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Sample records for future treatment strategies

  1. Future treatment strategies in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    van Spronsen, Francjan J; Enns, Gregory M

    2010-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) was the first inherited metabolic disease in which treatment was found to prevent clinical features of the disorder; dietary management was established almost 60 years ago. The institution of a low-phenylalanine (Phe) diet in the first few weeks of life was made possible by Guthrie neonatal screening, which further increased effectiveness of therapy. Indeed, neonatal diagnosis of PKU followed by institution of a low-Phe diet has been a remarkable success in preventing the devastating brain damage associated with untreated PKU. Nevertheless, significant difficulties exist in caring for PKU patients, including problems with adhering to the prescribed dietary regimen and the presence of neurocognitive deficits despite therapy. During the past few years, several ideas for new treatment strategies have emerged. This review aims to address these treatment strategies based on theoretical considerations of the biochemistry and pathogenesis of PKU. Recent times have seen the introduction of a wide array of novel treatments currently in clinical use, including more palatable medical foods, glycomacropeptide, large neutral amino acids, and tetrahydrobiopterin. Human trials are underway using an enzymatic therapeutic approach, while preclinical work continues in the fields of gene and cellular therapy. These therapeutic strategies propose to treat PKU at various levels, including nutritional intake, gut, liver, and blood-brain barrier, and have the potential to further improve outcome in PKU. PMID:20123478

  2. Liver transplantation for malignancy: Current treatment strategies and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hackl, Christina; Schlitt, Hans J; Kirchner, Gabriele I; Knoppke, Birgit; Loss, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In 1967, Starzl et al performed the first successful liver transplantation for a patient diagnosed with hepatoblastoma. In the following, liver transplantation was considered ideal for complete tumor resection and potential cure from primary hepatic malignancies. Several reports of liver transplantation for primary and metastatic liver cancer however showed disappointing results and the strategy was soon dismissed. In 1996, Mazzaferro et al introduced the Milan criteria, offering liver transplantation to patients diagnosed with limited hepatocellular carcinoma. Since then, liver transplantation for malignant disease is an ongoing subject of preclinical and clinical research. In this context, several aspects must be considered: (1) Given the shortage of deceased-donor organs, long-term overall and disease free survival should be comparable with results obtained in patients transplanted for non-malignant disease; (2) In this regard, living-donor liver transplantation may in selected patients help to solve the ethical dilemma of optimal individual patient treatment vs organ allocation justice; and (3) Ongoing research focusing on perioperative therapy and anti-proliferative immunosuppressive regimens may further reduce tumor recurrence in patients transplanted for malignant disease and thus improve overall survival. The present review gives an overview of current indications and future perspectives of liver transplantation for malignant disease. PMID:24833863

  3. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations. PMID:24603424

  4. Intramedullary spinal cord tumors: a review of current and future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Matthew K; Geraghty, Joseph R; Engelhard, Herbert H; Linninger, Andreas A; Mehta, Ankit I

    2015-08-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord tumors have low incidence rates but are associated with difficult treatment options. The majority of patients with these tumors can be initially treated with an attempted resection. Unfortunately, those patients who cannot undergo gross-total resection or have subtotal resection are left with few treatment options, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. These adjuvant treatments, however, are associated with the potential for significant adverse side effects and still leave patients with a poor prognosis. To successfully manage these patients and improve both their quality of life and prognosis, novel treatment options must be developed to supplement subtotal resection. New research is underway investigating alternative therapeutic approaches for these patients, including directed, localized drug delivery and nanomedicine techniques. These and other future investigations will hopefully lead to promising new therapies for these devastating diseases. PMID:26235012

  5. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Understanding molecular pathogenesis could lead to future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Nivedita U; Shy, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies, like many other degenerative disorders, have been challenging to treat. At this point, there is little specific therapy for the inherited neuropathies other than genetic counseling as well as symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation. In the past, ascorbic acid, progesterone antagonists, and subcutaneous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) injections have demonstrated improvement in animal models of CMT 1A, the most common inherited neuropathy, but have failed to translate any effect in humans. Given the difficulty in treatment, it is important to understand the molecular pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies in order to strategize potential future therapies. The hereditary neuropathies are in an era of molecular insight and over the past 20 years, more than 78 subtypes of Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) have been identified and extensively studied to understand the biological pathways in greater detail. Next generation molecular sequencing has also improved the diagnosis as well as the understanding of CMT. A greater understanding of the molecular pathways will help pave the way to future therapeutics of CMT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25108281

  6. Any Future for Fecal Microbiota Transplantation as Treatment Strategy for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    PubMed

    Kump, Patrizia; Högenauer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a novel therapeutic procedure aiming at restoring a normal intestinal microbiota by application of fecal microorganisms from a healthy subject into the gastrointestinal tract of a patient. FMT is the most effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). These infections also occur in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), where case series demonstrated a successful treatment of CDI by FMT in 83-92% of patients. The effect of FMT on the activity of IBD has mainly been investigated in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, including 3 randomized controlled trials. So far, 2 randomized controlled trials showed a superiority of FMT compared to placebo in inducing remission in UC, while 1 study found no significant difference to placebo. The variation in response to FMT between these studies as well as in the uncontrolled trials might be explained by many differences in the way of FMT application, patient pretreatment and patient and donor selection. The data for the use of FMT in Crohn's disease and pouchitis are sparse; currently, no conclusion can be drawn regarding the effectiveness of FMT in these indications. It needs to be noted that cases of IBD activation after FMT have been reported. So far, FMT can only be recommended to be used for the treatment of concomitant CDI in IBD in clinical practice. For treating IBD irrespective of CDI, FMT should be only used in clinical trials. Current forms of FMT, especially protocols using repeated application, are very time and personnel consuming. Future trends are the use of defined stable microbiota preparations, in particular oral preparations, which will enable better and larger controlled trails for investigating FMT in IBD. PMID:27548724

  7. Progression of mild Alzheimer’s disease: knowledge and prediction models required for future treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Knowledge of longitudinal progression in mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is required for the evaluation of disease-modifying therapies. Our aim was to observe the effects of long-term cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI) therapy in mild AD patients in a routine clinical setting. Methods This was a prospective, open-label, non-randomized, multicenter study of ChEI treatment (donepezil, rivastigmine or galantamine) conducted during clinical practice. The 734 mild AD patients (Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score 20 to 26) were assessed at baseline and then semi-annually over three years. Outcome measures included the MMSE, Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), Clinician’s Interview-Based Impression of Change (CIBIC) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale. Results After three years of ChEI therapy, 31% (MMSE) and 33% (ADAS-cog) of the patients showed improved/unchanged cognitive ability, 33% showed improved/unchanged global performance and 14% showed improved/unchanged IADL capacity. Higher mean dose of ChEI and lower educational level were both predictors of more positive longitudinal cognitive and functional outcomes. Older participants and those with a better IADL score at baseline exhibited a slower rate of cognitive decline, whereas younger participants and those with higher cognitive status showed more preserved IADL ability over time. Gender and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype showed inconsistent results. Prediction models using the abovementioned scales are presented. Conclusions In naturalistic mild AD patients, a marked deterioration in IADL compared with cognitive and global long-term outcomes was observed, indicating the importance of functional assessments during the early stages of the disease. The participants’ time on ChEI treatment before inclusion in studies of new therapies might affect their rate of decline and thus the comparisons of changes in scores between various studies. An

  8. Combotherapy and current concepts as well as future strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ling-Yun; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that 35.6 million people globally had dementia in 2010 and the prevalence of dementia has been predicted to double every 20 years. Thus, 115.4 million people may be living with dementia in 2050. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and is present in 60%–70% of people with dementia. Unfortunately, there are few approved drugs that can alleviate the cognitive or behavioral symptoms of AD dementia. Recent studies have revealed that pathophysiological changes related to AD occur decades before the appearance of clinical symptoms of dementia. This extended preclinical phase of AD provides a critical chance for disease-modifying agents to halt or delay the relentless process of AD. Although several trials targeting various pathological processes are ongoing, the examination of the combined use of different approaches to combat AD seems warranted. In this article, we will review current therapies, future strategies, and ongoing clinical trials for the treatment of AD with a special focus on combination therapies. Furthermore, preventive strategies for cognitively normal subjects in the presymptomatic stages of AD will also be addressed. In this review, we discuss current hypotheses of the disease process. In the decades since the approval of cholinesterase inhibitors, no new drug has ultimately demonstrated clear success in clinical trials. Given the difficulties that have been encountered in attempts to identify a single drug that can treat AD, we must pursue effective multi-target strategies, ie, combination therapies. The combination of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine is considered well tolerated and safe, and this combination benefits patients with moderate-to-severe AD. In contrast, with the exception of adjuvant therapies of conventional drugs, combinations of different disease-modifying agents with different mechanisms may have promising synergic effects and benefit cognition, behavior, and daily living

  9. Future Workforce Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Energy, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science is among the world's premier supporters of basic research. The Office of Science enables the U.S. to maintain its competitive edge by funding science that can transform its energy future, supports its national security and seeks to understand the fundamentals of matter and energy itself. To do…

  10. Accelerated repopulation as a cause of radiation treatment failure in non-small cell lung cancer: review of current data and future clinical strategies.

    PubMed

    Yom, Sue S

    2015-04-01

    Despite convincing evidence that the principles of accelerated repopulation would open up additional therapeutic opportunities in the treatment of advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer, this strategy has been generally underexplored. The implementation of accelerated radiotherapy schedules has been hampered by logistical barriers, concerns about acute toxicity, and the prioritization of integrating concurrent chemotherapy into the standard treatment platform. At present, it is unclear to what extent accelerated fractionation will influence future treatment paradigms in non-small cell lung cancer, although technical advances in radiotherapy, allowing higher dose delivery with reduced toxicity, could permit the development of more convenient and tolerable forms of accelerated schedules. PMID:25771413

  11. Service strategies of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, J.H.

    1998-07-01

    Service strategies of the future will have to take increasing account of the changes in the nature of global competition in the power generation market. Besides the key technical principles of availability and operational reliability, the costs for backup services such as overhauls, spare parts and retrofits will have to be lowered in order to boost competitiveness without, however, causing any unacceptable risks to plant operation. This objective can be achieved by OEM-integrated service contracts which include provisions relating to risk and profit sharing.

  12. Janus kinase inhibition as a potential strategy for the treatment of psoriasis: state of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cassano, N; Vena, G A

    2012-01-01

    Research is focusing the attention on drugs acting on intracellular signaling as a possible strategy for various malignancies and autoimmune disorders, as well as prevention of transplant rejection. In such a context, an intriguing therapeutic target appears to be the signaling pathway mediated by Janus kinases (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) protein family. Several companies are developing and evaluating JAK inhibitors for immune-mediated disorders, including psoriasis. Among these drugs, ruxolitinib and especially tofacitinib have reached more advanced phases of clinical and experimental development. This review discusses the potential role of JAK inhibition in the treatment of psoriasis and presents the preliminary data regarding the clinical development of JAK inhibitors in this disease. PMID:23241109

  13. Strategies for treatment of dystonia.

    PubMed

    Dressler, Dirk; Altenmueller, Eckart; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Bohlega, Saeed; Chana, Pedro; Chung, Tae Mo; Frucht, Steven; Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Kaelin, Alain; Kaji, Ryuji; Kanovsky, Petr; Laskawi, Rainer; Micheli, Federico; Orlova, Olga; Relja, Maja; Rosales, Raymond; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Timerbaeva, Sofia; Warner, Thomas T; Saberi, Fereshte Adib

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of dystonias is generally symptomatic. To produce sufficient therapy effects, therefore, frequently a multimodal and interdisciplinary therapeutic approach becomes necessary, combining botulinum toxin therapy, deep brain stimulation, oral antidystonic drugs, adjuvant drugs and rehabilitation therapy including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, re-training, speech therapy, psychotherapy and sociotherapy. This review presents the recommendations of the IAB-Interdisciplinary Working Group for Movement Disorders Special Task Force on Interdisciplinary Treatment of Dystonia. It reviews the different therapeutic modalities and outlines a strategy to adapt them to the dystonia localisation and severity of the individual patient. Hints to emerging and future therapies will be given. PMID:26370676

  14. Current and Future Treatment Strategies for Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Role of mTOR Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Finn, Richard S

    2012-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer that has the third highest cancer-related mortality rate worldwide. Although potentially curable by transplantation if detected early, the majority of cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease for which limited treatment options are available. The only proven systemic therapy for advanced HCC is sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor that has demonstrated modest efficacy and reasonable tolerability in patients with advanced HCC. Five years after the approval of sorafenib, no other agent has been proven to be beneficial in the first- or second-line setting in advanced HCC. While molecular studies have highlighted various potential targets in HCC, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has emerged as an exciting target for cancer therapy including HCC. Laboratory data have linked the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mTOR axis to various oncogenic processes, including survival and angiogenesis. Historically, mTOR inhibitors have been used for their immunosuppressive properties, but more recently they have been approved as anticancer agents. Retrospective HCC studies suggest that the inclusion of mTOR inhibition as part of an immunosuppressant regimen after transplantation may reduce HCC recurrence compared with other immunosuppressive agents such as calcineurin inhibitors. More recently, single-arm, phase I/II studies have shown that mTOR inhibitors also have activity as monotherapy in cases of recurrent HCC or de novo advanced HCC. This article will review the rationale for targeting the mTOR pathway in HCC, and the currently available clinical data supporting its development for HCC. PMID:24159589

  15. Compounds with anti-influenza activity: present and future of strategies for the optimal treatment and management of influenza. Part II: Future compounds against influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, R; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Bragazzi, N L; Panatto, D

    2014-12-01

    In the first part of this overview, we described the life cycle of the influenza virus and the pharmacological action of the currently available drugs. This second part provides an overview of the molecular mechanisms and targets of still-experimental drugs for the treatment and management of influenza. Briefly, we can distinguish between compounds with anti-influenza activity that target influenza virus proteins or genes, and molecules that target host components that are essential for viral replication and propagation. These latter compounds have been developed quite recently. Among the first group, we will focus especially on hemagglutinin, M2 channel and neuraminidase inhibitors. The second group of compounds may pave the way for personalized treatment and influenza management. Combination therapies are also discussed. In recent decades, few antiviral molecules against influenza virus infections have been available; this has conditioned their use during human and animal outbreaks. Indeed, during seasonal and pandemic outbreaks, antiviral drugs have usually been administered in mono-therapy and, sometimes, in an uncontrolled manner to farm animals. This has led to the emergence of viral strains displaying resistance, especially to compounds of the amantadane family. For this reason, it is particularly important to develop new antiviral drugs against influenza viruses. Indeed, although vaccination is the most powerful means of mitigating the effects of influenza epidemics, antiviral drugs can be very useful, particularly in delaying the spread of new pandemic viruses, thereby enabling manufacturers to prepare large quantities of pandemic vaccine. In addition, antiviral drugs are particularly valuable in complicated cases of influenza, especially in hospitalized patients. To write this overview, we mined various databases, including Embase, PubChem, DrugBank and Chemical Abstracts Service, and patent repositories. PMID:26137785

  16. Newer antiatherosclerosis treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Amitesh; Singh, Safal

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis has been a target of much clinical and molecular research. As a result of this extensive research, it is amply clear that atherogenesis is a multifactorial process involving an interplay of metabolic, immune and inflammatory mechanisms. Antiatherosclerotic strategies are today aiming for a multipronged approach targeting each arm of this multifactorial process. The newer agents under development can be divided into three broad categories: anti-inflammatory agents, modulators of intermediary metabolism and antiatherosclerosis vaccines. Potential targets for anti-inflammatory agents include inhibition of conversion of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidised LDL, blocking or downregulation of cell adhesion molecules, chemokine modulation and macrophage receptor blockade. Beyond inhibition of plaque formation, efforts are also ongoing to develop agents which stabilise the plaque by increasing its fibrous content and inhibiting its disruption. So far as research in the sphere of intermediary metabolism is concerned, the focus is now primarily on raising high-density lipoprotein and promoting reverse cholesterol transport; potential targets include cholesteryl ester transfer protein, liver X-receptor, lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase and high-density lipoprotein mimetics. Acyl-coenzymeA: cholesterol acyltransferase is another enzyme whose selective and differential inhibition is under active investigation. The concept of immunisation against a non-communicable disease such as atherosclerosis is still in its nascent stages. However, with increasing evidence to suggest the role of antigen-specific T-cell-mediated immunity in atherogenesis, this approach is potentially promising. Possible antigens under evaluation include oxidised LDL and its subparticles, heat-shock proteins and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. With cardiovascular disease being the single leading cause of death worldwide, the development of a safe and successful antiatherosclerosis

  17. Prevention strategies for cardioembolic stroke: present and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Giacomo; Abbas, Mohammed Abballa; Corea, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cause of cardioembolism. An update on secondary prevention strategies, used to protect patients from the risk of stroke in many common cardiac conditions, is presented in the paper. The main line of actions of stroke prevention in cardioembolism is mostly connected with antithrombotic drugs, but also other, more invasive, techniques are quickly emerging. Also the classic pharmacological prevention with coumarins may soon be overcome by new generation anticoagulants. Is an aggressive treatment of Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) always recommended? One of the main challenges of the future years will be to understand competitiveness between old and new preventive strategies. PMID:20721324

  18. Treatment strategy for Boerhaave's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, T; Hiranuma, S; Takiguchi, N; Ito, K; Maruyama, M; Nagahama, T; Kawano, T; Nagai, K; Nishikage, T; Noguchi, N; Takamatsu, S; Kawamura, T; Teramoto, K; Iwai, T; Arii, S

    2004-01-01

    Esophageal rupture is a potentially mortal condition. Rapid and correct diagnosis, and urgent surgical treatment with esophagectomy is indicated, but conservative and other surgical treatments have also been reported recently. The treatment strategies for esophageal rupture are discussed here, based on our experiences with four cases during the last 10 years. They were admitted urgently and each was treated by a different method. Three of them underwent emergency operations, one undergoing primary closure of the ruptured esophagus, another received a T-tube insertion from the ruptured site with omental flap, and the third an esophagogastrectomy. The fourth case was treated conservatively. All patients survived and were discharged 36-144 days post treatment. One of them was readmitted for debridement of necrotic rib. In conclusion, the prompt and accurate diagnosis of esophageal rupture is crucial for a subsequent successful treatment. Conservative treatment or operation including esophagectomy will be determined by the severity of the condition. PMID:15209751

  19. OVERVIEW AND THE FUTURE OF OBESITY TREATMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter addresses the future of obesity treatment. To provide a foundation for discussing the future, we begin with a brief background on the importance of obesity treatment and review of current interventions. We then examine issues and controversies that we believe will affect the future of...

  20. Future directions in treatment of brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Barani, Igor J.; Larson, David A.; Berger, Mitchel S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases affect up to 30% of patients with cancer. Management of brain metastases continues to evolve with ever increasing focus on cognitive preservation and quality of life. This manuscript reviews current state of brain metastases management and discusses various treatment controversies with focus on future clinical trials. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) are discussed in context of multiple (4+ brain metastases) as well as new approaches combining radiation and targeted agents. A brief discussion of modified WBRT approaches, including hippocampal-avoidance WBRT (HA-WBRT) is included as well as a section on recently presented results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0614, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of menantine for prevention of neurocognitive injury after WBRT. Methods: A search of selected studies relevant to management of brain metastases was performed in PubMed as well as in various published meeting abstracts. This data was collated and analyzed in context of contemporary management and future clinical trial plans. This data is presented in tabular form and discussed extensively in the text. Results: The published data demonstrate continued evolution of clinical trials and management strategies designed to minimize and/or prevent cognitive decline following radiation therapy management of brain metastases. Hippocampal avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) and radiosurgery treatments for multiple brain metastases are discussed along with preliminary results of RTOG 0614, a trial of memantine therapy to prevent cognitive decline following WBRT. Trial results appear to support the use of memantine for prevention of cognitive decline. Conclusions: Different management strategies for multiple brain metastases (>4 brain metastases) are currently being evaluated in prospective clinical trials to minimize the likelihood of cognitive decline following WBRT. PMID

  1. Future launchers strategy : the ariane 2010 initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnal, Ch.; Eymard, M.; Soccodato, C.

    2001-03-01

    With the new cryogenic upper stage ESC, the European heavy launcher Ariane 5+ is perfectly suited to the space market envisioned for the coming decade: flexible to cope with any payload and commercially attractive despite a fierce competition. Current Arianespace projections for the following years 2010-2020 indicate two major trends: satellites may still become larger and may require very different final orbits; today's market largely dominated by GEO may well evolve, influenced by LEO operations such as those linked to ISS or by constellations, to remain competitive, the launch cost has to be reduced. The future generation of the European heavy launcher has therefore to focus on an ever increased flexibility with a drastic cost reduction. Two strategies are possible to achieve this double goal: reusable launchers, either partially or totally, may ease the access to space, limiting costly expendable stages; the assessment of their technical feasibility and financial viability is undergoing in Europe under the Future Launchers Technology Program (FLTP), expendable launchers, derived from the future Ariane 5+. This second way started by CNES at the end of year 1999 is called the "Ariane 2010 initiative". The main objectives are simultaneously an increase of 25% in performance and a reduction of 30% in launch cost wrt Ariane 5+. To achieve these very ambitious goals, numerous major modifications are studied: technical improvements : modifications of the Solid Rocket Boosters may consist in filament winding casing, increased loading, simplified casting, improved grain, simplified Thrust Vector Control, … evolution of the Vulcain engine leading to higher efficiency despite a simplified design, flow separation controlled nozzle extension, propellant management of the two cryogenic stages, simplified electrical system, increased standardization, for instance on flanged interfaces and manufacturing processes, operational improvements such as launch cycle simplification

  2. New pharmacological treatment strategies for relapse prevention.

    PubMed

    Spanagel, Rainer; Vengeliene, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Here we discuss treatment strategies that are based on pharmacological interventions to reduce craving and relapse in alcohol-dependent patients. We will first provide a historical overview about relapse prevention strategies. We will then review the development of disulfiram, naltrexone, acamprosate, and nalmefene and discuss their neurobiological modes of action. Then the concept of convergent genomic analysis will be introduced for the discovery of new molecular treatment targets. Finally, we will provide convincing evidence for the use of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channel blockers as substitution drugs. Important conclusions of this review are: (i) learning from other addictive substances is very helpful-e.g., substitution therapies as applied to opiate addiction for decades could also be translated to alcoholics, (ii) the glutamate theory of alcohol addiction provides a convincing framework for the use of NMDA receptor antagonists as substitution drugs for alcohol-dependent patients, (iii) a combination of behavioral and pharmacological therapies may be the optimal approach for future treatment strategies-one promising example concerns the pharmacological disruption of reconsolidation processes of alcohol cue memories, (iv) given that many neurotransmitter systems are affected by chronic alcohol consumption, numerous druggable targets have been identified; consequently, a "cocktail" of different compounds will further improve the treatment situation, (v) in silico psychopharmacology, such as drug repurposing will yield new medications, and finally, (vi) the whole organism has to be taken into consideration to provide the best therapy for our patients. In summary, there is no other field in psychiatric research that has, in recent years, yielded so many novel, druggable targets and innovative treatment strategies than for alcohol addiction. However, it will still be several years before the majority of the "treatment-seeking population" will benefit

  3. Cultural psychiatry: research strategies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Ban, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews some key aspects of current research in cultural psychiatry and explores future prospects. The first section discusses the multiple meanings of culture in the contemporary world and their relevance for understanding mental health and illness. The next section considers methodological strategies for unpacking the concept of culture and studying the impact of cultural variables, processes and contexts. Multiple methods are needed to address the many different components or dimensions of cultural identity and experience that constitute local worlds, ways of life or systems of knowledge. Quantitative and observational methods of clinical epidemiology and experimental science as well as qualitative ethnographic methods are needed to capture crucial aspects of culture as systems of meaning and practice. Emerging issues in cultural psychiatric research include: cultural variations in illness experience and expression; the situated nature of cognition and emotion; cultural configurations of self and personhood; concepts of mental disorder and mental health literacy; and the prospect of ecosocial models of health and culturally based interventions. The conclusion considers the implications of the emerging perspectives from cultural neuroscience for psychiatric theory and practice. PMID:23816867

  4. Multimedia strategy considers waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.B.

    1995-05-01

    The advent of multimedia pollution prevention programs has raised some interesting and challenging questions on the subject of facility operations. First and foremost is the goal of a multimedia pollution prevention program: how can industrial streams in an operating facility be treated to prevent pollutants from escaping in a particular effluent or waste streams without transferring the same pollutants to another medium? Once this is resolved, the next issue to be addressed is the fate of pollutants removed from effluent streams. EPA is moving toward discouraging destruction as an acceptable means of waste treatment. The strategies are presented for handling pollutants from one media without contaminating another.

  5. Current therapeutic strategies for premature ejaculation and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhong-Cheng; Zhu, Yi-Chen; Yuan, Yi-Ming; Cui, Wan-Shou; Jin, Zhe; Li, Wei-Ren; Liu, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common sexual disorder in men that is mediated by disturbances in the peripheral and central nervous systems. Although all pharmaceutical treatments for PE are currently used ‘off-label', some novel oral agents and some newer methods of drug administration now provide important relief to PE patients. However, the aetiology of this condition has still not been unified, primarily because of the lack of a standard animal model for basic research and the absence of a widely accepted definition and assessment tool for evidence-based clinical studies in patients with PE. In this review, we focus on the current therapeutic strategies and future treatment perspectives for PE. PMID:21532601

  6. Current and future treatment of amyloid diseases.

    PubMed

    Ankarcrona, M; Winblad, B; Monteiro, C; Fearns, C; Powers, E T; Johansson, J; Westermark, G T; Presto, J; Ericzon, B-G; Kelly, J W

    2016-08-01

    There are more than 30 human proteins whose aggregation appears to cause degenerative maladies referred to as amyloid diseases or amyloidoses. These disorders are named after the characteristic cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils that accumulate systemically or are localized to specific organs. In most cases, current treatment is limited to symptomatic approaches and thus disease-modifying therapies are needed. Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils and intracellular tau neurofibrillary tangles as pathological hallmarks. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted with passive and active immunotherapy, and small molecules to inhibit Aβ formation and aggregation or to enhance Aβ clearance; so far such clinical trials have been unsuccessful. Novel strategies are therefore required and here we will discuss the possibility of utilizing the chaperone BRICHOS to prevent Aβ aggregation and toxicity. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is symptomatically treated with insulin. However, the underlying pathology is linked to the aggregation and progressive accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide as fibrils and oligomers, which are cytotoxic. Several compounds have been shown to inhibit islet amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity in vitro. Future animal studies and clinical trials have to be conducted to determine their efficacy in vivo. The transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses are a group of systemic degenerative diseases compromising multiple organ systems, caused by TTR aggregation. Liver transplantation decreases the generation of misfolded TTR and improves the quality of life for a subgroup of this patient population. Compounds that stabilize the natively folded, nonamyloidogenic, tetrameric conformation of TTR have been developed and the drug tafamidis is available as a promising treatment. PMID:27165517

  7. New treatment strategies for hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Ermis, Fatih; Senocak Tasci, Elif

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C infection can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and it is an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Achieving a sustained virological response has been the major aim for decades. Interferon treatment was the primarily developed therapy against the infection. Addition of the guanosine analog ribavirin to stop viral RNA synthesis increased the response rates as well as the adverse effects of the treatment. The increasing demands for alternative regimens led to the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). The approval of sofosbuvir and simeprevir signaled a new era of antiviral treatment for hepatitis C infection. Although the majority of studies have been performed with DAAs in combination with interferon and resulted in a decrease in treatment duration and increase in response rates, the response rates achieved with interferon-free regimens provided hope for patients ineligible for therapy with interferon. Most DAA studies are in phase II leading to phase III. In the near future more DAAs are expected to be approved. The main disadvantage of the therapy remains the cost of the drugs. Here, we focus on new treatment strategies for hepatitis C infection as well as agents targeting hepatitis C virus replication that are in clinical development. PMID:26301052

  8. Cellular Learning: Strategy for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrum, John

    1987-01-01

    Cellular learning refers to both arrangement of shop equipment and addition of new course materials for a contemporary manufacturing curriculum. The concept is an accumulation of ideas and strategies for the instruction and training of students. It also provides a method for consolidating old equipment and adding group technology. (CH)

  9. Future View: Web Navigation based on Learning User's Browsing Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagino, Norikatsu; Yamada, Seiji

    In this paper, we propose a Future View system that assists user's usual Web browsing. The Future View will prefetch Web pages based on user's browsing strategies and present them to a user in order to assist Web browsing. To learn user's browsing strategy, the Future View uses two types of learning classifier systems: a content-based classifier system for contents change patterns and an action-based classifier system for user's action patterns. The results of learning is applied to crawling by Web robots, and the gathered Web pages are presented to a user through a Web browser interface. We experimentally show effectiveness of navigation using the Future View.

  10. EMPA-REG and Other Cardiovascular Outcome Trials of Glucose-lowering Agents: Implications for Future Treatment Strategies in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Schernthaner, Guntram; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger

    2016-06-01

    reduce the CV burden of patients with T2DM, drugs influencing factors involved in atherogenesis (eg, insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, increase of HDL, prothrombotic state) are more promising. The recent IRIS (Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke) study documented a significant reduction in stroke and MI when pioglitazone instead of placebo was given to nondiabetic patients presenting with both stroke/transient ischemic attack and insulin resistance, confirming results from the PROactive (Prospective Pioglitazone Clinical Trial in Macrovascular Events) study in patients with T2DM. Based on these new data, we suggest that the addition of both empagliflozin and pioglitazone to metformin might be the relative best option to reduce the high CV morbidity and mortality of patients with T2DM and already established CV complications. The very recent announcement that the CV outcome study with liraglutide (LEADER) also demonstrated a significant reduction of the composite endpoint (cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction or non-fatal stroke) gives new hope for further beneficial treatment options for T2DM patients with established CVD. PMID:27210264

  11. Environmental scanning: a strategy for the future.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, P L; Stanton, M P

    1992-03-01

    The rapidity of change confronting nursing at all levels will continue to challenge nursing's ultimate capacity to adapt and remain a viable profession in the 21st century. The process of meeting the challenges can be proactive based on assessment of needs and available resources, or reactive based on the reaction to challenges. A strategy identified by the authors that can be used at all levels of nursing practice, administration, education, and research is environmental scanning. This methodology has been used effectively in other disciplines for strategic, long-term planning and can be readily adapted to a wide variety of nursing service, academic, or professional associations. PMID:1593290

  12. Current and future management strategies in intensive crop production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The root-knot nematode Control and Management Strategy chapter addresses the current and future developments in Meloidogyne spp. control in intensive crop production systems. Discussed are current nematode management strategies such as the use of cultural practices, host plant resistance, applicati...

  13. Counseling and the Future: Concepts, Issues, and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Donald G.

    Futurists and counselors both deal with the concept of change. This monograph examines some strategies counselors can use to help themselves adopt a future orientation and to assist their counselees in meeting the future confidently. The writings of Cornish, Fletcher and Conboy bring some focus to concepts and dimensions held by futurists and…

  14. Will Reforms Survive? Strategies for Sustaining Preparing Future Faculty Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferren, Ann; Gaff, Jerry G.; Clayton-Pedersen, Alma

    2002-01-01

    Observers of Preparing Future Faculty (PFF) programs reviewed a sample of campuses to discover the results of nearly 10 years of participation. Found significant factors in the programs, and strategies for sustaining their momentum, that provide insight into current practices in graduate education and what future faculty need. (EV)

  15. Powering nanorobotic devices: challenges and future strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Krishna Moorthi

    2014-04-01

    Nanotechnology, even after 55 years since its foundation (1959 Richard Feynman's speech - `There is lot of space in the bottom'), is still in its infancy. However, of late, there has been a large increase in the research being done in this field in many prominent Universities and Research institutions across the globe. Nanorobotics is the combination of Nanotechnology and the science of Robotics, to create robots that are only a few nanometres (10-9 metres) in size. Nanobots are yet to be made. But with the current pace of ongoing researches, scientists predict that nanobots will be made a reality by next ten years. The main proposed function of nanobots is to use them in the medical field to interact with cells or intra-cellular substances and prevent or reverse structural and genetical problems and diseases. One of the major challenges faced while creating a nanobot to travel through human body is to power it. Nanobots would require a very small yet highly potential source of energy. There are many hypothesised energy sources for nanobots which are either already available within the human body naturally or which are to be supplied externally. But, all of these energy sources pose a few challenges which need to be addressed if they are to be used to power nanobots. These challenges can be overcome using a number of strategies that can be used to make an economically, ecologically and medically viable energy source.

  16. Molecular diagnostics: future probe-based strategies.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Peter; Cardy, Donald L N

    2004-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs) represent powerful tools in clinical microbiology, particularly in areas where traditional culture-based methods alone prove insufficient. A notable advantage is in reducing the time from taking samples to reporting results. This, and the specificity and sensitivity imparted by NAATs, can help to improve patient care. Both thermal and isothermal NAATs have been adapted to aid diagnosis in clinical laboratories. Current molecular diagnostic assays are generally high-tech, and are expensive to buy and perform. Easy-to-use NAATs are beginning to appear, not only facilitating acceptable throughput in clinical laboratories, but also allowing tests to move out of the laboratory, closer to the point of care. Demand for simpler, miniaturized equipment and assays, and the trend toward personalized medicine, is leading towards the development of fully integrated automation and home-use kits. The integration of diverse disciplines, such as genomics, molecular biology, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, microfabrication, and organic chemistry, is behind the emerging DNA microarray technology. Development of DNA microchips allows the simultaneous detection of potentially thousands of target sequences, not only favoring high throughput, but also the potential for genotyping patient subsets with respect to their response to particular drug types (pharmakogenomics). It is envisaged that the future of probe-based technologies will see the development of fully integrated assays and devices suitable for nonskilled users. PMID:15148419

  17. Tissue engineering: current strategies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jennifer L; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2011-04-01

    Novel therapies resulting from regenerative medicine and tissue engineering technology may offer new hope for patients with injuries, end-stage organ failure, or other clinical issues. Currently, patients with diseased and injured organs are often treated with transplanted organs. However, there is a shortage of donor organs that is worsening yearly as the population ages and as the number of new cases of organ failure increases. Scientists in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering are now applying the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that can restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. In addition, the stem cell field is a rapidly advancing part of regenerative medicine, and new discoveries in this field create new options for this type of therapy. For example, new types of stem cells, such as amniotic fluid and placental stem cells that can circumvent the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cells, have been discovered. The process of therapeutic cloning and the creation of induced pluripotent cells provide still other potential sources of stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering applications. Although stem cells are still in the research phase, some therapies arising from tissue engineering endeavors that make use of autologous, adult cells have already entered the clinical setting, indicating that regenerative medicine holds much promise for the future. PMID:22111050

  18. Treatment Strategies for Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Mucocutaneous is an infection caused by a single celled parasite transmitted by sand fly bites. There are about 20 species of Leishmania that may cause mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Some Leishmania species are closely linked to humans and are therefore found in cities (L. tropica) whereas some others are more traditionally associated with animal species and therefore considered zoonoses (L. major). The evidence for optimal treatment of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis is patchy. Although the cutaneous form of the disease is often self-limiting, it does result in significant scarring and can spread to more invasive, mucocutaneous disease. Therefore, treatment may be considered to prevent these complications. Drugs for systemic and topical treatment are presented and discussed with regard to their application, use and adverse effects. PMID:20606970

  19. Update and future of systemic acne treatment.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, Christos C; Piquero-Martin, Jaime

    2003-01-01

    Systemic treatment is required in patients with moderate-to-severe acne, especially when acne scars start to occur. Antibiotics with anti-inflammatory properties, such as tetracyclines (oxytetracycline, tetracycline chloride, doxycycline, minocycline and limecycline) and macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin and azithromycin) are the agents of choice for papulopustular acne, even though the emerging resistant bacterial strains are minimizing their effect, especially regarding erythromycin. Systemic antibiotics should be administered during a period of 8-12 weeks. In severe papulopustular and in nodulocystic/conglobate acne, oral isotretinoin is the treatment of choice. Hormonal treatment represents an alternative regimen in female acne, whereas it is mandatory in resistant, severe pubertal or post-adolescent forms of the disease. Compounds with anti-androgenic properties include estrogens combined with progestins, such as ethinyl estradiol with cyproterone acetate, chlormadinone acetate, desogestrel, drospirenone, levonogestrel, norethindrone acetate, norgestimate, and other anti-androgens directly blocking the androgen receptor (flutamide) or inhibiting androgen activity at various levels, corticosteroids, spironolactone, cimetidine, and ketoconazole. After 3 months of treatment control of seborrhea and acne can be obtained. Low-dose corticosteroids (prednisone, prednisolone, or dexamethasone) are indicated in patients with adrenal hyperandrogenism or acne fulminans. New developments and future trends represent low-dose long-term isotretinoin regimens, new isotretinoin formulations (micronized isotretinoin), isotretinoin metabolites, combination treatments to reduce toxicity, insulin-sensitizing agents, 5alpha-reductase type 1 inhibitors, antisense oligonucleotide molecules, and, especially, new anti-inflammatory agents, such as lipoxygenase inhibitors. PMID:12566804

  20. Future perspectives: Moving towards NCL treatments.

    PubMed

    Cotman, Susan L; Mole, Sara E; Kohan, Romina

    2015-10-01

    Clinicians, basic researchers, representatives from pharma and families from around the world met in Cordoba, Argentina in October, 2014 to discuss recent research progress at the 14th International Congress on Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (NCLs; Batten disease), a group of clinically overlapping fatal, inherited lysosomal disorders with primarily neurodegenerative symptoms. This brief review article will provide perspectives on the anticipated future directions of NCL basic and clinical research as we move towards improved diagnosis, care and treatment of NCL patients. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease). PMID:25857620

  1. University Continuing Education: Strategies for an Uncertain Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, H. K.; Hamilton, A. Bruce

    Some of the most common predictions relating to university continuing education units provide a base from which a discussion of future strategies can begin. These include the following: the Big Generation (i.e., baby boomers) is here; knowledge, not products, is the major focus of society; competition for the traditional university continuing…

  2. Soil Contamination and Remediation Strategies. Current research and future challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruzzelli, G.

    2012-04-01

    eliminating the source of pollution, but also on blocking the pathways from contaminants to receptors or reducing the exposure to contaminants,. Future challenge integration of sustainability into remediation decision-making. Soil is not a waste! There is a growing interest in the clean up approaches that maintain soil quality after remediation treatments. This issue is of great importance in the U.S.A. where the EPA from 2009 is promoting innovative clean-up strategies (Green Remediation). Green remediation is defined as the practice of considering all environmental effects of remedy and incorporating options to maximize environmental benefit of cleanup actions . These remediation strategies restore contaminated sites to productive use with a great attention to the global environmental quality, including the preservation of soil functionality according to the following principles: use minimally invasive technologies; use passive energy technologies such as bioremediation and phytoremediation as primary remedies or finishing steps where possible and effective; minimize soil and habitat disturbance; minimize bioavailability of contaminants trough adequate contaminant source and plume control If we move from the current definition of remedial targets based on total concentrations, technologies with low impact on the environment can be utilized reducing the wrong choice to disposal soil in landfill destroying quickly a not renewable essential resource.

  3. Current and future treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlachterman, Alexander; Craft Jr, Willie W; Hilgenfeldt, Eric; Mitra, Avir; Cabrera, Roniel

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a unique challenge for physicians and patients. There is no definitively curative treatment. Rather, many treatment and management modalities exist with differing advantages and disadvantages. Both current guidelines and individual patient concerns must be taken into account in order to properly manage HCC. In addition, quality of life issues are particularly complex in patients with HCC and these concerns must also be factored into treatment strategies. Thus, considering all the options and their various pros and cons can quickly become complex for both clinicians and patients. In this review, we systematically discuss the current treatment modalities available for HCC, detailing relevant clinical data, risks and rewards and overall outcomes for each approach. Surgical options discussed include resection, transplantation and ablation. We also discuss the radiation modalities: conformal radiotherapy, yttrium 90 microspheres and proton and heavy ion radiotherapy. The biologic agent Sorafenib is discussed as a promising new approach, and recent clinical trials are reviewed. We then detail currently described molecular pathways implicated in the initiation and progression of HCC, and we explore the potential of each pathway as an avenue for drug exploitation. We hope this comprehensive and forward-looking review enables both clinicians and patients to understand various options and thereby make more informed decisions regarding this disease. PMID:26229392

  4. Current treatment of craniosynostosis and future therapeutic directions.

    PubMed

    Wan, Derrick C; Kwan, Matthew D; Lorenz, H Peter; Longaker, Michael T

    2008-01-01

    Normal craniofacial development is contingent upon coordinated growth between the brain and overlying calvaria. Craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures, perturbs this natural framework, resulting in dramatic dysmorphology of the skull and face along with a multitude of associated functional abnormalities. Traditional approaches to the treatment of craniosynostosis have employed complex surgical remodeling of the skull vault and facial deformities all aimed at increasing the amount of intracranial volume and restoring a more normal craniofacial appearance. Significant morbidity and mortality, however, have plagued these procedures, driving dramatic evolution in our approach towards the treatment of pathologically fused sutures. Recent clinical and genetic studies have identified multiple forms of human craniosynostosis, each associated with mutations within various cytokine signaling pathways. Knowledge garnered from these investigations bear promise for the future development of alternative strategies to enhance or perhaps even replace contemporary approaches for the treatment of craniosynostosis. PMID:18391503

  5. Lactic Acidosis: Current Treatments and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Jeffrey A; Madias, Nicolaos E

    2016-09-01

    Mortality rates associated with severe lactic acidosis (blood pH<7.2) due to sepsis or low-flow states are high. Eliminating the triggering conditions remains the most effective therapy. Although recommended by some, administration of sodium bicarbonate does not improve cardiovascular function or reduce mortality. This failure has been attributed to both reduction in serum calcium concentration and generation of excess carbon dioxide with intracellular acidification. In animal studies, hyperventilation and infusion of calcium during sodium bicarbonate administration improves cardiovascular function, suggesting that this approach could allow expression of the positive aspects of sodium bicarbonate. Other buffers, such as THAM or Carbicarb, or dialysis might also provide base with fewer untoward effects. Examination of these therapies in humans is warranted. The cellular injury associated with lactic acidosis is partly due to activation of NHE1, a cell-membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger. In animal studies, selective NHE1 inhibitors improve cardiovascular function, ameliorate lactic acidosis, and reduce mortality, supporting future research into their possible use in humans. Two main mechanisms contribute to lactic acid accumulation in sepsis and low-flow states: tissue hypoxia and epinephrine-induced stimulation of aerobic glycolysis. Targeting these mechanisms could allow for more specific therapy. This Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case presents a patient with acute lactic acidosis and describes current and future approaches to treatment. PMID:27291485

  6. Viral encephalitis: current treatments and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2012-12-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system infections that lead to a broad range of clinical manifestations. The course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, sub acute, or chronic. Some viruses have the ability to enter into the brain and cause direct injury, while others activate inflammatory cells that attack the central nervous system (CNS) secondarily. Some types of viral encephalitis occur in previously healthy individuals, while others affect immunocompromised patients. The epidemiology of viral encephalitis has undergone changes in recent years. Factors such as evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some types of viral encephalitis. The result is a change in the etiology spectrum of viral encephalitis, with new types of encephalitis arising or returning from time to time. Many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. Despite these advances, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality related to these disorders. This aim of this article is to review the current knowledge of the current drugs used in the management of the most important viral encephalitis, focusing on the mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects of the drugs. In addition, future perspectives in this area will be addressed. Despite the technological advances, much effort has yet to be undertaken to reduce the impact of these potentially devastating diseases. PMID:22640219

  7. Fractal Formation and Trend Trading Strategy in Futures Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masteika, Saulius; Rutkauskas, Aleksandras V.; Lopata, Audrius

    The paper presents the details of trend trading algorithm in futures market. A contribution of this paper lies in a modified chart pattern related to a fractal formation, nonlinearity and chaos theory, broadly discussed by Benoit B. Mandelbrot and Bill M. Williams. As typical fractal pattern often is being applied in conjunction with other forms of technical analysis, like moving averages, Elliott Waves analysis or MACD indicators the proposed pattern is presented as a basic indicator itself. The strategy can be applied as up-trend market forecasting tool. The efficiency of the proposed strategy was tested with the most active North American futures contracts using 10 years historical daily data. Experimental results showed better returns if compared to overall market average-CRB index.

  8. Overactive bladder syndrome pharmacotherapy: future treatment options

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is a lifestyle disease and its incidence increases with age. Although it is not a life-threatening disease, it is known to have a significant impact on the quality of life. The first-choice pharmacological treatment of OAB is antimuscarinics. However, their limited clinical effectiveness and unsatisfactory tolerance profile, combined with the advancement of knowledge on the aetiopathogenesis of the disease, have inspired research on new pharmacotherapy options for OAB. Basic research has provided foundations for the development of new OAB treatments, which seem very promising and can be applied in clinical practice. The mechanisms of the studied compounds are based on their effect on certain receptors and neurotransmitters that contribute to regulating the micturition reflex. These compounds are not only more receptor-specific as compared to currently used drugs, but also some of them are organ-specific. Some of such compounds have already passed the proof-of-concept stage of development and have the therapeutic potential to determine the future of OAB pharmacotherapy. This review focuses on the mechanisms of substances that are now undergoing pre-clinical and clinical tests and their effects on the micturition cycle, while also identifying opportunities for using them with specific groups of patients. Due to the fact that OAB is a disease of symptoms and its aetiopathogenesis is complex, it seems that modern treatment methods should be tailor-made and based on the pathophysiological mechanisms that induce disease symptoms, rather than only treating the symptoms by inhibiting the contractility of the urinary bladder. PMID:26848291

  9. Treatment of hemophilia in the near future.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, Flora; Garagiola, Isabella

    2015-11-01

    Advancements and debacles have characterized hemophilia treatment over the past 50 years. The 1970s saw the availability of plasma-derived concentrates making prophylaxis and home therapy possible. This optimistic perception changed extremely in the early 1980s, when most people with hemophilia were infected with HIV and hepatitis viruses. Then, also in the 1980s, the rapid progress in molecular biology led to the development of recombinant therapeutic products. This important advancement was a huge technological leap fresh off from the earlier 1980s disaster. Now in the 21st century, the newer bioengineering drugs open a new hopeful phase for the management of hemophilia. The current efforts are concentrated on producing novel coagulation factors with prolonged bioavailability, increased potency, and resistance to inactivation and potentially reduced immunogenicity; this phase of evolution is improving very quickly. 2014 is the year of marketing approval by the Food and Drug Administration of the first bioengineered FVIII and FIX long-acting drugs, using Fc-fusion strategy. This represents the first significant advance in the hemophilia therapy that dramatically transforms patient management by substantially reducing the frequency of injections, improving compliance, and simplifying prophylaxis and, in turn, refining the quality of life of hemophilia patients, offering them a nearly normal life expectancy, particularly to newborns with hemophilia B. PMID:25703518

  10. Amblyopia treatment strategies and new drug therapies.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Stefanucci, Alessio; Buomprisco, Giuseppe; Fazio, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Amblyopia is a unilateral or bilateral reduction of visual acuity secondary to abnormal visual experience during early childhood. It is one of the most common causes of vision loss and monocular blindness and is commonly associated with strabismus, anisometropia, and visual deprivation (in particular congenital cataract and ptosis). It is clinically defined as a two-line difference of best-corrected visual acuity between the eyes. The purpose of this study was to understand the neural mechanisms of amblyopia and summarize the current therapeutic strategies. In particular, the authors focused on the concept of brain plasticity and its implication for new treatment strategies for children and adults with amblyopia. PMID:24410693

  11. [Drug delivery strategies for targeted treatment of inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, C; Schmidt, C; Lange, K; Stallmach, A

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a frequently occurring disease in young people, which is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The therapy of IBD is dominated by the administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents, which suppress the intestinal inflammatory burden and improve the disease-related symptoms. Present treatment strategies are characterized by a limited therapeutical efficacy and the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The development of novel disease-targeted drug delivery strategies is preferable for a more effective therapy and thus demonstrates the potential to address unmet medical needs. This review gives an overview about drug delivery strategies for the treatment of IBD. Therefore, established intestine-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the diseased part of the gastrointestinal tract will be presented, including prodrugs, and dosage forms with pH-/time-dependent drug release. Furthermore future-oriented disease-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the intestinal inflammation will be described, including micro-/nanosized synthetic and biologic drug carriers. This novel therapeutic approach may enable a more effective anti-inflammatory treatment of IBD with reduced risks of adverse reactions. PMID:25723326

  12. A treatment strategy for psychogenic vomiting.

    PubMed

    Willard, S G; Swain, B S; Winstead, D K

    1989-01-01

    Although the literature supports the existence of psychogenic vomiting as a distinct psychiatric disorder, the DSM III-R does not include it as a diagnostic category. Of the numerous articles in the literature which describe this disorder, few discuss treatment. The purposes of this paper are to review the existing literature, to describe the family dynamics which are thought to precipitate the evolution of psychogenic vomiting in the identified patient, and to describe a treatment protocol which has been successfully employed in an outpatient setting. The illness is characterized as an eating disorder in terms of etiology, symptomatology, and treatment. A treatment strategy is described which includes insight-oriented psychotherapy with cognitive/behavioral interventions and family therapy. Two case studies are included which illustrate that a combined therapy approach is efficacious in treating psychogenic vomiting. PMID:2813832

  13. Erection rehabilitation following prostatectomy - current strategies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sopko, Nikolai A; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-04-01

    Despite continued advances in urological surgery, erectile dysfunction (ED) remains a serious adverse effect of radical prostatectomy. In this setting, ED is predominantly caused by injury to the neurovascular bundles, which lie alongside the prostate and are responsible for initiating and maintaining the erectile response. Most men will experience some degree of ED after radical prostatectomy, although erectile function outcomes have already remarkably improved since the development of nerve-sparing surgical techniques. To further improve outcomes, erection rehabilitation strategies are being investigated, which emphasize early treatment regimens with the aim of preventing adverse remodelling after surgery and preserving erectile function. Strategies include pharmacological therapy, mechanical therapy and psychosocial support. In addition, novel therapeutic approaches involving new targets for small-molecule treatments and regenerative medicine therapies are being developed to aid in restoring erectile function. Although ED treatments can be effective following radical prostatectomy, no specific erection rehabilitation regimen has currently been shown to be superior to other investigated rehabilitation regimens. Nevertheless, the different strategies rightfully remain an area of intensive research, as preservation of erectile function is a critical part of providing comprehensive care for men with prostate cancer to ensure their overall well-being, in contrast to just treating a patient's tumour. PMID:26976244

  14. Nonsurgical Treatment Strategies after Osteoporotic Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kwang-Soon; Bae, Ki-Cheor; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Son, Eun-Suck; Lee, Kyung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic disease that is increasing in prevalence as people live longer. Because the orthopedic surgeon is frequently the first and often the only physician to manage patients with osteoporotic hip fractures, every effort should be made to prevent future fractures. A multidisciplinary approach is essential in treatment of osteoporotic fractures. Basic treatment includes calcium and vitamin D supplementation, fall prevention, hip protection, and balance and exercise programs. Currently available pharmacologic agents are divided into antiresorptive and anabolic groups. Antiresorptive agents such as bisphosphonates limit bone resorption through inhibition of osteoclastic activity. Anabolic agents such as parathyroid hormone promote bone formation.

  15. New Strategies for the Treatment of Phenylketonuria (PKU)

    PubMed Central

    Strisciuglio, Pietro; Concolino, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) was the first inherited metabolic disease in which dietary treatment was found to prevent the disease’s clinical features. Treatment of phenylketonuria remains difficult due to progressive decrease in adherence to diet and the presence of neurocognitive defects despite therapy. This review aims to summarize the current literature on new treatment strategies. Additions to treatment include new, more palatable foods based on glycomacropeptide that contains very limited amount of aromatic amino acids, the administration of large neutral amino acids to prevent phenylalanine entry into the brain or tetrahydropterina cofactor capable of increasing residual activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase. Moreover, human trials have recently been performed with subcutaneous administration of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, and further efforts are underway to develop an oral therapy containing phenylanine ammonia-lyase. Gene therapy also seems to be a promising approach in the near future. PMID:25375236

  16. Monkey Trial Offers Hope for Future Ebola Treatment for Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... 157462.html Monkey Trial Offers Hope for Future Ebola Treatment for Humans Antibodies from 1995 survivor protected ... 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An antibody treatment for Ebola might be able to protect people for up ...

  17. Current and future treatment options in SIADH

    PubMed Central

    Zietse, Robert; van der Lubbe, Nils; Hoorn, Ewout J.

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of hyponatraemia due to SIADH is not always as straightforward as it seems. Although acute treatment with hypertonic saline and chronic treatment with fluid restriction are well established, both approaches have severe limitations. These limitations are not readily overcome by addition of furosemide, demeclocycline, lithium or urea to the therapy. In theory, vasopressin-receptor antagonists would provide a more effective method to treat hyponatraemia, by virtue of their ability to selectively increase solute-free water excretion by the kidneys (aquaresis). In this review we explore the limitations of the current treatment of SIADH and describe emerging therapies for the treatment of SIADH-induced hyponatraemia. PMID:19881932

  18. Consolidation Strategies in Ovarian Cancer: Observations for Future Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sabbatini, Paul; Spriggs, David; Aghajanian, Carol; Hensley, Martee; Tew, William; Konner, Jason; Bell-McGuinn, Kathryn; Juretzka, Margrit; Iasonos, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the characteristics of a series of study populations of ovarian cancer patients with identical elegibility criteria in second or subsequent clinical remission (cCR) and to propose endpoint benchmarks for future consolidation studies. Patients and Methods The patient populations consisted of those 1) untreated - U (observed until progression), n = 35; 2) receiving imatinib - G, n = 32; 3) receiving goserelin and bicalutamide - A, n = 32; and 4) receiving vaccine - V, n = 68; total = 167. The endpoint of the combined analysis was progression-free survival in second remission (PFS 2). Patient characteristics were compared by Chi-square test, and factors predicting PFS 2 evaluated in multivariate Cox model. Results Groups were comparable for age, stage, grade, and debulking. Multivariate model to predict PFS 2 duration included histology, stage, optimal debulking, PFS 1 duration and the type of intervention. As a benchmark for future studies, the median PFS 2 of the combined population of G, A, U (removing V which had the most impact in prolonging PFS 2, n=68) was 11.3 months (95% CI: 10.4 – 12.5 months). The percent of patients with PFS 2 > PFS 1 was 14/90 (16%). At 12 months, 43% remain progression free. Conclusion Preliminary benchmarks for efficacy endpoints are suggested for future consolidation trials of patients in cCR. However, the suggested strategies will require validation in randomized trials and larger data sets. PMID:19836827

  19. Emerging treatment strategies for glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Steven K; Brothers, Shaun P; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the deadliest form of brain tumor with a more than 90% 5-year mortality. GBM has a paltry median survival of 12.6 months attributed to the unique treatment limitations such as the high average age of onset, tumor location, and poor current understandings of the tumor pathophysiology. The resection techniques, chemotherapic strategies, and radiation therapy currently used to treat GBM have slowly evolved, but the improvements have not translated to marked increases in patient survival. Here, we will discuss the recent progress in our understanding of GBM pathophysiology, and the diagnostic techniques and treatment options. The discussion will include biomarkers, tumor imaging, novel therapies such as monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors, and the heterogeneity resulting from the GBM cancer stem cell population. PMID:25312641

  20. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  1. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Maverick W K

    2016-07-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  2. The black aged: a strategy for future mental health services.

    PubMed

    Carter, J H

    1978-12-01

    The younger generation of today will become the elderly of tomorrow. The qualitative differences in life experiences of blacks versus whites lead to differences in the manifestations of emotional problems. Thus the need for a special psychiatric strategy for aged blacks in the future. The problems of blacks, regardless of age, are inextricably linked with beliefs regarding illness, health and institutionalized racism. The many psychiatric ghettoes stemming from the depopulation of mental hospitals reflect poor planning and an obvious disregard for the realities of the whole life situations of elderly blacks. There should be an end to living in squalor and being the victims of muggings, rape and all forms of exploitation. Psychiatry should step forward with some careful and significant plans. PMID:712025

  3. Combine or Separate Future Pain? The Impact of Current Pain on Decisions about Future Dental Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Eduardo B.; Bianchini, Marco Aurélio; Lucchiari, Newton

    2013-01-01

    Patients are often given the option of undergoing future painful treatments in one or multiple sessions (e.g., extracting two wisdom teeth on one or two different days). In a randomized controlled field experiment, we investigated the impact of transient pain on patients’ decision to combine or separate future periodontal treatments. The main results show that most patients preferred to have the future treatments take place in one session when they made their choice after a painless examination (i.e., general clinical exam). However, the patients’ preference for combining the future treatments did not differ from chance when the choice was made immediately following a painful examination (i.e., pocketing and bleeding on probing exam). The impact of pain on decision making is observed within and between participants. Current pain seems to lead patients to question their ability to endure future painful treatments in one session. PMID:23704972

  4. [Treatment strategy for advanced prostate cancer with bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mikio; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki

    2006-08-01

    The introduction of PSA screening has led to confirming a shift towards an earlier pathological stage in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Consequently, the proportion of detecting early stage prostate cancer has clearly been increasing. On the other hand, progressive cancers in the form of distant metastases and locally advanced ones that have been confirmed at the initial diagnosis exhibit a constant rate. In addition, there have been a lot of cases where hormonal resistance was acquired during hormonal therapy which resulted in advanced metastases of the prostate. Prostate cancer has a tendency to be metastatic to bones. Combining the fact that the survival period of patients undergoing treatment is prolonged after metastases, the length of suffering caused by complications, such as ostealgia, pathological fracture and myelopathy, becomes an issue in which QOL and ADL of the patient are sacrificed for a long time. As for treatment of prostate cancer with metastases, a palliative treatment is common in the clinical scene. However, we can extend a life prognosis with use of radiotherapy and surgical treatment in addition to the palliative treatment at an appropriate time. It appears that a combination of new chemotherapy and hormonal therapy will be promising. In the future, we believe that the appearance of new anticancer drugs, endocrine therapies, bisphosphonates and strontium treatment could be used as a part of the treatment strategy for prostate cancer with bone metastases. PMID:16912523

  5. Bone pain: current and future treatments.

    PubMed

    Frost, Charlotte Ørsted; Hansen, Rikke Rie; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal conditions are common causes of chronic pain and there is an unmet medical need for improved treatment options. Bone pain is currently managed with disease modifying agents and/or analgesics depending on the condition. Disease modifying agents affect the underlying pathophysiology of the disease and reduce as a secondary effect bone pain. Antiresorptive and anabolic agents, such as bisphosphonates and intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34), respectively, have proven effective as pain relieving agents. Cathepsin K inhibitors and anti-sclerostin antibodies hold, due to their disease modifying effects, promise of a pain relieving effect. NSAIDs and opioids are widely employed in the treatment of bone pain. However, recent preclinical findings demonstrating a unique neuronal innervation of bone tissue and sprouting of sensory nerve fibers open for new treatment possibilities. PMID:26940053

  6. [Treatment of Alzheimer's disease and future approaches].

    PubMed

    Forette, Françoise; Hauw, Jean-Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The progressive neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease leads to neurochemical abnormalities which provide the basis for symptomatic treatments. Four cholinesterase inhibitors were released in this indication. Meta-analyses have confirmed a beneficial effect on cognitive functioning and activities of daily living. The NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine, was also approved for the treatment of moderate to severe and may be associated. Progress in the patho-physiology of the disease offers some hope of new treatments acting on the cerebral lesions. The amyloid hypothesis allowed the emergence of active or passive immunotherapies, and of secretase inhibitors or modulators. Recent studies have targeted the P tau protein. The brain plasticity and the uses of stem cells offer more distant hope. PMID:21144478

  7. Polyphenols: Potential Future Arsenals in the Treatment of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Solayman, Md; Ali, Yousuf; Alam, Fahmida; Islam, Md Asiful; Alam, Nadia; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common endocrine metabolic disorders. In addition to exercise and diet, oral anti-diabetic drugs have been used as a part of the management strategy worldwide. Unfortunately, none of the conventional anti-diabetic drugs are without side effects, and these drugs pose an economic burden. Therefore, the investigation of novel anti-diabetic regimens is a major challenge for researchers, in which nature has been the primary resource for the discovery of potential therapeutics. Many plants have been shown to act as anti-diabetic agents, in which the main active constituents are believed to be polyphenols. Natural products containing high polyphenol levels can control carbohydrate metabolism by various mechanisms, such as protecting and restoring beta-cell integrity, enhancing insulin releasing activity, and increasing cellular glucose uptake. Blackberries, red grapes, apricots, eggplant and popular drinks such as coffee, cocoa and green tea are all rich in polyphenols, which may dampen insulin resistance and be natural alternatives in the treatment of diabetes. Therefore, the aim of this review is to report on the available anti-diabetic polyphenols (medicinal plants, fruits and vegetables), their mechanisms in the various pathways of DM and their correlations with DM. Additionally, this review emphasizes the types of polyphenols that could be potential future resources in the treatment of DM via either novel regimens or as supplementary agents. PMID:26601968

  8. The future of cancer treatment: immunomodulation, CARs and combination immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Danny N; Smith, Eric L; Brentjens, Renier J; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2016-05-01

    In the past decade, advances in the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and adoptive cellular therapy to treat cancer by modulating the immune response have led to unprecedented responses in patients with advanced-stage tumours that would otherwise have been fatal. To date, three immune-checkpoint-blocking mAbs have been approved in the USA for the treatment of patients with several types of cancer, and more patients will benefit from immunomodulatory mAb therapy in the months and years ahead. Concurrently, the adoptive transfer of genetically modified lymphocytes to treat patients with haematological malignancies has yielded dramatic results, and we anticipate that this approach will rapidly become the standard of care for an increasing number of patients. In this Review, we highlight the latest advances in immunotherapy and discuss the role that it will have in the future of cancer treatment, including settings for which testing combination strategies and 'armoured' CAR T cells are recommended. PMID:26977780

  9. [Pathogenesis and treatment of presbyacusis. Current status and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mazurek, B; Stöver, T; Haupt, H; Gross, J; Szczepek, A

    2008-04-01

    Factors responsible for presbyacusis include physiological ageing processes as well as endogenous or exogenous causes. In the industrial countries, two main exogenous causes are exposure to loud noise and obesity. Pathomechanisms contributing to presbyacusis are hypoxia/ischemia, reactive species formation and oxidative stress, apoptotic and necrotic death of hair cells and spiral ganglion cells as well as inherited and acquired mutations in the mitochondrial DNA. Important for the successful treatment of presbyacusis is a timely fitting of hearing aids on both ears to improve communication and provide the auditory system with acoustic information. Using the hearing aids will also elevate the detection threshold of an existing tinnitus signal. At present, several therapeutic strategies based on pharmacological intervention are under discussion. The application of antioxidants or caloric restriction are considered to prevent or reduce oxidative stress-induced damage. Animal experiments evidenced that superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) strongly decreases in age; thus, a further approach may be the overexpression or modulation of the SOD2 within the cochlea. Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer technology would be a tempting approach to address this type of therapy. Finally, hair cell regeneration could be a possible treatment of presbyacusis in the future. PMID:18338147

  10. Entry inhibitors and future treatment of hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Fofana, Isabel; Jilg, Nikolaus; Chung, Raymond T; Baumert, Thomas F

    2014-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, HCV-induced liver disease is the leading indication for liver transplantation. The recent introduction of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has revolutionized HCV treatment by making possible the cure of the majority of patients. However, their efficacy and safety in difficult-to-treat patients such as patients receiving immunosuppression, those with advanced liver disease, co-morbidity and HIV/HCV-co-infection remain to be determined. Furthermore, prevention of liver graft infection remains a pressing issue. HCV entry inhibitors target the very first step of the HCV life cycle and efficiently inhibit cell-cell transmission - a key prerequisite for viral spread. Because of their unique mechanism of action on cell-cell transmission they may provide a promising and simple perspective for prevention of liver graft infection. A high genetic barrier to resistance and complementary mechanism of action compared to DAAs makes entry inhibitors attractive as a new strategy for treatment of multi-resistant or difficult-to-treat patients. Clinical studies are needed to determine the future role of entry inhibitors in the arsenal of antivirals to combat HCV infection. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Hepatitis C: next steps toward global eradication." PMID:24525381

  11. Hepatitis C treatment: current and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Munir, Saira; Saleem, Sana; Idrees, Muhammad; Tariq, Aaliyah; Butt, Sadia; Rauff, Bisma; Hussain, Abrar; Badar, Sadaf; Naudhani, Mahrukh; Fatima, Zareen; Ali, Muhmmad; Ali, Liaqat; Akram, Madiha; Aftab, Mahwish; Khubaib, Bushra; Awan, Zunaira

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a member of Flaviviridae family and one of the major causes of liver disease. There are about 175 million HCV infected patients worldwide that constitute 3% of world's population. The main route of HCV transmission is parental however 90% intravenous drug users are at highest risk. Standard interferon and ribavirin remained a gold standard of chronic HCV treatment having 38-43% sustained virological response rates. Currently the standard therapy for HCV is pegylated interferon (PEG-INF) with ribavirin. This therapy achieves 50% sustained virological response (SVR) for genotype 1 and 80% for genotype 2 & 3. As pegylated interferon is expensive, standard interferon is still the main therapy for HCV treatment in under developed countries. On the other hand, studies showed that pegylated IFN and RBV therapy has severe side effects like hematological complications. Herbal medicines (laccase, proanthocyandin, Rhodiola kirilowii) are also being in use as a natural and alternative way for treatment of HCV but there is not a single significant report documented yet. Best SVR indicators are genotype 3 and 2, < 0.2 million IU/mL pretreatment viral load, rapid virological response (RVR) rate and age <40 years. New therapeutic approaches are under study like interferon related systems, modified forms of ribavirin, internal ribosome entry site (HCV IRES) inhibitors, NS3 and NS5a inhibitors, novel immunomodulators and specifically targeted anti-viral therapy for hepatitis C compounds. More remedial therapies include caspase inhibitors, anti-fibrotic agents, antibody treatment and vaccines. PMID:21040548

  12. Biological treatment strategies for disc degeneration: potentials and shortcomings

    PubMed Central

    Nerlich, Andreas G.; Boos, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology, cell biology and material sciences have opened a new emerging field of techniques for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. These new treatment modalities aim for biological repair of the affected tissues by introducing cell-based tissue replacements, genetic modifications of resident cells or a combination thereof. So far, these techniques have been successfully applied to various tissues such as bone and cartilage. However, application of these treatment modalities to cure intervertebral disc degeneration is in its very early stages and mostly limited to experimental studies in vitro or in animal studies. We will discuss the potential and possible shortcomings of current approaches to biologically cure disc degeneration by gene therapy or tissue engineering. Despite the increasing number of studies examining the therapeutic potential of biological treatment strategies, a practicable solution to routinely cure disc degeneration might not be available in the near future. However, knowledge gained from these attempts might be applied in a foreseeable future to cure the low back pain that often accompanies disc degeneration and therefore be beneficial for the patient. PMID:16983559

  13. The future of tic disorder treatment.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Shannon M; Keller, Alex E; Walkup, John T

    2013-11-01

    Competing theories on the etiology and treatment of chronic tic disorders and Tourette syndrome have long made the search for efficacious intervention more challenging for patients and families seeking to reduce functional impairment related to tic symptoms. These symptoms were historically posited to be either psychological in origin, leading to the long tradition of psychoanalytic psychotherapy for tics, or biological in nature, particularly since the advent of successful treatments using neuroleptic medications. Current thinking about the phenomenology of tic disorders comes from growing empirical evidence as well as advances in neuroscience and genetics research and reveals a biological vulnerability that is exacerbated by physiological arousal related to environmental or interpersonal stress. This manuscript summarizes the evolution of this knowledge base and describes current best-practice recommendations for patients, families, and clinicians. PMID:24175754

  14. Treatment strategies for gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Imano, Motohiro; Okuno, Kiyotaka

    2014-03-01

    Although the treatment of gastric cancer improves the clinical outcomes, the survival of gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis is still very poor. Effective drugs against peritoneal metastasis, coupled with new therapeutic modalities, are needed to improve the prognoses of these patients. Paclitaxel and TS-1 are candidate drugs for peritoneal metastasis, and intraperitoneal chemotherapy and targeted therapy are potential new therapeutic modalities. Two phase II studies using TS-1 and intraperitoneal and systemic paclitaxel for gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis showed respectable survival results. In addition, peritoneal metastatic lesions showed high levels of epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (ECAM) and very low levels of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), thus indicating that an anti-ECAM monoclonal antibody, catumaxomab, would be effective against gastric cancer-derived peritoneal metastasis. Although catumaxomab and intraperitoneally administered paclitaxel are not generally used in Japan at present, these treatment strategies might therefore be effectively used in Japan in the near future. PMID:23677598

  15. Preparing Future Geoscience Professionals: Needs, Strategies, Programs, and Online Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Dunbar, R. W.; Beane, R. J.; Bruckner, M.; Bralower, T. J.; Feiss, P. G.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wiese, K.

    2011-12-01

    Geoscience faculty, departments, and programs play an important role in preparing future geoscience professionals. One challenge is supporting the diversity of student goals for future employment and the needs of a wide range of potential employers. Students in geoscience degree programs pursue careers in traditional geoscience industries; in geoscience education and research (including K-12 teaching); and opportunities at the intersection of geoscience and other fields (e.g., policy, law, business). The Building Strong Geoscience Departments project has documented a range of approaches that departments use to support the development of geoscience majors as professionals (serc.carleton.edu/departments). On the Cutting Edge, a professional development program, supports graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing an academic career through workshops, webinars, and online resources (serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/careerprep). Geoscience departments work at the intersection of student interests and employer needs. Commonly cited program goals that align with employer needs include mastery of geoscience content; field experience; skill in problem solving, quantitative reasoning, communication, and collaboration; and the ability to learn independently and take a project from start to finish. Departments and faculty can address workforce issues by 1) implementing of degree programs that develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that students need, while recognizing that students have a diversity of career goals; 2) introducing career options to majors and potential majors and encouraging exploration of options; 3) advising students on how to prepare for specific career paths; 4) helping students develop into professionals, and 5) supporting students in the job search. It is valuable to build connections with geoscience employers, work with alumni and foster connections between students and alumni with similar career interests, collaborate with

  16. Inhalation injury: epidemiology, pathology, treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lung injury resulting from inhalation of smoke or chemical products of combustion continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Combined with cutaneous burns, inhalation injury increases fluid resuscitation requirements, incidence of pulmonary complications and overall mortality of thermal injury. While many products and techniques have been developed to manage cutaneous thermal trauma, relatively few diagnosis-specific therapeutic options have been identified for patients with inhalation injury. Several factors explain slower progress for improvement in management of patients with inhalation injury. Inhalation injury is a more complex clinical problem. Burned cutaneous tissue may be excised and replaced with skin grafts. Injured pulmonary tissue must be protected from secondary injury due to resuscitation, mechanical ventilation and infection while host repair mechanisms receive appropriate support. Many of the consequences of smoke inhalation result from an inflammatory response involving mediators whose number and role remain incompletely understood despite improved tools for processing of clinical material. Improvements in mortality from inhalation injury are mostly due to widespread improvements in critical care rather than focused interventions for smoke inhalation. Morbidity associated with inhalation injury is produced by heat exposure and inhaled toxins. Management of toxin exposure in smoke inhalation remains controversial, particularly as related to carbon monoxide and cyanide. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been evaluated in multiple trials to manage neurologic sequelae of carbon monoxide exposure. Unfortunately, data to date do not support application of hyperbaric oxygen in this population outside the context of clinical trials. Cyanide is another toxin produced by combustion of natural or synthetic materials. A number of antidote strategies have been evaluated to address tissue hypoxia associated with cyanide exposure. Data

  17. Technology and the Future of Mental Health Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Intervention Technology? Join a Study Learn More Technology and the Future of Mental Health Treatment Introduction ... What is NIMH’s Role in Mental Health Intervention Technology? Between FY2009 and FY2015, NIMH awarded 404 grants ...

  18. Bone regenerative medicine: classic options, novel strategies, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review analyzes the literature of bone grafts and introduces tissue engineering as a strategy in this field of orthopedic surgery. We evaluated articles concerning bone grafts; analyzed characteristics, advantages, and limitations of the grafts; and provided explanations about bone-tissue engineering technologies. Many bone grafting materials are available to enhance bone healing and regeneration, from bone autografts to graft substitutes; they can be used alone or in combination. Autografts are the gold standard for this purpose, since they provide osteogenic cells, osteoinductive growth factors, and an osteoconductive scaffold, all essential for new bone growth. Autografts carry the limitations of morbidity at the harvesting site and limited availability. Allografts and xenografts carry the risk of disease transmission and rejection. Tissue engineering is a new and developing option that had been introduced to reduce limitations of bone grafts and improve the healing processes of the bone fractures and defects. The combined use of scaffolds, healing promoting factors, together with gene therapy, and, more recently, three-dimensional printing of tissue-engineered constructs may open new insights in the near future. PMID:24628910

  19. The Indonesian family planning program: its strategy for the future.

    PubMed

    Suyono, H; Parsons, J S; Teachman, J D

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the strategy of the Indonesian national family planning program for the coming 5-10 years, in which communities will be given greater responsibility for their own fertility limitation programs and a stronger alliance with other government programs will be sought in order to assure the long-term success of both family planning and development activities. The article explains why more vigorous fertility limitation efforts will be required in the future despite encouraging results so far, and describes the structure of the Indonesian national family planning program. The rationale behind the move away from clinics as depensers of family planning services is examined, and the community family planning approach in Bali is described and compared to that in Java. The differing approach to service delivery in the Outer Islands is then discussed. The relationship between development and the small family norm is discussed, and efforts underway to maximize cooperation between the family planning and development sector projects are described. PMID:12309781

  20. Migraine: pathophysiology, pharmacology, treatment and future trends.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Carlos M; Centurión, David; Valdivia, Luis Felipe; de Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R

    2003-03-01

    Migraine treatment has evolved into the scientific arena, but it seems still controversial whether migraine is primarily a vascular or a neurological dysfunction. Irrespective of this controversy, the levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), a vasoconstrictor and a central neurotransmitter, seem to decrease during migraine (with associated carotid vasodilatation) whereas an i.v. infusion of 5-HT can abort migraine. In fact, 5-HT as well as ergotamine, dihydroergotamine and other antimigraine agents invariably produce vasoconstriction in the external carotid circulation. The last decade has witnessed the advent of sumatriptan and second generation triptans (e.g. zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, naratriptan), which belong to a new class of drugs, the 5-HT1B/1D/1F receptor agonists. Compared to sumatriptan, the second-generation triptans have a higher oral bioavailability and longer plasma half-life. In line with the vascular and neurogenic theories of migraine, all triptans produce selective carotid vasoconstriction (via 5-HT1B receptors) and presynaptic inhibition of the trigeminovascular inflammatory responses implicated in migraine (via 5-HT1D/5-ht1F receptors). Moreover, selective agonists at 5-HT1D (PNU-142633) and 5-ht1F (LY344864) receptors inhibit the trigeminovascular system without producing vasoconstriction. Nevertheless, PNU-142633 proved to be ineffective in the acute treatment of migraine, whilst LY344864 did show some efficacy when used in doses which interact with 5-HT1B receptors. Finally, although the triptans are effective antimigraine agents producing selective cranial vasoconstriction, efforts are being made to develop other effective antimigraine alternatives acting via the direct blockade of vasodilator mechanisms (e.g. antagonists at CGRP receptors, antagonists at 5-HT7 receptors, inhibitors of nitric oxide biosynthesis, etc). These alternatives will hopefully lead to fewer side effects. PMID:15320857

  1. Systematic Treatment Selection (STS): A Review and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Tam T.; Bertoni, Matteo; Charvat, Mylea; Gheytanchi, Anahita; Beutler, Larry E.

    2007-01-01

    Systematic Treatment Selection (STS) is a form of technical eclectism that develops and plans treatments using empirically founded principles of psychotherapy. It is a model that provides systematic guidelines for the utilization of different psychotherapeutic strategies based on patient qualities and problem characteristics. Historically, it…

  2. Novel strategies for treatment of resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Judd, Eric K; Oparil, Suzanne

    2013-12-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as blood pressure (BP) remaining above goal despite the use of 3 or more antihypertensive medications at maximally tolerated doses (one ideally being a diuretic) or BP that requires 4 or more agents to achieve control, occurs in a substantial proportion (>10%) of treated hypertensive patients. Refractory hypertension is a recently described subset of resistant hypertension that cannot be controlled with maximal medical therapy (⩾5 antihypertensive medications of different classes at maximal tolerated doses). Patients with resistant or refractory hypertension are at increased cardiovascular risk and comprise the target population for novel antihypertensive treatments. Device-based interventions, including carotid baroreceptor activation and renal denervation, reduce sympathetic nervous system activity and have effectively reduced BP in early clinical trials of resistant hypertension. Renal denervation interrupts afferent and efferent renal nerve signaling by delivering radiofrequency energy, other forms of energy, or norepinephrine-depleting pharmaceuticals through catheters in the renal arteries. Renal denervation has the advantage of not requiring general anesthesia, surgical intervention, or device implantation and has been evaluated extensively in observational proof-of-principle studies and larger randomized controlled trials. It has been shown to be safe and effective in reducing clinic BP, indices of sympathetic nervous system activity, and a variety of hypertension-related comorbidities. These include impaired glucose metabolism/insulin resistance, end-stage renal disease, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias. This article reviews the strengths, limitations, and future applications of novel device-based treatment, particularly renal denervation, for resistant hypertension and its comorbidities. PMID:25028641

  3. Water quality monitoring strategies - A review and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Behmel, S; Damour, M; Ludwig, R; Rodriguez, M J

    2016-11-15

    The reliable assessment of water quality through water quality monitoring programs (WQMPs) is crucial in order for decision-makers to understand, interpret and use this information in support of their management activities aiming at protecting the resource. The challenge of water quality monitoring has been widely addressed in the literature since the 1940s. However, there is still no generally accepted, holistic and practical strategy to support all phases of WQMPs. The purpose of this paper is to report on the use cases a watershed manager has to address to plan or optimize a WQMP from the challenge of identifying monitoring objectives; selecting sampling sites and water quality parameters; identifying sampling frequencies; considering logistics and resources to the implementation of actions based on information acquired through the WQMP. An inventory and critique of the information, approaches and tools placed at the disposal of watershed managers was proposed to evaluate how the existing information could be integrated in a holistic, user-friendly and evolvable solution. Given the differences in regulatory requirements, water quality standards, geographical and geological differences, land-use variations, and other site specificities, a one-in-all solution is not possible. However, we advance that an intelligent decision support system (IDSS) based on expert knowledge that integrates existing approaches and past research can guide a watershed manager through the process according to his/her site-specific requirements. It is also necessary to tap into local knowledge and to identify the knowledge needs of all the stakeholders through participative approaches based on geographical information systems and adaptive survey-based questionnaires. We believe that future research should focus on developing such participative approaches and further investigate the benefits of IDSS's that can be updated quickly and make it possible for a watershed manager to obtain a

  4. [Glioma treatment strategies using mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Namba, Hiroki

    2010-10-01

    Because of the growth characteristics of malignant gliomas that are highly invasive and deeply infiltrate the surrounding brain area; the surgical resection of these gliomas with preservation of neural functions is almost always noncurative. The residual tumor cells are usually resistant to standard adjuvant radiochemotherapy, and therefore, the tumors inevitably recur after a certain period and finally cause the death of the patients. Neural and mesenchymal stem cells have been extensively studied for the development of new strategies for treating malignant gliomas because of these cells possess the intrinsic property of homing toward tumor cells. By using neural and mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles for drug carriers, it is possible to deliver anticancer drugs to the tumor cells that infiltrate functioning normal brain tissue and are difficult to remove. Several cytokines and suicide genes have been tested, and promising results have been reported in animal brain tumor models. However, further studies involving safety issues such as secondary cancer formation are required before human trials of stem cell therapies. In the present paper, the author has reviewed the recent concepts involved in the treatment of malignant gliomas with stem cells, especially mesenchymal stem cells that are much easier to obtain from the patients themselves. PMID:20940507

  5. Multimodal treatment strategies for advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Matthew J; Cosgrove, David; Herman, Joseph M; Rastegar, Neda; Kamel, Ihab; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2014-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is the second most common primary malignancy of the liver arising from malignant transformation and growth of biliary ductal epithelium. Approximately 50-70 % of CCAs arise at the hilar plate of the biliary tree, which are termed hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC). Various staging systems are currently employed to classify HCs and determine resectability. Depending on the pre-operative staging, the mainstays of treatment include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and photodynamic therapy. Surgical resection offers the only chance for cure of HC and achieving an R0 resection has demonstrated improved overall survival. However, obtaining longitudinal and radial surgical margins that are free of tumor can be difficult and frequently requires extensive resections, particularly for advanced HCs. Pre-operative interventions may be necessary to prepare patients for major hepatic resections, including endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, and portal vein embolization. Multimodal therapy that combines chemotherapy with external beam radiation, stereotactic body radiation therapy, bile duct brachytherapy, and/or photodynamic therapy are all possible strategies for advanced HC prior to resection. Orthotopic liver transplantation is another therapeutic option that can achieve complete extirpation of locally advanced HC in judiciously selected patients following standardized neoadjuvant protocols. PMID:24962146

  6. Optimizing Hypoxia Detection and Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Cameron J.; Evans, Sydney M.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies using Eppendorf® needle sensors have invariably documented the resistance of hypoxic human tumors to therapy. These studies first documented the need for individual patient measurement of hypoxia, since hypoxia varied from tumor-to-tumor. Furthermore, hypoxia in sarcomas & cervical cancer leads to distant metastasis or local/regional spread, respectively. For various reasons, the field has moved away from direct needle-sensor oxygen measurements to indirect assays (HIF-related changes; bioreductive metabolism) and the latter can be imaged non-invasively. Many of hypoxia’s detrimental therapeutic effects are reversible in mice but little treatment-improvement in hypoxic human tumors has been seen. The question is why? What factors cause human tumors to be refractory to anti-hypoxia strategies? We suggest the primary cause to be the complexity of hypoxia formation and its characteristics. Three basic types of hypoxia exist, encompassing various diffusional (distance from perfused vessel), temporal (on/off cycling) and perfusional (blood-flow efficiency) limitations. Surprisingly, there is no current information on their relative prevalence in human tumors and even animal models. This is important because different hypoxia sub-types are predicted to require different diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, but the implications of this remain unknown. Even more challenging, no agreement exists for the best way to measure hypoxia. Some results even suggest that hypoxia is unlikely to be targetable therapeutically. In this review, the authors will revisit various critical aspects of this field that are sometimes forgotten or misrepresented in the recent literature. Since most current non-invasive imaging studies involve PET-isotope-labelled 2-nitroimidazoles, we will emphasize key findings made in our studies using EF5 [2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)acetamide] and F18-labelled EF5. These will show the importance of

  7. Cancer Treatment Strategies Targeting Sphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Oskouian, Babak; Saba, Julie D.

    2011-01-01

    Ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate are related sphingolipid metabolites that can be generated through a de novo biosynthetic route or derived from the recycling of membrane sphingomyelin. Both these lipids regulate cellular responses to stress, with generally opposing effects. Sphingosine-1-phosphate functions as a growth and survival factor, acting as a ligand for a family of G protein-coupled receptors, whereas ceramide activates intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways through receptor-independent mechanisms. A growing body of evidence has implicated ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and the genes involved in their synthesis, catabolism and signaling in various aspects of oncogenesis, cancer progression and drug- and radiation resistance. This may be explained in part by the finding that both lipids impinge upon the PI3K/AKT pathway, which represses apoptosis and autophagy. In addition, sphingolipids influence cell cycle progression, telomerase function, cell migration and stem cell biology. Considering the central role of ceramide in mediating physiological as well as pharmacologically stimulated apoptosis, ceramide can be considered a tumor-suppressor lipid. In contrast, sphingosine-1-phosphate can be considered a tumor-promoting lipid, and the enzyme responsible for its synthesis functions as an oncogene. Not surprisingly, genetic mutations that result in reduced ceramide generation, increased sphingosine-1-phosphate synthesis or which reduce steady state ceramide levels and increase sphingosine-1-phosphate levels have been identified as mechanisms of tumor progression and drug resistance in cancer cells. Pharmacological tools for modulating sphingolipid pathways are being developed and represent novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. PMID:20919655

  8. Preparing Future Leaders: Project Management Strategies for Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Roger; Gutowski, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    This article makes a case for teaching project management strategies in service-learning courses. The authors describe three specific documents students can create to help them manage a service-learning project and then present strategies that can help students manage their project teams. Such skills, the authors argue, provide the tools students…

  9. Personal strategies for maximizing your value in an uncertain future.

    PubMed

    Pannesi, R

    1997-11-01

    Because of the trend toward downsizing and the increase in job insecurity, managers need to consider strategies to ensure that they are not among those who will be laid off in the coming years. This article presents a set of such strategies, which mostly fall into the two categories of skill enhancement and management style adaptation. PMID:10173996

  10. Treatment for primary hypothyroidism: current approaches and future possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Chakera, Ali J; Pearce, Simon HS; Vaidya, Bijay

    2012-01-01

    Primary hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease. Although the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism is often considered simple, there are large numbers of people with this condition who are suboptimally treated. Even in those people with hypothyroidism who are biochemically euthyroid on levothyroxine replacement there is a significant proportion who report poorer quality of life. This review explores the historical and current treatment options for hypothyroidism, reasons for and potential solutions to suboptimal treatment, and future possibilities in the treatment of hypothyroidism. PMID:22291465

  11. Closed Fuel Cycle Waste Treatment Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, J. D.; Collins, E. D.; Crum, J. V.; Ebert, W. L.; Frank, S. M.; Garn, T. G.; Gombert, D.; Jones, R.; Jubin, R. T.; Maio, V. C.; Marra, J. C.; Matyas, J.; Nenoff, T. M.; Riley, B. J.; Sevigny, G. J.; Soelberg, N. R.; Strachan, D. M.; Thallapally, P. K.; Westsik, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the existing waste management approaches for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in comparison to the objectives of implementing an advanced fuel cycle in the U.S. under current legal, regulatory, and logistical constructs. The study begins with the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Integrated Waste Management Strategy (IWMS) (Gombert et al. 2008) as a general strategy and associated Waste Treatment Baseline Study (WTBS) (Gombert et al. 2007). The tenets of the IWMS are equally valid to the current waste management study. However, the flowsheet details have changed significantly from those considered under GNEP. In addition, significant additional waste management technology development has occurred since the GNEP waste management studies were performed. This study updates the information found in the WTBS, summarizes the results of more recent technology development efforts, and describes waste management approaches as they apply to a representative full recycle reprocessing flowsheet. Many of the waste management technologies discussed also apply to other potential flowsheets that involve reprocessing. These applications are occasionally discussed where the data are more readily available. The report summarizes the waste arising from aqueous reprocessing of a typical light-water reactor (LWR) fuel to separate actinides for use in fabricating metal sodium fast reactor (SFR) fuel and from electrochemical reprocessing of the metal SFR fuel to separate actinides for recycle back into the SFR in the form of metal fuel. The primary streams considered and the recommended waste forms include; Tritium in low-water cement in high integrity containers (HICs); Iodine-129: As a reference case, a glass composite material (GCM) formed by the encapsulation of the silver Mordenite (AgZ) getter material in a low-temperature glass is assumed. A number of alternatives with distinct advantages are also considered including a fused silica waste form

  12. Future nanomedicine for the diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eichaker, Lauren R; Cho, Hongsik; Duvall, Craig L; Werfel, Thomas A; Hasty, Karen A

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for osteoarthritis (OA) are largely palliative until the joints become totally dysfunctional and prosthetic replacement becomes necessary. Effective methods are needed for diagnosing OA and monitoring its progression during its early stages, when the effects of therapeutic drugs or biological agents are most likely to be effective. Theranostic nanosomes and nanoparticles have the potential to noninvasively detect, track and treat the early stages of OA. As articular cartilage does not regenerate once it is degraded, cell-based treatments aided by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracking are attractive future treatment modalities for the later stages of OA progression, when significant cartilage replacement is needed. This article will describe the current and future translational approaches for the detection and noninvasive treatment of degenerative OA. PMID:25405797

  13. Human Papillomavirus: Current and Future RNAi Therapeutic Strategies for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hun Soon; Rajasekaran, Nirmal; Ju, Woong; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small DNA viruses; some oncogenic ones can cause different types of cancer, in particular cervical cancer. HPV-associated carcinogenesis provides a classical model system for RNA interference (RNAi) based cancer therapies, because the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 that cause cervical cancer are expressed only in cancerous cells. Previous studies on the development of therapeutic RNAi facilitated the advancement of therapeutic siRNAs and demonstrated its versatility by siRNA-mediated depletion of single or multiple cellular/viral targets. Sequence-specific gene silencing using RNAi shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of diseases that currently lack effective treatments. However, siRNA-based targeting requires further validation of its efficacy in vitro and in vivo, for its potential off-target effects, and of the design of conventional therapies to be used in combination with siRNAs and their drug delivery vehicles. In this review we discuss what is currently known about HPV-associated carcinogenesis and the potential for combining siRNA with other treatment strategies for the development of future therapies. Finally, we present our assessment of the most promising path to the development of RNAi therapeutic strategies for clinical settings. PMID:26239469

  14. [Chronic complications in cardiac transplantation. Clinical implications and future strategies].

    PubMed

    Magaña-Serrano, José Antonio; Argüero-Sánchez, Rubén

    2005-01-01

    Chronic complications are situations which limit the long-term utility of cardiac transplantation. The allograft vasculopathy is the most important cause of death at 5 years alter transplantation. Another conditions are systemic arterial hypertension, nephropathies, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemies and malignant neoplasies. The present manuscript summarizes the characteristics, clinical presentation and therapeutic strategies for this conditions. PMID:16524076

  15. A Critical Look at Communication Strategies: Possibilities for Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doqaruni, Vahid Rahmani

    2015-01-01

    Like general theories of human communication, previous research into second language (L2) communication strategies (CSs) has also been characterized on either interactional conceived account or cognitively conceived one. However, this paper is a critical attempt to show that CSs' full significance can only be understood if the domain of CSs…

  16. Hybrid curcumin compounds: a new strategy for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Teiten, Marie-Hélène; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that requires treatments able to target multiple intracellular components and signaling pathways. The natural compound, curcumin, was already described as a promising anticancer agent due to its multipotent properties and huge amount of molecular targets in vitro. Its translation to the clinic is, however, limited by its reduced solubility and bioavailability in patients. In order to overcome these pharmacokinetic deficits of curcumin, several strategies, such as the design of synthetic analogs, the combination with specific adjuvants or nano-formulations, have been developed. By taking into account the risk-benefit profile of drug combinations, as well as the knowledge about curcumin's structure-activity relationship, a new concept for the combination of curcumin with scaffolds from different natural products or components has emerged. The concept of a hybrid curcumin molecule is based on the incorporation or combination of curcumin with specific antibodies, adjuvants or other natural products already used or not in conventional chemotherapy, in one single molecule. The high diversity of such conjugations enhances the selectivity and inherent biological activities and properties, as well as the efficacy of the parental compound, with particular emphasis on improving the efficacy of curcumin for future clinical treatments. PMID:25514225

  17. Future Regulatory Science through a Global Product Development Strategy to Overcome the Device Lag.

    PubMed

    Tsuchii, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Environment that created "medical device lag (MDL)" has changed dramatically, and currently that term is not heard often. This was mainly achieved through the leadership of three groups: government, which determined to overcome MDL and took steps to do so; medical societies, which exhibited accountability in trial participation; and MD companies, which underwent a change in mindset that allowed comprehensive tripartite cooperation to reach the current stage. In particular, the global product development strategy (GPDS) of companies in a changing social environment has taken a new-turn with international harmonization trends, like Global Harmonization Task Force and International Council for Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. As a result, this evolution has created opportunities for treatment with cutting-edge MDs in Japanese society. Simultaneously, it has had a major impact on the planning process of GPDS of companies. At the same time, the interest of global companies has shifted to emerging economies for future potential profit since Japan no longer faces MDL issue. This economic trend makes MDLs a greater problem for manufacturers. From the regulatory science viewpoint, this new environment has not made it easy to plan a global strategy that will be adaptable to local societies. Without taking hasty action, flexible thinking from the global point of view is necessary to enable the adjustment of local strategies to fit the situation on the ground so that the innovative Japanese medical technology can be exported to a broad range of societies. PMID:27040334

  18. Current Treatment Strategies in Pediatric Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Etienne; Lee, Joyce SS; Tang, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a non-scarring autoimmune disease of the hair follicle that can present at any age. Pediatric cases are commonly seen in a dermatology clinic, and management can potentially be challenging, with a small proportion of cases experiencing a chronic relapsing course marked by distressing hair loss that can bring about significant psychosocial morbidity. We review the established treatments for pediatric alopecia areata, alongside second and third line therapies that have shown to be efficacious. We also offer a treatment algorithm as a guide to the treatment of pediatric AA. PMID:23248364

  19. Management of aortic graft infections - the present strategy and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Treska, V; Certik, B; Molacek, J

    2016-01-01

    Aortic graft infections (AGI) are serious complications of open and endovascular types of surgery with an incidence rate of 0.6-3 %. AGI are associated with 30-60 % perioperative mortality and 40-60 % morbidity rate with limb amputation rates between 10 % and 40 %. The economic cost of AGI is substantial. At the time of aortic reconstruction, almost 90 % of patients have one or more predisposing factors for AGI. The diagnosis is based on clinical symptomatology, laboratory markers, microbial cultures, and imaging modalities. The general principle of surgical treatment lies in the removal of infected graft, debridement of infected periprosthetic tissues, and vascular reconstruction by in situ or extra-anatomic bypass with long-term antibiotic therapy. The conservative treatment is used only for selected patients with endograft infection. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the incidence, predisposing factors, etiology, diagnosis, treatment options, and prevention of aortic vascular graft and endograft infections. With the growing number of endovascular procedures we can expect more cases of infected aortic endografts in patients with severe comorbidities in the near future, where the recent radical surgical approach (graft excision, debridement, and new revascularization) cannot be used. Therefore the less invasive, sophisticated and individualized treatment strategies will have to be used in search of the best therapeutic approach to each specific patient (Fig. 4, Ref. 82). PMID:26925740

  20. Current treatment strategies in autoimmune hemolytic disorders.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a heterogeneous disease usually classified according to the thermal range of the autoantibody in warm, cold and mixed forms. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. Corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for warm AIHA. For refractory/relapsed cases, the choice is between splenectomy (effective in ∼70% cases but with a presumed cure rate of 20%) and rituximab (effective in ∼70-80% of cases), which is becoming the preferred second-line treatment, and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins and danazol. For severe or refractory cases, last option treatments are plasma-exchange, high-dose cyclophosphamide and alemtuzumab. As regards cold agglutinin disease, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:26343892

  1. Gynecologic cancer: Diagnosis and treatment strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, F.N.; Freedman, R.S.; Gershenson, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 36 chapters divided into seven sections. The section headings are: Heath Memorial Award Lecture; Ovarian Cancer; Cervical and Vulvar Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Trophoblastic Disease; Diagnostic Procedures; and New Treatment Modalities.

  2. Immunotherapy strategies for multiple myeloma: the present and the future

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Frederick L; Nishihori, Taiga; Alsina, Melissa; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    Growing knowledge of the complexities of the immune system have led to a better understanding of how it can be harnessed for the purpose of anticancer therapy. Moreover, recent success with immunotherapies for solid tumors, combined with novel therapeutic strategies against myeloma, heighten excitement at the prospect of improving clinical outcomes for myeloma by improving antitumor immunity. Increased understanding of myeloma tumor-associated antigens, availability of more potent vaccines, expanded immune-modulating therapies, development of agents that block immune-suppressive pathways, increased sophistication of adoptive cell therapy techniques and capitalization upon standard autologous transplant are all important standalone or combination strategies that might ultimately improve prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:23998734

  3. The treatment strategy for tracheoesophageal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuemei; Zeng, Junli

    2015-01-01

    With the development of endoscopic techniques, the treatment of tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) has made marked progress. As surgical intervention is often not an advisable option due to advanced malignancy and poor performance status of the patients, bronchoscopic intervention provides a good choice to palliate symptoms and reconstruct the airway and esophagus. In this review, we focus on the application of interventional therapy of TEF, especially the application of airway stenting, and highlight some representative cases referred to our department for treatment. PMID:26807286

  4. Bridge to a sustainable future: National environmental technology strategy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    For the past two years the Administration has sought the views of Congress, the states, communities, industry, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and interested citizens on ways to spur the development and use of a new generation of environmental technologies. This document represents the views of thousands of individuals who participated in events around the country to help craft a national environmental technology strategy that will put us on the path to sustainable development.

  5. Monitoring the effects of wastewater treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    de-la-Ossa-Carretero, J A; Del-Pilar-Ruso, Y; Giménez-Casalduero, F; Sánchez-Lizaso, J L

    2016-02-01

    Wastewater disposal in coastal waters causes widespread environmental problems. Secondary treatment is expected to reduce the adverse effects of insufficiently treated wastewater. The environmental impact of sewage disposal via 18 wastewater treatment plants was analysed using the benthic opportunistic polychaetes and amphipods (BOPA) index. In previous studies this index proved to be an effective tool for monitoring sewage pollution. The impact of these discharges was highly related to treatment level, which ranged from pre-treatment to biological, as well as to flow rates and outfall position. Locations affected by pre-treated wastewater showed environmental degradation, especially marked near outfalls with higher flow rates. At most locations, biologically treated wastewater did not cause a significant impact and an improvement in ecological integrity was detected after this secondary treatment had been implemented. The impact of discharge was highly related to chemical oxygen demand (COD), suspended solids and nutrient concentrations, which are all lower in biologically treated wastewater. A 'moderate' ecological status was observed not only near sewage outfalls with high wastewater flow rates (>1,500,000 m(3)/month) with a COD over 200 mg/l but also near those with lower flow rates but with a COD over 400 mg/l. To reduce the impact of sewage disposal, it is necessary to carry out adequate treatment, have site outfalls deep enough, and implement water recycling. PMID:26801153

  6. [Treatment strategies for advanced prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Küronya, Zsófia; Bíró, Krisztina; Géczi, Lajos; Németh, Hajnalka

    2015-09-01

    There has been dramatic improvement in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer recently. The treatment of localized disease became more successful with the application of new, sophisticated techniques available for urologic surgeons and radiotherapists. Nevertheless a significant proportion of patients relapses after the initial local treatment or is diagnosed with metastatic disease at the beginning. In the past five years, six new drugs became registered for the treatment of metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, such as sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide, the α-emitting radionuclide alpharadin and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) ligand inhibitor denosumab. The availability of these new treatment options raises numerous questions. In this review we present the standard of care of metastatic prostate cancer by disease stage (hormone naive/ hormone sensitive metastatic prostate cancer, non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, oligometastatic/multimetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer) and the emerging treatment modalities presently assessed in clinical trials. We would also like to give advice on debatable aspects of the management of metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26339912

  7. Emerging strategies for the treatment of gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    Langworthy, James; Parkman, Henry P; Schey, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Gastroparesis is a syndrome of delayed gastric emptying in the absence of mechanical obstruction. Symptoms can be debilitating, affect nutritional states, and significantly impact patients' quality of life. The management of these patients can prove quite difficult to many providers. This article will review the current management recommendations of gastroparesis, discuss investigational medications and interventions, and summarize future directions of therapies targeting the underlying disease process. Current therapies are subdivided into those improving gastric motility and those directly targeting symptoms. Non-pharmacologic interventions, including gastric stimulator implantation and intra-pyloric botulinum toxic injection are reviewed. A discussion of expert opinion in the field, a look into the future of gastroparesis management, and a key point summary conclude the article. PMID:26840446

  8. Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications for prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Elsie M; Selin, Noelle E

    2013-01-01

    In their new paper, Bellanger and coauthors show substantial economic impacts to the EU from neurocognitive impairment associated with methylmercury (MeHg) exposures. The main source of MeHg exposure is seafood consumption, including many marine species harvested from the global oceans. Fish, birds and other wildlife are also susceptible to the impacts of MeHg and already exceed toxicological thresholds in vulnerable regions like the Arctic. Most future emissions scenarios project a growth or stabilization of anthropogenic mercury releases relative to present-day levels. At these emissions levels, inputs of mercury to ecosystems are expected to increase substantially in the future, in part due to growth in the legacy reservoirs of mercury in oceanic and terrestrial ecosystems. Seawater mercury concentration trajectories in areas such as the North Pacific Ocean that supply large quantities of marine fish to the global seafood market are projected to increase by more than 50% by 2050. Fish mercury levels and subsequent human and biological exposures are likely to also increase because production of MeHg in ocean ecosystems is driven by the supply of available inorganic mercury, among other factors. Analyses that only consider changes in primary anthropogenic emissions are likely to underestimate the severity of future deposition and concentration increases associated with growth in mercury reservoirs in the land and ocean. We therefore recommend that future policy analyses consider the fully coupled interactions among short and long-lived reservoirs of mercury in the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial ecosystems. Aggressive anthropogenic emission reductions are needed to reduce MeHg exposures and associated health impacts on humans and wildlife and protect the integrity of one of the last wild-food sources globally. In the near-term, public health advice on safe fish consumption choices such as smaller species, younger fish, and harvests from relatively unpolluted

  9. Treatment of myasthenia gravis: current practice and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ciafaloni, Emma; Sanders, Donald B

    2002-09-01

    Myasthenia gravis is the best understood of the autoimmune diseases and a number of treatments are currently used to produce clinical improvement. However, due to the scarcity of evidence-based and comparative data, there is still no consensus on many therapeutic issues. Even a widely accepted treatment like thymectomy has never been proven effective by a well-designed trial. These are just some of the unanswered questions: What is the best treatment algorithm and safest long-term management of myasthenia gravis? What patients are likely to benefit from thymectomy? How long should myasthenia gravis patients be treated? Is it possible to discontinue immunotherapy once remission has been achieved? What are the risks associated with long-term immunosuppression? In this article, we review current therapeutic strategies and these unresolved questions about myasthenia gravis treatment. PMID:19810991

  10. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    TW, CRAWFORD

    2008-07-17

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  11. Acute behavioral interventions and outpatient treatment strategies with suicidal adolescents

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kimberly H. McManama; Singer, Jonathan B.; LeCloux, Mary; Duarté-Vélez, Yovanska; Spirito, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among adolescents, there is limited knowledge of effective interventions to use with this population. This paper reviews the findings of studies on behavioral interventions for adolescents who are at acute suicide risk, as well as outpatient treatment and risk management strategies with suicidal adolescents. The importance of addressing comorbid behaviors and enhancing protective factors are discussed. Cultural considerations in working with suicidal adolescents and strategies for conducting culturally competent treatment are explored. PMID:26279646

  12. The Current and Future Treatment of Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Hardesty, Douglas A; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial malignancy, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality in oncology patients. The current treatment paradigm for brain metastasis depends on the patient's overall health status, the primary tumor pathology, and the number and location of brain lesions. Herein, we review the modern management options for these tumors, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Recent operative advances, such as fluorescence, confocal microscopy, and brachytherapy, are highlighted. With an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of brain metastasis come increased future therapeutic options. Therapy targeted to specific tumor molecular pathways, such as those involved in blood-brain barrier transgression, cell-cell adhesion, and angiogenesis, are also reviewed. A personalized plan for each patient, based on molecular characterizations of the tumor that are used to better target radiotherapy and chemotherapy, is undoubtedly the future of brain metastasis treatment. PMID:27252942

  13. Factors influencing the future need for treatment of root surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, R L; Hand, J S

    1994-10-01

    This paper discusses the current status of root surface caries in the elderly population and the need for treatment of this condition in the future. Although root surface exposure and root caries have been reported for adults at all ages, the people at greatest risk for these conditions are the elderly. In the United States, life expectancy and the population aged 65 years and older has increased substantially, and the proportion of the elderly population who are dentate has increased and is projected to increase further. Utilization of dental services by the elderly is similar to that of employed adults. Interpretation of studies of the prevalence and incidence of root surface caries are difficult due to differences in sampling, definition of lesions, and reporting conventions. Root surface caries prevalence is related to age and continues to be a significant problem for this population as they age. Factors that may affect the future need for treatment are explored. PMID:7986448

  14. The Current and Future Treatment of Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hardesty, Douglas A.; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial malignancy, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality in oncology patients. The current treatment paradigm for brain metastasis depends on the patient’s overall health status, the primary tumor pathology, and the number and location of brain lesions. Herein, we review the modern management options for these tumors, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Recent operative advances, such as fluorescence, confocal microscopy, and brachytherapy, are highlighted. With an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of brain metastasis come increased future therapeutic options. Therapy targeted to specific tumor molecular pathways, such as those involved in blood–brain barrier transgression, cell–cell adhesion, and angiogenesis, are also reviewed. A personalized plan for each patient, based on molecular characterizations of the tumor that are used to better target radiotherapy and chemotherapy, is undoubtedly the future of brain metastasis treatment. PMID:27252942

  15. Archiving strategy for USGS EROS center and our future direction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faundeen, John L.

    2010-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation and Science Center has the responsibility to acquire, manage, and preserve our Nation's land observations. These records are obtained primarily from airplanes and satellites dating back to the 1930s. The ability to compare landscapes from the past with current information enables change analysis at local and global scales. With new observations added daily, the records management challenges are daunting, involving petabytes of electronic data and tens of thousands of rolls of analog film. This paper focuses upon the appraisal and preservation functions employed to ensure that these records are available for current and future generations.

  16. Treatment strategies for tics in Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Clare M.; Rickards, Hugh E.; Cavanna, Andrea E.

    2011-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by tics: repetitive, involuntary movements and vocalizations. These symptoms can have a significant impact on patients’ daily functioning across many domains. Tics tend to be most severe in child and adolescent sufferers, so their presence has the potential to impact a period of life that is both critical for learning and is often associated with the experience of greater social tension and self-consciousness than adulthood. Furthermore, control over tics that lead to physical impairment or self-injurious behaviour is of vital importance in maintaining health and quality of life. There are numerous complicating factors in the prescription of treatment for tics, due to both the side effects associated with alleviating agents and patient characteristics, such as age and comorbid conditions. This review summarizes literature pertaining to the efficacy and safety of both traditionally prescribed and more modern medications. We also discuss the merits of behavioural and surgical techniques and highlight newer emerging treatments. Although treatment response is to some extent variable, there are a number of agents that are clearly useful as first-line treatments for TS. Other interventions may be of most benefit to patients exhibiting refractory tics or more specific symptom profiles. PMID:21339906

  17. Treatment-resistant depression: therapeutic trends, challenges, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harbi, Khalid Saad

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with major depression respond to antidepressant treatment, but 10%–30% of them do not improve or show a partial response coupled with functional impairment, poor quality of life, suicide ideation and attempts, self-injurious behavior, and a high relapse rate. The aim of this paper is to review the therapeutic options for treating resistant major depressive disorder, as well as evaluating further therapeutic options. Methods In addition to Google Scholar and Quertle searches, a PubMed search using key words was conducted, and relevant articles published in English peer-reviewed journals (1990–2011) were retrieved. Only those papers that directly addressed treatment options for treatment-resistant depression were retained for extensive review. Results Treatment-resistant depression, a complex clinical problem caused by multiple risk factors, is targeted by integrated therapeutic strategies, which include optimization of medications, a combination of antidepressants, switching of antidepressants, and augmentation with non-antidepressants, psychosocial and cultural therapies, and somatic therapies including electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy, deep brain stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and vagus nerve stimulation. As a corollary, more than a third of patients with treatment-resistant depression tend to achieve remission and the rest continue to suffer from residual symptoms. The latter group of patients needs further study to identify the most effective therapeutic modalities. Newer biomarker-based antidepressants and other drugs, together with non-drug strategies, are on the horizon to address further the multiple complex issues of treatment-resistant depression. Conclusion Treatment-resistant depression continues to challenge mental health care providers, and further relevant research involving newer drugs is warranted to improve the quality of life of patients

  18. Developing adaptive treatment strategies in substance abuse research.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Susan A; Lynch, Kevin G; Oslin, David; McKay, James R; TenHave, Tom

    2007-05-01

    For many individuals, substance abuse possesses characteristics of chronic disorders in that individuals experience repeated cycles of cessation and relapse; hence viewing drug dependence as a chronic, relapsing disorder is increasingly accepted. The development of a treatment for a chronic disorder requires consideration of the ordering of treatments, the timing of changes in treatment, and the use of measures of response, burden and adherence collected during treatment to make further treatment decisions. Adaptive treatment strategies provide a vehicle through which these issues can be addressed and thus provide a means toward improving and informing the clinical management of chronic substance abuse disorders. The sequential multiple assignment randomized trial (SMART) is particularly useful in developing adaptive treatment strategies. Simple analyses that can be used with the SMART design are described. Furthermore, the SMART design is compared with standard experimental designs. PMID:17056207

  19. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guihong; Yu, Fengbo; Lei, Ting; Gao, Haijun; Li, Peiwen; Sun, Yuxue; Huang, Haiyan; Mu, Qingchun

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research. PMID:27482235

  20. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, Guihong; Yu, Fengbo; Lei, Ting; Gao, Haijun; Li, Peiwen; Sun, Yuxue; Huang, Haiyan; Mu, Qingchun

    2016-06-01

    Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research. PMID:27482235

  1. Treatment resistant depression: strategies for primary care.

    PubMed

    Preston, Taylor C; Shelton, Richard C

    2013-07-01

    Depression is commonly diagnosed and treated in primary care. Recent evidence indicates that the majority of depressed patients will not fully recover with an initial antidepressant treatment. This paper reviews commonly used options for treatment after an inadequate initial antidepressant response. The alternatives range widely, and include escalating the dose of the initial antidepressant, switching to an alternative medication, combining two antidepressants with different mechanisms of action (e.g., bupropion + SSRI or mirtazapine + venlafaxine), adding other medications such as lithium or certain atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, aripiprazole, or quetiapine) to the antidepressant, adding a natural product such as l-methylfolate or s-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), or adding cognitive behavioral psychotherapy. What agent to be used will depend on the comfort level of the primary care practitioner and the availability of Psychiatry referral. However, it is reasonable to take one or more additional steps to attempt to achieve remission. PMID:23712721

  2. [The pharmacological treatment of obesity: past, present and future].

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Gábor; Pados, Gyula; Medvegy, Mihály; Bedros, J Róbert

    2012-03-11

    Currently, obesity presents one of the biggest health problems. Management strategies for weight reduction in obese individuals include changes in life style such as exercise and diet, behavioral therapy, and pharmacological treatment, and in certain cases surgical intervention. Diet and exercise are best for both prevention and treatment, but both require much discipline and are difficult to maintain. Drug treatment of obesity offer a possible adjunct, but it may only have modest results, limited by side effects; furthermore, the weight lowering effects last only as long as the drug is being taken and, unfortunately, as soon as the administration is stopped, the weight is regained. These strategies should be used in a combination for higher efficacy. Drugs used to induce weight loss have various effects: they increase satiety, reduce the absorption of nutrients or make metabolism faster; but their effect is usually moderate. In the past, several drugs were used in the pharmacological therapy of weight reduction including thyroid hormone, dinitrophenol, amphetamines and their analogues, e.g. fenfluramine, At present, only orlistat is available in the long term treatment (≥ 24 weeks) of obesity as sibutramine and rimonabant were withdrawn form the market. Several new anti-obesity drugs are being tested at present, and liraglutide, a GLP-1 analogue (incretin mimetic), is the most promising one. PMID:22370224

  3. Female urinary incontinence: effective treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Castro, R A; Arruda, R M; Bortolini, M A T

    2015-04-01

    Urinary incontinence is a dysfunction that tremendously affects women's quality of life, involving social, emotional and economic aspects. Although various treatments for urinary incontinence have been described, it is important to know which of them are truly effective. This review seeks to determine the current available therapies for women with stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome, based on the best scientific evidence. PMID:25307986

  4. Capability Investment Strategy to Enable JPL Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, William; Merida, Sofia; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Weisbin, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) formulates and conducts deep space missions for NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). The Chief Technologist of JPL has responsibility for strategic planning of the laboratory's advanced technology program to assure that the required technological capabilities to enable future missions are ready as needed. The responsibilities include development of a Strategic Plan (Antonsson, E., 2005). As part of the planning effort, a structured approach to technology prioritization, based upon the work of the START (Strategic Assessment of Risk and Technology) (Weisbin, C.R., 2004) team, was developed. The purpose of this paper is to describe this approach and present its current status relative to the JPL technology investment.

  5. Temporal Investment Strategy to Enable JPL Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, William P.; Hua, Hook; Weisbin, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) formulates and conducts deep space missions for NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). The Chief Technologist of JPL has the responsibility for strategic planning of the laboratory's advanced technology program to assure that the required technological capabilities to enable future JPL deep space missions are ready as needed; as such he is responsible for the development of a Strategic Plan. As part of the planning effort, he has supported the development of a structured approach to technology prioritization based upon the work of the START (Strategic Assessment of Risk and Technology) team. A major innovation reported here is the addition of a temporal model that supports scheduling of technology development as a function of time. The JPL Strategic Technology Plan divides the required capabilities into 13 strategic themes. The results reported here represent the analysis of an initial seven.

  6. Reducing hospital readmission rates: current strategies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kripalani, Sunil; Theobald, Cecelia N; Anctil, Beth; Vasilevskis, Eduard E

    2014-01-01

    New financial penalties for institutions with high readmission rates have intensified efforts to reduce rehospitalization. Several interventions that involve multiple components (e.g., patient needs assessment, medication reconciliation, patient education, arranging timely outpatient appointments, and providing telephone follow-up) have successfully reduced readmission rates for patients discharged to home. The effect of interventions on readmission rates is related to the number of components implemented; single-component interventions are unlikely to reduce readmissions significantly. For patients discharged to postacute care facilities, multicomponent interventions have reduced readmissions through enhanced communication, medication safety, advanced care planning, and enhanced training to manage medical conditions that commonly precipitate readmission. To help hospitals direct resources and services to patients with greater likelihood of readmission, risk-stratification methods are available. Future work should better define the roles of home-based services, information technology, mental health care, caregiver support, community partnerships, and new transitional care personnel. PMID:24160939

  7. Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Reading Strategies in Their Own Readings and Future Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akyol, Hayati; Ulusoy, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine pre-service teachers' use of reading strategies in their own readings. In addition, pre-service teachers' use of these strategies in their future teaching practices was also investigated. The subjects for this study were 505 pre-service teachers enrolled in one of the major universities in Ankara.…

  8. Portfolio Strategies, Relinquishment, the Urban School System of the Future, and Smart Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Paul; Jochim, Ashley; Campbell, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This brief outlines how new K-12 public education governance proposals--relinquishment, smart districts, and the urban school system of the future--are complements, not alternatives, to the portfolio strategy. The portfolio strategy defines the role of government, or how it can steer in public education; the other proposals show how, once…

  9. Amalgamation of Future Time Orientation, Epistemological Beliefs, Achievement Goals and Study Strategies: Empirical Evidence Established

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Huy P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recently research evidence emphasizes two main lines of inquiry, namely the relations between future time perspective (FTP), achievement goals (mastery, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance) and study processing strategies, and the relations between epistemological beliefs, achievement goals and study processing strategies.…

  10. Treatment compliance in chronic illness: Current situation and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Conthe, P; Márquez Contreras, E; Aliaga Pérez, A; Barragán García, B; Fernández de Cano Martín, M N; González Jurado, M; Ollero Baturone, M; Pinto, J L

    2014-01-01

    Long-term chronic diseases have a high mortality rate around the world, affecting both genders equally. Despite improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of various health problems, lack of treatment compliance remains an obstacle to improving health and patient quality of life, and it carries a high associated socio-healthcare cost. The objectives of this study were to develop the concept of «therapeutic adherence», which includes both pharmacological compliance as well as non-pharmacological (level of agreement and patient involvement, lifestyle changes, etc.) treatments. The study also aimed to establish the clinical and socio-health impact of non-compliance, the reasons for non-compliance, and methods and strategies to improve compliance. The results of this study support therapeutic adherence as an essential goal of the healthcare system that encompasses all stakeholders involved in patient health. PMID:24816042

  11. The future for electrocoagulation as a localised water treatment technology.

    PubMed

    Holt, Peter K; Barton, Geoffrey W; Mitchell, Cynthia A

    2005-04-01

    Electrocoagulation is an electrochemical method of treating polluted water whereby sacrificial anodes corrode to release active coagulant precursors (usually aluminium or iron cations) into solution. Accompanying electrolytic reactions evolve gas (usually as hydrogen bubbles) at the cathode. Electrocoagulation has a long history as a water treatment technology having been employed to remove a wide range of pollutants. However electrocoagulation has never become accepted as a 'mainstream' water treatment technology. The lack of a systematic approach to electrocoagulation reactor design/operation and the issue of electrode reliability (particularly passivation of the electrodes over time) have limited its implementation. However recent technical improvements combined with a growing need for small-scale decentralised water treatment facilities have led to a re-evaluation of electrocoagulation. Starting with a review of electrocoagulation reactor design/operation, this article examines and identifies a conceptual framework for electrocoagulation that focuses on the interactions between electrochemistry, coagulation and flotation. In addition detailed experimental data are provided from a batch reactor system removing suspended solids together with a mathematical analysis based on the 'white water' model for the dissolved air flotation process. Current density is identified as the key operational parameter influencing which pollutant removal mechanism dominates. The conclusion is drawn that electrocoagulation has a future as a decentralised water treatment technology. A conceptual framework is presented for future research directed towards a more mechanistic understanding of the process. PMID:15763088

  12. Burnout: Treatment and Prevention Strategies for College Student Affairs Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keener, Roger

    1990-01-01

    Presents possible prevention and treatment strategies for combating burnout among college student affairs professionals. Includes definition of burnout, review of symptoms of burnout, discussion of causes of burnout, and suggestions for treatment and prevention of burnout. Interventions discussed include personal counseling, using stress…

  13. Palmoplantar Psoriasis and Palmoplantar Pustulosis: Current Treatment and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Inês; Torres, Tiago

    2016-08-01

    Palmoplantar psoriasis and palmoplantar pustulosis are chronic skin diseases with a large impact on patient quality of life. They are frequently refractory to treatment, being generally described as a therapeutic challenge. This article aims to review the definitions of palmoplantar psoriasis and palmoplantar pustulosis, highlighting the similarities and differences in terms of epidemiology, clinical presentation, genetics, histopathology, and pathogenesis, as well as treatment options for both entities. Classical management of mild to moderate palmoplantar pustulosis and palmoplantar psoriasis relies on use of potent topical corticosteroids, phototherapy, and/or acitretin. Nevertheless, these drugs have proven to be insufficient in long-term control of extensive disease. Biologic therapy-namely, anti-interleukin-17 agents and phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors-has recently shown promising results in the treatment of palmoplantar psoriasis. Knowledge of the pathophysiologic pathways of both entities is of utmost importance and may, in the future, allow development of molecularly targeted therapeutics. PMID:27113059

  14. HDT mixtures treatment strategies by gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Laquerbe, C.; Contreras, S.; Demoment, J.

    2008-07-15

    Gas phase chromatographic processes are of interest for the separation of hydrogen isotopes from an HDT mixture. For a certain quantity, they are very competitive and present several benefits. Nevertheless no active packing material allows to have simultaneously good enrichment performances for tritium production and high decontamination capabilities for HD gases. The influence of the packing material is first described in this article. Then two specific processes (TCAP and Reverse Chromatography), each well adapted to perform one target, are presented. Finally, the problematic to propose an optimized treatment scheme associating these two processes is formulated. (authors)

  15. Pharmacologic Strategies for Treatment of Poisonings.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eric; Gooch, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Poisoning is the leading cause of injury-related mortality in the United States. Data suggest that nonmedical use of pharmaceuticals is increasing, along with a proportional increase in subsequent adverse events. The widespread use of illegal drugs contributes to the challenge, because these drugs may produce a wide array of clinical presentations that warrant time-critical recognition and treatment. Common legal and illegal poisonings highlighting clinical presentations in terms of toxidromes as a means of categorically recognizing these emergencies is the focus of this article. To optimize outcomes for situations such as these, pharmacologic considerations are discussed and explored. PMID:26897424

  16. [Phantom limb pain. Psychological treatment strategies].

    PubMed

    Diers, M; Flor, H

    2013-04-01

    Similar to other pain syndromes phantom limb pain is characterized by learning and memory processes that maintain the pain and increase maladaptive plastic changes of the brain: therefore, psychological interventions that change maladaptive memory processes are useful. In addition to traditional psychological interventions, such as pain management training and biofeedback, more recent developments that involve sensory discrimination training, mirror treatment, graded motor imagery, prosthesis training and training in virtual reality are interesting. These interventions not only reduce phantom limb pain but also reverse the associated maladaptive brain changes. PMID:23588803

  17. Research strategies for the treatment of biothreats.

    PubMed

    Cherwonogrodzky, John W

    2005-10-01

    Whether it is a layperson in the street or a politician in the Senate, there is widespread fear over the consequences of biothreats. In response to these fears, a wide range of treatments has been developed. These include antibiotics (conventional and unconventional uses), nucleic acids (analogues, antisense, ribozymes and DNAzymes), immunomodulators, antibodies, bacteriophage therapy and micro-encapsulation. Furthermore, there are often additional benefits when these therapeutics are used in combination, rather than alone. Although there has been much investment in therapeutics against a terrorist threat for reasons of national security, there are likely to be far greater benefits and applications on domestic and world health. PMID:16084772

  18. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease: an update on future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer. PMID:24535580

  19. Emerging Therapeutic Strategies and Future Challenges in Clinical Periodontics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Daniel; Hamada, Yusuke; John, Vanchit

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the protocol for treating periodontitis follows a standardized and straightforward algorithm: 1) review and reinforce oral hygiene; 2) perform scaling and root planing; 3) proceed to periodontal surgery if the disease process has not been arrested; then 4) enroll the patient in a customized periodontal maintenance recall program to maintain the health of the reduced periodontium. Multiple longitudinal studies have demonstrated that the aforementioned treatment regimen can arrest the progression of periodontitis and can increase the likelihood of tooth retention and periodontal stability. PMID:26939412

  20. Cancer Treatment Using Peptides: Current Therapies and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Thundimadathil, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of peptides in cancer therapy with special emphasis on peptide drugs which are already approved and those in clinical trials. The potential of peptides in cancer treatment is evident from a variety of different strategies that are available to address the progression of tumor growth and propagation of the disease. Use of peptides that can directly target cancer cells without affecting normal cells (targeted therapy) is evolving as an alternate strategy to conventional chemotherapy. Peptide can be utilized directly as a cytotoxic agent through various mechanisms or can act as a carrier of cytotoxic agents and radioisotopes by specifically targeting cancer cells. Peptide-based hormonal therapy has been extensively studied and utilized for the treatment of breast and prostate cancers. Tremendous amount of clinical data is currently available attesting to the efficiency of peptide-based cancer vaccines. Combination therapy is emerging as an important strategy to achieve synergistic effects in fighting cancer as a single method alone may not be efficient enough to yield positive results. Combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy or combining an anticancer peptide with a nonpeptidic cytotoxic drug is an example of this emerging field. PMID:23316341

  1. Present and New Treatment Strategies in the Management of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kolko, M

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and axonal loss. It remains a major cause of blindness worldwide. All current modalities of treatment are focused on lowering intraocular pressure (IOP), and it is evident that increased IOP is an important risk factor for progression of the disease. However, it is clear that a significant number of glaucoma patients show disease progression despite of pressure lowering treatments. Much attention has been given to the development of neuroprotective treatment strategies, but the identification of such has been hampered by lack of understanding of the etiology of glaucoma. Hence, in spite of many attempts no neuroprotective drug has yet been clinically approved. Even though neuroprotection is without doubt an important treatment strategy, many glaucoma subjects are diagnosed after substantial loss of RGCs. In this matter, recent approaches aim to rescue RGCs and regenerate axons in order to restore visual function in glaucoma. The present review seeks to provide an overview of the present and new treatment strategies in the management of glaucoma. The treatment strategies are divided into current available glaucoma medications, new pressure lowering targets, prospective neuroprotective interventions, and finally possible neuroregenrative strategies. PMID:26069521

  2. Nanotechnology-based water treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Ahlawat, Wandit; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Heydarifard, Solmaz; Nazhad, Mousa M; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2014-02-01

    The most important component for living beings on the earth is access to clean and safe drinking water. Globally, water scarcity is pervasive even in water-rich areas as immense pressure has been created by the burgeoning human population, industrialization, civilization, environmental changes and agricultural activities. The problem of access to safe water is inevitable and requires tremendous research to devise new, cheaper technologies for purification of water, while taking into account energy requirements and environmental impact. This review highlights nanotechnology-based water treatment technologies being developed and used to improve desalination of sea and brackish water, safe reuse of wastewater, disinfection and decontamination of water, i.e., biosorption and nanoadsorption for contaminant removal, nanophotocatalysis for chemical degradation of contaminants, nanosensors for contaminant detection, different membrane technologies including reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, ultrafiltration, electro-dialysis etc. This review also deals with the fate and transport of engineered nanomaterials in water and wastewater treatment systems along with the risks associated with nanomaterials. PMID:24749460

  3. Whole Cell Vaccines — Past Progress and Future Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Bridget P.; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines have shown success in curing tumors in pre-clinical models. Accumulating evidence also supports their ability to induce immune responses in patients. In many cases, these responses correlate with improved clinical outcomes. However, cancer vaccines have not yet demonstrated their true potential in clinical trials. This is likely due to the difficulty in mounting a significant antitumor response in patients with advanced disease because of preexisting tolerance mechanisms that are actively turning off immune recognition in cancer patients. This review will examine the recent progress being made in the design and implementation of whole cell cancer vaccines, one vaccine approach that simultaneously targets multiple tumor antigens to activate the immune response. These vaccines have been shown to induce antigen specific T cell responses. Pre-clinical studies evaluating these vaccines given in sequence with other agents and cancer treatment modalities support the use of immunomodulating doses of chemotherapy and radiation, as well as immune modulating pathway targeted monoclonal antibodies, to enhance the efficacy of cancer vaccines. Based on emerging pre-clinical data, clinical trials are currently exploring the use of combinatorial immune based therapies for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22595050

  4. Evolving Strategies for Cancer and Autoimmunity: Back to the Future

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Peter J. L.; McConnell, Fiona M.; Anderson, Graham; Nawaf, Maher G.; Gaspal, Fabrina M.; Withers, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Although current thinking has focused on genetic variation between individuals and environmental influences as underpinning susceptibility to both autoimmunity and cancer, an alternative view is that human susceptibility to these diseases is a consequence of the way the immune system evolved. It is important to remember that the immunological genes that we inherit and the systems that they control were shaped by the drive for reproductive success rather than for individual survival. It is our view that human susceptibility to autoimmunity and cancer is the evolutionarily acceptable side effect of the immune adaptations that evolved in early placental mammals to accommodate a fundamental change in reproductive strategy. Studies of immune function in mammals show that high affinity antibodies and CD4 memory, along with its regulation, co-evolved with placentation. By dissection of the immunologically active genes and proteins that evolved to regulate this step change in the mammalian immune system, clues have emerged that may reveal ways of de-tuning both effector and regulatory arms of the immune system to abrogate autoimmune responses whilst preserving protection against infection. Paradoxically, it appears that such a detuned and deregulated immune system is much better equipped to mount anti-tumor immune responses against cancers. PMID:24782861

  5. European Fusion Materials Research Program - Recent Results and Future Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Diegele, E.; Andreani, R.; Laesser, R.; Schaaf, B. van der

    2005-05-15

    The paper reviews the objectives and the status of the current EU long-term materials program. It highlights recent results, discusses some of the key issues and major existing problems to be resolved and presents an outlook on the R and D planned for the next few years. The main objectives of the Materials Development program are the development and qualification of reduced activation structural materials for the Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) in ITER and of low activation structural materials resistant to high fluence neutron irradiation for in-vessel components such as breeding blanket, divertor and first wall in DEMO. The EU strategy assumes: (i) ITER operation starting in 2015 with DEMO relevant Test Blanket Modules to be installed from day one of operation, (ii) IFMIF operation in 2017 and (iii) DEMO final design activities in 2022 to 2025. The EU candidate structural material EUROFER for TBMs has to be fully code qualified for licensing well before 2015. In parallel, research on materials for operation at higher temperatures is conducted following a logical sequence, by supplementing EUROFER with the oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels and, thereafter, with fibre-reinforced Silicon Carbide (SiC{sub f}/SiC). Complementary, tungsten alloys are developed as structural material for high temperature applications such as gas-cooled divertors.

  6. Heart Failure in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Nonpharmacologic Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    LeMond, Lisa; Mai, Tuan; Broberg, Craig S; Muralidaran, Ashok; Burchill, Luke J

    2015-11-01

    In early stages, heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains an elusive diagnosis. Many ACHD patients seem well-compensated owing to chronic physical and psychological adaptations. HF biomarkers and cardiopulmonary exercise tests are often markedly abnormal, although patients report stable health and good quality of life. Treatment differs from acquired HF. Evidence for effective drug therapy in ACHD-related HF is lacking. Residual ventricular, valvular, and vascular abnormalities contribute to HF pathophysiology, leading to an emphasis on nonpharmacologic treatment strategies. This article reviews emerging perspectives on nonpharmacologic treatment strategies, including catheter-based interventions, surgical correction, and palliative care. PMID:26471822

  7. Genetics, diagnosis, and future treatment strategies for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, M. Leigh Anne; Noone, Peadar G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disorder resulting in chronic oto-sino-pulmonary disease. While PCD is estimated to occur in 1 in 20,000 individuals, fewer than 1,000 patients in the US have a well-established diagnosis. Areas Covered We provide an overview of the clinical manifestations of PCD, describe the evolution of diagnostic methods, and critique the literature on management of PCD. Expert Opinion Although interest in clinical studies in non-CF bronchiectasis has increased in recent years, some of whom enroll patients with PCD, the literature regarding therapy for PCD as a distinct entity is lacking, as the numbers are small, and there have been no sub-analyses published. However, with improved screening and diagnostic methods, the development of clinical and research consortiums, and actively enrolling registries of PCD patients, the environment is conducive to perform longitudinal studies of disease course and therapeutic studies to alter that course. PMID:26998415

  8. Future therapeutical strategies dictated by pre-clinical evidence in ALS.

    PubMed

    Fornai, Francesco; Meininger, Vincent; Silani, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    Classic concepts on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis led to define the disease as a selective degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. At present such selectivity is questioned by novel findings. For instance, the occurrence of frontotemporal dementia is now increasingly recognized in the course of ALS. Again, areas outside the central nervous system are targeted in ALS. In keeping with motor areas other cell types surrounding motor neurons such as glia and interneurons are key in the pathogenesis of ALS. This multiple cell involvement may be due to a prion-like diffusion of specific misfolded proteins which are altered in ALS. This is the case of FUS and TDP-43 which harbor a prion domain prone to pathological misfolding. These misfolded proteins are metabolized by the autophagy, but in ALS there is evidence for a specific deficit of autophagy which impedes the clearance of these proteins. These concepts lead to re-analyze the potential therapeutics of ALS. In fact, mere cell substitution (stem cell) therapy appears insufficient to contrast all the alterations in the various pathways affected by ALS. Although preclinical data speed the application of stem cells in human clinical trials, several hurdles limit their translation into new therapies. Future treatments are expected to consider the need to target both motor neurons and neighboring cells which may contribute to the diffusion and persistence of the disease. On this basis the present manuscript describes which future strategies need to be pursued in order to design optimal therapeutic trial in ALS. PMID:21412723

  9. Unilateral condylar hyperplasia: a treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sabrina; da Silva Fabris, André Luis; Ferreira, Gabriel Ramalho; Faverani, Leonardo Perez; Francisconi, Giovanna Barbosa; Souza, Francisley Avila; Garcia, Idelmo Rangel

    2014-05-01

    Condylar hyperplasia (CH) is a pathologic condition that causes overdevelopment of the condylar head and neck as well as the mandible. Slowly progressive unilateral enlargement of the head and the neck of the condyle causes crossbite malocclusion, facial asymmetry, and shifting of the midpoint of the chin to the unaffected side. The etiology and the pathogenesis of CH remain uncertain. The diagnosis is made by clinical and radiologic examinations and bone scintigraph. A difference in uptake of 10% or more between condyles is regarded as indicative of CH, and the affected condyles had a relative uptake of 55% or more. When the diagnosis of active CH is established, the treatment consists of removal of the growth center by a partial condylectomy. The authors present the case of a 46-year-old male patient with right active type II CH or hemimandibular hyperplasia who underwent a high condylectomy. PMID:24820728

  10. Treatment strategies for aggressive lymphomas: what works?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Wyndham H

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, many treatment platforms have been developed for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, but none proved better than CHOP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, vincristine, prednisone/prednisolone). In the immunochemotherapy era, however, there is convincing evidence for superior chemotherapy platforms. A randomized study from the Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte showed that R-ACVBP (rituximab plus doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin, prednisone) was superior to rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP) in patients under 60 years of age, but toxicity limits its use to younger patients. Studies also suggest that DA-EPOCH-R (dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, rituximab) is more effective in some subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and a randomized comparison with R-CHOP is now nearing completion. The simplicity and safety of R-CHOP and the long history of failed contenders, however, has set a high bar for new approaches. PMID:24319235

  11. Endovascular Treatment Strategies in Aortoiliac Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkan, Ugur Oguzkurt, Levent Tercan, Fahri Gumus, Burcak

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this study was to report our experience in endovascular treatment of total aortoiliac occlusion. Five patients who underwent endovascular recanalization procedures including manual aspiration thrombectomy, balloon angioplasty, and stent placement for total aortoiliac occlusion in a 4-year period were reviewed retrospectively. The mean age of patients was 51 years (range, 43 to 58 years). All patients had abdominal aorta and bilateral common iliac artery occlusion with or without external iliac artery occlusion. All patients either had a contraindication to surgery or refused it. Initial technical success was obtained in four of five (80%) patients. Endovascular techniques were successful in four patients who had good distal runoff and short-segment aortoiliac occlusion, but failed in a patient who had the worst distal runoff and long-segment aortoiliac occlusion. We observed two major complications, one of which was bilateral rupture of the common iliac arteries treated with covered stent placement. Another patient had extension of intra-aortic thrombus into the iliac stent after primary stenting. This was successfully treated with manual aspiration thrombectomy. Aortic and iliac stents remained patent during the follow-up period (median, 18 months; range, 3 to 26 months) in four patients. Primary patency rates at 6, 12, and 24 months were all 80%. In conclusion, endovascular treatment can be an alternative for aortoiliac occlusion in selected patients. Short- to midterm follow-up so far is satisfactory. Removal of intra-aortic thrombus with manual aspiration thrombectomy before balloon angioplasty and/or stenting is possible and a good alternative to thrombolysis.

  12. Current treatment and future prospects of dopa-induced dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Mazzucchi, S; Frosini, D; Bonuccelli, U; Ceravolo, R

    2015-05-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) are one of the main issues in the management of Parkinson's disease (PD); once these dyskinesias are established treatment becomes difficult, so preventive strategies should be first evaluated. Although levodopa (LD) treatment has recently been related as risk factor for LID, the main strategy to delay LID is to start PD treatment with dopamine agonists, adding LD at low doses. After LID onset, approaches include reducing single LD doses, reducing or discontinuing monoamine oxidase type B/catechol O-methyltransferase (MAO-B/COMT) inhibitors and extended-release (ER) LD. Amantadine represents the best antidyskinetic tool, and ER amantadine is the most promising upcoming antidyskinetic drug. New LD formulations such as IPX-066 (able to provide continuous dopaminergic stimulation) also represent promising new approaches. The involvement of a nondopaminergic system in the pathogenesis of LID suggests that the modulation of glutamate, serotonin and adenosine could have potential as new upcoming drug targets, but the role of such drugs will still need to be confirmed in randomized controlled trials. PMID:26097904

  13. Future directions in the treatment of neuropathic pain: a review on various therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Gangadhar, Matharasala; Mishra, Ram Kumar; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2014-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by structural lesion leading to functional abnormalities in central and peripheral nervous system. Neuropathic pain in itself is not always a disease, as it arises due to consequences of other diseases like diabetes, spinal cord injury, degenerative neuronal diseases and cancer. Current strategies of neuropathic pain treatment have provided relief to the patients to some extent, but complete cure is still a distant dream. In the future, it is hoped that a combination of new and improved pharmaceutical developments combined with careful clinical trials and increased understanding of neuroplasticity will lead to improved and effective pain management strategies leading to improved quality of life. In this review we have discussed various therapeutic targets of neuropathic pain and their pathophysiological mechanisms. Current status of drugs used for treatment of neuropathic pain have also been discussed in the review. PMID:24152326

  14. 17 CFR 30.7 - Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment of foreign futures... FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FOREIGN FUTURES AND FOREIGN OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS § 30.7 Treatment of foreign futures or foreign options secured amount. (a) Except as provided in this section, a futures...

  15. Perimenstrual asthma: from pathophysiology to treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Serafini, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma is about 9,7 % in women and 5,5 % in men. Asthma can deteriorate during the perimenstrual period, a phenomenon known as perimenstrual asthma (PMA), which represents a unique, highly symptomatic asthma phenotype. It is distinguished from traditional allergic asthma by aspirin sensitivity, less atopy, and lower lung capacity. PMA incidence is reported to vary between 19 and 40 % of asthmatic women. The presence of PMA has been related to increases in asthma-related emergency department visits, hospitalizations and emergency treatment including intubations. It is hypothesized that hormonal status may influence asthma in women, focusing on the role of sex hormones, and specifically on the impact of estrogens' fluctuations at ovulation and before periods. This paper will focus on the pathophysiology of hormone triggered cycle related inflammatory/allergic events and their relation with asthma. We reviewed the scientific literature on Pubmed database for studies on PMA. Key word were PMA, mastcells, estrogens, inflammation, oral contraception, hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), and hormone free interval (HFI). Special attention will be devoted to the possibility of reducing the perimenstrual worsening of asthma and associated symptoms by reducing estrogens fluctuations, with appropriate hormonal contraception and reduced HFI. This novel therapeutical approach will be finally discussed. PMID:27482380

  16. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871

  17. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871

  18. Diagnostic and treatment strategies in mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    PubMed Central

    Vairo, Filippo; Federhen, Andressa; Baldo, Guilherme; Riegel, Mariluce; Burin, Maira; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, which lead to deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme ASB. This enzyme is important for the breakdown of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, which accumulate in body tissues and organs of MPS VI patients. The storage of GAGs (especially dermatan sulfate) causes bone dysplasia, joint restriction, organomegaly, heart disease, and corneal clouding, among several other problems, and reduced life span. Despite the fact that most cases are severe, there is a spectrum of severity and some cases are so attenuated that diagnosis is made late in life. Although the analysis of urinary GAGs and/or the measurement of enzyme activity in dried blood spots are useful screening methods, the diagnosis is based in the demonstration of the enzyme deficiency in leucocytes or fibroblasts, and/or in the identification of pathogenic mutations in the ARSB gene. Specific treatment with enzyme replacement has been available since 2005. It is safe and effective, bringing measurable benefits and increased survival to patients. As several evidences indicate that early initiation of therapy may lead to a better outcome, newborn screening is being considered for this condition, and it is already in place in selected areas where the incidence of MPS VI is increased. However, as enzyme replacement therapy is not curative, associated therapies should be considered, and research on innovative therapies continues. The management of affected patients by a multidisciplinary team with experience in MPS diseases is highly recommended. PMID:26586959

  19. Anal cancer treatment: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ghosn, Marwan; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Abdayem, Pamela; Antoun, Joelle; Nasr, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancers (AC) are relatively rare tumors. Their incidence is increasing, particularly among men who have sex with other men due to widespread infection by human papilloma virus. The majority of anal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, and they are treated according to stage. In local and locally advanced AC, concomitant chemoradiation therapy based on mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the current best treatment, while metastatic AC, chemotherapy with 5-FU and cisplatin remains the gold standard. There are no indications for induction or maintenance therapies in locally advanced tumors. Many novel strategies, such as targeted therapies, vaccination, immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy are in clinical trials for the treatment of AC, with promising results in some indications. PMID:25741135

  20. Present and Future in the Treatment of Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Arriba, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Albuminuria is recognized as the most important prognostic factor for chronic kidney disease progression. For this reason, blockade of renin-angiotensin system remains the main recommended strategy, with either angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers. However, other antiproteinuric treatments have begun to be studied, such as direct renin inhibitors or aldosterone blockers. Beyond antiproteinuric treatments, other drugs such as pentoxifylline or bardoxolone have yielded conflicting results. Finally, alternative pathogenic pathways are being explored, and emerging therapies including antifibrotic agents, endothelin receptor antagonists, or transcription factors show promising results. The aim of this review is to explain the advances in newer agents to treat diabetic kidney disease, along with the background of the renin-angiotensin system blockade. PMID:25945357

  1. Water management in cities of the future using emission control strategies for priority hazardous substances.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, E; Revitt, D M; Ledin, A; Lundy, L; Holten Lützhøft, H C; Wickman, T; Mikkelsen, P S

    2011-01-01

    Cities of the future face challenges with respect to the quantity and quality of water resources, and multiple managerial options need to be considered in order to safeguard urban surface water quality. In a recently completed project on 'Source control options for reducing emissions of Priority Pollutants' (ScorePP), seven emission control strategies (ECSs) were developed and tested within a semi-hypothetical case city (SHCC) to evaluate their potential to reduce the emission of selected European priority hazardous substances (PHSs) to surface waters. The ECSs included (1) business-as-usual, (2) full implementation of relevant European (EU) directives, (3) ECS2 in combination with voluntary options for household, municipalities and industry, (4) ECS2 combined with industrial treatment and best available technologies (BAT), (5) ECS2 in combination with stormwater and combined sewer overflow treatment, (6) ECS2 in combination with advanced wastewater treatment, and (7) combinations of ECS3-6. The SHCC approach was chosen to facilitate transparency, to allow compensating for data gaps and to decrease the level of uncertainty in the results. The selected PHSs: cadmium (Cd), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), nonylphenol (NP) and pentabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE) differ in their uses and environmental fate and therefore accumulate in surface waters to differing extents in response to the application of alternative ECS. To achieve the required reduction in PHS levels in urban waters the full implementation of existing EU regulation is prioritised and feasible combinations of managerial and technological options (source control and treatment) can be highly relevant for mitigating releases. PMID:22105136

  2. Treatment Strategy Profiles in Substance Use Disorder Treatment Programs: A Latent Class Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aletraris, Lydia; Paino, Maria; Roman, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Modern treatment options for substance use disorder are diverse. While studies have analyzed the adoption of individual evidence-based practices in treatment centers, little is known about the specific make-up of treatment strategy profiles in treatment centers throughout the United States. The current study used latent class analysis to profile underlying treatment strategies and to evaluate philosophical and structural supports associated with each profile. Methods Utilizing three aggregated and secondary datasets of nationally representative samples of substance use disorder treatment centers (N=775), we employed latent class analysis to determine treatment strategy profiles. Using multinomial logistic regression, we then examined organizational characteristics associated with each profile. Results We found three distinct treatment strategy profiles: Centers that primarily relied on Motivational Interviewing and Motivational Enhancement Therapy, centers that utilized psychosocial and alternative therapies, and centers that employed comprehensive treatments including pharmacotherapy. The multinomial logistic regression revealed that philosophical and structural center characteristics were associated with membership in the comprehensive class. Centers with philosophical orientations conducive to holistic care and pharmacotherapy-acceptance, resource-rich infrastructures, and an entrepreneurial reliance on insured clients were more likely to offer diverse interventions. All associations were significant at the .05 level. Principle Conclusion The findings from this study help us understand the general strategies of treatment centers. From a practical perspective, practitioners and clients should be aware of the variation in treatment center practices where they may offer or receive treatment. PMID:26105707

  3. Nitroimidazoles for the treatment of TB: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Boshoff, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a leading cause of death resulting from an infectious agent, and the spread of multi- and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis poses a threat to management of global health. New drugs that effectively shorten the duration of treatment and are active against drug-resistant strains of this pathogen are urgently required to develop effective chemotherapies to combat this disease. Two nitroimidazoles, PA-824 and OPC-67683, are currently in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of TB and the outcome of these may determine the future directions of drug development for anti-tubercular nitroimidazoles. In this review we summarize the development of these nitroimidazoles and alternative analogs in these series that may offer attractive alternatives to PA-824 and OPC-67683 for further development in the drug-discovery pipeline. Lastly, the potential pitfalls in the development of nitroimidazoles as drugs for TB are discussed. PMID:21879846

  4. Current treatment for Alzheimer disease and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Tariot, Pierre N; Federoff, Howard J

    2003-01-01

    A cascade of pathophysiological events is triggered in Alzheimer disease (AD) that ultimately involves common cellular signaling pathways and leads to cellular and network dysfunction, failure of neurotransmission, cell death, and a common clinical outcome. The process is asynchronous, meaning that viable neurons remain as targets for therapy even in the diseased state, and each stage of the cascade affords the possibility for therapeutic intervention. Cholinesterase inhibitors are the only available treatment in the United States for patients with mild to moderate AD, helping maintain cognitive and functional abilities in most patients and conferring beneficial behavioral effects in some. Memantine is an NMDA receptor antagonist that has recently been approved in Europe for treatment of moderately severe to severe AD and is under investigation in the United States. Its mechanism of action may include enhanced neurotransmission in several systems as well as antiexcitotoxic effects. There are data regarding the effectiveness of the combination of memantine with cholinesterase inhibitors that will be useful for the practicing clinician. Other agents have shown some benefit in clinical trials, including the antioxidants vitamin E, selegiline, and Ginkgo biloba extracts, although the weight of evidence regarding their effects is not sufficient to define clinical practice. Potential future therapies currently are in development that target multiple aspects of the illness cascade, including aberrant inflammation, neurotrophic function, and processing of beta amyloid and tau proteins. These newer approaches hold promise for disease modification but are as yet unproven. Whether or not disease-modifying or preventive therapies become a reality, clinicians will be faced with AD patients who require treatment at all stages of illness for the indefinite future. Cholinergic and emerging noncholinergic medications will likely prevail as the standards of treatment for years to

  5. Metastatic melanoma - a review of current and future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Maverakis, Emanual; Cornelius, Lynn A; Bowen, Glen M; Phan, Tiffany; Patel, Falin B; Fitzmaurice, Sarah; He, Young; Burrall, Barbara; Duong, Christopher; Kloxin, April M; Sultani, Hawa; Wilken, Reason; Martinez, Steve R; Patel, Forum

    2015-05-01

    Despite advances in treatment and surveillance, melanoma continues to claim approximately 9,000 lives in the US annually (SEER 2013). The National Comprehensive Cancer Network currently recommends ipilumumab, vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and high-dose IL-2 as first line agents for Stage IV melanoma. Little data exists to guide management of cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases despite the fact that they are relatively common. Existing options include intralesional Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, isolated limb perfusion/infusion, interferon-α, topical imiquimod, cryotherapy, radiation therapy, interferon therapy, and intratumoral interleukin-2 injections. Newly emerging treatments include the anti-programmed cell death 1 receptor agents (nivolumab and pembrolizumab), anti-programmed death-ligand 1 agents, and oncolytic vaccines (talimogene laherparepevec). Available treatments for select sites include adoptive T cell therapies and dendritic cell vaccines. In addition to reviewing the above agents and their mechanisms of action, this review will also focus on combination therapy as these strategies have shown promising results in clinical trials for metastatic melanoma treatment. PMID:25520039

  6. Huntington's disease: present treatments and future therapeutic modalities.

    PubMed

    Bonelli, Raphael M; Wenning, Gregor K; Kapfhammer, Hans P

    2004-03-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neuropsychiatric disorder for which therapeutic interventions have been rather fruitless to date, except in a slight symptomatic relief. Even the discovery of the gene related to HD in 1993 has not effectively advanced treatments. This article is essentially a review of available double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of therapy for this condition which also includes relevant open label trials. Unfortunately, HD research has tended to concentrate on the motor aspects of the disorder, whereas the major problems are behavioural (e.g. dementia, depression, psychosis), and the chorea is often least relevant in terms of management. We conclude that there is definitely poor evidence in management of HD. The analysis of the 24 best studies fails to result in a treatment recommendation of clinical relevance. Based on data of open-label studies, or even case reports, we recommend riluzole, olanzapine and amantadine for the treatment of the movement disorders associated with HD, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and mirtazapine for the treatment of depression, and atypical antipsychotic drugs for HD psychosis and behavioural problems. Moreover, adjuvant psychotherapy, physiotherapy and speech therapy should be applied to supply the optimal management. Finally, some cellular mechanisms are discussed in this paper because they are essential for future neuroprotective modalities, such as minocycline, unsaturated fatty acids or riluzole. PMID:15076012

  7. Advanced gastric cancer: Current treatment landscape and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Digklia, Antonia; Wagner, Anna Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer currently ranks fourth in cancer-related mortality worldwide. In the western world, it is most often diagnosed at an advanced stage, after becoming metastatic at distant sites. Patients with advanced disease (locally advanced or metastatic) have a somber prognosis, with a median overall survival of 10-12 mo, and palliative chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. In recent years, novel approaches using inhibition of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in first-line treatment of patients with overexpression of HER2. In addition, both second-line chemotherapy and treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-inhibitor ramucirumab demonstrated significant benefits in terms of overall survival, compared with best supportive care, in randomized studies. Moreover, ramucirumab in combination with chemotherapy demonstrated further significant benefits in terms of progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in second-line treatment for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. A recently published molecular classification of gastric cancer is expected to improve patient stratification and selection for clinical trials and provide a roadmap for future drug development. Nevertheless, despite these developments the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer remains poor. In this review we discuss current standards of care and outline major topics of drug development in gastric cancer. PMID:26937129

  8. [Diagnosis and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Disease: Present and Future Perspective].

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Wook

    2016-06-25

    Peptic ulcer disease is one of the most commonly encountered diseases in gastroenterology clinics. After the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall, it has been identified as the most important cause of peptic ulcer. Eradication of H. pylori markedly reduces the post-treatment recurrence rate of peptic ulcer. However, as human populations age, the incidence of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal diseases increases and consequent use of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-in-flammatory drugs increases. Thus causes and presenting patterns of peptic ulcer have changed. In this review, I describe new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease and explore future perspectives. PMID:27312832

  9. Novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Keerti; Jain, Narendra K

    2013-12-01

    Leishmaniasis reveals itself in two forms, cutaneous and visceral, but the later exerts serious complications and may lead to death, if untreated. The availability of limited number of antileishmanial chemotherapeutic agents, the high cost of treatment, growing incidences of resistance to first line drugs as well as severe toxicities associated with the drugs complicate the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis. To overcome these problems, critical investigation of new therapeutic strategies with potential antileishmanial activity and good tolerability are essential. In this review we explore the different facets of novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis with a purpose to summarize all the possible treatment tactics, which will help scientists working in this arena to implement their research in a systematic manner. PMID:23973338

  10. Platinum-induced neurotoxicity and preventive strategies: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Avan, Abolfazl; Postma, Tjeerd J; Ceresa, Cecilia; Avan, Amir; Cavaletti, Guido; Giovannetti, Elisa; Peters, Godefridus J

    2015-04-01

    models and appropriate trials planning should be integrated into the future design of neuroprotective strategies to find the best patient-oriented solution. PMID:25765877

  11. Platinum-Induced Neurotoxicity and Preventive Strategies: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Avan, Abolfazl; Postma, Tjeerd J.; Ceresa, Cecilia; Avan, Amir; Cavaletti, Guido; Giovannetti, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    models and appropriate trials planning should be integrated into the future design of neuroprotective strategies to find the best patient-oriented solution. PMID:25765877

  12. The multimodal treatment of acromegaly: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Etual; Ramirez, Claudia; Mercado, Moises

    2014-01-01

    Acromegaly is a chronic systemic disorder caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma. Active acromegaly results in a poor quality of life due to symptoms such as headache, fatigue, arthralgia, depression, sexual dysfunction and hyperhidrosis; an increased prevalence of co-morbidities like diabetes, hypertension as well as cancer risk and a reduced life expectancy. Appropriate, modern, multimodal treatment of acromegaly has led to a significant improvement in quality of life, an adequate control of co-morbidities and a drastic reduction in the mortality rates that used to prevail in the past. This multimodal strategy includes an adequate selection of patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment (which has to be performed by a skilled pituitary neurosurgeon), the use of pharmacological interventions such as somatostatin analogs and dopamine agonists, which target the pituitary adenoma; and pegvisomant, a GH mutant acting as a competitive antagonist of the GH receptor. Radiation therapy is an important tool, particularly in parts of the World where resources are limited. The ultimate outcome of the individual patient depends on the judicious use of all these treatment options, which are critically analyzed in this mini-review. PMID:24915854

  13. [North Rhine-Westphalia Scientific Rehabilitation Group--"future strategies for rehabilitation"].

    PubMed

    Fischer, J; Raschke, F

    1998-11-01

    This Northrine-Westfalian integrated research system in rehabilitation aims at the development of future strategies for medical rehabilitation. The well known deficits of rehabilitation have led to different complementary projects. These comprise research on the lack of evidence in efficacy, predictors for outcomes, international cooperation, university related curricula in training, implementation of health economics and disease management, and finally the need for an actual adaptation of social legislation. The research topics have been transformed into key themes which will be coherently integrated by additional external expert knowledge acquired in workshops organized by a task force group for the development of future strategies. PMID:10065489

  14. Understanding latent tuberculosis: the key to improved diagnostic and novel treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Esmail, Hanif; Barry, Clifton E; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of latent tuberculosis (LTBI) is a vital component of tuberculosis elimination but is not efficiently implemented with available diagnostics and therapeutics. The tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assays can inform that infection has occurred but do not prove that it persists. Treatment of LTBI with isoniazid targets actively replicating bacilli but not non-replicating populations, prolonging treatment duration. Developing more predictive diagnostic tests and treatments of shorter duration requires a greater understanding of the biology of latent tuberculosis, from both host and bacillary perspectives. In this article we discuss the basis of current diagnosis and treatment of LTBI and review recent developments in understanding the biology of latency that may enable future improved diagnostic and treatment strategies. PMID:22198298

  15. Present and future treatment possibilities in macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, E.; Wegner, A.; Pfeiler, T.; Mertz, M.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To discuss present and future treatment possibilities in different types of choroidal neovascularisation. Methods: Presented are angiographic- and OCT-findings in patients with macular degeneration of different origin. Choroidal neovascularisations, which are not likely to respond positively to established procedures like thermal laser coagulation or photodynamic therapy will be discussed. Results and conclusions: Present study-guidelines and new methods of pharmacological intervention are analysed in different patterns of macular degeneration. Conventional laser coagulation in the treatment of classic, extrafoveal CNV and photodynamic therapy of predominantly classic subfoveal CNV still represent a gold standard. There are new recommendations, loosening the tight criteria of the TAP and VIP-guidelines, which cover, for instance, wider visual acuity ranges and the treatment of juxtafoveally located choroidal neovascularisations. Positive findings in literature confirm the role of PDT in pathologic myopia and other non-AMD CNV. Studies about surgical procedures, like macula- or RPE-translocation after surgical removal or thermal laser destruction of the CNV are in progress and are expected to show promising results. Phase II/III studies will soon point out the effect of anti-VEGF agents. The application of intravitreal (triamcinolone) or peribulbar (anecortave acetat) steroids could be useful. The combination with surgical or laser techniques could bring further benefit to the patient.

  16. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D; Karatapanis, Stylianos

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major human pathogen associated with significant morbidity and mortality. However, after decades of efforts, treatment of H. pylori remains a challenge for physicians, as there is no universally effective regimen. Due to the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, mainly to clarithromycin, efficacy of standard triple therapies has declined to unacceptably low levels in most parts of the world. Novel regimens, specifically experimented to improve the therapeutic outcome against antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains, are now recommended as first-line empirical treatment options providing high efficacy (reportedly > 90% in intention to treat analysis) even in high clarithromycin resistance settings. These include the bismuth quadruple, concomitant, sequential and hybrid therapies. Due to the rapid development of quinolone resistance, levofloxacin-based regimens should be reserved as second-line/rescue options. Adjunct use of probiotics has been proposed in order to boost eradication rates and decrease occurrence of treatment-related side effects. Molecular testing methods are currently available for the characterization of H. pylori therapeutic susceptibility, including genotypic detection of macrolide resistance and evaluation of the cytochrome P450 2C19 status known to affect the metabolism of proton pump inhibitors. In the future, use of these techniques may allow for culture-free, non-invasive tailoring of therapy for H. pylori infection. PMID:25400982

  17. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D; Karatapanis, Stylianos

    2014-11-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major human pathogen associated with significant morbidity and mortality. However, after decades of efforts, treatment of H. pylori remains a challenge for physicians, as there is no universally effective regimen. Due to the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, mainly to clarithromycin, efficacy of standard triple therapies has declined to unacceptably low levels in most parts of the world. Novel regimens, specifically experimented to improve the therapeutic outcome against antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains, are now recommended as first-line empirical treatment options providing high efficacy (reportedly > 90% in intention to treat analysis) even in high clarithromycin resistance settings. These include the bismuth quadruple, concomitant, sequential and hybrid therapies. Due to the rapid development of quinolone resistance, levofloxacin-based regimens should be reserved as second-line/rescue options. Adjunct use of probiotics has been proposed in order to boost eradication rates and decrease occurrence of treatment-related side effects. Molecular testing methods are currently available for the characterization of H. pylori therapeutic susceptibility, including genotypic detection of macrolide resistance and evaluation of the cytochrome P450 2C19 status known to affect the metabolism of proton pump inhibitors. In the future, use of these techniques may allow for culture-free, non-invasive tailoring of therapy for H. pylori infection. PMID:25400982

  18. Phenylketonuria: a review of current and future treatments

    PubMed Central

    Al Hafid, Naz

    2015-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency in the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). If left untreated, the main clinical feature is intellectual disability. Treatment, which includes a low Phe diet supplemented with amino acid formulas, commences soon after diagnosis within the first weeks of life. Although dietary treatment has been successful in preventing intellectual disability in early treated PKU patients, there are major issues with dietary compliance due to palatability of the diet. Other potential issues associated with dietary therapy include nutritional deficiencies especially vitamin D and B12. Suboptimal outcomes in cognitive and executive functioning have been reported in patients who adhere poorly to dietary therapy. There have been continuous attempts at improving the quality of medical foods including their palatability. Advances in dietary therapy such as the use of large neutral amino acids (LNAA) and glycomacropeptides (GMP; found within the whey fraction of bovine milk) have been explored. Gene therapy and enzyme replacement or substitution therapy have yielded more promising data in the recent years. In this review the current and possible future treatments for PKU are discussed. PMID:26835392

  19. Phenylketonuria: a review of current and future treatments.

    PubMed

    Al Hafid, Naz; Christodoulou, John

    2015-10-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency in the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). If left untreated, the main clinical feature is intellectual disability. Treatment, which includes a low Phe diet supplemented with amino acid formulas, commences soon after diagnosis within the first weeks of life. Although dietary treatment has been successful in preventing intellectual disability in early treated PKU patients, there are major issues with dietary compliance due to palatability of the diet. Other potential issues associated with dietary therapy include nutritional deficiencies especially vitamin D and B12. Suboptimal outcomes in cognitive and executive functioning have been reported in patients who adhere poorly to dietary therapy. There have been continuous attempts at improving the quality of medical foods including their palatability. Advances in dietary therapy such as the use of large neutral amino acids (LNAA) and glycomacropeptides (GMP; found within the whey fraction of bovine milk) have been explored. Gene therapy and enzyme replacement or substitution therapy have yielded more promising data in the recent years. In this review the current and possible future treatments for PKU are discussed. PMID:26835392

  20. Novel Interventional Strategies for the Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Siontis, Konstantinos C; Oral, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    The landscape of the invasive management of atrial fibrillation, the most common sustained arrhythmia in humans, has changed dramatically in the last decade owing to numerous advances in arrhythmia mapping and ablation technologies. The current review critically appraises novel interventional strategies for the treatment of atrial fibrillation with a focus on clinical effectiveness and safety. PMID:27403294

  1. Treatment strategies for acute metabolic disorders in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Sarar

    2011-01-01

    Acute metabolic emergencies in neonates represent a challenge to the medical and nursing staff. If not treated optimally, these disorders are associated with poor outcome. Early diagnosis, supportive therapy and specific measures addressing the derranged metabolic process are the gold standards for favorable results. This review highlights treatment strategies for Inborn Errors of Metabolism (IEM) presenting in the neonatal period.

  2. The future of pharmacogenetics in the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mohamed Subhan; Iskandar, Muhammad Zaid; Parry, Helen M; Doney, Alex S; Palmer, Colin N; Lang, Chim C

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure is a common disease with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Current treatment comprises β-blockers, ACE inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists and diuretics. Variation in clinical response seen in patients begs the question of whether there is a pharmacogenetic component yet to be identified. To date, the genes most studied involve the β-1, β-2, α-2 adrenergic receptors and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway, mainly focusing on SNPs. However results have been inconsistent. Genome-wide association studies and next-generation sequencing are seen as alternative approaches to discovering genetic variations influencing drug response. Hopefully future research will lay the foundations for genotype-led drug management in these patients with the ultimate aim of improving their clinical outcome. PMID:26555119

  3. Future agents and treatment directions in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ocio, Enrique M.; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Orlowski, Robert; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The development of bortezomib and IMIDs resulted in a revolution in the treatment of MM. Moreover, second-generation proteasome inhibitors (carfilzomib) and IMIDs (pomalidomide) have recently been approved. Nevertheless, the incurability of this disease requires other drugs with different mechanisms of action to either prolong the survival of patients refractory to current therapies, or achieve cure. Active research has been done exploring the pathogenesis of MM and searching for novel druggable targets. In this regard, some of these novel agents seem promising, such as monoclonal antibodies (anti-CD38 - daratumumab or anti-CS1 - elotuzumab) or the kinesin protein inhibitor Arry-520. Other agents under investigation are kinase inhibitors, signaling pathways inhibitors or deacetylase inhibitors. With so many novel agents under investigation, future therapy in MM will probably involve the combined use of the already approved drugs with some of those newly discovered. PMID:24350987

  4. Optimal management of familial hypercholesterolemia: treatment and management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Nemati, Mohammad Hassan; Astaneh, Behrooz

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is an autosomally dominant disorder caused by various mutations in low-density lipoprotein receptor genes. This will lead to elevated levels of total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which may in turn lead to premature coronary atherosclerosis and cardiac-related death. The symptoms are more severe in the homozygous type of the disease. Different options for the treatment of affected patients are now available. Diet therapy, pharmacologic therapy, lipid apheresis, and liver transplantation are among the various treatments. We clinically review the treatment and management strategies for the disease in order to shed light on the optimal management of familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:21191428

  5. Noninfectious uveitis: strategies to optimize treatment compliance and adherence

    PubMed Central

    Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Cunningham, Emmett T; Arévalo, J Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Noninfectious uveitis includes a heterogenous group of sight-threatening ocular and systemic disorders. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of noninfectious uveitis in recent years, particularly with regard to the effective use of corticosteroids and non-corticosteroid immunosuppressive drugs, including biologic agents. All of these therapeutic approaches are limited, however, by any given patient’s ability to comply with and adhere to their prescribed treatment. In fact, compliance and adherence are among the most important patient-related determinants of treatment success. We discuss strategies to optimize compliance and adherence. PMID:26316689

  6. Treatment-resistant Schizophrenia: Evidence-based Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Englisch, Susanne; Zink, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Treatment-resistant symptoms complicate the clinical course of schizophrenia, and a large proportion of patients do not reach functional recovery. In consequence, polypharmacy is frequently used in treatment-refractory cases, addressing psychotic positive, negative and cognitive symptoms, treatment-emergent side effects caused by antipsychotics and comorbid depressive or obsessive-compulsive symptoms. To a large extent, such strategies are not covered by pharmacological guidelines which strongly suggest antipsychotic monotherapy. Add-on strategies comprise combinations of several antipsychotic agents and augmentations with mood stabilizers; moreover, antidepressants and experimental substances are applied. Based on the accumulated evidence of clinical trials and meta-analyses, combinations of clozapine with certain second-generation antipsychotic agents and the augmentation of antipsychotics with antidepressants seem recommendable, while the augmentation with mood stabilizers cannot be considered superior to placebo. Forthcoming investigations will have to focus on innovative pharmacological agents, the clinical spectrum of cognitive deficits and the implementation of cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:22654380

  7. Rehabilitating antisocial personalities: treatment through self-governance strategies.

    PubMed

    McRae, Leon

    2013-02-01

    Offenders with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) are widely assumed to reject psychotherapeutic intervention. Some commentators, therefore, argue that those with the disorder are better managed in the criminal justice system, where, following the introduction of indeterminate sentences, engagement with psychological treatment is coercively linked to the achievement of parole. By comparison, National Institute of Clinical Excellence guidelines on the management and treatment of ASPD recommend that those who are treatment seeking should be considered for admission to specialist psychiatric hospitals. The rationale is that prison-based interventions are underresourced, and the treatment of ASPD is underprioritised. The justification is that offenders with ASPD can be rehabilitated, if they are motivated. One problem, however, is that little is known about why offenders with ASPD seek treatment or what effect subsequent treatment has on their self-understanding. The aim of this paper is to address these unresolved issues. It draws on the findings of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funded qualitative study examining the experiences of sentenced male offenders admitted to a specialist personality disorder ward within the medium secure estate and the medical practitioners who treat them. The data are analysed with reference to Michel Foucault's work on governmentality and strategy in power relations. Two arguments are advanced: first, offenders with ASPD are motivated by legal coercive pressures to implement a variety of Foucauldian-type strategies to give the false impression of treatment progress. Second, and related, treatment does not result in changes in self-understanding in the resistive client with ASPD. This presupposes that, in respect of this group at least, Foucault was mistaken in his claim that resistive behaviours merely mask the effectiveness of treatment norms over time. Nevertheless, the paper concludes that specialist treatment in the

  8. Rehabilitating antisocial personalities: treatment through self-governance strategies

    PubMed Central

    McRae, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Offenders with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) are widely assumed to reject psychotherapeutic intervention. Some commentators, therefore, argue that those with the disorder are better managed in the criminal justice system, where, following the introduction of indeterminate sentences, engagement with psychological treatment is coercively linked to the achievement of parole. By comparison, National Institute of Clinical Excellence guidelines on the management and treatment of ASPD recommend that those who are treatment seeking should be considered for admission to specialist psychiatric hospitals. The rationale is that prison-based interventions are underresourced, and the treatment of ASPD is underprioritised. The justification is that offenders with ASPD can be rehabilitated, if they are motivated. One problem, however, is that little is known about why offenders with ASPD seek treatment or what effect subsequent treatment has on their self-understanding. The aim of this paper is to address these unresolved issues. It draws on the findings of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funded qualitative study examining the experiences of sentenced male offenders admitted to a specialist personality disorder ward within the medium secure estate and the medical practitioners who treat them. The data are analysed with reference to Michel Foucault's work on governmentality and strategy in power relations. Two arguments are advanced: first, offenders with ASPD are motivated by legal coercive pressures to implement a variety of Foucauldian-type strategies to give the false impression of treatment progress. Second, and related, treatment does not result in changes in self-understanding in the resistive client with ASPD. This presupposes that, in respect of this group at least, Foucault was mistaken in his claim that resistive behaviours merely mask the effectiveness of treatment norms over time. Nevertheless, the paper concludes that specialist treatment in the

  9. Strategies for Teaching African American History: Musings from the Past, Ruminations for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagbovie, Pero Gaglo

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of the existing body of scholarship on the teaching of African American history shows that various new relevant pedagogies should be adopted to utilize the past reflections for future teaching strategies. The author demonstrates the need for a more rigorous scholarship on the philosophies, methodologies and techniques of teaching…

  10. The Future of School Integration: Socioeconomic Diversity as an Education Reform Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahlenberg, Richard D., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The Century Foundation released The Future of School Integration: Socioeconomic Diversity as an Education Reform Strategy, edited by senior fellow Richard D. Kahlenberg. The volume seeks to answer important questions about how socioeconomic integration plans are faring and to provide guidance for how they can be sustained and expanded in the…

  11. Neurogenic ejaculatory disorders: focus on current and future treatments.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Rocco S; Polimeni, Giovanni; Ciurleo, Rosella; Casella, Carmela; Bramanti, Placido

    2011-09-01

    Ejaculation is a complex and still poorly understood neurological mechanism, at both spinal and cerebral levels as it is closely associated with orgasm. Physiologically, ejaculation is defined as the expulsion of seminal fluid from the urethral meatus and consists of two phases, namely emission and expulsion. Ejaculation is mediated by a spinal control center, referred to as a spinal pattern generator that coordinates sympathetic, parasympathetic and motor (somatic) outflows, integrating the latter with the inputs from the supraspinal sites in brainstem, hypothalamus and preoptic area. Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common sexual dysfunction among young men, and it has been considered mostly psychogenic in origin, although it can be associated to diverse urological and neurological diseases. On the contrary, retrograde ejaculation and anejaculation are predominantly related to organic causes, particularly to neurogenic ones. Since ejaculation is mostly a spinal reflex, it is comprehensible that ejaculatory disorders are more frequent in spinal cord injury than in other neurological disorders. Over the past decades, research has focused on PE, and evidence from clinical studies showed a beneficial effect of antidepressants for the treatment of men with PE. Other ejaculatory disorders, especially painful ejaculation, have been less investigated and the proper therapy is still controversial. Aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive description of both currently available treatments and most promising future therapies, including assigned patents, for the neurogenic ejaculatory disorders. PMID:21834782

  12. Logistics modeling of future solid waste storage, treatment, and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Holter, G.M.; Stiles, D.L.; Shaver, S.R.; Armacost, L.L.

    1993-11-01

    Logistics modeling is a powerful analytical technique for effective planning of waste storage, treatment, and disposal activities. Logistics modeling facilitates analyses of alternate scenarios for future waste flows, facility schedules, and processing or handling capacities. These analyses provide an increased understanding of the specific needs for waste storage, treatment, and disposal while adequate time remains to plan accordingly. They also help to determine the sensitivity of these needs to various system parameters. This paper discusses a logistics modeling system developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to aid in solid waste planning for a large industrial complex managing many different types and classifications of waste. The basic needs for such a system are outlined, and the approach adopted in developing the system is described. A key component of this approach is the development of a conceptual model that provides a flexible framework for modeling the waste management system and addressing the range of logistics and economic issues involved. Developing an adequate description of the waste management system being analyzed is discussed. Examples are then provided of the types of analyses that have been conducted. The potential application of this modeling system to different settings is also examined.

  13. Effective rheumatoid arthritis treatment requires comprehensive management strategies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Work by Lee and colleagues has shown that decreased sleep quality and increased psychiatric distress increase pain sensitivity at both articular and nonarticular sites in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This work is consistent with prior studies showing that factors independent of RA disease activity can influence RA outcome measures. Owing to increasing pressure on rheumatologists to use outcome measures to inform treatment decisions, the work by Lee and colleagues highlights the need for comprehensive RA management strategies to understand and address the human factors that influence outcomes measures. Such strategies will ensure appropriate use of increasingly expensive therapies while maximizing patient satisfaction and reimbursement. PMID:20067592

  14. Effective rheumatoid arthritis treatment requires comprehensive management strategies.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, Chad S

    2009-01-01

    Work by Lee and colleagues has shown that decreased sleep quality and increased psychiatric distress increase pain sensitivity at both articular and nonarticular sites in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This work is consistent with prior studies showing that factors independent of RA disease activity can influence RA outcome measures. Owing to increasing pressure on rheumatologists to use outcome measures to inform treatment decisions, the work by Lee and colleagues highlights the need for comprehensive RA management strategies to understand and address the human factors that influence outcomes measures. Such strategies will ensure appropriate use of increasingly expensive therapies while maximizing patient satisfaction and reimbursement. PMID:20067592

  15. Practical strategies for enhancing adherence to treatment regimen in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Greenley, Rachel N; Kunz, Jennifer H; Walter, Jennifer; Hommel, Kevin A

    2013-06-01

    Promoting adherence to treatment among pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a critical yet challenging task for health care providers. Several existing interventions to enhance adherence among individuals with IBD offer useful information about practical strategies to enhance adherence. The current review article has 3 goals. First, the review provides a context for understanding treatment regimen adherence in IBD by reviewing key definitional, measurement, and conceptual challenges in this area. Next, published studies focused on interventions to enhance adherence in IBD are briefly summarized, followed by a synthesis of practical adherence promotion strategies for use in IBD by health care providers. Strategies are distinguished by the level of evidence supporting their utility as well as by age group. Finally, recommendations for future research to facilitate the development and implementation of practical, evidence-based strategies for adherence promotion in IBD are provided. Findings from the literature review suggest that strategies including education, regimen simplification, and use of reminder systems and organizational strategies (e.g., pill boxes) are likely to be best suited for addressing accidental nonadherence. In contrast, addressing motivational issues, teaching problem-solving skills, and addressing problematic patterns of family functioning are more likely to benefit individuals displaying intentional nonadherence. PMID:23635715

  16. Practical Strategies for Enhancing Adherence to Treatment Regimen in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenley, Rachel N.; Kunz, Jennifer H.; Walter, Jennifer; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Promoting adherence to treatment among pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a critical yet challenging task for health care providers. Several existing interventions to enhance adherence among individuals with IBD offer useful information about practical strategies to enhance adherence. The current review article has 3 goals. First, the review provides a context for understanding treatment regimen adherence in IBD by reviewing key definitional, measurement, and conceptual challenges in this area. Next, published studies focused on interventions to enhance adherence in IBD are briefly summarized, followed by a synthesis of practical adherence promotion strategies for use in IBD by health care providers. Strategies are distinguished by the level of evidence supporting their utility as well as by age group. Finally, recommendations for future research to facilitate the development and implementation of practical, evidence-based strategies for adherence promotion in IBD are provided. Findings from the literature review suggest that strategies including education, regimen simplification, and use of reminder systems and organizational strategies (e.g., pill boxes) are likely to be best suited for addressing accidental nonadherence. In contrast, addressing motivational issues, teaching problem-solving skills, and addressing problematic patterns of family functioning are more likely to benefit individuals displaying intentional nonadherence. PMID:23635715

  17. Multimodality treatment strategies have changed prognosis of peritoneal metastases.

    PubMed

    Lungoci, Corneliu; Mironiuc, Aurel Ion; Muntean, Valentin; Oniu, Traian; Leebmann, Hubert; Mayr, Max; Piso, Pompiliu

    2016-01-15

    For a long time, treatment of peritoneal metastases (PM) was mostly palliative and thus, this status was link with "terminal status/despair". The current multimodal treatment strategy, consisting of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), has been strenuously achieved over time, but seems to be the best treatment option for PM patients. As we reviewed the literature data, we could emphasize some milestones and also, controversies in the history of proposed multimodal treatment and thus, outline the philosophy of this approach, which seems to be an unusual one indeed. Initially marked by nihilism and fear, but benefiting from a remarkable joint effort of human and material resources (multi-center and -institutional research), over a period of 30 years, CRS and HIPEC found their place in the treatment of PM. The next 4 years were dedicated to the refinement of the multimodal treatment, by launching research pathways. In selected patients, with requires training, it demonstrated a significant survival results (similar to the Hepatic Metastases treatment), with acceptable risks and costs. The main debates regarding CRS and HIPEC treatment were based on the oncologists' perspective and the small number of randomized clinical trials. It is important to statement the PM patient has the right to be informed of the existence of CRS and HIPEC, as a real treatment resource, the decision being made by multidisciplinary teams. PMID:26798438

  18. Multimodality treatment strategies have changed prognosis of peritoneal metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lungoci, Corneliu; Mironiuc, Aurel Ion; Muntean, Valentin; Oniu, Traian; Leebmann, Hubert; Mayr, Max; Piso, Pompiliu

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, treatment of peritoneal metastases (PM) was mostly palliative and thus, this status was link with “terminal status/despair”. The current multimodal treatment strategy, consisting of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), has been strenuously achieved over time, but seems to be the best treatment option for PM patients. As we reviewed the literature data, we could emphasize some milestones and also, controversies in the history of proposed multimodal treatment and thus, outline the philosophy of this approach, which seems to be an unusual one indeed. Initially marked by nihilism and fear, but benefiting from a remarkable joint effort of human and material resources (multi-center and -institutional research), over a period of 30 years, CRS and HIPEC found their place in the treatment of PM. The next 4 years were dedicated to the refinement of the multimodal treatment, by launching research pathways. In selected patients, with requires training, it demonstrated a significant survival results (similar to the Hepatic Metastases treatment), with acceptable risks and costs. The main debates regarding CRS and HIPEC treatment were based on the oncologists’ perspective and the small number of randomized clinical trials. It is important to statement the PM patient has the right to be informed of the existence of CRS and HIPEC, as a real treatment resource, the decision being made by multidisciplinary teams. PMID:26798438

  19. [Current Conservative Treatment and Management Strategies of Skeletal Muscle Injuries].

    PubMed

    Hotfiel, T; Carl, H-D; Swoboda, B; Heinrich, M; Heiß, R; Grim, C; Engelhardt, M

    2016-06-01

    Muscle injuries frequently occur during sport and are one of the commonest injuries. The diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries impose high demands on medical treatment, in order to ensure successful regeneration and a rapid return to sport. Most of the injuries can be treated conservatively, as skeletal muscles have a high endogenous capacity for repair and regeneration. Conservative treatment includes initial on-field therapy. This is known as the "RICE" principle and is common and recommended for initial treatment for most sports injuries. The primary therapy target is to reduce pain, swelling and bleeding and thus to limit the initial inflammatory process and prevent further damage. During the first days after injury, brief immobilization helps to reduce the re-injury rate and accelerates the formation of granulation tissue. There are many possible additional treatments, including intramuscular injections, manipulation of the sacroiliac joint or rehabilitation programs, including stretching and strengthening. If the acute treatment phase is complete after 3 to 5 days, more active treatment, including trunk stabilisation, stretching and strengthening, can be started gradually. Despite their high prevalence, there have only been a few studies on the treatment and management of these injuries. The aim of this manuscript is to review the literature on the classification, pathobiology and treatment strategies for muscle injuries. PMID:27351158

  20. Strategies for maximizing clinical effectiveness in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Rajiv; Targum, Steven D; Nasrallah, Henry A; Ross, Ruth

    2006-11-01

    The ultimate clinical objective in the treatment of schizophrenia is to enable affected individuals to lead maximally productive and personally meaningful lives. As with other chronic diseases that lack a definitive cure, the individual's service/recovery plan must include treatment interventions directed towards decreasing manifestations of the illness, rehabilitative services directed towards enhancing adaptive skills, and social support mobilization aimed at optimizing function and quality of life. In this review, we provide a conceptual framework for considering approaches for maximizing the effectiveness of the array of treatments and other services towards promoting recovery of persons with schizophrenia. We discuss pharmacological, psychological, and social strategies that decrease the burden of the disease of schizophrenia on affected individuals and their families while adding the least possible burden of treatment. In view of the multitude of treatments necessary to optimize outcomes for individuals with schizophrenia, effective coordination of these services is essential. In addition to providing best possible clinical assessment and pharmacological treatment, the psychiatrist must function as an effective leader of the treatment team. To do so, however, the psychiatrist must be knowledgeable about the range of available services, must have skills in clinical-administrative leadership, and must accept the responsibility of coordinating the planning and delivery of this multidimensional array of treatments and services. Finally, the effectiveness of providing optimal individualized treatment/rehabilitation is best gauged by measuring progress on multiple effectiveness domains. Approaches for efficient and reliable assessment are discussed. PMID:17122696

  1. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV): History, Pathophysiology, Office Treatment and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Hornibrook, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    BPPV is the most common cause of vertigo. It most often occurs spontaneously in the 50 to 70 year age group. In younger individuals it is the commonest cause of vertigo following head injury. There is a wide spectrum of severity from inconsistent positional vertigo to continuous vertigo provoked by any head movement. It is likely to be a cause of falls and other morbidity in the elderly. Misdiagnosis can result in unnecessary tests. The cardinal features and a diagnostic test were clarified in 1952 by Dix and Hallpike. Subsequently, it has been established that the symptoms are attributable to detached otoconia in any of the semicircular canals. BPPV symptoms can resolve spontaneously but can last for days, weeks, months, and years. Unusual patterns of nystagmus and nonrepsonse to treatment may suggest central pathology. Diagnostic strategies and the simplest “office” treatment techniques are described. Future directions for research are discussed. PMID:21808648

  2. Comparison of different treatment strategies for industrial landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Gotvajn, A Zgajnar; Tisler, T; Zagorc-Koncan, J

    2009-03-15

    The aim of our research was to determine appropriate treatment technique for effective treatment of heavily polluted tannery landfill leachate. We have accomplished several treatment experiments: (i) aerobic biological treatment, (ii) air stripping at various pH, (iii) adsorption to activated carbon, (iv) coagulation-flocculation and (v) advanced oxidation process with Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2). Efficiency of each procedure was monitored by chemical analysis and changes in biodegradability and acute toxicity were also evaluated (Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna). Biological treatment of raw leachate was effective only for very diluted leachate (up to 6Vol.%). It has been confirmed that air stripping at pH 11.0 effectively removed volatile organics and ammonia for 33% and 84%, respectively and contributed to lower toxicity of the leachate. Fenton's oxidation was the most effective among all used treatment procedures. COD removal reached 86%, biodegradability has been increased and toxicity reduced. Adsorption to activated carbon increased BOD(5)/COD ratio from 0.18 to 0.56 and it removed 40% of organics. Coagulation and flocculation procedures with FeCl(3) were also very effective. At lowered pH and added flocculant treatment efficiency reached 50%. But no method alone was effective enough to meet effluent limits for release into local surface waters. Future work was focused on the study of different promising treatment schemes, especially combination of Fenton's oxidation and biological treatment. PMID:18650010

  3. High Priority Future Research Needs for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kamal; Moorthy, Denish; Chan, Jeffrey A.; Concannon, Thomas W.; Ratichek, Sara J.; Chung, Mei; Balk, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify and prioritize future research needs (FRN) topics for diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Twenty-one panel members represented six stake-holder categories: patients and the public, providers; purchasers of health care, payers, policymakers, and principal investigators. Building on a recently completed comparative effectiveness review, stakeholders nominated and discussed potential FRN topics. Stakeholders then nominated their top priority FRN topics based on the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Effective Health Care Program Selection Criteria. From these nominations, the highest priority FRN topics were determined and were elaborated upon to include possible study designs to address the topics. Results: Thirty-seven topics were discussed and prioritized. The nine highest priority FRN topics included: cost-effectiveness of management strategies, defining age- and sex-specific criteria for OSA, evaluating routine preoperative screening for OSA, evaluating involvement of a sleep medicine specialist in diagnosis of OSA, evaluating clinical prediction rules, assessing the effect of treating sleep disordered breathing and long-term clinical outcomes, comparing treatments for patients who do not tolerate positive airway pressure, evaluating strategies to improve treatment compliance, and evaluating the association between sleep apnea severity and long-term clinical outcomes. Conclusions: While there are numerous specific research questions with low or insufficient strength of evidence for OSA management, OSA patients, their healthcare providers, and society at large would benefit from refocusing research efforts into the prioritized research questions and away from simple comparisons of short-term outcomes between specific interventions. Citation: Patel K; Moorthy D; Chan JA; Concannon TW. High priority future research needs for obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. J Clin Sleep Med 2013

  4. Novel treatment strategies for patients with relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jona, Adam; Younes, Anas

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), especially those who relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation, remains challenging. Patients with HL whose disease relapses after stem cell transplantation are rarely cured with current treatment modalities, and have a median survival is less than 3 years. With no new drugs have been approved by the FDA for HL in more than three decades, there is a clear unmet medical need for drug development for this patients population. New treatment strategies that are based on targeting oncogenic signaling pathways are currently explored. This review will focus on emerging new treatment modalities that are currently under investigation for patients with relapsed classical HL. PMID:20828898

  5. Reducing Fatal Opioid Overdose: Prevention, Treatment and Harm Reduction Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hawk, Kathryn F.; Vaca, Federico E.; D’Onofrio, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The opioid overdose epidemic is a major threat to the public’s health, resulting in the development and implementation of a variety of strategies to reduce fatal overdose [1-3]. Many strategies are focused on primary prevention and increased access to effective treatment, although the past decade has seen an exponential increase in harm reduction initiatives. To maximize identification of opportunities for intervention, initiatives focusing on prevention, access to effective treatment, and harm reduction are examined independently, although considerable overlap exists. Particular attention is given to harm reduction approaches, as increased public and political will have facilitated widespread implementation of several initiatives, including increased distribution of naloxone and policy changes designed to increase bystander assistance during a witnessed overdose [4-7]. PMID:26339206

  6. Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

  7. Treatment strategies in early and advanced Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Ossig, Christiana; Reichmann, Heinz

    2015-02-01

    The initiation of therapy in Parkinson disease (PD), altering the medication, adding new substances, and switching to alternative therapies throughout the disease is always a matter of debate. In the past, experts in PD have propagated different medication strategies. Even though there is no new medical treatment on the horizon, much has changed in consideration of the known treatments in the early and advanced therapy for PD. Therapeutic regimens have to be adapted and adjusted on a regular basis to accomplish the best medical care for the predominant symptom of the individual patient with PD. PMID:25432721

  8. Assessment and treatment strategies for rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakim, Wisam; Noorani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Tears of the rotator cuff are common and becoming an increasingly frequent problem. There is a vast amount of literature on the merits and limitations of the various methods of clinical and radiological assessment of rotator cuff tears. This is also the case with regard to treatment strategies. Certain popular beliefs and principles practiced widely and the basis upon which they are derived may be prone to inaccuracy. We provide an overview of the historical management of rotator cuff tears, as well as an explanation for how and why rotator cuff tears should be managed, and propose a structured methodology for their assessment and treatment.

  9. [Pleural empyema - treatment strategies in light of etiology].

    PubMed

    Hecker, E; Hecker, H C; Hecker, K A

    2013-06-01

    The variety of strategies in the treatment of parapneumonic pleural empyema demonstrates the ambiguity for the method of choice. Parapneumonic pleural empyema has been classified into different stages and classes. While the American Thoracic Society (ATS) classification is based on the natural course of the disease, or according to the radiological, physical and biochemical characteristics respectively, the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) has categorized the patients with pleural empyema according to the risk of a poor outcome. The British Thoracic Society (BTS) developed a treatment algorithm based on a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature. With regard to this classification the management of parapneumonic and postoperative pleural empyema is based on the stage of the disease. Therapeutic strategies include chest tube alone, chest tube with fibrinolysis, thoracoscopic debridement and decortication in open or minimally invasive techniques, closed empyemectomy, or treatment with thoracomyoplasty, open window treatment or vacuum clothing with negative pressure. The different conservative and operative therapeutic possibilities determinate the central treatment function of thoracic surgery. PMID:23807591

  10. New strategies for local treatment of vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Rita; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Ana; Martinez-de-Oliveira, José

    2015-09-15

    Vaginal infections are extremely prevalent, particularly among women of reproductive age. Although they do not result in high mortality rates, these infections are associated with high levels of anxiety and reduction of quality of life. In most cases, topical treatment of vaginal infections has been shown to be at least as effective as oral treatment, resulting in higher local drug concentrations, with fewer drug interactions and adverse effects. Furthermore, the emergence of microbial resistance to chemotherapeutics and the difficulties in managing infection recurrences sustain the need for more effective local treatments. However, conventional dosage forms have been associated with low retention in the vagina and discomfort. Formulation strategies such as the development of bioadhesive, thermogelling systems and microtechnological or nanotechnological approaches have been proposed to improve delivery of traditional drugs, and other treatment modalities such as new drugs, plant extracts, and probiotics are being studied. This article reviews the recent strategies studied to improve the treatment and prevention of the commonest vaginal infections-namely, vaginal bacteriosis, aerobic vaginitis, vulvovaginal candidosis, and trichomoniasis-through the intravaginal route. PMID:26144995

  11. Treatment Strategies for Patients with an INTERMACS I Profile

    PubMed Central

    Abu Saleh, Walid K.; Jabbari, Odeaa Al; Guha, Ashrith; Loebe, Matthias; Bruckner, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with INTERMACS class I heart failure can be very challenging, and temporary long-term device support may be needed. In this article, we review the currently available temporary support devices in order to support these severely ill patients with decompensated heart failure. Strategies of using a temporary assist as a bridge to long-term device support are also discussed. PMID:25793022

  12. Treatment strategies for patients with an INTERMACS I profile.

    PubMed

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Jabbari, Odeaa Al; Guha, Ashrith; Loebe, Matthias; Bruckner, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with INTERMACS class I heart failure can be very challenging, and temporary long-term device support may be needed. In this article, we review the currently available temporary support devices in order to support these severely ill patients with decompensated heart failure. Strategies of using a temporary assist as a bridge to long-term device support are also discussed. PMID:25793022

  13. Therapeutic Strategies for Treatment of Pulmonary Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM)

    PubMed Central

    Krymskaya, Vera P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare progressive lung disease affecting almost exclusively women. Neoplastic growth of atypical smooth muscle-like cells in the lung induces destruction of lung parenchyma leading to the formation of lung cysts, rupture of which results in spontaneous pneumothorax. LAM occurs sporadically or in association with inherited hamartoma syndrome tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Progression of LAM often results in loss of pulmonary function and death. Increasing understanding of neoplastic LAM cell growth is driving the development of therapeutic approaches targeting the disease progression. Areas covered This review provides background to understand the rationale for current treatments used in patients with LAM, to critically appraise the evidence for these treatments, and to discuss future treatment approaches. The literature review includes publications from PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov/. Expert Opinion Targeting mTOR activation with rapamycin analogs sirolimus and everolimus are awaiting approval by the FDA for treatment of LAM. A number of other treatment options have been investigated and are currently tested in clinical trials to target LAM cell survival and metastasis. Key remaining and poorly understood areas for development and validation of therapeutic targeting in LAM are destruction of lungs, pathological lymphangiogenesis, and hormonal regulation. Future will reveal whether they could be targeted therapeutically. PMID:26779398

  14. Future challenges for the treatment of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, Isidoro; Toro, Adriana

    2013-04-01

    The annual World Congress of the International Association of Surgeons, Gastroenterologists and Oncologists (IASGO) was held in Bangkok, Thailand, from 5-9 December 2012, hosted under the auspices of the President of the Association, Masatoshi Makuuchi and the General Secretary Nicolas Lygidakis. The President of the Congress and of the local committee was Nopadol Wora-Urai from Bangkok University (Bangkok, Thailand). The organization of the congress was excellent, and both the location and the kindness of the local people were marvellous. The congress was supported by 665 participants from 62 countries, including speakers from Europe, America, Africa, Asia and Australia. The program included symposia, videos, free papers and poster sessions. The scientific sessions also provided live surgery and lunch lectures. The congress offered the opportunity to exchange knowledge about the challenges and controversies involved in the management of abdominal diseases. This paper analyzes current possibilities and future expectations for the diagnosis and treatment of liver tumors, especially hepatocellular carcinomas and liver metastases from colorectal cancer. PMID:23560371

  15. Traumatic brain injury: future assessment tools and treatment prospects

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Steven R; Cantor, Joshua B; Ashman, Teresa A

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widespread and leads to death and disability in millions of individuals around the world each year. Overall incidence and prevalence of TBI are likely to increase in absolute terms in the future. Tackling the problem of treating TBI successfully will require improvements in the understanding of normal cerebral anatomy, physiology, and function throughout the lifespan, as well as the pathological and recuperative responses that result from trauma. New treatment approaches and combinations will need to be targeted to the heterogeneous needs of TBI populations. This article explores and evaluates the research evidence in areas that will likely lead to a reduction in TBI-related morbidity and improved outcomes. These include emerging assessment instruments and techniques in areas of structural/chemical and functional neuroimaging and neuropsychology, advances in the realms of cell-based therapies and genetics, promising cognitive rehabilitation techniques including cognitive remediation and the use of electronic technologies including assistive devices and virtual reality, and the emerging field of complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:19183780

  16. 17 CFR 1.30 - Loans by futures commission merchants; treatment of proceeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Loans by futures commission merchants; treatment of proceeds. 1.30 Section 1.30 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES... Property § 1.30 Loans by futures commission merchants; treatment of proceeds. Nothing in these...

  17. 17 CFR 1.30 - Loans by futures commission merchants; treatment of proceeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... merchants; treatment of proceeds. 1.30 Section 1.30 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES... Property § 1.30 Loans by futures commission merchants; treatment of proceeds. Nothing in these regulations shall prevent a futures commission merchant from lending its own funds to commodity or option...

  18. 17 CFR 1.30 - Loans by futures commission merchants; treatment of proceeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Loans by futures commission merchants; treatment of proceeds. 1.30 Section 1.30 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES... Property § 1.30 Loans by futures commission merchants; treatment of proceeds. Nothing in the regulations...

  19. 17 CFR 1.30 - Loans by futures commission merchants; treatment of proceeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Loans by futures commission merchants; treatment of proceeds. 1.30 Section 1.30 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES... Property § 1.30 Loans by futures commission merchants; treatment of proceeds. Nothing in these...

  20. Economic and financial restructuring of the petroleum industry: strategies for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between economics, finance, and geopolitics in the oil market is examined. Furthermore, the structural changes that have occurred in the petroleum industry are analyzed. Recent developments have greatly influenced oil prices, and the supply of and demand for oil. The research clearly points to an increasing U.S. reliance on the Middle East oil in the future. Large U.S. oil companies are emphasizing overseas oil exploration and development. The volatility and competitiveness in the market have led to a new oil-pricing mechanisms in international oil trade. Netback pricing, the growth of the crude-oil futures market, and an increase in barter agreements are important developments. Several factors, including the decline in oil prices, and the lack of investor interest in oil investments have reduced the capital available to the industry. This has created the need for new financing techniques. Companies are devising strategies to protect their financial strength. A survey of the restructuring of the petroleum industry was conducted. The survey examined the problems of the petroleum industry, strategies of the oil companies, and the future role of OPEC. The consensus amongst the respondents was that misjudgment regarding future oil prices was the leading cause of the industry's problems, and that the U.S. will be more vulnerable to oil-supply disruptions in the future.

  1. Strategies for microwave thermal treatment planning, navigation, and assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.

    2011-03-01

    Thermal treatment is commonly performed interstitially in either surgical or percutaneous procedures, using microwave antenna sources at 915 or 2540 MHz. There are a number of tools or aids as well as challenges for clinicians performing these procedures in the course of patient treatment. These challenges will be present whether the procedure is surgical, laparoscopic, or percutaneous, and include treatment planning, image guidance, navigation, coregistration in 3D, and treatment assessment. Treatment planning has been used historically in hyperthermia for microwave antenna arrays, but has yet to be properly applied in thermal ablation. Image assessment of thermal treatment is not typically performed in real time, although these tools will provide the clinician with further information to understand the extent of treatment and whether further treatment is needed. 3D imaging is available, but not coregistered to patient space. Navigation has been used in many medical specialties, but is also not in the clinician's toolbox in thermal treatment. Although treatment planning will lay out the skin entry and trajectory for each antenna placed, subsequently, each antenna needs to be tracked to accurately show placement in the patient and overlaid in patient space, along with the tumor target location. Some patient treatments may consist of multiple, but sequential single placements of an antenna, and guidance is even more critical to track positions and plan for the next insertion. Lastly, real-time image assessment will show the extent and shape of the coagulated lesion and which targets may have been undertreated. If used synchronously in arrays, MW power steering may also aid in filling in the ablation as the treatment progresses. This paper will analyze the present state-of-the art as well as a strategy to incorporate the various facets of planning, guidance, and assessment of treatment. The integration of thermal treatment planning, navigation and guidance, robotics

  2. Water and wastewater in developing countries: present reality and strategy for the future.

    PubMed

    Ujang, Z; Buckley, C

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarises the paper presentation sessions at the Conference, as well giving insights on the issues related to developing countries. It also discusses the present status of practice and research on water and wastewater management, and projected future scenario based not only on the papers presented in the Conference, but also on other sources. The strategy is presented to overcome many problems in developing countries such as rapid urbanization, industrialization, population growth, financial and institutional problems and, depleting water resources. The strategy consists of Integrated Urban Water Management (IUWM), cleaner industrial production, waste minimisation and financial arrangements. PMID:12448446

  3. Improving Care for Depression & Suicide Risk in Adolescents: Innovative Strategies for Bringing Treatments to Community Settings

    PubMed Central

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Miranda, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on interventions and services for depression and suicide prevention among adolescents, with the goals of placing this science within the context of current changing health care environments and highlighting innovative models for improving health and mental health. We examine the: challenges and opportunities offered by new initiatives and legislation designed to transform the U.S. health and mental healthcare systems; summarize knowledge regarding the treatment of depression and suicidality/self-harm in adolescents; and describe innovative models for partnering with health systems and communities. This review demonstrates that treatment models and service delivery strategies are currently available for increasing evidence-based care, particularly for depression, and concludes with recommendations for future research and quality improvement initiatives aimed at inspiring additional efforts to put science to work, bridge science and community practice, and develop strategies for partnering with communities to improve care, mental health, and well-being among adolescents. PMID:24437432

  4. High-energy physics strategies and future large-scale projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, F.

    2015-07-01

    We sketch the actual European and international strategies and possible future facilities. In the near term the High Energy Physics (HEP) community will fully exploit the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). Post-LHC options include a linear e+e- collider in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), as well as circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with linear and circular acceleration approaches based on crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of accelerator-based particle physics.

  5. SMARTer Discontinuation Trial Designs for Developing an Adaptive Treatment Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Scott N.; Rynn, Moira A.; Walkup, John T.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective Developing evidenced-based practices for the management of childhood psychiatric disorders requires research studies that address how to treat children during both the acute phase of the disorder and beyond. Given the selection of a medication for acute treatment, discontinuation trials are used to evaluate the effects of treatment duration (e.g., time on medication) and/or maintenance strategies following successful acute-phase treatment. Recently, sequential multiple assignment randomized trials (SMART) have been proposed for use in informing sequences of critical clinical decisions such as those mentioned. The objective of this article is to illustrate how a SMART study is related to the standard discontinuation trial design, while addressing additional clinically important questions with similar trial resources. Method The recently completed Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS), a randomized trial that examined the relative efficacy of three acute-phase treatments for pediatric anxiety disorders, along with a next logical step, a standard discontinuation trial design, is used to clarify the ideas. This example is used to compare the discontinuation trial design relative to the SMART design. Results We find that the standard discontinuation trial can be modified slightly using a SMART design to yield high-quality data that can be used to address a wider variety of questions in addition to the impact of treatment duration. We discuss how this innovative trial design is ultimately more efficient and less costly than the standard discontinuation trial, and may result in more representative comparisons between treatments. Conclusions Mental health researchers who are interested in addressing questions concerning the effects of continued treatment (for different durations) following successful acute-phase treatment should consider SMART designs in place of discontinuation trial designs in their research. SMART designs can be used to

  6. Optimal Pharmacologic Treatment Strategies in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Gayotri; Shinkazh, Nataliya; Davis, Nichola

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased to pandemic levels worldwide and is related to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Metabolic comorbidities are commonly associated with obesity and include metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Even if the prevalence of obesity remains stable until 2030, the anticipated numbers of people with diabetes will more than double as a consequence of population aging and urbanization. Weight reduction is integral in the prevention of diabetes among obese adults with pre-diabetes. Lifestyle intervention and weight reduction are also key in the management of type 2 diabetes. Weight loss is challenging for most obese patients, but for those with diabetes, it can pose an even greater challenge due to the weight gain associated with many treatment regimens. This article will review optimal treatment strategies for patients with comorbid obesity and type 2 diabetes. The role of anti-obesity agents in diabetes will also be reviewed. This literature review will provide readers with current strategies for the pharmacologic treatment of obesity and diabetes with a focus on the weight outcomes related to diabetes treatments. PMID:26237392

  7. Bioengineering Strategies for the Treatment of Type I Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Zhanzheng; Wen, Xuejun

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus, the third most common disease in the world, is a chronic metabolic disorder caused by a failure of insulin production and/or an inability to respond to insulin. Specifically, type 1 diabetes is a disease resulted by the autoimmune destruction of a patient's β-cell population within the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. The current primary treatment for type 1 diabetes is daily multiple insulin injections. However, this treatment cannot provide sustained physiological release, and the insulin amount is not finely tuned to glycemia. Pancreatic transplants or islet transplants would be the preferred treatment method but the lack of donor tissue and immunoincompatibility has been shown to be a roadblock to their widespread use. Bioengineering strategies are poised to combat these challenges. In this review, bioengineering approaches for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, including insulin controlled release systems, strategies for immunoisolation of transplanted islets, and cell-based therapies, such as β-cells and stem cells, are discussed. PMID:27301187

  8. 4D Proton treatment planning strategy for mobile lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Yixiu; Zhang Xiaodong; Chang, Joe Y.; Wang He; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Balter, Peter A.; Liu, Helen; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei . E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate strategies for designing compensator-based 3D proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional CT sets for 10 lung cancer patients were used in this study. The internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) was obtained by combining the tumor volumes at different phases of the respiratory cycle. For each patient, we evaluated four planning strategies based on the following dose calculations: (1) the average (AVE) CT; (2) the free-breathing (FB) CT; (3) the maximum intensity projection (MIP) CT; and (4) the AVE CT in which the CT voxel values inside the IGTV were replaced by a constant density (AVE{sub R}IGTV). For each strategy, the resulting cumulative dose distribution in a respiratory cycle was determined using a deformable image registration method. Results: There were dosimetric differences between the apparent dose distribution, calculated on a single CT dataset, and the motion-corrected 4D dose distribution, calculated by combining dose distributions delivered to each phase of the 4DCT. The AVE{sub R}IGTV plan using a 1-cm smearing parameter had the best overall target coverage and critical structure sparing. The MIP plan approach resulted in an unnecessarily large treatment volume. The AVE and FB plans using 1-cm smearing did not provide adequate 4D target coverage in all patients. By using a larger smearing value, adequate 4D target coverage could be achieved; however, critical organ doses were increased. Conclusion: The AVE{sub R}IGTV approach is an effective strategy for designing proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors.

  9. Recent Strategies in Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Flora

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease characterized by an elevation in pulmonary artery pressure that can lead to right ventricular failure and death. The pulmonary circulation has to accommodate the entire cardiac output in each cardiac cycle and evolution has adapted to this by making it a low-pressure high-flow system. However, pathology can affect both the arterial and venous components of this system. Pulmonary venous hypertension mainly refers to diseases that result in elevated venous pressure and occurs mainly from mitral valve and left-sided heart disease. Standard treatment options include oral anticoagulation, diuretics, oxygen supplementation, and for a small percentage of patients, calcium channel blockers. Newer treatments include prostacyclin analogues, endothelin receptor antago¬nists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. This article reviews the current treatments strategies for PAH and provides guidelines for its management. PMID:25946920

  10. Evidence-based Management Strategies for Treatment of Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Werdin, Frank; Tennenhaus, Mayer; Schaller, Hans-Eberhardt; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver

    2009-01-01

    The care and management of patients with chronic wounds and their far-reaching effects challenge both the patient and the practitioner. Further complicating this situation is the paucity of evidence-based treatment strategies for chronic wound care. After searching both MEDLINE and Cochrane databases, we reviewed currently available articles concerning chronic wound care. Utilizing this information, we have outlined a review of current, evidence-based concepts as they pertain to the treatment of chronic wounds, focusing on fundamental treatment principles for the management of venous, arterial, diabetic, and pressure ulcers. Individualized treatment options as well as general wound management principles applicable to all varieties of chronic wounds are described. Classification and treatment guidelines as well as the adoption of the TIME acronym facilitate an organized conceptional approach to wound care. In so doing, individual aspects of generalized wound care such as debridement, infection, and moisture control as well as attention to the qualities of the wound edge are comprehensively evaluated, communicated, and addressed. Effective adjuvant agents for the therapy of chronic wounds including nutritional and social support measures are listed, as is a brief review of strategies helpful for preventing recurrence. An appreciation of evidence-based treatment pathways and an understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic wounds are important elements in the management of patients with chronic wounds. To achieve effective and long-lasting results, a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, focused on the education and coordination of patient, family as well as medical and support staff can prove invaluable. PMID:19578487

  11. Advanced therapies for the treatment of hemophilia: future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Monogenic diseases are ideal candidates for treatment by the emerging advanced therapies, which are capable of correcting alterations in protein expression that result from genetic mutation. In hemophilia A and B such alterations affect the activity of coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively, and are responsible for the development of the disease. Advanced therapies may involve the replacement of a deficient gene by a healthy gene so that it generates a certain functional, structural or transport protein (gene therapy); the incorporation of a full array of healthy genes and proteins through perfusion or transplantation of healthy cells (cell therapy); or tissue transplantation and formation of healthy organs (tissue engineering). For their part, induced pluripotent stem cells have recently been shown to also play a significant role in the fields of cell therapy and tissue engineering. Hemophilia is optimally suited for advanced therapies owing to the fact that, as a monogenic condition, it does not require very high expression levels of a coagulation factor to reach moderate disease status. As a result, significant progress has been possible with respect to these kinds of strategies, especially in the fields of gene therapy (by using viral and non-viral vectors) and cell therapy (by means of several types of target cells). Thus, although still considered a rare disorder, hemophilia is now recognized as a condition amenable to gene therapy, which can be administered in the form of lentiviral and adeno-associated vectors applied to adult stem cells, autologous fibroblasts, platelets and hematopoietic stem cells; by means of non-viral vectors; or through the repair of mutations by chimeric oligonucleotides. In hemophilia, cell therapy approaches have been based mainly on transplantation of healthy cells (adult stem cells or induced pluripotent cell-derived progenitor cells) in order to restore alterations in coagulation factor expression. PMID:23237078

  12. [Adherence to psychopharmacological treatment: Psychotherapeutic strategies to enhance adherence].

    PubMed

    Lencer, R; Korn, D

    2015-05-01

    Effective psychopharmacological medication with good tolerability represents the cornerstone of treatment for severe mental illness; however, the 1-year adherence rates are only approximately 50%. The term adherence emphasizes the collaborative responsibility of the clinician and the patient for a positive treatment outcome. Reasons for non-adherence are manifold and include patient-specific factors, such as self-stigmatization, lack of social and familial support, cognitive impairment and substance use besides insufficient effectiveness and the occurrence of side effects of the psychotropic drugs. To enhance adherence, both clinician and patient have to fully understand all the reasons for and against adherence to medication before a collaborative decision is made on future long-term treatment. A positive attitude towards medication critically depends on whether patients feel that the medication supports the attainment of the individual goals. PMID:25903501

  13. Update on prolactinomas. Part 2: Treatment and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wong, Anni; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Couldwell, William T; Liu, James K

    2015-10-01

    The authors present an update on the various treatment modalities and discuss management strategies for prolactinomas. Prolactinomas are the most common type of functional pituitary tumor. Effective hyperprolactinemia treatment is of great importance, due to its potential deleterious effects including infertility, gonadal dysfunction and osteoporosis. Dopamine agonist therapy is the first line of treatment for prolactinomas because of its effectiveness in normalizing serum prolactin levels and shrinking tumor size. Though withdrawal of dopamine agonist treatment is safe and may be implemented following certain recommendations, recurrence of disease after cessation of the drug occurs in a substantial proportion of patients. Concerns regarding the safety of dopamine agonists have been raised, but its safety profile remains high, allowing its use during pregnancy. Surgery is typically indicated for patients who are resistant to medical therapy or intolerant of its adverse side effects, or are experiencing progressive tumor growth. Surgical resection can also be considered as a primary treatment for those with smaller focal tumors where a biochemical cure can be expected as an alternative to lifelong dopamine agonist treatment. Stereotactic radiosurgery also serves as an option for those refractory to medical and surgical therapy. PMID:26243714

  14. Has the DOTS Strategy Improved Case Finding or Treatment Success? An Empirical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Obermeyer, Ziad; Abbott-Klafter, Jesse; Murray, Christopher J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Nearly fifteen years after the start of WHO's DOTS strategy, tuberculosis remains a major global health problem. Given the lack of empirical evidence that DOTS reduces tuberculosis burden, considerable debate has arisen about its place in the future of global tuberculosis control efforts. An independent evaluation of DOTS, one of the most widely-implemented and longest-running interventions in global health, is a prerequisite for meaningful improvements to tuberculosis control efforts, including WHO's new Stop TB Strategy. We investigate the impact of the expansion of the DOTS strategy on tuberculosis case finding and treatment success, using only empirical data. Methods and Findings We study the effect of DOTS using time-series cross-sectional methods. We first estimate the impact of DOTS expansion on case detection, using reported case notification data and controlling for other determinants of change in notifications, including HIV prevalence, GDP, and country-specific effects. We then estimate the effect of DOTS expansion on treatment success. DOTS programme variables had no statistically significant impact on case detection in a wide range of models and specifications. DOTS population coverage had a significant effect on overall treatment success rates, such that countries with full DOTS coverage benefit from at least an 18% increase in treatment success (95% CI: 5–31%). Conclusions The DOTS technical package improved overall treatment success. By contrast, DOTS expansion had no effect on case detection. This finding is less optimistic than previous analyses. Better epidemiological and programme data would facilitate future monitoring and evaluation efforts. PMID:18320042

  15. [Pharmacological treatment strategy and mirror visual feedback treatment for neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Sumitani, Masahiko; Miyauchi, Satoru; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2012-11-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition, and pharmacotherapy is the most established treatment strategy. A variety of pharmacotherapies is used for neuropathic pain management: however, pharmacotherapies with evidence for analgesic potency are less common. Several pharmacotherapeutic treatment guidelines for neuropathic pain treatment recommend the first- to third-line drugs on the basis of evidence-based medicine; however, neuropathic pain is often resistant to pharmacotherapies. We have treated pharmacotherapy-resistant neuropathic pain with neurorehabilitation techniques such as mirror visual feedback (MVF) treatment. Further to our clinical experience using MVF, we discuss the cerebral mechanism associated with neuropathic pain in this study. PMID:23131739

  16. Dietary Strategies for the Treatment of Cadmium and Lead Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Qixiao; Narbad, Arjan; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are toxic heavy metals that cause adverse health effects in humans and animals. Chelation therapy, the conventional treatment for heavy metal toxicity, is reported to have a number of safety and efficacy issues. Recent studies have shown that dietary supplements play important roles in protecting against Cd and Pb toxicity. This paper reviews the evidence for protective effects of essential metals, vitamins, edible plants, phytochemicals, probiotics and other dietary supplements against Cd and Pb toxicity and describes the proposed possible mechanisms. Based on these findings, dietary strategies are recommended for people at risk of Cd and Pb exposure. The application of these strategies is advantageous for both the prevention and alleviation of Cd and Pb toxicity, as such supplements can be added easily and affordably to the daily diet and are expected to have very few side effects compared to the chelation therapy. PMID:25594439

  17. Combined bacterial and viral treatment: a novel anticancer strategy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An idea for a new combination therapy will be described herein. It is a proposition to combine viral and bacterial anticancer therapies and make them fight cancer in concert. We analyzed biological anticancer therapies and found overlapping advantages and disadvantages which led us to the conclusion that the combination therapy has the potential to create a new therapeutic quality. It is surprising how many weaknesses of viral anticancer therapy are the strengths of bacterial anticancer therapies and the other way round. We review the facts behind this concept and try to assess its value. We propose a few strategies how to combine these two therapies but as far as the review can go, final answers will have to come from the experiments. This review is the first attempt to describe a new strategy and understand the means for this idea but also to raise new questions and discuss new ways to look at anti-cancer treatment. PMID:26648783

  18. Dietary strategies for the treatment of cadmium and lead toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qixiao; Narbad, Arjan; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are toxic heavy metals that cause adverse health effects in humans and animals. Chelation therapy, the conventional treatment for heavy metal toxicity, is reported to have a number of safety and efficacy issues. Recent studies have shown that dietary supplements play important roles in protecting against Cd and Pb toxicity. This paper reviews the evidence for protective effects of essential metals, vitamins, edible plants, phytochemicals, probiotics and other dietary supplements against Cd and Pb toxicity and describes the proposed possible mechanisms. Based on these findings, dietary strategies are recommended for people at risk of Cd and Pb exposure. The application of these strategies is advantageous for both the prevention and alleviation of Cd and Pb toxicity, as such supplements can be added easily and affordably to the daily diet and are expected to have very few side effects compared to the chelation therapy. PMID:25594439

  19. Novel treatment strategies for brain tumors and metastases

    PubMed Central

    El-Habashy, Salma E.; Nazief, Alaa M.; Adkins, Chris E.; Wen, Ming Ming; El-Kamel, Amal H.; Hamdan, Ahmed M.; Hanafy, Amira S.; Terrell, Tori O.; Mohammad, Afroz S.; Lockman, Paul R.; Nounou, Mohamed Ismail

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes patent applications in the past 5 years for the management of brain tumors and metastases. Most of the recent patents discuss one of the following strategies: the development of new drug entities that specifically target the brain cells, the blood–brain barrier and the tumor cells, tailor-designing a novel carrier system that is able to perform multitasks and multifunction as a drug carrier, targeting vehicle and even as a diagnostic tool, direct conjugation of a US FDA approved drug with a targeting moiety, diagnostic moiety or PK modifying moiety, or the use of innovative nontraditional approaches such as genetic engineering, stem cells and vaccinations. Until now, there has been no optimal strategy to deliver therapeutic agents to the CNS for the treatment of brain tumors and metastases. Intensive research efforts are actively ongoing to take brain tumor targeting, and novel and targeted CNS delivery systems to potential clinical application. PMID:24998288

  20. Novel treatment strategies for brain tumors and metastases.

    PubMed

    El-Habashy, Salma E; Nazief, Alaa M; Adkins, Chris E; Wen, Ming Ming; El-Kamel, Amal H; Hamdan, Ahmed M; Hanafy, Amira S; Terrell, Tori O; Mohammad, Afroz S; Lockman, Paul R; Nounou, Mohamed Ismail

    2014-05-01

    This review summarizes patent applications in the past 5 years for the management of brain tumors and metastases. Most of the recent patents discuss one of the following strategies: the development of new drug entities that specifically target the brain cells, the blood-brain barrier and the tumor cells, tailor-designing a novel carrier system that is able to perform multitasks and multifunction as a drug carrier, targeting vehicle and even as a diagnostic tool, direct conjugation of a US FDA approved drug with a targeting moiety, diagnostic moiety or PK modifying moiety, or the use of innovative nontraditional approaches such as genetic engineering, stem cells and vaccinations. Until now, there has been no optimal strategy to deliver therapeutic agents to the CNS for the treatment of brain tumors and metastases. Intensive research efforts are actively ongoing to take brain tumor targeting, and novel and targeted CNS delivery systems to potential clinical application. PMID:24998288

  1. Creating the laboratory`s future; A strategy for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    ``Creating The Laboratory`s Future`` describes Livermore`s roles and responsibilities as a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory and sets the foundation for decisions about the Laboratory`s programs and operations. It summarizes Livermore`s near-term strategy, which builds on recent Lab achievements and world events affecting their future. It also discusses their programmatic and operational emphases and highlights program areas that the authors believe can grow through application of Lab science and technology. Creating the Laboratory`s Future reflects their very strong focus on national security, important changes in the character of their national security work, major efforts are under way to overhaul their administrative and operational systems, and the continuing challenge of achieving national consensus on the role of the government in energy, environment, and the biosciences.

  2. PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors in melanoma treatment: past success, present application and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jenny; Kefford, Richard; Carlino, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    Anti-programmed death (PD)-1 antibodies have now become the standard of care for advanced melanoma, with two drugs gaining US FDA approval in recent years: nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Both have demonstrated significant activity and durable response with a manageable toxicity profile. Despite initial success, ongoing challenges include patient selection and predictors of response, innate resistance and optimizing combination strategies. In this overview, we take a closer look at the history and development of therapeutic targets to the PD-1/PD-ligand (L)1 pathway, clinical evidence, availability of biomarkers and their limitations in clinical practice and future strategies to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27197541

  3. Looking into a Deaf Child's Future: A Brief Treatment Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Michael A.; Green, Christine L.

    1990-01-01

    A hearing mother who reported obsessional thoughts about her deaf child's future underwent brief psychotherapy. Clinical hypnosis modified the mother's negative images of her child's future, and meetings attended by the mother, a vocational counselor, and deaf adults affirmed the more positive images. Theoretical descriptions and personal…

  4. Therapeutic Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Spinal Cord Injury: A Promising Supplementary Treatment in Future.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Hao; An, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Bo; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by trauma. Pathophysiological events occurring after SCI include acute, subacute, and chronic phases, while complex mechanisms are comprised. As an abundant source of natural drugs, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) attracts much attention in SCI treatment recently. Hence, this review provides an overview of pathophysiology of SCI and TCM application in its therapy. Methods. Information was collected from articles published in peer-reviewed journals via electronic search (PubMed, SciFinder, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and CNKI), as well as from master's dissertations, doctoral dissertations, and Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Results. Both active ingredients and herbs could exert prevention and treatment against SCI, which is linked to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, or antiapoptosis effects. The detailed information of six active natural ingredients (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, ligustrazine, quercitrin, and puerarin) and five commonly used herbs (i.e., Danshen, Ginkgo, Ginseng, Notoginseng, and Astragali Radix) was elucidated and summarized. Conclusions. As an important supplementary treatment, TCM may provide benefits in repair of injured spinal cord. With a general consensus that future clinical approaches will be diversified and a combination of multiple strategies, TCM is likely to attract greater attention in SCI treatment. PMID:27118982

  5. Therapeutic Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Spinal Cord Injury: A Promising Supplementary Treatment in Future

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Hao; An, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Bo; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by trauma. Pathophysiological events occurring after SCI include acute, subacute, and chronic phases, while complex mechanisms are comprised. As an abundant source of natural drugs, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) attracts much attention in SCI treatment recently. Hence, this review provides an overview of pathophysiology of SCI and TCM application in its therapy. Methods. Information was collected from articles published in peer-reviewed journals via electronic search (PubMed, SciFinder, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and CNKI), as well as from master's dissertations, doctoral dissertations, and Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Results. Both active ingredients and herbs could exert prevention and treatment against SCI, which is linked to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, or antiapoptosis effects. The detailed information of six active natural ingredients (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, ligustrazine, quercitrin, and puerarin) and five commonly used herbs (i.e., Danshen, Ginkgo, Ginseng, Notoginseng, and Astragali Radix) was elucidated and summarized. Conclusions. As an important supplementary treatment, TCM may provide benefits in repair of injured spinal cord. With a general consensus that future clinical approaches will be diversified and a combination of multiple strategies, TCM is likely to attract greater attention in SCI treatment. PMID:27118982

  6. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Implications for Future Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Terri E.; Sawyer, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a critical problem with adherence rates ranging from 30–60%. Poor adherence to CPAP is widely recognized as a significant limiting factor in treating OSA, reducing the overall effectiveness of the treatment and leaving many OSA patients at heightened risk for comorbid conditions, impaired function and quality of life. The extant literature examining adherence to CPAP provides critical insight to measuring adherence outcomes, defining optimal adherence levels, and predicting CPAP adherence. This research has revealed salient factors that are associated with or predict CPAP adherence and may guide the development of interventions to promote CPAP adherence. Over the past 10 years, intervention studies to promote CPAP adherence have incorporated a multitude of strategies including education, support, cognitive behavioral approaches, and mixed strategies. This review of the current state of science of CPAP adherence will (1) synthesize the extant literature with regard to measuring, defining, and predicting CPAP adherence, (2) review published intervention studies aimed at promoting CPAP adherence, and (3) suggest directions for future empiric study of adherence to CPAP that will have implications for translational science. Our current understanding of CPAP adherence suggests that adherence is a multi-factorial, complex clinical problem that requires similarly designed approaches to effectively address poor CPAP adherence in the OSA population. PMID:20308750

  7. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Formulation--the Present and Future Development in Diabetes Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chooi Yeng

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder that has become the fourth leading cause of death in the developed countries. The disorder is characterized by pancreatic β-cells dysfunction, which causes hyperglycaemia leading to several other complications. Treatment by far, which focuses on insulin administration and glycaemic control, has not been satisfactory. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) is an endogenous peptide that stimulates post-prandial insulin secretion. Despite being able to mimic the effect of insulin, GLP1 has not been the target drug in diabetes treatment due to the peptide's metabolic instability. After a decade-long effort to improve the pharmacokinetics of GLP1, a number of GLP1 analogues are currently available on the market. The current Minireview does not discuss these drugs but presents strategies that were undertaken to address the weaknesses of the native GLP1, particularly drug delivery techniques used in developing GLP1 nanoparticles and modified GLP1 molecule. The article highlights how each of the selected preparations has improved the efficacy of GLP1, and more importantly, through an overview of these studies, it will provide an insight into strategies that may be adopted in the future in the development of a more effective oral GLP1 formulation. PMID:26551045

  8. [Child and adolescent obesity, psychosocial consequences and treatment strategies].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A S; Hilbert, A

    2013-04-01

    Being overweight and obese in childhood and adolescence is associated with various somatic and psychosocial sequelae. Psychosocial problems can negatively influence the future weight trajectory. Therefore, weight reduction or stabilization should be complemented by the treatment of significant psychosocial problems. This review provides an overview of the psychosocial problems associated with being overweight and obese in childhood and adolescence. Evidence on weight-related stigmatization and discrimination, eating disorder symptoms, general psychopathology, impaired quality of life, lowered self-esteem, social skill deficits, as well as academic problems is summarized. Furthermore, state-of-the-art diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the psychosocial problems are summarized. Future research should focus on the development of interventions targeting the destigmatization of obesity, as experiences of stigmatization and discrimination likely aggravate the psychosocial sequelae of overweight and obesity. PMID:23529599

  9. Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, J.; Hallett, K.; DeWolfe, J.; Venner, I.

    2012-01-01

    Water and wastewater systems are significant energy consumers with an estimated 3%-4% of total U.S. electricity consumption used for the movement and treatment of water and wastewater. Water-energy issues are of growing importance in the context of water shortages, higher energy and material costs, and a changing climate. In this economic environment, it is in the best interest for utilities to find efficiencies, both in water and energy use. Performing energy audits at water and wastewater treatment facilities is one way community energy managers can identify opportunities to save money, energy, and water. In this paper the importance of energy use in wastewater facilities is illustrated by a case study of a process energy audit performed for Crested Butte, Colorado's wastewater treatment plant. The energy audit identified opportunities for significant energy savings by looking at power intensive unit processes such as influent pumping, aeration, ultraviolet disinfection, and solids handling. This case study presents best practices that can be readily adopted by facility managers in their pursuit of energy and financial savings in water and wastewater treatment. This paper is intended to improve community energy managers understanding of the role that the water and wastewater sector plays in a community's total energy consumption. The energy efficiency strategies described provide information on energy savings opportunities, which can be used as a basis for discussing energy management goals with water and wastewater treatment facility managers.

  10. Chronic type B aortic dissection: indications and strategies for treatment.

    PubMed

    Rohlffs, F; Tsilimparis, N; Diener, H; Larena-Avellaneda, A; Von Kodolitsch, Y; Wipper, S; Debus, E S; Kölbel, T

    2015-04-01

    Chronic type B aortic dissection is a distinctive condition that needs individual treatment strategies and different considerations than in therapy of acute or subacute type B aortic dissection. The most common indication for treatment of this complex disease is aneurysmal dilatation of the dissected aortic segment. While open repair of the enlarged dissected aorta remains the best option for good-risk patients and patients with connective tissue disorders in high-volume centers with respective expertise, endovascular management of chronic type B aortic dissection with postdissection aneurysms has significantly gained ground in the past years. But the concept of TEVAR with implantation of a tubular stent-graft into the thoracic aorta to seal the proximal entry tear and reroute the blood flow into the true lumen alone, is not associated with satisfactory results. This is mainly due to the sparse remodeling capacity of the aortic tissue compared to earlier stages of the disease as the aortic wall and the dissection membrane are thickened and more rigid. On the other hand, it is restricted by the most limiting factor for endovascular success in chronic type B aortic dissection: persistent false lumen perfusion. This problem also affects patients with residual dissection after surgical repair of a DeBakey type I aortic dissection or dissection after ascending aortic repair for other pathologies. Hence, it is evident that strategies to achieve endovascular false lumen occlusion are of increasing importance and novel techniques have been introduced to solve the problem of persisting false lumen flow. Thus, the evolution of a large variety of techniques to address the false lumen perfusion issue indicates that complicated chronic type B dissection involves a high diversity in clinical presentation and morphology. A large armamentarium of catheter skills as well as critical individualized treatment strategies are required to address the heterogenous morphological disease