gases, contribute almost equally to increases in upper stratospheric ozone. In the tropical lower stratosphere, an increase in upwelling causes a steady decrease in ozone through the 21st century, and total column ozone does not return to 1960 levels in most of the models. In contrast, lower stratospheric and total column ozone in middle and high latitudes increases during the 21st century, returning to 1960 levels well before the end of the century in most models.

  5. Changes in tropospheric composition and air quality due to stratospheric ozone depletion and climate change.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S R; Solomon, K R; Tang, X

    2007-03-01

    It is well-understood that reductions in air quality play a significant role in both environmental and human health. Interactions between ozone depletion and global climate change will significantly alter atmospheric chemistry which, in turn, will cause changes in concentrations of natural and human-made gases and aerosols. Models predict that tropospheric ozone near the surface will increase globally by up to 10 to 30 ppbv (33 to 100% increase) during the period 2000 to 2100. With the increase in the amount of the stratospheric ozone, increased transport from the stratosphere to the troposphere will result in different responses in polluted and unpolluted areas. In contrast, global changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) are not predicted to be large, except where influenced by the presence of oxidizable organic matter, such as from large-scale forest fires. Recent measurements in a relatively clean location over 5 years showed that OH concentrations can be predicted by the intensity of solar ultraviolet radiation. If this relationship is confirmed by further observations, this approach could be used to simplify assessments of air quality. Analysis of surface-level ozone observations in Antarctica suggests that there has been a significant change in the chemistry of the boundary layer of the atmosphere in this region as a result of stratospheric ozone depletion. The oxidation potential of the Antarctic boundary layer is estimated to be greater now than before the development of the ozone hole. Recent modeling studies have suggested that iodine and iodine-containing substances from natural sources, such as the ocean, may increase stratospheric ozone depletion significantly in polar regions during spring. Given the uncertainty of the fate of iodine in the stratosphere, the results may also be relevant for stratospheric ozone depletion and measurements of the influence of these substances on ozone depletion should be considered in the future. In agreement with

  6. Catastrophic loss of stratospheric ozone in dense volcanic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Rapid, localized loss of ozone is predicted to occur in the midlatitude and tropical stratosphere in the presence of very large concentrations of sulfate aerosols. Volcanic eruptions can increase the effective surface area of sulfuric acid so that heterogeneous reactions involving ClONO2, and secondarily N2O5, are able to suppress NO(x) abundances by more than a factor of 10 relative to gas phase chemistry. When NO(x) levels fall below a threshold, e.g., 0.6 ppb at 24 km in mid-latitudes, the chlorine-catalyzed loss of O3 proceeds at rates comparable to those during the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole, more than 50 ppb per day. If such losses occurred following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the most volcanically perturbed regions over the tropics and mid-latitudes, this model predicts that they are driven primarily by the suppression of NO(x) below these critical levels. The increase in stratospheric chlorine since El Chichon has made Mount Pinatubo more than twice as effective in causing rapid O3 loss.

  7. Energetic particle precipitation: A major driver of the ozone budget in the Antarctic upper stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, Alessandro; Funke, Bernd; Santee, Michelle L.; Cordero, Raul R.; Watanabe, Shingo

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic activity is thought to affect ozone and, possibly, climate in polar regions via energetic particle precipitation (EPP) but observational evidence of its importance in the seasonal stratospheric ozone variation on long time scales is still lacking. Here we fill this gap by showing that at high southern latitudes, late winter ozone series, covering the 1979-2014 period, exhibit an average stratospheric depletion of about 10-15% on a monthly basis caused by EPP. Daily observations indicate that every austral winter EPP-induced low ozone concentrations appear at about 45 km in late June and descend later to 30 km, before disappearing by September. Such stratospheric variations are coupled with mesospheric ozone changes also driven by EPP. No significant correlation between these ozone variations and solar ultraviolet irradiance has been found. This suggests the need of including the EPP forcing in both ozone model simulations and trend analysis.

  8. Effects of Zonal Wind on Stratospheric Ozone Variations over Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidinma Okoro, Eucharia,

    2016-07-01

    The effects of zonal wind on stratospheric ozone variation over Nigeria have been studied. The areas covered in this study include; Maiduguri, Ikeja, Port-Harcourt, Calabar, Makurdi, Ilorin, Akure, Yola, Minna, Jos, Kano and Enugu in Nigeria, from 1986 to 2008. Zonal wind was computed from the iso-velocity map employing MATLAB software. The mean monthly variations of AAM and LOD at pressure levels of 20, 30 and 50 mb in the atmosphere depict a trend of maximum amplitude between April and September, and minimum amplitude between December and March. The trend observed in seasonal variation of O3 column data in the low latitude had maximum amount from May through August and minimum values from December through February. The mean monthly maximum O3 concentrations was found to be 284.70 Du (Kano) occurring in May 1989 while, an average monthly minimum O3 concentration was found to be 235.60 Du (Port-Harcourt and Calabar) occurring in January 1998. It has been established in this study that, the variation in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) caused by variation of the universal time or length of day (LOD) transfer ozone (O3) by means of zonal wind from the upper troposphere to the lower stratosphere in the stations understudy. The strong effect of the pressure levels of the atmosphere on O3 variation could be attributed to its effect on the AAM and LOD. Variation in the LOD is significant in the tropics, suggesting that, the effects of the extra-tropical suction pump (ETSP) action is not the only driver responsible for O3 transportation from the tropics to extra-tropical zones. Consequently, these findings lead to a deduction that weather pattern alteration observed due to these changes could lead to climate change. Keywords: ozone variations; dynamical processes; harmattan wind; ETSP; and climatic variability

  9. Stratospheric ozone change and related climate impacts over 1850-2100 as modelled by the ACCMIP ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Suarez, F.; Young, P. J.; Wild, O.

    2016-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone and associated climate impacts in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) simulations are evaluated in the recent past (1980-2000), and examined in the long-term (1850-2100) using the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) low- and high-emission scenarios (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively) for the period 2000-2100. ACCMIP multi-model mean total column ozone (TCO) trends compare favourably, within uncertainty estimates, against observations. Particularly good agreement is seen in the Antarctic austral spring (-11.9 % dec-1 compared to observed ˜ -13.9 ± 10.4 % dec-1), although larger deviations are found in the Arctic's boreal spring (-2.1 % dec-1 compared to observed ˜ -5.3 ± 3.3 % dec-1). The simulated ozone hole has cooled the lower stratosphere during austral spring in the last few decades (-2.2 K dec-1). This cooling results in Southern Hemisphere summertime tropospheric circulation changes captured by an increase in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) index (1.3 hPa dec-1). In the future, the interplay between the ozone hole recovery and greenhouse gases (GHGs) concentrations may result in the SAM index returning to pre-ozone hole levels or even with a more positive phase from around the second half of the century (-0.4 and 0.3 hPa dec-1 for the RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively). By 2100, stratospheric ozone sensitivity to GHG concentrations is greatest in the Arctic and Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes (37.7 and 16.1 DU difference between the RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively), and smallest over the tropics and Antarctica continent (2.5 and 8.1 DU respectively). Future TCO changes in the tropics are mainly determined by the upper stratospheric ozone sensitivity to GHG concentrations, due to a large compensation between tropospheric and lower stratospheric column ozone changes in the two RCP scenarios. These results demonstrate how changes in stratospheric ozone are tightly linked to climate and show

  10. Stratospheric ozone change and related climate impacts over 1850-2100 as modelled by the ACCMIP ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Suarez, F.; Young, P. J.; Wild, O.

    2015-09-01

    Stratospheric ozone and associated climate impacts in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) simulations are evaluated in the recent past (1980-2000), and examined in the long-term (1850-2100) using the Representative Concentration Pathways low and high emission scenarios (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively) for the period 2000-2100. ACCMIP multi-model mean total column ozone (TCO) trends compare favourably, within uncertainty estimates, against observations. Particularly good agreement is seen in the Antarctic austral spring (-11.9 % dec-1 compared to observed ~ -13.8 ± 11 % dec-1), although larger deviations are found in the Arctic's boreal spring (-2.1 % dec-1 compared to observed ~ -5.3 ± 3 % dec-1). The simulated ozone hole has cooled the lower stratosphere during austral spring in the last few decades (-2.2 K dec-1). This cooling results in Southern Hemisphere summertime tropospheric circulation changes captured by an increase in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) index (1.27 hPa dec-1). In the future, the interplay between the ozone hole recovery and greenhouse gases (GHGs) concentrations may result in the SAM index returning to pre-ozone hole levels or even with a more positive phase from around the second half of the century (-0.4 and 0.3 hPa dec-1 for the RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively). By 2100, stratospheric ozone sensitivity to GHG concentrations is greatest in the Arctic and Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes (37.7 and 16.1 DU difference between the RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively), and smallest over the tropics and Antarctica continent (2.5 and 8.1 DU respectively). Future TCO changes in the tropics are mainly determined by the upper stratospheric ozone sensitivity to GHG concentrations, due to a large compensation between tropospheric and lower stratospheric column ozone changes in the two RCP scenarios. These results demonstrate how changes in stratospheric ozone are tightly linked to climate and show the benefit of

  11. Observational evidence of the influence of Antarctic stratospheric ozone variability on middle atmosphere dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswara Rao, N.; Espy, P. J.; Hibbins, R. E.; Fritts, D. C.; Kavanagh, A. J.

    2015-10-01

    Modeling results have suggested that the circulation of the stratosphere and mesosphere in spring is strongly affected by the perturbations in heating induced by the Antarctic ozone hole. Here using both mesospheric MF radar wind observations from Rothera Antarctica (67°S, 68°W) as well as stratospheric analysis data, we present observational evidence that the stratospheric and mesospheric wind strengths are highly anti-correlated, and show their largest variability in November. We find that these changes are related to the total amount of ozone loss that occurs during the Antarctic spring ozone hole and particularly with the ozone gradients that develop between 57.5°S and 77.5°S. The results show that with increasing ozone loss during spring, winter conditions in the stratosphere and mesosphere persist longer into the summer. These results are discussed in the light of observations of the onset and duration of the Antarctic polar mesospheric cloud season.

  12. Simulating the impact of emissions of brominated very short lived substances on past stratospheric ozone trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Meul, Stefanie

    2015-04-01

    Bromine from very short lived substances (VSLS), primarily from natural oceanic sources, contributes substantially to the stratospheric bromine loading. This source of stratospheric bromine has so far been ignored in most chemistry climate model calculations of stratospheric ozone trends. Here we present a transient simulation with the chemistry climate model EMAC for the period 1960-2005 including emissions of the five brominated VSLS CHBr3, CH2Br2, CH2BrCl, CHBrCl2, and CHBr2Cl. The emissions lead to a realistic stratospheric bromine loading of about 20 pptv for present-day conditions. Comparison with a standard model simulation without VSLS shows large differences in modeled ozone in the extratropical lowermost stratosphere and in the troposphere. Differences in ozone maximize in the Antarctic Ozone Hole, resulting in more than 20% less ozone when VSLS are included. Even though the emissions of VSLS are assumed to be constant in time, the model simulation with VSLS included shows a much larger ozone decrease in the lowermost stratosphere during the 1979-1995 period and a faster ozone increase during 1996-2005, in better agreement with observed ozone trends than the standard simulation without VSLS emissions.

  13. Ice surface chemistry relevant to stratospheric ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Franz Martin

    The surface specific nonlinear laser spectroscopy method second harmonic generation (SHG) is used to investigate the heterogeneously catalyzed hydrolysis of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) on ice, a key reaction in stratospheric ozone depletion occurring in the presence of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) ice particles formed during the polar winter. The reaction, yielding hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and nitric acid (HNO3), is studied directly and in real time on a single crystal basal ice (Ih) surface maintained under typical conditions of the polar stratosphere. The ice crystal is kept in equilibrium with its vapor pressure. Polarization studies are consistent with the clean basal ice surface at 158K being 3m symmetric, in contrast to proposals by others that the surface is disordered. The symmetry is retained upon HNO3 adsorption; this observation disagrees with proposals by others that this could cause surface melting. A SHG spectrum from 290 to 310 nm is obtained from HOCl on ice; this spectrum resembles the electronic spectrum of HOCl and serves as an identification tool for adsorbed HOCl. HOCl adsorption onto ice is instantaneous and occurs in registry with the underlying ice lattice. Measured isothermal rate constants for HOCl desorption from ice result in an activation energy for desorption of 36 +/- 2 kJ/mol. When submonolayer amounts of ClONO2 are hydrolyzed on the ice surface, the SHG vs. time traces show no changes for hundreds of seconds, then a sigmoidal increase, and eventually a constant value. The SHG increase is related to the appearance of HOCl. Predosing experiments show that the delay times are due to autocatalysis, with the HOCl product being a possible autocatalyst. The HNO3 co-product, on the other hand, acts as a surface poison and inhibits HOCl desorption. A molecular reaction mechanism, based on one proposed by Bianco and Hynes, is presented and discussed in light of the obtained experimental data, supporting ab initio calculations, and numerical

  14. A post-Kyoto partner: Considering the stratospheric ozone regime as a tool to manage nitrous oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kanter, David; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Daniel, John S.; Portmann, Robert W.; Grabiel, Peter M.; Moomaw, William R.; Galloway, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the largest known remaining anthropogenic threat to the stratospheric ozone layer. However, it is currently only regulated under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol because of its simultaneous ability to warm the climate. The threat N2O poses to the stratospheric ozone layer, coupled with the uncertain future of the international climate regime, motivates our exploration of issues that could be relevant to the Parties to the ozone regime (the 1985 Vienna Convention and its 1987 Montreal Protocol) should they decide to take measures to manage N2O in the future. There are clear legal avenues to regulate N2O under the ozone regime as well as several ways to share authority with the existing and future international climate treaties. N2O mitigation strategies exist to address the most significant anthropogenic sources, including agriculture, where behavioral practices and new technologies could contribute significantly to reducing emissions. Existing policies managing N2O and other forms of reactive nitrogen could be harnessed and built on by the ozone regime to implement N2O controls. There are several challenges and potential cobenefits to N2O control which we discuss here: food security, equity, and implications of the nitrogen cascade. The possible inclusion of N2O in the ozone regime need not be viewed as a sign of failure of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to adequately deal with climate change. Rather, it could represent an additional valuable tool in sustainable development diplomacy. PMID:23440192

  15. A post-Kyoto partner: considering the stratospheric ozone regime as a tool to manage nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Kanter, David; Mauzerall, Denise L; Ravishankara, A R; Daniel, John S; Portmann, Robert W; Grabiel, Peter M; Moomaw, William R; Galloway, James N

    2013-03-19

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the largest known remaining anthropogenic threat to the stratospheric ozone layer. However, it is currently only regulated under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol because of its simultaneous ability to warm the climate. The threat N2O poses to the stratospheric ozone layer, coupled with the uncertain future of the international climate regime, motivates our exploration of issues that could be relevant to the Parties to the ozone regime (the 1985 Vienna Convention and its 1987 Montreal Protocol) should they decide to take measures to manage N2O in the future. There are clear legal avenues to regulate N2O under the ozone regime as well as several ways to share authority with the existing and future international climate treaties. N2O mitigation strategies exist to address the most significant anthropogenic sources, including agriculture, where behavioral practices and new technologies could contribute significantly to reducing emissions. Existing policies managing N2O and other forms of reactive nitrogen could be harnessed and built on by the ozone regime to implement N2O controls. There are several challenges and potential cobenefits to N2O control which we discuss here: food security, equity, and implications of the nitrogen cascade. The possible inclusion of N2O in the ozone regime need not be viewed as a sign of failure of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to adequately deal with climate change. Rather, it could represent an additional valuable tool in sustainable development diplomacy. PMID:23440192

  16. Variability and trends in total and vertically resolved stratospheric ozone based on the CATO ozone data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, D.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Wohltmann, I.; Bodeker, G. E.

    2006-10-01

    Trends in ozone columns and vertical distributions were calculated for the period 1979-2004 based on the ozone data set CATO (Candidoz Assimilated Three-dimensional Ozone) using a multiple linear regression model. CATO has been reconstructed from TOMS, GOME and SBUV total column ozone observations in an equivalent latitude and potential temperature framework and offers a pole to pole coverage of the stratosphere on 15 potential temperature levels. The regression model includes explanatory variables describing the influence of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), volcanic eruptions, the solar cycle, the Brewer-Dobson circulation, Arctic ozone depletion, and the increase in stratospheric chlorine. The effects of displacements of the polar vortex and jet streams due to planetary waves, which may significantly affect trends at a given geographical latitude, are eliminated in the equivalent latitude framework. The QBO shows a strong signal throughout most of the lower stratosphere with peak amplitudes in the tropics of the order of 10-20% (peak to valley). The eruption of Pinatubo led to annual mean ozone reductions of 15-25% between the tropopause and 23 km in northern mid-latitudes and to similar percentage changes in the southern hemisphere but concentrated at altitudes below 17 km. Stratospheric ozone is elevated over a broad latitude range by up to 5% during solar maximum compared to solar minimum, the largest increase being observed around 30 km. This is at a lower altitude than reported previously, and no negative signal is found in the tropical lower stratosphere. The Brewer-Dobson circulation shows a dominant contribution to interannual variability at both high and low latitudes and accounts for some of the ozone increase seen in the northern hemisphere since the mid-1990s. Arctic ozone depletion significantly affects the high northern latitudes between January and March and extends its influence to the mid-latitudes during later months. The vertical

  17. Impact of Very Short-live Halogens on Stratospheric Ozone Abundance (and UV radiation) in a Geo-engineered Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmes, Simone; Kinnison, Doug; Garcia, Rolando; Salawitch, Ross; Lee-Taylor, Julia

    2010-05-01

    In this study we used the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to explore the impact of very short-lived (VSL) bromocarbons on stratospheric ozone abundance and surface UV radiation under the influence of geoengineered aerosols. VSL bromocarbons have by definition a chemical lifetime of less than 0.5 years (WMO, 2006). In contrast to long-lived bromocarbons (e.g., CH3Br plus halons), these VSL bromocarbons have natural sources (e.g., oceanic emissions) and their abundance will therefore not decrease in the future due to international protocols. They are eventually oxidized via reactions with OH and photolysis to form inorganic bromine product gases and get transported into the stratosphere. Observations suggest that VSL bromocarbons add an additional 4-10 pptv volume mixing ratios to the total stratospheric inorganic bromine abundance. Since inorganic bromine is ~60 times more efficient (relative to inorganic chlorine) at catalytic destroying ozone, this additional inorganic bromine loading could significantly affect stratospheric ozone. This is especially true in the Arctic, where the coupled BrO/ClO catalytic ozone loss cycle is as important as the ClO dimer ozone loss cycle. The chemical activation of chlorine is highly dependent on the amount of sulfate aerosol and VSL bromine provides a reaction partner for activated chlorine, resulting in a significant increase of ozone depletion in a geo-engineered aerosol environment in high latitudes. An additional impact of short-lived bromocarbons on the ozone abundance is expected and was not considered in earlier studies.

  18. On the turnaround of stratospheric ozone trends deduced from the reevaluated Umkehr record of Arosa, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanis, P.; Maillard, E.; Staehelin, J.; Zerefos, C.; Kosmidis, E.; Tourpali, K.; Wohltmann, I.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the issue of the turnaround in ozone trends of the recently homogenized Umkehr ozone record of Arosa, Switzerland, which is the longest Umkehr data set, extending from 1956 to date, using different statistical methods. All methods show statistically significant negative ozone trends from 1970 to 1995 in the upper stratosphere (above 32.6 km) throughout the course of the year as well as in the lower stratosphere (below 23.5 km) mainly during winter to spring, which can be partially attributed to dynamical changes. Over the recent period (1996-2004) the year-round trends in the lower stratosphere become positive and are more positive during the winter to spring period. The results also show changes in upper stratospheric ozone trends after 1996, which are, however, not statistically significant at 95% if aerosol correction is applied on the retrieved data. This lack of significant trend changes during the recent period in the upper stratosphere is regionally coherent with recent results derived from upper stratospheric ozone data recorded by lidars, microwave radiometers, and satellite instruments at an adjacent location. Although the positive change in trends after 1996 both for upper and lower stratospheric ozone is in line with the reduction of the emissions of ozone-depleting substances from the successful implementation of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, we recommend, because of lack of significance for the upper stratospheric trends, repeating this analysis in a few years in order to overcome ambiguous results for documentation of the turnaround of upper stratospheric ozone.

  19. Relationship between total ozone amounts and stratospheric temperature at Syowa, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Shigeru Chubachi )

    1993-02-20

    Using statistical methods, the relationship has been studied between total ozone and 100-mbar temperatures at Syowa Station, Antarctica (69[degrees]S, 40[degrees]E), based on data obtained in 1961-1981 and 1982-1988, the time of ozone depletion in Antarctica. Results indicate a strong, positive correlation between total ozone and 100-mbar stratospheric temperatures during September-March for all years, but lower ozone values at 100-mbar stratospheric temperatures colder than about [minus]60[degrees]C during the 1982-1988 period. Ozone destruction by heterogeneous photochemical processes is the main cause of ozone depletion over Syowa during the 1980's, with a lesser contribution from a change in air dynamics (heat, ozone, and momentum transport to Antarctica during the austral spring) that increased polar vortex stability, thereby promoting photochemical ozone depression within the vortex. 27 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Export of Ozone-Poor Air from the Lower Tropical Stratosphere to Mid-latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Weinstock, E. M.; Anderson, J. G.

    2002-05-01

    Analysis of ozonesonde profiles shows a decline in ozone of 7 to 9%/decade during the past 20 to 30 years in the northern mid-latitude lower stratosphere [Logan et al., 1999], exposing the large population at these latitudes to increased health risks. Heterogeneous processing leading to halogen-catalyzed ozone loss is not expected to occur in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere because in situ measurements indicate the air is consistently undersaturated and low in ClO in this region [Smith et al., 2001]. Furthermore, in situ measurements acquired aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft during SOLVE (SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment) suggest that equatorward mixing of ozone-depleted air from the Arctic vortex does not contribute significantly to declines in mid-latitude lower stratospheric ozone. Instead, tracer-tracer correlations from SOLVE indicate that rapid isentropic transport from the lower tropical stratosphere coupled with diabatic descent in mid-latitudes delivers very young, ozone-poor air to the lowermost stratosphere (θ < 380 K) during northern winter. Given this result, we hypothesize that the seasonal and interannual variability in the strength of this transport from the lower tropical stratosphere modulates mid-latitude lower stratospheric ozone. We investigate methods of using in situ observations to test this hypothesis. Logan, J.A., et al., Trends in the vertical distribution of ozone: A comparison of two analyses of ozonesonde data, Journal of Geophysical Research, 104, 26373-26399, 1999. Smith, J.B., et al., Mechanisms for midlatitude ozone loss: Heterogeneous chemistry in the lowermost stratosphere?, Journal of Geophysical Research, 106, 1297-1309, 2001.

  1. Role of Stratospheric Air in a Severe Weather Event: Analysis of Potential Vorticity and Total Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, Melissa A.; Gallus, William A., Jr.; Olsen, Mark A.; Stanford, John L.

    2001-01-01

    The role of dry stratospheric air descending to low and middle tropospheric levels in a severe weather outbreak in the midwestern United States is examined using ACCEPT Eta model output, Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) analyses, and Earth probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP/TOMS) total ozone data. While stratospheric air was not found to play a direct role in the convection, backward trajectories show stratospheric air descended to 800 hPa just west of the convection. Damaging surface winds not associated with thunderstorms also occurred in the region of greatest stratospheric descent. Small-scale features in the high-resolution total ozone data compare favorably with geopotential heights and potential vorticity fields, supporting the notion that stratospheric air descended to near the surface. A detailed vertical structure in the potential vorticity appears to be captured by small-scale total ozone variations. The capability of the total ozone to identify mesoscale features assists model verification. The total ozone data suggest biases in the RUC analysis and Eta forecast of this event. The total ozone is also useful in determining whether potential vorticity is of stratospheric origin or is diabatically generated in the troposphere.

  2. A Global Climatology of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Ozone Derived from Aura OMI and MLS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, J.R.; Chandra, S.; Labow, G.; Bhartia, P. K.; Froidevaux, L.; Witte, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    A global climatology of tropospheric and stratospheric column ozone is derived by combining six years of Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) ozone measurements for the period October 2004 through December 2010. The OMI/MLS tropospheric ozone climatology exhibits large temporal and spatial variability which includes ozone accumulation zones in the tropical south Atlantic year-round and in the subtropical Mediterranean! Asia region in summer months. High levels of tropospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere also persist in mid-latitudes over the eastern North American and Asian continents extending eastward over the Pacific Ocean. For stratospheric ozone climatology from MLS, largest ozone abundance lies in the northern hemisphere in the latitude range 70degN-80degN in February-April and in the southern hemisphere around 40degS-50degS during months August-October. The largest stratospheric ozone abundances in the northern hemisphere lie over North America and eastern Asia extending eastward across the Pacific Ocean and in the southern hemisphere south of Australia extending eastward across the dateline. With the advent of many newly developing 3D chemistry and transport models it is advantageous to have such a dataset for evaluating the performance of the models in relation to dynamical and photochemical processes controlling the ozone distributions in the troposphere and stratosphere.

  3. STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION: A FOCUS ON EPA'S RESEARCH (EPA/640/K-95/004)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brochure describes the mechanisms of and problems associated with stratospheric ozone depletion as well as some of the Office ofResearch and Development's (ORD) associated research projects. The Office of Research and Development has pursued a multifacetedresearch program ...

  4. The features of ozone quasi-biennial oscillation in tropical stratosphere and its numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Zheng, B.; Zhang, H.

    The interannual variation of the vertical distribiltion of ozone in the tropical stratosphere and its quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) is analyzed Using HALOE data. The results are compared with the wind QBO. A numerical experiment is carried out to study the effects of wind QBO on the distribution, and variation OF ozone in the stratosphere by using the NCAR interactive chemical, dynamical, and radiative two-dimensional model (SOCRATES). Data analysis shows that the location of the maximum ozone mixing ratio in the stratosphere changes in the meridional and vertical directions, and assumes a quasi-biennial period, The meridional and vertical motion of the maximum mixing ratio leads to a QBO of column ozone and its hemispheric asymmetry. The QBO of the location of the maximum is closely connected with the zonal wind QBO. The data analysis also shows that in the tropical region, the phase of the QBO For ozone density changes many times with height. Numerical simulation shows that the meridional circulation induced by the wind QBO includes three pairs of cells in the stratosphere, which have hemispheric symmetry. The transport of ozone by the induced meridional circulation in various latitudes and heights is the main dynamic cause for the ozone QBO. Cells of the induced circulation in the middle stratosphere (25-35 km) play an important role in producing the ozone QBO.

  5. The features of ozone quasi—biennial oscillation in tropical stratosphere and its numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucjuan, Chen; Bin, Zheng; Hong, Zhang

    2002-09-01

    The inlcrunnual variation of the vertical distribution of ozone in the tropical stratosphere and its quasi—biennial oscillation (QBO) is analyzed using HALOE data. The results are compared with the wind QBO. A numerical experiment is carried out to study the effects of wind QBO on the distribution, and variation of ozone in the stratosphere by using (he NCAR interactive chemical, dynamical, and radiative two—dimensional model (SOCRATES). Data analysis shows that the location of the maximum ozone mixing ratio in the stratosphere changes in the meridional and vertical directions, and assumes a quasi—biennial period. The meridional and vertical motion of the maximum mixing ratio leads to a QBO of column ozone and its hemispheric asymmetry. The QBO of the location of the maximum is closely connected with the zonal wind QBO. The data analysis also shows that in the tropical region, the phase of the QBO for ozone density changes many times with height. Numerical simulation shows that the meridional circulation induced by the wind QBO includes three pairs of cells in the stratosphere, which have hemispheric symmetry. The transport of ozone by the induced meridional circulation in various latitudes and heights is the main dynamic cause for the ozone QBO. Cells of the induced circulation in the middle stratosphere (25-35 km) play an important role in producing the ozone QBO.

  6. Stratospheric ozone loss, ultraviolet effects and action spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    The major effect of stratospheric ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation reaching the ground. This increase will be entirely contained within the UV-B (290-320nm). How this will impact life on Earth will be determined by the UV-B photobiology of exposed organisms, including humans. One of the analytical methods useful in estimating these effects is Action Spectroscopy (biological effect as a function of wavelength). Carefully constructed action spectra will allow us to partially predict the increase in bio-effect due to additional UV exposure. What effect this has on the organism and the system in which the organism resides is of paramount importance. Suitable action spectra already exist for human skin cancer, human cell mutation and killing, and for one immune response. Comprehensive and widely applicable action spectra for terrestrial and aquatic plant responses are being generated but are not yet suitable for extensive analysis. There is little data available for animals, other than those experiments completed in the laboratory as model systems for human studies. Some polychromatic action spectra have proven useful in determining the possible impact of ozone loss on biological systems. The pitfalls and limits of this approach will be addressed.

  7. Ab Initio Studies of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the current understanding of ozone depletion chemistry, particularly with regards the formation of the so-called Antarctic ozone hole, will be presented together with an outline as to how ab initio quantum chemistry can be used to further our understanding of stratospheric chemistry. The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of fluorine, chlorine, bromine and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. The ab initio results will be shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the theoretical results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve experimental controversies. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of halogen oxide species will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of experimental studies.

  8. Influence of an Internally-Generated QBO on Modeled Stratospheric Dynamics and Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.; Song, I. S.

    2011-01-01

    A GEOS V2 CCM simulation with an internally generated quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) signal is compared to an otherwise identical simulation without a QBO. In a present-day climate, inclusion of the modeled QBO makes a significant difference to stratospheric dynamics and ozone throughout the year. The QBO enhances variability in the tropics, as expected, but also in the polar stratosphere in some seasons. The modeled QBO also affects the mean stratospheric climate. Because tropical zonal winds in the baseline simulation are generally easterly, there is a relative increase in zonal wind magnitudes in tropical lower and middle stratosphere in the QBO simulation. Extra-tropical differences between the QBO and 'no QBO' simulations thus reflect a bias toward the westerly phase of the QBO: a relative strengthening and poleward shifting the polar stratospheric jets, and a reduction in Arctic lower stratospheric ozone.

  9. Distinguishing the impacts of ozone-depleting substances and well-mixed greenhouse gases on Arctic stratospheric ozone and temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Harald E.; Polvani, Lorenzo M.; Solomon, Susan

    2014-04-01

    Whether stratospheric cooling due to increases in well-mixed greenhouse gases (WMGHG) could increase the depletion of Arctic stratospheric ozone has been the subject of scientific and public attention for decades. Here we provide evidence that changes in the concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODS), not WMGHG, have been the primary driver of observed Arctic lower stratospheric trends in both ozone and temperature. We do so by analyzing polar cap ozone and temperature trends in reanalysis data: these clearly suggest that both trends are mainly driven by ODS in the lower stratosphere. This observation-based finding is supported by results from a stratosphere-resolving chemistry-climate model driven with time-varying ODS and WMGHG, specified in isolation and in combination. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that ODS are the main driver of changes in the Arctic lower stratospheric temperatures and ozone, whereas WMGHG are the primary driver of changes in the upper stratosphere.

  10. Stratospheric ozone time series analysis using dynamical linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Marko; Kyrölä, Erkki

    2013-04-01

    We describe a hierarchical statistical state space model for ozone profile time series. The time series are from satellite measurements by the SAGE II and GOMOS instruments spanning years 1984-2012. The original data sets are combined and gridded monthly using 10 degree latitude bands, and covering 20-60 km with 1 km vertical spacing. Model components include level, trend, seasonal effect with solar activity, and quasi biennial oscillations as proxy variables. A typical feature of an atmospheric time series is that they are not stationary but exhibit both slowly varying and abrupt changes in the distributional properties. These are caused by external forcing such as changes in the solar activity or volcanic eruptions. Further, the data sampling is often nonuniform, there are data gaps, and the uncertainty of the observations can vary. When observations are combined from various sources there will be instrument and retrieval method related biases. The differences in sampling lead also to uncertainties. Standard classical ARIMA type of statistical time series methods are mostly useless for atmospheric data. A more general approach makes use of dynamical linear models and Kalman filter type of sequential algorithms. These state space models assume a linear relationship between the unknown state of the system and the observations and for the process evolution of the hidden states. They are still flexible enough to model both smooth trends and sudden changes. The above mentioned methodological challenges are discussed, together with analysis of change points in trends related to recovery of stratospheric ozone. This work is part of the ESA SPIN and ozone CCI projects.

  11. Modelling future changes in climate, ozone-depleting substances and ozone precursor emissions using the whole-atmosphere UM-UKCA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, A.; Archibald, A. T.; Maycock, A. C.; Abraham, L.; Telford, P.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Using the recently upgraded whole-atmosphere UM-UKCA chemistry-climate model, we investigate the atmospheric response to future changes in a) greenhouse gases under the RCP4.5 and 8.5 scenarios for climate change, b) ozone-depleting substances (ODS) and a recovery of the ozone layer and c) ozone precursor emissions and tropospheric oxidising capacity. In addition, we combine theses scenarios in order to explore the interactions between individual perturbations. Within this framework, the coupled stratosphere-troposphere system and whole-atmosphere chemistry allows us to study the impacts of changes in composition of the stratosphere on the troposphere and vice versa. Under a scenario for moderate climate change (RCP4.5), we find that by the year 2100: 1) the stratosphere significantly impacts the troposphere via changes in stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) but the chemical changes induced in the troposphere do not impact the stratosphere, 2) perturbations are linearly additive with regard to the total ozone column and tropospheric odd oxygen budget, 3) while the Brewer-Dobson circulation strengthens under climate change (with an increase in the tropical upward mass flux at 70hPa of 17%), this strengthening is offset by ozone recovery (which on its own leads to a decrease in the mass flux of 9%) and 4) the tropospheric ozone burden decreases by 10% given mitigation of its precursor emissions but this is offset by climate change and stratospheric ozone recovery (9% and 6% increases in the burden respectively).

  12. Chemical Depletion of Lower Stratospheric Ozone in the 1992-1993 Northern Winter Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.; Zurek, R. W.; Read, W. G.; Elson, L. S.; Kumer, J. B.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Roche, A. E.; O'Neill, A.; Harwood, R. S.; MacKenzie, I.; Swinbank, R.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite observations of ozone and chlorine monoxide in the Arctic lower stratosphere during winter 1992-1993 are compared with observations during other winters, observations of long-lived tracers and the evolution of the polar vortex. Chlorine in the lower stratospheric vortex during February 1993 was mostly in chemically reactive forms.

  13. Ozone response to a CO2 doubling - Results from a stratospheric circulation model with heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitari, G.; Palermi, S.; Visconti, G.; Prinn, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    A spectral 3D model of the stratosphere has been used to study the sensitivity of polar ozone with respect to a carbon dioxide increase. The lower stratospheric cooling associated with an imposed CO2 doubling may increase the probability of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and this affect ozone. The ozone perturbation obtained with the inclusion of a simple parameterization for heterogeneous chemistry on PSCs is compared to that relative to a pure homogeneous chemistry. In both cases the temperature perturbation is determined by a CO2 doubling, while the total chlorine content is kept at the present level. It is shown that the lower temperature may increase the depth and the extension of the ozone hole by extending the area amenable to PSC formation. It may be argued that this effect, coupled with an increasing amount of chlorine, may produce a positive feedback on the ozone destruction.

  14. Stratospheric ozone variations in the equatorial region as seen in Stratiospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment data

    SciTech Connect

    Shiotani, M.; Hasebe, F. |

    1994-07-01

    An analysis is made of equatorial ozone variations for 5 years, 1984-1989, using the ozone profile data derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument. Attention is focused on the annual cycle and also on interannual variability, particularly the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variations in the lower stratosphere, where the largest contribution to total column ozone takes place. The annual variation in zonal mean total ozone around the equator is composed of symmetric and asymmetric modes with respect to the equator, with maximum contributions being around 19 km for the symmetric mode and around 25 km for the asymmetric mode. The persistent zonal wavenumber 1 structure observed by the total ozone mapping spectrometer over the equator is almost missing in the SAGE-derived column amounts integrated in the stratosphere, suggesting a significant contribution from tropospheric ozone. Interannual variations in the equatorial ozone are dominated by the QBO above 20 km and the ENSO-related variation below 20 km. The ozone QBO is characterized by zonally uniform phase changes in association with the zonal wind QBO in the equatorial lower stratosphere. The ENSO-related ozone variation consists of both the east-west vacillation and the zonally uniform phase variation. During the El Nino event, the east-west contrast with positive (negative) deviations in the eastern (western) hemisphere is conspicuous, while the decreasing tendency of the zonal mean values is maximum at the same time.

  15. Stratospheric ozone variations in the equatorial region as seen in Stratiospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiotani, Masato; Hasebe, Fumio

    1994-01-01

    An analysis is made of equatorial ozone variations for 5 years, 1984-1989, using the ozone profile data derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument. Attention is focused on the annual cycle and also on interannual variability, particularly the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variations in the lower stratosphere, where the largest contribution to total column ozone takes place. The annual variation in zonal mean total ozone around the equator is composed of symmetric and asymmetric modes with respect to the equator, with maximum contributions being around 19 km for the symmetric mode and around 25 km for the asymmetric mode. The persistent zonal wavenumber 1 structure observed by the total ozone mapping spectrometer over the equator is almost missing in the SAGE-derived column amounts integrated in the stratosphere, suggesting a significant contribution from tropospheric ozone. Interannual variations in the equatorial ozone are dominated by the QBO above 20 km and the ENSO-related variation below 20 km. The ozone QBO is characterized by zonally uniform phase changes in association with the zonal wind QBO in the equatorial lower stratosphere. The ENSO-related ozone variation consists of both the east-west vacillation and the zonally uniform phase variation. During the El Nino event, the east-west contrast with positive (negative) deviations in the eastern (western) hemisphere is conspicuous, while the decreasing tendency of the zonal mean values is maximum at the same time.

  16. Investigations of Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange of Ozone Derived From MLS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mark A.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Ziemke, Jerry R.

    2006-01-01

    Daily high-resolution maps of stratospheric ozone have been constructed using observations by MLS combined with trajectory information. These fields are used to determine the extratropical stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) of ozone for the year 2005 using two diagnostic methods. The resulting two annual estimates compare well with past model- and observational-based estimates. Initial analyses of the seasonal characteristics indicate that significant STE of ozone in the polar regions occurs only during spring and early summer. We also examine evidence that the Antarctic ozone hole is responsible for a rapid decrease in the rate of ozone STE during the SH spring. Subtracting the high-resolution stratospheric ozone fiom OMI total column measurements creates a high-resolution tropospheric ozone residual (HTOR) product. The HTOR fields are compared to the spatial distribution of the ozone STE. We show that the mean tropospheric ozone maxima tend to occur near locations of significant ozone STE. This suggests that STE may be responsible for a significant fraction of many mean tropospheric ozone anomalies.

  17. Fiber-Optic Coupled Lidar Receiver System to Measure Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, David Brent; Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of ozone in the atmosphere has become increasingly important over the past two decades. Significant increases of ozone concentrations in the lower atmosphere, or troposphere, and decreases in the upper atmosphere, or stratosphere, have been attributed to man-made causes. High ozone concentrations in the troposphere pose a health hazard to plants and animals and can add to global warming. On the other hand, ozone in the stratosphere serves as a protective barrier against strong ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. Man-made CFC's (chlorofluorocarbons) act as a catalyst with a free oxygen atom and an ozone molecule to produce two oxygen molecules therefore depleting the protective layer of ozone in the stratosphere. The beneficial and harmful effects of ozone require the study of ozone creation and destruction processes in the atmosphere. Therefore, to provide an accurate model of these processes, an ozone lidar system must be able to be used frequently with as large a measurement range as possible. Various methods can be used to measure atmospheric ozone concentrations. These include different airborne and balloon measurements, solar occulation satellite techniques, and the use of lasers in lidar (high detection and ranging,) systems to probe the atmosphere. Typical devices such as weather balloons can only measure within the direct vicinity of the instrument and are therefore used infrequently. Satellites use solar occulation techniques that yield low horizontal and vertical resolution column densities of ozone.

  18. Chlorine catalyzed destruction of ozone - Implications for ozone variability in the upper stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Sushil; Jackman, Charles H.; Douglass, Anne R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Considine, David B.

    1993-01-01

    The annual mean and the annual amplitude of ozone have been derived from ozone measurements from the SBUV and SBUV/2 spectrometers on board the Nimbus-7 and NOAA-11 satellites. These values differ significantly from values calculated using a two-dimensional model of stratospheric photochemistry and dynamics with standard chemistry. We have found that the differences between the calculated and data-derived values are considerably improved by changing the partitioning in the Cly family to create a larger reservoir of HCl and reducing ClO. This is accomplished by including a channel for the products HCl + O2 from the reaction ClO + OH in addition to the products Cl + HO2. This partitioning also improves the agreement between the calculated and measured values of ClO/HCl ratio.

  19. Multi-Model Assessment of the Factors Driving Stratospheric Ozone Evolution Over the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, L. D.; Plummer, D. A.; Waugh, D. W.; Austin, J.; Scinocca, J.; Douglass, A. R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Canty, T.; Akiyoshi, H.; Bekki, S.; Braesicke, P.; Butchart, N.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Cugnet, D.; Dhomse, S.; Eyring, V.; Frith, S.; Hardiman, S. C.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J. F.; Mancini, E.; Marchand, M.; Michou, M.; Morgenstern, O.; Nakamura T.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of stratospheric ozone from 1960 to 2100 is examined in simulations from fourteen chemistry-climate models. There is general agreement among the models at the broadest levels, showing column ozone decreasing at all latitudes from 1960 to around 2000, then increasing at all latitudes over the first half of the 21st century, and latitudinal variations in the rate of increase and date of return to historical values. In the second half of the century, ozone is projected to continue increasing, level off or even decrease depending on the latitude, resulting in variable dates of return to historical values at latitudes where column ozone has declined below those levels. Separation into partial column above and below 20 hPa reveals that these latitudinal differences are almost completely due to differences in the lower stratosphere. At all latitudes, upper stratospheric ozone increases throughout the 21st century and returns to 1960 levels before the end of the century, although there is a spread among the models in dates that ozone returns to historical values. Using multiple linear regression, we find decreasing halogens and increasing greenhouse gases contribute almost equally to increases in the upper stratospheric ozone. In the tropical lower stratosphere an increase in tropical upwelling causes a steady decrease in ozone through the 21st century, and total column ozone does not return to 1960 levels in all models. In contrast, lower stratospheric and total column ozone in middle and high latitudes increases during the 21st century and returns to 1960 levels.

  20. Mechanisms and Feedbacks Causing Changes in Upper Stratospheric Ozone in the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Luke; Waugh, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Douglass, A. R.; Newman, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone is expected to increase during the 21st century as the abundance of halogenated ozone-depleting substances decrease to 1960 values. However, climate change will likely alter this "recovery" of stratospheric ozone by changing stratospheric temperatures, circulation, and abundance of reactive chemical species. Here we quantity the contribution of different mechanisms to changes in upper stratospheric ozone from 1960 to 2100 in the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOS CCM), using multiple linear regression analysis applied to simulations using either Alb or A2 greenhouse gas (GHG) scenarios. In both these scenarios upper stratospheric ozone has a secular increase over the 21st century. For the simulation using the Alb GHG scenario, this increase is determined by the decrease in halogen amounts and the greenhouse gas induced cooling, with roughly equal contributions from each mechanism. There is a larger cooling in the simulation using the A2 GHG scenario, but also enhanced loss from higher NOy and HOx concentrations, which nearly offsets the increase due to cooler temperatures. The resulting ozone evolutions are similar in the A2 and Alb simulations. The response of ozone due to feedbacks from temperature and HOx changes, related to changing halogen concentrations, are also quantified using simulations with fixed halogen concentrations.

  1. Numerical simulation of global variations of temperature, ozone, and trace species in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional dynamical chemical model of the middle atmosphere is used to examine the global response to planetary waves in the middle and high latitudes of the northern hemisphere. The model indicates that larger wave activity in the lower stratosphere at 60 deg N is correlated with decreasing zonal mean temperatures throughout the tropical and summer hemisphere stratosphere as a result of an induced global-scale circulation. The tendency of mean ozone is positively correlated with the temperature tendency in the lower stratosphere and negatively correlated in the upper stratosphere. In the upper stratosphere, the anticorrelation of mean ozone and temperature is due primarily to the temperature dependence of many of the reaction rates. The quantitative agreement of the model results with available observations is better when the dependence of the ozone-temperature relation on the mean zone amount is removed (by taking the log of ozone) because the model ozone differs from the observed. A model run in which the atmospheric chlorine is removed indicates that the magnitude of the ozone change for a given temperature change can be substantial for modifications in the model photochemistry. Another run tested a more realistic change in which a key reaction rate is modified; the results indicate differences of greater than 10% in the ratio of ozone to temperature changes. With improved measurement capabilities differences of this order may now or soon be detectable. The variations of other chemical species in the model with temperature are also presented.

  2. The Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation and mid-stratospheric tropical ozone trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Suarez, Fernando; Young, Paul J.; Wild, Oliver; Kinnison, Douglas E.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the global ozone layer has started to show the first signs of recovery, but puzzlingly tropical mid-stratospheric ozone has decreased since the beginning of the 90s. This is a key region of the stratosphere where most ozone is produced. Previous studies have shown that interannual variability in the troposphere (e.g. El Nino-Southern Oscillation) can affect the lower stratosphere, both dynamics and composition. Here for the first time, we show how multidecadal internal climate variability - in the Pacific Ocean's sea surface temperatures (i.e. the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation, IPO) - have an impact in mid-stratospheric tropical ozone, and account for the observed trends. We suggest a mechanism that involves dynamical (i.e. Brewer Dobson circulation) and chemical (i.e. ozone loss chemistry via NOy chemistry) processes to explain this IPO-ozone link. Understanding internally generated multidecadal variability in this region of the stratosphere is crucial to distinguish between forced and unforced signals and better describe ozone recovery.

  3. Ozone and nitrogen dioxide changes in the stratosphere during 1979-84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, Linwood B.; Natarajan, Murali

    1986-01-01

    Analyses of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide distributions as measured by four different satellite experiments indicate midlatitude increases of up to 75 percent during the 1979-84 period. These increases are attributed to enhanced upper atmospheric formation of odd nitrogen during solar cycle 21 with downward transport to the stratosphere. The increases in NO2 provide an explanation for the recently observed dramatic springtime minima in the Antarctic ozone and suggest the reason for the reported midlatitude stratospheric ozone decreases observed by satellite and ground-based stations since the mid 1970s.

  4. Impact of very short-lived halogens on stratospheric ozone abundance and UV radiation in a geo-engineered atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmes, S.; Kinnison, D. E.; Garcia, R. R.; Salawitch, R.; Canty, T.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Chance, K.

    2012-08-01

    The impact of very short-lived (VSL) halogenated source species on the ozone layer and surface erythemal ultraviolet radiation (UVERY) is investigated in the context of geo-engineering of climate by stratospheric sulfur injection. For a projected 2040 model atmosphere, consideration of VSL halogens at their upper limit results in lower ozone columns and higher UVERY due to geo-engineering for nearly all seasons and latitudes, with UVERY rising by 12% and 6% in southern and northern high latitudes, respectively. When VSL halogen sources are neglected, future UVERY increases due to declines in ozone column are nearly balanced by reductions of UVERY due to scattering by the higher stratospheric aerosol burden in mid-latitudes. Consideration of VSL sources at their upper limit tips the balance, resulting in annual average increases in UVERY of up to 5% in mid and high latitudes. Therefore, VSL halogens should be considered in models that assess the impact of stratospheric sulfur injections on the ozone layer.

  5. Impact of very short-lived halogens on stratospheric ozone abundance and UV radiation in a geo-engineered atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmes, S.; Kinnison, D. E.; Garcia, R. R.; Salawitch, R.; Canty, T.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Chance, K.

    2012-11-01

    The impact of very short-lived (VSL) halogenated source species on the ozone layer and surface erythemal ultraviolet radiation (UVERY) is investigated in the context of geo-engineering of climate by stratospheric sulfur injection. For a projected 2040 model atmosphere, consideration of VSL halogens at their upper limit results in lower ozone columns and higher UVERY due to geo-engineering for nearly all seasons and latitudes, with UVERY rising by 12% and 6% in southern and northern high latitudes, respectively. When VSL halogen sources are neglected, future UVERY increases due to declines in ozone column are nearly balanced by reductions of UVERY due to scattering by the higher stratospheric aerosol burden in mid-latitudes. Consideration of VSL sources at their upper limit tips the balance, resulting in annual average increases in UVERY of up to 5% in mid and high latitudes. Therefore, VSL halogens should be considered in models that assess the impact of stratospheric sulfur injections on the ozone layer.

  6. An Estimation of the Climatic Effects of Stratospheric Ozone Losses during the 1980s. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Robert M.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Shia, Run-Lie; Yang, Yajaing; Zhou, Shuntai; Molnar, Gyula

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the potential climatic effects of the ozone hole more directly and to assess the validity of previous lower resolution model results, the latest high spatial resolution version of the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., seasonal radiative dynamical climate model is used to simulate the climatic effects of ozone changes relative to the other greenhouse gases. The steady-state climatic effect of a sustained decrease in lower stratospheric ozone, similar in magnitude to the observed 1979-90 decrease, is estimated by comparing three steady-state climate simulations: 1) 1979 greenhouse gas concentrations and 1979 ozone, II) 1990 greenhouse gas concentrations with 1979 ozone, and III) 1990 greenhouse gas concentrations with 1990 ozone. The simulated increase in surface air temperature resulting from nonozone greenhouse gases is 0.272 K. When changes in lower stratospheric ozone are included, the greenhouse warming is 0.165 K, which is approximately 39% lower than when ozone is fixed at the 1979 concentrations. Ozone perturbations at high latitudes result in a cooling of the surface-troposphere system that is greater (by a factor of 2.8) than that estimated from the change in radiative forcing resulting from ozone depiction and the model's 2 x CO, climate sensitivity. The results suggest that changes in meridional heat transport from low to high latitudes combined with the decrease in the infrared opacity of the lower stratosphere are very important in determining the steady-state response to high latitude ozone losses. The 39% compensation in greenhouse warming resulting from lower stratospheric ozone losses is also larger than the 28% compensation simulated previously by the lower resolution model. The higher resolution model is able to resolve the high latitude features of the assumed ozone perturbation, which are important in determining the overall climate sensitivity to these perturbations.

  7. 76 FR 9987 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendments to the Section 608 Leak Repair Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ...://epa.gov/ozone/title6/608/leak.html . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The statutory and regulatory background is described in detail in the December 15, 2010, notice of proposed rulemaking (75 FR... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 82 Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendments to the Section 608 Leak...

  8. 77 FR 29341 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... part 2 subpart B; 41 FR 36752, 43 FR 40000, 50 FR 51661. If no claim of confidentiality accompanies the... to the provisions of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer for... AGENCY Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Request for Methyl Bromide Critical Use Exemption...

  9. Diurnal variation of stratospheric and mesospheric ozone observed by ground-based microwave radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocke, Klemens; Studer, Simone; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Schanz, Ansgar

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge on diurnal ozone variations in the middle atmosphere is of general interest for the estimation of atmospheric tides propagating throughout the whole atmosphere. Another aspect is the important area of ozone trend analysis. Does the ozone layer recover in the next decades? Expected trends are of the order of 1 percent per decade. If the diurnal ozone variation is not considered, avoided, or removed in the observational data sets then an ozone trend detection will be not possible since the amplitude of the diurnal variation of stratospheric ozone is of the same order as the decadal ozone trend. Ground-based microwave radiometry measures the diurnal ozone variation at a certain geographic location at altitudes from 25 to 65 km. Here we discuss the challenges for the measurement technique and the retrieval method. Finally we present characteristics of the diurnal ozone variation above Switzerland, continuously observed since 1994.

  10. Trends in Stratospheric Ozone Derived from Merged Odin-OSIRIS and SAGE II Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, C.; Degenstein, D. A.; Bourassa, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Stratospheric ozone profile measurements from the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite (2001-Present) are merged with those from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II satellite instrument (1984-2005) to calculate decadal trends in stratospheric ozone between 60°S and 60°N. A multi-instrument, multi-decade, deseasonalized and merged stratospheric ozone record (1984-present) is produced by analyzing the measurements during the operational overlap of both satellites (2001-2005). The deseasonalized monthly time series is fit using linear regression with six non-linear predictor basis functions: three quasi-biennial oscillation proxies, the El Niño- Southern Oscillation index, a solar activity proxy, and the NCEP pressure at the tropical tropopause; and two linear trends: before and after 1997, which give the decadal trends in ozone. From 1984-1997, statistically significant negative trends of 5-10% per decade exist throughout the stratosphere (30-50 km). From 1997-present, statistically significant recovery rates of 3-8% per decade exist throughout most of the stratosphere. Below 22 km and between 40°S-40°N a negative trend is measured before and after 1997. The recovery is not significant in the tropical stratosphere between 25-35 km.

  11. Short-lived halocarbons efficient at influencing climate through ozone loss in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossaini, Ryan; Chipperfield, Martyn; Montzka, Steven; Rap, Alex; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu

    2015-04-01

    Halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLS) of both natural and anthropogenic origin are a significant source of atmospheric bromine, chlorine and iodine. Due to relatively short atmospheric lifetimes (typically <6 months), VSLS breakdown in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS), where ozone perturbations drive a disproportionately large climate impact compared to other altitudes. Here we present chemical transport model simulations that quantify VSLS-driven ozone loss in the UTLS and infer the climate relevance of these ozone perturbations using a radiative transfer model. Our results indicate that through their impact on UTLS ozone, VSLS are efficient at influencing climate. We calculate a whole atmosphere global mean radiative effect (RE) of -0.20 (-0.16 to -0.23) Wm-2 from natural and anthropogenic VSLS-driven ozone loss, including a tropospheric contribution of -0.12 Wm-2. In the stratosphere, the RE due to ozone loss from natural bromine-containing VSLS (e.g. CHBr3, CH2Br2) is almost half of that from long-lived anthropogenic compounds (e.g. CFCs) and normalized by equivalent chlorine is ~4 times larger. We show that the anthropogenic chlorine-containing VSLS, not regulated by the Montreal Protocol, also contribute to ozone loss in the UTLS and that the atmospheric concentration of dichloromethane (CH2Cl2), the most abundant of these, is increasing rapidly. Finally, we present evidence that VSLS have made a small yet previously unrecognized contribution to the ozone-driven radiative forcing of climate since pre-industrial times of -0.02 (-0.01 to -0.03) Wm-2. Given the climate leverage that VSLS possess, future increases to their emissions, either through continued industrial or altered natural processes, may be important for future climate forcing.

  12. Fluctuations of total ozone and their relationship to stratospheric air motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salby, Murry L.; Callaghan, Patrick F.

    1993-01-01

    The origin of fluctuations of total ozone and the interactions that take place between the distribution of total ozone and the circulation of the troposphere are investigated on the basis of observations of total ozone from Nimbus 7 TOMS together with contemporaneous analyses of the circulation. It is shown that a sizable component of total ozone variability is explained by the quasi-columnar motion of air in the lower stratosphere. The development also suggests that in combination with isentropic analyses, total ozone measurements can provide a detailed picture of air motions in the lower stratosphere. Distributions of ozone column abundance and pressure on the 375-K isentropic surface for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are illustrated.

  13. An investigation into the causes of stratospheric ozone loss in the southern Australasian region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmann, P.; Karoly, D. J.; Newmann, P. A.; Clarkson, T. S.; Matthews, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of total ozone at Macquarie Island (55 deg S, 159 deg E) reveal statistically significant reductions of approximately twelve percent during July to September when comparing the mean levels for 1987-90 with those in the seventies. In order to investigate the possibility that these ozone changes may not be a result of dynamic variability of the stratosphere, a simple linear model of ozone was created from statistical analysis of tropopause height and isentropic transient eddy heat flux, which were assumed representative of the dominant dynamic influences. Comparison of measured and modeled ozone indicates that the recent downward trend in ozone at Macquarie Island is not related to stratospheric dynamic variability and therefore suggests another mechanism, possibly changes in photochemical destruction of ozone.

  14. Stratospheric ozone isotope enrichment studied by submillimeter-wave heterodyne radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Y.; Urban, J.; Takahashi, K.; JEM/SMILES Science-Team,

    2002-05-01

    Since the discovery of the heavy isotope enrichment of ozone formation in the stratosphere in 1981, considerable progress has been made in understanding the processes that control the isotope enrichment by using mass spectrometry, spectrometric techniques, laboratory measurements, and so on. The detection limit of the mass spectrometers is enough to discuss these isotope enrichments, but symmetric and asymmetric ozone isotopes cannot be distinguished. It is important to observe symmetric and asymmetric ozone isotopes separately with enough accuracy to understand the mechanism of the ozone isotope enrichment for the ozone formation chemistry. Measurements of the ozone isotopes using a new technology of he superconducting submillimeter-wave limb emission spectrometer (SMILES) have been proposed. The instrument is planned to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) at the International Space Station. The SMILES instrument is planned to be launched in 2006. The SMILES instrument measures thermal emissions from ozone isotopes as well as ozone-depletion-related molecules such as ClO, HCl, HO2, HNO3 and BrO in the frequency bands at 624.32-626.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz. Overview of this experiment, such as new techniques for a high-sensitive sounding, measurement coverage, measurement frequency, is described. The scientific objective of the SMILES experiment, including a brief review on the controversial problem of stratospheric ozone isotope anomaly, is presented. The error analysis of the SMILES measurement is evaluated by using the SMILES simulator for all 5 isotopes of normal ozone, asymmetric-17-ozone, asymmetric-18-ozone, symmetric-17-ozone, symmetric-18-ozone. The evaluation suggests that the global distributions of symmetric-17-ozone, asymmetric-18-ozone, symmetric-17-ozone, as well as normal ozone can be obtained from the single profile, with the errors of less than about 1 % between 20 and 40 km with the partial column about 5 km.

  15. Natural variability of tropical upper stratospheric ozone inferred from the Atmosphere Explorer backscatter ultraviolet experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Abrams, R. B.; Dasgupta, R.; Guenther, B.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of backscattered ultraviolet radiances observed at tropical latitudes by the Atmosphere Explorer-E satellite reveals both annual and semiannual cycles in upper stratospheric ozone. The annual variation dominates the signal at wavelengths which sense ozone primarily above 45 km while below this, to the lowest altitude sensed, 35 km, the semiannual component has comparable amplitude. Comparison of radiance measurements taken with the same instrument at solar minimum during 1976 and solar maximum in 1979 show no significant differences. This suggests that variations in upper stratospheric ozone over the solar cycle are small, although the data presently available do not allow a definite conclusion.

  16. Influence of polar stratospheric clouds on the depletion of Antarctic ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, Ross J.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Mcelroy, Michael B.

    1988-01-01

    Precipitation of nitrate in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) can provide a significant sink for Antarctic stratospheric odd nitrogen. It is argued that the depth of the Ozone Hole is sensitive to the occurrence of temperatures below about 196 K. An increase in the prevalence of temperatures below 196 K would enhance ozone loss by increasing the spatial extent and persistence of PSCs, and by decreasing the level of HNO3 that remains following PSC evaporation. Concentrations of halogen gases in the 1960s and earlier were insufficient to support major ozone loss, even if thermal conditions were favorable.

  17. Ozone in the stratosphere. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning empirical and theoretical studies and analyses of stratospheric ozone. The processing of upper atmospheric ozone concentrations that vary with ozone transport, formation, and depletion, and data collection using ground-based, airborne and satellite-borne instrumentation and sensors are examined. Citations cover studies on atmospheric composition, reaction kinetics, particle physics, chemical reactions, photochemistry, and atmospheric models of ozone. Investigations are based on the photochemistry, ozone constituents, and long-term measurement data. References to the Antarctic October depletion phenomenon are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Ozone in the stratosphere. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning empirical and theoretical studies and analyses of stratospheric ozone. The processing of upper atmospheric ozone concentrations that vary with ozone transport, formation, and depletion, and data collection using ground-based, airborne and satellite-borne instrumentation and sensors are examined. Citations cover studies on atmospheric composition, reaction kinetics, particle physics, chemical reactions, photochemistry, and atmospheric models of ozone. Investigations are based on the photochemistry, ozone constituents, and long-term measurement data. References to the Antarctic October depletion phenomenon are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Identification of Stratospheric Waves in Ozone in the Tropics from OMI High Spectral Resolution Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Liu, X.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) measurements have identified several types of tropical waves in the stratosphere. These waves include Kelvin waves, mixed Rossby-gravity waves, equatorial Rossby waves, and global normal modes. All of these detected waves occur when their zonal phase speeds are opposite the zonal winds in the low-mid stratosphere associated with the Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO). Peak-to-peak amplitudes in all cases are typically 5 DU. While total ozone data from TOMS is sensitive in detecting these tropical waves, they provide each day only a single horizontal cross-sectional map. The high spatial and spectral resolution of the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) provides a unique means to evaluate 3D structure in these waves including their propagation characteristics. Ozone profiles retrieved from OMI radiances for wavelengths 270-310 nm are utilized to examine the nature of these wave disturbances extending from the lower to upper stratosphere.

  20. Ground-based stratospheric lidar measurements for the National Ozone Expedition II

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, B.M.; Uthe, E.E.

    1987-09-01

    Recent measurements indicate that the column content of ozone in the antarctic stratosphere has been decreasing over the past dozen years and that major reductions occur between August and November, the late austral summer and early austral spring. Atmospheric scientists have proposed a number of theories to explain this phenomenon; however, they cannot validate these hypotheses with existing data. As part of National Ozone Expedition II, the authors will investigate the temporal variability of stratospheric aerosols and cloud distribution by using a ground-based lidar (laser infrared radar). The ground-based lidar can be used to monitor continuously the time and height variability of aerosols and the polar stratospheric cloud layers that occur at altitudes of greatest ozone depletion. These measurements can be correlated with other atmospheric composition measurements to infer the role of aerosol and clouds on observed ozone behavior.

  1. Stratospheric contribution to surface ozone in the desert Southwest during the 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. O.; Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Brioude, J. F.; Cooper, O. R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lin, M.; Marchbanks, R.; Pierce, R. B.; Reddy, P. J.; Sandberg, S.; Weickmann, A. M.; Williams, E. J.; Gustin, M. S.; Iraci, L. T.; Leblanc, T.; Yates, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS) was designed to investigate the potential impact of stratosphere-troposphere transport (STT) and long-range transport of pollution from Asia on surface O3 concentrations in Clark County, NV. This measurement campaign, which took place in May and June of 2013, was conducted at Angel Peak, NV, a high elevation site about 2.8 km above mean sea level and 45 km west of Las Vegas. The study was organized around the NOAA ESRL truck-based TOPAZ scanning ozone lidar with collocated in situ sampling of O3, CO, and meteorological parameters. These measurements were supported by the NOAA/NESDIS real time modelling system (RAQMS), FLEXPART particle dispersion model, and the NOAA GFDL AM3 model. In this talk, I will describe one of several STT events that occurred during the LVOS campaign. This intrusion, which was profiled by TOPAZ on the night of May 24-25, was also sampled by the NASA Alpha Jet, the Table Mountain ozone lidar, and by an ozonesonde flying above southern California. This event also led to significant ozone increases at surface monitors operated by Clark County, the California Air Resources Board, the U.S. National Park Service, and the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NRVOI), and resulted in exceedances of the 2008 75 ppbv O3 NAAQS both in Clark County and in surrounding areas of Nevada and southern California. The potential implications of this and similar events for air quality compliance in the western U.S. will be discussed.

  2. Inter-Annual and Decadal Changes in Tropospheric and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Jr. R.; Chandra, S.

    2011-01-01

    Ozone data beginning October 2004 from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are used to evaluate the accuracy of the Cloud slicing technique in effort to develop long data records of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone and studying their long-term changes. Using this technique, we have produced a 32-year (1979-2010) long record of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone from the combined Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (Toms) and OMI. The analyses of these time series suggest that the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) is the dominant source of inter-annual changes of 30-40 Dobson Units (DU). Tropospheric ozone also indicates a QBO signal in the peak to peak changes varying from 2 to 7 DU. Decadal changes in global stratospheric ozone indicate a turnaround in ozone loss around mid 1990's with most of these changes occurring in the Northern Hemisphere from the subtropics to high latitudes. The trend results are generally consistent with the prediction of chemistry climate models which include the reduction of ozone destroying substances beginning in the late 1980's mandated by the Montreal Protocol.

  3. Influence of isentropic transport on seasonal ozone variations in the lower stratosphere and subtropical upper troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jing, P.; Cunnold, D. M.; Yang, E.-S.; Wang, H.-J.

    2005-01-01

    The isentropic cross-tropopause ozone transport has been estimated in both hemispheres in 1999 based on the potential vorticity mapping of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 11 ozone measurements and contour advection calculations using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Global and Modeling Assimilation Office analysis. The estimated net isentropic stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux is approx.118 +/- 61 x 10(exp9)kg/yr globally within the layer between 330 and 370 K in 1999; 60% of it is found in the Northern Hemisphere, and 40% is found in the Southern Hemisphere. The monthly average ozone fluxes are strongest in summer and weakest in winter in both hemispheres. The seasonal variations of ozone in the lower stratosphere (LS) and upper troposphere (UT) have been analyzed using ozonesonde observations from ozonesonde stations in the extratropics and subtropics, respectively. It is shown that observed ozone levels increase in the UT over subtropical ozonesonde stations and decrease in the LS over extratropical stations in late spring/early summer and that the ozone increases in the summertime subtropical UT are unlikely to be explained by photochemical ozone production and diabatic transport alone. We conclude that isentropic transport is a significant contributor to ozone levels in the subtropical upper troposphere, especially in summer.

  4. Effect of vibrationally excited oxygen on ozone production in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O. Jr.; Connell, P.S.; Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Slanger, T.G.; Froidevaux, L.

    1994-01-20

    Photolysis of vibrationally excited oxygen produced by ultraviolet photolysis of ozone in the upper stratosphere is incorporated into the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory two-dimensional zonally averaged chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere. The importance of this potential contributor of odd oxygen to the concentration of ozone is evaluated based on recent information on vibrational distributions of excited oxygen and on preliminary studies of energy transfer from the excited oxygen. When energy transfer rate constants similar to those of Toumi et al. (1991) are assumed, increases in model ozone concentrations of up to 4.0% in the upper stratosphere are found, and the model ozone concentrations are found to agree slightly better with measurements, including recent data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. However, the ozone increase is only 0.3% when the larger energy transfer rate constants indicated by recent experimental work are applied to the model. An ozone increase of 1% at 50 km requires energy transfer rate constants one-twentieth those of the preliminary observations. As a result, vibrationally excited oxygen processes probably do not contribute enough ozone to be significant in models of the upper stratosphere. 41 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The impact of high altitude aircraft on the ozone layer in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tie, Xue XI; Brasseur, Guy; Lin, Xing; Friedlingstein, P.; Granier, Claire; Rasch, Philip

    1994-01-01

    The paper discusses the potential effects on the ozone layer of gases released by the engines of proposed high altitude supersonic aircraft. The major problem arises from the emissions of nitrogen oxides which have the potential to destroy significant quantities of ozone in the stratosphere. The magnitude of the perturbation is highly dependent on the cruise altitude of the aircraft. Furthermore, the depletion of ozone is substantially reduced when heterogeneous conversion of nitrogen oxides into nitric acid on sulfate aerosol particles is taken into account in the calculation. The sensitivity of the aerosol load on stratospheric ozone is investigated. First, the model indicates that the aerosol load induced by the SO2 released by aircraft is increased by about 10-20% above the background aerosols at mid-high latitude of the Northern Hemisphere at 15 km for the NASA emission scenario A (the NASA emission scenarios are explained in Tables I to III). This increase in aerosol has small effects on stratospheric ozone. Second, when the aerosol load is increased following a volcanic eruption similar to the eruption of El Chichon (Mexico, April 1982), the ozone column in spring increases by as much as 9% in response to the injection of NOx from the aircraft with the NASA emission scenario A. Finally, the modeled suggests that significant ozone depletion could result from the formation of additional polar stratospheric clouds produced by the injection of H2O and HNO3 by the aircraft engines.

  6. The relationship between the polar vortex and ozone in the boreal stratosphere from ERA-40 reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Merino, Beatriz; Serrano, Encarna

    2010-05-01

    The relation between the ozone and the polar vortex in the stratosphere has an outstanding role in climate studios, and also a large repercussion in the improvement of the climate models. This importance is due to the combination of two reasons: the key role of the stratospheric ozone in the Earth climate due to its radiative properties, and that the most important dynamic activity in the high-latitude stratosphere is associated with the polar vortex (present during the whole winter and part of the spring). This work focuses on the spring months, a transitional period in the stratospheric circulation between the winter westerlies (the stratospheric polar vortex, SPV, is completely developed) and summer easterlies (SPV has already disappeared). This breakdown of the SPV is known as the Stratospheric Final Warming, SFW. Using ERA-40 data, currently the longest-period reanalysis (1979-2002) with a sufficiently realistic representation of the stratosphere circulation, we analyze different aspects about the relation between the ozone concentration and the intensity of polar vortex in the boreal stratosphere during the springtime. Among other results, we see that the 24-yr mean evolution of the stratospheric ozone, averaged over the polar region (60°N-80°N), exhibits a slow increase along March followed by a progressive decrease during April and May. The interannual variability of the monthly mean of zonal wind and ozone mixing ratio at 50 hPa in the analyzed polar region decreases gradually along the season as well. When analyzing the springtime stratospheric preconditioning, we found that almost all the warm Februaries are not associated with low ozone content and strong SPV at the beginning of March; and that none cold February was followed by a weak SPV in the first third of March. Also, the stratospheric conditions around the SFW occurrence have been studied. It is seen that the 50-hPa ozone over the polar region is nearly constant prior to the SFW, while it gets

  7. Understanding the 11-year Solar Cycle Signal in Stratospheric Ozone using a 3D CTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Chipperfield, Martyn; Feng, Wuhu

    2014-05-01

    The exact structure of the 11-year solar cycle signal in stratospheric ozone is still an open scientific question. Long-term satellite data such as Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) and Solar Backscatter UltraViolet (SBUV) show a positive solar response in the tropical lower stratosphere and upper stratosphere/lower mesosphere (US/LM), but a negligible signal in the tropical middle stratosphere. On the other hand, Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements show a positive signal in the lower and middle stratosphere and smaller solar signal in the tropical US/LM. Currently most chemical models are able to simulate a "double-peak"-structured solar signal but the model simulated solar signals tend to show better agreement with the HALOE-derived solar signal than those from SBUV or SAGE measurements. Also, some recent studies argue that due to the significantly different solar variability during the recent solar cycle (23), the solar signal in the US/LM ozone is negative (out of phase with total solar irradiance changes) for this later period compared to previous solar cycles. We have used 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) simulations to better understand the possible mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy. Various model simulations have been performed for 1979-2012 time period using ERA-Interim meteorological fields as a dynamical forcing. Model output is sampled at collocated measurement points for three satellite instruments performing stratospheric ozone measurements using the solar occultation technique: SAGE II (1984-2005), HALOE (1992-2005) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE, 2003-present). Overall the modelled ozone shows good agreement with all the data sets. However, in the US/LM, modelled ozone anomalies are better correlated with HALOE and ACE than SAGE II measurements. Hence the modelled solar signal in the stratospheric and lower mesospheric ozone also shows better agreement with the solar signal derived using HALOE and

  8. Trends in stratospheric ozone derived from merged SAGE II and Odin-OSIRIS satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassa, A. E.; Degenstein, D. A.; Randel, W. J.; Zawodny, J. M.; Kyrölä, E.; McLinden, C. A.; Sioris, C. E.; Roth, C. Z.

    2014-07-01

    Stratospheric ozone profile measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment~(SAGE) II satellite instrument (1984-2005) are combined with those from the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite (2001-Present) to quantify interannual variability and decadal trends in stratospheric ozone between 60° S and 60° N. These data are merged into a multi-instrument, long-term stratospheric ozone record (1984-present) by analyzing the measurements during the overlap period of 2002-2005 when both satellite instruments were operational. The variability in the deseasonalized time series is fit using multiple linear regression with predictor basis functions including the quasi-biennial oscillation, El Niño-Southern Oscillation index, solar activity proxy, and the pressure at the tropical tropopause, in addition to two linear trends (one before and one after 1997), from which the decadal trends in ozone are derived. From 1984 to 1997, there are statistically significant negative trends of 5-10% per decade throughout the stratosphere between approximately 30 and 50 km. From 1997 to present, a statistically significant recovery of 3-8% per decade has taken place throughout most of the stratosphere with the notable exception between 40° S and 40° N below approximately 22 km where the negative trend continues. The recovery is not significant between 25 and 35 km altitudes when accounting for a conservative estimate of instrument drift.

  9. Impact of a potential 21st century "grand solar minimum" on surface temperatures and stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anet, J. G.; Rozanov, E. V.; Muthers, S.; Peter, T.; BröNnimann, S.; Arfeuille, F.; Beer, J.; Shapiro, A. I.; Raible, C. C.; Steinhilber, F.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the effects of a recently proposed 21st century Dalton minimum like decline of solar activity on the evolution of Earth's climate and ozone layer. Three sets of two member ensemble simulations, radiatively forced by a midlevel emission scenario (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change RCP4.5), are performed with the atmosphere-ocean chemistry-climate model AOCCM SOCOL3-MPIOM, one with constant solar activity, the other two with reduced solar activity and different strength of the solar irradiance forcing. A future grand solar minimum will reduce the global mean surface warming of 2 K between 1986-2005 and 2081-2100 by 0.2 to 0.3 K. Furthermore, the decrease in solar UV radiation leads to a significant delay of stratospheric ozone recovery by 10 years and longer. Therefore, the effects of a solar activity minimum, should it occur, may interfere with international efforts for the protection of global climate and the ozone layer.

  10. 76 FR 60736 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: The 2011 Critical Use Exemption From the Phaseout of Methyl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... decision taken by the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer at the..., NW., Washington, DC 20460. You may also visit the methyl bromide section of the ozone layer... use exemption, other stratospheric ozone protection regulations, the science of ozone layer...