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Sample records for future wide-field optical

  1. Adaptive wide-field optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We describe a wide-field optical tomography technique, which allows the measurement-guided optimization of illumination patterns for enhanced reconstruction performances. The iterative optimization of the excitation pattern aims at reducing the dynamic range in photons transmitted through biological tissue. It increases the number of measurements collected with high photon counts resulting in a dataset with improved tomographic information. Herein, this imaging technique is applied to time-resolved fluorescence molecular tomography for preclinical studies. First, the merit of this approach is tested by in silico studies in a synthetic small animal model for typical illumination patterns. Second, the applicability of this approach in tomographic imaging is validated in vitro using a small animal phantom with two fluorescent capillaries occluded by a highly absorbing inclusion. The simulation study demonstrates an improvement of signal transmitted (∼2 orders of magnitude) through the central portion of the small animal model for all patterns considered. A corresponding improvement in the signal at the emission wavelength by 1.6 orders of magnitude demonstrates the applicability of this technique for fluorescence molecular tomography. The successful discrimination and localization (∼1  mm error) of the two objects with higher resolution using the optimized patterns compared with nonoptimized illumination establishes the improvement in reconstruction performance when using this technique. PMID:23475290

  2. Wide field strip-imaging optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Arthur H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A strip imaging wide angle optical system is provided. The optical system is provided with a 'virtual' material stop to avoid aberrational effects inherent in wide angle optical systems. The optical system includes a spherical mirror section for receiving light from a 180-degree strip or arc of a target image. Light received by the spherical mirror section is reflected to a frusto-conical mirror section for subsequent rereflection to a row of optical fibers. Each optical fiber transmits a portion of the received light to a detector. The optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance associated with optical fibers to substantially eliminate vignetting effects inherent in wide-angle systems. Further, the optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance of the optical fibers to substantially limit spherical aberration. The optical system is ideally suited for any application wherein a 180-degree strip image need be detected, and is particularly well adapted for use in hostile environments such as in planetary exploration.

  3. Wide-Field, Two-Stage Optical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhart, Paul K.; Deslis, Apostolis A.; Macenka, Steve A.; Breckinridge, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed telescope offers wide field of view, yet relatively inexpensive to manufacture. Design, in form of three Schmidt cameras, offers 10-degree strip field of view, single large-diameter collecting aperture, four spherical mirrors, and two diamond-turned aspheric mirrors in relatively compact configuration. Transference of large-diameter Schmidt corrector plate to smaller element makes this wide-field optical system suitable for application of two-stage optics theory. Concept enables cost-effective implementation of large-diameter optics by relaxing fabrication requirements.

  4. Optical Design of WFIRST-AFTA Wide-Field Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasquale, Bert; Content, Dave; Kruk, Jeffrey; Vaughn, David; Gong, Qian; Howard, Joseph; Jurling, Alden; Mentzell, Eric; Armani, Nerses; Kuan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The WFIRSTAFTA Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope TMA optical design provides 0.28-sq FOV at 0.11 pixel scale, operating between 0.6 2.4m, including a spectrograph mode (1.3-1.95m.) An IFU provides a discrete 3x3.15 field at 0.15 sampling.

  5. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.; Atkinson, D.; Bharmal, N. A.; Bitenc, U.; Brangier, M.; Buey, T.; Butterley, T.; Cano, D.; Chemla, F.; Clark, P.; Cohen, M.; Conan, J.-M.; de Cos, F. J.; Dickson, C.; Dipper, N. A.; Dunlop, C. N.; Feautrier, P.; Fusco, T.; Gach, J. L.; Gendron, E.; Geng, D.; Goodsell, S. J.; Gratadour, D.; Greenaway, A. H.; Guesalaga, A.; Guzman, C. D.; Henry, D.; Holck, D.; Hubert, Z.; Huet, J. M.; Kellerer, A.; Kulcsar, C.; Laporte, P.; Le Roux, B.; Looker, N.; Longmore, A. J.; Marteaud, M.; Martin, O.; Meimon, S.; Morel, C.; Morris, T. J.; Myers, R. M.; Osborn, J.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Raynaud, H.; Reeves, A. P.; Rousset, G.; Lasheras, F. Sanchez; Rodriguez, M. Sanchez; Santos, J. D.; Sevin, A.; Sivo, G.; Stadler, E.; Stobie, B.; Talbot, G.; Todd, S.; Vidal, F.; Younger, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory adaptive optics real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  6. 'Virtual triple Schmidt' - Wide field two-stage optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhart, Paul K.

    1989-01-01

    The design concept of an unobscured-wide-field two-stage optical system based on a virtual triple Schmidt (VTS) configuration is presented. It is pointed out that the single large aperture and field-partitioning capability of two-stage systems can lower material and fabrication costs, making the VTS optics suitable for ground-based and space telescopes. The VTS design combines a Schmidt-camera first stage and a second stage comprising two back-to-back Schmidt systems as a 1:1 relay. Aspheric Schmidt correction is achieved at the relayed pupil location for all three systems. The effects of the separation between the error-producing surface and the aperture stop are discussed; the performance of the wavefront-correction system is analyzed; and extensive diagrams, drawings, and graphs of projected performance data are provided.

  7. Data Reduction Algorithm for Optical Wide Field Patrol (OWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Park, Y.; Yim, H.; Jo, J.; Moon, H.; Bae, Y.; Lim, Y.; Choi, J.; Choi, Y.; Park, J.; Son, J.

    2014-09-01

    OWL (Optical Wide-field Patrol) has a detector system which has the chopper which consists of 4 blades in front of the CCD camera to acquire efficiently the position and time information of moving objects such as artificial satellites. Using this system, it is possible to get more position data by splitting the streaks of the moving object into many pieces with fast rotating blades during tracking. At the same time, the time data of the rotating chopper can be acquired by the time tagger connected to the photo diode. In order to derive the orbits of the targets, we need a sequential data reduction procedure including the calculation of WCS (World Coordinate System) solution to transform the positions into equatorial coordinate systems, and the combination of the time data from the time tagger and the position data. We present such a data reduction procedure and the preliminary results after applying this procedure to the observation images.

  8. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.; Atkinson, D.; Bharmal, N. A.; Bitenc, U.; Brangier, M.; Buey, T.; Butterley, T.; Cano, D.; Chemla, F.; Clark, P.; Cohen, M.; Conan, J.-M.; de Cos, F. J.; Dickson, C.; Dipper, N. A.; Dunlop, C. N.; Feautrier, P.; Fusco, T.; Gach, J. L.; Gendron, E.; Geng, D.; Goodsell, S. J.; Gratadour, D.; Greenaway, A. H.; Guesalaga, A.; Guzman, C. D.; Henry, D.; Holck, D.; Hubert, Z.; Huet, J. M.; Kellerer, A.; Kulcsar, C.; Laporte, P.; Le Roux, B.; Looker, N.; Longmore, A. J.; Marteaud, M.; Martin, O.; Meimon, S.; Morel, C.; Morris, T. J.; Myers, R. M.; Osborn, J.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Raynaud, H.; Reeves, A. P.; Rousset, G.; Sanchez Lasheras, F.; Sanchez Rodriguez, M.; Santos, J. D.; Sevin, A.; Sivo, G.; Stadler, E.; Stobie, B.; Talbot, G.; Todd, S.; Vidal, F.; Younger, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory AO real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  9. Stroboscopic wide-field optical coherence gated imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Na, Jihoon; Eom, Jonghyun; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2009-02-01

    We present an advanced three-dimensional tomographic imaging system using the optical coherence gating based on stroboscopic illumination. The proposed system is based on a wide-field optical coherence tomography (WF-OCT) that is capable of en-face tomographic imaging through whole-field illumination and parallel detection technique. The scheme enables achievement of a three-dimensional volumetric image in real time only with a single axial continuous scanning. The axial scanning of the OCT system generates interferometric signal with a beat (or Doppler) frequency. The time-varying interfergams are usually detected in series with a CCD camera for the WF-OCT case. However, because the camera response is much slower than the Doppler frequency, the interference signal is averaged out for most cases. To avoid the averaging out problem of the beat signal, the input light is optically switched on and off at the same rate as the Doppler frequency generated by the axial scan. When the constructive interference components in the signal are synchronized with the stroboscopic illumination of the light source, the envelope signal of the sample can be detected by the slow camera. Compensated adaptive optic system was combined with the OCT instrument to avoid decrease of the interference signal by nonlinearity of scan motion. With the implemented WF-OCM, a lithium battery volume image of 6×4.5×0.005 (X×Y×Z) mm3 was obtained in 82 ms with axial scanning speed of 0.63 mm/s and visualized in volume rendering.

  10. 3D defect detection using optical wide-field microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tympel, Volker; Schaaf, Marko; Srocka, Bernd

    2007-06-01

    We report a method to detect signed differences in two similar data sets representing 3-dimensional intensity profiles recorded by optical wide-field microscopes. The signed differences describe missing or unexpected intensity values, defined as defects. In technical applications like wafer and mask inspection, data sets often represent surfaces. The reported method is able to describe the size and position especially in relation to the neighboring surface and is called Three-Dimension-Aberration (TDA)-Technology. To increase the tool performance and to handle different sizes of defects a scaled bottom-up method is implemented and started with high reduced data sets for the search of large defects. Each analysis contains three steps. The first step is a correlation to calculate the displacement vector between the similar data sets. In the second step a new data set is created. The new data set consists of intensity differences. Extreme values in the data set represent the position of defects. By the use of linear and non-linear filters the stability of detection can be improved. If all differences are below a threshold the bottom-up method starts with the next larger scaled data set. In the other case it is assumed that the defect is detected and step three starts with the detection of the convex hull of the defect and the search of the neighboring surface. As a result the defect is described by a parameter set including the relative position. Because of the layered structure of the data set and the bottom-up technique the method is suitable for multi-core processor architectures.

  11. Wide-Field Optic for Autonomous Acquisition of Laser Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Norman A.; Charles, Jeffrey R.; Biswas, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    An innovation reported in Two-Camera Acquisition and Tracking of a Flying Target, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 8 (August 2008), p. 20, used a commercial fish-eye lens and an electronic imaging camera for initially locating objects with subsequent handover to an actuated narrow-field camera. But this operated against a dark-sky background. An improved solution involves an optical design based on custom optical components for the wide-field optical system that directly addresses the key limitations in acquiring a laser signal from a moving source such as an aircraft or a spacecraft. The first challenge was to increase the light collection entrance aperture diameter, which was approximately 1 mm in the first prototype. The new design presented here increases this entrance aperture diameter to 4.2 mm, which is equivalent to a more than 16 times larger collection area. One of the trades made in realizing this improvement was to restrict the field-of-view to +80 deg. elevation and 360 azimuth. This trade stems from practical considerations where laser beam propagation over the excessively high air mass, which is in the line of sight (LOS) at low elevation angles, results in vulnerability to severe atmospheric turbulence and attenuation. An additional benefit of the new design is that the large entrance aperture is maintained even at large off-axis angles when the optic is pointed at zenith. The second critical limitation for implementing spectral filtering in the design was tackled by collimating the light prior to focusing it onto the focal plane. This allows the placement of the narrow spectral filter in the collimated portion of the beam. For the narrow band spectral filter to function properly, it is necessary to adequately control the range of incident angles at which received light intercepts the filter. When this angle is restricted via collimation, narrower spectral filtering can be implemented. The collimated beam (and the filter) must be relatively large to reduce the incident angle down to only a few degrees. In the presented embodiment, the filter diameter is more than ten times larger than the entrance aperture. Specifically, the filter has a clear aperture of about 51 mm. The optical design is refractive, and is comprised of nine custom refractive elements and an interference filter. The restricted maximum angle through the narrow-band filter ensures the efficient use of a 2-nm noise equivalent bandwidth spectral width optical filter at low elevation angles (where the range is longest), at the expense of less efficiency for high elevations, which can be tolerated because the range at high elevation angles is shorter. The image circle is 12 mm in diameter, mapped to 80 x 360 of sky, centered on the zenith.

  12. Wide-Field Sky Monitoring - Optical and X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; BART Teams; Ondrejov Observatory Lobster Eye Team

    We report on selected projects in wide-field sky imaging. This includes the recent efforts to digitize the astronomical sky plate archives and to apply these data for various scientific projects. We also address and discuss the status of the development of related algorithms and software programs. These data may easily provide very long term monitoring over very extended time intervals (up to more than 100 years) with limiting magnitudes between 12 and 23. The further experiments include CCD sky monitors, OMC camera onboard the ESA Integral satellite, robotic telescopes, and innovative wide-field X-ray telescopes.

  13. Telescope with a wide field of view internal optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, III, John James (Inventor); Zheng, Yunhui (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A telescope with internal scanner utilizing either a single optical wedge scanner or a dual optical wedge scanner and a controller arranged to control a synchronous rotation of the first and/or second optical wedges, the wedges constructed and arranged to scan light redirected by topological surfaces and/or volumetric scatterers. The telescope with internal scanner further incorporates a first converging optical element that receives the redirected light and transmits the redirected light to the scanner, and a second converging optical element within the light path between the first optical element and the scanner arranged to reduce an area of impact on the scanner of the beam collected by the first optical element.

  14. Wide field/planetary camera optics study. [for the large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Design feasibility of the baseline optical design concept was established for the wide field/planetary camera (WF/PC) and will be used with the space telescope (ST) to obtain high angular resolution astronomical information over a wide field. The design concept employs internal optics to relay the ST image to a CCD detector system. Optical design performance predictions, sensitivity and tolerance analyses, manufacturability of the optical components, and acceptance testing of the two mirror Cassegrain relays are discussed.

  15. Wide-Field Spatial Mapping of In Vivo Tattoo Skin Optical Properties Using Modulated Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Frederick R.; Cuccia, David J.; Kelly, Kristen M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives Modulated imaging is a new modality capable of wide-field, spatially resolved measurement of in vivo optical properties. Based on spatial light modulation, the method is inexpensive, non-contact, and allows spatial mapping of tissue absorption and reduced scattering coefficients at any wavelength between 450 and 1,100 nm. Currently, clinicians rely on qualitative visual inspection to guide parameter selection for laser-based tattoo removal. MI provides quantitative measurements of multi-colored tattooed skin which may help guide treatment and objectively assess response. Study Design/Materials and Methods We have measured the spatially varying optical properties of multicolored tattooed skin over a 50 mm × 50 mm field of view at wavelengths ranging from 650 to 970 nm using MI. These measurements were compared to a similar field of view of non-tattooed skin from an adjacent area. Results We have determined the differentiated optical properties in vivo of multi-colored tattooed skin versus non-tattooed skin. Conclusions MI provides spatially resolved quantitative information with potential for quantitative assessment of response to treatment and may provide guidance for laser tattoo removal in the future. PMID:19588528

  16. Adaptive optics for fluorescence wide-field microscopy using spectrally independent guide star and markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, Pierre; Muro, Eleonora; Pons, Thomas; Loriette, Vincent; Fragola, Alexandra

    2011-07-01

    We describe the implementation and use of an adaptive optics loop in the imaging path of a commercial wide field microscope. We show that it is possible to maintain the optical performances of the original microscope when imaging through aberrant biological samples. The sources used for illuminating the adaptive optics loop are spectrally independent, in excitation and emission, from the sample, so they do not appear in the final image, and their use does not contribute to the sample bleaching. Results are compared with equivalent images obtained with an identical microscope devoid of adaptive optics system.

  17. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with integrated wide-field retinal imaging and tracking

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Daniel; Zhong, Zhangyi; Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Deng, Cong; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new, unified implementation of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) incorporating a wide-field line-scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) and a closed-loop optical retinal tracker. AOSLO raster scans are deflected by the integrated tracking mirrors so that direct AOSLO stabilization is automatic during tracking. The wide-field imager and large-spherical-mirror optical interface design, as well as a large-stroke deformable mirror (DM), enable the AOSLO image field to be corrected at any retinal coordinates of interest in a field of >25 deg. AO performance was assessed by imaging individuals with a range of refractive errors. In most subjects, image contrast was measurable at spatial frequencies close to the diffraction limit. Closed-loop optical (hardware) tracking performance was assessed by comparing sequential image series with and without stabilization. Though usually better than 10 μm rms, or 0.03 deg, tracking does not yet stabilize to single cone precision but significantly improves average image quality and increases the number of frames that can be successfully aligned by software-based post-processing methods. The new optical interface allows the high-resolution imaging field to be placed anywhere within the wide field without requiring the subject to re-fixate, enabling easier retinal navigation and faster, more efficient AOSLO montage capture and stitching. PMID:21045887

  18. Optical system of large relative aperture and wide field using aspheric corrector for detecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Ming; Wang, Jianli; Zhang, Jingxu

    2009-05-01

    The magnitude requirement of space target detecting determines that the image of detecting telescope should have several performances: small spots, small 80% encircled energy diameter and good MTF(Modulation transfer function). So the aperture and field of view of optical system have some demands accordingly. The larger aperture, the more energy that telescope collects and higher magnitude the telescope detects; the wider field of view, the more extensive range which the telescope searches. Now most of ground telescopes whose apertures are from 500mm to 1000mm is on-axis optical system, so wide field of view becomes the most importance problem. To obtain large relative aperture and wide field of view, the paper introduces a catadioptric telescope with small aperture aspheric refractive corrector, whose conic surface will be used to remove the aberrations due to large relative aperture and wide field of view. As to the optical system, there is only one aspheric refractive corrector, and it is relatively easy for manufacturing because of its concave figure and normal material. The paper gives the example, and optimizes this optical system with ZEMAX program. And then the paper provides a specific analysis program for testing the aspheric refractive corrector. The aperture of this optical system is 750mm, and its relative aperture is 0.82, and the field of view is 3.6° diameter(diagonal). Its structure is simple and the image quality is also very good.

  19. Scalable wide-field optical coherence tomography-based angiography for in vivo imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingjiang; Wei, Wei; Song, Shaozhen; Qi, Xiaoli; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based angiography have demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications in the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of diseases with vascular involvement. While promising, its imaging field of view (FOV) is however still limited (typically less than 9 mm2), which somehow slows down its clinical acceptance. In this paper, we report a high-speed spectral-domain OCT operating at 1310 nm to enable wide FOV up to 750 mm2. Using optical microangiography (OMAG) algorithm, we are able to map vascular networks within living biological tissues. Thanks to 2,048 pixel-array line scan InGaAs camera operating at 147 kHz scan rate, the system delivers a ranging depth of ~7.5 mm and provides wide-field OCT-based angiography at a single data acquisition. We implement two imaging modes (i.e., wide-field mode and high-resolution mode) in the OCT system, which gives highly scalable FOV with flexible lateral resolution. We demonstrate scalable wide-field vascular imaging for multiple finger nail beds in human and whole brain in mice with skull left intact at a single 3D scan, promising new opportunities for wide-field OCT-based angiography for many clinical applications. PMID:27231630

  20. Concerning the Development of the Wide-Field Optics for WFXT Including Methods of Optimizing X-Ray Optical Prescriptions for Wide-Field Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.

    2010-01-01

    We present a progress report on the various endeavors we are undertaking at MSFC in support of the Wide Field X-Ray Telescope development. In particular we discuss assembly and alignment techniques, in-situ polishing corrections, and the results of our efforts to optimize mirror prescriptions including polynomial coefficients, relative shell displacements, detector placements and tilts. This optimization does not require a blind search through the multi-dimensional parameter space. Under the assumption that the parameters are small enough so that second order expansions are valid, we show that the performance at the detector can be expressed as a quadratic function with numerical coefficients derived from a ray trace through the underlying Wolter I optic. The optimal values for the parameters are found by solving the linear system of equations creating by setting derivatives of this function with respect to each parameter to zero.

  1. Design of a wide-field imaging optical system with super-resolution reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Xu, Jie; Wang, Jiaoyang; Chen, Xiaodong; Gong, Rui; Bi, Xiangli

    2015-05-01

    The need for a portable image acquiring system has become as strong as the extension of digital imaging technology, for this, a new mono-centric wide-field optical system is proposed. Recently, some high-resolution and wide-field imaging systems have been raised already, with which fairly clear and wide field of view (FOV) images could be easily obtained, however, their sizes are comparatively too large to be conveniently carried . With ZEMAX, a new optical design is emulated by scaling the structure of current wide-field optical systems and introducing the proposed lens-let arrays, the size of the whole system is comparatively smaller with the structure consisting of a two-glass mono-centric lens, lens-let array (the lenses in the array can be different), and a specific detector. Lens-let array is used to make the image plane from curve to almost flat. This hardware is small enough to apply to helmets and computers and the FOV of which is wide. Verified by a series of merit function, this optical design is found to have an acceptable imaging resolution and the computational imaging method is applied to this system to acquire a higher imaging resolution. From each lens-let a series of low resolution images are obtained and in this system a high-resolution image can be retrieved from multiple low-resolution images with super-resolution reconstruction method. Compared from the size and the imaging resolution, this new optical design is much smaller and has a higher imaging resolution.

  2. Application of a wide-field phantom eye for optical coherence tomography and reflectance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Anthony; Muyo, Gonzalo; van Hemert, Jano; Gorman, Alistair; Harvey, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance imaging are used in clinical practice to measure the thickness and transverse dimensions of retinal features. The recent trend towards increasing the field of view (FOV) of these devices has led to an increasing significance of the optical aberrations of both the human eye and the device. We report the design, manufacture and application of the first phantom eye that reproduces the off-axis optical characteristics of the human eye, and allows the performance assessment of wide-field ophthalmic devices. We base our design and manufacture on the wide-field schematic eye, [Navarro, R. J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, 1985, 2.] as an accurate proxy to the human eye and enable assessment of ophthalmic imaging performance for a ±70∘ external FOV. We used multi-material 3D-printed retinal targets to assess imaging performance of the following ophthalmic instruments: the Optos 200Tx, Heidelberg Spectralis, Zeiss FF4 fundus camera and Optos OCT SLO and use the phantom to provide an insight into some of the challenges of wide-field OCT. PMID:26740737

  3. Wide-field optical coherence tomography based microangiography for retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinqin; Lee, Cecilia S.; Chao, Jennifer; Chen, Chieh-Li; Zhang, Thomas; Sharma, Utkarsh; Zhang, Anqi; Liu, Jin; Rezaei, Kasra; Pepple, Kathryn L.; Munsen, Richard; Kinyoun, James; Johnstone, Murray; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) allows for the evaluation of functional retinal vascular networks without a need for contrast dyes. For sophisticated monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, OCTA capable of providing wide-field and high definition images of retinal vasculature in a single image is desirable. We report OCTA with motion tracking through an auxiliary real-time line scan ophthalmoscope that is clinically feasible to image functional retinal vasculature in patients, with a coverage of more than 60 degrees of retina while still maintaining high definition and resolution. We demonstrate six illustrative cases with unprecedented details of vascular involvement in retinal diseases. In each case, OCTA yields images of the normal and diseased microvasculature at all levels of the retina, with higher resolution than observed with fluorescein angiography. Wide-field OCTA technology will be an important next step in augmenting the utility of OCT technology in clinical practice. PMID:26912261

  4. Wide-field optical coherence tomography based microangiography for retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinqin; Lee, Cecilia S.; Chao, Jennifer; Chen, Chieh-Li; Zhang, Thomas; Sharma, Utkarsh; Zhang, Anqi; Liu, Jin; Rezaei, Kasra; Pepple, Kathryn L.; Munsen, Richard; Kinyoun, James; Johnstone, Murray; van Gelder, Russell N.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) allows for the evaluation of functional retinal vascular networks without a need for contrast dyes. For sophisticated monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, OCTA capable of providing wide-field and high definition images of retinal vasculature in a single image is desirable. We report OCTA with motion tracking through an auxiliary real-time line scan ophthalmoscope that is clinically feasible to image functional retinal vasculature in patients, with a coverage of more than 60 degrees of retina while still maintaining high definition and resolution. We demonstrate six illustrative cases with unprecedented details of vascular involvement in retinal diseases. In each case, OCTA yields images of the normal and diseased microvasculature at all levels of the retina, with higher resolution than observed with fluorescein angiography. Wide-field OCTA technology will be an important next step in augmenting the utility of OCT technology in clinical practice.

  5. Wide-field optical coherence tomography based microangiography for retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinqin; Lee, Cecilia S; Chao, Jennifer; Chen, Chieh-Li; Zhang, Thomas; Sharma, Utkarsh; Zhang, Anqi; Liu, Jin; Rezaei, Kasra; Pepple, Kathryn L; Munsen, Richard; Kinyoun, James; Johnstone, Murray; Van Gelder, Russell N; Wang, Ruikang K

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) allows for the evaluation of functional retinal vascular networks without a need for contrast dyes. For sophisticated monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, OCTA capable of providing wide-field and high definition images of retinal vasculature in a single image is desirable. We report OCTA with motion tracking through an auxiliary real-time line scan ophthalmoscope that is clinically feasible to image functional retinal vasculature in patients, with a coverage of more than 60 degrees of retina while still maintaining high definition and resolution. We demonstrate six illustrative cases with unprecedented details of vascular involvement in retinal diseases. In each case, OCTA yields images of the normal and diseased microvasculature at all levels of the retina, with higher resolution than observed with fluorescein angiography. Wide-field OCTA technology will be an important next step in augmenting the utility of OCT technology in clinical practice. PMID:26912261

  6. Developments of wide field submillimeter optics and lens antenna-coupled MKID cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Y.; Nitta, T.; Karatsu, K.; Sekine, M.; Sekiguchi, S.; Okada, T.; Shu, S.; Noguchi, T.; Naruse, M.; Mitsui, K.; Okada, N.; Tsuzuki, T.; Dominjon, A.; Matsuo, H.

    2014-07-01

    Wide field cryogenic optics and millimeter-wave Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector (MKID) cameras with Si lens array have been developed. MKID is a Cooper-pair breaking photon detector and consists of supercon- ducting resonators which enable microwave (~GHz) frequency multiplexing. Antenna-coupled Aluminum CPW resonators are put in a line on a Si substrate to be read by a pair of coaxial cables. A 220 GHz - 600 pixels MKID camera with anti-reflection (AR) coated Si lens has been demonstrated in an 0.1 K cryostat. A compact cryogenic system with high refractive index materials has been developed for the MKID camera.

  7. Catadioptric null test of ultra-deep concave aspheric lens in wide-field optical system.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xing; Jin, Guang

    2013-07-01

    To test the ultra-deep conic surface in wide-field optical systems, a catadioptric null test method is researched in this paper. Equations of infinite conjugate null test system are established and solved using optical path length. The numeric results of a self-aligning mirror's shapes are fitted by coefficients and validation is done in optical design software. The rms wavefront error is 0.0019λ (λ=632.8 nm) in the example fitted by five coefficients. Furthermore, by adjusting spherical aberration distributions, an all-spherical finite conjugate null test system is designed, whose rms wavefront error is 0.0309λ. The test methods in this paper have been proven to be adaptive to many other similar ultra-deep surfaces, even with higher orders. PMID:23842273

  8. Optimal grazing incidence optics and its application to wide-field X-ray imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Christopher J.; Burg, Richard; Giacconi, Riccardo

    1992-01-01

    A class of high-resolution, efficient, and wide-field grazing incidence optics is discussed. Optical designs for searching efficiently for distant X-ray clusters are developed. It is shown that a rather general procedure exists for the design of an optical mission if well-defined scientific goals can be provided. Clusters of galaxies with an angular diameter of about 5 arcsec over a field of about 1 deg are resolved so that a comprehensive deep search is possible with a payload of 1/10 the linear dimensions of AXAF. By dropping the requirement for perfect on-axis imagery, searching within a suitably general class of telescope design, and optimizing a quantity directly related to the scientific requirement, it is shown that satisfactory designs do exist. The resulting telescope is shown to be no more difficult to fabricate than existing mirrors, and it can be nested.

  9. High-resolution wide-field imaging of retinal and choroidal blood perfusion with optical microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lin; Subhush, Hrebesh M.; Wilson, David J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2010-03-01

    We present high-resolution wide-field imaging of retinal and choroidal blood perfusion with optical microangiography (OMAG) technology. Based on spatial frequency analysis, OMAG is capable of visualizing the vascular perfusion map down to capillary-level resolution. An OMAG system operating at 840 nm is used with an A-scan rate of 27,000 Hz, axial resolution of 8 μm, and sensitivity of 98 dB. To achieve wide-field imaging, we capture 16 optical coherence tomography (OCT) 3-D datasets in a sequential order, which together provide an area of ~7.4×7.4 mm2 at the posterior segment of the human eye. For each of these datasets, the bulk tissue motion artifacts are eliminated by applying a phase compensation method based on histogram estimation of bulk motion phases, while the displacements occurring between adjacent B-frames are compensated for by 2-D cross correlation between two adjacent OMAG flow images. The depth-resolved capability of OMAG imaging also provides volumetric information on the ocular circulations. Finally, we compare the clinical fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography imaging results with the OMAG results of blood perfusion map within the retina and choroid, and show excellent agreement between these modalities.

  10. Wide-field optical coherence tomography angiography enabled by two repeated measurements of B-scans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruikang K; Zhang, Anqi; Choi, Woo June; Zhang, Qinqin; Chen, Chieh-Li; Miller, Andrew; Gregori, Giovanni; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2016-05-15

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) has increasingly become clinically important, particularly in ophthalmology. However, the field of view (FOV) for current OCTA imaging is severely limited due to A-scan rates that can be afforded by current clinical systems and, more importantly, the requirement of a repeated scanning protocol. This Letter evaluates the possibility of using only two repeated B-scans for OCTA for the purpose of an increased FOV. The effect of repeated numbers on the OCTA result is discussed through experiments on an animal model in vivo and evaluated using quantitative metrics for image quality. Demonstrated through in vivo imaging of a pathological human eye, we show that optical microangiography-based OCTA with two repeated B-scans can provide wide-field angiography up to 12×12  mm with clinically acceptable image quality. PMID:27176995

  11. Wide-field two-dimensional multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic computed microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Li, Guo; Wang, Lidai; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Maslov, Konstantin; Engelbach, John A.; Garbow, Joel R.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is an emerging technique that directly images optical absorption in tissue at high spatial resolution. To date, the majority of OR-PAM systems are based on single focused optical excitation and ultrasonic detection, limiting the wide-field imaging speed. While one-dimensional multifocal OR-PAM (1D-MFOR-PAM) has been developed, the potential of microlens and transducer arrays has not been fully realized. Here, we present the development of two-dimensional multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic computed microscopy (2D-MFOR-PACM), using a 2D microlens array and a full-ring ultrasonic transducer array. The 10 × 10 mm2 microlens array generates 1800 optical foci within the focal plane of the 512-element transducer array, and raster scanning the microlens array yields optical-resolution photoacoustic images. The system has improved the in-plane resolution of a full-ring transducer array from ≥100 µm to 29 µm and achieved an imaging time of 36 seconds over a 10 × 10 mm2 field of view. In comparison, the 1D-MFOR-PAM would take more than 4 minutes to image over the same field of view. The imaging capability of the system was demonstrated on phantoms and animals both ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:24322226

  12. Proto-Type Development of Optical Wide-field Patrol Network and Test Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Choi, Y.; Jo, J.; Moon, H.; Yim, H.; Park, Y.; Hae, Y.; Park, S.; Choi, J.; Son, J.

    2014-09-01

    We present a prototype system developed for optical satellite tracking and its early test observation results. The main objective of the OWL (Optical Wide-field patroL) network is to get orbital information for Korean domestic satellites using optical means only and to maintain their orbital elements. The network is composed of 5 small wide-field telescopes deployed over the world. Each observing station is operated in fully robotic manner from receiving observation schedule to reporting the result, and controlled by the headquarter located in Daejeon, Korea, where orbit calculation and observation strategy will be determined. We developed a compact telescope system for robotic observation and easy maintenance. The telescope is 0.5m of aperture diameter with Rechey-Cretian configuration and its field of view is 1.1 deg. It is equipped with 4K CCD with 9um pixel size, and its pixel scale is 1.2 arcsec/pixel. A chopper wheel with variable speed is adopted to get more points in a single shot. The CCD camera and all the rotating parts (chopper wheel, de-rotator, and filter wheel) are integrated into one compact component called a wheel station. Each observing station is equipped with a fully automatic dome and heavy duty environment monitoring system. We could get an image every 20 seconds and up to ~100 trail points in a single exposure. Each point is time-tagged by ~1/1000 second precision. For one of best cases, we could estimate satellite position with RMS ~ 0.5km accuracy in the along-track with only 4 exposures (~100 points). The first system was installed at the Mongolian site after completing verification test at the testbed site in Daejeon, Korea. The second and third system will be installed in the end of this year.

  13. Wide-field optical coherence microscopy of the mouse brain slice.

    PubMed

    Min, Eunjung; Lee, Junwon; Vavilin, Andrey; Jung, Sunwoo; Shin, Sungwon; Kim, Jeehyun; Jung, Woonggyu

    2015-10-01

    The imaging capability of optical coherence microscopy (OCM) has great potential to be used in neuroscience research because it is able to visualize anatomic features of brain tissue without labeling or external contrast agents. However, the field of view of OCM is still narrow, which dilutes the strength of OCM and limits its application. In this study, we present fully automated wide-field OCM for mosaic imaging of sliced mouse brains. A total of 308 segmented OCM images were acquired, stitched, and reconstructed as an en-face brain image after intensive imaging processing. The overall imaging area was 11.2×7.0  mm (horizontal×vertical), and the corresponding pixel resolution was 1.2×1.2  μm. OCM images were compared to traditional histology stained with Nissl and Luxol fast blue (LFB). In particular, the orientation of the fibers was analyzed and quantified in wide-field OCM. PMID:26421546

  14. Wide-field and high-resolution optical imaging for early detection of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Mark C.; Schwarz, Richard A.; Rosbach, Kelsey; Roblyer, Darren; Muldoon, Tim; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-02-01

    Current procedures for oral cancer screening typically involve visual inspection of the entire tissue surface at risk under white light illumination. However, pre-cancerous lesions can be difficult to distinguish from many benign conditions when viewed under these conditions. We have developed wide-field (macroscopic) imaging system which additionally images in cross-polarized white light, narrowband reflectance, and fluorescence imaging modes to reduce specular glare, enhance vascular contrast, and detect disease-related alterations in tissue autofluorescence. We have also developed a portable system to enable high-resolution (microscopic) evaluation of cellular features within the oral mucosa in situ. This system is a wide-field epi-fluorescence microscope coupled to a 1 mm diameter, flexible fiber-optic imaging bundle. Proflavine solution was used to specifically label cell nuclei, enabling the characteristic differences in N/C ratio and nuclear distribution between normal, dysplastic, and cancerous oral mucosa to be quantified. This paper discusses the technical design and performance characteristics of these complementary imaging systems. We will also present data from ongoing clinical studies aimed at evaluating diagnostic performance of these systems for detection of oral neoplasia.

  15. Computational Optical Imaging Systems for Spectroscopy and Wide Field-of-View Gigapixel Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittle, David Scott

    This dissertation explores computational optical imaging methods to circumvent the physical limitations of classical sensing. An ideal imaging system would maximize resolution in time, spectral bandwidth, three-dimensional object space, and polarization. Practically, increasing any one parameter will correspondingly decrease the others. Spectrometers strive to measure the power spectral density of the object scene. Traditional pushbroom spectral imagers acquire high resolution spectral and spatial resolution at the expense of acquisition time. Multiplexed spectral imagers acquire spectral and spatial information at each instant of time. Using a coded aperture and dispersive element, the coded aperture snapshot spectral imagers (CASSI) here described leverage correlations between voxels in the spatial-spectral data cube to compressively sample the power spectral density with minimal loss in spatial-spectral resolution while maintaining high temporal resolution. Photography is limited by similar physical constraints. Low f/# systems are required for high spatial resolution to circumvent diffraction limits and allow for more photon transfer to the film plain, but require larger optical volumes and more optical elements. Wide field systems similarly suffer from increasing complexity and optical volume. Incorporating a multi-scale optical system, the f/#, resolving power, optical volume and wide field of view become much less coupled. This system uses a single objective lens that images onto a curved spherical focal plane which is relayed by small micro-optics to discrete focal planes. Using this design methodology allows for gigapixel designs at low f/# that are only a few pounds and smaller than a one-foot hemisphere. Computational imaging systems add the necessary step of forward modeling and calibration. Since the mapping from object space to image space is no longer directly readable, post-processing is required to display the required data. The CASSI system uses an undersampled measurement matrix that requires inversion while the multi-scale camera requires image stitching and compositing methods for billions of pixels in the image. Calibration methods and a testbed are demonstrated that were developed specifically for these computational imaging systems.

  16. Achieving collimated illumination for wide-field depth-resolved optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, John; Glose, Martin; Tacastacas, Stephen Neil V.; Tian, Peifang

    2011-04-01

    Camera based wide field optical imaging allows for in vivo functional imaging of the brain. The benefits of this method include a larger sampling area, faster data acquisition and higher spatial resolution; however it is unable to resolve depth information. This issue may be resolved by employing multiple wavelengths in the imaging system. As a demonstration of principle, we are building an imaging system with two different wavelengths at 455 nm and 585 nm, respectively by employing light emitting diodes (LEDs). The beam of an LED diverges quickly, therefore the objective of my research was to attach a collimating lens to modify the beam and minimize the divergence. In order to achieve this, we investigated different types of collimating lens and found the optimal one that can collimate the beam. We will present radiation patterns of beams with and without collimating lens.

  17. Methods of Optimizing X-Ray Optical Prescriptions for Wide-Field Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    We are working on the development of a method for optimizing wide-field x-ray telescope mirror prescriptions, including polynomial coefficients, mirror shell relative displacements, and (assuming 4 focal plane detectors) detector placement and tilt that does not require a search through the multi-dimensional parameter space. Under the assumption that the parameters are small enough that second order expansions are valid, we show that the performance at the detector surface can be expressed as a quadratic function of the parameters with numerical coefficients derived from a ray trace through the underlying Wolter I optic. The best values for the parameters are found by solving the linear system of equations creating by setting derivatives of this function with respect to each parameter to zero. We describe the present status of this development effort.

  18. A small animal time-resolved optical tomography platform using wide-field excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vivek

    Small animal imaging plays a critical role in present day biomedical research by filling an important gap in the translation of research from the bench to the bedside. Optical techniques constitute an emerging imaging modality which have tremendous potential in preclinical applications. Optical imaging methods are capable of non-invasive assessment of the functional and molecular characteristics of biological tissue. The three-dimensional optical imaging technique, referred to as diffuse optical tomography, provides an approach for the whole-body imaging of small animal models and can provide volumetric maps of tissue functional parameters (e.g. blood volume, oxygen saturation etc.) and/or provide 3D localization and quantification of fluorescence-based molecular markers in vivo. However, the complex mathematical reconstruction problem associated with optical tomography and the cumbersome instrumental designs limits its adoption as a high-throughput quantitative whole-body imaging modality in current biomedical research. The development of new optical imaging paradigms is thus necessary for a wide-acceptance of this new technology. In this thesis, the design, development, characterization and optimization of a small animal optical tomography system is discussed. Specifically, the platform combines a highly sensitive time-resolved imaging paradigm with multi-spectral excitation capability and CCD-based detection to provide a system capable of generating spatially, spectrally and temporally dense measurement datasets. The acquisition of such data sets however can take long and translate to often unrealistic acquisition times when using the classical point source based excitation scheme. The novel approach in the design of this platform is the adoption of a wide-field excitation scheme which employs extended excitation sources and in the process allows an estimated ten-fold reduction in the acquisition time. The work described herein details the design of the imaging platform employing DLP-based excitation and time-gated intensified CCD detection and the optimal system operation parameters are determined. The feasibility this imaging approach and accuracy of the system in reconstructing functional parameters and fluorescence markers based on lifetime contrast is established through phantom studies. As a part of the system characterization, the effect of noise in time-resolved optical tomography is investigated and propagation of system noise in optical reconstructions is established. Furthermore, data processing and measurement calibration techniques aimed at reducing the effect of noise in reconstructions are defined. The optimization of excitation pattern selection is established through a novel measurement-guided iterative pattern correction scheme. This technique referred to as Adaptive Full-Field Optical Tomography was shown to improve reconstruction performances in murine models by reducing the dynamic range in photon flux measurements on the surface. Lastly, the application of the unique attributes of this platform to a biologically relevant imaging application, referred to as Forster Resonance Energy Transfer is described. The tomographic imaging of FRET interaction in vivo on a whole-body scale is achieved using the wide-field imaging approach based on lifetime contrast. This technique represents the first demonstration of tomographic FRET imaging in small animals and has significant potential in the development of optical imaging techniques in varied applications ranging from drug discovery to in vivo study of protein-protein interaction.

  19. Wide-field spectral domain-optical coherence tomography in central serous chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Carrai, Paola; Pichi, Francesco; Bonsignore, Francesco; Ciardella, Antonio P; Nucci, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    The aim the study was to describe wide-field spectral-domain optical coherence tomography morphologic relationships of the vitreous, retina, and choroid in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) eyes. Standardized horizontal, vertical, and two oblique (supertemporal to inferonasal and supranasal to inferotemporal) SD-OCT sections were collected for 40 patient with CSCR. For extramacular imaging, images were obtained from eight locations: (1) nasal to the optic disk, (2) extreme nasal periphery, (3) superior to the superotemporal vascular arcade, (4) extreme superior periphery, (5) inferior to the inferotemporal vascular arcade, (6) extreme inferior periphery, (7) temporal to the macula, and (8) extreme temporal periphery. Wide-angle montage images of OCT from equator to equator were composed with a montaging software. Average subfoveal choroidal thickness was 478 ± 114 µm (range 232-695 µm) at the macular level, 367 ± 94 µm in the superior periphery, 257 ± 103 µm in the inferior periphery, 431 ± 121 and 280 ± 88 µm in the nasal and in the temporal periphery, respectively. Wide-field EDI-OCT revealed a relative thinning of the inner choroidal layer in the periphery, including the small and medium large vessels, which ranged from 86 µm nasally to 120.1 µm superiorly, with a mean of 98.8 ± 13.6 µm. Beneath the thinned inner choroidal layer, hyporeflective lumina, corresponding to the outer choroidal layer, were identified in the periphery of all eyes. The outer choroidal layer thickness ranged from 175.5 µm temporally to 235.5 µm superiorly, with a mean of 217.8 ± 41.4 µm. The novel approach of montaging SD-OCT images to examine relationships between the choroid, retina, and associated structures adjacent to and outside of the macula may have a number of relevant applications in the study of pathologic features of central serous chorioretinopathy. PMID:25552349

  20. Development of a Data Reduction algorithm for Optical Wide Field Patrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun-youp; Keum, Kang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Whan; Jin, Ho; Park, Yung-Sik; Hong-Suh; Jo, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Bae, Young-Ho; Choi, Jin; Choi, Young-Jun; Park, Jang-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2013-09-01

    The detector subsystem of the Optical Wide-field Patrol (OWL) network efficiently acquires the position and time information of moving objects such as artificial satellites through its chopper system, which consists of 4 blades in front of the CCD camera. Using this system, it is possible to get more position data with the same exposure time by changing the streaks of the moving objects into many pieces with the fast rotating blades during sidereal tracking. At the same time, the time data from the rotating chopper can be acquired by the time tagger connected to the photo diode. To analyze the orbits of the targets detected in the image data of such a system, a sequential procedure of determining the positions of separated streak lines was developed that involved calculating the World Coordinate System (WCS) solution to transform the positions into equatorial coordinate systems, and finally combining the time log records from the time tagger with the transformed position data. We introduce this procedure and the preliminary results of the application of this procedure to the test observation images.

  1. Picosecond wide-field magneto-optical imaging of magnetization dynamics of amorphous film elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozooni, Babak; von Hofe, Thomas; McCord, Jeffrey

    2014-08-01

    Time-resolved wide-field magneto-optical microscopy with picosecond time resolution and with phase-locked harmonic excitation is used to image the fundamental dynamic modes of magnetic domain and domain-wall states in soft-magnetic thick film elements. By analyzing mirrored domain states, the pure in-plane and out-of-plane dynamic magnetic response under a continuous microwave excitation is extracted simultaneously. Domain-wall oscillations and local domain response, including transversely aligned and closure domain states, are visualized below, at, and above the resonance frequency of the magnetic elements. Regions of different high-frequency permeability are distinguished from the laterally resolved measurements. Despite nearly constant precessional frequency, a strong mode amplitude variation is found with varying the magnetic bias field, which is correlated to the exhibited change of the individual domain structure. Inhomogeneous out-of-phase precessional modes within the individual domains occur close to a state of domain instability. The imaging results are compared to existing models of flux response. Magnetic domain knowledge and precise dynamic imaging is needed for the understanding of the dynamic magnetization behavior of even basic domain structures beyond the magnetic material's elementary properties.

  2. Dual-conjugate adaptive optics for wide-field high-resolution retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Thaung, Jörgen; Knutsson, Per; Popovic, Zoran; Owner-Petersen, Mette

    2009-03-16

    We present analysis and preliminary laboratory testing of a real-time dual-conjugate adaptive optics (DCAO) instrument for ophthalmology that will enable wide-field high resolution imaging of the retina in vivo. The setup comprises five retinal guide stars (GS) and two deformable mirrors (DM), one conjugate to the pupil and one conjugate to a plane close to the retina. The DCAO instrument has a closed-loop wavefront sensing wavelength of 834 nm and an imaging wavelength of 575 nm. It incorporates an array of collimator lenses to spatially filter the light from all guide stars using one adjustable iris, and images the Hartmann patterns of multiple reference sources on a single detector. Zemax simulations were performed at 834 nm and 575 nm with the Navarro 99 and the Liou- Brennan eye models. Two correction alternatives were evaluated; conventional single conjugate AO (SCAO, using one GS and a pupil DM) and DCAO (using multiple GS and two DM). Zemax simulations at 575 nm based on the Navarro 99 eye model show that the diameter of the corrected field of view for diffraction-limited imaging (Strehl >or= 0.8) increases from 1.5 deg with SCAO to 6.5 deg using DCAO. The increase for the less stringent condition of a wavefront error of 1 rad or less (Strehl >or= 0.37) is from 3 deg with SCAO to approximately 7.4 deg using DCAO. Corresponding results for the Liou-Brennan eye model are 3.1 deg (SCAO) and 8.2 deg (DCAO) for Strehl >or= 0.8, and 4.8 deg (SCAO) and 9.6 deg (DCAO) for Strehl >or= 0.37. Potential gain in corrected field of view with DCAO is confirmed both by laboratory experiments on a model eye and by preliminary in vivo imaging of a human eye. PMID:19293873

  3. WPOL, a future space Compton wide field polarimeter: Optimization for polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Dolgorouky, Y.; Limousin, O.; Bertoli, W.; Breelle, E.

    2015-07-01

    Polarimetry in the hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray domain (20-1000 keV) is a new area of astrophysics that started to unveil in the past few years, mainly with the ESA/INTEGRAL mission results. Following these pioneering observations, it is appropriate to prepare a new concept which will allow the astronomers to map the X-ray/gamma-ray polarized sources in our Galaxy. WPOL is a wide field polarimeter which aims at monitoring the X-ray and gamma-ray sources and measuring their polarimetric properties. This camera will be used in space to map our Galaxy and also to alert a main instrument in case of transient events such as gamma-ray bursts, black hole binaries state transition, supernovae. It will be proposed, as an accompanying instrument, within the context of the next medium mission ESA call (M4) in January 2015. This concept is based upon coded mask imaging, with a detector unit composed of two layers of Silicon Double Sided Strip Detectors (DSSD) and a tungsten mask. In this article, we will present the key scientific drivers and the instrumental concept for WPOL (imaging technique, energy reconstitution and polarimetric measurements). Then, we will present an optimization of the thickness of the first detection layer performed through MEGALIB Monte-Carlo simulations. Finally, we will present a MEGALIB simulation of WPOL's observation of a source at 100 keV to compute the minimum detectable polarization reached by the instrument.

  4. Innovations of wide-field optical-sectioning fluorescence microscopy: toward high-speed volumetric bio-imaging with simplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiun-Yann

    Optical microscopy has become an indispensable tool for biological researches since its invention, mostly owing to its sub-cellular spatial resolutions, non-invasiveness, instrumental simplicity, and the intuitive observations it provides. Nonetheless, obtaining reliable, quantitative spatial information from conventional wide-field optical microscopy is not always intuitive as it appears to be. This is because in the acquired images of optical microscopy the information about out-of-focus regions is spatially blurred and mixed with in-focus information. In other words, conventional wide-field optical microscopy transforms the three-dimensional spatial information, or volumetric information about the objects into a two-dimensional form in each acquired image, and therefore distorts the spatial information about the object. Several fluorescence holography-based methods have demonstrated the ability to obtain three-dimensional information about the objects, but these methods generally rely on decomposing stereoscopic visualizations to extract volumetric information and are unable to resolve complex 3-dimensional structures such as a multi-layer sphere. The concept of optical-sectioning techniques, on the other hand, is to detect only two-dimensional information about an object at each acquisition. Specifically, each image obtained by optical-sectioning techniques contains mainly the information about an optically thin layer inside the object, as if only a thin histological section is being observed at a time. Using such a methodology, obtaining undistorted volumetric information about the object simply requires taking images of the object at sequential depths. Among existing methods of obtaining volumetric information, the practicability of optical sectioning has made it the most commonly used and most powerful one in biological science. However, when applied to imaging living biological systems, conventional single-point-scanning optical-sectioning techniques often result in certain degrees of photo-damages because of the high focal intensity at the scanning point. In order to overcome such an issue, several wide-field optical-sectioning techniques have been proposed and demonstrated, although not without introducing new limitations and compromises such as low signal-to-background ratios and reduced axial resolutions. As a result, single-point-scanning optical-sectioning techniques remain the most widely used instrumentations for volumetric imaging of living biological systems to date. In order to develop wide-field optical-sectioning techniques that has equivalent optical performance as single-point-scanning ones, this thesis first introduces the mechanisms and limitations of existing wide-field optical-sectioning techniques, and then brings in our innovations that aim to overcome these limitations. We demonstrate, theoretically and experimentally, that our proposed wide-field optical-sectioning techniques can achieve diffraction-limited optical sectioning, low out-of-focus excitation and high-frame-rate imaging in living biological systems. In addition to such imaging capabilities, our proposed techniques can be instrumentally simple and economic, and are straightforward for implementation on conventional wide-field microscopes. These advantages together show the potential of our innovations to be widely used for high-speed, volumetric fluorescence imaging of living biological systems.

  5. All-weather calibration of wide-field optical and NIR surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, David L.; Saha, Abhijit; Claver, Jenna; Claver, Chuck; Axelrod, T.; DePoy, Darren; Ivezić, Željko; Jones, Lynne; Smith, R. Chris; Stubbs, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    The science goals for ground-based large-area surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, Pan-STARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, require calibration of broadband photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the sky to precisions of a percent or better. This performance will need to be achieved with data taken over the course of many years, and often in less than ideal conditions. This paper describes a strategy to achieve precise internal calibration of imaging survey data taken in less than 'photometric' conditions, and reports results of an observational study of the techniques needed to implement this strategy. We find that images of celestial fields used in this case study with stellar densities ∼1 arcmin{sup –2} and taken through cloudless skies can be calibrated with relative precision ∼0.5% (reproducibility). We report measurements of spatial structure functions of cloud absorption observed over a range of atmospheric conditions, and find it possible to achieve photometric measurements that are reproducible to 1% in images that were taken through cloud layers that transmit as little as 25% of the incident optical flux (1.5 magnitudes of extinction). We find, however, that photometric precision below 1% is impeded by the thinnest detectable cloud layers. We comment on implications of these results for the observing strategies of future surveys.

  6. Development of a Reduction Algorithm of GEO Satellite Optical Observation Data for Optical Wide Field Patrol (OWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun-youp; Choi, Jin; Jo, Jung Hyun; Son, Ju Young; Park, Yung-Sik; Yim, Hong-Suh; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Bae, Young-Ho; Choi, Young-Jun; Park, Jang-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    An algorithm to automatically extract coordinate and time information from optical observation data of geostationary orbit satellites (GEO satellites) or geosynchronous orbit satellites (GOS satellites) is developed. The optical wide-field patrol system is capable of automatic observation using a pre-arranged schedule. Therefore, if this type of automatic analysis algorithm is available, daily unmanned monitoring of GEO satellites can be possible. For data acquisition for development, the COMS1 satellite was observed with 1-s exposure time and 1-m interval. The images were grouped and processed in terms of ¡°action¡±, and each action was composed of six or nine successive images. First, a reference image with the best quality in one action was selected. Next, the rest of the images in the action were geometrically transformed to fit in the horizontal coordinate system (expressed in azimuthal angle and elevation) of the reference image. Then, these images were median-combined to retain only the possible non-moving GEO candidates. By reverting the coordinate transformation of the positions of these GEO satellite candidates, the final coordinates could be calculated.

  7. Optical design trade study for the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Content, D. A.; Goullioud, R.; Lehan, J. P.; Mentzell, J. E.

    2011-09-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission concept was ranked first in new space astrophysics mission by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey incorporating the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)-Omega payload concept and multiple science white papers. This mission is based on a space telescope at L2 studying exoplanets (via gravitational microlensing), probing dark energy, and surveying the near infrared sky. Since the release of NWNH, the WFIRST project has been working with the WFIRST science definition team (SDT) to refine mission and payload concepts. We present the driving requirements. The current interim reference mission point design, based on the use of a 1.3m unobscured aperture three mirror anastigmat form, with focal imaging and slitless spectroscopy science channels, is consistent with the requirements, requires no technology development, and out performs the JDEM-Omega design.

  8. Optical Design Trade Study for the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, David A.; Goullioud, R.; Lehan, John P.; Mentzell, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission concept was ranked first in new space astrophysics mission by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey incorporating the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)-Omega payload concept and multiple science white papers. This mission is based on a space telescope at L2 studying exoplanets [via gravitational microlensing], probing dark energy, and surveying the near infrared sky. Since the release of NWNH, the WFIRST project has been working with the WFIRST science definition team (SDT) to refine mission and payload concepts. We present the driving requirements. The current interim reference mission point design, based on the use of a 1.3m unobscured aperture three mirror anastigmat form, with focal imaging and slitless spectroscopy science channels, is consistent with the requirements, requires no technology development, and out performs the JDEM-Omega design.

  9. Development of a lightweight near-zero CTE optical bench for the Wide-Field Camera 3 instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Jill M.; Kunt, Cengiz; Lashley, Chris; McGuffey, Douglas B.

    2003-02-01

    The design and development of an optical bench (OB) for Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a next generation science instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has proven a challenging task. WFC3 will replace Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WF/PC 2) during the next servicing mission of the HST in 2004. The WFC3 program is re-using much of the hardware from WF/PC 1, returned from the First Servicing Mission, which has added complexity to the program. This posed some significant packaging challenges, further complicated by WFC3 utilizing two, separate optical channels. The WF/PC 1 optical bench could not house the additional optical components, so a new bench was developed. The new bench had to be designed to accommodate the sometimes-conflicting requirements of the two channels, which operate over a wavelength range of 200nm to 1800nm, from Near Ultraviolet to Near Infrared. In addition, the bench had to interface to the reused WF/PC 1 hardware, which was not optimized for this mission. To aid in the design of the bench, the team used software tools to merge structural, thermal and optical models to obtain performance (STOP) of the optical systems in operation. Several iterations of this performance analysis were needed during the design process to verify the bench would meet requirements. The fabrication effort included a rigorous material characterization program and significant tooling. After assembly, the optical bench underwent an extensive qualification program to prove the design and manufacturing processes. This paper provides the details of the design and development process of this highly optimized optical bench.

  10. Fast active optics control of wide-field telescopes based on science image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzlöhner, R.; Rakich, A.; Noethe, L.; Kuijken, K.; Schipani, P.

    2014-07-01

    We study a novel active optics control scheme at the VST on Cerro Paranal, an f/5:5 survey telescope with a 1x1 degree field of view and a 2.6m primary mirror. This scheme analyzes the elongation pattern of the star PSFs across the full science image (267 Mpixels) and compares their second moments with an analytical model based on 5th-order geometrical optics, comprising 9 degrees of freedom in mirror misalignments and deformations. Using a numerical optimization method, we can complete the star extraction and fitting process in under one minute, fast enough for effective closed-loop active optics control in survey observing cadences.

  11. An optical design of the telescope in the Wide Field of View Cherenkov/Fluorescence Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiali; Yang, Rui; Xiao, Gang; Cao, Zhen; Ma, Lingling; Zha, Min; Zhang, Bingkai; Zhang, Shoushan; Zhang, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Spherical design and Davies-cotton design, which can supply a wide Field of View (FOV) and have a single optical element structure, are the two candidate optics for Wide FOV Cherenkov/Fluorescence Telescope Array (WFCTA). To obtain a good imaging quality, we have done a detailed study to acquire optimal configurations for these two optics. In this paper, first, a proper curvature radius for the reflector, an optimized location for the camera, as well as a tolerance for the distortion of images for two designs have been presented. Furthermore, using such optimal configurations, the features of Cherenkov images initiated by proton and iron showers both with two optics have been investigated. Based on these results, it can be concluded that spherical design has the prior optical properties, such as a wider FOV of 16°, a higher and more homogeneous resolution for all incident directions within the 16° FOV and a lower light loss in the spots, as well as more signals collected in an Cherenkov image, relatively shorter arrival time difference for lights in a shower and brighter PMTs in the central part of a shower track. Thus it will be chosen as WFCTA optics. Finally, the optical properties of the two designs with 10° FOV have also been investigated. It should be mentioned that with such a smaller FOV, Davies-cotton optics is an effective design for it has a great imaging quality comparing with the setup of 16° FOV.

  12. A wide-field relay optics system for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, E.

    1997-02-01

    Relay optics designed for use with imaging arrays at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory are described. An off-axis ellipsoidal mirror with foci displaced from the conjugate planes is used to achieve a Strehl ratio >0.88 over a 2' square field of view (corresponding to a far field of 15×15 diffraction beams) at a wavelength of 350 μm. The mirror also provides an aperture-stop image just prior to focus which allows compact entry into cryogenic camera dewars. Using a compensating ellipsoid in subsequent camera optics, the Strehl ratio can be improved to >0.95 at all points across the field, even for off-axis chop angles of the telescope's secondary mirror as large as 2'.

  13. RETINOCHOROIDAL MORPHOLOGY DESCRIBED BY WIDE-FIELD MONTAGE IMAGING OF SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Keisuke; Kanno, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To present baseline images of the vitreous, retina, and choroid from the macula to the periphery in normal patients using a novel montaging technique of spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Methods: Twenty-six normal eyes of 22 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. Montaged images of four radial optical coherence tomography scans through the fovea were obtained from each subject. Results: In the macula, there were six identifiable retinal layers as well as four bands in the outer retina. In the periphery, the ganglion cell layer was not identifiable. The external limiting membrane, the second band, and the retinal pigment epithelium were continuously delineated from the macula to the periphery. The third band was not visible in the periphery. Conclusion: Spectral domain optical coherence tomography montaged images provide wide-angle images of the vitreous, retina, and choroid, allowing for evaluation of peripheral findings and examination of relationships between peripheral and posterior disease. The maximum scan length achieved here was 36 mm. The scan length is approximately three times than that provided by conventional posterior scanning and is consistent with known dimensions of the eye. This method is achievable with current commercially available devices and may contribute to decision making in clinical practice. PMID:26241154

  14. The explosive transient camera - An automatic, wide-field sky monitor for short-timescale optical transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderspek, Roland K.; Ricker, George R.; Doty, John P.

    1992-01-01

    The Explosive Transient Camera (ETC) is a widefield sky monitor designed to detect short-timescale (1-l0 s) celestial optical flashes. It consists of two arrays of wide-field CCD cameras monitoring about 0.4 steradian of the night sky for optical transients with risetimes of about 1-10 s and peak magnitudes m(V) of less than about 10. The ETC was designed to be completely automated in order to make year-round observations with minimal human intervention. A small, powerful 68,000-based computer controls all aspects of observations, including roof motion, CCD readouts, and weather sensing: under software control, the ETC is able to perform all the functions of a human observer automatically.

  15. Tolerancing the fabrication errors of static optical elements for ELT-size wide-field AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véran, Jean-Pierre; Pazder, John; Herriot, Glen; Andersen, David

    2012-07-01

    Advanced wide-field AO systems, such as Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO) systems often require many static optical elements (mirror and lenses) in addition to the active ones (deformable mirrors). These static elements induce additional wave-front errors due to random fabrication errors such as polishing errors. For ELT-size AO systems, these optical elements can be very large, and thus their cost and availability critically depends on how of much fabrication error can be tolerated. Therefore, a rigorous tolerance analysis is absolutely critical. Requirements can, in principle be relaxed, on account that fabrication errors with spatial scales larger than the inter-actuator spacing of the deformable mirrors (DMs) can be corrected. However, this process is significantly complicated by the fact that these optical elements are often conjugated far away from the DMs, and therefore DM correction cannot be achieved over a wide field of view (FOV). In this paper, we present our tolerance analysis in the context of NFIRAOS, the first-light MCAO system for the Thirty Meter Telescope. We start from two top-level error budgets: the “on-axis” error budget, which specifies the acceptable residual wave-front error in the narrow 17”x17” science FOV; and the “off-axis” error budget, which specifies the acceptable residual wave-front error at the edge of the 2’ diameter technical FOV. The former directly relates to science image quality, whereas the latter directly relates to sky coverage. For different assumptions on the spatial power spectrum of the polishing errors, we derive the requirements on each optical element in NFIRAOS using a Monte-Carlo analysis of the predicted off-axis performance of the system with on axis AO correction.

  16. Improvements in Space Surveillance Processing for Wide Field of View Optical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydney, P.; Wetterer, C.

    2014-09-01

    For more than a decade, an autonomous satellite tracking system at the Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing (AMOS) observatory has been generating routine astrometric measurements of Earth-orbiting Resident Space Objects (RSOs) using small commercial telescopes and sensors. Recent work has focused on developing an improved processing system, enhancing measurement performance and response while supporting other sensor systems and missions. This paper will outline improved techniques in scheduling, detection, astrometric and photometric measurements, and catalog maintenance. The processing system now integrates with Special Perturbation (SP) based astrodynamics algorithms, allowing covariance-based scheduling and more precise orbital estimates and object identification. A merit-based scheduling algorithm provides a global optimization framework to support diverse collection tasks and missions. The detection algorithms support a range of target tracking and camera acquisition rates. New comprehensive star catalogs allow for more precise astrometric and photometric calibrations including differential photometry for monitoring environmental changes. This paper will also examine measurement performance with varying tracking rates and acquisition parameters.

  17. KMTNET: A Network of 1.6 m Wide-Field Optical Telescopes Installed at Three Southern Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Lee; Lee, Chung-Uk; Park, Byeong-Gon; Kim, Dong-Jin; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Han, Cheongho; Chun, Moo-Young; Yuk, Insoo

    2016-02-01

    The Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) is a wide-field photometric system installed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI). Here, we present the overall technical specifications of the KMTNet observation system, test observation results, data transfer and image processing procedure, and finally, the KMTNet science programs. The system consists of three 1.6 m wide-field optical telescopes equipped with mosaic CCD cameras of 18k by 18k pixels. Each telescope provides a 2.0 by 2.0 square degree field of view. We have finished installing all three telescopes and cameras sequentially at the Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile, the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) in South Africa, and the Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in Australia. This network of telescopes, which is spread over three different continents at a similar latitude of about -30 degrees, enables 24-hour continuous monitoring of targets observable in the Southern Hemisphere. The test observations showed good image quality that meets the seeing requirement of less than 1.0 arcsec in I-band. All of the observation data are transferred to the KMTNet data center at KASI via the international network communication and are processed with the KMTNet data pipeline. The primary scientific goal of the KMTNet is to discover numerous extrasolar planets toward the Galactic bulge by using the gravitational microlensing technique, especially earth-mass planets in the habitable zone. During the non-bulge season, the system is used for wide-field photometric survey science on supernovae, asteroids, and external galaxies.

  18. FRD in optical fibres at low temperatures: investigations for Gemini's Wide-field Fibre Multi-Object Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, A. C.; de Oliveira, L. S.; Dos Santos, J. B.; Arruda, M. V.; Dos Santos, L. G. C.; Rodrigues, F.; de Castro, F. L. F.

    2011-06-01

    While there is no direct evidence for the deterioration in Focal Ratio Degradation (FRD) of optical fibres in severe temperature gradients, the fibre ends inserted into metallic containment devices such as steel ferrules can be a source of stress, and hence increased FRD at low temperatures. In such conditions, instruments using optical fibres may suffer some increase in FRD and consequent loss of system throughput when they are working in environments with significant thermal gradients, a common characteristic of ground-based observatories. In this paper we present results of experiments with optical fibres inserted in different materials as a part of our prototyping study for Gemini's Wide-field Multi-Object Spectrograph (WFMOS) project. Thermal effects and the use of new holding techniques will be discussed in the context of Integral Field Units and multi-fibres systems. In this work, we have used careful methodologies that give absolute measurements of FRD to quantify the advantages of using epoxy-based composites rather than metals as support structures for the fibre ends. This is shown to be especially important in minimizing thermally induced stresses in the fibre terminations. Not only is this important for optimizing fibre spectrograph performance but the benefits of using such materials are demonstrated in the minimization of positional variations and the avoidance of metal-to-glass delamination. Furthermore, by impregnating the composites with small zirconium oxide particles the composite materials supply their own fine polishing grit which aids significantly to the optical quality of the finished product.

  19. Optically fast, wide field-of-view, five-mirror anastigmat (5MA) imagers for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silny, John F.; Kim, Eugene D.; Cook, Lacy G.; Moskun, Eric M.; Patterson, Robert L.

    2011-10-01

    Recent trends in focal plane array (FPA) technology have led naturally to the development of very large format remote sensors that require optically fast, wide field-of-view (FOV) imaging optics. Systems that cover broad spectral ranges, such as multispectral imagers (MSI) and hyperspectral imagers (HSI), require reflective optics to provide aberration and distortion control without the complication of wavelength dependent errors induced by powered refractive elements. These large format systems require even wider fields-of-view than offered by the conventional three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) and four-mirror anastigmat (4MA) designs. Recently, Raytheon has demonstrated in hardware the first-ever aligned and tested five-mirror anastigmat (5MA) imager. The 5MA was designed with an F/3.0 optical speed and a 36 degree cross-scan FOV for use with a large format imaging spectrometer. The 5MA imager has useful features such as: (1) a real entrance pupil to support a full-aperture calibrator or a small scan mirror, (2) an intermediate image for stray light control, and (3) a real exit pupil for optimal cold-shielding in infrared applications. A computer-aided alignment method was used to align the 5MA imager with a final target of balanced wavefront error (WFE) across the full 36 deg FOV. This paper discusses the design and development of the first-ever 5MA imager and some potential air- and space-borne remote sensing applications.

  20. Adaptive optics wide-field microscope corrections using a MEMS DM and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azucena, Oscar; Tao, Xiaodong; Crest, Justin; Kotadia, Shaila; Sullivan, William; Gavel, Donald; Reinig, Marc; Olivier, Scot; Kubby, Joel

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrated the used of an adaptive optic system in biological imaging to improve the imaging characteristics of a wide field microscope. A crimson red fluorescent bead emitting light at 650 nm was used together with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror to compensate for the aberrations introduce by a Drosophila embryo. The measurement and correction at one wavelength improves the resolving power at a different wavelength, enabling the structure of the sample to be resolved (510 nm). The use of the crimson beads allow for less photobleaching to be done to the science object of the embryo, in this case our GFP model (green fluorescent beads), and allows for the science object and wavefront reference to be spectrally separated. The spectral separation allows for single points sources to be used for wavefront measurements, which is a necessary condition for the Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor operation.

  1. MegaCam: a wide-field optical/infrared camera for the UH 2.2-m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Joseph L.; Luppino, Gerard A.; Hodapp, Klaus-Werner

    1994-06-01

    The MegaCam is a multi-purpose, wide-field, two-color camera being designed for use at the UH 2.2m telescope. The camera will utilize a Rockwell 1024 x 1024 HgCdTe detector array for 1-2.5 micrometers imaging, and a 2048 x 4096 frame-store CCD (2048 x 2048 active area) for optical imaging. The optics are based on a modified Offner relay design with additional lenses to give a 2:1 magnification in the infrared channel for a field of view of 5'.8 x 5'.8 (0.34 arcsec/pixel) using the f/10 telescope secondary, or a scale of 1'.9 x 1'.9 (0.15 arcsec/pixel) at f/31. This design provides a simple, high-throughput, and compact optical layout. A beamsplitter is placed in front of the IR optics at a low angle of incidence to form the optical image at 1:1 magnification on the CCD, for a field of view of 4'.7 x 4'.7 and 1'.5 x 1'.5 at f/10 and f/31, respectively. The optics and filters are to be housed in a LN(subscript 2)-cooled dewar. The CCD and IR arrays will be operated with modified SDSU-design controllers. The user interface will have several modes to make simultaneous optical/IR imaging simple to configure and perform at the telescope.

  2. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Gérard R; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey-and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces-the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5-2 degrees field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images. PMID:16353802

  3. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Gérard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey - and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces - the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images.

  4. Optical sectioning in wide-field microscopy obtained by dynamic structured light illumination and detection based on a smart pixel detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miti?, Jelena; Anhut, Tiemo; Meier, Matthias; Ducros, Mathieu; Serov, Alexander; Lasser, Theo

    2003-05-01

    Optical sectioning in wide-field microscopy is achieved by illumination of the object with a continuously moving single-spatial-frequency pattern and detecting the image with a smart pixel detector array. This detector performs an on-chip electronic signal processing that extracts the optically sectioned image. The optically sectioned image is directly observed in real time without any additional postprocessing.

  5. Andromeda (M31) optical and infrared disk survey. I. Insights in wide-field near-IR surface photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stéphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; McDonald, Michael; De Jong, Roelof; Tully, R. Brent

    2014-05-01

    We present wide-field near-infrared J and K{sub s} images of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) taken with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope as part of the Andromeda Optical and Infrared Disk Survey. This data set allows simultaneous observations of resolved stars and near-infrared (NIR) surface brightness across M31's entire bulge and disk (within R = 22 kpc), permitting a direct test of the stellar composition of near-infrared light in a nearby galaxy. Here we develop NIR observation and reduction methods to recover a uniform surface brightness map across the 3° × 1° disk of M31 with 27 WIRCam fields. Two sky-target nodding strategies are tested, and we find that strictly minimizing sky sampling latency cannot improve background subtraction accuracy to better than 2% of the background level due to spatio-temporal variations in the NIR skyglow. We fully describe our WIRCam reduction pipeline and advocate using flats built from night-sky images over a single night, rather than dome flats that do not capture the WIRCam illumination field. Contamination from scattered light and thermal background in sky flats has a negligible effect on the surface brightness shape compared to the stochastic differences in background shape between sky and galaxy disk fields, which are ∼0.3% of the background level. The most dramatic calibration step is the introduction of scalar sky offsets to each image that optimizes surface brightness continuity. Sky offsets reduce the mean surface brightness difference between observation blocks from 1% to <0.1% of the background level, though the absolute background level remains statistically uncertain to 0.15% of the background level. We present our WIRCam reduction pipeline and performance analysis to give specific recommendations for the improvement of NIR wide-field imaging methods.

  6. 3D galaxy clustering with future wide-field surveys: Advantages of a spherical Fourier-Bessel analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys are extremely promising to help in addressing the major challenges of cosmology, in particular in understanding the nature of the dark universe. The strength of these surveys, naturally described in spherical geometry, comes from their unprecedented depth and width, but an optimal extraction of their three-dimensional information is of utmost importance to best constrain the properties of the dark universe. Aims: Although there is theoretical motivation and novel tools to explore these surveys using the 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) power spectrum of galaxy number counts Cℓ(k,k'), most survey optimisations and forecasts are based on the tomographic spherical harmonics power spectrum C(ij)_ℓ. The goal of this paper is to perform a new investigation of the information that can be extracted from these two analyses in the context of planned stage IV wide-field galaxy surveys. Methods: We compared tomographic and 3D SFB techniques by comparing the forecast cosmological parameter constraints obtained from a Fisher analysis. The comparison was made possible by careful and coherent treatment of non-linear scales in the two analyses, which makes this study the first to compare 3D SFB and tomographic constraints on an equal footing. Nuisance parameters related to a scale- and redshift-dependent galaxy bias were also included in the computation of the 3D SFB and tomographic power spectra for the first time. Results: Tomographic and 3D SFB methods can recover similar constraints in the absence of systematics. This requires choosing an optimal number of redshift bins for the tomographic analysis, which we computed to be N = 26 for zmed ≃ 0.4, N = 30 for zmed ≃ 1.0, and N = 42 for zmed ≃ 1.7. When marginalising over nuisance parameters related to the galaxy bias, the forecast 3D SFB constraints are less affected by this source of systematics than the tomographic constraints. In addition, the rate of increase of the figure of merit as a function of median redshift is higher for the 3D SFB method than for the 2D tomographic method. Conclusions: Constraints from the 3D SFB analysis are less sensitive to unavoidable systematics stemming from a redshift- and scale-dependent galaxy bias. Even for surveys that are optimised with tomography in mind, a 3D SFB analysis is more powerful. In addition, for survey optimisation, the figure of merit for the 3D SFB method increases more rapidly with redshift, especially at higher redshifts, suggesting that the 3D SFB method should be preferred for designing and analysing future wide-field spectroscopic surveys. CosmicPy, the Python package developed for this paper, is freely available at https://cosmicpy.github.io. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Wide-field imaging of retinal vasculature using optical coherence tomography-based microangiography provided by motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinqin; Huang, Yanping; Zhang, Thomas; Kubach, Sophie; An, Lin; Laron, Michal; Sharma, Utkarsh; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based optical microangiography (OMAG) is a high-resolution, noninvasive imaging technique capable of providing three-dimensional in vivo blood flow visualization within microcirculatory tissue beds in the eye. Although the technique has demonstrated early clinical utility by imaging diseased eyes, its limited field of view (FOV) and the sensitivity to eye motion remain the two biggest challenges for the widespread clinical use of the technology. Here, we report the results of retinal OMAG imaging obtained from a Zeiss Cirrus 5000 spectral domain OCT system with motion tracking capability achieved by a line scan ophthalmoscope (LSO). The tracking LSO is able to guide the OCT scanning, which minimizes the effect of eye motion in the final results. We show that the tracking can effectively correct the motion artifacts and remove the discontinuities and distortions of vascular appearance due to microsaccade, leading to almost motion-free OMAG angiograms with good repeatability and reliability. Due to the robustness of the tracking LSO, we also show the montage scan protocol to provide unprecedented wide field retinal OMAG angiograms. We experimentally demonstrate a 12×16 mm2 retinal OMAG angiogram acquired from a volunteer, which is the widest FOV retinal vasculature imaging up to now in the community.

  8. Wide-field imaging of retinal vasculature using optical coherence tomography-based microangiography provided by motion tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinqin; Huang, Yanping; Zhang, Thomas; Kubach, Sophie; An, Lin; Laron, Michal; Sharma, Utkarsh; Wang, Ruikang K

    2015-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based optical microangiography (OMAG) is a high-resolution, noninvasive imaging technique capable of providing three-dimensional in vivo blood flow visualization within microcirculatory tissue beds in the eye. Although the technique has demonstrated early clinical utility by imaging diseased eyes, its limited field of view (FOV) and the sensitivity to eye motion remain the two biggest challenges for the widespread clinical use of the technology. Here, we report the results of retinal OMAG imaging obtained from a Zeiss Cirrus 5000 spectral domain OCT system with motion tracking capability achieved by a line scan ophthalmoscope (LSO). The tracking LSO is able to guide the OCT scanning, which minimizes the effect of eye motion in the final results. We show that the tracking can effectively correct the motion artifacts and remove the discontinuities and distortions of vascular appearance due to microsaccade, leading to almost motion-free OMAG angiograms with good repeatability and reliability. Due to the robustness of the tracking LSO, we also show the montage scan protocol to provide unprecedented wide field retinal OMAG angiograms. We experimentally demonstrate a 12 x 16 mm² retinal OMAG angiogram acquired from a volunteer, which is the widest FOV retinal vasculature imaging up to now in the community. PMID:26102573

  9. Instrumentation of LOTIS: Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System; a fully automated wide field of view telescope system searching for simultaneous optical counterparts of gamma ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.S.; Ables, E.; Barthelmy, S.D.; Bionta, R.M.; Ott, L.L.; Parker, E.L.; Williams, G.G.

    1998-03-06

    LOTIS is a rapidly slewing wide-field-of-view telescope which was designed and constructed to search for simultaneous gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical counterparts. This experiment requires a rapidly slewing ({lt} 10 sec), wide-field-of-view ({gt} 15{degrees}), automatic and dedicated telescope. LOTIS utilizes commercial tele-photo lenses and custom 2048 x 2048 CCD cameras to view a 17.6 x 17.6{degrees} field of view. It can point to any part of the sky within 5 sec and is fully automated. It is connected via Internet socket to the GRB coordinate distribution network which analyzes telemetry from the satellite and delivers GRB coordinate information in real-time. LOTIS started routine operation in Oct. 1996. In the idle time between GRB triggers, LOTIS systematically surveys the entire available sky every night for new optical transients. This paper will describe the system design and performance.

  10. Macroscopic optical imaging technique for wide-field estimation of fluorescence depth in optically turbid media for application in brain tumor surgical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Kolste, Kolbein K.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Valdés, Pablo A.; Jermyn, Michael; Wilson, Brian C.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Leblond, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A diffuse imaging method is presented that enables wide-field estimation of the depth of fluorescent molecular markers in turbid media by quantifying the deformation of the detected fluorescence spectra due to the wavelength-dependent light attenuation by overlying tissue. This is achieved by measuring the ratio of the fluorescence at two wavelengths in combination with normalization techniques based on diffuse reflectance measurements to evaluate tissue attenuation variations for different depths. It is demonstrated that fluorescence topography can be achieved up to a 5 mm depth using a near-infrared dye with millimeter depth accuracy in turbid media having optical properties representative of normal brain tissue. Wide-field depth estimates are made using optical technology integrated onto a commercial surgical microscope, making this approach feasible for real-world applications. PMID:25652704

  11. BOMBOLO: a Multi-Band, Wide-field, Near UV/Optical Imager for the SOAR 4m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeloni, R.; Guzmán, D.; Puzia, T. H.; Infante, L.

    2014-10-01

    BOMBOLO is a new multi-passband visitor instrument for SOAR observatory. The first fully Chilean instrument of its kind, it is a three-arms imager covering the near-UV and optical wavelengths. The three arms work simultaneously and independently, providing synchronized imaging capability for rapid astronomical events. BOMBOLO will be able to address largely unexplored events in the minute-to-second timescales, with the following leading science cases: 1) Simultaneous Multiband Flickering Studies of Accretion Phenomena; 2) Near UV/Optical Diagnostics of Stellar Evolutionary Phases; 3) Exoplanetary Transits and 4) Microlensing Follow-Up. BOMBOLO optical design consists of a wide field collimator feeding two dychroics at 390 and 550 nm. Each arm encompasses a camera, filter wheel and a science CCD230-42, imaging a 7 x 7 arcmin field of view onto a 2k x 2k image. The three CCDs will have different coatings to optimise the efficiencies of each camera. The detector controller to run the three cameras will be Torrent (the NOAO open-source system) and a PanView application will run the instrument and produce the data-cubes. The instrument is at Conceptual Design stage, having been approved by the SOAR Board of Directors as a visitor instrument in 2012 and having been granted full funding from CONICYT, the Chilean State Agency of Research, in 2013. The Design Phase is starting now and will be completed in late 2014, followed by a construction phase in 2015 and 2016A, with expected Commissioning in 2016B and 2017A.

  12. O-6 Optical Property Degradation of the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera-2 Pick Off Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Karen M.; Hughes, D. W.; Lauer, H. V.; Burkett, P. J.; Reed, B. B.

    2011-01-01

    Degradation in the performance of optical components can be greatly affected by exposure to the space environment. Many factors can contribute to such degradation including surface contaminants; outgassing; vacuum, UV, and atomic oxygen exposure; temperature cycling; or combinations of parameters. In-situ observations give important clues to degradation processes, but there are relatively few opportunities to correlate those observations with post-flight ground analyses. The return of instruments from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) after its final servicing mission in May 2009 provided such an opportunity. Among the instruments returned from HST was the Wide-Field Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC-2), which had been exposed to the space environment for 16 years. This work focuses on the identifying the sources of degradation in the performance of the Pick-off mirror (POM) from WFPC-2. Techniques including surface reflectivity measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, FTIR (and ATR-FTIR) analyses, SEM/EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with and without ion milling, and wet and dry physical surface sampling were performed. Destructive and contact analyses took place only after completion of the non-destructive measurements. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was then repeated to determine the extent of contaminant removal by the destructive techniques, providing insight into the nature and extent of polymerization of the contaminant layer.

  13. KMTNet: a network of 1.6-m wide field optical telescopes installed at three southern observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Kim, Dong-Jin; Park, Byeong-Gon; Lee, Dong-Joo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Jae Woo; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Lim, Beomdu; Lim, Jin-Sun; Gho, Seung-Won; Kim, Min-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) have installed three identical 1.6-m telescopes, called Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), which cover 2 x 2 degree field of view with the plate scale of 0.4 arcsec/pixel at three observatories - CTIO, SSO and SAAO in southern hemisphere. The uniqueness of the system is the uninterupted 24-hour monitoring with a wide field optics in southern hemisphere. The telescope adopts prime focus using a parabolic mirror and four spherical flattening lenses. The structural design and driving systems are modified from the degin of 2MASS telescope. The one piece filter-shutter assembly has a sliding shutter and four 310-mm square filters. Each observation system produces a 680MB size image file at site and the images are transfered to KASI data center using the Global Ring Network for Advanced Application Development (GLORIAD) network with the band width of 50Mbps in average. The main science goal of the KMTNet is to discover Earth like extra solar planet using the microlensing technique during bulge season, and 50% of the total observation time is allocated for the science program solely. The other telescope times are allocated for pre-selected seven science programs during non-bulge season. From the test observation, we verify that the most important two requirements are satisfied: 10 arcsec in RMS for the pointing accuracy and 1 arcsec of delivered image quality in I-band. In this presentation, we introduce finally installed system at each observatory and its observational performance obtained from the test observation.

  14. Dynamic registration of an optical see-through HMD into a wide field-of-view rotorcraft flight simulation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viertler, Franz; Hajek, Manfred

    2015-05-01

    To overcome the challenge of helicopter flight in degraded visual environments, current research considers headmounted displays with 3D-conformal (scene-linked) visual cues as most promising display technology. For pilot-in-theloop simulations with HMDs, a highly accurate registration of the augmented visual system is required. In rotorcraft flight simulators the outside visual cues are usually provided by a dome projection system, since a wide field-of-view (e.g. horizontally > 200° and vertically > 80°) is required, which can hardly be achieved with collimated viewing systems. But optical see-through HMDs do mostly not have an equivalent focus compared to the distance of the pilot's eye-point position to the curved screen, which is also dependant on head motion. Hence, a dynamic vergence correction has been implemented to avoid binocular disparity. In addition, the parallax error induced by even small translational head motions is corrected with a head-tracking system to be adjusted onto the projected screen. For this purpose, two options are presented. The correction can be achieved by rendering the view with yaw and pitch offset angles dependent on the deviating head position from the design eye-point of the spherical projection system. Furthermore, it can be solved by implementing a dynamic eye-point in the multi-channel projection system for the outside visual cues. Both options have been investigated for the integration of a binocular HMD into the Rotorcraft Simulation Environment (ROSIE) at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen. Pros and cons of both possibilities with regard on integration issues and usability in flight simulations will be discussed.

  15. Prime Focus Spectrograph: A very wide-field, massively multiplexed, optical & near-infrared spectrograph for Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TAMURA, NAOYUKI

    2015-08-01

    PFS (Prime Focus Spectrograph), a next generation facility instrument on Subaru, is a very wide-field, massively-multiplexed, and optical & near-infrared spectrograph. Exploiting the Subaru prime focus, 2400 reconfigurable fibers will be distributed in the 1.3 degree field. The spectrograph will have 3 arms of blue, red, and near-infrared cameras to simultaneously observe spectra from 380nm to 1260nm at one exposure. The development of this instrument has been undertaken by the international collaboration at the initiative of Kavli IPMU. The project is now going into the construction phase aiming at system integration and on-sky commissioning in 2017-2018, and science operation in 2019. In parallel, the survey design has also been developed envisioning a Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) that spans roughly speaking 300 nights over 5 years. The major science areas are three-folds: Cosmology, galaxy/AGN evolution, and Galactic archaeology (GA). The cosmology program will be to constrain the nature of dark energy via a survey of emission line galaxies over a comoving volume of ~10 Gpc^3 in the redshift range of 0.8 < z < 2.4. In the GA program, radial velocities and chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way, dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and M31 will be used to understand the past assembly histories of those galaxies and the structures of their dark matter halos. Spectra will be taken for ~1 million stars as faint as V = 22 therefore out to large distances from the Sun. For the extragalactic program, our simulations suggest the wide wavelength coverage of PFS will be particularly powerful in probing the galaxy populations and its clustering properties over a wide redshift range. We will conduct a survey of color-selected 1 < z < 2 galaxies and AGN over 20 square degrees down to J = 23.4, yielding a fair sample of galaxies with stellar masses above ˜10^10 solar masses. Further, PFS will also provide unique spectroscopic opportunities even in the era of Euclid, LSST, WFIRST and TMT. In this presentation, an overview of the instrument, current project status and path forward will be given.

  16. Wide field of view telescope

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark R.; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.

    2008-01-15

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  17. Invited Article: First flight in space of a wide-field-of-view soft x-ray imager using lobster-eye optics: Instrument description and initial flight results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Porter, F. Scott; Sibeck, David G.; Carter, Jenny A.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chornay, Dennis J.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Keller, John W.; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Kujawski, Joseph; Kuntz, Kip; Read, Andy M.; Robertson, Ina P.; Sembay, Steve; Snowden, Steven L.; Thomas, Nicholas; Uprety, Youaraj; Walsh, Brian M.

    2015-07-01

    We describe the development, launch into space, and initial results from a prototype wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager that employs lobster-eye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The sheath transport observer for the redistribution of mass is the first instrument using this type of optics launched into space and provides proof-of-concept for future flight instruments capable of imaging structures such as the terrestrial cusp, the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere, comets, the Moon, and the solar wind interaction with planetary bodies like Venus and Mars [Kuntz et al., Astrophys. J. (in press)].

  18. Invited Article: First flight in space of a wide-field-of-view soft x-ray imager using lobster-eye optics: Instrument description and initial flight results.

    PubMed

    Collier, Michael R; Porter, F Scott; Sibeck, David G; Carter, Jenny A; Chiao, Meng P; Chornay, Dennis J; Cravens, Thomas E; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Keller, John W; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Kujawski, Joseph; Kuntz, Kip; Read, Andy M; Robertson, Ina P; Sembay, Steve; Snowden, Steven L; Thomas, Nicholas; Uprety, Youaraj; Walsh, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    We describe the development, launch into space, and initial results from a prototype wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager that employs lobster-eye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The sheath transport observer for the redistribution of mass is the first instrument using this type of optics launched into space and provides proof-of-concept for future flight instruments capable of imaging structures such as the terrestrial cusp, the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere, comets, the Moon, and the solar wind interaction with planetary bodies like Venus and Mars [Kuntz et al., Astrophys. J. (in press)]. PMID:26233339

  19. High-resolution wide-field microscopy with adaptive optics for spherical aberration correction and motionless focusing

    PubMed Central

    Sedat, J.W.; Agard, D.A.; Kam, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Live imaging in cell biology requires three-dimensional data acquisition with the best resolution and signal-to-noise ratio possible. Depth aberrations are a major source of image degradation in three-dimensional microscopy, causing a significant loss of resolution and intensity deep into the sample. These aberrations occur because of the mismatch between the sample refractive index and the immersion medium index. We have built a wide-field fluorescence microscope that incorporates a large-throw deformable mirror to simultaneously focus and correct for depth aberration in three-dimensional imaging. Imaging fluorescent beads in water and glycerol with an oil immersion lens we demonstrate a corrected point spread function and a 2-fold improvement in signal intensity. We apply this new microscope to imaging biological samples, and show sharper images and improved deconvolution. PMID:20096044

  20. Active optics and the axisymmetric case: MINITRUST wide-field three-reflection telescopes with mirrors aspherized from tulip and vase forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulie, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2004-09-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires larger size telescopes. Compared to the catadioptric Schmidt, the optical properties of a three mirror telescope provides significant advantages. (1) The flat field design is anastigmatic at any wavelength, (2) the system is extremely compact -- four times shorter than a Schmidt -- and, (3) compared to a Schmidt with refractive corrector -- requiring the polishing of three optical surfaces --, the presently proposed Modified-Rumsey design uses all of eight available free parameters of a flat fielded anastigmatic three mirror telescope for mirrors generated by active optics methods. Compared to a Rumsey design, these parameters include the additional slope continuity condition at the primary-tertiary link for in-situ stressing and aspherization from a common sphere. Then, active optics allows the polishing of only two spherical surfaces: the combined primary-tertiary mirror and the secondary mirror. All mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. This compact system is of interest for space and ground-based astronomy and allows to built larger wide-field telescopes such as demonstrated by the design and construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° FOV, consisting of an in-situ stressed double vase form primary-tertiary and of a stress polished tulip form secondary. Optical tests of these telescopes, showing diffraction limited images, are presented.

  1. Wide-Field Plate Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, M. K.; Stavrev, K. Y.; Tsvetkova, K. P.; Semkov, E. H.; Mutatov, A. S.

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) and the possibilities for its application as a research tool in observational astronomy are presented. Currently the WFPDB comprises the descriptive data for 400 000 archival wide field photographic plates obtained with 77 instruments, from a total of 1 850 000 photographs stored in 269 astronomical archives all over the world since the end of last century. The WFPDB is already accessible for the astronomical community, now only in batch mode through user requests sent by e-mail. We are working on on-line interactive access to the data via INTERNET from Sofia and parallel from the Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg. (Initial information can be found on World Wide Web homepage URL http://www.wfpa.acad.bg.) The WFPDB may be useful in studies of a variety of astronomical objects and phenomena, andespecially for long-term investigations of variable objects and for multi-wavelength research. We have analysed the data in the WFPDB in order to derive the overall characteristics of the totality of wide-field observations, such as the sky coverage, the distributions by observation time and date, by spectral band, and by object type. We have also examined the totality of wide-field observations from point of view of their quality, availability and digitisation. The usefulness of the WFPDB is demonstrated by the results of identification and investigation of the photometrical behaviour of optical analogues of gamma-ray bursts.

  2. Optomechanical design concept for GMACS: a wide-field multi-object moderate resolution optical spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smee, Stephen A.; Prochaska, Travis; Shectman, Stephen A.; Hammond, Randolph P.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; DePoy, D. L.; Marshall, J. L.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the conceptual optomechanical design for GMACS, a wide-field, multi-object, moderate-resolution optical spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). GMACS is a candidate first-light instrument for the GMT and will be one of several instruments housed in the Gregorian Instrument Rotator (GIR) located at the Gregorian focus. The instrument samples a 9 arcminute x 18 arcminute field of view providing two resolution modes (i.e, low resolution, R ~ 2000, and moderate resolution, R ~ 4000) over a 3700 Å to 10200 Å wavelength range. To minimize the size of the optics, four fold mirrors at the GMT focal plane redirect the full field into four individual "arms", that each comprises a double spectrograph with a red and blue channel. Hence, each arm samples a 4.5 arcminute x 9 arcminute field of view. The optical layout naturally leads to three separate optomechanical assemblies: a focal plane assembly, and two identical optics modules. The focal plane assembly contains the last element of the telescope's wide-field corrector, slit-mask, tent-mirror assembly, and slit-mask magazine. Each of the two optics modules supports two of the four instrument arms and houses the aft-optics (i.e. collimators, dichroics, gratings, and cameras). A grating exchange mechanism, and articulated gratings and cameras facilitate multiple resolution modes. In this paper we describe the details of the GMACS optomechanical design, including the requirements and considerations leading to the design, mechanism details, optics mounts, and predicted flexure performance.

  3. Wide-field optical detection of nanoparticles using on-chip microscopy and self-assembled nanolenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudanyali, Onur; McLeod, Euan; Luo, Wei; Greenbaum, Alon; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Hennequin, Yves; Allier, Cédric P.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-03-01

    The direct observation of nanoscale objects is a challenging task for optical microscopy because the scattering from an individual nanoparticle is typically weak at optical wavelengths. Electron microscopy therefore remains one of the gold standard visualization methods for nanoparticles, despite its high cost, limited throughput and restricted field-of-view. Here, we describe a high-throughput, on-chip detection scheme that uses biocompatible wetting films to self-assemble aspheric liquid nanolenses around individual nanoparticles to enhance the contrast between the scattered and background light. We model the effect of the nanolens as a spatial phase mask centred on the particle and show that the holographic diffraction pattern of this effective phase mask allows detection of sub-100 nm particles across a large field-of-view of >20 mm2. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we report on-chip detection of individual polystyrene nanoparticles, adenoviruses and influenza A (H1N1) viral particles.

  4. Wide-field optical detection of nanoparticles using on-chip microscopy and self-assembled nanolenses

    PubMed Central

    Mudanyali, Onur; McLeod, Euan; Luo, Wei; Greenbaum, Alon; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Hennequin, Yves; Allier, Cédric P.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    The direct observation of nanoscale objects is a challenging task for optical microscopy because the scattering from an individual nanoparticle is typically weak at optical wavelengths. Electron microscopy therefore remains one of the gold standard visualization methods for nanoparticles, despite its high cost, limited throughput and restricted field-of-view. Here, we describe a high-throughput, on-chip detection scheme that uses biocompatible wetting films to self-assemble aspheric liquid nanolenses around individual nanoparticles to enhance the contrast between the scattered and background light. We model the effect of the nanolens as a spatial phase mask centred on the particle and show that the holographic diffraction pattern of this effective phase mask allows detection of sub-100 nm particles across a large field-of-view of >20 mm2. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we report on-chip detection of individual polystyrene nanoparticles, adenoviruses and influenza A (H1N1) viral particles. PMID:24358054

  5. The dawn of wide-field Sunyaev-Zel'dovich cluster surveys: Efficient optical follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, Fredrick William

    The South Pole Telescope team has recently reported the first 21 galaxy clusters uniformly selected by a blind Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) survey. Prompt optical imaging has confirmed the existence of red-sequence galaxy overdensities at the SZ locations, and provided first estimates of their redshift and optical richness. We have also followed up a subset spectroscopically. These are some of the most massive clusters in the universe, spanning redshifts from z=0.15 to z>1, with median of 0.74. This remarkable sample serves as proof of concept for SZ cluster surveys, which will provide a new, powerful window on the nature of dark energy. We are attacking the problem of following up many hundreds or thousands of SZ detections in the coming years by developing a real-time photometric calibration tool called Stellar Locus Regression. We also attack it from a hardware standpoint by building PISCO, a simultaneous multiband CCD imager. Optimizing the observing strategy alone using SLR provides a factor of 2 in cluster-confirmation yield over standard methods, and PISCO gives another factor of 3 to 4 for z<1 clusters. Finally, we provide the first sky background characterization in the new CCD y band at Cerro Tololo in Chile, which will be used in next-generation astronomical camera systems and will provide useful additional information. as well as new challenges, for cluster studies such as this.

  6. Real-time optically sectioned wide-field microscopy employing structured light illumination and a CMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitic, Jelena; Anhut, Tiemo; Serov, Alexandre; Lasser, Theo; Bourquin, Stephane

    2003-07-01

    Real-time optically sectioned microscopy is demonstrated using an AC-sensitive detection concept realized with smart CMOS image sensor and structured light illumination by a continuously moving periodic pattern. We describe two different detection systems based on CMOS image sensors for the detection and on-chip processing of the sectioned images in real time. A region-of-interest is sampled at high frame rate. The demodulated signal delivered by the detector corresponds to the depth discriminated image of the sample. The measured FWHM of the axial response depends on the spatial frequency of the projected grid illumination and is in the ?m-range. The effect of using broadband incoherent illumination is discussed. The performance of these systems is demonstrated by imaging technical as well as biological samples.

  7. Wide-field, full-field optical coherence microscopy for high-axial-resolution phase and amplitude imaging.

    PubMed

    Federici, Antoine; da Costa, Henrique S Gutierrez; Ogien, Jonas; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Dubois, Arnaud

    2015-09-20

    An original single-objective, full-field optical coherence microscopy system is reported that is capable of imaging both the phase and the amplitude of semi-transparent samples over a field of view of 17.5  mm×17.5  mm with an axial sectioning resolution of 1.5 μm. A special stack acquisition arrangement ensures optimal reachable imaging depth. Several phase-shifting interferometry algorithms for phase measurement with broadband light are compared theoretically and experimentally. Using the phase information, noninvasive depth-resolved topographic images of multilayer samples are produced to characterize each layer by measuring their defects and curvature with a nanometric scale precision. Using the amplitude information, tomographic images with a constant detection sensitivity of ∼80  dB through the entire field of view are obtained and applied to biological specimens. PMID:26406527

  8. Comparison of multispectral wide-field optical imaging modalities to maximize image contrast for objective discrimination of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblyer, Darren; Kurachi, Cristina; Stepanek, Vanda; Schwarz, Richard A.; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Lee, J. Jack; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-11-01

    Multispectral widefield optical imaging has the potential to improve early detection of oral cancer. The appropriate selection of illumination and collection conditions is required to maximize diagnostic ability. The goals of this study were to (i) evaluate image contrast between oral cancer/precancer and non-neoplastic mucosa for a variety of imaging modalities and illumination/collection conditions, and (ii) use classification algorithms to evaluate and compare the diagnostic utility of these modalities to discriminate cancers and precancers from normal tissue. Narrowband reflectance, autofluorescence, and polarized reflectance images were obtained from 61 patients and 11 normal volunteers. Image contrast was compared to identify modalities and conditions yielding greatest contrast. Image features were extracted and used to train and evaluate classification algorithms to discriminate tissue as non-neoplastic, dysplastic, or cancer; results were compared to histologic diagnosis. Autofluorescence imaging at 405-nm excitation provided the greatest image contrast, and the ratio of red-to-green fluorescence intensity computed from these images provided the best classification of dysplasia/cancer versus non-neoplastic tissue. A sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85% were achieved in the validation set. Multispectral widefield images can accurately distinguish neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue; however, the ability to separate precancerous lesions from cancers with this technique was limited.

  9. First ever cross comparison of thermospheric wind measured by narrow- and wide-field optical Doppler spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, M. S.; Meriwether, J.; Conde, M.; Hampton, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first ever cross comparisons of F region horizontal neutral wind measurements taken using two different types of optical Doppler spectrometer: all-sky scanning Doppler imagers (SDI) and narrow-field Fabry-Perot interferometers (NFPIs). Horizontal neutral winds were inferred using bistatic observations from three NFPIs, together with monostatic and bistatic observations from two SDIs. All instruments were located in Alaska. Cross comparisons were made for a total of seven nights in January and February 2010. The results show a high degree of correlation between the diurnal behaviors of the line-of-sight (LOS) winds measured by both instruments. The SDI and NFPI LOS wind time series also often contained high-frequency fluctuations with similar overall characteristics, strongly suggesting that these fluctuations were geophysical in origin. However, the amplitude of the high-frequency component was stronger in the NFPI LOS wind than in the SDI data. Even the smallest SDI angular resolution element is much larger than the NFPI field of view, suggesting that its relative insensitivity to high frequencies is because these fluctuations are associated with local-scale structures whose spatial extent is smaller than ˜40 km spanned by the smallest SDI viewing field. Upon fitting vectors to the LOS wind data, close agreement was found between the wind components estimated by the two types of instrument. Discrepancies that did arise occurred most often when the neutral wind speed was weak, suggesting that conditions capable of driving higher neutral wind speeds also suppressed the development of small-scale structures in the thermospheric neutral wind fields.

  10. BRIGHTEST X-RAY CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES IN THE CFHTLS WIDE FIELDS: CATALOG AND OPTICAL MASS ESTIMATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkazemi, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Lerchster, M.; Erfanianfar, G.; Seitz, S.; Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E.; Tanaka, M.; Brimioulle, F.; Kettula, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Kneib, J. P.; Rykoff, E.; Erben, T.; Taylor, J. E.

    2015-01-20

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) presents a unique data set for weak-lensing studies, having high-quality imaging and deep multiband photometry. We have initiated an XMM-CFHTLS project to provide X-ray observations of the brightest X-ray-selected clusters within the wide CFHTLS area. Performance of these observations and the high quality of CFHTLS data allow us to revisit the identification of X-ray sources, introducing automated reproducible algorithms, based on the multicolor red sequence finder. We have also introduced a new optical mass proxy. We provide the calibration of the red sequence observed in the Canada-France-Hawaii filters and compare the results with the traditional single-color red sequence and photo-z. We test the identification algorithm on the subset of highly significant XMM clusters and identify 100% of the sample. We find that the integrated z-band luminosity of the red sequence galaxies correlates well with the X-ray luminosity, with a surprisingly small scatter of 0.20 dex. We further use the multicolor red sequence to reduce spurious detections in the full XMM and ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) data sets, resulting in catalogs of 196 and 32 clusters, respectively. We made spectroscopic follow-up observations of some of these systems with HECTOSPEC and in combination with BOSS DR9 data. We also describe the modifications needed to the source detection algorithm in order to maintain high purity of extended sources in the shallow X-ray data. We also present the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity and velocity dispersion.

  11. In vivo wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography of human oral cavity with a forward-viewing probe

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeoreum; Jang, Won Hyuk; Xiao, Peng; Kim, Bumju; Wang, Taejun; Li, Qingyun; Lee, Ji Youl; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2015-01-01

    We report multimodal imaging of human oral cavity in vivo based on simultaneous wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) with a forward-viewing imaging probe. Wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and PS-OCT were to provide both morphological and fluorescence information on the surface, and structural and birefringent information below the surface respectively. The forward-viewing probe was designed to access the oral cavity through the mouth with dimensions of approximately 10 mm in diameter and 180 mm in length. The probe had field of view (FOV) of approximately 5.5 mm in diameter, and adjustable depth of field (DOF) from 2 mm to 10 mm by controlling numerical aperture (NA) in the detection path. This adjustable DOF was to accommodate both requirements for image-based guiding with high DOF and high-resolution, high-sensitivity imaging with low DOF. This multimodal imaging system was characterized by using a tissue phantom and a mouse model in vivo, and was applied to human oral cavity. Information of surface morphology and vasculature, and under-surface layered structure and birefringence of the oral cavity tissues was obtained. These results showed feasibility of this multimodal imaging system as a tool for studying oral cavity lesions in clinical applications. PMID:25780742

  12. An automated wide-field time-gated optically sectioning fluorescence lifetime imaging multiwell plate reader for high-content analysis of protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibhai, Dominic; Kumar, Sunil; Kelly, Douglas; Warren, Sean; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Murray, Edward J.; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A. A.; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M. W.

    2011-03-01

    We describe an optically-sectioned FLIM multiwell plate reader that combines Nipkow microscopy with wide-field time-gated FLIM, and its application to high content analysis of FRET. The system acquires sectioned FLIM images in <10 s/well, requiring only ~11 minutes to read a 96 well plate of live cells expressing fluorescent protein. It has been applied to study the formation of immature HIV virus like particles (VLPs) in live cells by monitoring Gag-Gag protein interactions using FLIM FRET of HIV-1 Gag transfected with CFP or YFP. VLP formation results in FRET between closely packed Gag proteins, as confirmed by our FLIM analysis that includes automatic image segmentation.

  13. Wide field corrector for the KMTNet telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongseok; Cha, Sang-Mok; Poteet, Wade; Lam, Philip; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Park, Byeong-Gon; Buchroeder, Richard A.; Jin, Ho

    2014-07-01

    We present the design, assembly, alignment, and verification process of the wide field corrector for the Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) 1.6 meter optical telescope. The optical configuration of the KMTNet telescope is prime focus, having a wide field corrector and the CCD camera on the topside of Optical Tube Assembly (OTA). The corrector is made of four lenses designed to have all spherical surfaces, being the largest one of 552 mm physical diameter. Combining with a purely parabolic primary mirror, this optical design makes easier to fabricate, to align, and to test the wide field optics. The centering process of the optics in the lens cell was performed on a precision rotary table using an indicator. After the centering, we mounted three large and heavy lenses on each cell by injecting the continuous Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) silicon rubber bonding via a syringe.

  14. Reflection, phase and en- face sectional imaging of scattering objects using quasi-single-shot wide-field optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anna, Tulsi; Kimura, Satoshi; Mehta, Dalip Singh; Sato, Manabu

    2015-10-01

    We report a quasi-single-shot wide-field optical coherence tomography system that enables to measure the reflection, phase and en- face OCT images from the same setup using the glass jig. The jig consisting of a wedge glass substrate and a glue dot is contacted to the tissue surfaces, and the data within glue dot is used to reduce the phase noise of the interference signal. The reconstructed image size of the object was 4.0 mm × 4.3 mm. The standard deviation (STD) of the phase variation was minimized by 54 % and obtained to be 0.027 rad for the poke tissue. The corresponding STD in optical path length change was measured to be 1.4 nm. The refractive index of the water and poke tissue at the surface is also evaluated as 1.36 and 1.39, respectively, using reflection intensity images. Further, the en- face sectional images of the tissue sample are also measured.

  15. Self-Management of Patient Body Position, Pose, and Motion Using Wide-Field, Real-Time Optical Measurement Feedback: Results of a Volunteer Study

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, James M.; Price, Gareth J.; Sharrock, Phil J.; Jackson, Andrew S.N.; Stratford, Julie; Moore, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We present the results of a clinical feasibility study, performed in 10 healthy volunteers undergoing a simulated treatment over 3 sessions, to investigate the use of a wide-field visual feedback technique intended to help patients control their pose while reducing motion during radiation therapy treatment. Methods and Materials: An optical surface sensor is used to capture wide-area measurements of a subject's body surface with visualizations of these data displayed back to them in real time. In this study we hypothesize that this active feedback mechanism will enable patients to control their motion and help them maintain their setup pose and position. A capability hierarchy of 3 different level-of-detail abstractions of the measured surface data is systematically compared. Results: Use of the device enabled volunteers to increase their conformance to a reference surface, as measured by decreased variability across their body surfaces. The use of visual feedback also enabled volunteers to reduce their respiratory motion amplitude to 1.7 ± 0.6 mm compared with 2.7 ± 1.4 mm without visual feedback. Conclusions: The use of live feedback of their optically measured body surfaces enabled a set of volunteers to better manage their pose and motion when compared with free breathing. The method is suitable to be taken forward to patient studies.

  16. Future Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahony, Michael J.; Politi, Christina; Klonidis, Dimitrios; Nejabati, Reza; Simeonidou, Dimitra

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents views on the future of optical networking. A historical look at the emergence of optical networking is first taken, followed by a discussion on the drivers pushing for a new and pervasive network, which is based on photonics and can satisfy the needs of a broadening base of residential, business, and scientific users. Regional plans and targets for optical networking are reviewed to understand which current approaches are judged important. Today, two thrusts are driving separate optical network infrastructure models, namely 1) the need by nations to provide a ubiquitous network infrastructure to support all the future services and telecommunication needs of residential and business users and 2) increasing demands by the scientific community for networks to support their requirements with respect to large-scale data transport and processing. This paper discusses these network models together with the key enabling technologies currently being considered for future implementation, including optical circuit, burst and packet switching, and optical code-division multiplexing. Critical subsystem functionalities are also reviewed. The discussion considers how these separate models might eventually merge to form a global optical network infrastructure.

  17. Real-time GPU-accelerated processing and volumetric display for wide-field laser-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Heesung; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Eun-Soo; Kim, Se-Hwa; Lee, Tae Geol

    2015-01-01

    Fast signal processing and real-time displays are essential for practical imaging modality in various fields of applications. However, the imaging speed in optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), in particular, depends on factors such as the pulse repetition rate of the laser, scanning method, field of view (FOV), and signal processing time. In the past, efforts to increase acquisition speed either focused on developing new scanning methods or using lasers with higher pulse repetition rates. However, high-speed signal processing is also important for real-time volumetric display in OR-PAM. In this study, we carried out parallel signal processing using a graphics processing unit (GPU) to enable fast signal processing and wide-field real-time displays in laser-scanning OR-PAM. The average total GPU processing time for a B-mode PAM image was approximately 1.35 ms at a display speed of 480 fps when the data samples were acquired with 736 (axial) × 500 (lateral) points/B-mode-frame at a pulse repetition rate of 300 kHz. In addition, we successfully displayed maximum amplitude projection images of a mouse’s ear as volumetric images with an FOV of 3 mm × 3 mm (500 × 500 pixels) at 1.02 s, corresponding to 0.98 fps. PMID:26713184

  18. Automatic detection of asteroids and meteoroids. A Wide Field Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereš, P.; Tóth, J.; Jedicke, R.; Tonry, J.; Denneau, L.; Wainscoat, R.; Kornoš, L.; Šilha, J.

    2014-07-01

    We propose a low-cost robotic optical survey aimed at 1-300 m Near Earth Objects (NEO) based on four state-of-the-art telescopes having extremely wide field of view. The small Near-Earth Asteroids (NEA) represent a potential risk but also easily accessible space resources for future robotic or human space in-situ exploration, or commercial activities. The survey system will be optimized for the detection of fast moving-trailed-asteroids, space debris and will provide real-time alert notifications. The expected cost of the system including 1-year development and 2-year operation is 1,000,000 EUR. The successful demonstration of the system will promote cost-effectiveicient ADAM-WFS (Automatic Detection of Asteroids and Meteoroids -- A Wide Field Survey) systems to be built around the world.

  19. The XMM-Newton Wide-Field Survey in the COSMOS Field. III. Optical Identification and Multiwavelength Properties of a Large Sample of X-Ray-Selected Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, M.; Zamorani, G.; Comastri, A.; Hasinger, G.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Finoguenov, A.; Mainieri, V.; Salvato, M.; Vignali, C.; Elvis, M.; Fiore, F.; Gilli, R.; Impey, C. D.; Lilly, S. J.; Mignoli, M.; Silverman, J.; Trump, J.; Urry, C. M.; Bender, R.; Capak, P.; Huchra, J. P.; Kneib, J. P.; Koekemoer, A.; Leauthaud, A.; Lehmann, I.; Massey, R.; Matute, I.; McCarthy, P. J.; McCracken, H. J.; Rhodes, J.; Scoville, N. Z.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.

    2007-09-01

    We present the optical identification of a sample of 695 X-ray sources detected in the first 1.3 deg2 of the COSMOS XMM-Newton survey, down to a 0.5-2 keV (2-10 keV) limiting flux of ~10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 (~510-15 erg cm-2 s-1). In order to identify the correct optical counterparts and to assess the statistical significance of the X-ray-to-optical associations we have used the ``likelihood ratio technique.'' Here we present the identification method and its application to the CFHT I-band and photometric catalogs. We were able to associate a candidate optical counterpart to ~90% (626) of the X-ray sources, while for the remaining ~10% of the sources we were not able to provide a unique optical association due to the faintness of the possible optical counterparts (IAB>25) or to the presence of multiple optical sources, with similar likelihoods of being the correct identification, within the XMM-Newton error circles. We also cross-correlated the candidate optical counterparts with the Subaru multicolor and ACS catalogs and with the Magellan/IMACS, zCOSMOS, and literature spectroscopic data; the spectroscopic sample comprises 248 objects (~40% of the full sample). Our analysis of this statistically meaningful sample of X-ray sources reveals that for ~80% of the counterparts there is a very good agreement between the spectroscopic classification, the morphological parameters as derived from ACS data, and the optical-to-near-infrared colors: the large majority of spectroscopically identified broad-line active galactic nuclei (BL AGNs) have a pointlike morphology on ACS data, blue optical colors in color-color diagrams, and an X-ray-to-optical flux ratio typical of optically selected quasars. Conversely, sources classified as narrow line AGNs or normal galaxies are on average associated with extended optical sources, have significantly redder optical-to-near-infrared colors, and span a larger range of X-ray-to-optical flux ratios. However, about 20% of the sources show an apparent mismatch between the morphological and spectroscopic classifications. All the ``extended'' BL AGNs lie at redshift <1.5, while the redshift distribution of the full BL AGN population peaks at z~1.5. The most likely explanation is that in these objects the nuclear emission is not dominant with respect to the host galaxy emission in the observed ACS band. Our analysis also suggests that the type 2/type 1 ratio decreases toward high luminosities, in qualitative agreement with the results from X-ray spectral analysis and the most recent modeling of the X-ray luminosity function evolution. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; also based on data collected at the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA), under NASA contract NAS 5-26555 the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under Large Program 175.A-0839 Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which are operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA), under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique de France and the University of Hawaii.

  20. Wide Field Imager for Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Rau, Arne; Plattner, Markus; WFI proto-Consortium

    2015-09-01

    The Wide Field Imager focal plane instrument on ATHENA will combine unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arcmin with a high count-rate capability (> 1 Crab). The energy resolution of the silicon sensor is state-of-the-art in the energy band of interest from 0.1 keV to 15 keV. At energy of 6 keV for example, the full width at half maximum of the line shall be not worse than 150 eV until the end of the mission. The performance is accomplished by a set of DEPFET active pixel sensor matrices with a pixel size well suited to the angular resolution of 5 arc sec (on-axis) of the mirror system.Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450 micron thick silicon bulk. Two different types of DEPFET sensors are planned for the WFI instrument: A set of large-area sensors to cover the physical size of 14 cm x 14 cm in the focal plane and a single gateable DEPFET sensor matrix optimized for the high count rate capability of the instrument. An overview will be given about the presently developed instrument concept and design, the status of the technology development, and the expected performance. An outline of the project organization, the model philosophy as well as the schedule will complete the presentation about the Wide Field Imager for Athena.

  1. Lensless imaging for wide field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahara, Hajime; Yagi, Yasushi

    2015-02-01

    It is desirable to engineer a small camera with a wide field of view (FOV) because of current developments in the field of wearable cameras and computing products, such as action cameras and Google Glass. However, typical approaches for achieving wide FOV, such as attaching a fisheye lens and convex mirrors, require a trade-off between optics size and the FOV. We propose camera optics that achieve a wide FOV, and are at the same time small and lightweight. The proposed optics are a completely lensless and catoptric design. They contain four mirrors, two for wide viewing, and two for focusing the image on the camera sensor. The proposed optics are simple and can be simply miniaturized, since we use only mirrors for the proposed optics and the optics are not susceptible to chromatic aberration. We have implemented the prototype optics of our lensless concept. We have attached the optics to commercial charge-coupled device/complementary metal oxide semiconductor cameras and conducted experiments to evaluate the feasibility of our proposed optics.

  2. Gemini Frontier Fields: Wide-field Adaptive Optics Ks-band Imaging of the Galaxy Clusters MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Carrasco, E. R.; Pessev, P.; Garrel, V.; Winge, C.; Neichel, B.; Vidal, F.

    2015-04-01

    We have observed two of the six Frontier Fields galaxy clusters, MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744, using the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) and the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI). With 0.″ 08-0.″ 10 FWHM our data are nearly diffraction-limited over a 100\\prime\\prime × 100\\prime\\prime wide area. GeMS/GSAOI complements the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) redwards of 1.6 μm with twice the angular resolution. We reach a 5σ depth of {{K}s}˜ 25.6 mag (AB) for compact sources. In this paper, we describe the observations, data processing, and initial public data release. We provide fully calibrated, co-added images matching the native GSAOI pixel scale as well as the larger plate scales of the HST release, adding to the legacy value of the Frontier Fields. Our work demonstrates that even for fields at high galactic latitude where natural guide stars are rare, current multi-conjugated adaptive optics technology at 8 m telescopes has opened a new window on the distant universe. Observations of a third Frontier Field, Abell 370, are planned. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal Observatories, Chile.

  3. Ultrahigh-resolution, wide-field-of-view optical filter for the detection of frequency-doubled Nd:YAG radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, T.M.; Chung, Y.C.

    1988-06-01

    We report a simple theoretical model for the calculation of the dependence of filter quantum efficiency versus laser pump power in an atomic Rb vapor laser-excited optical filter. We present the calculations for a 532.4-nm Rb filter that can be used to detect the practical and important frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The results of these calculations show that the filter's quantum efficiency is relatively insensitive to the laser pump power. The laser powers required to pump the filter range from 3.6 to 226 mW per square centimeter of filter aperture.

  4. In vivo wide-field multispectral scanning laser ophthalmoscopy-optical coherence tomography mouse retinal imager: longitudinal imaging of ganglion cells, microglia, and Müller glia, and mapping of the mouse retinal and choroidal vasculature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Jian, Yifan; Wang, Xinlei; Li, Yuanpei; Lam, Kit S; Burns, Marie E; Sarunic, Marinko V; Pugh, Edward N; Zawadzki, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) provide complementary views of the retina, with the former collecting fluorescence data with good lateral but relatively low-axial resolution, and the latter collecting label-free backscattering data with comparable lateral but much higher axial resolution. To take maximal advantage of the information of both modalities in mouse retinal imaging, we have constructed a compact, four-channel, wide-field (∼50  deg) system that simultaneously acquires and automatically coregisters three channels of confocal SLO and Fourier domain OCT data. The scanner control system allows “zoomed” imaging of a region of interest identified in a wide-field image, providing efficient digital sampling and localization of cellular resolution features in longitudinal imaging of individual mice. The SLO is equipped with a “flip-in” spectrometer that enables spectral “fingerprinting” of fluorochromes. Segmentation of retina layers and en face display facilitate spatial comparison of OCT data with SLO fluorescence patterns. We demonstrate that the system can be used to image an individual retinal ganglion cell over many months, to simultaneously image microglia and Müller glia expressing different fluorochromes, to characterize the distinctive spatial distributions and clearance times of circulating fluorochromes with different molecular sizes, and to produce unequivocal images of the heretofore uncharacterized mouse choroidal vasculature. PMID:26677070

  5. WIDE-FIELD ASTRONOMICAL MULTISCALE CAMERAS

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Daniel L.; Brady, David J.

    2013-05-15

    In order to produce sufficiently low aberrations with a large aperture, telescopes have a limited field of view. Because of this narrow field, large areas of the sky at a given time are unobserved. We propose several telescopes based on monocentric reflective, catadioptric, and refractive objectives that may be scaled to wide fields of view and achieve 1.''1 resolution, which in most locations is the practical seeing limit of the atmosphere. The reflective and Schmidt catadioptric objectives have relatively simple configurations and enable large fields to be captured at the expense of the obscuration of the mirror by secondary optics, a defect that may be managed by image plane design. The refractive telescope design does not have an obscuration but the objective has substantial bulk. The refractive design is a 38 gigapixel camera which consists of a single monocentric objective and 4272 microcameras. Monocentric multiscale telescopes, with their wide fields of view, may observe phenomena that might otherwise be unnoticed, such as supernovae, glint from orbital space debris, and near-earth objects.

  6. Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    We present WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer) mid-infrared photometry of young stellar object candidates in the Canis Majoris clouds at a distance of 1 kpc. WISE has identified 682 objects with apparent 12 and 22 micron excess emission in a 7 deg x 10 deg field around the CMa Rl cloud . While a substantial fraction of these candidates are likely galaxies, AGB stars, and artifacts from confusion along the galactic plane, others are part of a spectacular cluster of YSOs imaged by WISE along a dark filament in the R1 cloud. Palomar Double Spectrograph observations of several sources in this cluster confirm their identity as young A and B stars with strong emission lines. In this contribution, we plot the optical -mid-infrared spectral energy distribution for the WISE YSO candidates and discuss potential contaminants to the sample . The data demonstrate the utility of WISE in performing wide-area surveys for young stellar objects.

  7. Imaging spectrometer wide field catadioptric design

    SciTech Connect

    Chrisp; Michael P.

    2008-08-19

    A wide field catadioptric imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The catadioptric design has zero Petzval field curvature. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, a system with a catadioptric lens and a dioptric lens for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the system for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the system for receiving the light and the system for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light through the system for receiving the light to the detector array.

  8. Wide field-of-view bifocal eyeglasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Sergio; Rubinstein, Jacob

    2015-09-01

    When vision is affected simultaneously by presbyopia and myopia or hyperopia, a solution based on eyeglasses implies a surface with either segmented focal regions (e.g. bifocal lenses) or a progressive addition profile (PALs). However, both options have the drawback of reducing the field-of-view for each power position, which restricts the natural eye-head movements of the wearer. To avoid this serious limitation we propose a new solution which is essentially a bifocal power-adjustable optical design ensuring a wide field-of-view for every viewing distance. The optical system is based on the Alvarez principle. Spherical refraction correction is considered for different eccentric gaze directions covering a field-of-view range up to 45degrees. Eye movements during convergence for near objects are included. We designed three bifocal systems. The first one provides 3 D for far vision (myopic eye) and -1 D for near vision (+2 D Addition). The second one provides a +3 D addition with 3 D for far vision. Finally the last system is an example of reading glasses with +1 D power Addition.

  9. Stereoscopic wide field of view imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prechtl, Eric F. (Inventor); Sedwick, Raymond J. (Inventor); Jonas, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A stereoscopic imaging system incorporates a plurality of imaging devices or cameras to generate a high resolution, wide field of view image database from which images can be combined in real time to provide wide field of view or panoramic or omni-directional still or video images.

  10. Wide Field X-ray Telescope (WFXT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S. S.; Borgani, S.; Campana, S.; Citterio, O.; Forman, W.; Giacconi, R.; Gilli, R.; Paolillo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Ptak, A.; Rosati, P.; Tozzi, P.; Weisskopf, M.; the WFXT Team

    The Wide Field X-ray Telescope is the latest in a series of mission concepts to carry out a large area X-ray survey with sensitivity orders of magnitude fainter than the ROSAT All Sky Survey, and with angular resolution of 5 arcsec over the entire survey area. The science that can be addressed by such a mission and the technical readiness are discussed. The conclusion is that WFXT addresses many of the science issues raised in the 2010 New World New Horizons decadal survey and is well matched to the next generation of optical, IR and radio surveys currently being planned. The technologies needed for WFXT have all been demonstrated, and only the mirrors have a technical readiness level (TRL) that is less than 6. Three independent cost estimates for this mission, covering life-cycle costs, launch services and a GO program are below \\$1B (FY12), and suggest that the mission concept is mature and ready for implementation.

  11. Invited Article: First Flight in Space of a Wide-field-of-view Soft X-Ray Imager Using Lobster-Eye Optics: Instrument Description and Initial Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael; Porter, F. Scott; Sibeck, David G.; Carter, Jenny A.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chomay, Dennis J.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Galeazzi, Massiniliano; Keller, John; Koutroumpa, Dimitra

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development, launch into space, and initial results from a prototype wide eld-of-view (FOV) soft X-ray imager that employs Lobster-eye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) is the rst instrument using this type of optics launched into space and provides proof-of-concept for future ight instruments capable of imaging structures such as the terrestrial cusp, the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere, comets, the moon, and the solar wind interaction with planetary bodies like Venus and Mars.

  12. Wide-field camera 3 ground testing and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushouse, H.; Baggett, S.; Brown, T.; Hartig, G. F.; Hilbert, B.; Hill, R. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Lupie, O.; MacKenty, J. W.; Reid, I. N.; Robberto, M.

    2006-06-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a panchromatic imager being developed for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is now fully integrated and has undergone extensive ground testing at Goddard Space Flight Center, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum test environments. The thermal-vacuum testing marks the first time that both of the WFC3 UV/Visible and IR channels have been operated and characterized in flight-like conditions. The testing processes are completely automated, with WFC3 and the optical stimulus that is used to provide external targets and sources being commanded by coordinated computer scripts. All test data are captured and stored in the long-term Hubble Data Archive. A full suite of instrument calibration tests have been performed, including measurements of detector properties such as dark current, read noise, flat field response, gain, linearity, and persistence, as well as total system throughput, encircled energy, grism dispersions, IR thermal background, and image stability tests. Nearly all instrument characteristics have been shown to meet or exceed expectations and requirements. Solutions to all issues discovered during testing are in the process of being implemented and will be verified during future ground tests.

  13. The Wide-Field Infrared Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacking, P.; Schember, H.

    1993-05-01

    We propose to build a Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) in response to NASA's 1992 Announcement of Opportunity for Small Explorers. WIRE will be capable of detecting typical starburst galaxies at a redshift of 0.5, ultraluminous infrared galaxies beyond a redshift of 2, and luminous protogalaxies beyond a redshift of 5. This instrument will survey about 100 deg(2) of high Galactic latitude sky at 12 and 25 microns, in passbands where 20% of the luminosity from local starbursts is radiated. WIRE will measure the 12--25 microns color of the starburst galaxies, which is a powerful statistical luminosity indicator. The distribution of starburst galaxy 12--25 microns colors as a function of flux density will reveal their evolutionary history and perhaps the presence of protogalaxies at high redshifts. Follow-up observations of a subset of the WIRE survey will provide a test of our assumptions in using the flux-color distribution to determine the evolution of starburst galaxies. The objective of the WIRE mission is to answer the following questions: (1) What fraction of the luminosity of the Universe at a redshift of 0.5 and beyond is due to starburst galaxies? (2) How fast and in what ways are starburst galaxies evolving? (3) Are luminous protogalaxies common at redshifts less than 3? During its four-month mission lifetime, WIRE will gather ample data to answer these questions and amass a catalog exceeding the size of the IRAS Point Source Catalog. If starburst galaxies are evolving at a modest pace, then a three-hour exposure will reach flux densities below 0.4 mJy, 5sigma , and will be dominated by confusion noise. WIRE is specifically designed to detect the maximum number of high-redshift starburst galaxies using the smallest, simplest instrument possible. The 28cm aperture Cassegrain telescope has no moving parts and a wide 34 times 34 arcminute field of view. It capitalizes on the 128 times 128 Si:As IBC detector arrays now available. The optics and detectors are cooled during the mission using only 3 kg of solid H_2. The WIRE instrument requires only a single stare-type observing mode, fixed solar panel, 35 watts of power, and a low data rate (7 kbits/sec average). The WIRE survey will be over 500 times fainter than the IRAS Faint Source Survey at 12 and 25 microns. This revolutionary gain in sensitivity over a significant part of the sky permits breakthroughs in all areas of astronomy.

  14. Fiber Optics: A Bright Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, James, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of the impact of fiber optics on telecommunications and its application to information processing and library services, including information retrieval, news services, remote transmission of library services, and library networking. (RAA)

  15. The Wide-Field Infrared Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schember, Helene; Hacking, Perry

    1993-01-01

    More than 30% of current star formation is taking place ingalaxies known as starburst galaxies. Do starburst galaxies play a central role in the evolution of all galaxies, and can they lead us to the birth of galaxies and the source of quasars? We have proposed to build the Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE), capable of detecting typical starburst galaxies at a redshift of 0.5, ultraluminous infrared galaxies behond a redshift of 2, and luminous protogalaxies beyond a redshift of 5.

  16. Developing Wide-Field Spatio-Spectral Interferometry for Far-Infrared Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.; Maher, Stephen F.; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Sinukoff, Evan J.

    2012-01-01

    Interferometry is an affordable way to bring the benefits of high resolution to space far-IR astrophysics. We summarize an ongoing effort to develop and learn the practical limitations of an interferometric technique that will enable the acquisition of high-resolution far-IR integral field spectroscopic data with a single instrument in a future space-based interferometer. This technique was central to the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS) space mission design concepts, and it will first be used on the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII). Our experimental approach combines data from a laboratory optical interferometer (the Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed, WIIT), computational optical system modeling, and spatio-spectral synthesis algorithm development. We summarize recent experimental results and future plans.

  17. The wide field imager instrument for Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Porro, Matteo; Rau, Arne; Santangelo, Andrea E.; Tenzer, Chris; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-07-01

    The "Hot and Energetic Universe" has been selected as the science theme for ESA's L2 mission, scheduled for launch in 2028. The proposed Athena X-ray observatory provides the necessary capabilities to achieve the ambitious goals of the science theme. The X-ray mirrors are based on silicon pore optics technology and will have a 12 m focal length. Two complementary camera systems are foreseen which can be moved in and out of the focal plane by an interchange mechanism. These instruments are the actively shielded micro-calorimeter spectrometer X-IFU and the Wide Field Imager (WFI). The WFI will combine an unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arcmin with a high countrate capability (approx. 1 Crab). It permits a state-of-the-art energy resolution in the energy band of 0.1 keV to 15 keV during the entire mission lifetime (e.g. FWHM <= 150 eV at 6 keV). This performance is accomplished by a set of DEPFET active pixel sensor matrices with a pixel size matching the angular resolution of 5 arcsec (on-axis) of the mirror system. Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450 micron thick silicon bulk. The signal electrons generated by an X-ray photon are collected in a so-called internal gate below the transistor channel. The resulting change of the conductivity of the transistor channel is proportional to the number of electrons and thus a measure for the photon energy. DEPFETs have already been developed for the "Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer" on-board of ESA's BepiColombo mission. For Athena we develop enhanced sensors with integrated electronic shutter and an additional analog storage area in each pixel. These features improve the peak-to-background ratio of the spectra and minimize dead time. The sensor will be read out with a new, fast, low-noise multi-channel analog signal processor with integrated sequencer and serial analog output. The architecture of sensor and readout ASIC allows readout in full frame mode and window mode as well by addressing selectively arbitrary sub-areas of the sensor allowing time resolution in the order of 10 μs. The further detector electronics has mainly the following tasks: digitization, pre-processing and telemetry of event data as well as supply and control of the detector system. Although the sensor will already be equipped with an on-chip light blocking filter, a filter wheel is necessary to provide an additional external filter, an on-board calibration source, an open position for outgassing, and a closed position for protection of the sensor. The sensor concept provides high quantum efficiency over the entire energy band and we intend to keep the instrumental background as low as possible by designing a graded Z-shield around the sensor. All these properties make the WFI a very powerful survey instrument, significantly surpassing currently existing observatories and in addition allow high-time resolution of the brightest X-ray sources with low pile-up and high efficiency. This manuscript will summarize the current instrument concept and design, the status of the technology development, and the envisaged baseline performance.

  18. Design and development of a wide field telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Il; Lee, Sangon; Lim, Juhee; Yang, Ho-Soon; Rhee, Hyug-Gyo; Song, Jae Bong; Lee, Yun Woo; Lee, Jong Ung; Jin, Ho

    2012-09-01

    A prototype of large wide field telescope is a Cassegrain telescope which covers 2° field of view with two hyperbolic mirrors, a 0.5 m primary mirror and a 0.2 m secondary mirror with multiple correction lenses. To fulfill the optical and mechanical performance requirements in design and development phase extensive finite element analyses using NX NASTRAN and optical analyses with CODE V and PCFRINGE have been conducted for the structure of optical system. Analyses include static deformation (gravity and thermal), frequency, dynamic response analysis, and optical performance evaluations for minimum optical deformation. Image motion is also calculated based on line of sight sensitivity equations integrated in finite element models. A parametric process was performed for the design optimization to produce highest fundamental frequency for a given weight, as well as to deal with the normal concerns about global performance.

  19. Wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging of cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGinty, James; Galletly, Neil P.; Dunsby, Chris; Munro, Ian; Elson, Daniel S.; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Cohen, Patrizia; Ahmad, Raida; Forsyth, Amanda; Thillainayagam, Andrew V.; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Stamp, Gordon W

    2010-01-01

    Optical imaging of tissue autofluorescence has the potential to provide rapid label-free screening and detection of surface tumors for clinical applications, including when combined with endoscopy. Quantitative imaging of intensity-based contrast is notoriously difficult and spectrally resolved imaging does not always provide sufficient contrast. We demonstrate that fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) applied to intrinsic tissue autofluorescence can directly contrast a range of surface tissue tumors, including in gastrointestinal tissues, using compact, clinically deployable instrumentation achieving wide-field fluorescence lifetime images of unprecedented clarity. Statistically significant contrast is observed between cancerous and healthy colon tissue for FLIM with excitation at 355 nm. To illustrate the clinical potential, wide-field fluorescence lifetime images of unstained ex vivo tissue have been acquired at near video rate, which is an important step towards real-time FLIM for diagnostic and interoperative imaging, including for screening and image-guided biopsy applications. PMID:21258496

  20. Science with the Second Wide Field and Planetary Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauger, J.

    1992-07-01

    With the commencement of Cycle 4 observations, the General Observor community will have access to the second Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WFPC2), a replacement for the orginal WFPC instrument. WFPC2, a wide-field photometric camera which covers the spectrum from 12000 to 10000 Angstroms, will be installed in the Hubble radial bay during the currently manifested December 1993 Shuttle servicing mission. Besides optical correction for the aberrated Hubble primary mirror, the WFPC2 incorporates evolutionary improvement in photometric imaging capabilities. The CCD sensors, signal chain electronics, filter set, FUV performance, internal calibrations, and operational efficiency have all been improved through new technologies and lessons learned from WFPC operations and Hubble experience since launch. Here we provide an overview of the new instrument, beginning with the assumption that the reader is already familiar with the original WFPC now in service.

  1. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We present recent results from the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT). The data acquired with the WIIT is "double Fourier" data, including both spatial and spectral information within each data cube. We have been working with this data, and starting to develop algorithms, implementations, and techniques for reducing this data. Such algorithms and tools are of great importance for a number of proposed future missions, including the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT), the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I)/Darwin. Recent results are discussed and future study directions are described.

  2. Selected aspects of wide-field stellar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcio, Luigi Arsenio

    1999-11-01

    In Michelson stellar interferometry, the high-resolution information about the source structure is detected by performing observations with widely separated telescopes, interconnected to form an interferometer. At optical wavelengths, this method provides a technically viable approach for achieving angular resolutions in the milliarcsecond range, comparable to those of a 100 m diameter telescope, whose realization is beyond the immediate engineering capabilities. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to the definition of dedicated interferometric instruments, which will allow to address ambitious astronomical tasks such as high-resolution imaging, astrometry at microarcsecond level, and the direct detection of exoplanets. Astrometry and related techniques employ the so-called wide field-of-view interferometric mode, where phase measurements are performed simultaneously at two (or more) sources; often, the actual observable is the instantaneous phase difference of the two object signals. The future success of wide-field interferometry critically depends on the development of techniques for the accurate control of field-dependent (anisoplanatic) phase errors. In this thesis, we address two aspects of this problem in detail. The first one is theoretical in nature. For ground-based measurements, atmospheric turbulence is the largest source of random phase fluctuations between the on- and the off-axis fringes. We developed a model of the temporal power spectrum of this disturbance, whose validity is not limited to low frequencies only, as it is the case with earlier models. This extension opens the possibility of the analysis of dynamic issues, such as the determination of the allowable coherent integration time T for the off-axis fringes. The spectrum turns out to be well approximated by a sequences of four power-law branches. In first instance, its overall form is determined by the values of the baseline length, telescope diameter, and average beam separation in the atmosphere. Due to the rapid decorrelation of the on- and off-axis phases for increasing star separation theta, the useful field for wide-field interferometry is limited to about |theta|<1', the so-called very narrow angle regime. For high-accuracy applications, this range decreases to a few arcseconds. We estimated that for the VLTI along baselines operating at lambda=2.2 mu, a turbulence-related error of less than lambda/10 rms is only available for field angles smaller than 7.3'' and 5.8'', for UT-UT and AT-AT pairs respectively. The bulk of the spectral power is confined at relatively low frequencies, typically below 1 Hz. Both smaller star separations and larger telescope sizes contribute in lowering the spectral content at hight frequencies. We found that in general, as compared to blind observations, wide-field measurements can make use of significantly longer off-axis integration times T, even at rather big star separations. For the long UT-UT baseline operating at lambda=2.2 mu, we have calculated a 5 % fringe visibility loss is reached for T=740 ms, 2.1 s and 12.7 s for star separations of 30'', 10'', and 5'', respectively. These figures are about 2, 5 and 32 times higher than for a blind observation. Finally, we point out that for large telescopes a significant fraction of the total phase error due to anisoplanatic turbulence is contributed by wavefront modes higher than piston. Therefore, we generalized the formalism used in out study to the analysis of (Zernike) wavefront modes of arbitrary order. This thesis also addresses an instrumental aspect of the problem of the control of anisoplanatic phase errors. A Michelson interferometric imager is suitable for wide-field operation only if the configuration of the pupil images forms a scaled replica of the total array aperture. This implies the factual coincidence of the magnification factors M and pupil rotations phi of all interferometric arms: for the VLTI, the matching accuracy requirements are as severe as dM< 1.9e-3, dphi < 3.8''. We addressed the problem of measuring dM, dphi, to the accuracies expressed here above. In the selected approach, this is done by measuring the difference of the star separation vectors for the two interferometer arms, as measured at the corresponding pupil images. Variations of M and phi affect this quantity in orthogonal directions, which allows the simultaneous determination of both unknowns. The measurement makes use of two two-axis tilt sensors, that determine the angular separation vectors of the on- and off-axis beams, respectively, from the two interferometric arms. A 0.0075'' single-axis accuracy is required, together with a sufficiently high sensitivity for astronomical applications. This led to the choice of implementing the sensors as pupil plane devices, using the same interferometric tilt-detection principle as applied in Fine Guidance Sensors of the Hubble Space Telescope. The main challenge was to ensure equal responses for the two sensors, to within 0.0075''. Test measurements have shown that we succeeded in controlling mismatches between the sensors (including their mutual orientations, electronic gain and phase, linearity and signal normalization) a the 0.004'' level, and in performing beam recombination without introducing errors exceeding 0.006''. Pupil rotation alignment runs confirmed a 2'' overall measurement uncertainty for dphi, about half the 3.8'' calibration requirement. Finally, in this thesis we also developed a near-filed propagation method, intended for the diffraction-based analysis of optical systems with extremely high accuracy requirements (typically 1 deg in phase and 1.e-3 in field amplitude). Examples thereof are the nulling optics for planet detection and, outside the field of stellar interferometry, systems for the determination of the shape of mirrors for extreme-UV lithographic projection systems. The method is based on the local Fresnel approximation of the propagation integral, that we have solved analytically for rectangular domains and for triangular ones with an arched hypotenuse. This allows for an accurate computation of the field diffracted at the edges of complicated aperture shapes, without having to recur to time-consuming numerical quadrature techniques. The method has shown the ability to provide complex amplitude estimates that are consistently accurate to the specifications given above, and this in reasonable times. In a series of comparative tests, our method outperformed the Hopkins algorithm by typically a factor of fifty with respect to the computational speed.

  3. WINGS: WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Jesüs

    2007-05-01

    WINGS is a multiwavelength survey of 77 nearby (0.041043.5 erg/s) Galaxy Clusters. The main goal of this survey is to establish the zero point for evolutionary studies of clusters and galaxies in clusters. I will describe the different components of the WINGS project which includes: * Photometry - Optical (B,V) wide-field (˜30x30') deep photometry of 77 fields (Varela et al,2006). Catalogs contain ˜6x105 objects classified as stars and galaxies. Position, basic photometry (total magnitude and aperture photometry) and geometrical parameters (isophotal area, ellipticity, position angle,...) have been measured for each object. For the 10% largest galaxies surface photometry and objective morphological classification is also being performed with special designed tools. Images and catalogs will be publicly available. - NIR (J,K) wide field imaging focus on stellar mass analysis. - U and Hα wide field imaging for analysis of the star formation characteristics of the galaxies. - Other on-going photometric follow-up programs: Ultra-wide-field (˜1deg x 1deg) imaging in UBV to study the outer parts of the clusters of galaxies and their infalling regions; search for Ultra Compact Dwarf galaxies. * Spectroscopy - Spectra have been already taken for a subsample of 51 fields (˜100-200 galaxies per field) covering the wavelength range ˜3600-8000 Angstrom. This allows to obtain redshifts, for cluster membership and dynamical studies, as well as to analyse the star formation history, extinction and stellar masses of the different stellar populations that compound galaxies. Some of the first scientific results will also be presented.

  4. Experimental comparison of Wide Field AO control schemes using the Homer AO bench.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, Amélie; Petit, Cyril; Fusco, Thierry

    2011-09-01

    Wide Field Adaptive Optics (WFAO) concepts, such as Laser Tomography AO (LTAO) or Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO) have been developed in order to overcome the anisoplanatism limit of classical AO. Most of the future AO-assisted instruments of ELTs rely on such concepts which have raised critical challenges such as tomographic estimation and from laser and natural guide star combined with efficient DM(s) control. In that context, the experimental validation of the various clever control solutions proposed by several teams in the past years is now essential to reach a level of maturity compatible with their implementation in future WFAO developments for ELT. The ONERA wide field AO facility (HOMER bench) has been developed for these very issues. Gathering a 3D turbulence generator, laser and natural guide stars, two deformable mirrors with variable altitude positions and a PC-based flexible and user-friendly RTC , HOMER allows the implementation and comparison of control schemes from the simplest least-square to the optimal Linear Quadratic Gaussian solutions including Virtual DM and Pseudo-closed loop approaches. After a description of the bench internal calibrations and ultimate performance, all the control schemes are compared experimentally. Their evolutions as a function of wavefront sensors SNR as well as their robustness to calibration / model errors are particularly emphasised. Finally, we derive from the previous works some specific calibrations and identifications procedures ensuring both robustness and efficiency of WFAO systems and we extrapolate their applications to the future ELT AO systems.

  5. Future metrology needs for FEL reflective optics.

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.

    2000-09-21

    An International Workshop on Metrology for X-ray and Neutron Optics has been held March 16-17, 2000, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, near Chicago, Illinois (USA). The workshop gathered engineers and scientists from both the U.S. and around the world to evaluate metrology instrumentation and methods used to characterize surface figure and finish for long grazing incidence optics used in beamlines at synchrotrons radiation sources. This two-day workshop was motivated by the rapid evolution in the performance of x-ray and neutron sources along with requirements in optics figure and finish. More specifically, the performance of future light sources, such as free-electron laser (FEL)-based x-ray sources, is being pushed to new limits in term of both brilliance and coherence. As a consequence, tolerances on surface figure and finish of the next generation of optics are expected to become tighter. The timing of the workshop provided an excellent opportunity to study the problem, evaluate the state of the art in metrology instrumentation, and stimulate innovation on future metrology instruments and techniques to be used to characterize these optics. This paper focuses on FEL optics and metrology needs. (A more comprehensive summary of the workshop can be found elsewhere.) The performance and limitations of current metrology instrumentation will be discussed and recommendations from the workshop on future metrology development to meet the FEL challenges will be detailed.

  6. Wide-field in vivo oral OCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anthony M. D.; Cahill, Lucas; Liu, Kelly; MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine; Lane, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We have built a polarization-sensitive swept source Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) instrument capable of wide-field in vivo imaging in the oral cavity. This instrument uses a hand-held side-looking fiber-optic rotary pullback catheter that can cover two dimensional tissue imaging fields approximately 2.5 mm wide by up to 90 mm length in a single image acquisition. The catheter spins at 100 Hz with pullback speeds up to 15 mm/s allowing imaging of areas up to 225 mm2 field-of-view in seconds. A catheter sheath and two optional catheter sheath holders have been designed to allow imaging at all locations within the oral cavity. Image quality of 2-dimensional image slices through the data can be greatly enhanced by averaging over the orthogonal dimension to reduce speckle. Initial in vivo imaging results reveal a wide-field view of features such as epithelial thickness and continuity of the basement membrane that may be useful in clinic for chair-side management of oral lesions. PMID:26203389

  7. Metrology systems of Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide field upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hill, Gary J.; Cornell, Mark E.; Vattiat, Brian L.; Perry, Dave M.; Rafferty, Tom H.; Taylor, Trey; Hart, Michael; Rafal, Marc D.; Savage, Richard D.

    2012-09-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) Wide-Field Upgrade (WFU) will be equipped with new closed-loop metrology systems to actively control the optical alignment of the new four-mirror Wide-Field Corrector (WFC) as it tracks sidereal motion with respect to the fixed primary mirror. These systems include a tip/tilt camera (TTCam), distance measuring interferometers (DMI), guide probes (GP), and wavefront sensors (WFS). While the TTCam and DMIs are to monitor the mechanical alignment of the WFC, the WFSs and GPs will produce direct measurement of the optical alignment of the WFC with respect to the HET primary mirror. Together, these systems provide fully redundant alignment and pointing information for the telescope, thereby keeping the WFC in focus and suppressing alignment driven field aberrations. In addition to these closed-loop metrology systems, we will have a pupil viewing camera (PVCam) and a calibration wavefront sensor (CWFS). The PVCam will be used for occasional reflectance measurement of the HET primary mirror segments in the standard R,G,B colors. The CWFS will provide the reference wavefront signal against which the other two WFS are calibrated. We describe the current snapshot of these systems and discuss lab/on-sky performance test results of the systems.

  8. Wide field camera observations of Baade's Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Light, R. M.; Baum, William A.; Worthey, Guy; Faber, S. M.; Hunter, Deidre A.; O'Neil, Earl J., Jr.; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Groth, E. J.; Westphal, James A.

    1993-01-01

    We have observed a field in Baade's Window using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and obtain V- and I-band photometry down to V approximately 22.5. These data go several magnitudes fainter than previously obtained from the ground. The location of the break in the luminosity function suggests that there are a significant number of intermediate age (less than 10 Gyr) stars in the Galactic bulge. This conclusion rests on the assumptions that the extinction towards our field is similar to that seen in other parts of Baade's Window, that the distance to the bulge is approximately 8 kpc, and that we can determine fairly accurate zero points for the HST photometry. Changes in any one of these assumptions could increase the inferred age, but a conspiracy of lower reddening, a shorter distance to the bulge, and/or photometric zero-point errors would be needed to imply a population entirely older than 10 Gyr. We infer an initial mass function slope for the main-sequence stars, and find that it is consistent with that measured in the solar neighborhood; unfortunately, the slope is poorly constrained because we sample only a narrow range of stellar mass and because of uncertainties in the observed luminosity function at the faint end.

  9. XUV wide field camera for Rosat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, M. R.; Barstow, M. A.; Pye, J. P.; Wells, Alan; Willingale, R.

    1990-06-01

    The Rosat satellite, due to be launched in June 1990, carries a payload of two coaligned imaging telescopes: the German X-Ray Telescope (XRT), which operates in the soft X-ray band (0.1 to 2 keV or 6 to 100 A), and the UK Wide Field Camera (WFC), which operates in the XUV band (0.02 to 0.2 keV or 60 to 600 A). Rosat will perform two main tasks in its anticipated two- to four-year lifetime: a six-month all-sky survey in the soft X-ray and XUV bands, followed by a program of pointed observations for detailed studies of thousands of individual targets. This paper reviews the design and performance of the WFC. The instrument is a grazing incidence telescope comprising a set of three nested, Wolter-Schwarzschild type I, gold-coated aluminum mirrors with a microchannel plate detector at their common focus. Thin plastic and metal film filters define the wavelength passbands.

  10. Compact infrared pinhole fisheye for wide field applications.

    PubMed

    Druart, Guillaume; Guérineau, Nicolas; Taboury, Jean; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Haïdar, Riad; Primot, Jérôme; Fendler, Manuel; Cigna, Jean-Charles

    2009-02-20

    The performances of a compact infrared optical system using advanced pinhole optics for wide field applications are given. This concept is adapted from the classical Tisse design in order to fit with infrared issues. Despite a low light gathering efficiency and a low resolution in comparison with classical lenses, pinhole imagery provides a long depth of field and a wide angular field of view. Moreover, by using a simple lens that compresses the field of view, the angular acceptance of this pinhole camera can be drastically widened to a value around 180°. This infrared compact system is named pinhole fisheye since it is based on the field lens of a classical fisheye system. PMID:23567570

  11. Future metrology needs for FEL reflective optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoufid, Lahsen

    2001-01-01

    An International Workshop on Metrology for X-ray and Neutron Optics has been held March 16-17,2000, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago, Illinois, USA). The workshop gathered engineers and scientist from both the U.S. and around the world to evaluate the metrology instrumentation and methods used to characterize surface figure and finish for long grazing incidence optics used in beamlines at synchrotron radiation sources. This two-day workshop was motivated by the rapid evolution in the performance of x-ray and neutron sources along with requirements in optics figure and finish. More specifically, the performance of future light sources, such as free-electron laser (FEL)-based x-ray sources, is being pushed to new limits in term of both brilliance and coherence. As a consequence, tolerances on surface figure and finish of the next generation of optics are expected to become tighter. The timing of the workshop provided an excellent opportunity to study the problem, evaluate the state of the art in metrology instrumentation, and stimulate innovation on future metrology instruments and techniques to be used to characterize these optics.

  12. OAOWFC: Okayama Astrophysical Observatory NIR Wide-Field Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, M.; Yanagisawa, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Okita, K.; Nagayama, S.; Toda, H.; Ohta, K.; Kawai, N.

    2008-05-22

    In order to detect and trace the early phase of near-infrared (NIR) afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) quickly, we are now developing the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory Wide-Field Camera, OAOWFC. The aperture size of OAOWFC is 91 cm. The focal plane is covered by a 2Kx2K HAWAII2-RG detector with a pixel size of 18.5 {mu}mx18.5 {mu}m, resulting 0.95x0.95 deg{sup 2} field of view with an image scale of 1.6 arcsec/pixel. OAOWFC is designed to be a fully robotic instrument. This camera forms a part of Multicolor Imaging Telescopes for Survey and Monstrous Explosions (MITSuME), a multi telescope system dedicated to optical-NIR follow-up observations of GRB afterglows. Very wide field of view of OAOWFC enables us to catch GRB afterglows under less accurate localization sometimes given by the first alert. OAOWFC has an ability to detect bright GRB afterglow located at z = 10 easily, and it might be detectable at z = 18 if the conditions are met.

  13. Facility calibration unit of Hobby Eberly Telescope wide field upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hill, Gary J.; Vattiat, Brian L.; Smith, Michael P.; Haeuser, Marco

    2012-09-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) Wide-Field Upgrade (WFU) will be equipped with new Facility Calibration Unit (FCU). The FCU is in support of VIRUS and the facility instruments and consists of the head and source box. The FCU head, connected to the source box through two liquid light guides, is attached to the bottom of the WFU Wide-Field Corrector (WFC) and can be deployed into the beam to inject calibration light through the WFC whenever calibration is needed. A set of Fresnel lenses is used in the FCU head to mimic the caustics of M1 as much as possible to re-produce the telescope’s focal plane illumination pattern. Various imaging/non-imaging optical components (e.g. Compound Parabolic Concentrators, cone reflectors, condenser lenses) are used for efficient coupling between different types of calibration lamps and light guides, covering wavelengths from 350nm to 1800nm. In addition, we developed an efficient and tunable Light-Emitting Diode (LED) based source and coupler for UV and Visible spectral flat field calibration. This paper presents the designs, prototypes, and as-built components / subsystems of the FCU.

  14. Two-mirror, three-reflection telescopes as candidates for sky surveys in ground and space applications. The MINITRUST: an active optics warping telescope for wide-field astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, Roberto F.; La Padula, Cesare D.; Vignato, Agostino; Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Dohlen, Kjetil

    2002-12-01

    A concept based on a two-mirror, three-reflection telescope has been investigated. Its anastigmatism and flat fielded properties, the compactness and optical performances over 2-2.5 arc deg field of view, make this optical system of high interest for the development of much larger telescopes than with Schmidt designs. The 2MTRT concept is a potential candidate for sky surveys with 2-3 meter class telescopes and particularily well adapted for UV space surveys. Preliminary developments have been carried out with the construction of a 30-cm prototype on Amoretti's design, providing encouraging results. At present, a 45-cm 2MTRT prototype has been realized for ground based sky survey of NEOs, based on active optics (MINITRUST), in order to overcome the difficulty of obtaining three aspherical surfaces. The primary and tertiary lie on the same double vase substrate, and have a rest profile. The hyperbolization is carried out in situ by air depressure. The secondary, in a tulip form substrate, has been hyperbolized by elastic relaxation. The project is planned for operation in 2003.

  15. A Deep Wide-field Infrared Survey for Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. F.; Croom, S.; Warren, S.; Hall, P. B.; Brown, M.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B.; Smith, M. G.; Norman, D.; Tiede, G.; Smith, P. S.

    2004-10-01

    We report preliminary results from a survey to construct a complete, near-IR selected sample of quasars. We are using the unique deep optical and near-IR imaging in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (Bw,R,I,J,H,K), which will cover 18 sq.deg. An RIK-selected sample of color outliers was observed spectroscopically with WIYN Hydra and WHT WYFFOS to > 1 mag deeper than the SDSS NGP sample. Two out of 32 objects classifiable as broad-line AGN were consistent with intrinsic reddening E(B-V) ≤ 0.4 mag. Even redder objects are present in the sample, but not yet confirmed. This pilot program was to refine selection technique and shows the way to efficient sample selection.

  16. Wide-field surveys from the SNAP mission

    SciTech Connect

    agkim@lbl.gov

    2002-07-23

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-borne observatory that will survey the sky with a wide-field optical/NIR imager. The images produced by SNAP will have an unprecedented combination of depth, solid-angle, angular resolution, and temporal sampling. Two 7.5 square-degree fields will be observed every four days over 16 months to a magnitude depth of AB = 27.7 in each of nine filters. Co-adding images over all epochs will give an AB = 30.3 per filter. A 300 square-degree field will be surveyed with no repeat visits to AB = 28 per filter. The nine filters span 3500-17000 {angstrom}. Although the survey strategy is tailored for supernova and weak gravitational lensing observations, the resulting data supports a broad range of auxiliary science programs.

  17. Wide field camera 3 ground testing and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushouse, H.; Baggett, S.; Bond, H.; Brown, T.; Deustua, S.; Hartig, G. F.; Hilbert, B.; Hill, R. J.; Kim-Quijano, J.; Kimble, R. A.; MacKenty, J. W.; Martel, A.; McCullough, P.; Petro, L.; Rinehart, S.; Robberto, M.

    2008-07-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a panchromatic imager developed for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is fully integrated with its flight detectors and has undergone several rounds of ground testing and calibration at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The testing processes are highly automated, with WFC3 and the optical stimulus, which is used to provide external targets and illumination, being commanded by coordinated computer scripts. All test data are captured and stored in the long-term Hubble Data Archive. A full suite of instrument characterization and calibration tests has been performed, including the measurement of key detector properties such as dark current, read noise, flat field response, gain, linearity, and persistence, as well as instrument-level properties like total system throughput, imaging quality and encircled energy, grism dispersions, IR thermal background, and image stability. Nearly all instrument characteristics have been shown to meet or exceed expectations and requirements.

  18. Vision and Wide-Field Imagers with Curved Focal Planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arianpour, Ashkan

    This dissertation provides details regarding the implementation of curved-focal surface fiber coupled imaging for medical and wide-field applications. An optomechanical fluid-filled eye model with visual acuity better than 20/20 vision was design and characterized. A wearable telescopic contact lens was worn on the optomechanical eye model and the performance characterized. Measurements of the contact lens surfaces were modeled to quantify the impact of contact lens fabrication on end-result resolution. Separately, the limitations of the field of view in fiber coupled monocentric imaging are analyzed. This dissertation describes a novel technique to address this based on conformal micro-optics. The design, simulation, and fabrication of an embossed surface relief micro-prism that increases the field of view are demonstrated.

  19. Optical MEMS: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Chandra Mouli

    2005-09-01

    Spurred by the growth of the internet, Optical Telecommunications bandwidth, experienced unprecedented growth during late 1990's. During this time of great economic expansion, the creation of new enterprises was vast and the expansion of established component, system and services companies was breathtaking. Unfortunately, this positive economic state was short-lived. This period was followed in 2001-2004 by one of the most significant market crashes in history. During those 10 years of economic growth, about $20B in venture capital was invested in the optical telecom industry, most of this investment was lost in recent years. Many start-up industries which experienced unprecedented growth at the end of the 20th century were lost at the start of the 21st. (1) During this time many, innovative technologies were born and buried. However, many new capabilities emerged from this period of unrest; one such example is the advent of Optical MEMS (MOEMS). Many academics and corporate laboratories pursued the development of MOEMS during the economic boom and, in the author's view; MOEMS surfaced as a powerful and versatile tool set that has proved invaluable and in the last few years during economic downturn, stood the test of time. In the Telecommunications industry, for optical switching and wavelength management applications MOEMS has proven to be the technology of choice. (2) Variable Optical Attenuators (VOA), Wavelength Blockers (WB), Dynamic Gain Equalizers (DGE), and most recently Wavelength Selective Switches (WSS) are being used in the numerous recent network deployments. Moreover, agile networks of the future will have MOEMS at every node. This presentation will provide an overview of the history of MOEMS in Telecommunications, discuss its byproducts and offer a window into the future of the technology.

  20. Future challenging in X-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citterio, O.; Ghigo, M.; Mazzoleni, F.; Pareschi, G.; Aschenbach, B.; Bräuninger, H.; Parodi, G.

    One of the main guidelines for future X ray astronomy projects like e.g. XEUS- (ESA) and Generation-X (NASA) is to utilize grazing-incidence focusing optics2 with extremely large collecting areas (several m tens at 1 keV), with a dramatic increase of about two order of magnitude compared to the current X-ray telescopes. In order not to fall beyond the source confusion limit at low fluxes, the angular resolution required for these optics should be superb (a few arcsecs at most). The enormous mirror dimensions together with the high imaging performances give rise to a number of problems. It is basically impossible to realize so large mirrors from closed Wolter I shells which benefit from high mechanical stiffness. But instead the mirrors need to be formed as rectangular segments, a series of them will be assembled in a petal. Taking into account the realistic load capabilities of space launchers, to be able to put in orbit so large mirror modules the mass/geometric-area ratio of the optics should be very small. Finally, with a so large optics mass it would be very difficult to provide the electric power for an optics thermal active control, able to maintain the mirrors at the usual temperature of 20 o C. Therefore, very likely, the optics will instead operate in extreme thermal conditions, with the mirror temperature oscillating between -30 and - 40o C, that tends to exclude the epoxy - replication approach (the mismatch between the CTE of the substrate and that of the resin would cause prohibitively large deformations of the mirror surface profiles). From these considerations light weight materials with high thermal-mechanical properties such as glass or ceramics become attractive to realize the mirrors of future X-ray telescopes. In this paper we will discuss some technological methods based on the production and correct integration of thin mirror segments. Some aspects concerning the mass production and the economics of the proposed processes will be presented as well.

  1. DMD-based programmable wide field spectrograph for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Lanzoni, Patrick; Liotard, Arnaud; Viard, Thierry; Costes, Vincent; Hébert, Philippe-Jean

    2015-03-01

    In Earth Observation, Universe Observation and Planet Exploration, scientific return could be optimized in future missions using MOEMS devices. In Earth Observation, we propose an innovative reconfigurable instrument, a programmable wide-field spectrograph where both the FOV and the spectrum could be tailored thanks to a 2D micromirror array (MMA). For a linear 1D field of view (FOV), the principle is to use a MMA to select the wavelengths by acting on intensity. This component is placed in the focal plane of a first grating. On the MMA surface, the spatial dimension is along one side of the device and for each spatial point, its spectrum is displayed along the perpendicular direction: each spatial and spectral feature of the 1D FOV is then fully adjustable dynamically and/or programmable. A second stage with an identical grating recomposes the beam after wavelengths selection, leading to an output tailored 1D image. A mock-up has been designed, fabricated and tested. The micromirror array is the largest DMD in 2048 x 1080 mirrors format, with a pitch of 13.68μm. A synthetic linear FOV is generated and typical images have been recorded o at the output focal plane of the instrument. By tailoring the DMD, we could modify successfully each pixel of the input image: for example, it is possible to remove bright objects or, for each spatial pixel, modify the spectral signature. The very promising results obtained on the mock-up of the programmable wide-field spectrograph reveal the efficiency of this new instrument concept for Earth Observation.

  2. Wide-field, high-resolution Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoan; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report an imaging method, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), which iteratively stitches together a number of variably illuminated, low-resolution intensity images in Fourier space to produce a wide-field, high-resolution complex sample image. By adopting a wavefront correction strategy, the FPM method can also correct for aberrations and digitally extend a microscope’s depth-of-focus beyond the physical limitations of its optics. As a demonstration, we built a microscope prototype with a resolution of 0.78 μm, a field-of-view of ~120 mm2, and a resolution-invariant depth-of-focus of 0.3 mm (characterized at 632 nm). Gigapixel colour images of histology slides verify FPM’s successful operation. The reported imaging procedure transforms the general challenge of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy from one that is coupled to the physical limitations of the system’s optics to one that is solvable through computation. PMID:25243016

  3. Portable wide-field hand-held NIR scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Young-Jin; Roman, Manuela; Carrasquilla, Jennifer; Erickson, Sarah J.; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2013-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging modality is one of the widely used medical imaging techniques for breast cancer imaging, functional brain mapping, and many other applications. However, conventional NIR imaging systems are bulky and expensive, thereby limiting their accelerated clinical translation. Herein a new compact (6 × 7 × 12 cm3), cost-effective, and wide-field NIR scanner has been developed towards contact as well as no-contact based real-time imaging in both reflectance and transmission mode. The scanner mainly consists of an NIR source light (between 700- 900 nm), an NIR sensitive CCD camera, and a custom-developed image acquisition and processing software to image an area of 12 cm2. Phantom experiments have been conducted to estimate the feasibility of diffuse optical imaging by using Indian-Ink as absorption-based contrast agents. As a result, the developed NIR system measured the light intensity change in absorption-contrasted target up to 4 cm depth under transillumination mode. Preliminary in-vivo studies demonstrated the feasibility of real-time monitoring of blood flow changes. Currently, extensive in-vivo studies are carried out using the ultra-portable NIR scanner in order to assess the potential of the imager towards breast imaging..

  4. Curved focal plane detector array for wide field cameras.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Delphine; Fendler, Manuel; Baier, Nicolas; Primot, Jérôme; le Coarer, Etienne

    2012-08-01

    Miniaturization is the main goal for system design in future cameras. This paper offers a novel method to scale down the optical system and to improve the image quality. As with the human retina, the detector array is spherically bent to fit the curved image surface; so the field curvature aberration is directly suppressed, leading to a better resolution and a simplified optical design. By thinning the substrate, the device is monolithically curved without modifying the fabrication process of the active pixels. Optical characterizations have been performed on planar and curved focal plane based cameras to illustrate the optical advantages of detector array curvature. PMID:22859030

  5. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT): Recent Progress and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.; Frey, Bradley J.; Leisawitz, David T.; Lyon, Richard G.; Maher, Stephen F.; Martino, Anthony J.

    2008-01-01

    Continued research with the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) has achieved several important milestones. We have moved WIIT into the Advanced Interferometry and Metrology (AIM) Laboratory at Goddard, and have characterized the testbed in this well-controlled environment. The system is now completely automated and we are in the process of acquiring large data sets for analysis. In this paper, we discuss these new developments and outline our future research directions. The WIIT testbed, combined with new data analysis techniques and algorithms, provides a demonstration of the technique of wide-field interferometric imaging, a powerful tool for future space-borne interferometers.

  6. Optical processing for future computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husain, A.; Haugen, P. R.; Hutcheson, L. D.; Warrior, J.; Murray, N.; Beatty, M.

    1986-01-01

    In the development of future data management systems, such as the NASA Space Station, a major problem represents the design and implementation of a high performance communication network which is self-correcting and repairing, flexible, and evolvable. To obtain the goal of designing such a network, it will be essential to incorporate distributed adaptive network control techniques. The present paper provides an outline of the functional and communication network requirements for the Space Station data management system. Attention is given to the mathematical representation of the operations being carried out to provide the required functionality at each layer of communication protocol on the model. The possible implementation of specific communication functions in optics is also considered.

  7. Toward future IP optical backbone networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urushidani, Shigeo

    2005-11-01

    The rapid and aggressive penetration of broadband access services such as fiber to the home (FTTH) has been accelerating the increase in IP traffic volume and new networking technologies are required in order to accommodate future traffic in a cost-effective manner. This paper overviews the advanced IP optical network architecture and technologies for very-large-scale IP backbone networks. These technologies are the key to accommodate the huge volumes of IP traffic expected and control network resources in an effective and dynamic manner. We describe advanced IP optical networking technologies which accommodate multiple service networks using multi-instance technologies, and enable multi-layer traffic engineering using virtual network topology technologies. The migration scenario is described from the existing networks to GMPLS networks; reference is made to the advanced Path Computation Element (PCE) which enables multi-layer traffic engineering and MPLS/GMPLS migration. New network concepts such as Layer 1 Virtual Private Network (L1VPN) and GMPLS interoperability issues, which are being discussed in IETF, are also described.

  8. Wide-Field Slitless Spectroscopy with JWST/NIRISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William V.; Ravindranath, Swara; Willott, Chris

    2015-08-01

    The Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) aboard the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will offer wide-field slitless spectroscopy (WFSS) with a resolving power R = 150 at wavelengths from 0.8 to 2.25 microns. In this band, NIRISS will be sensitive to Lyman-alpha emission lines and continuum breaks in the spectra of galaxies with redshifts 6 < z < 17, allowing it to probe the first stars and ionizing sources in the early universe. NIRISS observations of the high-redshift universe will provide a wealth of information on foreground objects, creating a unique library of optical emission-line spectra from the faintest galaxies at lower redshifts. To explore its ability to identify and characterize galaxies at all redshifts, we have modeled NIRISS observations of a massive strong-lensing galaxy cluster and analyzed the synthetic images using standard software tools. Our simulations demonstrate that WFSS with NIRISS will provide a powerful tool for the exploration of galaxies near and far.NIRISS is provided to the JWST project by the Canadian Space Agency under the leadership of René Doyon of the Université de Montréal. The prime contractor is COM DEV Canada.

  9. Non-mydriatic, wide field, fundus video camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeher, Bernhard; Voigtmann, Peter; Michelson, Georg; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2014-02-01

    We describe a method we call "stripe field imaging" that is capable of capturing wide field color fundus videos and images of the human eye at pupil sizes of 2mm. This means that it can be used with a non-dilated pupil even with bright ambient light. We realized a mobile demonstrator to prove the method and we could acquire color fundus videos of subjects successfully. We designed the demonstrator as a low-cost device consisting of mass market components to show that there is no major additional technical outlay to realize the improvements we propose. The technical core idea of our method is breaking the rotational symmetry in the optical design that is given in many conventional fundus cameras. By this measure we could extend the possible field of view (FOV) at a pupil size of 2mm from a circular field with 20° in diameter to a square field with 68° by 18° in size. We acquired a fundus video while the subject was slightly touching and releasing the lid. The resulting video showed changes at vessels in the region of the papilla and a change of the paleness of the papilla.

  10. Wide field-of-view microscopy with Talbot pattern illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jigang; Liu, Guangshuo

    2012-12-01

    Wide field-of-view (FOV) microscopy is useful for high-throughput applications because of the capability to obtain large amount of information from a single image. One way to implement a wide FOV microscope is to scan the sample with a two-dimensional focus grid. The transmission or reflection of the focal spots can then be used to reconstruct the sample image. This scheme is effectively a parallel scanning optical microscope (SOM), where the FOV depends on the area of the focus grid and the imaging resolution depends on the spot size of the foci. We use the Talbot image of a twodimensional aperture grid as the focus grid and developed a wide FOV microscope. Preliminary experimental results show the capability of our microscope to acquire wide FOV images of US air force target and MCF-7 cancer cell samples. Fluorescence images of fluorescence beads are also acquired. Because the diffraction of incident beam by the aperture grid contains complicated angular frequencies, the focal spots in Talbot pattern cannot be approximated as Gaussian beams as in conventional SOM. We characterized the focal spots in Talbot pattern and studied the evolution of the full width at half maximum (FWHM). We also simulated the SOM imaging under Talbot pattern illumination using the razor blade as the sample objects.

  11. Schematic diagram of light path in Wide Field Planetary Camera 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    An optical schematic diagram of one of the four channels of the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2(WFPC-2) shows the path taken by beams from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) before an image is formed at the camera's chargecoupled devices.

  12. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Progress and Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisawitz, D.; Leviton, D.; Martino, A.; Maynard, W.; Mundy, L. G.; Rinehart, S. A.; Zhang, X.; WIIT Science and Technical Advisory Group Team

    2001-12-01

    We describe the technique of wide field mosaic imaging for optical/IR interferometers and present early experimental results from a laboratory instrument designed to validate, experiment with, and refine the technique. A conventional single-detector stellar interferometer operating with narrow bandwidth at center wavelength λ is limited in its field of view to the primary beam of the individual telescope apertures, or ~ λ / Dtel radians, where Dtel is the telescope diameter. Such a field is too small for many applications; often one wishes to image extended sources. We are developing and testing a technique analogous to the mosaicing method employed in millimeter and radio astronomy, but applicable to optical/IR Michelson interferometers, in which beam combination is done in the pupil plane. An Npix x Npix array detector placed in the image plane of the interferometer is used to record simultaneously the fringe patterns from many contiguous telescope fields, effectively multiplying the field size by Npix/2, where the factor 2 allows for Nyquist sampling. This technology will be especially valuable for far IR and submillimeter interferometric space observatories such as the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS). SPIRIT and SPECS will be designed to provide sensitive, high angular resolution observations of fields several arcminutes in diameter, and views of the universe complementary to those provided by HST, NGST, and ALMA. Funding for WIIT is provided by NASA Headquarters through the ROSS/SARA Program and by the Goddard Space Flight Center through its IR&D Program.

  13. MIRIS: A Compact Wide-field Infrared Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wonyong; Lee, Dae-Hee; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Park, Youngsik; Moon, Bongkon; Park, Sung-Joon; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Kim, Il-Joong; Park, Won-Kee; Lee, Dukhang; Seon, Kwang-Il; Nam, Uk-Won; Cha, Sang-Mok; Park, Kwijong; Park, Jang-Hyun; Yuk, In-Soo; Ree, Chang Hee; Jin, Ho; Choel Yang, Sun; Park, Hong-Young; Shin, Goo-Hwan; Seo, Joung-Ki; Rhee, Seung-Wu; Park, Jong-Oh; Lee, Hyung Mok; Murakami, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2014-09-01

    A compact infrared space telescope called MIRIS (Multi-purpose Infra-Red Imaging System) was developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), and launched onboard the Science and Technology Satellite-3 of Korea (STSAT-3) in 2013 November. The main mission of MIRIS is the Paschen-? emission line survey along the Galactic plane and the cosmic infrared background (CIB) observation, particularly around the north ecliptic pole region. For these missions, a wide field of view (3.67 3.67) with an angular resolution of 51.6'' and wavelength coverage from 0.9 ~ 2.0 ?m have been adopted for MIRIS, having optical components consisting of a 80 mm main lens and four other lenses with F/2 focal ratio optics. The opto-mechanical system was carefully designed to minimize any effects from shock during the launch process and thermal variation. Also, the telescope was designed to use a passive cooling technique to maintain the temperature around 200 K in order to reduce thermal noise. A micro Stirling cooler was used to cool down the Teledyne PICNIC infrared array to 90 K, which was equipped in a dewar with four filters for infrared passbands of I, H, and Paschen-? and a dual-band continuum line filter. MIRIS system was integrated into the STSAT-3 as its primary payload and successfully passed required tests in the laboratory, such as thermal-vacuum, vibration, and shock tests. MIRIS is now operating in sun synchronous orbits for initial tests and has observed its first images successfully.

  14. Unique wide field of view visual simulation. [of helicopter flight close to earth surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemela, J.

    1975-01-01

    Visual simulations are required to support investigations of the man-machine aspects of helicopter nap-of-the-earth flight. The visual simulation requirements are discussed vis-a-vis available technology. A wide field of view of the world outside the cockpit is necessary to provide adequate visual cues to the pilot. A unique design is described employing three TV monitors, collimating lenses, and electronics to selectively display a wide field of view without the use of a costly wide angle optical probe.

  15. The Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael; Hart, John; McGregor, Peter; Oates, Patrick; Bloxham, Gabe; Jones, Damien

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) under construction at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA) of the Australian National University (ANU) for the ANU 2.3 m telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory. WiFeS is a powerful integral field, double-beam, concentric, image-slicing spectrograph designed to deliver excellent throughput, wavelength stability, spectrophotometric performance and superb image quality along with wide spectral coverage throughout the 320 950 nm wavelength region. It provides a 25×38 arcsec field with 0.5 arcsec sampling along each of twenty five 38×1 arcsec slitlets. The output format is optimized to match the 4096×4096 pixel CCD detectors in each of two cameras individually optimized for the blue and the red ends of the spectrum, respectively. A process of “interleaved nod-and-shuffle” will be applied to permit quantum noise-limited sky subtraction. Using VPH gratings, spectral resolutions of 3000 and 7000 are provided. The full spectral range is covered in a single exposure at R=3000, and in two exposures in the R=7000 mode. The use of transmissive coated optics, VPH gratings and optimized mirror coatings ensures a throughput (including telescope atmosphere and detector) >30% over a wide spectral range. The concentric image-slicer design ensures an excellent and uniform image quality across the full field. To maximize scientific return, the whole instrument is configured for remote observing, pipeline data reduction, and the accumulation of calibration image libraries.

  16. PSF reconstruction for MUSE in wide field mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villecroze, R.; Fusco, Thierry; Bacon, Roland; Madec, Pierre-Yves

    2012-07-01

    The resolution of ground-based telescopes is dramatically limited by the atmospheric turbulence.. Adaptative optics (AO) is a real-time opto-mechanical approach which allows to correct for the turbulence effect and to reach the ultimate diffraction limit astronomical telescopes and their associated instrumentation. Nevertheless, the AO correction is never perfect especially when it has to deal with large Field of View (FoV). Hence, a posteriori image processing really improves the final estimation of astrophysical data. Such techniques require an accurate knowledge of the system response at any position in the FoV The purpose of this work is then the estimation of the AO response in the particular case of the MUSE [1] /GALACSI [2] instrument (a 3D mult-object spectrograph combined with a Laser-assisted wide field AO system which will be installed at the VLT in 2013). Using telemetry data coming from both AO Laser and natural guide stars, a Point Spread Function (PSF) is derived at any location of the FoV and for every wavelength of the MUSE spectrograph. This document presents the preliminary design of the MUSE WFM PSF reconstruction process. The various hypothesis and approximations are detailed and justified. A first description of the overall process is proposed. Some alternative strategies to improve the performance (in terms of computation time and storage) are described and have been implemented. Finally, after a validation of the proposed algorithm using end-to-end models, a performance analysis is conducted (with the help of a full end-to-end model). This performance analysis will help us to populate an exhaustive error budget table.

  17. Metal multilayer mirrors for EUV wide field telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.W.; Bloch, J.J.; Roussel-Dupre,D.

    1989-01-01

    Metal multilayer mirrors have been designed for the ALEXIS satellite, which is to carry six wide field telescopes to perform an all-sky survey in three or four narrow wavelength bands in the EUV. Comprised of alternating layers of molybdenum and silicon, the mirrors are optimized to provide maximum reflectivity at angles from 11.5 to 17/degree/ off normal incidence and at wavelengths of 133, 171, or 186A. Simultaneously, the mirrors use a ''wavetrap'' described below to suppress reflectivity at 304A, where the extremely strong geocoronal line of He II causes severe background problems. Low reflectivity at 304A is achieved by superposing two layer pairs that provide destructive interference with an effective 2d spacing of 152A. The Mo layers in this wavetrap must be very thin, about 10A each, in order to allow the shorter wavelengths desired for peak reflectivity to penetrate without significant attenuation. Because refraction changes the effective angle of passage through the wavetrap, a joint optimization between layer thicknesses in the deep layers and the wavetrap layers must be performed for each target peak wavelength. For the 186A mirror, the optimum design from substrate upward is 40 layer pairs, each 74A Si and 31A Mo, followed by 2 layer pairs, each 55A Si and 10A Mo. Calculations predict this design will have a peak reflectivity at 186A of 35 percent and a 304A reflectivity less than 10/sup /minus/5/, if available optical constants are correct and the multilayer can be fabricated without difficulty. We will present details of the calculations and laboratory measurements of the reflectivity performance attained with prototype mirrors. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  18. A wide-field survey for high-redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakazu, Yuko K. M.

    2008-02-01

    The present thesis reports the results from the Hawaii Quasar and T dwarf survey (HQT survey), which is a wide-field optical imaging survey conducted with Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The HQT survey was designed to search for low- luminosity quasars ( M 1450 < -22.5) at high-redshift ( z > 5.7) as well as T dwarfs, both of which are selected by their very red optical I -- z ' colors. We developed a new color selection technique using a narrowband NB 816 filter in order to break a well-known color degeneracy between quasars and foreground M and L dwarfs. The follow-up Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy and near-IR imaging with various instruments on Mauna Kea have demonstrated the effectiveness of our technique, and have successfully revealed six faint T dwarfs ( J < 20). These dwarfs are among the most distant spectroscopically known (60 - 170 pc) and they provide an indirect support for the high binary fraction at L/ T transition. The non-detection of z > 5.7 quasars in our survey is consistent with the present picture of the cosmic reionization in which quasars are negligible contributor to the cosmic reionization. With our survey area coverage (9.3 deg 2 ) and depths ( Z AB < 23.3), we were able to set strong constraints on the faint-end slope of the quasar luminosity function. Majority of our candidate quasars turned out to be strong emission line galaxies at z < 1, whose large equivalent widths and low metal contents suggest they are very young systems which have just undergone starbursts within a few Myrs. In order to systematically search for these Ultra-Strong Emission Line galaxies (USELs), we used narrowband selected samples from Hu's ultra-deep multiwavelength data. The followup Keck/DEIMOS spectra have revealed their high star formation density (5-10% of UV measurements at z = 0-1), which is a significant contribution at a epoch when cosmic star formation is in its peak. Many of the USELs show [OIII]l4363 auroral lines and about a dozen satisfy the criteria for eXtremely Metal Poor Galaxies (XMPGs). Our XMPGs are the most distant known today. Our high yield rate of XMPGs suggests that narrowband method is powerful in finding such populations. Strikingly, a few of our XMPGs have metallities close to the most metal-poor galaxy. Our discovery indicates that galaxies are still forming in relatively chemically pristine sites at z ~ 1

  19. Automated classification of periodic variable stars detected by the wide-field infrared survey explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Masci, Frank J.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Cutri, Roc M.; Hoffman, Douglas I.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a methodology to classify periodic variable stars identified using photometric time-series measurements constructed from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) full-mission single-exposure Source Databases. This will assist in the future construction of a WISE Variable Source Database that assigns variables to specific science classes as constrained by the WISE observing cadence with statistically meaningful classification probabilities. We have analyzed the WISE light curves of 8273 variable stars identified in previous optical variability surveys (MACHO, GCVS, and ASAS) and show that Fourier decomposition techniques can be extended into the mid-IR to assist with their classification. Combined with other periodic light-curve features, this sample is then used to train a machine-learned classifier based on the random forest (RF) method. Consistent with previous classification studies of variable stars in general, the RF machine-learned classifier is superior to other methods in terms of accuracy, robustness against outliers, and relative immunity to features that carry little or redundant class information. For the three most common classes identified by WISE: Algols, RR Lyrae, and W Ursae Majoris type variables, we obtain classification efficiencies of 80.7%, 82.7%, and 84.5% respectively using cross-validation analyses, with 95% confidence intervals of approximately ±2%. These accuracies are achieved at purity (or reliability) levels of 88.5%, 96.2%, and 87.8% respectively, similar to that achieved in previous automated classification studies of periodic variable stars.

  20. Automated Classification of Periodic Variable Stars Detected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masci, Frank J.; Hoffman, Douglas I.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Cutri, Roc M.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a methodology to classify periodic variable stars identified using photometric time-series measurements constructed from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) full-mission single-exposure Source Databases. This will assist in the future construction of a WISE Variable Source Database that assigns variables to specific science classes as constrained by the WISE observing cadence with statistically meaningful classification probabilities. We have analyzed the WISE light curves of 8273 variable stars identified in previous optical variability surveys (MACHO, GCVS, and ASAS) and show that Fourier decomposition techniques can be extended into the mid-IR to assist with their classification. Combined with other periodic light-curve features, this sample is then used to train a machine-learned classifier based on the random forest (RF) method. Consistent with previous classification studies of variable stars in general, the RF machine-learned classifier is superior to other methods in terms of accuracy, robustness against outliers, and relative immunity to features that carry little or redundant class information. For the three most common classes identified by WISE: Algols, RR Lyrae, and W Ursae Majoris type variables, we obtain classification efficiencies of 80.7%, 82.7%, and 84.5% respectively using cross-validation analyses, with 95% confidence intervals of approximately ±2%. These accuracies are achieved at purity (or reliability) levels of 88.5%, 96.2%, and 87.8% respectively, similar to that achieved in previous automated classification studies of periodic variable stars.

  1. Deepest Wide-Field Colour Image in the Southern Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    LA SILLA CAMERA OBSERVES CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH ESO PR Photo 02a/03 ESO PR Photo 02a/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 437 pix - 95k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 873 pix - 904k] [HiRes - JPEG: 4000 x 4366 pix - 23.1M] Caption : PR Photo 02a/03 shows a three-colour composite image of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) , obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) camera on the 2.2-m MPG/ESO telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile). It was produced by the combination of about 450 images with a total exposure time of nearly 50 hours. The field measures 36 x 34 arcmin 2 ; North is up and East is left. Technical information is available below. The combined efforts of three European teams of astronomers, targeting the same sky field in the southern constellation Fornax (The Oven) have enabled them to construct a very deep, true-colour image - opening an exceptionally clear view towards the distant universe . The image ( PR Photo 02a/03 ) covers an area somewhat larger than the full moon. It displays more than 100,000 galaxies, several thousand stars and hundreds of quasars. It is based on images with a total exposure time of nearly 50 hours, collected under good observing conditions with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) - many of them extracted from the ESO Science Data Archive . The position of this southern sky field was chosen by Riccardo Giacconi (Nobel Laureate in Physics 2002) at a time when he was Director General of ESO, together with Piero Rosati (ESO). It was selected as a sky region towards which the NASA Chandra X-ray satellite observatory , launched in July 1999, would be pointed while carrying out a very long exposure (lasting a total of 1 million seconds, or 278 hours) in order to detect the faintest possible X-ray sources. The field is now known as the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) . The new WFI photo of CDF-S does not reach quite as deep as the available images of the "Hubble Deep Fields" (HDF-N in the northern and HDF-S in the southern sky, cf. e.g. ESO PR Photo 35a/98 ), but the field-of-view is about 200 times larger. The present image displays about 50 times more galaxies than the HDF images, and therefore provides a more representative view of the universe . The WFI CDF-S image will now form a most useful basis for the very extensive and systematic census of the population of distant galaxies and quasars, allowing at once a detailed study of all evolutionary stages of the universe since it was about 2 billion years old . These investigations have started and are expected to provide information about the evolution of galaxies in unprecedented detail. They will offer insights into the history of star formation and how the internal structure of galaxies changes with time and, not least, throw light on how these two evolutionary aspects are interconnected. GALAXIES IN THE WFI IMAGE ESO PR Photo 02b/03 ESO PR Photo 02b/03 [Preview - JPEG: 488 x 400 pix - 112k] [Normal - JPEG: 896 x 800 pix - 1.0M] [Full-Res - JPEG: 2591 x 2313 pix - 8.6M] Caption : PR Photo 02b/03 contains a collection of twelve subfields from the full WFI Chandra Deep Field South (WFI CDF-S), centred on (pairs or groups of) galaxies. Each of the subfields measures 2.5 x 2.5 arcmin 2 (635 x 658 pix 2 ; 1 pixel = 0.238 arcsec). North is up and East is left. Technical information is available below. The WFI CDF-S colour image - of which the full field is shown in PR Photo 02a/03 - was constructed from all available observations in the optical B- ,V- and R-bands obtained under good conditions with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the 2.2-m MPG/ESO telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile), and now stored in the ESO Science Data Archive. It is the "deepest" image ever taken with this instrument. It covers a sky field measuring 36 x 34 arcmin 2 , i.e., an area somewhat larger than that of the full moon. The observations were collected during a period of nearly four years, beginning in January 1999 when the WFI instrument was first installed (cf. ESO PR 02/99 ) and ending in October 2002. Altogether, nearly 50 hours of exposure were collected in the three filters combined here, cf. the technical information below. Although it is possible to identify more than 100,000 galaxies in the image - some of which are shown in PR Photo 02b/03 - it is still remarkably "empty" by astronomical standards. Even the brightest stars in the field (of visual magnitude 9) can hardly be seen by human observers with binoculars. In fact, the area density of bright, nearby galaxies is only half of what it is in "normal" sky fields. Comparatively empty fields like this one provide an unsually clear view towards the distant regions in the universe and thus open a window towards the earliest cosmic times . Research projects in the Chandra Deep Field South ESO PR Photo 02c/03 ESO PR Photo 02c/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 513 pix - 112k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1026 pix - 1.2M] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1717 x 2201 pix - 5.5M] ESO PR Photo 02d/03 ESO PR Photo 02d/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 469 pix - 112k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 937 pix - 1.0M] [Full-Res - JPEG: 2545 x 2980 pix - 10.7M] Caption : PR Photo 02c-d/03 shows two sky fields within the WFI image of CDF-S, reproduced at full (pixel) size to illustrate the exceptional information richness of these data. The subfields measure 6.8 x 7.8 arcmin 2 (1717 x 1975 pixels) and 10.1 x 10.5 arcmin 2 (2545 x 2635 pixels), respectively. North is up and East is left. Technical information is available below. Astronomers from different teams and disciplines have been quick to join forces in a world-wide co-ordinated effort around the Chandra Deep Field South. Observations of this area are now being performed by some of the most powerful astronomical facilities and instruments. They include space-based X-ray and infrared observations by the ESA XMM-Newton , the NASA CHANDRA , Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and soon SIRTF (scheduled for launch in a few months), as well as imaging and spectroscopical observations in the infrared and optical part of the spectrum by telescopes at the ground-based observatories of ESO (La Silla and Paranal) and NOAO (Kitt Peak and Tololo). A huge database is currently being created that will help to analyse the evolution of galaxies in all currently feasible respects. All participating teams have agreed to make their data on this field publicly available, thus providing the world-wide astronomical community with a unique opportunity to perform competitive research, joining forces within this vast scientific project. Concerted observations The optical true-colour WFI image presented here forms an important part of this broad, concerted approach. It combines observations of three scientific teams that have engaged in complementary scientific projects, thereby capitalizing on this very powerful combination of their individual observations. The following teams are involved in this work: * COMBO-17 (Classifying Objects by Medium-Band Observations in 17 filters) : an international collaboration led by Christian Wolf and other scientists at the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA, Heidelberg, Germany). This team used 51 hours of WFI observing time to obtain images through five broad-band and twelve medium-band optical filters in the visual spectral region in order to measure the distances (by means of "photometric redshifts") and star-formation rates of about 10,000 galaxies, thereby also revealing their evolutionary status. * EIS (ESO Imaging Survey) : a team of visiting astronomers from the ESO community and beyond, led by Luiz da Costa (ESO). They observed the CDF-S for 44 hours in six optical bands with the WFI camera on the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope and 28 hours in two near-infrared bands with the SOFI instrument at the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) , both at La Silla. These observations form part of the Deep Public Imaging Survey that covers a total sky area of 3 square degrees. * GOODS (The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey) : another international team (on the ESO side, led by Catherine Cesarsky ) that focusses on the coordination of deep space- and ground-based observations on a smaller, central area of the CDF-S in order to image the galaxies in many differerent spectral wavebands, from X-rays to radio. GOODS has contributed with 40 hours of WFI time for observations in three broad-band filters that were designed for the selection of targets to be spectroscopically observed with the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile), for which over 200 hours of observations are planned. About 10,000 galaxies will be spectroscopically observed in order to determine their redshift (distance), star formation rate, etc. Another important contribution to this large research undertaking will come from the GEMS project. This is a "HST treasury programme" (with Hans-Walter Rix from MPIA as Principal Investigator) which observes the 10,000 galaxies identified in COMBO-17 - and eventually the entire WFI-field with HST - to show the evolution of their shapes with time. Great questions With the combination of data from many wavelength ranges now at hand, the astronomers are embarking upon studies of the many different processes in the universe. They expect to shed more light on several important cosmological questions, such as: * How and when was the first generation of stars born? * When exactly was the neutral hydrogen in the universe ionized the first time by powerful radiation emitted from the first stars and active galactic nuclei? * How did galaxies and groups of galaxies evolve during the past 13 billion years? * What is the true nature of those elusive objects that are only seen at the infrared and submillimetre wavelengths (cf. ESO PR 23/02 )? * Which fraction of galaxies had an "active" nucleus (probably with a black hole at the centre) in their past, and how long did this phase last? Moreover, since these extensive optical observations were obtained in the course of a dozen observing periods during several years, it is also possible to perform studies of certain variable phenomena: * How many variable sources are seen and what are their types and properties? * How many supernovae are detected per time interval, i.e. what is the supernovae frequency at different cosmic epochs? * How do those processes depend on each other? This is just a short and very incomplete list of questions astronomers world-wide will address using all the complementary observations. No doubt that the coming studies of the Chandra Deep Field South - with this and other data - will be most exciting and instructive! Other wide-field images Other wide-field images from the WFI have been published in various ESO press releases during the past four years - they are also available at the WFI Photo Gallery . A collection of full-resolution files (TIFF-format) is available on a WFI CD-ROM . Technical Information The very extensive data reduction and colour image processing needed to produce these images were performed by Mischa Schirmer and Thomas Erben at the "Wide Field Expertise Center" of the Institut für Astrophysik und Extraterrestrische Forschung der Universität Bonn (IAEF) in Germany. It was done by means of a software pipeline specialised for reduction of multiple CCD wide-field imaging camera data. This pipeline is mainly based on publicly available software modules and algorithms ( EIS , FLIPS , LDAC , Terapix , Wifix ). The image was constructed from about 150 exposures in each of the following wavebands: B-band (centred at wavelength 456 nm; here rendered as blue, 15.8 hours total exposure time), V-band (540 nm; green, 15.6 hours) and R-band (652 nm; red, 17.8 hours). Only images taken under sufficiently good observing conditions (defined as seeing less than 1.1 arcsec) were included. In total, 450 images were assembled to produce this colour image, together with about as many calibration images (biases, darks and flats). More than 2 Terabyte (TB) of temporary files were produced during the extensive data reduction. Parallel processing of all data sets took about two weeks on a four-processor Sun Enterprise 450 workstation and a 1.8 GHz dual processor Linux PC. The final colour image was assembled in Adobe Photoshop. The observations were performed by ESO (GOODS, EIS) and the COMBO-17 collaboration in the period 1/1999-10/2002.

  2. IAU Working Group on Wide-Field Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGillivray, H. T.

    1991-01-01

    Contents: 1. Introduction - The IAU Working Group on Wide-Field Imaging (R. M. West). 2. Reports from the Sub-Sections of the Working Group - a. Sky surveys and patrols (R. M. West). b. Photographic techniques (D. F. Malin). c. Digitization techniques (H. T. MacGillivray). d. Archival and retrieval of wide-field data (B. Lasker). 3. Meeting of the Organising Committee (R. M. West). 4. Wide-field plate archives (M. Tsvetkov). 5. Reproduction of the Palomar Observatory Sky Surveys (R. J. Brucato). 6. Status of the St ScI scan-distribution program (B. Lasker). 7. Pixel addition - pushing Schmidt plates to B = 25 (M. R. S. Hawkins). 8. Photometry from Estar film (S. Phillipps, Q. Parker). 9. ASCHOT - Astrophysical Schmidt Orbital Telescope (H. Lorenz). 10. The Hitchhiker parallel CCD camera (J. Davies, M. Disney, S. Driver, I. Morgan, S. Phillipps).

  3. The Astronomical Potential of Wide-field Imaging from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, S.

    2001-12-01

    Wide-field imaging is best done from space. Unrestricted by seeing and the limitations of an isoplanatic patch, it should be possible to construct space telescopes delivering very wide fields of diffraction-limited images with enormous information content per image. Among the science programs that will benefit are complete sky surveys to look for rare objects, staring observations to look for microlensing events, monitoring of star clusters to look for eclipses by extra-solar planets, regular surveys of large regions to search for time-variable phenomena, especially supernovae, and repeated observations of the ecliptic to identify ``killer asteroids" and other interlopers. This talk will discuss some of the science that could be enabled by wide-field imaging telescopes in space such as the SNAP satellite.

  4. MEO and LEO space debris optical observations at Crimean Observatory: first experience and future perspectives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, Vasilij; Biryukov, Vadim; Agapov, Vladimir; Molotov, Igor

    The near Earth space observation group of Crimean Observatory is performing the regular op-tical monitoring of space debris at GEO region within framework of the International Scientific Optical Network (ISON). During last years we also paid attention to objects on lower orbits due to increasing interest to LEO and MEO regions caused by several catastrophic events happened in the recent past. Optical observations provide high quality information about position and physical properties of space debris at LEO and MEO so they can be considered as another source of data comple-mentary to traditional radar measurements. We will discuss our observations of fragments from Briz-M upper stage (object 28944) and Block-DM ullage motor (25054) explosions. Results of observation of USA-193 debris will be presented. Then we will focus on observations and some photometric properties of FengYun 1C debris as well as Cosmos 2251 and Iridium 33 fragments. Radar cross-section versus optical photometry will be compared. Moreover, estimates of orbital parameters as well as area-to-mass ratio for some observed objects will be given. Most of our observations which we discuss in the paper represent just the first attempt to investigate capabilities of our optical system to observe MEO and LEO objects. But these results are very promising and show good perspectives for the future. We will briefly describe future perspectives of our optical observations of space debris and other objects in MEO and LEO region after the new wide-field telescopes will be put into operation.

  5. Closed-loop tomographic control on HOMER wide-field AO bench: experimental results and identification issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, Amelie; Costille, Anne; Petit, Cyril; Fusco, Thierry

    2010-07-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) has a limited corrected field of view because of the anisoplanatism effect. Wide Field AO (WFAO) concepts, such as Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO), have been developed to overcome this limitation. These complex WFAO systems raise critical challenges such as tomographic control and calibrations. We present new results obtained in closed-loop configuration with the laboratory bench HOMER which is devoted to implementation and validation of these WFAO concepts in the perspective of future VLT/ELT AO systems. Turbulence is generated with rotating phase screens and multi-directional analysis is performed. Tomographic control relies on Linear Quadratic Gaussian control (LQG). The correction can be applied thanks to two Deformable Mirrors (DM). We also focus on calibration issues and models identification. We investigate in particular identification of relative geometry of the wave front sensors, DM altitude and asterism and its impact on performance.

  6. A Precision Metrology System for the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.

    2003-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) will replace the current Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). By providing higher throughput and sensitivity than WFPC2, and operating from the near-IR to the near-UV, WFC3 will once again bring the pefiormance of HST above that from ground-based observatories. Crucial to the integration of the WFC3 optical bench is a pair of 2-axis cathetometers used to view targets which cannot be seen by other means when the bench is loaded into its enclosure. The setup and calibration of these cathetometers is described, along with results from a comparison of the cathetometer system with other metrology techniques. Finally, the use of the cathetometers on the flight optical bench and measurement results are given.

  7. Wide-field fluorescence molecular tomography with compressive sensing based preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ruoyang; Pian, Qi; Intes, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Wide-field optical tomography based on structured light illumination and detection strategies enables efficient tomographic imaging of large tissues at very fast acquisition speeds. However, the optical inverse problem based on such instrumental approach is still ill-conditioned. Herein, we investigate the benefit of employing compressive sensing-based preconditioning to wide-field structured illumination and detection approaches. We assess the performances of Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) when using such preconditioning methods both in silico and with experimental data. Additionally, we demonstrate that such methodology could be used to select the subset of patterns that provides optimal reconstruction performances. Lastly, we compare preconditioning data collected using a normal base that offers good experimental SNR against that directly acquired with optimal designed base. An experimental phantom study is provided to validate the proposed technique. PMID:26713202

  8. Wide-field fluorescence molecular tomography with compressive sensing based preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ruoyang; Pian, Qi; Intes, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Wide-field optical tomography based on structured light illumination and detection strategies enables efficient tomographic imaging of large tissues at very fast acquisition speeds. However, the optical inverse problem based on such instrumental approach is still ill-conditioned. Herein, we investigate the benefit of employing compressive sensing-based preconditioning to wide-field structured illumination and detection approaches. We assess the performances of Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) when using such preconditioning methods both in silico and with experimental data. Additionally, we demonstrate that such methodology could be used to select the subset of patterns that provides optimal reconstruction performances. Lastly, we compare preconditioning data collected using a normal base that offers good experimental SNR against that directly acquired with optimal designed base. An experimental phantom study is provided to validate the proposed technique. PMID:26713202

  9. Wide-field Raman imaging of dental lesions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Li, Bolan; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa

    2014-06-21

    Detection of dental caries at the onset remains as a great challenge in dentistry. Raman spectroscopy could be successfully applied towards detecting caries since it is sensitive to the amount of Raman active mineral crystals, the most abundant component of enamel. Effective diagnosis requires full examination of a tooth surface via Raman mapping. Point-scan Raman mapping is not clinically relevant (feasible) due to lengthy data acquisition time. In this work, a wide-field Raman imaging system was assembled based on a high-sensitivity 2D CCD camera for imaging the mineralization status of teeth with lesions. Wide-field images indicated some lesions to be hypomineralized and others to be hypermineralized. The observations of wide-field Raman imaging were in agreement with point-scan Raman mapping. Therefore, sound enamel and lesions can be discriminated by Raman imaging of the mineral content. In conclusion, wide-field Raman imaging is a potentially useful tool for visualization of dental lesions in the clinic. PMID:24781363

  10. Wide-field feedback neurons dynamically tune early visual processing.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, John C; Nern, Aljoscha; Rubin, Gerald M; Reiser, Michael B

    2014-05-21

    An important strategy for efficient neural coding is to match the range of cellular responses to the distribution of relevant input signals. However, the structure and relevance of sensory signals depend on behavioral state. Here, we show that behavior modifies neural activity at the earliest stages of fly vision. We describe a class of wide-field neurons that provide feedback to the most peripheral layer of the Drosophila visual system, the lamina. Using in vivo patch-clamp electrophysiology, we found that lamina wide-field neurons respond to low-frequency luminance fluctuations. Recordings in flying flies revealed that the gain and frequency tuning of wide-field neurons change during flight, and that these effects are mimicked by the neuromodulator octopamine. Genetically silencing wide-field neurons increased behavioral responses to slow-motion stimuli. Together, these findings identify a cell type that is gated by behavior to enhance neural coding by subtracting low-frequency signals from the inputs to motion detection circuits. PMID:24853944

  11. Wide-Field Raman Imaging of Dental Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shan; Li, Bolan; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Detection of dental caries at the onset remains as a great challenge in dentistry. Raman spectroscopy could be successfully applied towards detecting caries since it is sensitive to the amount of the Raman active mineral crystals, the most abundant component of enamel. Effective diagnosis requires full examination of a tooth surface via a Raman mapping. Point-scan Raman mapping is not clinically relevant (feasible) due to lengthy data acquisition time. In this work, a wide-field Raman imaging system was assembled based on a high-sensitivity 2D CCD camera for imaging the mineralization status of teeth with lesions. Wide-field images indicated some lesions to be hypomineralized and others to be hypermineralized. The observations of wide-field Raman imaging were in agreement with point-scan Raman mapping. Therefore, sound enamel and lesions can be discriminated by Raman imaging of the mineral content. In conclusion, wide-field Raman imaging is a potentially useful tool for visualization of dental lesions in the clinic. PMID:24781363

  12. The second generation Wide-Field/Planetary Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leschly, Kim; Allestad, David; Herrell, Linda

    1991-01-01

    The general design and principal features of the second generation Wide-Field/Planetary Camera (WFPC-2) for the Hubble Space Telescope are reviewed. The discussion covers the background of WFPC-2 development, science capabilities, key performance parameters, optical and electronic equipment, mechanisms, thermal control, and contamination control. Attention is also given to on-orbit operations, including commanding and telemetry and on-orbit servicing.

  13. PyWiFeS: Wide Field Spectrograph data reduction pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, Michael; Vogt, Frédéric; Nielsen, Jon; Sharp, Rob

    2014-02-01

    PyWiFeS is a Python-based data reduction pipeline for the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS). Its core data processing routines are built on standard scientific Python packages commonly used in astronomical applications. It includes an implementation of a global optical model of the spectrograph which provides wavelengths solutions accurate to ˜0.05 Å (RMS) across the entire detector. Through scripting, PyWiFeS can enable batch processing of large quantities of data.

  14. Design Evolution of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peabody, Hume; Peters, Carlton; Rodriguez, Juan; McDonald, Carson; Content, David A.; Jackson, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    The design of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) continues to evolve as each design cycle is analyzed. In 2012, two Hubble sized (2.4 m diameter) telescopes were donated to NASA from elsewhere in the Federal Government. NASA began investigating potential uses for these telescopes and identified WFIRST as a mission to benefit from these assets. With an updated, deeper, and sharper field of view than previous design iterations with a smaller telescope, the optical designs of the WFIRST instruments were updated and the mechanical and thermal designs evolved around the new optical layout. Beginning with Design Cycle 3, significant analysis efforts yielded a design and model that could be evaluated for Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) purposes for the Wide Field Imager (WFI) and provided the basis for evaluating the high level observatory requirements. Development of the Cycle 3 thermal model provided some valuable analysis lessons learned and established best practices for future design cycles. However, the Cycle 3 design did include some major liens and evolving requirements which were addressed in the Cycle 4 Design. Some of the design changes are driven by requirements changes, while others are optimizations or solutions to liens from previous cycles. Again in Cycle 4, STOP analysis was performed and further insights into the overall design were gained leading to the Cycle 5 design effort currently underway. This paper seeks to capture the thermal design evolution, with focus on major design drivers, key decisions and their rationale, and lessons learned as the design evolved.

  15. Design Evolution of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope Using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peabody, Hume L.; Peters, Carlton V.; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Juan E.; McDonald, Carson S.; Content, David A.; Jackson, Clifton E.

    2015-01-01

    The design of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) continues to evolve as each design cycle is analyzed. In 2012, two Hubble sized (2.4 m diameter) telescopes were donated to NASA from elsewhere in the Federal Government. NASA began investigating potential uses for these telescopes and identified WFIRST as a mission to benefit from these assets. With an updated, deeper, and sharper field of view than previous design iterations with a smaller telescope, the optical designs of the WFIRST instruments were updated and the mechanical and thermal designs evolved around the new optical layout. Beginning with Design Cycle 3, significant analysis efforts yielded a design and model that could be evaluated for Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) purposes for the Wide Field Imager (WFI) and provided the basis for evaluating the high level observatory requirements. Development of the Cycle 3 thermal model provided some valuable analysis lessons learned and established best practices for future design cycles. However, the Cycle 3 design did include some major liens and evolving requirements which were addressed in the Cycle 4 Design. Some of the design changes are driven by requirements changes, while others are optimizations or solutions to liens from previous cycles. Again in Cycle 4, STOP analysis was performed and further insights into the overall design were gained leading to the Cycle 5 design effort currently underway. This paper seeks to capture the thermal design evolution, with focus on major design drivers, key decisions and their rationale, and lessons learned as the design evolved.

  16. Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Spatial-Spectral Image Synthesis Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Leisawitz, David T.; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Sinukoff, Evan J.

    2012-01-01

    Developed is an algorithmic approach for wide field of view interferometric spatial-spectral image synthesis. The data collected from the interferometer consists of a set of double-Fourier image data cubes, one cube per baseline. These cubes are each three-dimensional consisting of arrays of two-dimensional detector counts versus delay line position. For each baseline a moving delay line allows collection of a large set of interferograms over the 2D wide field detector grid; one sampled interferogram per detector pixel per baseline. This aggregate set of interferograms, is algorithmically processed to construct a single spatial-spectral cube with angular resolution approaching the ratio of the wavelength to longest baseline. The wide field imaging is accomplished by insuring that the range of motion of the delay line encompasses the zero optical path difference fringe for each detector pixel in the desired field-of-view. Each baseline cube is incoherent relative to all other baseline cubes and thus has only phase information relative to itself. This lost phase information is recovered by having point, or otherwise known, sources within the field-of-view. The reference source phase is known and utilized as a constraint to recover the coherent phase relation between the baseline cubes and is key to the image synthesis. Described will be the mathematical formalism, with phase referencing and results will be shown using data collected from NASA/GSFC Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT).

  17. Wide-field interferometric phase microscopy with molecular specificity using plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Turko, Nir A; Peled, Anna; Shaked, Natan T

    2013-11-01

    We present a method for adding molecular specificity to wide-field interferometric phase microscopy (IPM) by recording the phase signatures of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) labeling targets of interest in biological cells. The AuNPs are excited by time-modulated light at a wavelength corresponding to their absorption spectral peak, evoking a photothermal (PT) effect due to their plasmonic resonance. This effect induces a local temperature rise, resulting in local refractive index and phase changes that can be detected optically. Using a wide-field interferometric phase microscope, we acquired an image sequence of the AuNP sample phase profile without requiring lateral scanning, and analyzed the time-dependent profile of the entire field of view using a Fourier analysis, creating a map of the locations of AuNPs in the sample. The system can image a wide-field PT phase signal from a cluster containing down to 16 isolated AuNPs. AuNPs are then conjugated to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies and inserted to an EGFR-overexpressing cancer cell culture, which is imaged using IPM and verified by confocal microscopy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time wide-field interferometric PT imaging is performed at the subcellular level without the need for total internal reflection effects or scanning. PMID:24081309

  18. The Future of X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    The most important next step is the development of X-ray optics comparable to (or better than) Chandra in angular resolution that far exceed Chandra s effective area. Use the long delay to establish an adequately funded, competitive technology program along the lines I have recommended. Don't be diverted from this objective, except for Explorer-class missions. Progress in X-ray optics, with emphasis on the angular resolution, is central to the paradigm-shifting discoveries and the contributions of X-ray astronomy to multiwavelength astrophysics over the past 51 years.

  19. Neutron polycapillary optics: back to future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, Alexander

    2005-08-01

    At the sunrise of the Kumakhov optics, the latter was enormously attractive for neutron scientists eager to take advantage from focused neutron beams. However, in spite of this initial enthusiasm, rear neutron applications of polycapillary optics are mostly limited either to feasibility studies or to non-scattering techniques. The reason for such a drawback is a serious degradation in the momentum resolution of neutron scattering methods caused by increased divergence of focused beams. However, limited brightness of present day neutron sources (both existing and coming) requires rethinking the current situation. Neutron lenses are successfully tested for low Q-resolution applications providing an enormous increase of neutron flux at small samples. Moreover, some recent developments in the field of neutron instrumentation allow us to overcome the resolution problem by decoupling the angular resolution and the incident beam divergence thus opening the opportunity for the use of focusing neutron optics in some high Q-resolution application. Further advances in technology required to improve the performance of neutron polycapillary optics, also in combination with modem methods of polarization of neutron beams, are discussed.

  20. Si photonics technology for future optical interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xuezhe; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V.

    2011-12-01

    Scaling of computing systems require ultra-efficient interconnects with large bandwidth density. Silicon photonics offers a disruptive solution with advantages in reach, energy efficiency and bandwidth density. We review our progress in developing building blocks for ultra-efficient WDM silicon photonic links. Employing microsolder based hybrid integration with low parasitics and high density, we optimize photonic devices on SOI platforms and VLSI circuits on more advanced bulk CMOS technology nodes independently. Progressively, we successfully demonstrated single channel hybrid silicon photonic transceivers at 5 Gbps and 10 Gbps, and 80 Gbps arrayed WDM silicon photonic transceiver using reverse biased depletion ring modulators and Ge waveguide photo detectors. Record-high energy efficiency of less than 100fJ/bit and 385 fJ/bit were achieved for the hybrid integrated transmitter and receiver, respectively. Waveguide grating based optical proximity couplers were developed with low loss and large optical bandwidth to enable multi-layer intra/inter-chip optical interconnects. Thermal engineering of WDM devices by selective substrate removal, together with WDM link using synthetic wavelength comb, we significantly improved the device tuning efficiency and reduced the tuning range. Using these innovative techniques, two orders of magnitude tuning power reduction was achieved. And tuning cost of only a few 10s of fJ/bit is expected for high data rate WDM silicon photonic links.

  1. In-Flight Performance of Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a powerful new UVNisible/IR imager, was installed into HST during Servicing Mission 4. After a successful commissioning in the Servicing Mission Orbital Verification program, WFC3 has been engaged in an exciting program of scientific observations. I review here the in-flight scientific performance of the instrument, addressing such topics as image quality, sensitivity, detector performance, and stability.

  2. Foregrounds in Wide-field Redshifted 21 cm Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Bowman, Judd D.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bernardi, G.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Corey, B. E.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Emrich, D.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P.; Kratzenberg, E.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tegmark, M.; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2015-05-01

    Detection of 21 cm emission of H i from the epoch of reionization, at redshifts z\\gt 6, is limited primarily by foreground emission. We investigate the signatures of wide-field measurements and an all-sky foreground model using the delay spectrum technique that maps the measurements to foreground object locations through signal delays between antenna pairs. We demonstrate interferometric measurements are inherently sensitive to all scales, including the largest angular scales, owing to the nature of wide-field measurements. These wide-field effects are generic to all observations but antenna shapes impact their amplitudes substantially. A dish-shaped antenna yields the most desirable features from a foreground contamination viewpoint, relative to a dipole or a phased array. Comparing data from recent Murchison Widefield Array observations, we demonstrate that the foreground signatures that have the largest impact on the H i signal arise from power received far away from the primary field of view. We identify diffuse emission near the horizon as a significant contributing factor, even on wide antenna spacings that usually represent structures on small scales. For signals entering through the primary field of view, compact emission dominates the foreground contamination. These two mechanisms imprint a characteristic pitchfork signature on the “foreground wedge” in Fourier delay space. Based on these results, we propose that selective down-weighting of data based on antenna spacing and time can mitigate foreground contamination substantially by a factor of ∼100 with negligible loss of sensitivity.

  3. Quantitative phase imaging by wide field lensless digital holographic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinda-Ougba, A.; Koukourakis, N.; Essaidi, A.; Ger­hardt, N. C.; Hofmann, M. R.

    2015-05-01

    Wide field, lensless microscopes have been developed for telemedicine and for resource limited setting [1]. They are based on in-line digital holography which is capable to provide amplitude and phase information resulting from numerical reconstruction. The phase information enables achieving axial resolution in the nanometer range. Hence, such microscopes provide a powerful tool to determine three-dimensional topologies of microstructures. In this contribution, a compact, low-cost, wide field, lensless microscope is presented, which is capable of providing topological profiles of microstructures in transparent material. Our setup consist only of two main components: a CMOSsensor chip and a laser diode without any need of a pinhole. We use this very simple setup to record holograms of microobjects. A wide field of view of ~24 mm², and a lateral resolution of ~2 μm are achieved. Moreover, amplitude and phase information are obtained from the numerical reconstruction of the holograms using a phase retrieval algorithm together with the angular spectrum propagation method. Topographic information of highly transparent micro-objects is obtained from the phase data. We evaluate our system by recording holograms of lines with different depths written by a focused laser beam. A reliable characterization of laser written microstructures is crucial for their functionality. Our results show that this system is valuable for determination of topological profiles of microstructures in transparent material.

  4. A Precision Metrology System for the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.

    2003-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) will replace the current Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). By providing higher throughput and sensitivity than WFPC2, and operating from the near-IR to the near-UV, WFC3 will once again bring the performance of HST above that from ground-based observatories. Crucial to the integration of the WFC3 optical bench is a pair of 2-axis cathetometers used to view targets which cannot be seen by other means when the bench is loaded into its enclosure. The setup and calibration of these cathetometers is described, along with results from a comparison of the cathetometer system with other metrology techniques.

  5. Stray-field-induced Faraday contributions in wide-field Kerr microscopy and -magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markó, D.; Soldatov, I.; Tekielak, M.; Schäfer, R.

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic domain contrast in wide-field Kerr microscopy on bulk specimens can be substantially distorted by non-linear, field-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective lens that are caused by stray-field components emerging from the specimen. These Faraday contributions, which were detected by Kerr-magnetometry on grain-oriented iron-silicon steel samples, are thoroughly elaborated and characterized. They express themselves as a field-dependent gray-scale offset to the domain contrast and in highly distorted surface magnetization curves if optically measured in a wide field Kerr microscope. An experimental method to avoid such distortions is suggested. In the course of these studies, a low-permeability part in the surface magnetization loop of slightly misoriented (110)-surfaces in iron-silicon sheets was discovered that is attributed to demagnetization effects in direction perpendicular to the sheet surface.

  6. Panoramic Views of Cluster-Scale Assemblies Explored by Subaru Wide-Field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tamura, Takayuki; Yahagi, Hideki; Nagashima, Masahiro; Tanaka, Ichi; Arimoto, Nobuo; Futamase, Toshifumi; Iye, Masanori; Karasawa, Yoshikazu; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kawasaki, Wataru; Kitayama, Tetsu; Matsuhara, Hideo; Nakata, Fumiaki; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohta, Kouji; Okamoto, Takashi; Okamura, Sadanori; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Suto, Yasushi; Tamura, Naoyuki; Umetsu, Keiichi; Yamada, Toru

    2005-04-01

    We have started PISCES project; a panoramic imaging and spectroscopic survey of distant clusters on Subaru. It exploits the unique wide-field imaging capability of Suprime-Cam, which provides a 34' × 27' field of view corresponding to a physical area of 16 × 13 Mpc2 at z ˜ 1. We plan to target 15 clusters at 0.4 ≲ z ≲ 1.3. We report on our first results concerning the inner structures and large-scale structures of two distant clusters at z = 0.55 and 0.83 together with the earlier results on a z = 0.41 cluster. The photometric redshift technique has been applied to multi-color data in order to remove most of the foreground/background galaxies so as to isolate the cluster member candidates. We have found large-scale filamentary structures around the clusters, extending out to > 5 Mpc from the cores, as well as complex inner structures. The galaxy distributions in the inner regions of the clusters look similar to the X-ray intensity maps, suggesting that most of the optical structures trace physically bound systems. We also compared the structures of the three clusters with those of model clusters in a numerical simulation (N-body + semi-analytic model) by parameterising the shapes of the iso-density contours of galaxies, and found a broad agreement. Our results that cluster-scale assembly takes place along filaments during hierarchical clustering need to be confirmed spectroscopically in the near future.

  7. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Enabling Techniques for High Angular Resolution Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, S. A.; Armstrong, T.; Frey, Bradley J.; Jung, J.; Kirk, J.; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Lyon, R.; Maher, Stephen; Martino, Anthony J.; Pauls, T.

    2007-01-01

    The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) was designed to develop techniques for wide-field of view imaging interferometry, using "double-Fourier" methods. These techniques will be important for a wide range of future spacebased interferometry missions. We have provided simple demonstrations of the methodology already, and continuing development of the testbed will lead to higher data rates, improved data quality, and refined algorithms for image reconstruction. At present, the testbed effort includes five lines of development; automation of the testbed, operation in an improved environment, acquisition of large high-quality datasets, development of image reconstruction algorithms, and analytical modeling of the testbed. We discuss the progress made towards the first four of these goals; the analytical modeling is discussed in a separate paper within this conference.

  8. Autonomous wide-field-of-view star tracker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauwecker, Chris J.; Abreu, Rene; Plascyk, James A.

    1993-11-01

    This paper describes the design of a low power, lightweight, three-axis, high accuracy, wide field of view (WFOV), CCD based Star Tracker System. The autonomous system will provide an inertial attitude reference for several lightweight, lowpower satellite programs underway at TRW. The paper includes the trades which led to the current design. Product performance, description, and verification are provided. The paper concludes with a development schedule, which includes a flight unit acceptance in January 1994, and closing comments regarding increased functionality and improved integration ease.

  9. Status and Calibration of the HST Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John W.; WFC3 Team

    2011-05-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 is the most used science instrument on HST since its installation in May 2009 during Servicing Mission 4. This presentation reviews its in-flight performance and calibration with particular attention to topics relevant to Cycle 19 Phase 2 proposers. The new capability for Charge Injection in the UVIS channel to mitigate radiation damaged induced charge transfer inefficiency will be discussed. Results from recent tests to commission a capability to perform spatial scans to enable higher S/N spectroscopy of bright target will presented. Ongoing improvements to the photometric, flat field, and spectroscopy calibrations will be summarized.

  10. SSC Geopositional Assessment of the Advanced Wide Field Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Kenton

    2006-01-01

    The geopositional accuracy of the standard geocorrected product from the Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) was evaluated using digital orthophoto quarter quadrangles and other reference sources of similar accuracy. Images were analyzed from summer 2004 through spring 2005. Forty to fifty check points were collected manually per scene and analyzed to determine overall circular error, estimates of horizontal bias, and other systematic errors. Measured errors were somewhat higher than the specifications for the data, but they were consistent with the analysis of the distributing vendor.

  11. A ROSAT Wide Field Camera search for XUV bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Alan; Page, Clive G.; Sembay, S.; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1993-01-01

    We have searched the ROSAT Wide Field Camera all-sky survey for shorttime-scale (less than 50 s) XUV bursts down to a limiting count of 5 x 10 exp -3 count/sq arcmin, corresponding to an incident flux of about 3 x 10 exp -10 erg/sq cm. In a total observation period of 171 d covering the entire sky, we found no evidence for such events. The present results are used to place limits on the log N-log S relation for gamma-ray bursts and constraints on the spectral shape of the previously reported ultrasoft X-ray transients.

  12. Mitigating fluorescence spectral overlap in wide-field endoscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Vivian; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The number of molecular species suitable for multispectral fluorescence imaging is limited due to the overlap of the emission spectra of indicator fluorophores, e.g., dyes and nanoparticles. To remove fluorophore emission cross-talk in wide-field multispectral fluorescence molecular imaging, we evaluate three different solutions: (1) image stitching, (2) concurrent imaging with cross-talk ratio subtraction algorithm, and (3) frame-sequential imaging. A phantom with fluorophore emission cross-talk is fabricated, and a 1.2-mm ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) is used to test and compare these approaches. Results show that fluorophore emission cross-talk could be successfully avoided or significantly reduced. Near term, the concurrent imaging method of wide-field multispectral fluorescence SFE is viable for early stage cancer detection and localization in vivo. Furthermore, a means to enhance exogenous fluorescence target-to-background ratio by the reduction of tissue autofluorescence background is demonstrated. PMID:23966226

  13. Science with a wide-field UV transient explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Sagiv, I.; Gal-Yam, A.; Ofek, E. O.; Waxman, E.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Topaz, J.; Aharonson, O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Phinney, E. S.; Nakar, E.; Maoz, D.; Beichman, C.; Murthy, J.; Worden, S. P.

    2014-04-01

    The time-variable electromagnetic sky has been well-explored at a wide range of wavelengths. In contrast, the ultra-violet (UV) variable sky is relatively poorly explored, even though it offers exciting scientific prospects. Here, we review the potential scientific impact of a wide-field UV survey on the study of explosive and other transient events, as well as known classes of variable objects, such as active galactic nuclei and variable stars. We quantify our predictions using a fiducial set of observational parameters which are similar to those envisaged for the proposed ULTRASAT mission. We show that such a mission would be able to revolutionize our knowledge about massive star explosions by measuring the early UV emission from hundreds of events, revealing key physical parameters of the exploding progenitor stars. Such a mission would also detect the UV emission from many tens of tidal-disruption events of stars by supermassive black holes at galactic nuclei and enable a measurement of the rate of such events. The overlap of such a wide-field UV mission with existing and planned gravitational-wave and high-energy neutrino telescopes makes it especially timely.

  14. PERSPECTIVE: Toward a wide-field retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameri, Hossein; Ratanapakorn, Tanapat; Ufer, Stefan; Eckhardt, Helmut; Humayun, Mark S.; Weiland, James D.

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a wide field electrode array that may increase the field of vision in patients implanted with a retinal prosthesis. Mobility is often impaired in patients with low vision, particularly in those with peripheral visual loss. Studies on low vision patients as well as simulation studies on normally sighted individuals have indicated a strong correlation between the visual field and mobility. In addition, it has been shown that an increased visual field is associated with a significant improvement in visual acuity and object discrimination. Current electrode arrays implanted in animals or human vary in size; however, the retinal area covered by the electrodes has a maximum projected visual field of about 10°. We have designed wide field electrode arrays that could potentially provide a visual field of 34°, which may significantly improve the mobility. Tests performed on a mechanical eye model showed that it was possible to fix 10 mm wide flexible polyimide dummy electrode arrays onto the retina using a single retinal tack. They also showed that the arrays could conform to the inner curvature of the eye. Surgeries on an enucleated porcine eye model demonstrated feasibility of implantation of 10 mm wide arrays through a 5 mm eye wall incision.

  15. The Wide-Field Imager for Solar Probe Plus (WISPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell A.; Plunkett, Simon P.; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Thernisien, Arnaud F. R.; Wang, Dennis; Rich, Nathan; Carter, Michael T.; Chua, Damien H.; Socker, Dennis G.; Linton, Mark G.; Morrill, Jeff S.; Lynch, Sean; Thurn, Adam; Van Duyne, Peter; Hagood, Robert; Clifford, Greg; Grey, Phares J.; Velli, Marco; Liewer, Paulett C.; Hall, Jeffrey R.; DeJong, Eric M.; Mikic, Zoran; Rochus, Pierre; Mazy, Emanuel; Bothmer, Volker; Rodmann, Jens

    2015-02-01

    The Wide-field Imager for Solar PRobe Plus (WISPR) is the sole imager aboard the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission scheduled for launch in 2018. SPP will be a unique mission designed to orbit as close as 7 million km (9.86 solar radii) from Sun center. WISPR employs a 95∘ radial by 58∘ transverse field of view to image the fine-scale structure of the solar corona, derive the 3D structure of the large-scale corona, and determine whether a dust-free zone exists near the Sun. WISPR is the smallest heliospheric imager to date yet it comprises two nested wide-field telescopes with large-format (2 K × 2 K) APS CMOS detectors to optimize the performance for their respective fields of view and to minimize the risk of dust damage, which may be considerable close to the Sun. The WISPR electronics are very flexible allowing the collection of individual images at cadences up to 1 second at perihelion or the summing of multiple images to increase the signal-to-noise when the spacecraft is further from the Sun. The dependency of the Thomson scattering emission of the corona on the imaging geometry dictates that WISPR will be very sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. WISPR will be the first `local' imager providing a crucial link between the large-scale corona and the in-situ measurements.

  16. Wide-Field Fundus Autofluorescence for Retinitis Pigmentosa and Cone/Cone-Rod Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Akio; Oishi, Maho; Ogino, Ken; Morooka, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa and cone/cone-rod dystrophy are inherited retinal diseases characterized by the progressive loss of rod and/or cone photoreceptors. To evaluate the status of rod/cone photoreceptors and visual function, visual acuity and visual field tests, electroretinogram, and optical coherence tomography are typically used. In addition to these examinations, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) has recently garnered attention. FAF visualizes the intrinsic fluorescent material in the retina, which is mainly lipofuscin contained within the retinal pigment epithelium. While conventional devices offer limited viewing angles in FAF, the recently developed Optos machine enables recording of wide-field FAF. With wide-field analysis, an association between abnormal FAF areas and visual function was demonstrated in retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy. In addition, the presence of "patchy" hypoautofluorescent areas was found to be correlated with symptom duration. Although physicians should be cautious when interpreting wide-field FAF results because the peripheral parts of the image are magnified significantly, this examination method provides previously unavailable information. PMID:26427426

  17. Wide field-of-view dual-band multispectral muzzle flash detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, J.; Melchor, J.; Spiliotis, P.; Taplin, L.

    2013-06-01

    Sensor technologies are undergoing revolutionary advances, as seen in the rapid growth of multispectral methodologies. Increases in spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution, and in breadth of spectral coverage, render feasible sensors that function with unprecedented performance. A system was developed that addresses many of the key hardware requirements for a practical dual-band multispectral acquisition system, including wide field of view and spectral/temporal shift between dual bands. The system was designed using a novel dichroic beam splitter and dual band-pass filter configuration that creates two side-by-side images of a scene on a single sensor. A high-speed CMOS sensor was used to simultaneously capture data from the entire scene in both spectral bands using a short focal-length lens that provided a wide field-of-view. The beam-splitter components were arranged such that the two images were maintained in optical alignment and real-time intra-band processing could be carried out using only simple arithmetic on the image halves. An experiment related to limitations of the system to address multispectral detection requirements was performed. This characterized the system's low spectral variation across its wide field of view. This paper provides lessons learned on the general limitation of key hardware components required for multispectral muzzle flash detection, using the system as a hardware example combined with simulated multispectral muzzle flash and background signatures.

  18. Technological status and future challenges of deep space optical communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, James R.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the concepts, techniques, and system design features that may be used to realize an optical communications link for future planetary missions. Such a spacecraft subsystem would encompass a 10-30 cm aperture optical telescope for both transmitting and receiving. Uplink from a laser, in the form of pulsed ranging signals or command information, will be extracted by a tracking detector; downlink data, as well as detected ranging pulses, will be properly formatted and used to modulate the downlink laser. The optical receiving station may be either on the ground or in earth orbit.

  19. Fiber optics for the future - Wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, with signals transmitted on different wavelengths through a single fiber, can have increased information capacity and fault isolation properties over single wavelength optical systems. This paper describes a typical WDM system. The applicability of future standards to such a system are discussed. Also, a state-of-the-art survey of optical multimode components which could be used to implement the system are made. The components to be surveyed are sources, multiplexers, and detectors. Emphasis is given to the demultiplexer techniques which are the major developmental components in the WDM system.

  20. Fiber optics for the future - wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, with signals transmitted on different wavelengths through a single fiber, can have increased information capacity and fault isolation properties over single wavelength optical systems. This paper describes a typical WDM system. The applicability of future standards to such a system are discussed. Also, a state-of-the-art survey of optical multimode components which could be used to implement the system are made. The components to be surveyed are sources, multiplexers, and detectors. Emphasis is given to the demultiplexer techniques which are the major developmental components in the WDM system.

  1. In-vivo performance comparison study of wide-field oxygenation imaging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Giessen, Martijn; Angelo, Joseph; Vargas, Christina; Gioux, Sylvain

    2015-03-01

    Wide-field oxygenation saturation (StO2) estimates can be clinically very advantageous. Particularly when implemented in a non-contact manner, applications such as intra-operative assessment of tissue perfusion are very promising. Nevertheless, wide-field optical oxygenation imaging did not yet successfully translate to the clinic. In this work we compare four proposed methods for wide-field imaging that are based on different photon propagation models and that depend on different sets of assumed parameters such as absorption and reduced scattering coefficients. We investigated these for methods, with particular attention to sensitivities to errors in assumed parameters of calibration estimates. To this end we acquired an in vivo time series of a pig skin flap with a venous occlusion. StO2 estimates of all methods were compared to estimates from spatial frequency domain imaging of the same time series. Correct assumptions on scatter power and accurate calibration were found to be the most important prerequisites for accurate StO2 estimates. Although all models were able to measure relative changes in StO2 when the occlusion was applied and released, only the models that incorporated assumed reduced scattering coefficients estimated StO2 values within 5% of the expected values (estimated using SFDI). An important aspect of the compared methods is their ability to be used for real-time imaging. With the addition of real-time calibration and robust tissue scattering estimates, real-time wide-field imaging of oxygenation saturation can prove to provide important added value in the clinic.

  2. The Fundamental Role of Wide-Field Imaging in Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, J. T.; Ackermann, M.; Zimmer, P.

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is fundamentally based upon surveillance of the variety of objects moving in Earth orbital space: functioning satellites, derelicts, and space debris. Optical telescopes provide a significant fraction of all data for the surveillance of space, and virtually all data on GEO and related objects. Starting with an operational definition of surveillance of space (SoS), we discuss: The unique role of wide-field imaging in acquiring surveillance data The detector-driven optical design of small, wide-field telescopes that produce data capable of providing high signal-to-noise images and tracks in the presence of detector and complicated background noise Multiple sky tracking and detector readout combinations to optimize object detection from LEO through GEO The approach to real-time image data processing capable of enabling rapid analysis and decision-making, as needed. Specifically, we describe the fundamental physics associated with the design of optical surveillance cameras based upon small aperture, wide field-of-view telescopes which we have designed. Critical performance issues include uncued detection of new and/or un-cataloged objects to faint limiting magnitudes (V > 18 at LEO), including initial orbit determination, and the capability to survey large areas of the sky (such as the CONUS GEO belt of approximately 1800 sq. degrees) to faint limiting magnitudes (V = 18) every two hours. The goal is to convert these data into actionable information in very near real-time. Initial data demonstrating and supporting our surveillance of space system designs and design goals will be presented.

  3. On the Atmospheric Extinction Reduction Procedure in Multiband Wide-Field Photometric Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A.; Mironov, A.; Biryukov, A.; Kroussanova, N.; Prokhorov, M.; Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Perkov, A.; Sasyuk, V.

    2015-06-01

    We propose an improved method for the atmospheric extinction reduction within optical photometry. Our method is based on the simultaneous multicolor observations of photometric standards. Such data are now available within the modern wide-field sky surveys and contain a large amount of information about instant atmospheric conditions. So, it became possible to estimate the extinction parameters on the basis of a quite short observational dataset and, hence, to trace the rapid stars twinkling accurately. Having been developed for a new MiniMegaTORTORa observational system, the proposed method can be adopted for a wide range of modern observational programs.

  4. Real-time monitoring of graphene patterning with wide-field four-wave mixing microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivistoinen, Juha; Aumanen, Jukka; Hiltunen, Vesa-Matti; Myllyperkiö, Pasi; Johansson, Andreas; Pettersson, Mika

    2016-04-01

    The single atom thick two-dimensional graphene is a promising material for various applications due to its extraordinary electronic, optical, optoelectronic, and mechanical properties. The demand for developing graphene based applications has entailed a requirement for development of methods for fast imaging techniques for graphene. Here, we demonstrate imaging of graphene with femtosecond wide-field four-wave mixing microscopy. The method provides a sensitive, non-destructive approach for rapid large area characterization of graphene. We show that the method is suitable for online following of a laser patterning process of microscale structures on single-layer graphene.

  5. The JPL optical communications telescope laboratory (OCTL) test bed for the future optical Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K. E.; Page, N.; Wu, J.; Srinivasan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Relative to RF, the lower power-consumption and lower mass of high bandwidth optical telecommunications make this technology extremely attractive for returning data from future NASA/JPL deep space probes.

  6. Status and Performance of HST Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy; MacKenty, John; O'Connell, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The HST Wide Field Camera 3 is a panchromatic UV-visible-near infrared camera whose development is currently nearing completion, for a planned installation into the Hubble Space Telescope during Servicing Mission 4. WFC3 provides two imaging channels. The UVIS channel features a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD focal plane with sensitivity from 200 to 1000 nm and a 160 x 160 arcsec field of view. The UVIS channel provides unprecedented sensitivity and field of view in the near ultraviolet for HST. The IR channel features a 1014 x 1014 pixel HgCdTe focal plane covering 850 to 1700 nm with a 135 x 135 arcsec field of view, providing a substantial advance in IR survey efficiency for HST. The construction of WFC3 is nearly complete, and the instrument is well into its integration and test program. We present the current status of the instrument and its projected scientific performance when installed into HST.

  7. Dynamic speckle illumination wide-field reflection phase microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngwoon; Hosseini, Poorya; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; So, Peter T. C.; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a quantitative reflection-phase microscope based on time-varying speckle-field illumination. Due to the short spatial coherence length of the speckle field, the proposed imaging system features superior lateral resolution, 520 nm, as well as high-depth selectivity, 1.03 µm. Off-axis interferometric detection enables wide-field and single-shot imaging appropriate for high-speed measurements. In addition, the measured phase sensitivity of this method, which is the smallest measurable axial motion, is more than 40 times higher than that available using a transmission system. We demonstrate the utility of our method by successfully distinguishing the motion of the top surface from that of the bottom in red blood cells. The proposed method will be useful for studying membrane dynamics in complex eukaryotic cells. PMID:25361156

  8. Wide Field X-Ray Telescope Mission Concept Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. C.; Thomas, H. D.; Fabisinski, L. L.; Baysinger, M.; Hornsby, L. S.; Maples, C. D.; Purlee, T. E.; Capizzo, P. D.; Percy, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Wide Field X-Ray Telescope (WFXT) is an astrophysics mission concept for detecting and studying extra-galactic x-ray sources, including active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies, in an effort to further understand cosmic evolution and structure. This Technical Memorandum details the results of a mission concept study completed by the Advanced Concepts Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in 2012. The design team analyzed the mission and instrument requirements, and designed a spacecraft that enables the WFXT mission while using high heritage components. Design work included selecting components and sizing subsystems for power, avionics, guidance, navigation and control, propulsion, structures, command and data handling, communications, and thermal control.

  9. A Parallel Imaging Approach to Wide-field MR Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Mary Preston; Wright, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), suggested in the earliest papers on MRI, has always been limited by the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) resulting from the small voxel size. MRM has largely been enabled by the use of microcoils which provide the SNR improvement required to overcome this limitation. Concomitant with the small coils is a small field-of-view, which limits the use of MRM as a histological tool or for imaging large regions in general. This paper describes initial results in wide field-of-view MR microscopy using a large array of narrow, parallel coils, which provides an SNR enhancement as well as the ability to use parallel imaging techniques. Comparison images made between a volume coil and the proposed technique demonstrate reductions in imaging time of over 100 with no loss in SNR or resolution. PMID:22139858

  10. Wide field x-ray telescopes: Detecting x-ray transients/afterglows related to GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, Rene; Pina, Ladislav; Inneman, Adolf; Gorenstein, Paul

    1998-05-16

    The recent discovery of X-ray afterglows of GRBs opens the possibility of analyses of GRBs by their X-ray detections. However, imaging X-ray telescopes in current use mostly have limited fields of view. Alternative X-ray optics geometries achieving very large fields of view have been theoretically suggested in the 70's but not constructed and used so far. We review the geometries and basic properties of the wide-field X-ray optical systems based on one- and two-dimensional lobster-eye geometry and suggest technologies for their development and construction. First results of the development of double replicated X-ray reflecting flats for use in one-dimensional X-ray optics of lobster-eye type are presented and discussed. The optimum strategy for locating GRBs upon their X-ray counterparts is also presented and discussed.

  11. Curvature wavefront sensing performance simulations for active correction of the Javalambre wide-field telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chueca, Sergio; Marín-Franch, Antonio; Cenarro, Andrés. Javier; Varela, Jesús; Ederoclite, Alessandro; Cristóbal-Hornillos, David; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Gruel, Nicolás.; Moles, Mariano; Yanes, Axel; Rueda, Fernando; Rueda, Sergio; Luis-Simoes, Roberto; Hernández-Fuertes, Javier; López-Sainz, Angel; Maícas-Sacristán, Natalio; Lamadrid, José Luis; Díaz-Martín, Miguel Chioare; Taylor, Keith

    2012-09-01

    In order to maintain image quality during Javalambre wide field telescope operations, deformations and rigid body motions must be actively controlled to minimize optical disturbances. For JST/T250 the aberrations of the telescope will be measured with four curvature sensors at the focal plane. To correct the measured distortions, the secondary mirror position (with a hexapod support) and the camera position can be modified in a control closed loop. Multiple software tools have been developed to accomplish this goal, constituting the "Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre" (OAJ) Active Optics Pipeline. We present a comprehensive analysis of the wave-front sensing system, including the availability of reference stars, pupil registration, wavefront estimators and the iteration matrix evaluation techniques. Some preliminary simulations have been made using a telescope model with a Optical Ray Tracing Software.

  12. Wide-Field-of-View, High-Resolution, Stereoscopic Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prechtl, Eric F.; Sedwick, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    A device combines video feeds from multiple cameras to provide wide-field-of-view, high-resolution, stereoscopic video to the user. The prototype under development consists of two camera assemblies, one for each eye. One of these assemblies incorporates a mounting structure with multiple cameras attached at offset angles. The video signals from the cameras are fed to a central processing platform where each frame is color processed and mapped into a single contiguous wide-field-of-view image. Because the resolution of most display devices is typically smaller than the processed map, a cropped portion of the video feed is output to the display device. The positioning of the cropped window will likely be controlled through the use of a head tracking device, allowing the user to turn his or her head side-to-side or up and down to view different portions of the captured image. There are multiple options for the display of the stereoscopic image. The use of head mounted displays is one likely implementation. However, the use of 3D projection technologies is another potential technology under consideration, The technology can be adapted in a multitude of ways. The computing platform is scalable, such that the number, resolution, and sensitivity of the cameras can be leveraged to improve image resolution and field of view. Miniaturization efforts can be pursued to shrink the package down for better mobility. Power savings studies can be performed to enable unattended, remote sensing packages. Image compression and transmission technologies can be incorporated to enable an improved telepresence experience.

  13. Imaging without lenses: achievements and remaining challenges of wide-field on-chip microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Alon; Luo, Wei; Su, Ting-Wei; Göröcs, Zoltán; Xue, Liang; Isikman, Serhan O; Coskun, Ahmet F; Mudanyali, Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    We discuss unique features of lens-free computational imaging tools and report some of their emerging results for wide-field on-chip microscopy, such as the achievement of a numerical aperture (NA) of ~0.8–0.9 across a field of view (FOV) of more than 20 mm2 or an NA of ~0.1 across a FOV of ~18 cm2, which corresponds to an image with more than 1.5 gigapixels. We also discuss the current challenges that these computational on-chip microscopes face, shedding light on their future directions and applications. PMID:22936170

  14. DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY LEO A: SUPRIME-CAM WIDE-FIELD STELLAR PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Stonkutė, Rima; Narbutis, Donatas; Vansevičius, Vladas; Arimoto, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Takashi; Tamura, Naoyuki

    2014-10-01

    We have surveyed a complete extent of Leo A—an apparently isolated gas-rich low-mass dwarf irregular galaxy in the Local Group. The B, V, and I passband CCD images (typical seeing ∼0.''8) were obtained with the Subaru Telescope equipped with the Suprime-Cam mosaic camera. The wide-field (20' × 24') photometry catalog of 38,856 objects (V ∼ 16-26 mag) is presented. This survey is also intended to serve as ''a finding chart'' for future imaging and spectroscopic observation programs of Leo A.

  15. Wide field multi-objects position detection through digital close-range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao; Gu, Yonggang

    2009-07-01

    Digital close-range measurement technique is developed from the geodesy surveying and the photogrammetry surveying, at present it is mainly applied to wide field detection with high relative accuracy, but its absolute accuracy is not high, about one micron to one millimeter. In this paper we apply this technique to wide field multi-objects optical fibers' space coordinates detection, a set of non-contact on-line detection system is designed and the accuracy of position detection is less than 0.03mm in the field of 600mm×600mm, that means this system has high relative accuracy and high absolute accuracy. In order to build this system, two aspects are mainly researched: CCD measurement error is the basis of photogrammetry, in order to control measurement error, the influence to measurement error affected by speckle recognition algorithm, the light source and camera space position is researched from experiments and theory. The result shows some significant conclusions: the detection error of Gravity Method is about 0.03 pixel; The uniformity of light source is important; The position detection of static goals through general photogrammetry can achieve high accuracy, about several microns, but when objects are moving, F number, lamp-house, speckle status and imaging size will probably cause additional measurement error, It is about a dozen microns to tens of microns. How to detect objects in wide field of view is a critical problem in photogrammetry, for the normal single frame photo-field is about hundreds of millimeter and the measuring field is several meters. In this paper, surface measuring through laser ranging device and Triangle Intersection Method are used to obtain fibers' positions in wide field of view. And some key technologies are adopted such as precise calibration of CCD camera, light rays adjustment method, subpixel image processing technology and corresponding image points matching. Multi-objects can be detected simultaneously in the wide field of view through theses technologies and the detection accuracy is increased. The experiments result shows that this system is stable and reliable, and it has the potential in precision measurement, industry measurement and other application areas.

  16. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Interim Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J.; Schechter, P.; Baltay, C.; Bean, R.; Bennett, D.; Brown, R.; Conselice, C.; Donahue, M.; Gaudi, S.; Lauer, T.; Perlmutter, S.; Rauscher, B.; Rhodes, J.; Roellig, T.; Stern, D.; Sumi, T.; Gerhels, N.; Sambruna, R.; Barry, R. K.; Content, D.; Grady, K; Jackson, C.; Kruk, J.; Melton, M.; Rioux, N.

    2011-01-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons (NWNH) in Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010 Decadal Survey prioritized the community consensus for ground-based and space-based observatories. Recognizing that many of the community s key questions could be answered with a wide-field infrared survey telescope in space, and that the decade would be one of budget austerity, WFIRST was top ranked in the large space mission category. In addition to the powerful new science that could be accomplished with a wide-field infrared telescope, the WFIRST mission was determined to be both technologically ready and only a small fraction of the cost of previous flagship missions, such as HST or JWST. In response to the top ranking by the community, NASA formed the WFIRST Science Definition Team (SDT) and Project Office. The SDT was charged with fleshing out the NWNH scientific requirements to a greater level of detail. NWNH evaluated the risk and cost of the JDEM-Omega mission design, as submitted by NASA, and stated that it should serve as the basis for the WFIRST mission. The SDT and Project Office were charged with developing a mission optimized for achieving the science goals laid out by the NWNH re-port. The SDT and Project Office opted to use the JDEM-Omega hardware configuration as an initial start-ing point for the hardware implementation. JDEM-Omega and WFIRST both have an infrared imager with a filter wheel, as well as counter-dispersed moderate resolution spectrometers. The primary advantage of space observations is being above the Earth's atmosphere, which absorbs, scatters, warps and emits light. Observing from above the atmosphere enables WFIRST to obtain precision infrared measurements of the shapes of galaxies for weak lensing, infrared light-curves of supernovae and exoplanet microlensing events with low systematic errors, and infrared measurements of the H hydrogen line to be cleanly detected in the 1Wide-field Infrared Sur-vey Explorer (WISE) are all space missions that have produced stunning new scientific advances by going to space to observe in the infrared. This interim report describes progress as of June 2011 on developing a requirements flowdown and an evaluation of scientific performance. An Interim Design Reference Mission (IDRM) configuration is presented that is based on the specifications of NWNH with some refinements to optimize the design in accordance with the new scientific requirements. Analysis of this WFIRST IDRM concept is in progress to ensure the capability of the observatory is compatible with the science requirements. The SDT and Project will continue to refine the mission concept over the coming year as design, analysis and simulation work are completed, resulting in the SDT s WFIRST Design Reference Mission (DRM) by the end of 2012.

  17. Temporally focused wide-field two-photon microscopy: paraxial to vectorial.

    PubMed

    Yew, Elijah Y S; Sheppard, Colin J R; So, Peter T C

    2013-05-20

    Temporal focusing allows for optically sectioned wide-field microscopy. The optical sectioning arises because this method takes a pulsed input beam, stretches the pulses by diffracting off a grating, and focuses the stretched pulses such that only at the focal plane are the pulses re-compressed. This approach generates nonlinear optical processes at the focal plane and results in depth discrimination. Prior theoretical models of temporal focusing processes approximate the contributions of the different spectral components by their mean. This is valid for longer pulses that have narrower spectral bandwidth but results in a systematic deviation when broad spectrum, femtosecond pulses are used. Further, prior model takes the paraxial approximation but since these pulses are focused with high numerical aperture (NA) objectives, the effects of the vectorial nature of light should be considered. In this paper we present a paraxial and a vector theory of temporal focusing that takes into account the finite spread of the spectrum. Using paraxial theory we arrive at an analytical solution to the electric field at the focus for temporally focused wide-field two-photon (TF2p) microscopy as well as in the case of a spectrally chirped input beam. We find that using paraxial theory while accounting for the broad spectral spread gives results almost twice vector theory. Experiment results agree with predictions of the vector theory giving an axial full-width half maximum (FWHM) of 2.1 μmand1.8 μmrespectively as long as spectral spread is taken into account. Using our system parameters, the optical sectioning of the TF2p microscope is found to be 8 μm. The optical transfer function (OTF) of a TF2p microscope is also derived and is found to pass a significantly more limited band of axial frequencies than a point scanning two-photon (2p) microscope or a single photon (1p) confocal microscope. PMID:23736515

  18. Temporally focused wide-field two-photon microscopy: Paraxial to vectorial

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Elijah Y. S.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; So, Peter T. C.

    2013-01-01

    Temporal focusing allows for optically sectioned wide-field microscopy. The optical sectioning arises because this method takes a pulsed input beam, stretches the pulses by diffracting off a grating, and focuses the stretched pulses such that only at the focal plane are the pulses re-compressed. This approach generates nonlinear optical processes at the focal plane and results in depth discrimination. Prior theoretical models of temporal focusing processes approximate the contributions of the different spectral components by their mean. This is valid for longer pulses that have narrower spectral bandwidth but results in a systematic deviation when broad spectrum, femtosecond pulses are used. Further, prior model takes the paraxial approximation but since these pulses are focused with high numerical aperture (NA) objectives, the effects of the vectorial nature of light should be considered. In this paper we present a paraxial and a vector theory of temporal focusing that takes into account the finite spread of the spectrum. Using paraxial theory we arrive at an analytical solution to the electric field at the focus for temporally focused wide-field two-photon (TF2p) microscopy as well as in the case of a spectrally chirped input beam. We find that using paraxial theory while accounting for the broad spectral spread gives results almost twice vector theory. Experiment results agree with predictions of the vector theory giving an axial full-width half maximum (FWHM) of 2.1 μmand 1.8 μmrespectively as long as spectral spread is taken into account. Using our system parameters, the optical sectioning of the TF2p microscope is found to be 8 μm. The optical transfer function (OTF) of a TF2p microscope is also derived and is found to pass a significantly more limited band of axial frequencies than a point scanning two-photon (2p) microscope or a single photon (1p) confocal microscope. PMID:23736515

  19. Space infrared telescope facility wide field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    1988-01-01

    The wide-field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC) is capable of two-dimensional photometry in either a wide-field or diffraction-limited mode over the wavelength range from 2 to 30 microns with a possible extension to 120 microns. A low-doped indium antimonide detector was developed for 1.8 to 5.0 microns, detectors were tested and optimized for the entire 1.8 to 30 micron range, beamsplitters were developed and tested for the 1.8 to 30 micron range, and tradeoff studies of the camera's optical system performed. Data are presented on the performance of InSb, Si:In, Si:Ga, and Si:Sb array detectors bumpbonded to a multiplexed CMOS readout chip of the source-follower type at SIRTF operating backgrounds (equal to or less than 1 x 10 to the 8th ph/sq cm/sec) and temperature (4 to 12 K). Some results at higher temperatures are also presented for comparison to SIRTF temperature results. Data are also presented on the performance of IRAC beamsplitters at room temperature at both 0 and 45 deg angle of incidence and on the performance of the all-reflecting optical system baselined for the camera.

  20. Wide-field profiling of smooth steep surfaces by structured illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongting; Tan, Jiubin; Liu, Chenguang; Liu, Jian; Li, Yong

    2016-05-01

    We propose sectioning structured illumination wide-field microscopy (SSIWM) combined with the coating of a readily removable thin fluorescent film (RTFF) for smooth steep surfaces. The profiling of smooth steep surfaces is difficult to achieve using conventional optical systems because these surfaces reflect lights away from the collective lens. In particular, when the angle between optical axis and the normal line of the surface is larger than sin-1(NA), no light reflected from the area can be collected by the collective lens. The proposed method employing an RTFF to the SSIWM can overcome the poor collection barrier and be used to measure the shape of the surface owing to the isotropic incoherent scattering property. Additionally, conventional SSIWM is a promising wide-field imaging technique with high axial sectioning ability and low cost; however, it cannot be introduced to measure a reflective surface because of the non-sectioning characteristic in using a laser (coherent). However, the proposed method can extend the application scope of SSIWM owing to the incoherent property of the coating surface. Simulations and experimental results are presented to show the validity of the proposed method.

  1. Wide Field-of-View Fluorescence Imaging of Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P.; Kline, David I.; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys. PMID:25582836

  2. Wide field of view multifocal scanning microscopy with sparse sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wu, Jigang

    2016-02-01

    We propose to use sparsely sampled line scans with a sparsity-based reconstruction method to obtain images in a wide field of view (WFOV) multifocal scanning microscope. In the WFOV microscope, we used a holographically generated irregular focus grid to scan the sample in one dimension and then reconstructed the sample image from line scans by measuring the transmission of the foci through the sample during scanning. The line scans were randomly spaced with average spacing larger than the Nyquist sampling requirement, and the image was recovered with sparsity-based reconstruction techniques. With this scheme, the acquisition data can be significantly reduced and the restriction for equally spaced foci positions can be removed, indicating simpler experimental requirement. We built a prototype system and demonstrated the effectiveness of the reconstruction by recovering microscopic images of a U.S. Air Force target and an onion skin cell microscope slide with 40, 60, and 80% missing data with respect to the Nyquist sampling requirement.

  3. Metrology of confined flows using wide field nanoparticle velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Ranchon, Hubert; Picot, Vincent; Bancaud, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    The manipulation of fluids in micro/nanofabricated systems opens new avenues to engineer the transport of matter at the molecular level. Yet the number of methods for the in situ characterization of fluid flows in shallow channels is limited. Here we establish a simple method called nanoparticle velocimetry distribution analysis (NVDA) that relies on wide field microscopy to measure the flow rate and channel height based on the fitting of particle velocity distributions along and across the flow direction. NVDA is validated by simulations, showing errors in velocity and height determination of less than 1% and 8% respectively, as well as with experiments, in which we monitor the behavior of 200 nm nanoparticles conveyed in channels of ~1.8 μm in height. We then show the relevance of this assay for the characterization of flows in bulging channels, and prove its suitability to characterize the concentration of particles across the channel height in the context of visco-elastic focusing. Our method for rapid and quantitative flow characterization has therefore a broad spectrum of applications in micro/nanofluidics, and a strong potential for the optimization of Lab-on-Chips modules in which engineering of confined transport is necessary. PMID:25974654

  4. Status and Performance of HST/Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy

    2004-01-01

    The HST Wide Field Camera 3 is a panchromatic UV-visible-near infrared camera whose development is currently nearing completion, for a planned installation into the Hubble Space Telescope during Servicing Mission 4. WFC3 provides two imaging channels. The UVIS channel features a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD focal plane with sensitivity from 200 to 1000 nm and a 160 x 160 arcsec field of view. The UVIS channel provides unprecedented sensitivity and field of view in the near ultraviolet for HST. The IR channel features a 1014 x 1014 pixel HgCdTe focal plane covering 850 to 1700 nm with a 135 x 135 arcsec field of view, providing an order of magnitude increase in J+H band surveying efficiency for HST. WFC3 offers a rich complement of filters and grisms in each channel. The construction of WFC3 is nearly complete, and the instrument is well into its integration and test program. We present the current status of the instrument and its projected scientific performance.

  5. Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

    2011-07-20

    Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10(-6)/°C near 550 nm, which corresponds to ∼800 m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations. PMID:21772398

  6. Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope WFIRST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J.; Schechter, P.; Baltay, C.; Bean, R.; Bennett, D.; Brown, R.; Conselice, C.; Donahue, M.; Fan, X.; Rauscher, B.; Rhodes, J.; Roellig, T.; Stern, D.; Gehrels, N.; Sambruna, R.; Traub, W.; Barry, R. K.; Content, D.; Goullioud, R.; Grady, K.; Kruk, J.; Melton, M.; Peddie, C.; Rioux, N.; Seiffert, M.

    2012-01-01

    In December 2010, NASA created a Science Definition Team (SDT) for WFIRST, the Wide Field Infra-Red Survey Telescope, recommended by the Astro 2010 Decadal Survey as the highest priority for a large space mission. The SDT was chartered to work with the WFIRST Project Office at GSFC and the Program Office at JPL to produce a Design Reference Mission (DRM) for WFIRST. Part of the original charge was to produce an interim design reference mission by mid-2011. That document was delivered to NASA and widely circulated within the astronomical community. In late 2011 the Astrophysics Division augmented its original charge, asking for two design reference missions. The first of these, DRM1, was to be a finalized version of the interim DRM, reducing overall mission costs where possible. The second of these, DRM2, was to identify and eliminate capabilities that overlapped with those of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (henceforth JWST), ESA's Euclid mission, and the NSF's ground-based Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (henceforth LSST), and again to reduce overall mission cost, while staying faithful to NWNH. This report presents both DRM1 and DRM2.

  7. Wide-Field Infrared Explorer spacecraft system design.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, D. F.; Sparr, L. M.

    Following a formal and competitive process, the Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) instrument was selected in 1994 to become a participant in NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Explorer Program (SMEX). The WIRE instrument will be used to conduct a deep infrared, extragalactic science survey 500 times more sensitive than the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) Faint Source Catalog. The WIRE spacecraft is being configured to be placed into a 470540 km sun-synchronous orbit. The WIRE instrument will be delivered to NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in early 1998 to undergo integration and test with the WIRE spacecraft bus and subsequently will be launched in the fall of 1998. The SMEX program uses a strict design-to-cost approach to manage and to contain overall mission cost. This paper presents the major instrument, operational and cost requirements driving the spacecraft systems design for the mechanical, structural, thermal, attitude control, command and data handling, power and electrical systems.

  8. Wide Field-of-View Fluorescence Imaging of Coral Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P.; Kline, David I.; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys.

  9. Wide field-of-view fluorescence imaging of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P; Kline, David I; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L D; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys. PMID:25582836

  10. Adaptive optics high resolution spectroscopy: present status and future direction

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C; Angel, R; Ciarlo, D; Fugate, R O; Ge, J; Kuzmenko, P; Lloyd-Hart, M; Macintosh, B; Najita, J; Woolf, N

    1999-07-27

    High resolution spectroscopy experiments with visible adaptive optics (AO) telescopes at Starfire Optical Range and Mt. Wilson have demonstrated that spectral resolution can be routinely improved by a factor of - 10 over the seeing-limited case with no extra light losses at visible wavelengths. With large CCDs now available, a very wide wavelength range can be covered in a single exposure. In the near future, most large ground-based telescopes will be equipped with powerful A0 systems. Most of these systems are aimed primarily at diffraction-limited operation in the near IR. An exciting new opportunity will thus open up for high resolution IR spectroscopy. Immersion echelle gratings with much coarser grooves being developed by us at LLNL will play a critical role in achieving high spectral resolution with a compact and low cost IR cryogenically cooled spectrograph and simultaneous large wavelength coverage on relatively small IR detectors. We have constructed a new A0 optimized spectrograph at Steward Observatory to provide R = 200,000 in the optical, which is being commissioned at the Starfire Optical Range 3.5m telescope. We have completed the optical design of the LLNL IR Immersion Spectrograph (LISPEC) to take advantage of improved silicon etching technology. Key words: adaptive optics, spectroscopy, high resolution, immersion gratings

  11. Future metrology needs for synchrotron radiation grazing-incidence optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoufid, L.; Hignette, O.; Howells, M.; Irick, S.; Lammert, H.; Takacs, P.

    2001-07-01

    An International Workshop on Metrology for X-ray and Neutron Optics, the first of its kind, was held on March 16-17, 2000, at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Metrology specialists, beamline engineers and scientists, and vendors from around the world met to evaluate current metrology instrumentation and methods used to characterize the surface figure and finish off long grazing-incidence optics used in synchrotron radiation beamlines, and to consider future needs for synchrotron, free-electron laser, and neutron sources. This paper summarizes the discussions on mirror and metrology requirements for the current and next-generation X-ray sources. Some recommended strategies for the needs of the future are also given.

  12. Automatic detection of asteroids and meteoroids --- a wide-field survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereš, P.; Tóth, J.; Jedicke, R.; Tonry, J.; Denneau, L.; Wainscoat, R.; Kornoš, L.; Šilha, J.

    2014-07-01

    The small Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) represent a potential risk but also an easily accessible space resource for future robotic or human in-situ space exploration or commercial activities. However, the population of 1--300 m NEAs is not well understood in terms of size- frequency and orbital distribution. NEAs with diameters below 200 m tend to have much faster spin rates than large objects and they are believed to be monolithic and not rubble-pile like their large counterparts. Moreover, the current surveys do not systematically search for the small NEAs that are mostly overlooked. We propose a low- cost robotic optical survey (ADAM-WFS) aimed at small NEAs based on four state-of-the-art telescopes having extremely wide fields of view. The four Houghton-Terebizh 30-cm astrographs (Fig. left) with 4096×4096 -pixel CCD cameras will acquire 96 square degrees in one exposure with the plate scale of 4.4 arcsec/pixel. In 30 seconds, the system will be able to reach +17.5 mag in unfiltered mode. The survey will be operated on semi-automatic basis, covering the entire night sky three times per night and optimized toward fast moving targets recognition. The advantage of the proposed system is the usage of existing of-the-shelf components and software for the image processing and object identification and linking (Denneau et al., 2013). The one-year simulation of the survey (Fig. right) at the testing location at AGO Modra observatory in Slovakia revealed that we will detect 60--240 NEAs between 1--300 m that get closer than 10 lunar distances from the Earth. The number of detections will rise by a factor of 1.5--2 in case the survey is placed at a superb observing location such as Canary Islands. The survey will also serve as an impact warning system for imminent impactors. Our simulation showed that we have a 20 % chance of finding a 50-m NEA on a direct impact orbit. The survey will provide multiple byproducts from the all-sky scans, such as comet discoveries, sparse light curves of bright main-belt asteroids, space-debris detection, and stationary transient events like novae, supernovae, variable stars, and microlensing. The budget for the prototype development and testing is estimated to be 1,000,000 EUR. The planned development time is one year.

  13. Optics education for now and future from an entropy perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donn, Shoang C.

    1995-10-01

    During the 20th century, the electronics industry has evolved from radio, television, and audio systems to computer systems. The trace of evolution is clearly from linear systems to nonlinear systems. This is by no means accidental, and is due to the fact that nonlinear systems are more versatile than linear systems. As of now, the successful commercial optical instruments are all linear systems. From the entropy point of view, as the knowledge of human beings further expands, we need more powerful computing capabilities such as memory association and self organization. Based on the fundamental differences between the electron and the photon, this paper presents the argument that optical computing will provide memory association and self organization ability (which compliments the current electronic logical computing). Thus, one can infer that the main future thrust of the optical industry will be in nonlinear optical systems and hybrid combinations with nonlinear electronic systems in order to provide both self organization and logical computing (to emulate, more or less, the computing power of the human brain). Currently, the stat of the ar has already demonstrated successful combinations of linear optical system with nonlinear electronic systems (computers). These kinds of hybrid systems are called electro-photonic systems in the following curriculum. Based on the above vision for the future and taking into account the need for immediate employment, the following curriculum is designed to provide a core training to the students who are interested in choosing optics or electro-photonics as their career. This curriculum is being offered in the upper years at the Physics Department of Chung Yuan University. Electronics, Optics, Electro-photonic System Design and Analysis, Optical System Design and Analysis, Introduction to Optical Computing, Holography, Nonlinear Optics, The Experimental Technology for Electro- photonics (I), The Experimental Technology for Electro-photonics (II). The main thrust among all these courses is the system modeling and analysis. In this paper, the design of this curriculum will be elaborated and the topics for each course will be listed in detail.

  14. Optical Surveys of Galaxies: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Sadanori

    2015-03-01

    A brief history is given of wide area optical surveys of galaxies and resulting catalogs, starting from the Shapley-Ames Catalog through POSS and CfA surveys to modern surveys. Scientific impacts of large surveys are described in terms of the complete sample, large homogeneous samples, and new discoveries. Upcoming and future ambitious surveys are also mentioned. A recent review of surveys in various wavelength regions is given by Djorgovski et al. (2012).

  15. Spacelab utilization for future optics technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Sanctis, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    During the timeframe from 1980 to the year 2000, optics technology and applications experiments will require spacecraft that yield the maximum benefit at minimum cost. Current NASA plans include Spacelab, Power Extension Package (PEP), 25 kW Power System (PS), and a Science Applications and Space Platform (SASP), to satisfy the user needs in low earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous orbit (GEO). The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the optics technology user with NASA planning applicable to his future needs. This paper identifies current NASA concepts, including Spacelab hardware, that can be utilized to achieve a broad spectrum of optics scientific and application missions. Evolving configurations of Spacelab hardware elements will be shown that can be utilized as an orbital test platform in LEO and GEO.

  16. Development of the wide field imager for Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Eder, Josef; Fürmetz, Maria; Nandra, Kirpal; Pietschner, Daniel; Plattner, Markus; Rau, Arne; Reiffers, Jonas; Strecker, Rafael; Barbera, Marco; Brand, Thorsten; Wilms, Jörn

    2015-08-01

    The WFI (Wide Field Imager) instrument is planned to be one of two complementary focal plane cameras on ESA's next X-ray observatory Athena. It combines unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arcmin x 40 arcmin together with excellent count-rate capability (>= 1 Crab). The energy resolution of the silicon sensor is state-of-the-art in the energy band of interest from 0.2 keV to 15 keV, e.g. the full width at half maximum of a line at 6 keV will be <= 150 eV until the end of the nominal mission phase. This performance is accomplished by using DEPFET active pixel sensors with a pixel size of 130 μm x 130 μm well suited to the on-axis angular resolution of 5 arcsec of the mirror system. Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450 μm thick silicon bulk. Two different types of DEPFET sensors are planned for the WFI instrument: A set of four large-area sensors to cover the physical size of 14 cm x 14 cm in the focal plane and a single smaller gateable DEPFET sensor matrix optimized for high count-rate observations. Here we present the conceptual design of the instrument with focus on the critical subsystems and describe the instrument performance expectations. An outline of the model philosophy and the project organization completes the presentation.

  17. PRIMO: A Wide Field Prime Focus Infrared Mosaic Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, D.; Bally, J.; Green, J.; Morse, J.; Probst, R.; Green, R.; Joyce, R.; Liang, M.; Arentz, R.; Reitsema, H.; Marriott, J.

    2000-12-01

    We describe a proposal for a major new facility infrared camera for the NOAO 4-m telescopes. With a half-degree field of view at prime focus, a refractive collimator-camera design, and a 1-2.5 um range, PRIMO will enable deep, wide-field infrared surveys. The need for surveys which bridge the five-magnitude gap between 2MASS and 8-10 m spectroscopic sensitivity is well established. PRIMO will enable high-latitude broadband surveys to trace the luminosity and clustering evolution of galaxies, investigations into the composition and history of young stellar populations throughout the total volume of star-forming complexes, narrow-band imaging surveys of star forming regions, and of nebulae formed in late stellar evolutionary stages. The NOAO 4-m telescopes are well suited to this role, and PRIMO will also empower US investment in Gemini and other new generation very large telescopes. By leveraging this instrument with the previous NSF investment in these telescopes, we will provide the US community with a survey facility comparable to the UK VISTA project at a fraction of the latter's cost. This project will be carried out through teaming of an accomplished university group, CU-Boulder, a national center, NOAO, and an aerospace industry partner, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. Our approach is a new model for developing major ground-based astronomical instruments. The instrument concept has been developed and costed, and we meet our performance goals with a straightforward, low-risk design. The project schedule is aggressive: two years from start of funding to first light.

  18. Wide field polarimetry around the Perseus cluster at 350 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brentjens, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: This paper investigates the fascinating diffuse polarization structures at 350 MHz that have previously been tentatively attributed to the Perseus cluster and, more specifically, tries to find out whether the structures are located at (or near) the Perseus cluster, or in the Milky Way. Methods: A wide field, eight point Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope mosaic of the area around the Perseus cluster was observed in full polarization. The frequency range was 324 to 378 MHz and the resolution of the polarization maps was 2' × 3'. The maps were processed using Faraday rotation measure synthesis to counter bandwidth depolarization. The RM-cube covers Faraday depths of -384 to +381 rad m-2 in steps of 3 rad m-2. Results: There is emission all over the field at Faraday depths between -50 and +100 rad m-2. All previously observed structures were detected. However, no compelling evidence was found supporting association of those structures with either the Perseus cluster or large scale structure formation gas flows in the Perseus-Pisces super cluster. On the contrary, one of the structures is clearly associated with a Galactic depolarization canal at 1.41 GHz. Another large structure in polarized intensity, as well as Faraday depth at a Faraday depth of +30 rad m-2, coincides with a dark object in WHAM Hα maps at a kinematic distance of 0.5 ± 0.5 kpc. All diffuse polarized emission at 350 MHz towards the Perseus cluster is most likely located within 1 kpc from the Sun. The layers that emit the polarized radiation are less than 40 pc/|B_∥| thick. Appendix is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Three wide-field telescopes with spherical primary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Dan

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents three optical designs based on the work of Maurice Paul. Paul's three-mirror anastigmats produce well-corrected, distortion-free fields of view. His design equations can be solved for a spherical primary mirror with one limitation: the image field is curved. Adding all-spherical refractive field-flattening optics yields well-corrected, flat image-fields of two degrees angular diameter or more. These designs can be scaled to very large telescopes with current technology.

  20. Coherent Optical Communications: Historical Perspectives and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kazuro

    Coherent optical fiber communications were studied extensively in the 1980s mainly because high sensitivity of coherent receivers could elongate the unrepeated transmission distance; however, their research and development have been interrupted for nearly 20 years behind the rapid progress in high-capacity wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) systems using erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs). In 2005, the demonstration of digital carrier phase estimation in coherent receivers has stimulated a widespread interest in coherent optical communications again. This is due to the fact that the digital coherent receiver enables us to employ a variety of spectrally efficient modulation formats such as M-ary phase-shift keying (PSK) and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) without relying upon a rather complicated optical phase-locked loop. In addition, since the phase information is preserved after detection, we can realize electrical post-processing functions such as compensation for chromatic dispersion and polarization-mode dispersion in the digital domain. These advantages of the born-again coherent receiver have enormous potential for innovating existing optical communication systems. In this chapter, after reviewing the 20-year history of coherent optical communication systems, we describe the principle of operation of coherent detection, the concept of the digital coherent receiver, and its performance evaluation. Finally, challenges for the future are summarized.

  1. The Impact Of Fiber Optics (Photonics) On Future Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Stanley M.; Ritter, Charles H.

    1990-02-01

    Military aircraft design has been in a state of evolutionary development since its invention. After the first usage of aircraft for military applications in World War I, the military has been seeking ways of improving mission effectiveness to maintain military superiority. The military has been constantly searching for new methods and technologies to accomplish this goal. In the early days of aviation, there were clear distinctions and divisions between aircraft system functions. Although they all served to support the flight of the aircraft, they operated independently of each other. With the modern trend of developing a high degree of integration between the various aircraft systems, requirements are emerging for a group of new technologies to support this trend. One such group of emerging technologies is the combination of photonics, integrated optics and fiber optics. The integrated approach to the development of the avionics, non-avionics and airframe of the aircraft is part of the approach to improving aircraft mission effectiveness through enhanced mission function performance and associated susceptibility (reliability, availability, survivability). This paper will discuss the general evolution of aircraft and, in particular, the role of photonics, integrated optics and fiber optics on the avionics, non avionics and airframe of past and future aircraft. Included will be the relationship of these emerging optical technologies to the military programs involving smart structures and smart skins.

  2. Prototyping results for a wide-field fiber positioner for the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Anna M.; McGrath, Andrew J.

    2004-07-01

    Given the physical size of the GSMT prime focus field is approximately equivalent to that of the Subaru telescope it is possible to directly apply current technology developed for the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument (FMOS, to be commissioned in 2005) and substantially reduce the risk associated with developing a new solution for wide-field multi-object spectroscopy on an ELT. The Anglo-Australian Observatory has recently completed a design study for an ~1000 fiber, Echidna-style positioner for the prime focus of the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope (GSMT). The positioner forms part of the wide-field Multi-Object Multi-Fiber Optical Spectrograph (MOMFOS), an ELT prime focus instrument offering a minimum of 800 fibers patrolling the corrected 20 arcmin field. The design study identified 2 components of an equivalent MOMFOS positioner design that required prototyping. Firstly, a higher spine packing density is required to satisfy the proposed scientific program. Secondly, the fiber position measurement system adopted for FMOS cannot be simply scaled and applied to MOMFOS given space constraints in the top end unit. As such a new and, if possible, simpler system was required. Prototyping results for both components are presented.

  3. Fundamental study of flow field generated by rotorcraft blades using wide-field shadowgraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The vortex trajectory and vortex wake generated by helicopter rotors are visualized using a wide-field shadowgraph technique. Use of a retro-reflective Scotchlite screen makes it possible to investigate the flow field generated by full-scale rotors. Tip vortex trajectories are visible in shadowgraphs for a range of tip Mach number of 0.38 to 0.60. The effect of the angle of attack is substantial. At an angle of attack greater than 8 degrees, the visibility of the vortex core is significant even at relatively low tip Mach numbers. The theoretical analysis of the sensitivity is carried out for a rotating blade. This analysis demonstrates that the sensitivity decreases with increasing dimensionless core radius and increases with increasing tip Mach number. The threshold value of the sensitivity is found to be 0.0015, below which the vortex core is not visible and above which it is visible. The effect of the optical path length is also discussed. Based on this investigation, it is concluded that the application of this wide-field shadowgraph technique to a large wind tunnel test should be feasible. In addition, two simultaneous shadowgraph views would allow three-dimensional reconstruction of vortex trajectories.

  4. Lensless wide-field fluorescent imaging on a chip using compressive decoding of sparse objects

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ahmet F.; Sencan, Ikbal; Su, Ting-Wei; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a compressive sampling algorithm for on-chip fluorescent imaging of sparse objects over an ultra-large field-of-view (>8 cm2) without the need for any lenses or mechanical scanning. In this lensfree imaging technique, fluorescent samples placed on a chip are excited through a prism interface, where the pump light is filtered out by total internal reflection after exciting the entire sample volume. The emitted fluorescent light from the specimen is collected through an on-chip fiber-optic faceplate and is delivered to a wide field-of-view opto-electronic sensor array for lensless recording of fluorescent spots corresponding to the samples. A compressive sampling based optimization algorithm is then used to rapidly reconstruct the sparse distribution of fluorescent sources to achieve ~10 µm spatial resolution over the entire active region of the sensor-array, i.e., over an imaging field-of-view of >8 cm2. Such a wide-field lensless fluorescent imaging platform could especially be significant for high-throughput imaging cytometry, rare cell analysis, as well as for micro-array research. PMID:20588904

  5. The 64 Mpixel wide field imager for the Wendelstein 2m telescope: design and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosyra, Ralf; Gössl, Claus; Hopp, Ulrich; Lang-Bardl, Florian; Riffeser, Arno; Bender, Ralf; Seitz, Stella

    2014-11-01

    The Wendelstein Observatory of Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich has recently been upgraded with a modern 2m robotic telescope. One Nasmyth port of the telescope has been equipped with a wide-field corrector which preserves the excellent image quality (<0.8 " median seeing) of the site (Hopp et al. 2008) over a field of view of 0.7 degrees diameter. The available field is imaged by an optical imager (WWFI, the Wendelstein Wide Field Imager) built around a customized 2×2 mosaic of 4 k×4 k 15 μm e2v CCDs from Spectral Instruments. This paper provides an overview of the design and the WWFI's performance. We summarize the system mechanics (including a structural analysis), the electronics (and its electromagnetic interference (EMI) protection) and the control software. We discuss in detail detector system parameters, i.e. gain and readout noise, quantum efficiency as well as charge transfer efficiency (CTE) and persistent charges. First on sky tests yield overall good predictability of system throughput based on lab measurements.

  6. WISH: Wide-field Imaging Durvayor for High-redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Toru

    2015-08-01

    We introduce the concept and current status of WISH project and discuss the science cases. WISH is a proposed space science mission for JAXA, which is dedicated for the deep and wide-field near-infrared imaging surveys. The mission contains the 1.5m cooled telescope as well as the imager with the FoV of ~850 square arcmin. The main goal of WISH is to detect and study galaxies at z=8-15 in the earliest history of structure formation in the universe. The key feature is to conduct WISH Ultra Deep Survey, which images in total of 100 square degrees in 6 broad-band filters at 0.9-4.5 micron down to 28AB magnitude. While more than 10^5 galaxies at z=8-9, 10^4 galaxies at z=11-12 will be detected, WISH-UDS is designed to constrain UV luminosity function at z=15. Depending on the models of the earliest evolution history, 1-1000 galaxies at z~15 (~100 galaxies for the moderate cases) will be detected. The UV spectral properties as well as the clustering properties of galaxies at z=8-15 can be studied as well; UV slope can be measured up to z=15, and the stellar and dark-matter-halo masses can be obtained up to z=9. WISH UDS can provide excellent opportunities for studying SNe at high redshift. Up to ~7000 type Ia SNe at z>1 can be detected and the distance modulus can be constrained with the precision of 0.9-1.5% at z>1.5. More than 100 Super Luminous SNe at z>6, and 10 SLSN at z>10 can also be detected, which allow us to study the earliest history of massive star formation in the universe. WISH imaging surveys as well as WISHSpec, which is an optional parallel-operation simple IFU spectrograph, also provide unique opportunities in various astronomical fields. WISH mission proposal was submitted to JAXA in February 2015 for the first down selection of JAXA Large Strategic Science Mission targeting the launch date in 2020-22. International collaborations including SAO (G.Fazio et al.), LAM (D. Burgarella et al.) and Canada (M.Sawicki et al.) are also actively coordinated.

  7. Confirmation of Wide-field Signatures in Redshifted 21 cm Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Bowman, Judd D.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bernardi, G.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Deshpande, A. A.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hernquist, L.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tegmark, M.; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2015-07-01

    We confirm our recent prediction of the “pitchfork” foreground signature in power spectra of high-redshift 21 cm measurements where the interferometer is sensitive to large-scale structure on all baselines. This is due to the inherent response of a wide-field instrument and is characterized by enhanced power from foreground emission in Fourier modes adjacent to those considered to be the most sensitive to the cosmological H i signal. In our recent paper, many signatures from the simulation that predicted this feature were validated against Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) data, but this key pitchfork signature was close to the noise level. In this paper, we improve the data sensitivity through the coherent averaging of 12 independent snapshots with identical instrument settings and provide the first confirmation of the prediction with a signal-to-noise ratio \\gt 10. This wide-field effect can be mitigated by careful antenna designs that suppress sensitivity near the horizon. Simple models for antenna apertures that have been proposed for future instruments such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array and the Square Kilometre Array indicate they should suppress foreground leakage from the pitchfork by ∼40 dB relative to the MWA and significantly increase the likelihood of cosmological signal detection in these critical Fourier modes in the three-dimensional power spectrum.

  8. Objective evaluation of 3-D wide-field effect by human postural control analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Toshihiro; Yano, Sumio; Mitsuhashi, Tetsuo

    1992-08-01

    A new evaluation method of visual wide-field effects using human postural control analysis is proposed. In designing a television system for future, it is very important to understand the dynamic response of human beings in order to evaluate the visual effects of displayed images objectively. Visual effects produced by 3-D wide-field images are studied. An observer's body sway produced by postural control is discussed using rotating 2-D and 3-D images. Comparisons between stationary and rotating images are also performed. A local peak appears in power spectra of the body sway for the rotating images (3-D and 2-D). On the other hand, no distinctive component appears in the power spectra for the stationary images. By extending the visual field, the cyclic component can be proved from the audio-correlation function of the body sway for the rotating images. These results suggest that displayed images induce the postural control. The total length of the body sway locus is also analyzed to evaluate the postural control. The total length for the rotating images increases in proportion to viewing angles, and is nearly saturated after 50 (deg). Moreover, it is shown that the total length for the rotating 3-D image is greater than for the rotating 2-D image.

  9. Instrumental Direction-dependent Effects in Wide-field Wide-band Interferometric Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Rau, U.; Golap, K.

    2014-04-01

    Many next generation radio telescopes, some now in operation, offer significant improvement in the sensitivity and angular resolution compared to the telescopes operated in the past decades. This improvement in sensitivity is achieved with the use of wide-band receivers and larger collecting area. The effects of wide instantaneous fractional bandwidths that classical calibration and imaging algorithms ignore, lead to errors higher than the sensitivity that these new telescopes offer. Examples, relevant for some of the telescopes already in operation include the effects of time and frequency variant primary beams, frequency dependence of the emission from the sky and antenna pointing errors. The effects of wide fractional bandwidth and ionospheric phase screen limit the imaging performance below ~1 GHz. Additionally, significant variations in the shape of the wide-band primary beams (PB) for aperture array telescopes leads to errors of similar magnitude. Corrections for these effects increases the required computing power by many orders of magnitude. Furthermore, both wide fractional bandwidths and larger collecting area lead to many orders of magnitude increase in the data volume also, putting severe constraints on the run-time performance of the algorithms for calibration and imaging. In this talk, I will review the state-of-the-art algorithms for wide-field wide-band imaging and the run-time costs of the different approaches for correction of various direction-dependent effects and discuss the computational challenges in thermal noise-limited wide-field imaging with current and future radio telescopes.

  10. Diffuse optical tomography: Present status and its future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yukio; Okawa, Shinpei

    2014-05-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is one of the emerging modalities for the non-invasive imaging of thick biological tissues using near-infrared (NIR) light. This article reviews the fundamentals and development of DOT technology since its advent in the early 1990s, including the modeling of light propagation in biological tissues which strongly scatter and weakly absorb NIR light, the optical properties of biological tissues in the NIR wavelength range, three typical measurement methods, image reconstruction algorithms, and so forth. Then various studies are referred to for improvement of the DOT images, which are essentially low in quality due to the ill-conditioned and underdetermined problem. Studies and clinical applications presently attracting much attention are discussed in some detail. Finally, the expected future developments are summarized.

  11. Indoor optical wireless communications: recent developments and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Dominic

    2009-08-01

    Wireless communications is facing the challenges of a predicted 'explosion' in the number of wireless devices, demand for higher capacity, and the need to reduce power consumption in order to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Optical Wireless (OW) communications may have a part to play in helping to achieve these aims. High speed line of sight optical wireless systems have the potential to provide a low complexity alternative to high frequency RF wireless communications, and may offer lower energy consumption. Visible light communications is also a growing area of interest. Low energy solid-state lighting sources can be modulated to provide data communications, and this can augment the communications provided by other wireless techniques. In this paper we review progress in these areas. Examples and results from systems will be reported, together with future directions and challenges..

  12. Design of refocusing system for a high-resolution space TDICCD camera with wide-field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Shiliang; Liu, Jinguo

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the design and realization of a refocusing system for a space TDICCD camera of 2.2-meter focal length, which, features a three mirror anastigmatic(TMA) optical system along with 8 TDICCDs assemble at the focal plane, is high resolution and wide field of view. TDICCDs assemble is a kind of major method of acquiring wide field of view for space camera. In this way, the swath width reach 60km. First, the design of TMA optical system and its advantage of this space TDICCD camera was introduced; Then, the refocusing system as well as the technique of mechanical interleaving assemble for TDICCDs focal plane of this space camera was discussed in detail, At last, the refocusing system was measured. Experimental results indicated that the precision of the refocusing system is +/- 3.12μm(3σ), which satisfy the refocusing control system requirements of higher precision and stabilization.

  13. GRAAL: a seeing enhancer for the NIR wide-field imager Hawk-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paufique, J.; Bruton, A.; Glindemann, A.; Jost, A.; Kolb, J.; Jochum, L.; Le Louarn, M.; Kiekebusch, M.; Hubin, N.; Madec, P.-Y.; Conzelmann, R.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Donaldson, R.; Arsenault, R.; Tordo, S.

    2010-07-01

    We describe the design and development status of GRAAL, the Ground-layer adaptive optics assisted by Laser, which will deliver enhanced images to the Hawk-I instrument on the VLT. GRAAL is an adaptive optics module, part of AOF, the Adaptive optics facility, using four Laser- and one natural guide-stars to measure the turbulence, and correcting for it by deforming the adaptive secondary mirror of a Unit telescope in the Paranal observatory. The outstanding feature of GRAAL is the extremely wide field of view correction, over 10 arcmin diameter, with an image enhancement of about 20% in average in K band. When observing GRAAL will provide FWHM better than 0.3" 40% of the time. Besides the Adaptive optics facility deformable mirror and Laser guide stars, the system uses subelectron L3-CCD and a real-time computing platform, SPARTA. GRAAL completed early this year a final design phase shared internally and outsourced for its mechanical part by the Spanish company NTE. It is now in manufacturing, with a first light in the laboratory planned in 2011.

  14. Water-Immersible MEMS scanning mirror designed for wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Martel, Catherine; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Gao, Liang; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    By offering images with high spatial resolution and unique optical absorption contrast, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has gained increasing attention in biomedical research. Recent developments in OR-PAM have improved its imaging speed, but have sacrificed either the detection sensitivity or field of view or both. We have developed a wide-field fast-scanning OR-PAM by using a water-immersible MEMS scanning mirror (MEMS-ORPAM). Made of silicon with a gold coating, the MEMS mirror plate can reflect both optical and acoustic beams. Because it uses an electromagnetic driving force, the whole MEMS scanning system can be submerged in water. In MEMS-ORPAM, the optical and acoustic beams are confocally configured and simultaneously steered, which ensures uniform detection sensitivity. A B-scan imaging speed as high as 400 Hz can be achieved over a 3 mm scanning range. A diffraction-limited lateral resolution of 2.4 μm in water and a maximum imaging depth of 1.1 mm in soft tissue have been experimentally determined. Using the system, we imaged the flow dynamics of both red blood cells and carbon particles in a mouse ear in vivo. By using Evans blue dye as the contrast agent, we also imaged the flow dynamics of lymphatic vessels in a mouse tail in vivo. The results show that MEMS-OR-PAM could be a powerful tool for studying highly dynamic and time-sensitive biological phenomena.

  15. Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST]: telescope design and simulated performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goullioud, R.; Content, D. A.; Kuan, G. M.; Moore, J. D.; Chang, Z.; Sunada, E. T.; Villalvazo, J.; Hawk, J. P.; Armani, N. V.; Johnson, E. L.; Powell, C. A.

    2012-09-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission concept was ranked first in new space astrophysics missions by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey, incorporating the Joint Dark Energy Mission payload concept and multiple science white papers. This mission is based on a space telescope at L2 studying exoplanets [via gravitational microlensing], probing dark energy, and surveying the near infrared sky. Since the release of the Astro2010 Decadal Survey, the team has been working with the WFIRST Science Definition Team to refine mission and payload concepts. We present the current interim reference mission point design of the payload, based on the use of a 1.3m unobscured aperture three mirror anastigmat form, with focal imaging and slit-less spectroscopy science channels. We also present the first results of Structural/Thermal/Optical performance modeling of the telescope point design.

  16. Sampling and Analysis of Impact Crater Residues Found on the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G. W.; Colaux, J. L.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Webb, R, P.; Griffin, T. J.; Reed, B. B.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Kou, J.-C.; Robinson, G. A.; Opiela, J. N.; Gerlach, L.

    2013-01-01

    After nearly 16 years in low Earth orbit (LEO), the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) was recovered from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during the 12 day shuttle mission designated STS-125. The WFPC-2 radiator had been struck by approximately 700 impactors producing crater features 300 microns and larger in size. Following optical inspection in 2009, agreement was reached for joint NASA-ESA study of crater residues, in 2011. Over 480 impact features were extracted at NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Space Exposed Hardware clean-room and curation facility during 2012, and were shared between NASA and ESA. We describe analyses conducted using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) - energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX): by NASA at JSC's Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division; and for ESA at the Natural History Museum (NHM), with Ion beam analysis (IBA) using a scanned proton microbeam at the University of Surrey Ion Beam Centre (IBC).

  17. Characterization of spatially varying aberrations for wide field-of-view microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoan; Ou, Xiaoze; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2013-01-01

    We describe a simple and robust approach for characterizing the spatially varying pupil aberrations of microscopy systems. In our demonstration with a standard microscope, we derive the location-dependent pupil transfer functions by first capturing multiple intensity images at different defocus settings. Next, a generalized pattern search algorithm is applied to recover the complex pupil functions at ~350 different spatial locations over the entire field-of-view. Parameter fitting transforms these pupil functions into accurate 2D aberration maps. We further demonstrate how these aberration maps can be applied in a phase-retrieval based microscopy setup to compensate for spatially varying aberrations and to achieve diffraction-limited performance over the entire field-of-view. We believe that this easy-to-use spatially-varying pupil characterization method may facilitate new optical imaging strategies for a variety of wide field-of-view imaging platforms. PMID:23842300

  18. Quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of sickle red blood cells performed by wide field digital interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Telen, Marilyn J.; Truskey, George A.; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We have applied wide-field digital interferometry (WFDI) to examine the morphology and dynamics of live red blood cells (RBCs) from individuals who suffer from sickle cell anemia (SCA), a genetic disorder that affects the structure and mechanical properties of RBCs. WFDI is a noncontact, label-free optical microscopy approach that can yield quantitative thickness profiles of RBCs and measurements of their membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale reflecting their stiffness. We find that RBCs from individuals with SCA are significantly stiffer than those from a healthy control. Moreover, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish classes of RBCs in SCA, including sickle RBCs with apparently normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs. We expect that this approach will be useful for diagnosis of SCA and for determining efficacy of therapeutic agents.

  19. Wide-field-of-view imaging spectrometer (WFIS) engineering model laboratory tests and field demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haring, Robert E.; Pollock, Randy; Cross, Richard M.

    2003-12-01

    The Wide Field-of View Imaging Spectrometer (WFIS) is a patented optical design allowing horizon to horizon imaging of the earth and earth"s atmosphere in the pushbroom-imaging mode from an aircraft or space platform. The design couples a fast, F/2.8, unobstructed all reflective telescope to an all-reflective three element imaging spectrometer using a unique field coupling mirror arrangement. Early laboratory demonstrations of the technology covered fields of view exceeding 70 degrees. The latest instrument, the incubator WFIS, demonstrate the field of view can be extended to 120 degrees. This paper summarizes the current ongoing work with the engineering model WFIS covering this field of view and a spectral range from 360 nm to 1000 nm. Also presented are the results of the latest laboratory and field demonstrations. The paper also identifies specific applications the technology is now addressing.

  20. WISPIR: A Wide-Field Imaging SPectrograph for the InfraRed for the SPICA Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Mundy, Lee G.

    2010-01-01

    We have undertaken a study of a far infrared imaging spectrometer based on a Fourier transform spectrometer that uses well-understood, high maturity optics, cryogenics, and detectors to further our knowledge of the chemical and astrophysical evolution of the Universe as it formed planets, stars, and the variety of galaxy morphologies that we observe today. The instrument, Wide-field Imaging Spectrometer for the InfraRed (WISPIR), would operate on the SPICA observatory, and will feature a spectral range from 35 - 210 microns and a spectral resolving power of R=1,000 to 6,000, depending on wavelength. WISPIR provides a choice of full-field spectral imaging over a 2'x2' field or long-slit spectral imaging along a 2' slit for studies of astrophysical structures in the local and high-redshift Universe. WISPIR in long-slit mode will attain a sensitivity two orders of magnitude better than what is currently available.

  1. Signal-to-noise ratio for the wide field-planetary camera of the Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zissa, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Signal-to-noise ratios for the Wide Field Camera and Planetary Camera of the Space Telescope were calculated as a function of integration time. Models of the optical systems and CCD detector arrays were used with a 27th visual magnitude point source and a 25th visual magnitude per arc-sq. second extended source. A 23rd visual magnitude per arc-sq. second background was assumed. The models predicted signal-to-noise ratios of 10 within 4 hours for the point source centered on a signal pixel. Signal-to-noise ratios approaching 10 are estimated for approximately 0.25 x 0.25 arc-second areas within the extended source after 10 hours integration.

  2. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Smaller Particle Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J.C.; Opiela, J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G.; Webb, R.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J.; Griffin, T.; Gerlach, L.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The radiator shield on the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was subject to optical inspection following return from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009. The survey revealed over 600 impact features of > 300 micrometers diameter, from exposure in space for 16 years. Subsequently, an international collaborative programme of analysis was organized to determine the origin of hypervelocity particles responsible for the damage. Here we describe examples of the numerous smaller micrometeoroid (MM) impact features (< 700 micrometers diameter) which excavated zinc orthotitanate (ZOT) paint from the radiator surface, but did not incorporate material from underlying Al alloy; larger impacts are described by [3]. We discuss recognition and interpretation of impactor remains, and MM compositions found on WFPC2.

  3. Wide field of view laser beacon system for three-dimensional aircraft position measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, L. M.; Miles, R. B.; Webb, S. G.; Wong, E. Y.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a new wide field of view laser beacon system for measurement, in three dimensions, of aircraft or other remote objects. The system is developed for aircraft collision hazard warning independent of ground-based hardware, as well as for flight research, helicopter-assisted construction and rescue, and robotic manipulation applications. Accurate information describing the relative range, elevation, and azimuth of the aircraft are generated by the sweep of a low-power fan-shaped rotating laser beacon past an array of optical detectors. The system achieves a wide angle of acceptance of laser beacon light through use of compound parabolic concentrators, which collimate the light for spectral filtering to minimize solar interference. An on-board microprocessor system converts the pulse sequence to aircraft position in real time. System reliability and performance are enhanced through narrow pass filtering of the pulse signals, digital logic design to mask spurious signals, and adaptive modulation of trigger threshold levels.

  4. A wide-field infrared camera for the Observatoire du mont Mégantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artigau, Etienne; Doyon, Rene; Nadeau, Daniel; Vallee, Philippe; Thibault, Simon

    2003-03-01

    A wide-field near-infrared (0.8 2.4 μm) camera for the 1.6 m telescope of the Observatoire du mont Mégantic (OMM), is currently under construction at the Université de Montréal. The field of view is 30' × 30' and will have very little distortion. The optics comprise 8 spherical cryogenic lenses. The instrument features two filter wheels with provision for 10 filters including broad band I, z, J, H, K and other narrow-band filters. The camera is based on a 2048 × 2048 HgCdTe Hawaii-2 detector driven by a 32-output SDSU-II controller operating at ~250 kHz.

  5. Strategy for contamination control to improve Wide-Field/Planetary Camera far-ultraviolet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leschly, Kim; Taylor, Daniel M.; Jenkins, Teresa; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1990-01-01

    A multifaceted contamination control strategy has been developed for the second generated Wide-Field and Planetary Camera (WFPC-2) to improve the FUV stability by several orders of magnitude, compared to the first camera (WFPC-1). The strategy involves: improved on-orbit boil-off capability of the detector optics, added internal shielding and instrument venting, in-process subassembly vacuum bakeout at elevated temperatures, material substitution, sample testing in ultraclean vacuum facility, and internal instrument contamination-transport modeling. A science performance goal of 1 percent photometric accuracy at 1470 A over an extended time (of at least 30 days) has been established as a contamination control target for WFPC-2. The WFPC-2 is currently planned to be launched by the Shuttle in mid-1993 and replace the WFPC-1 which was recently launched with the HST.

  6. EOS Space Systems Wide Field Imager for SSA Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, I.; Blundell, M.; Smith, C.

    2013-09-01

    EOS Space Systems (EOSSS) has designed and manufactured space surveillance imagers since 1999. From early adaptations of Celestron Nexstar tubes to use ICCD sensors, to current EMCCD sensors in custom designed optical assemblies, the company has been required to seek the widest fields possible on a systems small enough to ride on a larger telescope OTA. The latest 14 inch (350mm) variant uses f0.75 corrected optics to achieve real time (2 second) imaging to visual magnitude 16 or fainter, and fields of view up to 3 degrees given the appropriate image plane size. With mass of only 50 kg and up to 1 Mpix 14 bit sampling, this imager has many potential SSA applications.

  7. Designing contact lenses for a wide field of view via ocular wavefront tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xin; Thibos, Larry

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Correcting the off-axis wavefront aberration is potentially important for peripheral vision, for diagnostic imaging of the retina, and for influencing refractive development. A new technique called ocular wavefront tomography (OWT) was adapted to optimize the design of contact lenses to improve the eye's peripheral optical quality. Methods OWT is a technique for customizing a multi-surface model eye to mimic the off-axis wavefront aberrations for an individual eye. This technique was adapted for contact lens design by establishing clear design goals for the eye + contact lens system. To demonstrate the method we optimized the shape of an aspheric and bifocal contact lens to correct a wide angle model eye with −2D foveal myopia. Two strategies for correction reflected alternative design goals: 1) to fully correct central vision while also improving optical quality peripherally to enhance vision and retinal imaging, or 2) fully correct central vision while introducing a degree of peripheral myopia relative to central vision in order to slow myopia progression. Results The OWT technique successfully produced aspheric and bifocal contact lens designs over a wide field of view. In addition to correcting foveal vision, the optimized contact lens designs either 1) improved the retinal image quality across the visual field (< 45°) significantly to obtain a visual performance and retinal imaging benefit or 2) produced the desired level of myopia in the peripheral field to obtain a refractive development benefit. Conclusion The OWT technique is a validated tool to optimize contact lens design over a wide field.

  8. Wide-field Functional Imaging of Blood Flow and Hemoglobin Oxygen Saturation in the Rodent Dorsal Window Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Austin J.; White, Sean M.; Indrawan, Elmer S.; Lotfi, Justin; Nudelman, Matthew J.; Costantini, Samantha J.; Agarwal, Nikita; Jia, Wangcun; Kelly, Kristen M.; Sorg, Brian S.; Choi, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The rodent dorsal window chamber is a widely used in vivo model of the microvasculature. The model consists of a 1cm region of exposed microvasculature in the rodent dorsal skin that is immobilized by surgically implanted titanium frames, allowing the skin microvasculature to be visualized. We describe a detailed protocol for surgical implantation of the dorsal window chamber which enables researchers to perform the window chamber implantation surgery. We further describe subsequent wide-field functional imaging of the chamber to obtain hemodynamic information in the form of blood oxygenation and blood flow on a cm size region of interest. Optical imaging techniques, such as intravital microscopy, have been applied extensively to the dorsal window chamber to study microvascular-related disease and conditions. Due to the limited field of view of intravital microscopy, detailed hemodynamic information typically is acquired from small regions of interest, typically on the order of hundreds of μm. The wide-field imaging techniques described herein complement intravital microscopy, allowing researchers to obtain hemodynamic information at both microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales. Compared with intravital microscopy, wide-field functional imaging requires simple instrumentation, is inexpensive, and can give detailed metabolic information over a wide field of view. PMID:21787792

  9. High-Resolution, Wide-Field-of-View Scanning Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, Cesar; Wilson, Robert; Seshadri, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    A proposed telescope would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view (<0.10 ) while scanning over a total field of view nominally 16 wide without need to slew the entire massive telescope structure. The telescope design enables resolution of a 1-m-wide object in a 50- km-wide area of the surface of the Earth as part of a 200-km-wide area field of view monitored from an orbit at an altitude of 700 km. The conceptual design of this telescope could also be adapted to other applications both terrestrial and extraterrestrial in which there are requirements for telescopes that afford both wide- and narrow-field capabilities. In the proposed telescope, the scanning would be effected according to a principle similar to that of the Arecibo radio telescope, in which the primary mirror is stationary with respect to the ground and a receiver is moved across the focal surface of the primary mirror. The proposed telescope would comprise (1) a large spherical primary mirror that would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view and (2) a small displaceable optical relay segment that would be pivoted about the center of an aperture stop to effect the required scanning (see figure). Taken together, both comprise a scanning narrow-angle telescope that does not require slewing the telescope structure. In normal operation, the massive telescope structure would stare at a fixed location on the ground. The inner moveable relay optic would be pivoted to scan the narrower field of view over the wider one, making it possible to retain a fixed telescope orientation, while obtaining high-resolution images over multiple target areas during an interval of 3 to 4 minutes in the intended orbit. The pivoting relay segment of the narrow-angle telescope would include refractive and reflective optical elements, including two aspherical mirrors, to counteract the spherical aberration of the primary mirror. Overall, the combination of the primary mirror and the smaller relay optic would provide narrow-angle, diffraction-limited high resolution at a wavelength of 500 nm.

  10. Wide field snapshot imaging polarimeter using modified Savart plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Naooki; Odate, Satoru; Otaki, Katsura; Kubota, Masahiro; Kitahara, Rintaro; Oka, Kazuhiko

    2013-09-01

    Without moving parts, the snapshot imaging polarimeter utilizing Savart plates is capable of stable and fast measurements of spatiallly distributed Stokes parameters. To increase feasibility of the optical design, we propose modi cations that enable a wider eld-of view. By changing the Savar plates' con guration and improving the calibration procedure, the unwanted effects associated with the increase in the eld of view can be reduced. We carried out the veri cation experiments of the wide eld of view snapshot imaging polarimeter.

  11. Lessons Learned from the Wide Field Camera 3 TV1 Test Campaign and Correlation Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peabody, Hume; Stavley, Richard; Bast, William

    2007-01-01

    In January 2004, shortly after the Columbia accident, future servicing missions to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were cancelled. In response to this, further work on the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument was ceased. Given the maturity level of the design, a characterization thermal test (TV1) was completed in case the mission was re-instated or an alternate mission found on which to fly the instrument. This thermal test yielded some valuable lessons learned with respect to testing configurations and modeling/correlation practices, including: 1. Ensure that the thermal design can be tested 2. Ensure that the model has sufficient detail for accurate predictions 3. Ensure that the power associated with all active control devices is predicted 4. Avoid unit changes for existing models. This paper documents the difficulties presented when these recommendations were not followed.

  12. Simulating Current and Future Optical Ground Based NEO Surveys Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grav, Tommy; Spahr, Tim; Mainzer, Amy

    2015-08-01

    Surveys for near-Earth objects (NEOs) have undergone rapid development over the last decade. The current suite of surveys have discovered more than 12,000 NEOs to date and are now discovering more than 1,000 NEOs per year. More than 90% of NEOs larger than 1 km in diameter have been discovered to date, representing considerable progress by the astronomical community (Mainzer et al. 2011, 2012). In 2005, Congress mandated that NASA should discover 90% of objects larger than 140 meter in diameter in 15 years, i.e. before 2020. We have undertaken a project to perform high-fidelity simulations of a variety of ground-based optical surveys, including present and future facilities, to evaluate the potential of these projects to reach this Congressionally mandated goal. Our survey simulations includes NEO population models based on the orbital element models of Bottke et al. (2002), Grav et al. (2011), and Greenstreet et al. (2013) as well as physical properties derived from recent measurements of diameters and albedos from Mainzer et al. (2011, 2012). The simulations replicates the performance of the existing suite of ground-based projects such as the Catalina Sky Survey and Pan-STARRS and predicts the performance of future large scale ground-based optical surveys.

  13. Integral wide-field spectroscopy in astronomy: the Imaging FTS solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, J. P.; Drissen, L.; Grandmont, F.; Thibault, S.

    2013-04-01

    Long-slit grating spectrometers in scanning mode and Fabry-Perot interferometers as tunable filters are commonly used to perform integral wide-field spectroscopy on extended astrophysical objects as HII regions and nearby galaxies. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate, by comparison, through a thorough review of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) properties, that this instrument represents another interesting solution. After a brief recall of the performances, regarding FOV and spectral resolution, of the grating spectrometer, without and with integral field units (IFU), and of the imaging Fabry-Perot, it is demonstrated that for an IFTS the product of the maximum resolution R by the entrance beam étendue U is equal to 2.6 N× S_I with N × N the number of pixels of the detector array and S_I the area of the interferometer beamsplitter. As a consequence, the IFTS offers the most flexible choice of field size and spectral resolution, up to high values for both parameters. It also presents on a wide field an important multichannel advantage in comparison to integral field grating spectrometers, even with multiple IFUs. To complete, the few astronomical IFTSs, built behind ground-based telescopes and in space, for the visible range up to the sub-millimetric domain, are presented. Through two wide-field IFTS projects, one in the visible, the other one in the mid-infrared, the question is addressed of the practical FOV and resolution limits, set by the optical design of the instrument, which can be achieved. Within the 0.3 to ˜ 2.5 \\upmum domain, a Michelson interferometer with wide-field diopric collimators provides the easiest solution. This design is illustrated by a 11^'× 11^'-field IFTS in the 0.35-0.90 \\upmum range around an off-axis interferometer, called SITELLE, proposed for the 3.6-m CFH Telescope. At longer wavelengths, an all-mirror optics is required, as studied for a spaceborne IFTS, H2EX, for the 8-29 \\upmum range, a 20^' × 20^' field, and a high resolution of ˜eq 3× 10^4 at 10 \\upmum. To comply with these characteristics, the interferometer is designed with cat's eye retroreflectors. In the same domain and up to the far infrared, if the instrument aims only at a low spectral resolution (few thousands) and a smaller field (few arcmins^2), roof-top or corner cube mirrors, as for the IFTS SPIRE on the Herschel space telescope, are usable. At last, perspectives are opened, behind an ELT in the visible and the near infrared with the SITELLE optical combination, in the 2-5 \\upmum on the Antarctic plateau or in space up to longer wavelengths, with the H2EX design, to provide the missing capability of global high spectral resolution studies of extended sources, from comets to distant galaxy clusters.

  14. Large filters for wide-field survey telescope LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Sassolas, Benoit; Flaminio, Raffaele; Forest, Daniéle; Lagrange, Bernard; Michel, Christophe; Antilogus, Pierre

    2012-09-01

    The LSST design foresees the use of six wide-band large optical filters that can alternatively be moved in front of the CCD camera. Each of the six filters has a different band-pass covering all the wavelengths from 300 nm to 1200 nm. The way to achieve this is to coat an optimized optical thin films stack on a filter substrate. Each filter requires a specific design using specific appropriate materials. The main characteristics of these filters, that constitute a real technological challenge, are: their relatively large size - their radii of curvature (about 5.6 m) that represent a sagitta of 12,5 mm that increases the uniformity complexity, the large rejection band requirements with transmission lower than 0.01 % out of the band and a transmission of 95 % over the band-pass. This paper proposes to show the problematic and the results obtained at LMA (Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés-FRANCE) to the purpose of realizing these filters using the IBS (Ion Beam Sputtering) deposition technique. The results obtained with High-Pass/Low-Pass structures will be presented. Experimental results will be shown concerning the R-band filter (552-691 nm). An overview of the work to be done to realize transmittance map over large filters will be given.

  15. Wide-Field High-Performance Geosynchronous Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John; Jenstrom, Del; Wilson, Mark; Hinkal, Sanford; Kirchman, Frank

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) Program and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are sponsoring the Advanced Geosynchronous Studies (AGS) to develop technologies and system concepts for Earth observation from geosynchronous orbit. This series of studies is intended to benefit both MTPE science and the NOAA GOES Program. Within the AGS program, advanced imager trade studies have investigated two candidate concepts for near-term advanced geosynchronous imagers. One concept uses a scan mirror to direct the line of sight from a 3-axis stabilized platform. Another eliminates the need for a scan mirror by using an agile spacecraft bus to scan the entire instrument. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the optical design trades and system issues encountered in evaluating the two scanning approaches.

  16. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations. PMID:24603424

  17. Wide-field Raman imaging for bone detection in tissue

    PubMed Central

    Papour, Asael; Kwak, Jin Hee; Taylor, Zach; Wu, Benjamin; Stafsudd, Oscar; Grundfest, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate bone growth in soft tissue can occur after trauma to a limb and can cause a disruption to the healing process. This is known as Heterotopic Ossification (HO) in which regions in the tissue start to mineralize and form microscopic bone-like structures. These structures continue to calcify and develop into large, non-functional bony masses that cause pain, limit limb movement, and expose the tissue to reoccurring infections; in the case of open wounds this can lead to amputation as a result of a failed wound. Both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and X-ray imaging have poor sensitivity and specificity for the detection of HO, thus delaying therapy and leading to poor patient outcomes. We present a low-power, fast (1 frame per second) optical Raman imaging system with a large field of view (1 cm2) that can differentiate bone tissue from soft tissue without spectroscopy, this in contrast to conventional Raman microscopy systems. This capability may allow for the development of instrumentation which permits bedside diagnosis of HO. PMID:26504639

  18. Deep wide-field imaging of main belt comets and asteroids in their fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Jayadev; Jewitt, David; Ridgway, Susan

    2013-02-01

    We propose to conduct a deep imaging study, using the pODI optical imager on the WIYN telescope, of selected regions of the main asteroid belt that contain a known main-belt comet (MBC), an asteroid that shows evidence of significant mass loss, seen as transient, comet-like tails and comae. We will take the first deep, wide-field images of these known active asteroids. In addition, we will use the considerable pODI field-of-view to search for direct evidence of very low-level mass-loss activity in the sample of main belt asteroids that will also be detected. A recent search for MBC candidates in the TALCS asteroid survey done at CFHT did not find new MBC candidates, but claimed that there is statistically significant evidence for very low level activity, measured over the ensemble of the asteroids. If true, this would be of significant scientific interest for all the reasons that apply to the MBCs themselves, in that they could be repositories of primordial water, and a supply source both for volatiles on earth, and dust in debris disks in general. In order to test this possibility, and further characterize the mass-loss phenomenon in known cases of MBC activity, we propose to observe two ~ 1 sq. degree fields around known MBCs to significantly deeper levels than TALCS and with better resolution. This project will also help characterize the pODI system: the sensitivity, quality of the PSF over the wide-field, guiding and efficiency, and the data reduction pipeline.

  19. Deep wide-field imaging of main belt comets and asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Jayadev; Jewitt, David; Ridgway, Susan

    2014-02-01

    We propose to continue a deep imaging study, using the pODI optical imager on the WIYN telescope, of selected regions of the main asteroid belt that contain a known main-belt comet (MBC). An MBC is an asteroid that shows evidence of significant mass loss, seen as transient, comet- like tails and comae. In 2013, we were awarded 4 nights over the two semesters and obtained high-impact wide-field, deep images of two new MBCs, P/2010 A2 and P/2013 P5, to study their origins. In addition, we use the considerable pODI field-of-view to search for direct evidence of very low-level mass-loss activity in the sample of main belt asteroids that will also be detected. Asteroids could be repositories of primordial water and a supply for volatiles on earth. In order to test this possibility (suggested by the recent TALCS asteroid survey at CFHT) and further characterize the mass-loss in known MBC activity, we will observe ~ 25- arcminute fields around ~ 3 known MBCs to significantly deeper levels than TALCS with better resolution. More than half of the 2013A allocation was lost to weather. We request 4 nights in 2014A. With this additional time we are confident of reaching publishable results on low level mass-loss and on the evolution of the activity in known MBCs. We will follow the secular evolution of P/2010 A2. And, as in the previous two semesters, we hope to add a spectacular wide-field deep image of a new MBC.

  20. The development of a wide-field, high-resolution UV Raman hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomer, Nathaniel R.; Nelson, Matthew P.; Angel, S. M.

    2015-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation and analysis of explosive and biological analytes because it provides a unique molecular fingerprint that allows for unambiguous target identification. Raman can be advantageous when utilized with deep UV excitation, but typical deep UV Raman systems have numerous limitations that hinder their performance and make their potential integration onto a field portable platform difficult. These systems typically offer very low throughput, are physically large and heavy, and can only probe an area the size of a tightly focused laser, severely diminishing the ability of the system to investigate large areas efficiently. The majority of these limitations are directly related to a system's spectrometer, which is typically dispersive grating based and requires a very narrow slit width and long focal length optics to achieve high spectral resolution. To address these shortcomings, ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS), teaming with the University of South Carolina, are developing a revolutionary wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging system capable of providing wide-area, high resolution measurements with greatly increased throughput in a small form factor, which would revolutionize the way Raman is conducted and applied. The innovation couples a spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS), a novel slit-less spectrometer that operates similar to Michelson interferometer, with a fiber array spectral translator (FAST) fiber array, a two-dimensional imaging fiber for hyperspectral imagery. This combination of technologies creates a novel wide-field, high throughput Raman hyperspectral imager capable of yielding very high spectral resolution measurements using defocused excitation, giving the system a greater area coverage and faster search rate than traditional Raman systems. This paper will focus on the need for an innovative UV Raman system, provide an overview of spatial heterodyne Raman spectroscopy, and discuss the development of the system.

  1. WiFeS: the wide field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Waldron, Liam E.; McGregor, Peter; Conroy, Peter; Doolan, Matthew C.; Zhelem, Ross; Bloxham, Gabe; Saunders, Will; Jones, Damien; Pfitzner, Lee

    2004-09-01

    WiFeS is a powerful integral field, double-beam, concentric, image-slicing spectrograph designed to deliver excellent thoughput, precision spectrophotometric performance and superb image quality along with wide spectral coverage throughout the 320-1000 nm wavelength region. It is currently under construction at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics of the Australian National University (ANU), and will be mounted on the ANU 2.3m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory. It will provide a 25x31 arc sec field with 0.5 arc sec sampling along each of twenty five 31x1.0 arc sec slitlets. The output format is arranged to match the 4096x4096 pixel CCD detectors in each of two cameras individually optimized for the blue and the red ends of the spectrum, respectively. A process of "interleaved nod-and-shuffle" will be applied to permit quantum noise-limited sky subtraction. Using VPH gratings, spectral resolutions modes of 3000 and 7000 will be provided. The full spectral range is covered in a single exposure in the R=3000 mode, and in two exposures in the R=7000 mode. The use of transmissive coated optics, VPH gratings and optimized mirror coatings ensures a throughput (including telescope and atmosphere) that peaks above 30%. The concentric image-slicer design ensures an excellent and uniform image quality across the full field. To maximize the scientific return, the whole instrument is configured for remote observing, pipeline data reduction, and the accumulation of calibration image libraries.

  2. Improving the performances of current optical interferometers & future designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, L.; Le Coroller, H.; Surdej, J.

    2014-04-01

    The number of astrophysical studies making use of interferometers has steadily increased during the past 15 years. Nevertheless, the performances of interferometers are still limited: their sensitivity does not exceed magnitude V=12, and their imaging capability could yet be improved by increasing the number of telescopes/sub-apertures. In the context of the ELTs, it is not certain how future interferometry projects will be financed. However, interferometry remains the only way to observe compact astrophysical objects at very high angular resolution (< milli-arcsecond), like gravitational micro-lensing events, central engines of AGNs, proto-planetary disks, exoplanets, etc. The aim of this workshop was to review and discuss the development of technologies that could improve the performances of current and future interferometers: new optical designs; techniques to improve the accuracy of measurements (visibility, closure-phase, etc.); progress on delay-line performances; solutions without delay-lines; technologies for larger apertures at lower cost (ex: lightweight replica mirrors); optimized beam combiners (integrated optic, pupil densifier, etc.); fringe tracking systems; laser telemetry applied to interferometry; heterodyne interferometry; progress in heterodyne detection using new technologies (laser comb, time propagation technologies, etc.); progress in image reconstruction techniques; progress in nulling interferometry; and important science cases that could benefit from progress in interferometry (report of observations at the limit of current interferometers). Nearly 50 oral presentations have been delivered, followed by very lively discussions which eventually emerged with the proposition to organize the "Planet Formation Interferometer/Imager" (PFI) project. The present proceedings reflect most of the highlights of this international colloquium.

  3. High spatial and temporal resolution wide-field imaging of neuron activity using quantum NV-diamond

    PubMed Central

    Hall, L. T.; Beart, G. C. G.; Thomas, E. A.; Simpson, D. A.; McGuinness, L. P.; Cole, J. H.; Manton, J. H.; Scholten, R. E.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Petrou, S.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of the dynamics of biological neural networks is fundamental to gaining insight into information processing in the brain. While techniques exist to measure spatial or temporal properties of these networks, it remains a significant challenge to resolve the neural dynamics with subcellular spatial resolution. In this work we consider a fundamentally new form of wide-field imaging for neuronal networks based on the nanoscale magnetic field sensing properties of optically active spins in a diamond substrate. We analyse the sensitivity of the system to the magnetic field generated by an axon transmembrane potential and confirm these predictions experimentally using electronically-generated neuron signals. By numerical simulation of the time dependent transmembrane potential of a morphologically reconstructed hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that the imaging system is capable of imaging planar neuron activity non-invasively at millisecond temporal resolution and micron spatial resolution over wide-fields. PMID:22574249

  4. Development of a wide field spherical aberration corrector for the Hobby Eberly Telescope: design, fabrication and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chang Jin; Frater, Eric; Lowman, Andrew E.; Su, Peng; Zhao, Chunyu; Zhou, Ping; Burge, James H.

    2014-07-01

    A 4-mirror prime focus corrector is under development to provide seeing-limited images for the 10-m aperture Hobby- Eberly Telescope (HET) over a 22 arcminute wide field of view. The images created by the spherical primary mirror are aberrated with 13 arcmin diameter point spread function. The University of Arizona is developing the 4-mirror wide field corrector to compensate the aberrations from the primary mirror and present seeing limited imaged to the pickoffs for the fiber-fed spectrographs. The requirements for this system pose several challenges, including optical fabrication of the aspheric mirrors, system alignment, and operational mechanical stability. This paper presents current status of the program which covers fabrication of mirrors and structures and pretest result from the alignment of the system.

  5. Recent progress in the simulation and synthesis of Wide Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanola-Parramon, Roser; Leisawitz, David; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Iacchetta, Alexander; Maher, Stephen F.; Rinehart, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) is a double Fourier interferometer (DF) operating at optical wavelengths, and provides data that are highly representative of those from a space-based far-infrared interferometer like the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT). Developed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, this testbed produces high-quality interferometric data and is capable of observing spatially and spectrally complex hyperspectral test scenes, from geometrically simple to astronomically representative test scenes.Here we present the simulation of recent WIIT measurements using the Far-infrared Interferometer Instrument Simulator (FIInS). This simulation enables us to compare a synthesized spatial-spectral data cube based on FIInS-generated DF data with the input hyperspectral test scene. FIInS has been modified to perform the calculations at optical wavelengths and to include an extended field of view due to the presence of a detector array. The results from FIInS are compared with the results obtained from recent measurements with WIIT. For this current study, the test scene under consideration spatially consists of four reference point sources intended for spectral and spatial calibration, and six science sources, comprised of binary systems. Each binary pair member has a unique spectrum. Our results demonstrate that FIInS accurately describes the performance of a real double Fourier interferometer, and that the expected hyperspectral data cube can be reconstructed from synthetic or real interferometric data.

  6. A testbed for wide-field, high-resolution, gigapixel-class cameras.

    PubMed

    Kittle, David S; Marks, Daniel L; Son, Hui S; Kim, Jungsang; Brady, David J

    2013-05-01

    The high resolution and wide field of view (FOV) of the AWARE (Advanced Wide FOV Architectures for Image Reconstruction and Exploitation) gigapixel class cameras present new challenges in calibration, mechanical testing, and optical performance evaluation. The AWARE system integrates an array of micro-cameras in a multiscale design to achieve gigapixel sampling at video rates. Alignment and optical testing of the micro-cameras is vital in compositing engines, which require pixel-level accurate mappings over the entire array of cameras. A testbed has been developed to automatically calibrate and measure the optical performance of the entire camera array. This testbed utilizes translation and rotation stages to project a ray into any micro-camera of the AWARE system. A spatial light modulator is projected through a telescope to form an arbitrary object space pattern at infinity. This collimated source is then reflected by an elevation stage mirror for pointing through the aperture of the objective into the micro-optics and eventually the detector of the micro-camera. Different targets can be projected with the spatial light modulator for measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system, fiducials in the overlap regions for registration and compositing, distortion mapping, illumination profiles, thermal stability, and focus calibration. The mathematics of the testbed mechanics are derived for finding the positions of the stages to achieve a particular incident angle into the camera, along with calibration steps for alignment of the camera and testbed coordinate axes. Measurement results for the AWARE-2 gigapixel camera are presented for MTF, focus calibration, illumination profile, fiducial mapping across the micro-camera for registration and distortion correction, thermal stability, and alignment of the camera on the testbed. PMID:23742532

  7. A testbed for wide-field, high-resolution, gigapixel-class cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittle, David S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Son, Hui S.; Kim, Jungsang; Brady, David J.

    2013-05-01

    The high resolution and wide field of view (FOV) of the AWARE (Advanced Wide FOV Architectures for Image Reconstruction and Exploitation) gigapixel class cameras present new challenges in calibration, mechanical testing, and optical performance evaluation. The AWARE system integrates an array of micro-cameras in a multiscale design to achieve gigapixel sampling at video rates. Alignment and optical testing of the micro-cameras is vital in compositing engines, which require pixel-level accurate mappings over the entire array of cameras. A testbed has been developed to automatically calibrate and measure the optical performance of the entire camera array. This testbed utilizes translation and rotation stages to project a ray into any micro-camera of the AWARE system. A spatial light modulator is projected through a telescope to form an arbitrary object space pattern at infinity. This collimated source is then reflected by an elevation stage mirror for pointing through the aperture of the objective into the micro-optics and eventually the detector of the micro-camera. Different targets can be projected with the spatial light modulator for measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system, fiducials in the overlap regions for registration and compositing, distortion mapping, illumination profiles, thermal stability, and focus calibration. The mathematics of the testbed mechanics are derived for finding the positions of the stages to achieve a particular incident angle into the camera, along with calibration steps for alignment of the camera and testbed coordinate axes. Measurement results for the AWARE-2 gigapixel camera are presented for MTF, focus calibration, illumination profile, fiducial mapping across the micro-camera for registration and distortion correction, thermal stability, and alignment of the camera on the testbed.

  8. Future electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grönwall, Christina; Schwering, Piet B.; Rantakokko, Jouni; Benoist, Koen W.; Kemp, Rob A. W.; Steinvall, Ove; Letalick, Dietmar; Björkert, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    In the electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations (ESUO) study we pave the way for the European Defence Agency (EDA) group of Electro-Optics experts (IAP03) for a common understanding of the optimal distribution of processing functions between the different platforms. Combinations of local, distributed and centralized processing are proposed. In this way one can match processing functionality to the required power, and available communication systems data rates, to obtain the desired reaction times. In the study, three priority scenarios were defined. For these scenarios, present-day and future sensors and signal processing technologies were studied. The priority scenarios were camp protection, patrol and house search. A method for analyzing information quality in single and multi-sensor systems has been applied. A method for estimating reaction times for transmission of data through the chain of command has been proposed and used. These methods are documented and can be used to modify scenarios, or be applied to other scenarios. Present day data processing is organized mainly locally. Very limited exchange of information with other platforms is present; this is performed mainly at a high information level. Main issues that arose from the analysis of present-day systems and methodology are the slow reaction time due to the limited field of view of present-day sensors and the lack of robust automated processing. Efficient handover schemes between wide and narrow field of view sensors may however reduce the delay times. The main effort in the study was in forecasting the signal processing of EO-sensors in the next ten to twenty years. Distributed processing is proposed between hand-held and vehicle based sensors. This can be accompanied by cloud processing on board several vehicles. Additionally, to perform sensor fusion on sensor data originating from different platforms, and making full use of UAV imagery, a combination of distributed and centralized processing is essential. There is a central role for sensor fusion of heterogeneous sensors in future processing. The changes that occur in the urban operations of the future due to the application of these new technologies will be the improved quality of information, with shorter reaction time, and with lower operator load.

  9. A Near IR Fabry-Perot Interferometer for Wide Field, Low Resolution Hyperspectral Imaging on the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. K.; Satyapal, S.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Barclay, R.; Amato, D.; Arritt, B.; Brown, G.; Harvey, V.; Holt, C.; Kuhn, J.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss work in progress on a near-infrared tunable bandpass filter for the Goddard baseline wide field camera concept of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). This filter, the Demonstration Unit for Low Order Cryogenic Etalon (DULCE), is designed to demonstrate a high efficiency scanning Fabry-Perot etalon operating in interference orders 1 - 4 at 30K with a high stability DSP based servo control system. DULCE is currently the only available tunable filter for lower order cryogenic operation in the near infrared. In this application, scanning etalons will illuminate the focal plane arrays with a single order of interference to enable wide field lower resolution hyperspectral imaging over a wide range of redshifts. We discuss why tunable filters are an important instrument component in future space-based observatories.

  10. OP09O-OP404-9 Wide Field Camera 3 CCD Quantum Efficiency Hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Nick

    2009-01-01

    The HST/Wide Field Camera (WFC) 3 UV/visible channel CCD detectors have exhibited an unanticipated quantum efficiency hysteresis (QEH) behavior. At the nominal operating temperature of -83C, the QEH feature contrast was typically 0.1-0.2% or less. The behavior was replicated using flight spare detectors. A visible light flat-field (540nm) with a several times full-well signal level can pin the detectors at both optical (600nm) and near-UV (230nm) wavelengths, suppressing the QEH behavior. We are characterizing the timescale for the detectors to become unpinned and developing a protocol for flashing the WFC3 CCDs with the instrument's internal calibration system in flight. The HST/Wide Field Camera 3 UV/visible channel CCD detectors have exhibited an unanticipated quantum efficiency hysteresis (QEH) behavior. The first observed manifestation of QEH was the presence in a small percentage of flat-field images of a bowtie-shaped contrast that spanned the width of each chip. At the nominal operating temperature of -83C, the contrast observed for this feature was typically 0.1-0.2% or less, though at warmer temperatures contrasts up to 5% (at -50C) have been observed. The bowtie morphology was replicated using flight spare detectors in tests at the GSFC Detector Characterization Laboratory by power cycling the detector while cold. Continued investigation revealed that a clearly-related global QE suppression at the approximately 5% level can be produced by cooling the detector in the dark; subsequent flat-field exposures at a constant illumination show asymptotically increasing response. This QE "pinning" can be achieved with a single high signal flat-field or a series of lower signal flats; a visible light (500-580nm) flat-field with a signal level of several hundred thousand electrons per pixel is sufficient for QE pinning at both optical (600nm) and near-UV (230nm) wavelengths. We are characterizing the timescale for the detectors to become unpinned and developing a protocol for flashing the WFC3 CCDs with the instrument's internal calibration system in flight. A preliminary estimate of the decay timescale for one detector is that a drop of 0.1-0.2% occurs over a ten day period, indicating that relatively infrequent cal lamp exposures can mitigate the behavior to extremely low levels.

  11. Mimir: A Near-Infrared Wide-Field Imager, Spectrometer and Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, D. P.; Sarcia, D.; Grabau, A.; Tollestrup, E. V.; Buie, M. W.; Dunham, E.; Taylor, B.

    2007-12-01

    Mimir, a new facility-class near-infrared instrument for the 1.8 m Perkins telescope on Anderson Mesa outside Flagstaff, Arizona, was commissioned and has been operating for three years. Mimir is multifunction, performing wide-field (F/5) and narrow-field (F/17) imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and imaging polarimetry. The F/5 mode images at 0.59" per pixel onto the 1024 × 1024 pixel ALADDIN III InSb array detector, giving a 10' × 10' field of view. In the F/17 mode, the plate scale is 0.18" per pixel. Optically, Mimir is a refractive reimager for the F/17.5 Perkins beam. A six-lens collimator produces an achromatic 25 mm pupil, which is imaged by a five-lens camera (F/5), a four-lens camera (F/17), or a two-lens pupil viewer onto the detector. Three filter wheels precede the pupil, one follows the pupil. The wheels contain a rotating half-wave plate, broadband filters, narrowband filters, grisms, long-pass filters, a wire grid, and thermal IR blockers. The first telescope focus is within Mimir, where a slit and decker unit, consisting of two linear motion cars, selects one of 13 slit scenes. The slit and decker cars, the four filter wheels, the half-wave plate rotation, and the camera selector are all driven by stepper motors within the cold vacuum space. Cooling is provided by a CTI 1050 two-stage, closed-cycle helium refrigerator, keeping the optics, filters, and internal surfaces between 65 and 75 K and the detector at 33.5 K. Switching between Mimir's different modes takes only a few seconds, making it a versatile tool for conducting a wide range of investigations and for quickly reacting to changing observing conditions. Mimir on the Perkins telescope achieves imaging sensitivities 2-4 mag deeper than 2MASS, moderate resolution (R ˜ 700) JHK spectra of virtually any 2MASS source, high-precision wide-field imaging polarimetry, and L' and M' band imaging and spectroscopy.

  12. The Power of Wide Field HI Surveys: ALFALFA Imaging of Massive Tidal Features in the Leo Cloud of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisman, Luke; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; ALFALFA Almost Darks Team

    2016-01-01

    Tidal interactions are well known to play an important role in galactic evolution in group environments, but the extent of these interactions, and their relative impact on the morphology-density relation is still unclear. Neutral hydrogen (HI) mapping can reveal the recent interaction history of group galaxies, but is difficult to execute due to the need for high sensitivity over wide fields. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey (ALFALFA; Giovanelli et al. 2005; Haynes et al. 2011) provides high sensitivity, unbiased, wide field maps of HI in the local volume; here we will present a 50 deg2 ALFALFA map of a well studied region of the Leo Cloud of galaxies, which includes the NGC3226/7 group and HCG44. These observations reveal HI tails and plumes with extents exceeding 1.4 deg (~600 kpc), well beyond the primary beams of previous observations. These tails constitute a significant fraction of the total HI mass in NGC3226/7 (Arp 94) and HCG44. We will also present WSRT maps of the extended emission near Arp 94, which show tail morphologies inconsistent with 2 body interactions. These observations demonstrate that large scale group interactions will be an important science outcome for future sensitive, wide field HI surveys.This work is supported by NSF grants AST-0607007 and AST-1107390 and by grants from the Brinson Foundation.

  13. Miniature wide field-of-view star trackers for spacecraft attitude sensing and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, William; Curtis, Eric; Hull, Anthony; Morgan, William

    1993-01-01

    Introducing a family of miniature, wide field-of-view star trackers for low cost, high performance spacecraft attitude determination and navigation applications. These devices, derivative of the WFOV Star Tracker Camera developed cooperatively by OCA Applied Optics and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Brilliant Pebbles program, offer a suite of options addressing a wide range of spacecraft attitude measurement and control requirements. These sensors employ much wider fields than are customary (ranging between 20 and 60 degrees) to assure enough bright stars for quick and accurate attitude determinations without long integration intervals. The key benefit of this approach are light weight, low power, reduced data processing loads and high information carrier rates for wide ACS bandwidths. Devices described range from the proven OCA/LLNL WFOV Star Tracker Camera (a low-cost, space-qualified star-field imager utilizing the spacecraft's own computer and centroiding and position-finding), to a new autonomous subsystem design featuring dual-redundant cameras and completely self-contained star-field data processing with output quaternion solutions accurate to 100 micro-rad, 3 sigma, for stand-alone applications.

  14. Background simulations for the wide field imager aboard the ATHENA X-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauf, Steffen; Kuster, Markus; Hoffmann, Dieter H. H.; Lang, Philipp-Michael; Neff, Stephan; Pia, Maria Grazia; Strder, Lothar

    2012-09-01

    The ATHENA X-ray observatory was a European Space Agency project for a L-class mission. ATHENA was to be based upon a simplified IXO design with the number of instruments and the focal length of the Wolter optics being reduced. One of the two instruments, the Wide Field Imager (WFI) was to be a DePFET based focal plane pixel detector, allowing for high time and spatial resolution spectroscopy in the energy-range between 0.1 and 15 keV. In order to fulfill the mission goals a high sensitivity is essential, especially to study faint and extended sources. Thus a detailed understanding of the detector background induced by cosmic ray particles is crucial. During the mission design generally extensive Monte-Carlo simulations are used to estimate the detector background in order to optimize shielding components and software rejection algorithms. The Geant4 toolkit1,2 is frequently the tool of choice for this purpose. Alongside validation of the simulation environment with XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and Space Shuttle STS-53 data we present estimates for the ATHENA WFI cosmic ray induced background including long-term activation, which demonstrate that DEPFET-technology based detectors are able to achieve the required sensitivity.

  15. Characterization of high proper motion objects from the wide-field infrared survey explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Luhman, K. L.; Sheppard, Scott S.

    2014-06-01

    We present an analysis of high proper motion objects that we have found in a recent study and in this work with multi-epoch astrometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using photometry and proper motions from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey and WISE, we have identified the members of this sample that are likely to be late-type, nearby, or metal-poor. We have performed optical and near-infrared spectroscopy on 41 objects, from which we measure spectral types that range from M4-T2.5. This sample includes 11 blue L dwarfs and 5 subdwarfs; the latter were also classified as such in the recent study by Kirkpatrick and coworkers. Based on their spectral types and photometry, several of our spectroscopic targets may have distances of <20 pc with the closest at ∼12 pc. The tangential velocities implied by the spectrophotometric distances and proper motions indicate that four of the five subdwarfs are probably members of the Galactic halo while several other objects, including the early-T dwarf WISE J210529.08–623558.7, may belong to the thick disk.

  16. [A wide-field push-broom hyperspectral imager based on curved prism].

    PubMed

    Nie, Yun-Feng; Xiangli, Bin; Zhou, Jin-Song; Huang, Min

    2012-06-01

    A wide-field pushbroom hyperspectral imager covering short-wavelength infrared range is presented, which can be carried by space borne or airborne platform for remote sensing, acquiring hyperspectral data cube, and analyzing substance compositions and physicochemical properties. Curved prism which simultaneously possesses the functions of dispersion and imaging is used as the prismatic element, and the combination with Offner relay configuration substantially simplifies the design of spectrometer. Compared to conventional dispersive spectral imagers, this design is compact, light-weighted, and small-sized, and can efficiently correct unavoidable spectral line curve (smile) and spectral band (keystone or frown) by prismatic dispersion Compared to grating spectral imagers of the same configuration, the energy utilization efficiency of this design is much higher. The paraxial aberration theory and imaging characteristics of Offner relay configuration is briefly described. The optical layout and image evaluations, including spatial and spectral dimensions, are illustrated respectively, according to Monte Carlo ray-tracing results of seven principal wavelengths. PMID:22870671

  17. Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec: A New Robotic Wide Field Baker-Nunn Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fors, Octavi; Núñez, Jorge; Muiños, José Luis; Montojo, Francisco Javier; Baena-Gallé, Roberto; Boloix, Jaime; Morcillo, Ricardo; Merino, María Teresa; Downey, Elwood C.; Mazur, Michael J.

    2013-05-01

    A Baker-Nunn Camera (BNC), originally installed at the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in 1958, was refurbished and robotized. The new facility, called Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec (TFRM), was installed at the Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec (OAdM). The process of refurbishment is described in detail. Most of the steps of the refurbishment project were accomplished by purchasing commercial components, which involve little posterior engineering assembling work. The TFRM is a 0.5 m aperture f/0.96 optically modified BNC, which offers a unique combination of instrumental specifications: fully robotic and remote operation, wide field of view (4°.4 × 4°.4), moderate limiting magnitude (V ~ 19.5 mag), ability of tracking at arbitrary right ascension (α) and declination (δ) rates, as well as opening and closing CCD shutter at will during an exposure. Nearly all kinds of image survey programs can benefit from those specifications. Apart from other less time-consuming programs, since the beginning of science TFRM operations we have been conducting two specific and distinct surveys: super-Earths transiting around M-type dwarfs stars, and geostationary debris in the context of Space Situational Awareness/Space Surveillance and Tracking (SSA/SST) programs. Preliminary results for both cases will be shown.

  18. WIDE-FIELD MULTIBAND PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS IN THE FORNAX GALAXY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hak-Sub; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Young-Wook; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Kim, Sang Chul; Kim, Eunhyeuk

    2013-01-20

    We present wide-field multiband photometry of globular cluster (GC) systems in NGC 1399, NGC 1404, and NGC 1387 located in the central region of the Fornax galaxy cluster. Observation was carried out through U, B, V, and I bands, which marks one of the widest and deepest U-band studies on extragalactic GC systems. The present U-band photometry enables us to significantly reduce the contamination by a factor of two for faint sources (V {sub 0} {approx} 23.5). The main results based on some 2000 GC candidates around NGC 1399, NGC 1404, and NGC 1387 are as follows: (1) the GC system in each galaxy exhibits bimodal color distributions in all colors examined, but the shape of color histograms varies systematically depending on colors; (2) NGC 1399 shows that the mean colors of both blue and red GCs become bluer with increasing galactocentric radius; (3) NGC 1399 shows overabundance of GCs in the directions of NGC 1404 and NGC 1387, indicating their ongoing interactions; and (4) NGC 1399 also exhibits a {approx}0.'5 offset between the center of the inner GC distribution and the galaxy's optical center, suggesting that NGC 1399 is not yet dynamically relaxed and may be undergoing merger events.

  19. Design of four-mirror afocal principal system for wide field multichannel infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Huang, Ying; Li, Yan

    2015-08-01

    The image space scanning system is widely used for multichannel infrared imaging to overcome the absence of large infrared focal plane array. The field of view of afocal system directly influences the time resolution of the image space scanning system. The field of view of afocal system is generally less than 7°. Therefore, it is significant to design larger field of view of afocal system for increasing time resolution. The method of four-mirror afocal system design based on primary aberration is explored. The structural parameters are calculated according to magnification and obscuration ratio of each mirror. The conic parameters are calculated according to primary aberration coefficients. The procedure for calculating initial structural parameters is programmed. Then a four-mirror afocal system is designed with an entrance pupil diameter of 200mm, a field of view of 20°×1°, the operating wave band of 3~12μm, compression ratio of 2.5 times and the distance of exit pupil of 620mm. The results indicate that the maximum root mean square (RMS) wavefront error is less than 0.042λ(λ=7.5μm), the maximum optical path difference(OPD) is less than λ/4(λ=3~12μm). It has high imaging quality and the modulation transfer function (MTF) is approached to the diffraction limit. The method of afocal system design can be widely used for wide field multichannel infrared imaging.

  20. A wide-field study of Holmberg II and evidence for ram pressure stripping.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, E. J.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Barker, M. K.; Irwin, M. J.; Jablonka, P.; Arimoto, N.

    We present a deep, wide-field optical study of the M81 group dwarf galaxy Holmberg II (HoII) based on Subaru/Suprime-Cam imaging. Individual stars are resolved down to I˜25.2, i.e., about 1.5 mag below the tip of the red giant branch (RGB). We use resolved star counts in the outskirts of the galaxy to measure the radial surface brightness profile down to mu_V ˜ 32 mag arcsec-2, from which we determine a projected exponential scalelength of 0.70arcmin ±0.01arcmin (i.e., 0.69± 0.01 kpc). The low surface-brightness stellar component of HoII is regular and symmetric and has an extent much smaller than the vast H I cloud in which it is embedded. We compare the spatial distribution of the young and old stellar populations, and find that the old RGB stars are significantly more centrally concentrated than the young stellar populations, contrary to what is observed in most dwarf galaxies of the Local Universe. We discuss these properties in the context of the comet-like distribution of H I gas around HoII, and argue for the presence of a hot intragroup medium in the vicinity of HoII to explain the contrasting morphologies of the gas and stars.

  1. New wide field camera for Subaru Telescope: Hyper Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) is a new wide field optical imaging camera built for 8.2 m Subaru telescope. The field of view is 1.5 degree in diameter and the nearly 50 cm image circle was paved by 116 fully depleted CCDs (2k x 4k 15 micron square pixels). To realize a seeing limit imaging at Mauna Kea, the specification on the overall instrument PSF is set as 0.32 arc-second (FWHM). This is crucial for our primary scientific objectives: weak gravitational lensing survey to probe dark matter distribution. We started building the camera in 2006 and had a first light in 2012. The delivered image quality turned out to be mostly seeing limited as designed. We once observed the seeing size of 0.43 arc-second (median value over the field of view) in Y-band with 300 seconds exposure. Our 300 nights observing proposal has been accepted. The program started in March 2014 and continues over 5 years. The wide survey plans to cover 1,400 square degree with the limiting magnitude of i_AB = 26 (5 sigma, 2 arcsec aperture). General observer programs are carried out in parallel. In this talk, we will present the design and the actual performance of the camera as well as how we implement the massive (1.6 GByte/exposure) data management system.

  2. Managing the Development of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irace, William; Cutri, Roc; Duval, Valerie; Eisenhardt, Peter; Elwell, John; Greanias, George; Heinrichsen, Ingolf; Howard, Joan; Liu, Feng-Chuan; Royer, Donald; Wright, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a NASA Medium-Class Explorer (MIDEX) mission, is surveying the entire sky in four bands from 3.4 to 22 microns with a sensitivity hundreds to hundreds of thousands times better than previous all-sky surveys at these wavelengths. The single WISE instrument consists of a 40 cm three-mirror anastigmatic telescope, a two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat, a scan mirror mechanism, and reimaging optics giving 6" resolution (full-width-half-maximum). WISE was placed into a Sun-synchronous polar orbit on a Delta II 7320 launch vehicle on December 14, 2009. NASA selected WISE as a MIDEX in 2002 following a rigorous competitive selection process. To gain further confidence in WISE, NASA extended the development period one year with an option to cancel the mission if certain criteria were not met. MIDEX missions are led by the principal investigator who in this case delegated day-to-day management to the project manager. With a cost cap and relatively short development schedule, it was essential for all WISE partners to work seamlessly together. This was accomplished with an integrated management team representing all key partners and disciplines. The project was developed on budget and on schedule in spite of the need to surmount significant technical challenges. This paper describes our management approach, key challenges and critical decisions made. Results are described from a programmatic, technical and scientific point of view. Lessons learned are offered for projects of this type.

  3. Rapid wide-field Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging based on four photoelastic modulators with no moving parts.

    PubMed

    Alali, Sanaz; Gribble, Adam; Alex Vitkin, I

    2016-03-01

    A new polarimetry method is demonstrated to image the entire Mueller matrix of a turbid sample using four photoelastic modulators (PEMs) and a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, with no moving parts. Accurate wide-field imaging is enabled with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) optical gating technique and an evolutionary algorithm (EA) that optimizes imaging times. This technique accurately and rapidly measured the Mueller matrices of air, polarization elements, and turbid phantoms. The system should prove advantageous for Mueller matrix analysis of turbid samples (e.g., biological tissues) over large fields of view, in less than a second. PMID:26974110

  4. Optical Tecnology Developments in Biomedicine: History, Current and Future

    PubMed Central

    Nioka, Shoko; Chen, Yu

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical optics is a rapidly emerging field for medical imaging and diagnostics. This paper reviews several biomedical optical technologies that have been developed and translated for either clinical or pre-clinical applications. Specifically, we focus on the following technologies: 1) near-infrared spectroscopy and tomography, 2) optical coherence tomography, 3) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, and 4) optical molecular imaging. There representative biomedical applications are also discussed here. PMID:23905030

  5. Optical tecnology developments in biomedicine: history, current and future.

    PubMed

    Nioka, Shoko; Chen, Yu

    2011-09-01

    Biomedical optics is a rapidly emerging field for medical imaging and diagnostics. This paper reviews several biomedical optical technologies that have been developed and translated for either clinical or pre-clinical applications. Specifically, we focus on the following technologies: 1) near-infrared spectroscopy and tomography, 2) optical coherence tomography, 3) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, and 4) optical molecular imaging. There representative biomedical applications are also discussed here. PMID:23905030

  6. FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  7. Demonstration of the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometer Testbed Using a Calibrated Hyperspectral Image Projector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Leisawitz, David; Maher, Steve; Rinehart, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-field Imaging Interferometer testbed (WIIT) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center uses a dual-Michelson interferometric technique. The WIIT combines stellar interferometry with Fourier-transform interferometry to produce high-resolution spatial-spectral data over a large field-of-view. This combined technique could be employed on future NASA missions such as the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and the Sub-millimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS). While both SPIRIT and SPECS would operate at far-infrared wavelengths, the WIIT demonstrates the dual-interferometry technique at visible wavelengths. The WIIT will produce hyperspectral image data, so a true hyperspectral object is necessary. A calibrated hyperspectral image projector (CHIP) has been constructed to provide such an object. The CHIP uses Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology to produce customized, spectrally-diverse scenes. CHIP scenes will have approximately 1.6-micron spatial resolution and the capability of . producing arbitrary spectra in the band between 380 nm and 1.6 microns, with approximately 5-nm spectral resolution. Each pixel in the scene can take on a unique spectrum. Spectral calibration is achieved with an onboard fiber-coupled spectrometer. In this paper we describe the operation of the CHIP. Results from the WIIT observations of CHIP scenes will also be presented.

  8. Wide-field direct CCD observations supporting the Astro-1 Space Shuttle mission's Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintzen, Paul; Angione, Ron; Talbert, Freddie; Cheng, K.-P.; Smith, Eric; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1993-01-01

    Wide field direct CCD observations are being obtained to support and complement the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) images provided by Astro's Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) during a Space Shuttle flight in December 1990. Because of the wide variety of projects addressed by UIT, the fields observed include (1) galactic supernova remnants such as the Cygnus Loop and globular clusters such as Omega Cen and M79; (2) the Magellanic Clouds, M33, M81, and other galaxies in the Local Group; and (3) rich clusters of galaxies, principally the Perseus cluster and Abell 1367. Ground-based observations have been obtained for virtually all of the Astro-1 UIT fields. The optical images allow identification of individual UV sources in each field and provide the long baseline in wavelength necessary for accurate analysis of UV-bright sources. To facilitate use of our optical images for analysis of UIT data and other projects, we plan to archive them, with the UIT images, at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), where they will be universally accessible via anonymous FTP. The UIT, one of three telescopes comprising the Astro spacecraft, is a 38-cm f/9 Ritchey-Chretien telescope on which high quantum efficiency, solar-blind image tubes are used to record VUV images on photographic film. Five filters with passbands centered between 1250A and 2500A provide both VUV colors and a measurement of extinction via the 2200A dust feature. The resulting calibrated VUV pictures are 40 arcminutes in diameter at 2.5 arcseconds resolution. The capabilities of UIT, therefore, complement HST's WFPC: the latter has 40 times greater collecting area, while UIT's usable field has 170 times WFPC's field area.

  9. Optical lead flint glasses: key material in optics since centuries and in future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter

    2015-09-01

    About 350 years ago a new kind of glass types was invented for decorative purposes such as drinking glasses, bowls and vases. It needed more than 70 years until the capability of these lead flint glasses was discovered to improve the performance of optical systems markedly. Color correction enabled images with resolution more than ten times better than earlier systems opening the view of researchers for new fields in the micro and macro world. Within the next 150 years the progress in optical glass production concentrated on improving quality especially homogeneity, characterization of its properties and achieving larger lenses. The introduction of glass types with considerably different compositions in the 1880s led to complementation of the glass program but not to a replacement of the lead flint glasses. Their outstanding optical properties together with their favorable melting behavior kept them being workhorses in optical systems design. One of the outstanding properties of lead flint glasses is their capability of being cast in large volumes. The size development reached a summit by the end of the 19th century with the lenses of the largest refracting telescopes. Their use as radiation shielding glasses since the second half of the 20th century led to even bigger castings of up to two tons of weight. In the 1990s the other outstanding property made lead flint glass types playing an important role in microlithography. Transmissive optics working with the mercury i-line needs crown and flint glass for dispersion correction of the comparatively broad i-line. The flint glasses had to have utmost transmission in the near UV to reduce thermal lensing as far as possible. This combination of requirements on dispersion and transmission could be fulfilled only by using lead flint glasses. It remains valid in fluorescence microscopy. Here the trend goes to an ever broader spectral range extending from the IR into the UV allowing diffraction limited resolution for many fluorescence light bands simultaneously. These outstanding properties of the lead flint glass types caused SCHOTT to keep them in the glass program and not to replace them completely as other glass companies have done. The improvements of the last two decades with respect to homogeneity and transmittance underline their suitability for future extreme quality optics with applications in medical and general research and in astronomy for large beam shaping and atmospheric dispersion correction.

  10. From classical to modern near-field optics and the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2014-11-01

    This paper reviews the framework of classical near-field optics and recent progress in modern near-field optics. Some applications are also reviewed, including novel optical functional devices, nano-fabrication technologies, energy conversion technologies, and information processing systems. Novel theoretical models based on mathematical science are also presented, as well as an outlook for the future, hinting at the possibilities of near-field optics.

  11. Fiber optic interconnect and optoelectronic packaging challenges for future generation avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranek, Mark W.

    2007-02-01

    Forecasting avionics industry fiber optic interconnect and optoelectronic packaging challenges that lie ahead first requires an assumption that military avionics architectures will evolve from today's centralized/unified concept based on gigabit laser, optical-to-electrical-to-optical switching and optical backplane technology, to a future federated/distributed or centralized/unified concept based on gigabit tunable laser, electro-optical switch and add-drop wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technology. The requirement to incorporate avionics optical built-in test (BIT) in military avionics fiber optic systems is also assumed to be correct. Taking these assumptions further indicates that future avionics systems engineering will use WDM technology combined with photonic circuit integration and advanced packaging to form the technical basis of the next generation military avionics onboard local area network (LAN). Following this theme, fiber optic cable plants will evolve from today's multimode interconnect solution to a single mode interconnect solution that is highly installable, maintainable, reliable and supportable. Ultimately optical BIT for fiber optic fault detection and isolation will be incorporated as an integral part of a total WDM-based avionics LAN solution. Cost-efficient single mode active and passive photonic component integration and packaging integration is needed to enable reliable operation in the harsh military avionics application environment. Rugged multimode fiber-based transmitters and receivers (transceivers) with in-package optical BIT capability are also needed to enable fully BIT capable single-wavelength fiber optic links on both legacy and future aerospace platforms.

  12. Cone of Darkness: Finding Blank-sky Positions for Multi-object Wide-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.

    2014-05-01

    We present the Cone of Darkness, an application to automatically configure blank-sky positions for a series of stacked, wide-field observations, such as those carried out by the SAMI instrument on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61 core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical plane at the telescope's prime focus. To make the most efficient use of each plug-plate, several observing fields are typically stacked to produce a single plate. When choosing blank-sky positions for the observations it is most effective to select these such that one set of 26 holes gives valid sky positions for all fields on the plate. However, when carried out manually this selection process is tedious and includes a significant risk of error. The Cone of Darkness software aims to provide uniform blank-sky position coverage over the field of observation, within the limits set by the distribution of target positions and the chosen input catalogs. This will then facilitate the production of the best representative median sky spectrum for use in sky subtraction. The application, written in C++, is configurable, making it usable for a range of instruments. Given the plate characteristics and the positions of target holes, the software segments the unallocated space on the plate and determines the position which best fits the uniform distribution requirement. This position is checked, for each field, against the selected catalog using a TAP ADQL search. The process is then repeated until the desired number of sky positions is attained.

  13. Wide field imager instrument for the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Porro, Matteo; Rau, Arne; Santangelo, Andrea; Tenzer, Chris; Wilms, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected for ESA's L2 mission, scheduled for launch in 2028. It will provide the necessary capabilities to achieve the ambitious goals of the science theme "The Hot and Energetic Universe." Athena's x-ray mirrors will be based on silicon pore optics technology with a 12-m focal length. Two complementary focal plane camera systems are foreseen, which can be moved interchangeably to the focus of the mirror system: the actively shielded micro-calorimeter spectrometer X-IFU and the wide field imager (WFI). The WFI camera will provide an unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arc min with a high count-rate capability (˜1 Crab). It permits a state-of-the-art energy resolution in the energy band of 0.1 to 15 keV during the entire mission lifetime (e.g., full width at half maximum ≤150 eV at 6 keV). This performance is accomplished by a set of depleted P-channel field effect transistor (DEPFET) active pixel sensor matrices with a pixel size well suited to the angular resolution of 5 arc sec (on-axis) of the mirror system. Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450-μm-thick silicon bulk. This manuscript will summarize the current instrument concept and design, the status of the technology development, and the envisaged baseline performance.

  14. Discovery of two new Galactic candidate luminous blue variables with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Langer, N.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Todt, H.; Hamann, W.-R.; Grebel, E. K.; Buckley, D.; Crause, L.; Crawford, S.; Gulbis, A.; Hettlage, C.; Hooper, E.; Husser, T.-O.; Kotze, P.; Loaring, N.; Nordsieck, K. H.; O'Donoghue, D.; Pickering, T.; Potter, S.; Romero Colmenero, E.; Vaisanen, P.; Williams, T.; Wolf, M.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; Nysewander, M. C.; LaCluyze, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    We report the discovery of two new Galactic candidate luminous blue variable (LBV) stars via detection of circular shells (typical of confirmed and candidate LBVs) and follow-up spectroscopy of their central stars. The shells were detected at 22 μm in the archival data of the Mid-Infrared All Sky Survey carried out with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Follow-up optical spectroscopy of the central stars of the shells conducted with the renewed Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) showed that their spectra are very similar to those of the well-known LBVs P Cygni and AG Car, and the recently discovered candidate LBV MN112, which implies the LBV classification for these stars as well. The LBV classification of both stars is supported by detection of their significant photometric variability: one of them brightened in the R and I bands by 0.68 ± 0.10 and 0.61 ± 0.04 mag, respectively, during the last 13-18 years, while the second one (known as Hen 3-1383) varies its B, V, R, I and Ks brightnesses by ≃0.5-0.9 mag on time-scales from 10 d to decades. We also found significant changes in the spectrum of Hen 3-1383 on a time-scale of ≃3 months, which provides additional support for the LBV classification of this star. Further spectrophotometric monitoring of both stars is required to firmly prove their LBV status. We discuss a connection between the location of massive stars in the field and their fast rotation, and suggest that the LBV activity of the newly discovered candidate LBVs might be directly related to their possible runaway status. a USNO B-1 (Monet et al. 2003); bDENIS; c2MASS; dSALT; ePROMPT.

  15. X-Ray Optics: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, William W.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray astronomy started with a small collimated proportional counter atop a rocket in the early 1960s. It was immediately recognized that focusing X-ray optics would drastically improve both source location accuracy and source detection sensitivity. In the past 5 decades, X-ray astronomy has made significant strides in achieving better angular resolution, large photon collection area, and better spectral and timing resolutions, culminating in the three currently operating X-ray observatories: Chandra, XMM/Newton, and Suzaku. In this talk I will give a brief history of X-ray optics, concentrating on the characteristics of the optics of these three observatories. Then I will discuss current X-ray mirror technologies being developed in several institutions. I will end with a discussion of the optics for the International X-ray Observatory that I have been developing at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  16. Towards future systems with nano-optics contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminska, Bozena; Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Chuo, Yindar; Landrock, Clint; Omrane, Badr; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    The long anticipated deployment of nano-optics that can enable next generation computing has encountered several practical impediments that have delayed widespread adoption in commercial processes. However, the global market in nano-enabled products is expected to grow to over $80B USD within the next 3 years. In response, the research community is creating solutions to overcome challenging issues such as reliability and cost-effective fabrication. New approaches in sensing, continuous uptime powering, and post silicon manufacturing will maximize overall performance and allow unprecedented commercial applications. This paper reviews present limitations of nano-optics and then considers the new generation of devices and their manufacturing that may turn promises into reality. We highlight several recent innovations: high sensitivity/selectivity nano-optical sensing devices; sustainable power from polymer energy harvesting and storage; optical variable devices for visual authentication of secure documents; and nano-template masters for high-volume manufacturing.

  17. UVUDF: Ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble ultra deep field with wide-field camera 3

    SciTech Connect

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc; Colbert, James W.; Hanish, Daniel J.; Kurczynski, Peter; Gawiser, Eric; Bond, Nicholas A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; De Mello, Duilia F.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Brown, Thomas M.; Coe, Dan; Ferguson, Henry C.; Atek, Hakim; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Gronwall, Caryl; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Ravindranath, Swara; and others

    2013-12-01

    We present an overview of a 90 orbit Hubble Space Telescope treasury program to obtain near-ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using the Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS detector with the F225W, F275W, and F336W filters. This survey is designed to: (1) investigate the episode of peak star formation activity in galaxies at 1 < z < 2.5; (2) probe the evolution of massive galaxies by resolving sub-galactic units (clumps); (3) examine the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from galaxies at z ∼ 2-3; (4) greatly improve the reliability of photometric redshift estimates; and (5) measure the star formation rate efficiency of neutral atomic-dominated hydrogen gas at z ∼ 1-3. In this overview paper, we describe the survey details and data reduction challenges, including both the necessity of specialized calibrations and the effects of charge transfer inefficiency. We provide a stark demonstration of the effects of charge transfer inefficiency on resultant data products, which when uncorrected, result in uncertain photometry, elongation of morphology in the readout direction, and loss of faint sources far from the readout. We agree with the STScI recommendation that future UVIS observations that require very sensitive measurements use the instrument's capability to add background light through a 'post-flash'. Preliminary results on number counts of UV-selected galaxies and morphology of galaxies at z ∼ 1 are presented. We find that the number density of UV dropouts at redshifts 1.7, 2.1, and 2.7 is largely consistent with the number predicted by published luminosity functions. We also confirm that the image mosaics have sufficient sensitivity and resolution to support the analysis of the evolution of star-forming clumps, reaching 28-29th magnitude depth at 5σ in a 0.''2 radius aperture depending on filter and observing epoch.

  18. Laser guide star adaptive optics: Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, C.E.

    1993-03-01

    Feasibility demonstrations using one to two meter telescopes have confirmed the utility of laser beacons as wavefront references for adaptive optics systems. Laser beacon architectures suitable for the new generation of eight and ten meter telescopes are presently under study. This paper reviews the concept of laser guide star adaptive optics and the progress that has been made by groups around the world implementing such systems. A description of the laser guide star program at LLNL and some experimental results is also presented.

  19. THE FIRST HUNDRED BROWN DWARFS DISCOVERED BY THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER (WISE)

    SciTech Connect

    Davy Kirkpatrick, J.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Beichman, Charles A.; Cushing, Michael C.; Mainzer, A.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Bauer, James M.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Wright, Edward L.; McLean, Ian S.; Lake, Sean E.; Petty, Sara M.; Thompson, Maggie A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Bridge, Carrie R.; Stanford, S. A.; Bailey, Vanessa; and others

    2011-12-01

    We present ground-based spectroscopic verification of 6 Y dwarfs (see also Cushing et al.), 89 T dwarfs, 8 L dwarfs, and 1 M dwarf identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Eighty of these are cold brown dwarfs with spectral types {>=}T6, six of which have been announced earlier by Mainzer et al. and Burgasser et al. We present color-color and color-type diagrams showing the locus of M, L, T, and Y dwarfs in WISE color space. Near-infrared and, in a few cases, optical spectra are presented for these discoveries. Near-infrared classifications as late as early Y are presented and objects with peculiar spectra are discussed. Using these new discoveries, we are also able to extend the optical T dwarf classification scheme from T8 to T9. After deriving an absolute WISE 4.6 {mu}m (W2) magnitude versus spectral type relation, we estimate spectrophotometric distances to our discoveries. We also use available astrometric measurements to provide preliminary trigonometric parallaxes to four of our discoveries, which have types of L9 pec (red), T8, T9, and Y0; all of these lie within 10 pc of the Sun. The Y0 dwarf, WISE 1541-2250, is the closest at 2.8{sup +1.3}{sub -0.6} pc; if this 2.8 pc value persists after continued monitoring, WISE 1541-2250 will become the seventh closest stellar system to the Sun. Another 10 objects, with types between T6 and >Y0, have spectrophotometric distance estimates also placing them within 10 pc. The closest of these, the T6 dwarf WISE 1506+7027, is believed to fall at a distance of {approx}4.9 pc. WISE multi-epoch positions supplemented with positional info primarily from the Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera allow us to calculate proper motions and tangential velocities for roughly one-half of the new discoveries. This work represents the first step by WISE to complete a full-sky, volume-limited census of late-T and Y dwarfs. Using early results from this census, we present preliminary, lower limits to the space density of these objects and discuss constraints on both the functional form of the mass function and the low-mass limit of star formation.

  20. The First Hundred Brown Dwarfs Discovered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Michael C.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Wright, Edward L.; Mainzer, A.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; McLean, Ian S.; Thompson, Maggie A.; Bauer, James M.; Benford, Dominic J.; Bridge, Carrie R.; Lake, Sean E.; Petty, Sara M.; Stanford, S. A.; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Bailey, Vanessa; Beichman, Charles A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Bochanski, John J.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Capak, Peter L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Hinz, Philip M.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Knox, Russell P.; Manohar, Swarnima; Masters, Daniel; Morales-Calderón, Maria; Prato, Lisa A.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Salvato, Mara; Schurr, Steven D.; Scoville, Nicholas Z.; Simcoe, Robert A.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Stern, Daniel; Stock, Nathan D.; Vacca, William D.

    2011-12-01

    We present ground-based spectroscopic verification of 6 Y dwarfs (see also Cushing et al.), 89 T dwarfs, 8 L dwarfs, and 1 M dwarf identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Eighty of these are cold brown dwarfs with spectral types >=T6, six of which have been announced earlier by Mainzer et al. and Burgasser et al. We present color-color and color-type diagrams showing the locus of M, L, T, and Y dwarfs in WISE color space. Near-infrared and, in a few cases, optical spectra are presented for these discoveries. Near-infrared classifications as late as early Y are presented and objects with peculiar spectra are discussed. Using these new discoveries, we are also able to extend the optical T dwarf classification scheme from T8 to T9. After deriving an absolute WISE 4.6 μm (W2) magnitude versus spectral type relation, we estimate spectrophotometric distances to our discoveries. We also use available astrometric measurements to provide preliminary trigonometric parallaxes to four of our discoveries, which have types of L9 pec (red), T8, T9, and Y0; all of these lie within 10 pc of the Sun. The Y0 dwarf, WISE 1541-2250, is the closest at 2.8+1.3 -0.6 pc if this 2.8 pc value persists after continued monitoring, WISE 1541-2250 will become the seventh closest stellar system to the Sun. Another 10 objects, with types between T6 and >Y0, have spectrophotometric distance estimates also placing them within 10 pc. The closest of these, the T6 dwarf WISE 1506+7027, is believed to fall at a distance of ~4.9 pc. WISE multi-epoch positions supplemented with positional info primarily from the Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera allow us to calculate proper motions and tangential velocities for roughly one-half of the new discoveries. This work represents the first step by WISE to complete a full-sky, volume-limited census of late-T and Y dwarfs. Using early results from this census, we present preliminary, lower limits to the space density of these objects and discuss constraints on both the functional form of the mass function and the low-mass limit of star formation.

  1. The WSRT wide-field H I survey. I. The background galaxy sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.; Thilker, D.; Walterbos, R. A. M.

    2003-08-01

    We have used the Westerbork array to carry out an unbiased wide-field survey for H I emission features, achieving an RMS sensitivity of about 18 mJy/Beam at a velocity resolution of 17 km s-1 over 1800 deg2 and between -1000 < VHel <+6500 km s-1. The primary data consists of auto-correlation spectra with an effective angular resolution of 49' FWHM, although cross-correlation data were also acquired. The survey region is centered approximately on the position of Messier 31 and is Nyquist-sampled over 60x 30o in RA x Dec. More than 100 distinct features are detected at high significance in each of the two velocity regimes (negative and positive LGSR velocities). In this paper we present the results for our H I detections of external galaxies at positive LGSR velocity. We detect 155 external galaxies in excess of 8sigma in integrated H I flux density. Plausible optical associations are found within a 30' search radius for all but one of our H I detections in DSS images, although several are not previously cataloged or do not have published red-shift determinations. Our detection without a DSS association is at low galactic latitude. Twenty-three of our objects are detected in H I for the first time. We classify almost half of our detections as ``confused'', since one or more companions is cataloged within a radius of 30' and a velocity interval of 400 km s-1. We identify a handful of instances of significant positional offsets exceeding 10 kpc of unconfused optical galaxies with the associated H I centroid, possibly indicative of severe tidal distortions or uncataloged gas-rich companions. A possible trend is found for an excess of detected H I flux in unconfused galaxies within our large survey beam relative to that detected previously in smaller telescope beams, both as function of increasing distance and increasing gas mass. This may be an indication for a diffuse gaseous component on 100 kpc scales in the environment of massive galaxies or a population of uncataloged low mass companions. We use our galaxy sample to estimate the H I mass function from our survey volume. Good agreement is found with the HIPASS BGC results, but only after explicit correction for galaxy density variations with distance. Table 1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/406/829 and Fig. 3 is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  2. Panchromatic properties of galaxies in wide-field optical spectroscopic and photometric surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon P.

    2012-08-01

    The past 15 years have seen an explosion in the number of redshifts recovered via wide area spectroscopic surveys. At the current time there are approximately 2 million spectroscopic galaxy redshifts known (and rising) which represents an extraordinary growth since the pioneering work of Marc Davis and John Huchra. Similarly there has been a parallel explosion in wavelength coverage with imaging surveys progressing from single band, to multi-band, to truly multiwavelength or pan-chromatic involving the coordination of multiple facilities. With these empirically motivated studies has come a wealth of new discoveries impacting almost all areas of astrophysics. Today individual surveys, as best demonstrated by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, now rank shoulder-to-shoulder alongside major facilities. In the coming years this trend is set to continue as we begin the process of designing and conducting the next generation of spectroscopic surveys supported by multi-facility wavelength coverage.

  3. Optical Communications for NASA's Small Spacecraft Missions of the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.; Chen, C-C.; Hemmati, H.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's space missions of the future will be dominated by more moderate sized mini- and micro- spacecraft. Such missions will place stringent requirements on the mass and power consumption required for the various spacecraft subsystems.

  4. Optical imaging technology in minimally invasive surgery. Current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Boppart, S A; Deutsch, T F; Rattner, D W

    1999-07-01

    Optical engineering and imaging technology have played a major role in the evolving field of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) by making it possible to visualize the manipulation of tissue at remote internal sites. We assess and review the optical imaging technology used during a variety of MIS procedures from an engineering perspective. The field of MIS is evolving rapidly. Optic-based technologies have the potential to further improve diagnostic capabilities of MIS. Optical imaging technologies and instrument designs are discussed in relation to their current and future use in MIS procedures. Technical limitations in imaging technology are described, along with potential solutions. We review the current status and future role of optical imaging technology in MIS. In the future, synergistic benefits from engineering, imaging technology, and MIS are likely to improve diagnostic ability and patient care. PMID:10384083

  5. A distributed optical grid network infrastructure for future easy-to-use innovative network services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Sugang; Harai, Hiroaki; Wada, Naoya

    2011-11-01

    Extending the researches on wavelength switched optical networks (WSON), efficient integration of the novel optical packet switching network and wavelength switching-based optical circuit switching network technologies which offers both best-effort packet delivery and QoS guaranteed lightpath services has been being studied. In addition, researches on the optical-layer transparent data processing, such as all-optical wavelength multicasting, all-optical 3R regeneration, etc, are conducted simultaneously. It is believed that future innovative optical network services (INSes) would be built on these novel future-proof technologies, and foster colorful applications in the new generation networks. Before the wide applications of INS in different fields, there would be a foreseeable strong requirement for INS firstly posed by pioneer grid applications, e.g., e-science, e-government, and e-banking, etc, which would require the high-performance underlying networks. Our research here is motivated to glue the optical networks and grid applications by integrating lightpath, geographically distributed INS systems and grid resources (e.g., computers, storages, instruments, etc.), and finally offering an easy-to-use high performance networked grid computing environment-optical grid network (OGN) to user applications. In this paper, we introduce our research activities of a distributed optical grid network infrastructure (OGNI), and the creation of the future easy-to-use INS based on OGNI. The proposals have been validated through fieldtrial experiments over a developed WSON testbed.

  6. Elastic Optical Path Network Architecture: Framework for Spectrally-Efficient and Scalable Future Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, Masahiko; Takara, Hidehiko; Sone, Yoshiaki; Yonenaga, Kazushige; Hirano, Akira

    This paper presents an elastic optical path network architecture as a novel networking framework to address the looming capacity crunch problem in internet protocol (IP) and optical networks. The basic idea is to introduce elasticity and adaptation into the optical domain to yield spectrally-efficient optical path accommodation, heightened network scalability through IP traffic offloading to the elastic optical layer, and enhanced survivability for serious disasters.

  7. The Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument Charge-Coupled Device Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waczynski, A.; Beck, T.; Boucarut, R.; Cheng, E.; Cottingham, D.; Delo, G.; Fixsen, D.; Hill, R. J.; Johnson, S.; Kenny, P.; Landsman, W.; Malumuth, E.; Offenberg, J.; Polidan, E.; Russell, A. M.; Schlossberg, D.; Sharp, E.; Wassell, E.; Wen, Y.; Yagelowich, J.

    The Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a new instrument planned for deployment during Servicing Mission 4 in 2004. One of its key scientific goals is to provide panchromatic coverage from the near-UV through the near-IR. This is accomplished using two detector technologies, Marconi Applied Technologies back-thinned CCDs and Rockwell Scientific Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (HgCdTe) IR focal planes. The Marconi CCDs have been delivered and characterized. The performance of these devices is exceptionally good, and will provide a new wide-field, near-UV capability for the observatory. Several notable advances are described.

  8. Wide field super-resolution surface imaging through plasmonic structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Lu, Dylan; Shen, Hao; Wan, Weiwei; Ponsetto, Joseph Louis; Huang, Eric; Liu, Zhaowei

    2014-08-13

    We experimentally demonstrate a wide field surface plasmon (SP) assisted super-resolution imaging technique, plasmonic structured illumination microscopy (PSIM), by combining tunable SP interference (SPI) with structured illumination microscopy (SIM). By replacing the laser interference fringes in conventional SIM with SPI patterns, PSIM exhibits greatly enhanced resolving power thanks to the unique properties of SP waves. This PSIM technique is a wide field, surface super-resolution imaging technique with potential applications in the field of high-speed biomedical imaging. PMID:25014211

  9. A Wide-Field NV Diamond Magnetic Imager for Highly Parallel Detection of Rare Biological Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, David; Lee, Kyungheon; Lee, Hakho; Walsworth, Ronald

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a wide-field magnetic imaging device based on Nitrogen Vacancy centers in diamond, optimized for the detection of rare, immunomagnetically labeled biological targets such as circulating tumor cells. The new imager allows simultaneous magnetic imaging over a ~ 1 mm2 field of view, approximately two orders of magnitude larger than previous implementations. We describe experiments to detect cancer cells tagged with superparamagnetic nanoparticles, including validation studies for a cell detection assay and technical considerations associated magnetic imaging over very wide fields of view.

  10. Neutron polycapillary optics: present status and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, A.

    2005-07-01

    Up to present, neutron applications of polycapillary optics have been rather rear and mostly limited either to feasibility studies or to non-scattering techniques. The practical use of polycapillary focusing neutron optics for purposes of neutron scattering have been hindered by a serious degradation of momentum resolution caused by increased divergence of focused beams. However, limited size of samples available for research as well as limited brightness of present day neutron sources (both reactors and spallation sources) requires to rethink the current situation. Neutron lenses are successfully tested for low Q-resolution applications providing an enormous increase of neutron flux at small samples. Moreover, some recent developments in the field of neutron instrumentation allow us to overcome the resolution problem by decoupling the angular resolution and the incident beam divergence thus opening the opportunity for the use of focusing neutron optics in some high Q-resolution application. Further advances in technology required to improve the performance of neutron polycapillary optics, also in combination with modem methods of polarization of neutron beams, are discussed.

  11. Merging porphyrins and structured optical fibres: future technology for chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Cicero; Canning, John; Crossley, Maxwell J.; Stocks, Danial; Sintic, Maxine

    2008-04-01

    Spectroscopic characterisation of water soluble porphyrins using a structured optical fibre are presented and discussed. Porphyrin thin-films were also fabricated inside the holes of structured fibres. The thin-films self-assemble inside the fibres leading to energy coupling between the molecules. These are the first steps towards future chemically tailored optical fibre sensors for molecular detection.

  12. Wavelet image processing applied to optical and digital holography: past achievements and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katharine J.

    2005-08-01

    The link between wavelets and optics goes back to the work of Dennis Gabor who both invented holography and developed Gabor decompositions. Holography involves 3-D images. Gabor decompositions involves 1-D signals. Gabor decompositions are the predecessors of wavelets. Wavelet image processing of holography, both optical holography and digital holography, will be examined with respect to past achievements and future challenges.

  13. Optical coherence elastography: current status and future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2011-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has several advantages over other imaging modalities, such as angiography and ultrasound, due to its inherently high in vivo resolution, which allows for the identification of morphological tissue structures. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) benefits from the superior spatial resolution of OCT and has promising applications, including cancer diagnosis and the detailed characterization of arterial wall biomechanics, both of which are based on the elastic properties of the tissue under investigation. We present OCE principles based on techniques associated with static and dynamic tissue excitation, and their corresponding elastogram image-reconstruction algorithms are reviewed. OCE techniques, including the development of intravascular- or catheter-based OCE, are in their early stages of development but show great promise for surgical oncology or intravascular cardiology applications.

  14. Optimized geometries for future generation optical lattice clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, S.; Ostermann, L.; Ritsch, H.

    2016-04-01

    Atoms deeply trapped in magic wavelength optical lattices provide a Doppler- and collision-free dense ensemble of quantum emitters ideal for high-precision spectroscopy and they are the basis of some of the best optical atomic clocks to date. However, despite their minute optical dipole moments the inherent long-range dipole-dipole interactions in such lattices still generate line shifts, dephasing and modified decay. We show that in a perfectly filled lattice line shifts and decay are resonantly enhanced depending on the lattice constant and geometry. Potentially, this yields clock shifts of many atomic linewidths and reduces the measurement by optimizing the lattice geometry. Such collective effects can be tailored to yield zero effective shifts and prolong dipole lifetimes beyond the single-atom decay. In particular, we identify dense 2D hexagonal or square lattices as the most promising configurations for an accuracy and precision well below the independent ensemble limit. This geometry should also be an ideal basis for related applications such as superradiant lasers, precision magnetometry or long-lived quantum memories.

  15. Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed: Results and Future Work

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Sommargren, G; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Severson, S; Dillon, D; Sheinis, A; Palmer, D; Kasdin, J; Olivier, S

    2004-07-15

    'Extreme' adaptive optics systems are optimized for ultra-high-contrast applications, such as ground-based extrasolar planet detection. The Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed at UC Santa Cruz is being used to investigate and develop technologies for high-contrast imaging, especially wavefront control. A simple optical design allows us to minimize wavefront error and maximize the experimentally achievable contrast before progressing to a more complex set-up. A phase shifting diffraction interferometer is used to measure wavefront errors with sub-nm precision and accuracy. We have demonstrated RMS wavefront errors of <1.3 nm and a contrast of >10{sup -7} over a substantial region using a shaped pupil. Current work includes the installation and characterization of a 1024-actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical- Systems (MEMS) deformable mirror, manufactured by Boston Micro-Machines, which will be used for wavefront control. In our initial experiments we can flatten the deformable mirror to 1.8-nm RMS wavefront error within a control radius of 5-13 cycles per aperture. Ultimately this testbed will be used to test all aspects of the system architecture for an extrasolar planet-finding AO system.

  16. Sampling and Analysis of Impact Crater Residues found on the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G. W.; Colaux, J. L.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Webb, R. P.; Griffin, T. J.; Reed, B. B.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Kou, J.-C.; Robinson, G. A.; Opiela, J. N.; Gerlach, L.

    2013-01-01

    After nearly 16 years on orbit, the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC-2) was recovered from the Hubble Space Telescope in May 2009 during the 12 day shuttle mission designated STS-125. During that exposure to the low Earth orbit environment, the WFPC-2 radiator was struck by approximately 700 impactors producing crater features 300 micrometers and larger in size. Following an optical inspection of these features in 2009, an agreement was reached for the joint NASA-ESA examination and characterization of crater residues, the remnants of the projectile, in 2011. Active examination began in 2012, with 486 of the impact features being cored at NASA Johnson Space Center fs (JSC) Space Exposed Hardware cleanroom and curation facility. The core samples were subsequently divided between NASA and ESA. NASA's analysis was conducted at JSC fs Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/ energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) methods, and ESA's analysis was conducted at the Natural History Museum (NHM) again using SEM/EDS, and at the University of Surrey Ion Beam Centre (IBC) using ion beam analysis (IBA) with a scanned proton microbeam. As detailed discussion of the joint findings remains premature at this point, this paper reports on the coring technique developed; the practical taxonomy developed to classify residues as belonging either to anthropogenic "orbital debris" or micrometeoroids; and the protocols for examination of crater residues. Challenges addressed in coring were the relative thickness of the surface to be cut, protection of the impact feature from contamination while coring, and the need to preserve the cleanroom environment so as to preclude or minimize cross-contamination. Classification criteria are summarized, including the assessment of surface contamination and surface cleaning. Finally, we discuss the analytical techniques used to examine the crater residues. We employed EDS from either electron excitation (SEM-EDS) and, in a minority of cases for cores assessed as "difficult" targets, proton excitation (IBA). All samples were documented by electron imagery: backscattered electron imagery in the SEM, and where appropriate, secondary electron imagery during IBA.

  17. Wide field of view helmet mounted display systems for helicopter simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran A.; Bucher, Nancy M.; Hennessy, Robert T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper elaborates on visually-coupled Wide Field of View Helmet Mounted Display (WFOVHMD) system technology as a viable visual presentation system for helicopter simulation. Critical research issues on helmet mounted displays are reviewed. Tradeoffs associated with this mode of presentation as well as research and training applications are discussed.

  18. Application of the wide-field shadowgraph technique to rotor wake visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Thomas R.; Light, Jeffrey S.

    1989-01-01

    The wide field shadowgraph technique is reviewed along with its application to the visualization of rotor wakes. In particular, current experimental methods and data reduction requirements are discussed. Sample shadowgraphs are presented. These include shadowgraphs of model-scale helicopter main rotors and tilt rotors, and full scale tail rotors, both in hover and in forward flight.

  19. Estimating crop production in Iowa from Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indian National Remote Sensing Agency ResourceSat-1 Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) data for the USA is being provided online by the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) and Arctic Slope Regional Corporation – Management Services (ASRC-MS). Because of the frequent revisit time and pixel sizes...

  20. The Status of NASA's Wide-Field Meteor Camera Network and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaauw, R.; Cooke, W.; Kingery, A.; Suggs, R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) recently established two wide-field cameras to detect meteors in the millimeter-size-range. This paper outlines the concepts of the system, the hardware and software, and results of 3,440 orbits seen from December 13, 2012 until May 14, 2014.

  1. ISS-Lobster: a low-cost wide-field X-ray transient detector on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Robert; Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Racusin, Judith; Marshall, Frank; Ptak, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    ISS-Lobster is a wide-field X-ray transient detector proposed to be deployed on the International Space Station. Through its unique imaging X-ray optics that allow a 30 deg by 30 deg FoV, a 1 arc min position resolution and a 10-11 erg/(sec cm2) sensitivity in 2000 sec, ISS-Lobster will observe numerous events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including: tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts, and perhaps most exciting, X-ray counterparts of gravitational wave detections involving stellar mass and possibly supermassive black holes. The mission includes a 3-axis gimbal system that allows fast Target of Opportunity pointing, and a small gamma-ray burst monitor to be contributed by the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology).

  2. KOALA: a wide-field 1000 element integral-field unit for the Anglo-Australian Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, S. C.; Ireland, M.; Lawrence, J. S.; Tims, J.; Staszak, N.; Brzeski, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sharp, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Case, S.; Colless, M.; Croom, S.; Couch, W.; De Marco, O.; Glazebrook, K.; Saunders, W.; Webster, R.; Zucker, D. B.

    2012-09-01

    KOALA, the Kilofibre Optimised Astronomical Lenslet Array, is a wide-field, high efficiency integral field unit being designed for use with the bench mounted AAOmega spectrograph on the AAT. KOALA will have 1000 fibres in a rectangular array with a selectable field of view of either 1390 or 430 sq. arcseconds with a spatial sampling of 1.25" or 0.7" respectively. To achieve this KOALA will use a telecentric double lenslet array with interchangeable fore-optics. The IFU will feed AAOmega via a 31m fibre run. The efficiency of KOALA is expected to be ≍ 52% at 3700A and ≍ 66% at 6563°Å with a throughput of > 52% over the entire wavelength range.

  3. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Sace Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Ion Beam Analysis of Subtle Impactor Traces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grime, G. W.; Webb, R. P.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Colaux, J. L.; Kearsley, A. T.; Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Opiela, J.; Griffin, T.; Gerlach, L.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of origin for particles responsible for impact damage on spacecraft such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) relies upon postflight analysis of returned materials. A unique opportunity arose in 2009 with collection of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) from HST by shuttle mission STS-125. A preliminary optical survey confirmed that there were hundreds of impact features on the radiator surface. Following extensive discussion between NASA, ESA, NHM and IBC, a collaborative research program was initiated, employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ion beam analysis (IBA) to determine the nature of the impacting grains. Even though some WFPC2 impact features are large, and easily seen without the use of a microscope, impactor remnants may be hard to find.

  4. PyWiFeS: a rapid data reduction pipeline for the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, Michael J.; Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Nielsen, Jon; Sharp, Robert G.

    2014-02-01

    We present PyWiFeS, a new Python-based data reduction pipeline for the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS). PyWiFeS consists of a series of core data processing routines built on standard scientific Python packages commonly used in astronomical applications. Included in PyWiFeS is an implementation of a new global optical model of the spectrograph which provides wavelengths solutions accurate to ˜0.05 Å (RMS) across the entire detector. The core PyWiFeS package is designed to be scriptable to enable batch processing of large quantities of data, and we present a default format for handling of observation metadata and scripting of data reduction.

  5. Design and analysis of the tracker bridge for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide-field upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Michael S.; Mollison, Nicholas T.; Soukup, Ian M.; Zierer, Joseph J.; Good, John M.; Nichols, Steven P.

    2010-07-01

    A large structural weldment has been designed to serve as the new star tracker bridge for the Wide Field Upgrade to the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory in support of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment‡. The modeling approach, analysis techniques and design details will be of interest to designers of large structures where stiffness is the primary design driver. The design includes detailed structural analysis using finite element models to maximize natural frequency response and limit deflections and light obscuration. Considerable fabrication challenges are overcome to allow integration of precision hardware required for positioning the corrector optics to a precision of less than 5 microns along the 4-meter travel range. Detailed descriptions of the bridge geometry, analysis results and challenging fabrication issues are discussed.

  6. Mathematical Design Optimization of Wide-Field X-ray Telescopes: Mirror Nodal Positions and Detector Tilts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mathematical formalism for determining the mirror shell nodal positions and detector tilts that optimize the spatial resolution averaged over a field-of-view for a nested x-ray telescope, assuming known mirror segment surface prescriptions and known detector focal surface. The results are expressed in terms of ensemble averages over variable combinations of the ray positions and wave vectors in the flat focal plane intersecting the optical axis at the nominal on-axis focus, which can be determined by Monte-Carlo ray traces of the individual mirror shells. This work is part of our continuing efforts to provide analytical tools to aid in the design process for wide-field survey x-ray astronomy missions.

  7. Mathematical Design Optimization of Wide-Field X-ray Telescopes: Mirror Nodal Positions and Detector Tilts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, Ronald; O'Dell, Stephen; Ramsey, Brian; Weisskopf, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mathematical formalism for determining the mirror shell nodal positions and detector tilts that optimize the spatial resolution averaged over a field-of-view for a nested x-ray telescope, assuming known mirror segment surface prescriptions and known detector focal surface. The results are expressed in terms of ensemble averages over variable combinations of the ray positions and wavevectors in the flat focal plane intersecting the optical axis at the nominal on-axis focus, which can be determined by Monte-Carlo ray traces of the individual mirror shells. This work is part of our continuing efforts to provide analytical tools to aid in the design process for wide-field survey x-ray astronomy missions.

  8. High-contrast epi-fluorescence wide-field imaging of biological cells using integrating-bucket method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K. S.; Choi, W. J.; Eom, J. B.; Chang, K. S.; Lee, B. H.

    2015-11-01

    We present an optical lock-in detection scheme, called the integrating-bucket technique, as a signal-to-background ratio enhancement method for wide-field fluorescence imaging of biological cells. The proposed method uses sinusoidally modulated illumination light and captures four frames of fluorescence images, one per each quarter of the modulation period, by integrating the fluorescence intensity signal. The capability of this technique is demonstrated by imaging fluorescent bead solutions as well as labeled cells. The results show that the method yields a 4-10 dB higher signal contrast than conventional fluorescence microscopy, and a background-free fluorescence image can be extracted within a sub-second time scale. Our findings indicate that the proposed method could be advantageous for the long-term study of live cells.

  9. Short wavelength optics for future free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.T.

    1984-04-01

    Although much free-electron laser work is directed toward achieving sufficient single-pass gain to be useful for research purposes, the availability of mirrors of high reflectance for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime would make resonant cavities a possibility. In addition, as in ordinary synchrotron radiation work, mirrors are required for the construction of realistic experiments and for beam manipulation purposes such as folding and extraction. The Working Group discussed a number of approaches to reflecting optics for free electron lasers, which are summarized here, and described in some detail. 16 references, 2 figures.

  10. Architectural Options for a Future Deep Space Optical Communications Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, B. L.; Benjamin, T.; Scozzafava, J.; Khatri, F.; Sharma, J.; Parvin, B.; Liebrecht, P. E.; Fitzgerald, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of different options at Earth to provide Deep Space optical communication services. It is based mainly on work done for the Mars Laser Communications Demonstration (MLCD) Project, a joint project between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology (JPL), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL). It also reports preliminary conclusions from the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System Continuation Study at GSFC. A lasercom flight terminal will be flown on the Mars Telecommunications Orbiter (MTO) to be launched by NASA in 2009, and will be the first high rate deep space demonstration of this revolutionary technology.

  11. High resolution observations using adaptive optics: Achievements and future needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankarasubramanian, K.; Rimmele, T.

    2008-06-01

    Over the last few years, several interesting observations were obtained with the help of solar Adaptive Optics (AO). In this paper, few observations made using the solar AO are enlightened and briefly discussed. A list of disadvantages with the current AO system are presented. With telescopes larger than 1.5 m expected during the next decade, there is a need to develop the existing AO technologies for large aperture telescopes. Some aspects of this development are highlighted. Finally, the recent AO developments in India are also presented.

  12. The wide-field Fourier spectroscopic-imaging of the radiation heat from the object itself in the middle infrared region for the health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wei; Takuma, Takashi; Inui, Asuka; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Yuzuriha, Takehiko; Kagiyama, Hiroyasu; Kojima, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ishimaru, Ichirou

    2012-03-01

    We are aiming at the realization of the wide-field spectroscopic-imaging-sensor that is available for the health monitoring or the plant factory. Conventionally, the body temperature is measured by the thermography as a total intensity of the middle infrared radiation. We are trying to analyze the spectroscopic characteristics of the radiation heat from the human body in detail to measure the blood glucose or the moisture-retaining properties of the human skin. The proposed imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy can measure the radiation heat from the object itself with the wide field of view and the wide wavelength-band. In this proposed method, we install the phase-shifter on the optical Fourier-transform-plane of the imaging optics to give the arbitrary phase-shift to the half flux of the object beams. Thus, the interferogram can be formed on the imaging plane in each bright point by the phase-shift interference-phenomena between the object beams that are emitted from the each corresponding bright point on the objective surface. In this report, we mention the feasibility results of the wide-field spectroscopic-imaging using the black body for the basic optical evaluation and the house plants for measuring the glucose distribution with the infrared camera(wavelength: 8?m-14?m).

  13. Effects of spatial and spectral frequencies on wide-field functional imaging (wifi) characterization of preclinical breast cancer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Choi, Bernard

    2010-02-01

    A common strategy to study breast cancer is the use of the preclinical model. These models provide a physiologically relevant and controlled environment in which to study both response to novel treatments and the biology of the cancer. Preclinical models, including the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model, are very amenable to optical imaging and to this end, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument that is perfectly suited to studying tumor metabolism in preclinical models. WiFI combines two optical imaging modalities, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm x 5 cm) field of view. Using SFDI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are determined, which are then used to extract tissue chromophore concentrations in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. In the current study, we employ Monte Carlo simulations of SFDI light propagation in order to characterize the penetration depth of light in both the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model. Preliminary results suggest that different spatial frequency and wavelength combinations have different penetration depths, suggesting the potential depth sectioning capability of the SFDI component of WiFI.

  14. Wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic microscopy based on a water-immersible MEMS scanning mirror

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Gao, Liang; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. By offering images with high spatial resolution and unique optical absorption contrast, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has gained increasing attention in biomedical research. Recent developments in OR-PAM have improved its imaging speed, but have to sacrifice either the detection sensitivity or field of view or both. We have developed a wide-field fast-scanning OR-PAM by using a water-immersible microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror (MEMS-OR-PAM). In MEMS-OR-PAM, the optical and acoustic beams are confocally configured and simultaneously steered, which ensures the uniform detection sensitivity. A B-scan imaging speed as high as 400 Hz can be achieved over a 3 mm scanning range. Using the system, we imaged the flow dynamics of both red blood cells and carbon particles in a mouse ear in vivo. Presented results show that MEMS-OR-PAM could be a powerful tool for studying highly dynamic and time-sensitive biological phenomena. PMID:23224156

  15. Wide field-of-view soft X-ray imaging for solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Snowden, S. L.; Carter, J. A.; Collado-Vega, Y.; Connor, H. K.; Cravens, T. E.; Read, A. M.; Sembay, S.; Thomas, N. E.

    2016-04-01

    Soft X-ray imagers can be used to study the mesoscale and macroscale density structures that occur whenever and wherever the solar wind encounters neutral atoms at comets, the Moon, and both magnetized and unmagnetized planets. Charge exchange between high charge state solar wind ions and exospheric neutrals results in the isotropic emission of soft X-ray photons with energies from 0.1 to 2.0 keV. At Earth, this process occurs primarily within the magnetosheath and cusps. Through providing a global view, wide field-of-view imaging can determine the significance of the various proposed solar wind-magnetosphere interaction mechanisms by evaluating their global extent and occurrence patterns. A summary of wide field-of-view (several to tens of degrees) soft X-ray imaging is provided including slumped micropore microchannel reflectors, simulated images, and recent flight results.

  16. Improved sensitivity to fluorescence for cancer detection in wide-field image-guided neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jermyn, Michael; Gosselin, Yoann; Valdes, Pablo A.; Sibai, Mira; Kolste, Kolbein; Mercier, Jeanne; Angulo, Leticia; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Petrecca, Kevin; Daigle, Olivier; Wilson, Brian C.; Leblond, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    In glioma surgery, Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may identify residual tumor that could be resected while minimizing damage to normal brain. We demonstrate that improved sensitivity for wide-field spectroscopic fluorescence imaging is achieved with minimal disruption to the neurosurgical workflow using an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) relative to a state-of-the-art CMOS system. In phantom experiments the EMCCD system can detect at least two orders-of-magnitude lower PpIX. Ex vivo tissue imaging on a rat glioma model demonstrates improved fluorescence contrast compared with neurosurgical fluorescence microscope technology, and the fluorescence detection is confirmed with measurements from a clinically-validated spectroscopic probe. Greater PpIX sensitivity in wide-field fluorescence imaging may improve the residual tumor detection during surgery with consequent impact on survival. PMID:26713218

  17. Wide Field Infra-Red Survey Telescope (WFIRST) 2.4-Meter Mission Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, D.; Aaron, K.; Alplanalp, L.; Anderson, K.; Capps, R.; Chang, Z.; Dooley, J.; Egerman, R.; Goullioud, R.; Klein, D.; Kruk, J.; Kuan, G.; Melton, M.; Ruffa, J.; Underhill, M.; Buren, D. Van

    2013-01-01

    The most recent study of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission is based on reuse of an existing 2.4m telescope. This study was commissioned by NASA to examine the potential science return and cost effectiveness of WFIRST by using this significantly larger aperture telescope. We review the science program envisioned by the WFIRST 2012-2013 Science Definition Team (SDT), an overview of the mission concept, and the telescope design and status. Comparisons against the previous 1.3m and reduced cost 1.1m WFIRST design concepts are discussed. A significant departure from past point designs is the option for serviceability and the geostationary orbit location which enables servicing and replacement instrument insertion later during mission life. Other papers at this conference provide more in depth discussion of the wide field instrument and the optional exoplanet imaging coronagraph instrument.

  18. Nonlinear compensation technologies for future optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Tomofumi; Hoshida, Takeshi; Nakashima, Hisao; Oda, Shoichiro; Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Tanimura, Takahito; Dou, Liang; Zhao, Ying; Tao, Zhenning; Rasmussen, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    Digital nonlinear compensation techniques have been thought to be keys to realize further spectrally efficient optical fiber communication systems. The most critical issue of the digital nonlinear compensation algorithms has been their computational complexity, or gate count of digital signal processing circuit. Among several approaches, digital nonlinear compensation algorithms based on perturbation analysis are attractive in terms of the hardware efficiency because the algorithms can compensate the accumulated nonlinear noise over all transmission spans with only one stage. In this paper, we discuss three approaches to sophisticate the perturbation nonlinear compensation. First, we illustrate a perturbation-based post-equalization method to improve the robustness to transceiver device imperfections. We next propose and numerically evaluate a symbol degeneration method to extend the perturbation nonlinear compensation methods to higher-order QAM without increasing the computational complexity. Finally, we discuss a sub-band processing of perturbation nonlinear compensation for further computational complexity reduction. By combining the perturbation method with Nyquist frequency division multiplexing, the computational complexity of perturbation calculation is reduced by a factor of more than 10 for 3000-km single-channel transmission of 128 Gbit/s dualpolarization QPSK with only 0.1 dB performance degradation.

  19. Wide field-of-view digital night vision head-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Michael P.; Foote, Bobby D.

    2010-04-01

    SA Photonics and Vision Systems International (VSI) are developing an innovative wide field of view digital night vision head mounted display (HMD). This HMD has an 80 degree field of view and has been designed to minimize weight, peripheral obscuration and forward projection. Digital night vision sensors enable electronic image enhancement and VSI's Zero A/C Integration enables the HMD to be integrated with legacy aircraft and provide symbology overlay and recording without the need for an expensive drive electronics box.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope: Wide field and planetary camera instrument handbook. Version 2.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, Richard (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented of the development and construction of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WF/PC). The WF/PC is a duel two dimensional spectrophotometer with rudimentary polarimetric and transmission grating capabilities. The instrument operates from 1150 to 11000 A with a resolution of 0.1 arcsec per pixel or 0.043 arcsec per pixel. Data products and standard calibration methods are briefly summarized.

  1. Using APART for wall visibility calculations in the calibration channel of wide field planetary camera II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, James W.; Scholl, Marija S.

    1993-01-01

    The cone visibility from the CCD detector array plane in the calibration channel of wide field planetary camera II (WFPC II) is analyzed, using APART, for three representative wavelengths as characterized by indices of refraction. The light pipe walls are visible from the corners of the equivalent CCD detector array when imaging with the smallest index of refraction, n = 1.375. Painting the inside of the light pipe walls will result in a decrease in their visibility.

  2. Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST]: Telescope Design and Simulated Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goullioud, R.; Content, D. A.; Kuan, G. M.; Moore, J. D.; Chang, Z.; Sunada, E. T.; Villalvazo, J.; Hawk, J. P.; Armani, N. V.; Johnson, E. L.; Powell, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    The ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey proposed multiple missions with NIR focal planes and 3 mirror wide field telescopes in the 1.5m aperture range. None of them would have won as standalone missions WFIRST is a combination of these missions, created by Astro 2010 committee. WFIRST Science Definition Team (SDT) tasked to examine the design. Project team is a GSFC-JPL-Caltech collaboration. This interim mission design is a result of combined work by the project team with the SDT.

  3. Properties and performance of two wide field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence telescope array prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. S.; Bai, Y. X.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, M. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, L. H.; Ding, K. Q.; He, H. H.; Liu, J. L.; Li, X. X.; Liu, J.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, X. H.; Sheng, X. D.; Zhou, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zha, M.; Xiao, G.

    2011-02-01

    A wide field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence telescope array is one of the main components of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory project. To serve as Cherenkov and fluorescence detectors, a flexible and mobile design is adopted for easy reconfiguring of the telescope array. Two prototype telescopes have been constructed and successfully run at the site of the ARGO-YBJ experiment in Tibet. The features and performance of the telescopes are presented.

  4. Intra-familial Similarity of Wide-Field Fundus Autofluorescence in Inherited Retinal Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Yuka; Ogino, Ken; Oishi, Akio; Gotoh, Norimoto; Makiyama, Yukiko; Oishi, Maho; Kurimoto, Masafumi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    To examine the similarity of wide-field fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging in inherited retinal dystrophy between siblings and between parents and their children. The subjects included 17 siblings (12 with retinitis pigmentosa and 5 with cone rod dystrophy) and 10 parent-child pairs (8 with retinitis pigmentosa and 2 with cone rod dystrophy). We quantified the similarity of wide-field FAF using image processing techniques of cropping, binarization, superimposition, and subtraction. The estimated similarity of the siblings was compared with that of the parent-child pairs and that of the age-matched unrelated patients. The similarity between siblings was significantly higher that of parent-child pairs or that of age-matched unrelated patients (P = 0.004 and P = 0.049, respectively). Wide-field FAF images were similar between siblings with inherited retinal dystrophy but different between parent-child pairs. This suggests that aging is a confounding factor in genotype-phenotype correlation studies. PMID:26427425

  5. Star formation with large optical/infrared telescopes: recent results and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughrean, Mark J.

    2000-06-01

    The current generation of large optical/IR telescopes will make a great impact on the study of the origin an devolution of stellar and planetary systems. The considerable collecting area, excellent spatial resolution, and reduced thermal background of the new 8-10 meter class telescopes all combine to yield sensitivities which will enable us to detect and characterize young low-mass stars, brown dwarfs, and giant planets at kiloparsec distances, thus including many dense clusters embedded in giant molecular clouds, where most stars in the galaxy are born. In the nearby star- forming regions, the faint surface brightness sensitivity and high spatial resolution will allow us to probe the environment of young stars in scattered and intrinsic emission on scales from 0.1 parsec, the original size of the protostellar core, to 10AU, where young giant planets may be forming in a circumstellar disk. We review recent star formation results from large ground-based optical/IR telescopes, predominantly the VLT and Keck, which serve to illustrate outstanding questions and to preview important insights that should be yielded by the armada of 8-10 meter ground-based telescopes over the coming decade. We also look forward to the further leap in capability that will be delivered at the end of the decade by the NGST, a cryogenic space-based 8 meter telescope which will have extremely low backgrounds at optical to mid-IR wavelengths and be diffraction-limited over a wide field in the near-IR and longwards.

  6. Negative optical inertia for enhancing the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Khalili, Farid; Danilishin, Stefan; Mueller-Ebhardt, Helge; Miao Haixing; Zhao Chunnong; Chen Yanbei

    2011-03-15

    We consider enhancing the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors by using double optical spring. When the power, detuning and bandwidth of the two carriers are chosen appropriately, the effect of the double optical spring can be described as a 'negative inertia', which cancels the positive inertia of the test masses and thus increases their response to gravitational waves. This allows us to surpass the free-mass standard quantum limit (SQL) over a broad frequency band, through signal amplification, rather than noise cancellation, which has been the case for all broadband SQL-beating schemes so far considered for gravitational-wave detectors. The merit of such signal amplification schemes lies in the fact that they are less susceptible to optical losses than noise-cancellation schemes. We show that it is feasible to demonstrate such an effect with the Gingin High Optical Power Test Facility, and it can eventually be implemented in future advanced GW detectors.

  7. Probing other solar systems with current and future adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B; Marois, C; Phillion, D; Poyneer, L; Graham, J; Zuckerman, B; Gavel, D; Veran, J; Wilhelmsen-Evans, J; Mellis, C

    2008-09-08

    Over the past decade, the study of extrasolar planets through indirect techniques--primarily Doppler measurements--has revolutionized our understanding of other solar systems. The next major step in this field will be the direct detection and characterization, via imaging and spectroscopy, of the planets themselves. To achieve this, we must separate the light from the faint planet from the extensive glare of its parent star. We pursued this goal using the current generation of adaptive optics (AO) systems on large ground-based telescopes, using infrared imaging to search for the thermal emission from young planets and developing image processing techniques to distinguish planets from telescope-induced artifacts. Our new Angular Differential Imaging (ADI) technique, which uses the sidereal rotation of the Earth and telescope, is now standard for ground-based high-contrast imaging. Although no young planets were found in our surveys, we placed the strongest limits yet on giant planets in wide orbits (>30 AU) around young stars and characterized planetary companion candidates. The imaging of planetary companions on solar-system-like scales (5-30 AU) will require a new generation of advanced AO systems that are an order of magnitude more powerful than the LLNL-built Keck AO system. We worked to develop and test the key technologies needed for these systems, including a spatially-filtered wavefront sensor, efficient and accurate wavefront reconstruction algorithms, and precision AO wavefront control at the sub-nm level. LLNL has now been selected by the Gemini Observatory to lead the construction of the Gemini Planet Imager, a $24M instrument that will be the most advanced AO system in the world.

  8. Applications of lobster eye optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Pina, L.; Inneman, A.; Tichy, V.

    2015-05-01

    Applications of wide field Lobster Eye X ray telescopes are presented and discussed. The wide field X ray optics was originally proposed for use in X-ray astronomy, but there are numerous other application areas as well.

  9. Segmented X-Ray Optics for Future Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClelland, Ryan S.

    2013-01-01

    Lightweight and high resolution mirrors are needed for future space-based X-ray telescopes to achieve advances in high-energy astrophysics. The slumped glass mirror technology in development at NASA GSFC aims to build X-ray mirror modules with an area to mass ratio of approx.17 sq cm/kg at 1 keV and a resolution of 10 arc-sec Half Power Diameter (HPD) or better at an affordable cost. As the technology nears the performance requirements, additional engineering effort is needed to ensure the modules are compatible with space-flight. This paper describes Flight Mirror Assembly (FMA) designs for several X-ray astrophysics missions studied by NASA and defines generic driving requirements and subsequent verification tests necessary to advance technology readiness for mission implementation. The requirement to perform X-ray testing in a horizontal beam, based on the orientation of existing facilities, is particularly burdensome on the mirror technology, necessitating mechanical over-constraint of the mirror segments and stiffening of the modules in order to prevent self-weight deformation errors from dominating the measured performance. This requirement, in turn, drives the mass and complexity of the system while limiting the testable angular resolution. Design options for a vertical X-ray test facility alleviating these issues are explored. An alternate mirror and module design using kinematic constraint of the mirror segments, enabled by a vertical test facility, is proposed. The kinematic mounting concept has significant advantages including potential for higher angular resolution, simplified mirror integration, and relaxed thermal requirements. However, it presents new challenges including low vibration modes and imperfections in kinematic constraint. Implementation concepts overcoming these challenges are described along with preliminary test and analysis results demonstrating the feasibility of kinematically mounting slumped glass mirror segments.

  10. Galaxy cluster searches based on photometric redshifts in the four CFHTLS Wide fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Adami, C.; Cappi, A.; Maurogordato, S.; Márquez, I.; Ilbert, O.; Coupon, J.; Arnouts, S.; Benoist, C.; Blaizot, J.; Edorh, T. M.; Garilli, B.; Guennou, L.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mazure, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Mezrag, C.; Slezak, E.; Tresse, L.; Ulmer, M. P.

    2011-11-01

    Context. Cosmological parameters can be constrained by counting clusters of galaxies as a function of mass and redshift and by considering regions of the sky sampled as deeply and as homogeneously as possible. Aims: Several methods for detecting clusters in large imaging surveys have been developed, among which the one used here, which is based on detecting structures. This method was first applied to the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) Deep 1 field by Mazure et al. (2007, A&A, 467, 49), then to all the Deep and Wide CFHTLS fields available in the T0004 data release by Adami et al. (2010, A&A, 509, A81). The validity of the cluster detection rate was estimated by applying the same procedure to galaxies from the Millennium simulation. Here we use the same method to analyse the full CFHTLS Wide survey, based on the T0006 data release. Methods: Our method is based on the photometric redshifts computed with Le Phare for all the galaxies detected in the Wide fields, limited to magnitudes z' ≤ 22.5. We constructed galaxy density maps in photometric redshift bins of 0.1 based on an adaptive kernel technique, detected structures with SExtractor at various detection levels, and built cluster catalogues by applying a minimal spanning tree algorithm. Results: In a total area of 154 deg2, we have detected 4061 candidate clusters at 3σ or above (6802 at 2σ and above), in the redshift range 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 1.15, with estimated mean masses between 1.3 × 1014 and 12.6 × 1014 M⊙. This catalogue of candidate clusters will be available at the CDS. We compare our detections with those made in various CFHTLS analyses with other methods. By stacking a subsample of clusters, we show that this subsample has typical cluster characteristics (colour - magnitude relation, galaxy luminosity function). We also confirm that the cluster-cluster correlation function is comparable to the one obtained for other cluster surveys and analyse large-scale filamentary galaxy distributions. Conclusions: We have increased the number of known optical high-redshift cluster candidates by a large factor, an important step towards obtaining reliable cluster counts to measure cosmological parameters. The clusters that we detect behave as expected if they are located at the intersection of filaments by which they are fed. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the CFHT Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of the NRC and CNRS.The catalog of candidate clusters is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/535/A65

  11. Optical Tweezers and Optical Trapping Improved for Future Automated Micromanipulation and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Decker, Arthur J.

    2005-01-01

    Optical trap arrays are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for holding, manipulating, and optically interrogating arrays of nanotube sensors. The trap arrays, for example, might be used to arrange arrays of chemical sensors for insertion onto a chip in liquid, air, and vacuum environments. Neural-network-controlled spatial light modulators (SLMs) are to generate and control the trap positions and trap profiles in three dimensions.

  12. Current concepts and future perspectives on surgical optical imaging in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Yoo, Jung Sun; van Dam, Gooitzen M.

    2010-11-01

    There are vibrant developments of optical imaging systems and contrast-enhancing methods that are geared to enhancing surgical vision and the outcome of surgical procedures. Such optical technologies designed for intraoperative use can offer high integration in the operating room compared to conventional radiological modalities adapted to intraoperative applications. Simple fluorescence epi-illumination imaging, in particular, appears attractive but may lead to inaccurate observations due to the complex nature of photon-tissue interaction. Of importance therefore are emerging methods that account for the background optical property variation in tissues and can offer accurate, quantitative imaging that eliminates the appearance of false negatives or positives. In parallel, other nonfluorescent optical imaging methods are summarized and overall progress in surgical optical imaging applications is outlined. Key future directions that have the potential to shift the paradigm of surgical health care are also discussed.

  13. An integrative approach for analyzing hundreds of neurons in task performing mice using wide-field calcium imaging.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ali I; Gritton, Howard J; Tseng, Hua-An; Bucklin, Mark E; Yao, Zhaojie; Han, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neurotechnology have been integral to the investigation of neural circuit function in systems neuroscience. Recent improvements in high performance fluorescent sensors and scientific CMOS cameras enables optical imaging of neural networks at a much larger scale. While exciting technical advances demonstrate the potential of this technique, further improvement in data acquisition and analysis, especially those that allow effective processing of increasingly larger datasets, would greatly promote the application of optical imaging in systems neuroscience. Here we demonstrate the ability of wide-field imaging to capture the concurrent dynamic activity from hundreds to thousands of neurons over millimeters of brain tissue in behaving mice. This system allows the visualization of morphological details at a higher spatial resolution than has been previously achieved using similar functional imaging modalities. To analyze the expansive data sets, we developed software to facilitate rapid downstream data processing. Using this system, we show that a large fraction of anatomically distinct hippocampal neurons respond to discrete environmental stimuli associated with classical conditioning, and that the observed temporal dynamics of transient calcium signals are sufficient for exploring certain spatiotemporal features of large neural networks. PMID:26854041

  14. An integrative approach for analyzing hundreds of neurons in task performing mice using wide-field calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ali I.; Gritton, Howard J.; Tseng, Hua-an; Bucklin, Mark E.; Yao, Zhaojie; Han, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neurotechnology have been integral to the investigation of neural circuit function in systems neuroscience. Recent improvements in high performance fluorescent sensors and scientific CMOS cameras enables optical imaging of neural networks at a much larger scale. While exciting technical advances demonstrate the potential of this technique, further improvement in data acquisition and analysis, especially those that allow effective processing of increasingly larger datasets, would greatly promote the application of optical imaging in systems neuroscience. Here we demonstrate the ability of wide-field imaging to capture the concurrent dynamic activity from hundreds to thousands of neurons over millimeters of brain tissue in behaving mice. This system allows the visualization of morphological details at a higher spatial resolution than has been previously achieved using similar functional imaging modalities. To analyze the expansive data sets, we developed software to facilitate rapid downstream data processing. Using this system, we show that a large fraction of anatomically distinct hippocampal neurons respond to discrete environmental stimuli associated with classical conditioning, and that the observed temporal dynamics of transient calcium signals are sufficient for exploring certain spatiotemporal features of large neural networks. PMID:26854041

  15. CHIMERA: a wide-field, multi-colour, high-speed photometer at the prime focus of the Hale telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, L. K.; Hallinan, G.; Milburn, J.; Gardner, P.; Konidaris, N.; Singh, N.; Shao, M.; Sandhu, J.; Kyne, G.; Schlichting, H. E.

    2016-04-01

    The Caltech HIgh-speed Multi-colour camERA (CHIMERA) is a new instrument that has been developed for use at the prime focus of the Hale 200-inch telescope. Simultaneous optical imaging in two bands is enabled by a dichroic beam splitter centred at 567 nm, with Sloan u' and g' bands available on the blue arm and Sloan r', i' and z_s bands available on the red arm. Additional narrow-band filters will also become available as required. An electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) detector is employed for both optical channels, each capable of simultaneously delivering sub-electron effective read noise under multiplication gain and frame rates of up to 26 fps full frame (several 1000 fps windowed), over a fully corrected 5 × 5 arcmin field of view. CHIMERA was primarily developed to enable the characterization of the size distribution of sub-km Kuiper Belt Objects via stellar occultation, a science case that motivates the frame-rate, the simultaneous multi-colour imaging and the wide field of view of the instrument. In addition, it also has unique capability in the detection of faint near-Earth asteroids and will be used for the monitoring of short-duration transient and periodic sources, particularly those discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), and the upcoming Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF).

  16. History of optical theory of reflecting telescopes and implications for future projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Raymond N.

    1997-03-01

    This contribution, The History of Optical Theory of Reflecting Telescopes and Implications for Future Projects, is a shortened form of the Karl Schwarzschild lecture given in Bochum in September 1993. Some material has been added from an invited paper given in Padua in December 1992. For a full account, with figures and tables, the reader is referred to these two papers.

  17. A PANCHROMATIC CATALOG OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT IN THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, M. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Kaviraj, S.; Crockett, R. M.; Silk, J.; O'Connell, R. W.; Hathi, N. P.; McCarthy, P. J.; Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Koekemoer, A.; Bond, H. E.; Yan, H.; Kimble, R. A.; Balick, B.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D. N. B.; and others

    2012-03-01

    In the first of a series of forthcoming publications, we present a panchromatic catalog of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) from observations in the Early Release Science (ERS) program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) field. Our ETGs span a large redshift range, 0.35 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.5, with each redshift spectroscopically confirmed by previous published surveys of the ERS field. We combine our measured WFC3 ERS and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) GOODS-S photometry to gain continuous sensitivity from the rest-frame far-UV to near-IR emission for each ETG. The superior spatial resolution of the HST over this panchromatic baseline allows us to classify the ETGs by their small-scale internal structures, as well as their local environment. By fitting stellar population spectral templates to the broadband photometry of the ETGs, we determine that the average masses of the ETGs are comparable to the characteristic stellar mass of massive galaxies, 10{sup 11} < M{sub *}[M{sub Sun }]<10{sup 12}. By transforming the observed photometry into the Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV and NUV, Johnson V, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey g' and r' bandpasses we identify a noteworthy diversity in the rest-frame UV-optical colors and find the mean rest-frame (FUV-V) = 3.5 and (NUV-V) = 3.3, with 1{sigma} standard deviations {approx_equal}1.0. The blue rest-frame UV-optical colors observed for most of the ETGs are evidence for star formation during the preceding gigayear, but no systems exhibit UV-optical photometry consistent with major recent ({approx}<50 Myr) starbursts. Future publications which address the diversity of stellar populations likely to be present in these ETGs, and the potential mechanisms by which recent star formation episodes are activated, are discussed.

  18. SIMULTANEOUS EXOPLANET CHARACTERIZATION AND DEEP WIDE-FIELD IMAGING WITH A DIFFRACTIVE PUPIL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Guyon, Olivier; Eisner, Josh A.; Angel, Roger; Woolf, Neville J.; Bendek, Eduardo A.; Milster, Thomas D.; Ammons, S. Mark; Shao, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie; Nemati, Bijan; Martinache, Frantz; Pitman, Joe; Woodruff, Robert A.; Belikov, Ruslan

    2013-04-10

    High-precision astrometry can identify exoplanets and measure their orbits and masses while coronagraphic imaging enables detailed characterization of their physical properties and atmospheric compositions through spectroscopy. In a previous paper, we showed that a diffractive pupil telescope (DPT) in space can enable sub-{mu}as accuracy astrometric measurements from wide-field images by creating faint but sharp diffraction spikes around the bright target star. The DPT allows simultaneous astrometric measurement and coronagraphic imaging, and we discuss and quantify in this paper the scientific benefits of this combination for exoplanet science investigations: identification of exoplanets with increased sensitivity and robustness, and ability to measure planetary masses to high accuracy. We show how using both measurements to identify planets and measure their masses offers greater sensitivity and provides more reliable measurements than possible with separate missions, and therefore results in a large gain in mission efficiency. The combined measurements reliably identify potentially habitable planets in multiple systems with a few observations, while astrometry or imaging alone would require many measurements over a long time baseline. In addition, the combined measurement allows direct determination of stellar masses to percent-level accuracy, using planets as test particles. We also show that the DPT maintains the full sensitivity of the telescope for deep wide-field imaging, and is therefore compatible with simultaneous scientific observations unrelated to exoplanets. We conclude that astrometry, coronagraphy, and deep wide-field imaging can be performed simultaneously on a single telescope without significant negative impact on the performance of any of the three techniques.

  19. Calibration of Wide-Field Deconvolution Microscopy for Quantitative Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Sook; Wee, Tse-Luen (Erika); Brown, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Deconvolution enhances contrast in fluorescence microscopy images, especially in low-contrast, high-background wide-field microscope images, improving characterization of features within the sample. Deconvolution can also be combined with other imaging modalities, such as confocal microscopy, and most software programs seek to improve resolution as well as contrast. Quantitative image analyses require instrument calibration and with deconvolution, necessitate that this process itself preserves the relative quantitative relationships between fluorescence intensities. To ensure that the quantitative nature of the data remains unaltered, deconvolution algorithms need to be tested thoroughly. This study investigated whether the deconvolution algorithms in AutoQuant X3 preserve relative quantitative intensity data. InSpeck Green calibration microspheres were prepared for imaging, z-stacks were collected using a wide-field microscope, and the images were deconvolved using the iterative deconvolution algorithms with default settings. Afterwards, the mean intensities and volumes of microspheres in the original and the deconvolved images were measured. Deconvolved data sets showed higher average microsphere intensities and smaller volumes than the original wide-field data sets. In original and deconvolved data sets, intensity means showed linear relationships with the relative microsphere intensities given by the manufacturer. Importantly, upon normalization, the trend lines were found to have similar slopes. In original and deconvolved images, the volumes of the microspheres were quite uniform for all relative microsphere intensities. We were able to show that AutoQuant X3 deconvolution software data are quantitative. In general, the protocol presented can be used to calibrate any fluorescence microscope or image processing and analysis procedure. PMID:24688321

  20. The NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Image Cutout Web Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Lindsey E.; Fitzpatrick, Mike; Tody, Doug

    A Web service for extracting multi-band science grade image cutouts from the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS) is described. The NDWFS data is stored as a multi-band database of large images on the NDWFS archive server. Given a cutout center and size the NDWFS image cutout service creates cutout images on-the-fly. The service provides high performance access to the survey data and isolates the client from the details of how the survey data is stored in the archive.

  1. Deconvolution of wide-field-of-view satellite radiometer measurements of reflected solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. L.

    1981-06-01

    An approach is presented by which the deconvolution of wide-field-of-view (WFOV) measurements of solar radiation reflected from earth is reduced from the solution of a two-dimensional integral equation to the solution of a set of one-dimensional integral equations. This reduces the storage needed for the required matrices by an order of magnitude and the computations by two orders of magnitude. Also, the theoretical and operational difficulties associated with the solution of ill-posed problems are greatly simplified by working with one-dimensional integral equations rather than with a two-dimensional integral equation.

  2. The Wide-Field Camera 3 For The Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, E. S.; WFC3 Team

    1999-12-01

    Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is an instrument currently being developed for installation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during its fourth Servicing Mission (currently scheduled for late 2003). The instrument will contain two imaging channels. The UVIS channel covers from 200 nm to 1000 nm using a UV-sensitized CCD detector. The IR channel covers from 850 nm to 1700 nm using a Rockwell Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) focal plane array. After deployment, this instrument will provide HST with a significant improvement in sensitivity in both the near-UV and near-IR spectral regions.

  3. Deconvolution of wide-field-of-view satellite radiometer measurements of reflected solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    An approach is presented by which the deconvolution of wide-field-of-view (WFOV) measurements of solar radiation reflected from earth is reduced from the solution of a two-dimensional integral equation to the solution of a set of one-dimensional integral equations. This reduces the storage needed for the required matrices by an order of magnitude and the computations by two orders of magnitude. Also, the theoretical and operational difficulties associated with the solution of ill-posed problems are greatly simplified by working with one-dimensional integral equations rather than with a two-dimensional integral equation.

  4. The First Hundred Brown Dwarfs Discovered by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Michael C.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Wright, Edward L.; Mainzer, Amanda K.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; McLean, Ian S.; Bauer, James M.; Benford, Dominic J.; Lake, Sean E.; Petty, Sara M.; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Beichman, Charles; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Stern, Daniel; Vacca, William D.

    2011-01-01

    We present ground-based spectroscopic verification of six Y dwarfs also Cushing et al.), eighty-nine T dwarfs, eight L dwarfs, and one M dwarf identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Eighty of these are cold brown dwarfs with spectral types > or =T6, six of which have been announced earlier in Mainzer et al. and I3urgasser et al. We present color-color and colortype diagrams showing the locus of M, L, T, and Y dwarfs in WISE color space. "

  5. Wide-field in vivo background free imaging by selective magnetic modulation of nanodiamond fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Susanta K.; Bumb, Ambika; Wu, Xufeng; Sochacki, Kem A.; Kellman, Peter; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Neuman, Keir C.

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity and resolution of fluorescence-based imaging in vivo is often limited by autofluorescence and other background noise. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a wide-field background-free imaging technique based on magnetic modulation of fluorescent nanodiamond emission. Fluorescent nanodiamonds are bright, photo-stable, biocompatible nanoparticles that are promising probes for a wide range of in vitro and in vivo imaging applications. Our readily applied background-free imaging technique improves the signal-to-background ratio for in vivo imaging up to 100-fold. This technique has the potential to significantly improve and extend fluorescent nanodiamond imaging capabilities on diverse fluorescence imaging platforms. PMID:24761300

  6. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Larger Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G. W.; Webb, R. P.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J. L.; Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Opiela, J.; Griffin, G. T.; Gerlach, L.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was returned from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by shuttle mission STS-125 in 2009. In space for 16 years, the surface accumulated hundreds of impact features on the zinc orthotitanate paint, some penetrating through into underlying metal. Larger impacts were seen in photographs taken from within the shuttle orbiter during service missions, with spallation of paint in areas reaching 1.6 cm across, exposing alloy beneath. Here we describe larger impact shapes, the analysis of impactor composition, and the micrometeoroid (MM) types responsible.

  7. Wide Field Camera 3: A Powerful New Imager for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy

    2008-01-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a powerful UV/visible/near-infrared camera in development for installation into the Hubble Space Telescope during upcoming Servicing Mission 4. WFC3 provides two imaging channels. The UVIS channel incorporates a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD focal plane with sensitivity from 200 to 1000 nm. The IR channel features a 1024 x 1024 pixel HgCdTe focal plane covering 850 to 1700 nm. We report here on the design of the instrument, the performance of its flight detectors, results of the ground test and calibration program, and the plans for the Servicing Mission installation and checkout.

  8. CPAPIR: a wide-field infrared camera for the Observatoire du Mont Megantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artigau, Etienne; Doyon, Rene; Vallee, Philippe; Riopel, Martin; Nadeau, Daniel

    2004-09-01

    CPAPIR is a wide-field infrared camera for use at the Observatoire du mont Megantic and CTIO 1.5 m telescopes. The camera will be primarily a survey instrument with a half-degree field of view, making it one of the most efficient of its kind. CPAPIR will provide broad and narrow band filters within its 0.8 to 2.5 ?m bandpass. The camera is based on a Hawaii-2 2048x2048 HgCdTe detector.

  9. The TERAPIX Tool for the Reduction of Wide-Field Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovich, M.; Mellier, Y.; Bertin, E.; Missonnier, G.; Didelon, P.; Morin, B.; Dantel-Fort, M.; McCracken, H.

    TERAPIX (Traitement Élémentaire Réduction et Analyse des PIXels) is an astronomical data processing center located at IAP (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris). TERAPIX is aimed to the processing of mosaics of wide-field images from CFH12K and MEGACAM at CFHT, WFI at ESO and OMEGACAM at VST: at present more than 2 Terabytes of disk space are available, as well as three COMPAQ workstations with EV5, EV6 and EV67 processors see http://www.terapix.iap.fr for more details

  10. Quantitative phase microscopy of articular chondrocyte dynamics by wide-field digital interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Natan T.; Finan, John D.; Guilak, Farshid; Wax, Adam

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally implement label-free phase microscopy using wide-field digital interferometry (WFDI) techniques to retrieve quantitative volumetric data of articular chondrocyte dynamics. Using the scanless interferometric system, we visualize chondrocyte swelling and bursting induced by hypo-osmotic pressure. Reconstructed images are obtained by an efficient digital process. We use the resulting images to calculate quantitative temporal-spatial morphological parameters of the cell, with the observed dynamics limited only by the true frame rate of the camera. To show the utility of WFDI in recording articular chondrocyte dynamics, we also provide an experimental comparison of WFDI and differential interference contrast microscopy. PMID:20210420

  11. Estimating the Supernova Cosmological Constraints Possible With the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Miles; Rubin, David; Aldering, Greg Scott; Baltay, Charles; Fagrelius, Parker; Law, David R.; Perlmutter, Saul; Pontoppidan, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The proposed Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) supernova survey will measure precision distances continuously in redshift to 1.7 with excellent systematics control. However, the Science Definition Team report presented a idealized version of the survey, and we now work to add realism. Using SNe from HST programs, we investigate the expected contamination from the host-galaxy light to estimate required exposure times. We also present estimates of purity and completeness, generated by degrading well-measured nearby SN spectra to WFIRST resolution and signal-to-noise. We conclude with a more accurate prediction of the cosmological constraints possible with WFIRST SNe.

  12. On the Design of Wide-Field X-ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, Ronald F.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Weiskopf, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray telescopes having a relatively wide field-of-view and spatial resolution vs. polar off-axis angle curves much flatter than the parabolic dependence characteristic of Wolter I designs are of great interest for surveys of the X-ray sky and potentially for study of the Sun s X-ray emission. We discuss the various considerations affecting the design of such telescopes, including the possible use of polynomial mirror surface prescriptions, a method of optimizing the polynomial coefficients, scaling laws for mirror segment length vs. intersection radius, the loss of on-axis spatial resolution, and the positioning of focal plane detectors.

  13. Sherlock: An Automated Follow-Up Telescope for Wide-Field Transit Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotredes, Lewis; Charbonneau, David; Looper, Dagny L.; O'Donovan, Francis T.

    2004-06-01

    The most significant challenge currently facing photometric surveys for transiting gas-giant planets is that of confusion with eclipsing binary systems that mimic the photometric signature. A simple way to reject most forms of these false positives is high-precision, rapid-cadence monitoring of the suspected transit at higher angular resolution and in several filters. We are currently building a system that will perform higher-angular-resolution, multi-color follow-up observations of candidate systems identified by Sleuth (our wide-field transit survey instrument at Palomar), and its two twin system instruments in Tenerife and northern Arizona.

  14. Sherlock: An Automated Follow-Up Telescope for Wide-Field Transit Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotredes, L.; Charbonneau, D.; O'Donovan, F. T.; Looper, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    The current challenge facing photometric surveys for transiting gas-giant planets is that of confusion with eclipsing binary systems that mimic the photometric signature. A simple way to reject most forms of these false positives is high-precision, rapid-cadence monitoring of the suspected transit at higher angular resolution and in several filters. We are currently building a telescope that will perform higher-angular-resolution, multi-color follow-up observations of candidate systems identified by Sleuth (our wide-field transit survey instrument at Palomar), and its two twin instruments in Tenerife and northern Arizona.

  15. Optoelectronics components and technology for optical networking in China: recent progress and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan; Liu, Shuihua

    2004-04-01

    Current optical communication systems are more and more relying on the advanced opto-electronic components. A series of revolutionary optical and optoelectronics components technology accounts for the fast progress and field deployment of high-capacity telecommunication and data-transmission systems. Since 1990s, the optical communication industry in China entered a high-speed development period and its wide deployment had already established the solid base for China information infrastructure. In this presentation, the main progress of optoelectronics components and technology in China are reviewed, which includes semiconductor laser diode/photo receiver, fiber optical amplifier, DWDM multiplexer/de-multiplexer, dispersion compensation components and all optical network node components, such as optical switch, OADM, tunable optical filters and variable optical attenuators, etc. Integration discrete components into monolithic/hybrid platform component is an inevitable choice for the consideration of performance, mass production and cost reduction. The current status and the future trends of OEIC and PIC components technology in China will also be discuss mainly on the monolithic integration DFB LD + EA modulator, and planar light-wave circuit (PLC) technology, etc.

  16. Optical Packet and Burst Switching Technologies for the Future Photonic Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Yoo, S. J.

    2006-12-01

    This paper reviews advanced optical burst switching (OBS) and optical packet switching (OPS) technologies and discusses their roles in the future photonic Internet. Discussions include optoelectronic and optical systems technologies as well as systems integration into viable network elements (OBS and OPS routers). Optical label switching (OLS) offers a unified multiple-service platform with effective and agile utilization of the available optical bandwidth in support of voice, data, and multimedia services on the Internet Protocol. In particular, OLS routers with wavelength routing switching fabrics and parallel optical labeling allow forwarding of asynchronously arriving variable-length packets, bursts, and circuits. By exploiting contention resolution in wavelength, time, and space domains, the OLS routers can achieve high throughput without resorting to a store-and-forward method associated with large buffer requirements. Testbed demonstrations employing OLS edge routers show high-performance networking in support of multimedia and data communications applications over the photonic Internet with optical packets and bursts switched directly at the optical layer.

  17. Using Wide-Field Meteor Cameras to Actively Engage Students in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, D. M.; Scales, J. N.

    2012-08-01

    Astronomy has always afforded teachers an excellent topic to develop students' interest in science. New technology allows the opportunity to inexpensively outfit local school districts with sensitive, wide-field video cameras that can detect and track brighter meteors and other objects. While the data-collection and analysis process can be mostly automated by software, there is substantial human involvement that is necessary in the rejection of spurious detections, in performing dynamics and orbital calculations, and the rare recovery and analysis of fallen meteorites. The continuous monitoring allowed by dedicated wide-field surveillance cameras can provide students with a better understanding of the behavior of the night sky including meteors and meteor showers, stellar motion, the motion of the Sun, Moon, and planets, phases of the Moon, meteorological phenomena, etc. Additionally, some students intrigued by the possibility of UFOs and "alien visitors" may find that actual monitoring data can help them develop methods for identifying "unknown" objects. We currently have two ultra-low light-level surveillance cameras coupled to fish-eye lenses that are actively obtaining data. We have developed curricula suitable for middle or high school students in astronomy and earth science courses and are in the process of testing and revising our materials.

  18. Grazing-incidence hyperboloid-hyperboloid designs for wide-field x-ray imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J E; Krywonos, A; Thompson, P L; Saha, T T

    2001-01-01

    The classical Wolter type I grazing-incidence x-ray telescope consists of a paraboloidal primary mirror and a confocal hyperboloidal secondary mirror. This design exhibits stigmatic imaging on-axis but suffers from coma, astigmatism, field curvature, and higher-order aberrations such as oblique spherical aberration. Wolter-Schwarzschild designs have been developed that strictly satisfy the Abbe sine condition and thus exhibit no spherical aberration or coma. However, for wide-field applications such as the solar x-ray imager (SXI), there is little merit in a design with stigmatic imaging on-axis. Instead, one needs to optimize some area-weighted-average measure of resolution over the desired operational field of view. This has traditionally been accomplished by mere despacing of the focal plane of the classical Wolter type I telescope. Here we present and evaluate in detail a family of hyperboloid-hyperboloid grazing-incidence x-ray telescope designs whose wide-field performance is much improved over that of an optimally despaced Wolter type I and even somewhat improved over that of an optimally despaced Wolter-Schwarzschild design. PMID:18356984

  19. A comparison of super wide field microscopy systems in mohs surgery.

    PubMed

    Goldsberry, Anne; Hanke, C William; Countryman, Nicholas B

    2014-12-01

    Microscopic frozen section interpretation is one of the cornerstones of Mohs surgery. The recent development of super wide field (SWF) microscopy can improve accuracy and efficiency while reading microscope sections, and also decrease the physician's musculoskeletal and ocular strain. Super wide field microscopy systems increase viewable field area (VA) by combining low magnification objectives, eg, 1x or 2x (Figure 1), with eyepieces that have a higher field number. This article reviews 3 SWF microscopy systems: Leica DM2000 (Leica Microsystems, Wetzlar, Germany), Nikon Eclipse Ni (Nikon Instruments Inc., Melville, NY), and Olympus BX43 (Olympus, Center Valley, PA). The Leica DM2000's 1.25x objective results in a VA of 314.16 mm2. The Nikon Eclipse Ni's 1x objective results in a VA of 490.87 mm2. The Olympus BX43's 1.25x objective results in a VA of 352.99 mm2. The maximum VA at the lowest objective for Nikon is nearly 40% greater than for the Olympus and over 50% greater than for the Leica. The Nikon Eclipse Ni has a significantly higher maximum VA than the other 2 systems. PMID:25607789

  20. Astro-WISE Processing of Wide-field Images and Other Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddelmeijer, H.; Williams, O. R.; McFarland, J. P.; Belikov, A.

    2012-09-01

    Astro-WISE (Vriend et al. 2012) is the Astronomical Wide-field Imaging System for Europe (Valentijn et al. 2007). It is a scientific information system which consists of hardware and software federated over about a dozen institutes throughout Europe. It has been developed to exploit the ever increasing avalanche of data produced by astronomical surveys and data intensive scientific experiments in general. The demo explains the architecture of the Astro-WISE information system and shows the use of Astro-WISE interfaces. Wide-field astronomical images are derived from the raw image to the final catalog according to the user's request. The demo is based on the standard Astro-WISE guided tour, which can be accessed from the Astro-WISE website. The typical Astro-WISE data processing chain is shown, which can be used for data handling for a variety of different instruments, currently 14, including OmegaCAM, MegaCam, WFI, WFC, ACS/HST, etc.

  1. Interferometric Imaging with the 32 Element Murchison Wide-Field Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, S. M.; Mitchell, D. A.; Wayth, R. B.; Greenhill, L. J.; Bernardi, G.; Gleadow, S.; Edgar, R. G.; Clark, M. A.; Allen, G.; Arcus, W.; Benkevitch, L.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F. H.; Bunton, J. D.; Burns, S.; Cappallo, R. J.; Coles, W. A.; Corey, B. E.; deSouza, L.; Doeleman, S. S.; Derome, M.; Deshpande, A.; Emrich, D.; Goeke, R.; Gopalakrishna, M. R.; Herne, D.; Hewitt, J. N.; Kamini, P. A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kincaid, B. B.; Kocz, J.; Kowald, E.; Kratzenberg, E.; Kumar, D.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Madhavi, S.; Matejek, M.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Pathikulangara, J.; Prabu, T.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Salah, J. E.; Schinkel, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Stevens, J.; Tingay, S. J.; Vaccarella, A.; Waterson, M.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C.

    2010-11-01

    The Murchison Wide-Field Array (MWA) is a low-frequency radio telescope, currently under construction, intended to search for the spectral signature of the epoch of reionization (EOR) and to probe the structure of the solar corona. Sited in western Australia, the full MWA will comprise 8192 dipoles grouped into 512 tiles and will be capable of imaging the sky south of 40° declination, from 80 MHz to 300 MHz with an instantaneous field of view that is tens of degrees wide and a resolution of a few arcminutes. A 32 station prototype of the MWA has been recently commissioned and a set of observations has been taken that exercise the whole acquisition and processing pipeline. We present Stokes I, Q, and U images from two ~4 hr integrations of a field 20° wide centered on Pictoris A. These images demonstrate the capacity and stability of a real-time calibration and imaging technique employing the weighted addition of warped snapshots to counter extreme wide-field imaging distortions.

  2. Wide-Field Fluorescein Angiography in Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Beare, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of our study was to investigate if peripheral retinal ischaemia contributed to the pathogenesis of neovascular AMD (NvAMD), using wide-field fluorescein angiography (WFFA). Methods. This prospective study included 30 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed NvAMD in the index eye. Wide-field colour fundus images and fluorescein angiograms were obtained using P200C optomap FA and analysed using a grid with three concentric circles of 50°, 100°, and 200° centred on the fovea to define zones Z1, Z2, and Z3. Results. Areas of peripheral retinal nonperfusion were seen in 2 (7%) eyes, peripheral vascular leakage in 5 (17%) eyes, and diffuse dye leakage close to the ora in 5 (17%) eyes. A total of one-third of the study eyes showed changes on WFFA in Z2 and Z3. On comparing index eyes to nonindex eyes in these patients, the presence of NvAMD was associated with peripheral FA changes (P = 0.009, Fisher's test). Conclusion. Frank peripheral retinal non-perfusion does not appear to be associated with NvAMD. In some patients with active NvAMD there is degradation of the peripheral blood-retina barrier. Smoking was also found to be associated with the above-mentioned abnormalities. PMID:25379537

  3. Imaging design of the wide field x-ray monitor onboard the HETE satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Zand, J.J.M. In`T; Fenimore, E.E.; Kawai, N.; Yoshida, A.; Matsuoka, M.; Yamauchi, M.

    1994-11-01

    The High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE), to be launched in 1995, will study Gamma-Ray Bursts in an unprecendented wide wavelength range from Gamma- and X-ray to UV wavelengths. The X-ray range (2 to 25 keV) will be covered by 2 perpendicularly oriented 1-dimensional coded aperture cameras. These instruments cover a wide field of view of 2 sr and thus have a relatively large potential to locate GRBs to a fraction of a degree, which is an order of magnitude better than BATSE. The imaging design of these coded aperture cameras relates to the design of the coded apertures and the decoding algorithm. The aperture pattern is to a large extent determined by the high background in this wide field application and the low number of pattern elements ({approximately}100) in each direction. The result is a random pattern with an open fraction of 33%. The onboard decoding algorithm is dedicated to the localization of a single point source.

  4. Wide field fluorescent imaging of extracellular spatiotemporal potassium dynamics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; Dufour, Suzie; Carlen, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Potassium homeostasis is fundamental for the physiological functioning of the brain. Increased [K(+)] in the extracellular fluid has a major impact on neuronal physiology and can lead to ictal events. Compromised regulation of extracellular [K(+)] is involved in generation of seizures in animal models and potentially also in humans. For this reason, the investigation of K(+) spatio-temporal dynamics is of fundamental importance for neuroscientists in the field of epilepsy and other related pathologies. To date, the majority of studies investigating changes in extracellular K(+) have been conducted using a micropipette filled with a K(+) sensitive solution. However, this approach presents a major limitation: the area of the measurement is circumscribed to the tip of the pipette and it is not possible to know the spatiotemporal distribution or origin of the focally measured K(+) signal. Here we propose a novel approach, based on wide field fluorescence, to measure extracellular K(+) dynamics in neural tissue. Recording the local field potential from the somatosensory cortex of the mouse, we compared responses obtained from a K(+)-sensitive microelectrode to the spatiotemporal increases in fluorescence of the fluorophore, Asante Potassium Green-2, in physiological conditions and during 4-AP induced ictal activity. We conclude that wide field imaging is a valuable and versatile tool to measure K(+) dynamics over a large area of the cerebral cortex and is capable of capturing fast dynamics such as during ictal events. Moreover, the present technique is potentially adaptable to address questions regarding spatiotemporal dynamics of other ionic species. PMID:25312775

  5. WPOL: a DSSD-based hard x-ray wide field imager and polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, P.; Bertoli, W.; Breelle, E.; Dolgorouky, Y.; Gouiffès, C.; Khalil, M.; Limousin, O.; Lebrun, F.; Rodriguez, J.

    2014-07-01

    WPOL (Wide field camera with POLarimetry) is a wide field camera which aims to monitor the X-ray/low gamma-ray sources and measures their polarimetric properties. This camera will be operated in space to trigger a main instrument in case of transient events (gamma-ray bursts, black hole binaries state transition, supernovae, …) and to map the Xray/ gamma-ray polarized sources of the Galaxy, which has never been done up to now. It will be proposed, as an accompanying instrument, in the context of the next medium mission ESA call (M4). The concept of the instrument is based upon a coded mask imaging with a detector unit composed of two planes of Silicon double sided stripped detectors (DSSD), a passive collimator and a tungsten mask. Mapping is done on the first plane through mask imaging and polarization is measured by studying Compton scattering events between the two planes. The source direction in the sky being known through the mask pattern projected on the detector plane, and the scattered photon direction being measured between the two planes, only the determination of the first energy deposit is needed to compute the whole Compton scattering kinetics and in particular, to determine the source photon energy

  6. Design and implementation of coating hardware for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide-field corrector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, John; Lee, Hanshin; Hill, Gary J.; Vattiat, Brian; Perry, David; Kriel, Herman; Savage, Richard

    2014-07-01

    A major upgrade of the HET is in progress that will substantially increase the pupil size to 10 meters and the field of view to 22 arc-minutes by replacing the spherical aberration corrector. The new Wide Field Corrector is a 4-element assembly weighing 750kg and measuring 1.34 meters diameter by 2.1 meter in length. Special fixtures were required in order to support the mirrors of the Wide-Field Corrector and adapt them to the coaters chamber, during the vacuum coating process. For the 1 meter-class mirrors, the only suitable support interface was located on a 80mm wide cylindrical surface on the periphery of each mirror. The vacuum compatible system had to support the mirrors with the surface facing downward, and accommodate thermal ranges from ambient to 100C without inducing stresses in the substrate. The fixture also had to accommodate washing, as well as support of witness samples during testing and production runs, and provide masking for alignment fixtures in the center apertures of each mirror. Design principles, materials, implementation details, as well as lessons learned are covered*.

  7. T80Cam: a wide field camera for the J-PLUS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Franch, Antonio; Taylor, Keith; Cenarro, Javier; Cristobal-Hornillos, David; Moles, Mariano

    2015-08-01

    T80Cam is a wide-field camera mounted at the Cassegrain focus of the JAST/T80 telescope, a dedicated 0.83m wide-field telescope at the OAJ (Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre) in Teruel, Spain. The camera has been designed to carry out the J-PLUS (Javalambre Photometric Local Universe Survey), a multi-band photometric survey that will observe 8500 square degrees of the northern sky. The camera has been manufactured by Spectral Instruments and is equipped with an e2v CCD290-99 backside illuminated detector. This is a large format 9.2k-by-9.2k, 10μm pixel, high efficiency CCD that is read from 16 ports simultaneously allowing read times of 12s with a read out noise of 3.4 electrons (rms). T80Cam covers 2 square degrees FoV with a pixel scale of 0.55"/pixel. It will observe in the wavelength range 330-1000nm through a set of 12 carefully optimized broad-, intermediate- and narrow-band filters. In this talk the status of the T80Cam will be presented, including on telescope commissioning and performances results.

  8. Microlensing Surveys of M31 in the Wide Field Imaging ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, E.

    2004-10-27

    The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the closest large galaxy to the Milky Way, thus it is an important laboratory for studying massive dark objects in galactic halos (MACHOs) by gravitational microlensing. Such studies strongly complement the studies of the Milky Way halo using the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We consider the possibilities for microlensing surveys of M31 using the next generation of wide field imaging telescopes with fields of view in the square degree range. We consider proposals for such imagers both on the ground and in space. For concreteness, we specialize to the SNAP proposal for a space telescope and the LSST proposal for a ground based telescope. We find that a modest space-based survey of 50 visits of one hour each is considerably better than current ground based surveys covering 5 years. Crucially, systematic effects can be considerably better controlled with a space telescope because of both the infrared sensitivity and the angular resolution. To be competitive, 8 meter class wide-field ground based imagers must take exposures of several hundred seconds with several day cadence.

  9. Wide-field heterodyne interferometric vibrometry for two-dimensional surface vibration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Samuel; Maruyama, Yuta; Suzuki, Takamasa; Nin, Fumiaki; Hibino, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Osami

    2015-12-01

    Conventional laser Doppler vibrometry and heterodyne interferometry suffer during the simultaneous measurement of the spatial distribution of vibration parameters such as the amplitude, frequency and phase in a wide field of view. Although demand is increasing for methods that can measure vibrations over a wide field of view for a wide range of applications from industrial product inspections to biological measurements, full-field (FF) techniques for high-speed vibration measurements without a spatial scan are untapped. We propose a new method for high-speed FF vibration measurement that can easily be combined with profilometry and tomographic interferometry using a conventional CCD or CMOS camera. In principle, the measurable vibration frequency is unrestricted because the heterodyne signal produced by the modulated interferogram can be controlled to accommodate the CCD frame rate. The validity of the proposed method and the measurement accuracy of the spatial vibration amplitude were evaluated through simulations and experiments. In experiments, the spatial vibration parameters of a mirror vibrated at a frequency of 1 kHz and amplitude of approximately 5-65 nm were successfully measured with a spatial fluctuation of 3%-6.5%.

  10. Generalized mesh-based Monte Carlo for wide-field illumination and detection via mesh retessellation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ruoyang; Intes, Xavier; Fang, Qianqian

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are commonly used as the gold standard in modeling photon transport through turbid media. With the rapid development of structured light applications, an accurate and efficient method capable of simulating arbitrary illumination patterns and complex detection schemes over large surface area is in great need. Here we report a generalized mesh-based Monte Carlo algorithm to support a variety of wide-field illumination methods, including spatial-frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) patterns and arbitrary 2-D patterns. The extended algorithm can also model wide-field detectors such as a free-space CCD camera. The significantly enhanced flexibility of source and detector modeling is achieved via a fast mesh retessellation process that combines the target domain and the source/detector space in a single tetrahedral mesh. Both simulations of complex domains and comparisons with phantom measurements are included to demonstrate the flexibility, efficiency and accuracy of the extended algorithm. Our updated open-source software is provided at http://mcx.space/mmc. PMID:26819826

  11. A payload-centric integration and test approach on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fengchuan; Abid, Mohamed; Duval, Valerie; Eisenhardt, Peter; Elwell, John; Heinrichsen, Ingolf; Irace, William R.; LaPointe, Jason; Larsen, Mark; Shannon, Mark; Taylor, Nicholas; Wright, Edward

    2010-08-01

    NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission was successfully launched on December 14, 2009. All spacecraft subsystems and the single instrument consisting of four imaging bands from 3.4 to 22 microns, a 40 cm afocal telescope, reimaging optics, and a two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat have performed nominally on orbit, enabling the trouble-free survey of the entire infrared sky. Among the many factors that contributed to the WISE post-launch success is the thorough pre-launch system integration and test (I&T) approach tailored to the cryogenic payload. The simple and straightforward interfaces between the spacecraft and the payload allowed the payload to be fully tested prior to integration with the spacecraft. A payload high-fidelity thermal, mass and dynamic simulator allowed the spacecraft I&T to proceed independently through the system-level thermal vacuum test and random vibration test. A payload electrical simulator, a high-rate data processor and a science data ingest processor enabled very early end-to-end data flow and radio-frequency testing using engineering model payload electronics and spacecraft avionics, which allowed engineers to identify and fix developmental issues prior to building flight electronics. This paper describes in detail the WISE I&T approach, its benefits, challenges encountered and lessons learned.

  12. ISS-Lobster: a low-cost wide-field x-ray transient detector on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Petre, Rob; Gehrels, Neil; Marshall, Francis; Ptak, Andy; Racusin, Judith

    2015-05-01

    ISS-Lobster is a wide-field X-ray transient detector proposed to be deployed on the International Space Station. Through its unique imaging X-ray optics that allow a 30 deg by 30 deg FoV, a 1 arc min position resolution and a 1.6x10-11 erg/(sec cm2) sensitivity in 2000 sec, ISS-Lobster will observe numerous events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including: tidal disruptions of stars by supermassive black holes, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts, and perhaps most exciting, X-ray counterparts of gravitational wave detections involving stellar mass and possibly supermassive black holes. The mission includes a 3-axis gimbal system that allows fast Target of Opportunity pointing, and a small gamma-ray burst monitor. In this article we focus on ISS-Lobster measurements of X-ray counterparts of detections by the world-wide ground-based gravitational wave network.

  13. The VLT Interferometer and its AMBER Instrument: Simulations of Interferometric Imaging in the Wide-Field Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöcker, T.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Przygodda, F.; Weigelt, G.

    We present computer simulations of interferometric imaging with the VLT interferometer and the AMBER instrument. These simulations include both the astrophysical modelling of a stellar object by radiative transfer calculations and the simulation of light propagation from the object to the detector (through atmosphere, telescopes, and the AMBER instrument), simulation of photon noise and detector read-out noise, and finally data processing of the interferograms. The results show the dependence of the visibility error bars on the following observational parameters: different seeing during the observation of object and reference star (Fried parameters r0,object and r0,ref. ranging between 0.9 m and 1.2 m), different residual tip-tilt error (δtt,object and δtt,ref. ranging between 0.1% and 20% of the Airy disk diameter), and object brightness (Kobject=3.5 mag to 13 mag, Kref.=3.5 mag). Exemplarily, we focus on stars in late stages of stellar evolution and study one of its key objects, the dusty supergiant IRC +10 420 that is rapidly evolving on human timescales. We show computer simulations of VLT interferometry of IRC +10 420 with two ATs (wide-field mode, i.e. without fiber optics spatial filters) and discuss whether the visibility accuracy is sufficient to distinguish between different theoretical model predictions.

  14. Wide-field tracking of moving objects with a compact multi-object dispersed fixed-delay interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Wan, Xiaoke; Myers, Derek; Powell, Scott

    2012-09-01

    We present a new concept for a Doppler imaging remote sensing instrument to track moving objects within a wide field of view using a compact multi-object Dispersed Fixed-Delay Interferometer (DFDI). The instrument is a combination of a Michelson type interferometer with a fixed optical delay and a medium resolution spectrograph. This takes advantage of the strength of the DFDI approach over the traditional cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph approach for high radial velocity (RV) precision measurements: multi-object capability, high throughput and a compact design. The combination of a fiber integral field unit (IFU) with a DFDI instrument allows simultaneous sampling of all of the objects within the observing field of view (FOV) to provide differential RV measurements of moving objects over background objects. Due to the three dimensional nature of the IFU spectroscopy the object location and spectral features can be simultaneously acquired. With the addition of RV signals to the measurements, this approach allows precise extraction of trajectories and spectral properties of moving objects (such as space debris and near Earth Objects (NEOs)) through sequential monitoring of moving objects. Measurement results from moving objects in a lab as well as moving cars in a field using this innovative approach are reported.

  15. Wide-field imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells in blood by fluorescent nanodiamond labeling and time gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Yuen Yung; Su, Long-Jyun; Chen, Oliver Yenjyh; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Nanodiamonds containing high density ensembles of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centers are promising fluorescent biomarkers due to their excellent photostability and biocompatibility. The NV- centers in the particles have a fluorescence lifetime of up to 20 ns, which distinctly differs from those (<10 ns) of cell and tissue autofluorescence, making it possible to achieve background-free detection in vivo by time gating. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as optical labels for wide-field time-gated fluorescence imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells with a nanosecond intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) as the detector. The combined technique has allowed us to acquire fluorescence images of FND-labeled HeLa cells in whole blood covered with a chicken breast of ~0.1-mm thickness at the single cell level, and to detect individual FND-labeled HeLa cells in blood flowing through a microfluidic device at a frame rate of 23 Hz, as well as to locate and trace FND-labeled lung cancer cells in the blood vessels of a mouse ear. It opens a new window for real-time imaging and tracking of transplanted cells (such as stem cells) in vivo.

  16. Wide-field imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells in blood by fluorescent nanodiamond labeling and time gating.

    PubMed

    Hui, Yuen Yung; Su, Long-Jyun; Chen, Oliver Yenjyh; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Nanodiamonds containing high density ensembles of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) centers are promising fluorescent biomarkers due to their excellent photostability and biocompatibility. The NV(-) centers in the particles have a fluorescence lifetime of up to 20 ns, which distinctly differs from those (<10 ns) of cell and tissue autofluorescence, making it possible to achieve background-free detection in vivo by time gating. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as optical labels for wide-field time-gated fluorescence imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells with a nanosecond intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) as the detector. The combined technique has allowed us to acquire fluorescence images of FND-labeled HeLa cells in whole blood covered with a chicken breast of ~0.1-mm thickness at the single cell level, and to detect individual FND-labeled HeLa cells in blood flowing through a microfluidic device at a frame rate of 23 Hz, as well as to locate and trace FND-labeled lung cancer cells in the blood vessels of a mouse ear. It opens a new window for real-time imaging and tracking of transplanted cells (such as stem cells) in vivo. PMID:24994610

  17. GRT-WF (Goddard Robotic Telescope Wide Field) Observations on Sprites to Study Correlations Between Sprites and TGFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ken; Hegley, Jakob; Vydra, Ekaterina; Sakamoto, Takanori; Okajima, Takashi; Gehrels, Neil

    2015-08-01

    It is believed that accelerated electrons are responsible for both Sprites and terrestrial gamma- ray flashes (TGFs). Although several theoretical explanations have been made, we still do not fully understand how TGFs are generated. Therefore, we search for correlations between Sprites and TGFs. We constructed a wide field optical camera system (GRT- WF) using off- the- shelf hardware in June, 2011 at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU), Fort Myers, Florida where a high thunderstorm activity during summer is observed. Seven cameras have been set to point along azimuth directions to cover most of the visible sky. The field of view of each camera is ~40 x 60 deg. The events are captured automatically by off- the- shelf software. We have observed around five hundred Sprites in the past four years. We have compared these Sprites with the TGFs detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope LAT in times and locations as well as other instruments. We discuss the preliminary results of our study.

  18. Wide-field imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells in blood by fluorescent nanodiamond labeling and time gating

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Yuen Yung; Su, Long-Jyun; Chen, Oliver Yenjyh; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Nanodiamonds containing high density ensembles of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV−) centers are promising fluorescent biomarkers due to their excellent photostability and biocompatibility. The NV− centers in the particles have a fluorescence lifetime of up to 20 ns, which distinctly differs from those (<10 ns) of cell and tissue autofluorescence, making it possible to achieve background-free detection in vivo by time gating. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as optical labels for wide-field time-gated fluorescence imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells with a nanosecond intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) as the detector. The combined technique has allowed us to acquire fluorescence images of FND-labeled HeLa cells in whole blood covered with a chicken breast of ~0.1-mm thickness at the single cell level, and to detect individual FND-labeled HeLa cells in blood flowing through a microfluidic device at a frame rate of 23 Hz, as well as to locate and trace FND-labeled lung cancer cells in the blood vessels of a mouse ear. It opens a new window for real-time imaging and tracking of transplanted cells (such as stem cells) in vivo. PMID:24994610

  19. A Very Wide-Field Hybrid (Focusing/Coded Mask) X-Ray Telescope Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, Paul

    2011-09-01

    The success of Swift at detecting and positioning variable hard X-ray sources, most notably gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), demonstrates that investigations with a very wide field telescope should continue permanently, like the continuing search for supernovas, and its scope expanded. The softer X-ray band is likely to be an even richer arena in which to search for ever more distant GRBs. The X-ray component of their spectra will be enriched by the redshift especially at large distances where the redshift increases very rapidly with distance. Furthermore most GRBs are likely to have an X-ray afterglow, which a very wide field telescope would detect from its birth. Multiple X-ray afterglows can be studied simultaneously. Some GRB models predict that X-ray afterglows will be more numerous than GRBs because they are less narrowly beamed. In addition many other types of variable X-ray sources can be monitored even more effectively than by scanning instruments. There are three possible approaches to a very wide field X-ray telescope, a 2D coded mask like Swift, a 2D lobster-eye telescope, and a hybrid that is a lobster-eye telescope in one dimension and a coded mask in the other. For the same field of view and the same focal length all three could use the same detector system including an omni-directional gamma-ray detector. We offer reasons why the hybrid, which is composed of identical flat mirrors, is the best of the three. It has much less background from diffuse X-rays and known X-ray sources than the 2D coded mask, and has substantially more area and bandwidth than the 2D lobster-eye. While positions are expected to be an arc minute or better, a small number of the mirrors used to fabricate the hybrid can be configured as a KB telescope that when pointed refines positions to arc second precision.

  20. Cryogenic optical performance of a lightweighted mirror assembly for future space astronomical telescopes: correlating optical test results and thermal optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Ron; Arnold, William R.; Baker, Markus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Burdick, Gregory; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Hanson, Craig; Hogue, William D.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Kirk, Charlie; Maffett, Steven P.; Matthews, Gary W.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl, H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.

    2013-09-01

    A 43cm diameter stacked core mirror demonstrator was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two CNC pocket milled face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE® mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

  1. Cryogenic Optical Performance of a Lightweighted Mirror Assembly for Future Space Astronomical Telescopes: Correlating Optical Test Results and Thermal Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Arnold, William R.; Baker, Marcus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Burdick, Gregory; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Hanson, Craig; Hogue, William D.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Kirk, Charlie; Maffett, Steven P.; Matthews, Gary W.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl, H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.

    2013-01-01

    A 43cm diameter stacked core mirror demonstrator was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two CNC pocket milled face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE® mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

  2. Cryogenic Optical Performance of a Light-weight Mirror Assembly for Future Space Astronomical Telescopes: Optical Test Results and Thermal Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Baker, Markus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Carpenter, James R.; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Hogue, William D.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl. H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.; Kirk, Charles S.; Hanson, Craig; Burdick, Gregory; Maffett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A 40 cm diameter mirror assembly was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5 m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

  3. VARIABILITY FLAGGING IN THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER PRELIMINARY DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D. I.; Cutri, R. M.; Masci, F. J.; Fowler, J. W.; Marsh, K. A.; Jarrett, T. H.

    2012-05-15

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Preliminary Data Release Source Catalog contains over 257 million objects. We describe the method used to flag variable source candidates in the Catalog. Using a method based on the chi-square of single-exposure flux measurements, we generated a variability flag for each object, and have identified almost 460,000 candidate sources that exhibit significant flux variability with greater than {approx}7{sigma} confidence. We discuss the flagging method in detail and describe its benefits and limitations. We also present results from the flagging method, including example light curves of several types of variable sources including Algol-type eclipsing binaries, RR Lyr, W UMa, and a blazar candidate.

  4. The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) molecular adsorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Moore, Sonya; Soules, David; Voecks, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    A device has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, for the adsorption of contaminants inside a space instrument during flight. The molecular adsorber was developed for use on the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, and it has been shown to perform at its design specifications in the WFPC-2. The basic principle of the molecular adsorber is a zeolite-coated ceramic honeycomb. The arrangement is efficient for adsorption and also provides the needed rigidity to retain the special zeolite coating during the launch vibrational environment. The adsorber, on other forms, is expected to be useful for all flight instruments sensitive to internal sources of contamination. Typically, some internal contamination is unavoidable. A common design solution is to increase the venting to the exterior. However, for truly sensitive instruments, the external contamination environment is more severe. The molecular adsorber acts as a one-way vent to solve this problem. Continued development is planned for this device.

  5. Display challenges resulting from the use of wide field of view imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, Gregory J.; Fulton, Jack; Nicholson, Gail; Seals, Ean

    2012-06-01

    As focal plane array technologies advance and imagers increase in resolution, display technology must outpace the imaging improvements in order to adequately represent the complete data collection. Typical display devices tend to have an aspect ratio similar to 4:3 or 16:9, however a breed of Wide Field of View (WFOV) imaging devices exist that skew from the norm with aspect ratios as high as 5:1. This particular quality, when coupled with a high spatial resolution, presents a unique challenge for display devices. Standard display devices must choose between resizing the image data to fit the display and displaying the image data in native resolution and truncating potentially important information. The problem compounds when considering the applications; WFOV high-situationalawareness imagers are sought for space-limited military vehicles. Tradeoffs between these issues are assessed to the image quality of the WFOV sensor.

  6. A mobile phone-based retinal camera for portable wide field imaging.

    PubMed

    Maamari, Robi N; Keenan, Jeremy D; Fletcher, Daniel A; Margolis, Todd P

    2014-04-01

    Digital fundus imaging is used extensively in the diagnosis, monitoring and management of many retinal diseases. Access to fundus photography is often limited by patient morbidity, high equipment cost and shortage of trained personnel. Advancements in telemedicine methods and the development of portable fundus cameras have increased the accessibility of retinal imaging, but most of these approaches rely on separate computers for viewing and transmission of fundus images. We describe a novel portable handheld smartphone-based retinal camera capable of capturing high-quality, wide field fundus images. The use of the mobile phone platform creates a fully embedded system capable of acquisition, storage and analysis of fundus images that can be directly transmitted from the phone via the wireless telecommunication system for remote evaluation. PMID:24344230

  7. The NOAA-9 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Wide Field-of-View Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Kathryn A.; Smith, G. Louis; Young, David F.

    1999-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) consisted of wide field-of-view (WFOV) radiometers and scanning radiometers for measuring outgoing longwave radiation and solar radiation reflected from the Earth. These instruments were carried by the dedicated Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and by the NOAA-9 and -10 operational spacecraft. The WFOV radiometers provided data from which instantaneous fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are computed by use of a numerical filter algorithm. Monthly mean fluxes over a 5-degree equal angle grid are computed from the instantaneous TOA fluxes. The WFOV radiometers aboard the NOAA-9 spacecraft operated from February 1985 through December 1992, at which time a failure of the shortwave radiometer ended the usable data after nearly 8 years. This paper examines the monthly mean products from that data set.

  8. Deconvolution of wide field-of-view radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.; Green, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The theory of deconvolution of wide field-of-view (WFOV) radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation provides a technique by which the resolution of such measurements can be enhanced to provide radiant exitance at the top of the atmosphere with a finer resolution than the field of view. An analytical solution for the earth-emitted radiant exitance in terms of WFOV radiometer measurements is derived for the nonaxisymmetric (or regional) case, in which the measurements and radiant exitance are considered to be functions of both latitude and longitude. This solution makes it possible to deconvolve a set of WFOV radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation and obtain information with a finer resolution than the instantaneous field of view of the instrument. It is shown that there are tradeoffs involved in the selection between WFOV and scanning radiometers.

  9. Readout electronics for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/Fluorescence Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, R.; Bai, L.; Zhang, J.; Huang, J.; Yang, C.; Cao, Z.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), supported by IHEP of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is a multipurpose project with a complex detectors array for high energy gamma ray and cosmic ray detection. The Wide Field of view Cherenkov Telescope Array (WFCTA), as one of the components of the LHAASO project, aim to tag each primary particle that causes an air shower. The WFCTA is a portable telescope array used to detect cosmic ray spectra. The design of the readout electronics of the WFCTA is described in this paper Sixteen photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), together with their readout electronics are integrated into a single sub-cluster. To maintain good resolution and linearity over a wide dynamic range, a dual-gain amplification configuration on an analog board is used The digital board contains two 16channel 14-bit, 50 Msps analog-to-digital converters (ADC) and its power consumption, noise level, and relative deviation are all tested.

  10. Science yield estimate with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traub, Wesley A.; Breckinridge, James; Greene, Thomas P.; Guyon, Olivier; Jeremy Kasdin, N.; Macintosh, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The coronagraph instrument (CGI) on the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope will directly image and spectrally characterize planets and circumstellar disks around nearby stars. Here we estimate the expected science yield of the CGI for known radial-velocity (RV) planets and potential circumstellar disks. The science return is estimated for three types of coronagraphs: the hybrid Lyot and shaped pupil are the currently planned designs, and the phase-induced amplitude apodizing complex mask coronagraph is the backup design. We compare the potential performance of each type for imaging as well as spectroscopy. We find that the RV targets can be imaged in sufficient numbers to produce substantial advances in the science of nearby exoplanets. To illustrate the potential for circumstellar disk detections, we estimate the brightness of zodiacal-type disks, which could be detected simultaneously during RV planet observations.

  11. Vibrational phase imaging in wide-field CARS for nonresonant background suppression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heuke, Sandro; Schmitt, Michael; Yao, Baoli; Ye, Tong; Lei, Ming; Gao, Peng; Popp, Jrgen

    2015-04-20

    Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy is a valuable tool for label-free imaging of biological samples. As a major drawback quantification based on CARS images is compromised by the appearance of a nonresonant background. In this paper we propose and demonstrate a wide-field CARS vibrational phase imaging scheme that allows for nonresonant background suppression. Several CARS images at a few consecutive planes perpendicular to the propagation direction were recorded to reconstruct a phase map utilizing the iteration phase retrieval method. Experimental results verify that the CARS background is efficiently suppressed by the phase imaging approach, as compared to traditional CARS imaging without background correction. The proposed background correction method is robust against environmental disturbance, since the experimental implementation of the suggested detection scheme requires no reference beam. PMID:25969113

  12. Palm-size wide-field Fourier spectroscopic imager with uncooled infrared microbolometer arrays for smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Natsumi; Suzuki, Yo; Qi, Wei; Hosono, Satsuki; Saito, Tsubasa; Ogawa, Satoshi; Sato, Shun; Fujiwara, Masaru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Tanaka, Naotaka; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    We proposed the imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy that is a near-common-path interferometer with strong robustness against mechanical vibrations. We introduced the miniature uncooled infrared microbolometer arrays for smartphone (e.g. product name: FILR ONE price: around 400USD). And we constructed the phase-shifter with the piezo impact drive mechanism (maker: Technohands.co.Ltd., stroke: 4.5mm, resolution: 0.01μm, size: 20mm, price: around 800USD). Thus, we realized the palm-size mid-infrared spectroscopic imager [size: L56mm×W69mm×H43mm weight: 500g]. And by using wide-angle lens as objective lens, the proposed method can obtain the wide-field 2- dimensional middle-infrared (wavelength: 7.5-13.5[μm]) spectroscopic imaging of radiation lights emitted from human bodies itself

  13. The Zvenigorod Astronomical Plate Collection Presented in the Wide-Field Plate Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshchagin, S. V.; Chupina, N. V.; Osipenko, V. P.; Dluzhnevskaya, O. B.; Tsvetkov, M. K.

    2012-01-01

    The results of the plate cataloging and digitization in the Zvenigorod Observatory are described. The observational material was obtained in the period 1972 - 2005 with the 40 cm Carl Zeiss astrograph (F=200 cm, field size 8x8 sq. deg., scale 100 arcsec/mm). The archive includes at present 3703 plates observations in the northern hemisphere mainly for mapping the sky according to the FON program. In addition, other objects as asteroids, minor planets, Pluto, Mars, etc. were observed too. A part of the archive is scanned already, as well as original observational logbooks. These results are included in the Wide-Field Plate Database in Sofia (www.skyarchive.org) and described in the site of the Institute of Astronomy, RAN (http://www.inasan.ru/ rus/scan/).

  14. A wide field-of-view scanning endoscope for whole anal canal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chao; Huangfu, Jiangtao; Lai, Lily L.; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel wide field-of-view (FOV) scanning endoscope, the AnCam, which is based on contact image sensor (CIS) technology used in commercialized business card scanners. The AnCam can capture the whole image of the anal canal within 10 seconds with a resolution of 89 μm, a maximum FOV of 100 mm × 120 mm, and a depth-of-field (DOF) of 0.65 mm at 5.9 line pairs per mm (lp/mm). We demonstrate the performance of the AnCam by imaging the entire anal canal of pigs and tracking the dynamics of acetowhite testing. We believe the AnCam can potentially be a simple and convenient solution for screening of the anal canal for dysplasia and for surveillance in patients following treatment for anal cancer. PMID:25780750

  15. Continuous wide-field characterization of drug release from skin substitute using off-axis interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gabai, Haniel; Baranes-Zeevi, Maya; Zilberman, Meital; Shaked, Natan T

    2013-08-15

    We achieved continuous, noncontact wide-field imaging and characterization of drug release from a polymeric device in vitro by uniquely using off-axis interferometric imaging. Unlike the current gold-standard methods in this field, which are usually based on chromatography and spectroscopy, our method requires no user intervention during the experiment and involves less lab consumable instruments. Using a simplified interferometric imaging system, we experimentally demonstrate the characterization of anesthetic drug release (Bupivacaine) from a soy-based protein matrix, which is used as a skin substitute for wound dressing. Our results demonstrate the potential of interferometric imaging as an inexpensive and easy-to-use alternative for characterization of drug release in vitro. PMID:24104636

  16. In-flight Performance of the Detectors on HST/Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy

    2009-01-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a powerful new imager recently installed on the Hubble Space Telescope during Servicing Mission 4. WFC3 covers wavelengths from the near UV (200nm) to the near infrared (out to 1.7microns), in two channels. The UV/visible (UVIS) channel utilizes two low-noise, UV-enhanced 2Kx4K CCD detectors from e2v, while the IR channel incorporates a 1Kx1K 1.7micron cutoff HgCdTe array, custom-developed for the WFC3 program by Teledyne. We report here on the performance of the detectors in-flight as observed in this summer's Servicing Mission Orbital Verification program.

  17. A Powerful New Imager for HST: Performance and Early Science Results from Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy

    2009-01-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope during the highly successful Servicing Mission 4 in May, 2009. WFC3 offers sensitive, high resolution imaging over a broad wavelength range from the near UV through the visible to the near IR (200nm - 1700nm). Its capabilities in the near UV and near IR ends of that range represent particularly large advances vs. those of previous HST instruments. In this talk, I will review the purpose and design of the instrument, describe its performance in flight, and highlight some of the initial scientific results from the instrument, including its use in deep infrared surveys in search of galaxies at very high redshift, in investigations of the global processes of star formation in nearby galaxies, and in the study of the recent impact on Jupiter.

  18. Wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging with multi-anode detectors.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Roland; Prokazov, Yury; Turbin, Evgeny; Zuschratter, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has become a powerful and widely used tool to monitor inter- and intramolecular dynamics of fluorophore-labeled proteins inside living cells.Here, we present recent achievements in the construction of a positional sensitive wide-field single-photon counting detector system to measure fluorescence lifetimes in the time domain and demonstrate its usage in FRET applications.The setup is based on a conventional fluorescence microscope equipped with synchronized short-pulse lasers that illuminate the entire field of view at minimal invasive intensities, thereby enabling long-term experiments of living cells. The system is capable to acquire single-photon counting images and measures directly the transfer rate of fast photophysical processes as, for instance, FRET, in which it can resolve complex fluorescence decay kinetics. PMID:24108639

  19. Studies on wide-field-of-view multiphoton imaging using the flexible clinical multiphoton tomograph MPTflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton imaging systems are capable of high-resolution 3-D image acquisition of deep tissue. A first commercially available CE-certified biomedical system for subcelluar resolution of human skin has been launched by JenLab company with the DermaInspectR in 2002. The demand for more flexibility caused the development of the MPTflexR, which provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetic examinations. However the high resolution of clinical multiphoton tomographs are adherent with a small field-of-view (FOV) of about 360×360μm2. Especially time-consuming is the relocation of areas of interest (AOI) like lesions, sweat glands or hair shafts during a multiphoton examination. This limitation can be be overcome by macroscopic large-area (wide-field-ofview) multiphoton tomography, which is tested first within this work.

  20. Multiple target tracking in a wide-field-of-view camera system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hye-Sook; Axelrod, T.S.; Colella, N.J.; Colvin, M.E.; Ledebuhr, A.G.

    1990-05-01

    A real-time-multiple-target-tracking system is being developed using a wide-field-of-view (WFOV) camera. The high resolution WFOV camera was conceived as part of the Strategic Defense Initiative Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The camera system consists of a lens made of concentric solid blocks of index matching glasses, CCDs arrayed on the focal plane, and a custom VLSI image processor to extract the targets. This paper will briefly review the existing prototype system, the on-going effort to cover the full field of view using digital CCD cameras, the production of custom VLSI chips developed to extract centroids in real time, and the implementation of transputers to run the tracking algorithms. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  1. An optimal numerical filter for wide-field-of-view measurements of earth-emitted radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.; House, F. B.

    1981-01-01

    A technique is described in which all data points along an arc of the orbit may be used in an optimal numerical filter for wide-field-of-view measurements of earth emitted radiation. The statistical filter design is derived whereby the filter is required to give a minimum variance estimate of the radiative exitance at discrete points along the ground track of the satellite. An equation for the optimal numerical filter is given by minimizing the estimate error variance equation with respect to the filter weights, resulting in a discrete form of the Wiener-Hopf equation. Finally, variances of the errors in the radiant exitance can be computed along the ground track and in the cross track directions.

  2. Wide-field endoscopic fluorescence imaging for gastrointestinal tumor detection with glucose analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yun; Qu, Yawei; Bai, Jing; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-05-01

    The lack of functional information and targeted imaging in conventional white-light endoscopy leads to a high miss-rate of gastrointestinal tumor. The combination of near-infrared fluorescence imaging and endoscopy presents a promising approach. Here we introduce a new endoscopy method employing a home-made flexible wide-field epi-fluorescence endoscope, that can be inserted through the biopsy channel of a gastrointestinal endoscope, with the glucose analogue 2- DeoxyGlucosone as the near-infrared fluorescent probe. System characterization indicates a good sensitivity and linearity over a large field of view. Its capability of tumor identification and location is demonstrated with in-vivo imaging of xenografted tumor model.

  3. Wide field-of-view digital night vision head-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Michael P.

    2011-06-01

    SA Photonics has developed (with support from the Air Force Research Lab, the US Army and Vision Systems International) an innovative wide field of view digital night vision head mounted display (HMD). This HMD has an 80 degree field of view to greatly improve operator situational awareness. By using creating an all-digital system, we provide the capability to enhance and record night vision imagery, overlay symbology, and inset video from remote sensors, either mounted on the aircraft or on UAVs. This HMD has been designed with maximum pilot utility in mind, and is easily stowable without impacting center of gravity or maneuverability of the pilot's head within the cockpit. Because the sensors are digital, they can be located right above the pilot's eyes removing any hyperstereoopsis.

  4. Stellar photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide-field/Planetary camera - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Hunter, Deidre; Groth, Edward J.; Light, Robert M.; Faber, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    The prospects for the use of the Wide-Field/Planetary Camera (WFPC) for stellar photometry are described. The large halos of the point-spread function (PSF) resulting from spherical aberration and from spatial, temporal, and color variations of the PSF are the main limitations to accurate photometry. Degradations caused by crowding are exacerbated by the halos of the PSF. An attempt is made to quantify these effects and determine the current accuracy of stellar photometry with the WFPC. In realistic cases, the brighter stars in crowded fields have 0.09 mag errors; fainter stars have larger errors depending on the degree of crowding. It is shown that measuring Cepheids in Virgo Cluster galaxies is not currently possible without inordinate increases in exposure times.

  5. SpIOMM and SITELLE: Wide-field Imaging FTS for the Study of Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drissen, Laurent; Bernier, Anne-Pier; Robert, Carmelle; Robert

    2011-12-01

    SpIOMM, a wide-field Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer attached to the Mont Mégantic 1.6-m telescope, is capable of obtaining the visible spectrum of every source of light in a 12 arcminute field of view, with a spectral resolution ranging from R = 1 (wide-band image) to R = 25 000, resulting in 1.7 million spectra with a spatial resolution of one arcsecond. SITELLE will be a similar instrument attached to the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, and will be in operation in early 2013. We present a short description of these instruments and illustrate their capabilities to study nearby galaxies with the results of a data cube of M51.

  6. Cortical activation following chronic passive implantation of a wide-field suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B.; Nayagam, David A. X.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Luu, Chi D.; Allen, Penelope J.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Williams, Chris E.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. The research goal is to develop a wide-field retinal stimulating array for prosthetic vision. This study aimed at evaluating the efficacy of a suprachoroidal electrode array in evoking visual cortex activity after long term implantation. Approach. A planar silicone based electrode array (8 mm × 19 mm) was implanted into the suprachoroidal space in cats (ntotal = 10). It consisted of 20 platinum stimulating electrodes (600 μm diameter) and a trans-scleral cable terminated in a subcutaneous connector. Three months after implantation (nchronic = 6), or immediately after implantation (nacute = 4), an electrophysiological study was performed. Electrode total impedance was measured from voltage transients using 500 μs, 1 mA pulses. Electrically evoked potentials (EEPs) and multi-unit activity were recorded from the visual cortex in response to monopolar retinal stimulation. Dynamic range and cortical activation spread were calculated from the multi-unit recordings. Main results. The mean electrode total impedance in vivo following 3 months was 12.5 ± 0.3 kΩ. EEPs were recorded for 98% of the electrodes. The median evoked potential threshold was 150 nC (charge density 53 μC cm-2). The lowest stimulation thresholds were found proximal to the area centralis. Mean thresholds from multiunit activity were lower for chronic (181 ± 14 nC) compared to acute (322 ± 20 nC) electrodes (P < 0.001), but there was no difference in dynamic range or cortical activation spread. Significance. Suprachoroidal stimulation threshold was lower in chronic than acute implantation and was within safe charge limits for platinum. Electrode-tissue impedance following chronic implantation was higher, indicating the need for sufficient compliance voltage (e.g. 12.8 V for mean impedance, threshold and dynamic range). The wide-field suprachoroidal array reliably activated the retina after chronic implantation.

  7. T80Cam: the wide field camera for the OAJ 83-cm telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Franch, A.; Taylor, K.; Cepa, J.; Laporte, R.; Cenarro, A. J.; Chueca, S.; Cristobal-Hornillos, D.; Ederoclite, A.; Gruel, N.; Hernández-Fuertes, J.; López-Sainz, A.; Luis-Simoes, R.; Moles, M.; Rueda-Teruel, F.; Rueda-Teruel, S.; Varela, J.; Yanes-Díaz, A.; Benitez, N.; Dupke, R.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Sims, G.; Sodré, L.; Toerne, K.

    2012-09-01

    The Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ) is a new astronomical facility located at the Sierra de Javalambre (Teruel, Spain) whose primary role will be to conduct all-sky astronomical surveys. The OAJ facility will have two wide-field telescopes: the JST/T250; a 2.55-m telescope with a 3° diameter field of view (FoV), and the JAST/T80; an 0.83-m telescope with a 2° diameter FoV. First light instrumentation is being designed to exploit the survey capabilities of the OAJ telescopes. This paper describes the T80Cam, a wide-field camera that will be installed at the Cassegrain focus of the JAST/T80. It is equipped with an STA 1600 backside illuminated detector. This is a 10.5k-by-10.5k, 9μm pixel, high efficiency CCD that is read from 16 ports simultaneously, allowing read times of ~20s with a typical read noise of 6 electrons (rms). This full wafer CCD covers a large fraction of the JAST/T80's FoV with a pixel scale of ~0.50"/pixel. T80Cam will observe in the wavelength range 330-1000nm through a set of 12 carefully optimized broad-, intermediate- and narrow-band filters. The camera is intended for surveys with the JAST/T80 telescope, starting with the planned J-PLUS (Javalambre Photometric Local Universe Survey), a multi-band photometric all-sky survey that will be completed in about 2 years and will reach AB˜ 23 mag (5σ level) with the SDSS filters.

  8. An experiment in big data: storage, querying and visualisation of data taken from the Liverpool Telescope's wide field cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, R. M.; Steele, Iain A.; Smith, R. J.; Mawson, Neil R.

    2014-07-01

    The Small Telescopes Installed at the Liverpool Telescope (STILT) project has been in operation since March 2009, collecting data with three wide field unfiltered cameras: SkycamA, SkycamT and SkycamZ. To process the data, a pipeline was developed to automate source extraction, catalogue cross-matching, photometric calibration and database storage. In this paper, modifications and further developments to this pipeline will be discussed, including a complete refactor of the pipeline's codebase into Python, migration of the back-end database technology from MySQL to PostgreSQL, and changing the catalogue used for source cross-matching from USNO-B1 to APASS. In addition to this, details will be given relating to the development of a preliminary front-end to the source extracted database which will allow a user to perform common queries such as cone searches and light curve comparisons of catalogue and non-catalogue matched objects. Some next steps and future ideas for the project will also be presented.

  9. Lessons Learned from the Wide Field Camera 3 TV1 and TV2 Thermal Vacuum Test Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peabody, Hume; Stavely, Richard; Bast, William

    2008-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument has undergone two complete thermal vacuum tests (TV1 and TV2), during which valuable lessons were learned regarding test configuration, test execution, model capabilities, and modeling practices. The very complex thermal design of WFC3 produced a number of challenging aspects to ground testing with numerous ThermoElectric Coolers and heat pipes, not all of which were functional. Lessons learned during TV1 resulted in significant upgrades to the model capabilities and a change in the test environment approach for TV2. These upgrades proved invaluable during TV2 when pretest modeling assumptions proved to be false. Each of the lessons learned relate to one of two following broad statements: 1. Ensure the design can be tested and that the effect of non-flight like conditions is well understood, particularly with respect to non passive devices (TECs, Heat Pipes, etc) 2. Ensure that the model is sufficiently detailed and is capable of predicting off-nominal behavior and the power dissipation of any thermal devices, especially TECs This paper outlines a number of the lessons learned over these two test campaigns with respect to the thermal design, model, and test configuration and presents recommendations for future tests.

  10. The Wide Field X-ray Telescope Mission--A Digital Sky Survey in X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S.; Jones, C.; Vikhlinin, A.; Forman, W.; Giacconi, R.; Ptak, A.; Rosati, P.; Weisskopf, M.; Borgani, S.; Pareschi, G.; Campana, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tozzi, P.; Gilli, R.; Paolillo, M.; Bautz, M.; Hickox, R.

    2010-07-15

    Sensitive surveys of the X-ray universe have been limited to small areas of the sky due to the intrinsically small field of view of Wolter-I X-ray optics. High angular resolution is needed to achieve a low background per source, minimize source confusion, and distinguish point from extended objects. WFXT consists of three co-aligned wide field X-ray telescopes with a 1 deg. field of view and a < or approx. 10''(goal of 5'') angular resolution (HEW) over the full field. Total effective area at 1 keV will be >5000 cm{sup -2}. WFXT will perform three extragalactic surveys that will cover most of the sky to 100-1000 times the sensitivity of the ROSAT All Sky Survey, > ir approx. 2000 deg{sup 2} to deep Chandra or XMM-Newton sensitivity, and > or approx. 100 deg{sup 2} to the deepest Chandra sensitivity. WFXT will generate a legacy X-ray dataset of a half million clusters and groups of galaxies to z{approx_equal}2, also characterizing the physics of the intracluster gas for a significant fraction of them, thus providing an unprecedented data set for cosmological applications; it will detect >10{sup 7} AGN to z>6, again obtaining spectra for a substantial fraction, to study the growth of supermassive black holes; it will detect >10{sup 5} normal/starburst galaxies; and it will detect and characterize star formation regions across the Galaxy. WFXT is the only X-ray survey mission that will match, in area and sensitivity, the next generation of wide-area optical, IR and radio surveys.

  11. Video-rate wide-field coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with collinear nonphase-matching illumination.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming; Winterhalder, Martin; Selm, Romedi; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    A simple scheme for video-rate wide-field coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is presented. The method is based on collinear nonphase-matching illumination. The mechanisms leading to CARS signal generation are investigated. We find that refraction-mediated phase-matching is the main effect. Video-rate wide-field CARS microscopy of polystyrene beads and CARS wide-field images of C. elegans embryos are shown, and the capabilities and the limitations of the scheme are discussed. PMID:21361665

  12. Free-space optical communications in support of future manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Elaine M.

    1990-01-01

    Four areas of research in optical communications in support of future manned space missions being carried out at Johnson Space Center are discussed. These are the Space Station Freedom proximity operations, direct LEO-to-ground communications, IR voice communications inside manned spacecraft, and deep space and lunar satellite operations. The background, requirements, and scenario for each of these areas of research are briefly described.

  13. Radiation-induced Backgrounds in Astronomical Instruments: Considerations for Geosynchronous Orbit and Implications for the Design of the WFIRST Wide-field Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Xapsos, Michael A.; Armani, Nerses; Stauffer, Craig; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-03-01

    Geosynchronous orbits are appealing for solar or astrophysical observatories because they permit continuous data downlink at high rates. The radiation environment in these orbits presents unique challenges, however. This paper describes both the characteristics of the radiation environment in geosynchronous orbit and the mechanisms by which this radiation generates backgrounds in photon detectors. Shielding considerations are described, and a preliminary shielding design for the proposed Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope observatory is presented as a reference for future space telescope concept studies that consider a geosynchronous orbit.

  14. Correction: Localized plasmon assisted structured illumination microscopy for wide-field high-speed dispersion-independent super resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsetto, Joseph Louis; Wei, Feifei; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-02-01

    Correction for `Localized plasmon assisted structured illumination microscopy for wide-field high-speed dispersion-independent super resolution imaging' by Joseph Louis Ponsetto et al., Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 5807-5812.

  15. High-resolution, in vivo retinal imaging using adaptive optics and its future role in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Doble, Nathan

    2005-03-01

    Until recently it was impossible to fully realize the optical resolution afforded by the human eye due to the inherent optical aberrations. These aberrations limit the ability to see fine structure in the retinal layers and visual perception of the outside world. A conventional spectacle or contact lens refraction only provides a static amelioration of the lowest order aberrations, namely defocus and astigmatism. In addition, all of these distortions are constantly evolving due to changes in accommodation and head/eye movements. The technique of adaptive optics not only corrects all of the static spatial modes but also measures and corrects any dynamic changes. Such systems have allowed for routine in vivo cellular imaging, the classification of individual photoreceptor cells and have enabled psychophysical testing of human visual function at the neural level. This review introduces the principle of adaptive optics and the key hardware required to implement such a scheme. The integration of adaptive optics into different imaging modalities is presented along with descriptions of current systems in use today and the experimental results obtained to date. Finally, the review concludes by discussing future technology and gives the author's prediction of how the field will evolve over the coming years. PMID:16293057

  16. The optical antenna system design research on earth integrative network laser link in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianzhu; Fu, Qiang; He, Jingyi

    2014-11-01

    Earth integrated information network can be real-time acquisition, transmission and processing the spatial information with the carrier based on space platforms, such as geostationary satellites or in low-orbit satellites, stratospheric balloons or unmanned and manned aircraft, etc. It is an essential infrastructure for China to constructed earth integrated information network. Earth integrated information network can not only support the highly dynamic and the real-time transmission of broadband down to earth observation, but the reliable transmission of the ultra remote and the large delay up to the deep space exploration, as well as provide services for the significant application of the ocean voyage, emergency rescue, navigation and positioning, air transportation, aerospace measurement or control and other fields.Thus the earth integrated information network can expand the human science, culture and productive activities to the space, ocean and even deep space, so it is the global research focus. The network of the laser communication link is an important component and the mean of communication in the earth integrated information network. Optimize the structure and design the system of the optical antenna is considered one of the difficulty key technologies for the space laser communication link network. Therefore, this paper presents an optical antenna system that it can be used in space laser communication link network.The antenna system was consisted by the plurality mirrors stitched with the rotational paraboloid as a substrate. The optical system structure of the multi-mirror stitched was simulated and emulated by the light tools software. Cassegrain form to be used in a relay optical system. The structural parameters of the relay optical system was optimized and designed by the optical design software of zemax. The results of the optimal design and simulation or emulation indicated that the antenna system had a good optical performance and a certain reference value in engineering. It can provide effective technical support to realize interconnection of earth integrated laser link information network in the future.

  17. MID-INFRARED VARIABILITY FROM THE SPITZER DEEP WIDE-FIELD SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, Szymon; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Assef, Roberto J.; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Gorjian, V.; Griffith, R.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Brodwin, M.; Bock, J. J.; Borys, C.; Brand, K.; Grogin, N.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cool, R.; Cooray, A.; Croft, S.; Dey, Arjun; Gonzalez, A.; Ivison, R.

    2010-06-10

    We use the multi-epoch, mid-infrared Spitzer Deep Wide-Field Survey to investigate the variability of objects in 8.1 deg{sup 2} of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey Booetes field. We perform a Difference Image Analysis of the four available epochs between 2004 and 2008, focusing on the deeper 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands. Out of 474, 179 analyzed sources, 1.1% meet our standard variability selection criteria that the two light curves are strongly correlated (r>0.8) and that their joint variance ({sigma}{sub 12}) exceeds that for all sources with the same magnitude by 2{sigma}. We then examine the mid-IR colors of the variable sources and match them with X-ray sources from the XBooetes survey, radio catalogs, 24 {mu}m selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates, and spectroscopically identified AGNs from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES). Based on their mid-IR colors, most of the variable sources are AGNs (76%), with smaller contributions from stars (11%), galaxies (6%), and unclassified objects, although most of the stellar, galaxy, and unclassified sources are false positives. For our standard selection criteria, 11%-12% of the mid-IR counterparts to X-ray sources, 24 {mu}m AGN candidates, and spectroscopically identified AGNs show variability. The exact fractions depend on both the search depth and the selection criteria. For example, 12% of the 1131 known z>1 AGNs in the field and 14%-17% of the known AGNs with well-measured fluxes in all four Infrared Array Camera bands meet our standard selection criteria. The mid-IR AGN variability can be well described by a single power-law structure function with an index of {gamma} {approx} 0.5 at both 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, and an amplitude of S {sub 0} {approx_equal} 0.1 mag on rest-frame timescales of 2 yr. The variability amplitude is higher for shorter rest-frame wavelengths and lower luminosities.

  18. Design of integration time for the space-borne multi-spectral imager with super-wide field of view based on freeform mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Huan; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yongchao; Lu, Chunling; Wang, Chao; Ge, Xianying

    2015-08-01

    The freeform optics is extensively applied in the fields of aerospace, aviation, lighting, medical treatment, et al.. For the linearly push-broom space-borne imager, integration time of different field of view can be affected by the optical system design of the imager, orbits of the satellite, maneuver of the attitudes, rotation of the Earth, light delay due to the refraction and transmission of the atmosphere, terrain error and so on. The dynamically imaging quality should be affected by the accuracy and adjusting mode of the integration time. In this paper, a new method which is especially appropriate to imaging model simulating and integration time calculating for the wide-field-of-view remote sensor is proposed. Then, the integration time of specified viewing direction for the imager with a single projection center and a super-wide field of view based on freeform mirror, which is mounted on a sun-synchronous orbit satellite, is calculated. And influence on imaging quality of adjusting integration time of different grouping modes for the focal plane assembly is analyzed. The results indicate that with the constraint condition of satellite roll angle and the modulation transfer function (MTF) influence factor no more than 20°and 2% respectively, integration time of all CCDs for the whole focal plane assembly divided into two groups with each adopting the uniform integration time, can fulfill the requirements of the imaging quality for the imager.

  19. Ray tracing simulations for the wide-field x-ray telescope of the Einstein Probe mission based on Geant4 and XRTG4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Donghua; Zhang, Chen; Yuan, Weimin; Willingale, Richard; Ling, Zhixing; Feng, Hua; Li, Hong; Ji, Jianfeng; Wang, Wenxin; Zhang, Shuangnan

    2014-07-01

    Einstein Probe (EP) is a proposed small scientific satellite dedicated to time-domain astrophysics working in the soft X-ray band. It will discover transients and monitor variable objects in 0.5-4 keV, for which it will employ a very large instantaneous field-of-view (60° × 60°), along with moderate spatial resolution (FWHM ˜ 5 arcmin). Its wide-field imaging capability will be achieved by using established technology in novel lobster-eye optics. In this paper, we present Monte-Carlo simulations for the focusing capabilities of EP's Wide-field X-ray Telescope (WXT). The simulations are performed using Geant4 with an X-ray tracer which was developed by cosine (http://cosine.nl/) to trace X-rays. Our work is the first step toward building a comprehensive model with which the design of the X-ray optics and the ultimate sensitivity of the instrument can be optimized by simulating the X-ray tracing and radiation environment of the system, including the focal plane detector and the shielding at the same time.

  20. Brief wide-field photostimuli evoke and modulate oscillatory reverberating activity in cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Pulizzi, Rocco; Musumeci, Gabriele; Van den Haute, Chris; Van De Vijver, Sebastiaan; Baekelandt, Veerle; Giugliano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Cell assemblies manipulation by optogenetics is pivotal to advance neuroscience and neuroengineering. In in vivo applications, photostimulation often broadly addresses a population of cells simultaneously, leading to feed-forward and to reverberating responses in recurrent microcircuits. The former arise from direct activation of targets downstream, and are straightforward to interpret. The latter are consequence of feedback connectivity and may reflect a variety of time-scales and complex dynamical properties. We investigated wide-field photostimulation in cortical networks in vitro, employing substrate-integrated microelectrode arrays and long-term cultured neuronal networks. We characterized the effect of brief light pulses, while restricting the expression of channelrhodopsin to principal neurons. We evoked robust reverberating responses, oscillating in the physiological gamma frequency range, and found that such a frequency could be reliably manipulated varying the light pulse duration, not its intensity. By pharmacology, mathematical modelling, and intracellular recordings, we conclude that gamma oscillations likely emerge as in vivo from the excitatory-inhibitory interplay and that, unexpectedly, the light stimuli transiently facilitate excitatory synaptic transmission. Of relevance for in vitro models of (dys)functional cortical microcircuitry and in vivo manipulations of cell assemblies, we give for the first time evidence of network-level consequences of the alteration of synaptic physiology by optogenetics. PMID:27099182

  1. Pulsed light imaging for wide-field dosimetry of photodynamic therapy in the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott C.; Sexton, Kristian; Chapman, Michael Shane; Maytin, Edward; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy using aminoluvelinic acid (ALA) is an FDA-approved treatment for actinic keratoses, pre-cancerous skin lesions which pose a significant risk for immunocompromised individuals, such as organ transplant recipients. While PDT is generally effective, response rates vary, largely due to variations in the accumulation of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) after ALA application. The ability to quantify PpIX production before treatment could facilitate the use of additional interventions to improve outcomes. While many groups have demonstrated the ability to image PpIX in the clinic, these systems generally require darkening the room lights during imaging, which is unpopular with clinicians. We have developed a novel wide-field imaging system based on pulsed excitation and gated acquisition to image photosensitizer activity in the skin. The tissue is illuminated using four pulsed LED's to excite PpIX, and the remitted light acquired with a synchronized ICCD. This approach facilitates real-time background subtraction of ambient light, precluding the need to darken the exam room. Delivering light in short bursts also allows the use of elevated excitation intensity while remaining under the maximum permissible exposure limits, making the modality more sensitive to photosensitizer fluorescence than standard approaches. Images of tissue phantoms indicate system sensitivity down to 250nM PpIX and images of animals demonstrate detection of PpIX fluorescence in vivo under normal room light conditions.

  2. Subaru next-generation wide-field camera: HyperSuprime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiyama, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Furusawa, Hisanori; Takeshi, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    We summarize the design and the specification of a next generation instrument for Subaru Telescope: a very wide-field (2°φ) CCD camera which we name HyperSuprime. The latest design of the corrector ensures 80% encircled energy diameter of 0".3 from 600 nm to 1100 nm over the 2°φ field of view. The size of the focal plane is 612 mm in diameter and covered by about 170 four side buttable 2kx4k CCDs. Fully depleted CCD which is now being developed is the primary candidate for HyperSuprime. The readout electronics is connected behind the CCD and this CCD package is screwed to the cold plate with three positioning pins. The large entrance window of the dewar is supported with additional ribs so that the dewar is evacuated and CCDs are cooled down to about -80°C. HyperSuprime equips with a filter exchanger which can accommodate four large mosaicked filters and a roll-type shutter.

  3. Wide field-of-view fluorescence image deconvolution with aberration-estimation from Fourier ptychography.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jaebum; Kim, Jinho; Ou, Xiaoze; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a method to simultaneously acquire an aberration-corrected, wide field-of-view fluorescence image and a high-resolution coherent bright-field image using a computational microscopy method. First, the procedure applies Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to retrieve the amplitude and phase of a sample, at a resolution that significantly exceeds the cutoff spatial frequency of the microscope objective lens. At the same time, redundancy within the set of acquired FPM bright-field images offers a means to estimate microscope aberrations. Second, the procedure acquires an aberrated fluorescence image, and computationally improves its resolution through deconvolution with the estimated aberration map. An experimental demonstration successfully improves the bright-field resolution of fixed, stained and fluorescently tagged HeLa cells by a factor of 4.9, and reduces the error caused by aberrations in a fluorescence image by up to 31%, over a field of view of 6.2 mm by 9.3 mm. For optimal deconvolution, we show the fluorescence image needs to have a signal-to-noise ratio of at least ~18. PMID:26977345

  4. Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations of Proxima Centauri: No Evidence of the Possible Substellar Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golimowski, David A.; Schroeder, Daniel J.

    1998-07-01

    Two-epoch observations of Proxima Centauri using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) are reported. Exposures of 10 and 40 s were recorded through the F1042M filter (lambda_c ~ 1 μm), permitting examination of the circumstellar region beyond 0.09" from Proxima Cen. No evidence of a substellar companion within 0.85" of Proxima Cen is seen, which counters the recently reported detection of a faint feature by Schultz et al. using HST's Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS). A feature in the WFPC2 images having a relative brightness and a separation comparable to those of the FOS feature would have been detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of ~22. Moreover, if the FOS feature were a substellar companion, it should have appeared in our F1042M images to be about 3.7 mag fainter than Proxima Cen. Inspection of deep WFPC2 images of Proxima Cen through three filters indicates that the FOS feature is not a background object. Local enhancements of WFPC2's point-spread function suggest a possible instrumental origin for the FOS feature, but the singularity and apparent motion of the FOS feature complicate this notion.

  5. Wide-field wide-band Interferometric Imaging: The WB A-Projection and Hybrid Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, S.; Rau, U.; Golap, K.

    2013-06-01

    Variations of the antenna primary beam (PB) pattern as a function of time, frequency, and polarization form one of the dominant direction-dependent effects at most radio frequency bands. These gains may also vary from antenna to antenna. The A-Projection algorithm, published earlier, accounts for the effects of the narrow-band antenna PB in full polarization. In this paper, we present the wide-band A-Projection algorithm (WB A-Projection) to include the effects of wide bandwidth in the A-term itself and show that the resulting algorithm simultaneously corrects for the time, frequency, and polarization dependence of the PB. We discuss the combination of the WB A-Projection and the multi-term multi-frequency synthesis (MT-MFS) algorithm for simultaneous mapping of the sky brightness distribution and the spectral index distribution across a wide field of view. We also discuss the use of the narrow-band A-Projection algorithm in hybrid imaging schemes that account for the frequency dependence of the PB in the image domain.

  6. Wide-field imaging on 8- to 100-meter class telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, Giorgia; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Baruffolo, Andrea; Farinato, Jacopo; Foppiani, Italo; Lombini, Matteo; Giallongo, Emanuele; Di Paola, Andrea; Pedichini, Fernando; Speziali, Roberto

    2006-06-01

    It is generally believed that very fast cameras imaging large Fields of View translate into huge optomechanics and mosaics of very large contiguous CCDs. It has already been suggested that seeing limited imaging cameras for telescopes whose diameters are larger than 20m are considered virtually impossible for a reasonable cost. It has also been suggested that using existing technology and at a moderate price, one can build a Smart Fast Camera, a device that placed on aberrated Field of View, including those of slow focal ratios, is able to provide imaging at an equivalent focal ratio as low as F/1, with a size that is identical to the large focal ratio focal plane size. The design allows for easy correction of aberrations over the Field of View. It has low weight and size with respect to any focal reducer or prime focus station of the same performance. It can be applied to existing 8m-class telescopes to provide a wide field fast focal plane or to achieve seeing-limited imaging on Extremely Large Telescopes. As it offers inherently fast read-out in a massive parallel mode, the SFC can be used as a pupil or focal plane camera for pupil-plane or Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing for 30-100m class telescopes. Basing upon Smart Fast Camera concept, we present a study turned to explain the pliability of this instrument for different existing telescopes.

  7. Wide-field computational color imaging using pixel super-resolved on-chip microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Alon; Feizi, Alborz; Akbari, Najva; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Lens-free holographic on-chip imaging is an emerging approach that offers both wide field-of-view (FOV) and high spatial resolution in a cost-effective and compact design using source shifting based pixel super-resolution. However, color imaging has remained relatively immature for lens-free on-chip imaging, since a ‘rainbow’ like color artifact appears in reconstructed holographic images. To provide a solution for pixel super-resolved color imaging on a chip, here we introduce and compare the performances of two computational methods based on (1) YUV color space averaging, and (2) Dijkstra’s shortest path, both of which eliminate color artifacts in reconstructed images, without compromising the spatial resolution or the wide FOV of lens-free on-chip microscopes. To demonstrate the potential of this lens-free color microscope we imaged stained Papanicolaou (Pap) smears over a wide FOV of ~14 mm2 with sub-micron spatial resolution. PMID:23736466

  8. The silicon micro-strip detector plane for the LOFT/wide-field monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldwurm, A.; Ferrando, P.; Götz, D.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Limousin, O.; Basa, S.; Bertoli, W.; Delagnes, Eric; Dolgorouky, Y.; Gevin, O.; Gros, A.; Gouiffes, C.; Jeanneau, F.; Lachaud, C.; Llored, M.; Olivetto, C.; Prevot, G.; Renaud, D.; Rodriguez, J.; Rossin, C.; Schanne, S.; Soldi, S.; Varniere, P.

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) on the LOFT mission is to provide unambiguous detection of the high-energy sources in a large field of view, in order to support science operations of the LOFT primary instrument, the LAD. The monitor will also provide by itself a large number of results on the timing and spectral behavior of hundreds of galactic compact objects, Active Galactic Nuclei and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The WFM is based on the coded aperture concept where a position sensitive detector records the shadow of a mask projected by the celestial sources. The proposed WFM detector plane, based on Double Sided micro-Strip Silicon Detectors (DSSD), will allow proper 2-dimensional recording of the projected shadows. Indeed the positioning of the photon interaction in the detector with equivalent fine resolution in both directions insures the best imaging capability compatible with the allocated budgets for this telescope on LOFT. We will describe here the overall configuration of this 2D-WFM and the design and characteristics of the DSSD detector plane including its imaging and spectral performances. We will also present a number of simulated results discussing the advantages that this configuration offers to LOFT. A DSSD-based WFM will in particular reduce significantly the source confusion experienced by the WFM in crowded regions of the sky like the Galactic Center and will in general increase the observatory science capability of the mission.

  9. Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) for GOES Imager and Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etemad, Shahriar; Bremer, James C.; Zukowski, Barbara J.; Pasquale, Bert A.; zukowski, Tmitri J.; Prince, Robert E.; O'Neill, Patrick A.; Ross, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Two of the GOES instruments, the Imager and the Sounder, perform scans of the Earth to provide a full disc picture of the Earth. To verify the entire scan process, an image of a target that covers an 18 deg. circular field-of-view is collimated and projected into the field of regard of each instrument. The Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) has many advantages over its predecessor, WFC1, including lower thermal dissipation higher fir field MTF, smaller package, and a more intuitive (faster) focusing process. The illumination source is an LED array that emits in a narrow spectral band centered at 689 nm, within the visible spectral bands of the Imager and Sounder. The illumination level can be continuously adjusted electronically. Lower thermal dissipation eliminates the need for forced convection cooling and minimizes time to reach thermal stability. The lens system has been optimized for the illumination source spectral output and athernalized to remain in focus during bulk temperature changes within the laboratory environment. The MTF of the lens is higher than that of the WFC1 at the edge of FOV. The target is focused in three orthogonal motions, controlled by an ergonomic system that saves substantial time and produces a sharper focus. Key words: Collimator, GOES, Imager, Sounder, Projector

  10. Wide field-of-view fluorescence image deconvolution with aberration-estimation from Fourier ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaebum; Kim, Jinho; Ou, Xiaoze; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to simultaneously acquire an aberration-corrected, wide field-of-view fluorescence image and a high-resolution coherent bright-field image using a computational microscopy method. First, the procedure applies Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to retrieve the amplitude and phase of a sample, at a resolution that significantly exceeds the cutoff spatial frequency of the microscope objective lens. At the same time, redundancy within the set of acquired FPM bright-field images offers a means to estimate microscope aberrations. Second, the procedure acquires an aberrated fluorescence image, and computationally improves its resolution through deconvolution with the estimated aberration map. An experimental demonstration successfully improves the bright-field resolution of fixed, stained and fluorescently tagged HeLa cells by a factor of 4.9, and reduces the error caused by aberrations in a fluorescence image by up to 31%, over a field of view of 6.2 mm by 9.3 mm. For optimal deconvolution, we show the fluorescence image needs to have a signal-to-noise ratio of at least ~18. PMID:26977345

  11. Exoplanets from the Arctic: The First Wide-field Survey at 80°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Carlberg, Raymond; Salbi, Pegah; Ngan, Wai-Hin Wayne; Ahmadi, Aida; Steinbring, Eric; Murowinski, Richard; Sivanandam, Suresh; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Located within 10° of the North Pole, northern Ellesmere Island offers continuous darkness in the winter months. This capability can greatly enhance the detection efficiency of planetary transit surveys and other time domain astronomy programs. We deployed two wide-field cameras at 80°N, near Eureka, Nunavut, for a 152 hr observing campaign in 2012 February. The 16 megapixel camera systems were based on commercial f/1.2 lenses with 70 mm and 42 mm apertures, and they continuously imaged 504 and 1295 deg2, respectively. In total, the cameras took over 44,000 images and produced better than 1% precision light curves for approximately 10,000 stars. We describe a new high-speed astrometric and photometric data reduction pipeline designed for the systems, test several methods for the precision flat fielding of images from very-wide-angle cameras, and evaluate the cameras' image qualities. We achieved a scintillation-limited photometric precision of 1%-2% in each 10 s exposure. Binning the short exposures into 10 minute chunks provided a photometric stability of 2-3 mmag, sufficient for the detection of transiting exoplanets around the bright stars targeted by our survey. We estimate that the cameras, when operated over the full Arctic winter, will be capable of discovering several transiting exoplanets around bright (mV < 9.5) stars.

  12. CALIBRATION OF LOW-FREQUENCY, WIDE-FIELD RADIO INTERFEROMETERS USING DELAY/DELAY-RATE FILTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Aaron R.; Backer, Donald C.

    2009-07-15

    We present a filtering technique that can be applied to individual baselines of wide-bandwidth, wide-field interferometric data to geometrically select regions on the celestial sphere that contain primary calibration sources. The technique relies on the Fourier transformation of wide-band frequency spectra from a given baseline to obtain one-dimensional 'delay images', and then the transformation of a time-series of delay images to obtain two-dimensional 'delay/delay-rate images'. Source selection is possible in these images given appropriate combinations of baseline, bandwidth, integration time, and source location. Strong and persistent radio frequency interference (RFI) limits the effectiveness of this source selection owing to the removal of data by RFI excision algorithms. A one-dimensional, complex CLEAN algorithm has been developed to compensate for RFI-excision effects. This approach allows CLEANed, source-isolated data to be used to isolate bandpass and primary beam gain functions. These techniques are applied to data from the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization as a demonstration of their value in calibrating a new generation of low-frequency radio interferometers with wide relative bandwidths and large fields of view.

  13. Recalibrating the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) W4 Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. J. I.; Jarrett, T. H.; Cluver, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    We present a revised effective wavelength and photometric calibration for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer W4 band, including tests of empirically motivated modifications to its pre-launch laboratory-measured relative system response curve. We derived these by comparing measured W4 photometry with photometry synthesised from spectra of galaxies and planetary nebulae. The difference between measured and synthesised photometry using the pre-launch laboratory-measured W4 relative system response can be as large as 0.3 mag for galaxies and 1 mag for planetary nebulae. We find the W4 effective wavelength should be revised upward by 3.3%, from 22.1 to 22.8 μm, and the W4 AB magnitude of Vega should be revised from m W4 = 6.59 to m W4 = 6.66. In an attempt to reproduce the observed W4 photometry, we tested three modifications to the pre-launch laboratory-measured W4 relative system response curve, all of which have an effective wavelength of 22.8 μm. Of the three relative system response curve models tested, a model that matches the laboratory-measured relative system response curve, but has the wavelengths increased by 3.3% (or ≃ 0.73 μm) achieves reasonable agreement between the measured and synthesised photometry.

  14. Wide-field SCUBA-2 observations of NGC 2264: submillimetre clumps and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, J. V.; Richer, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    We present wide-field observations of the NGC 2264 molecular cloud in the dust continuum at 850 and 450 μm using SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Using 12CO 3 → 2 molecular line data, we determine that emission from CO contaminates the 850 μm emission at levels ˜30 per cent in localized regions associated with high-velocity molecular outflows. Much higher contamination levels of 60 per cent are seen in shocked regions near the massive star S Mon. If not removed, the levels of CO contamination would contribute an extra 13 per cent to the dust mass in NGC 2264. We use the FELLWALKER routine to decompose the dust into clumpy structures, and a Hessian-based routine to decompose the dust into filamentary structures. The filaments can be described as a hub-filament structure, with lower column density filaments radiating from the NGC 2264 C protocluster hub. Above mean filament column densities of 2.4 × 1022 cm-2, star formation proceeds with the formation of two or more protostars. Below these column densities, filaments are starless, or contain only a single protostar.

  15. Verification of the CALIPSO Lidar, Wide Field Camera, and Imaging Infrared Radiometer Geolocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, K. A.; Pitts, M. C.; Tremas, T.; Macdonnell, D. G.; Lee, K.

    2006-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) science payload consists of three instruments: the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), Wide Field Camera (WFC), and Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR). Accurate geolocation is required to co-register measurements from CALIOP with those of the WFC and IIR and also for combining CALIPSO observations with additional measurements from other instruments of the Aqua constellation. Through analysis of on-orbit data, offsets in geolocation can be identified and the pointing of the instruments relative to one another can be determined to verify co-registration requirements. The geolocation verification technique used for CALIOP compares the lidar surface heights at locations determined from satellite ephemeris and attitude data to surface heights from a digital elevation model (DEM). The WFC location verification technique utilizes coastline detection and a target driven geolocation system to assess pointing and geolocation biases. The IIR also uses a similar target driven geolocation system to determine biases in the reported IIR pixel locations. Through these analyses, unmodeled biases in instrument pointing are identified and, if necessary, corrections can then be applied to the calculated footprint locations to correct for these biases. In this paper, the geolocation verification techniques for each of the individual instruments will be described and the results of the geolocation assessment will be presented.

  16. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Assef, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars.We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks.We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  17. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  18. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Padgett, D. L.; Rebull, L. M.

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the 'fireworks hypothesis' since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  19. An Automatic Technique for Finding Faint Moving Objects in Wide Field CCD Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainaut, O. R.; Meech, K. J.

    1996-09-01

    The traditional method used to find moving objects in astronomical images is to blink pairs or series of frames after registering them to align the background objects. While this technique is extremely efficient in terms of the low signal-to-noise ratio that the human sight can detect, it proved to be extremely time-, brain- and eyesight-consuming. The wide-field images provided by the large CCD mosaic recently built at IfA cover a field of view of 20 to 30' over 8192(2) pixels. Blinking such images is an enormous task, comparable to that of blinking large photographic plates. However, as the data are available digitally (each image occupying 260Mb of disk space), we are developing a set of computer codes to perform the moving object identification in sets of frames. This poster will describe the techniques we use in order to reach a detection efficiency as good as that of a human blinker; the main steps are to find all the objects in each frame (for which we rely on ``S-Extractor'' (Bertin & Arnouts (1996), A&ASS 117, 393), then identify all the background objects, and finally to search the non-background objects for sources moving in a coherent fashion. We will also describe the results of this method applied to actual data from the 8k CCD mosaic. {This work is being supported, in part, by NSF grant AST 92-21318.}

  20. Resolving the extended stellar haloes of nearby galaxies: the wide-field PISCeS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crnojevic, Denija; Sand, David J.; Caldwell, Nelson; Guhathakurta, Puragra; McLeod, Brian A.; Seth, Anil; Simon, Joshua D.; Strader, Jay; Toloba, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    I will present results from the wide-field Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS): we investigate the resolved stellar haloes of two nearby galaxies (the spiral NGC253 and the elliptical Centaurus A, D~3.7 Mpc) out to a galactocentric radius of 150 kpc with Magellan/Megacam. The survey led to the discovery of ~20 faint satellites and stunning streams/substructures in two environments substantially different from the Local Group, i.e. the loose Sculptor group of galaxies and the Centaurus A group dominated by an elliptical. These discoveries clearly testify the past and ongoing accretion processes shaping the haloes of these nearby galaxies, and provide the first complete census of their satellite systems down to an unprecedented M_V<-8. This effectively enables the first direct comparison of external galaxies' resolved haloes to the PAndAS survey. The detailed characterization of the stellar content, shape and gradients in the extended haloes of NGC253, Centaurus A and in their satellites represent crucial constraints to theoretical models of galaxy formation and evolution.

  1. Intraoperative detection and removal of microscopic residual sarcoma using wide-field imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Jeffrey K; Ferrer, Jorge M; Brigman, Brian E; Lee, Chang-Lung; Dodd, Rebecca D; Eward, William C; Marshall, Lisa F; Cuneo, Kyle C; Carter, Jessica E; Ramasunder, Shalini; Kim, Yongbaek; Lee, W David; Griffith, Linda G; Bawendi, Moungi G; Kirsch, David G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: The goal of limb-sparing surgery for a soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity is to remove all malignant cells while preserving limb function. After initial surgery, microscopic residual disease in the tumor bed will cause a local recurrence in approximately 33% of patients with sarcoma. To help identify these patients, the authors developed an in vivo imaging system to investigate the suitability of molecular imaging for intraoperative visualization. METHODS: A primary mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma and a wide field-of-view imaging device were used to investigate a series of exogenously administered, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes activated by cathepsin proteases for real-time intraoperative imaging. RESULTS: The authors demonstrated that exogenously administered cathepsin-activated probes can be used for image-guided surgery to identify microscopic residual NIR fluorescence in the tumor beds of mice. The presence of residual NIR fluorescence was correlated with microscopic residual sarcoma and local recurrence. The removal of residual NIR fluorescence improved local control. CONCLUSIONS: The authors concluded that their technique has the potential to be used for intraoperative image-guided surgery to identify microscopic residual disease in patients with cancer. Cancer 2012. © 2012 American Cancer Society. PMID:22437667

  2. Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) for GOES Imager and Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemad, Shahriar; Bremer, James C.; Zukowski, Barbara J.; Pasquale, Bert A.; Zukowski, Tmitri J.; Prince, Robert E.; O'Neill, Patrick A.; Ross, Robert W.

    2004-10-01

    Two of the GOES instruments, the Imager and the Sounder, perform scans of the Earth to provide a full disc picture of the Earth. To verify the entire scan process, an image of a target that covers an 18o circular field-of-view is collimated and projected into the field of regard of each instrument. The Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) 1 has many advantages over its predecessor, WFC1, including lower thermal dissipation, higher far field MTF, smaller package, and a more intuitive (faster) focusing process. The illumination source is an LED array that emits in a narrow spectral band centered at 689 nm, within the visible spectral bands of the Imager and Sounder. The illumination level can be continuously adjusted electronically. Lower thermal dissipation eliminates the need for forced convection cooling and minimizes time to reach thermal stability. The lens system has been optimized for the illumination source spectral output and athermalized to remain in focus during bulk temperature changes within the laboratory environment. The MTF of the lens is higher than that of the WFC1 at the edge of FOV. The target is focused in three orthogonal motions, controlled by an ergonomic system that saves substantial time and produces a sharper focus.

  3. Calibration of HST wide field camera for quantitative analysis of faint galaxy images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Casertano, Stefano; Neuschaefer, Lyman W.; Wyckoff, Eric W.

    1994-01-01

    We present the methods adopted to optimize the calibration of images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera (WFC) (1991-1993). Our main goal is to improve quantitative measurement of faint images, with special emphasis on the faint (I approximately 20-24 mag) stars and galaxies observed as a part of the Medium-Deep Survey. Several modifications to the standard calibration procedures have been introduced, including improved bias and dark images, and a new supersky flatfield obtained by combining a large number of relatively object-free Medium-Deep Survey exposures of random fields. The supersky flat has a pixel-to-pixel rms error of about 2.0% in F555W and of 2.4% in F785LP; large-scale variations are smaller than 1% rms. Overall, our modifications improve the quality of faint images with respect to the standard calibration by about a factor of five in photometric accuracy and about 0.3 mag in sensitivity, corresponding to about a factor of two in observing time. The relevant calibration images have been made available to the scientific community.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WSRT wide-field HI survey. II. (Braun+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.; Thilker, D. A.

    2004-04-01

    We have used the Westerbork array to carry out an unbiased wide-field survey for HI emission features, achieving an RMS sensitivity of about 18mJy/Beam at a velocity resolution of 17km/s over 1800deg2 and between -1000). (1 data file).

  5. Narrow and wide field amacrine cells fire action potentials in response to depolarization and light stimulation.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Stephanie J; Cook, Paul B

    2007-01-01

    Action potentials in amacrine cells are important for lateral propagation of signals across the inner retina, but it is unclear how many subclasses of amacrine cells contain voltage-gated sodium channels or can fire action potentials. This study investigated the ability of amacrine cells with narrow ( <200 microm) and wide (>200 microm) dendritic fields to fire action potentials in response to depolarizing current injections and light stimulation. The pattern of action potentials evoked by current injections revealed two distinct classes of amacrine cells; those that responded with a single action potential (single-spiking cells) and those that responded with repetitive action potentials (repetitive-spiking cells). Repetitive-spiking cells differed from single-spiking cells in several regards: Repetitive-spiking cells were more often wide field cells, while single-spiking cells were more often narrow field cells. Repetitive-spiking cells had larger action potential amplitudes, larger peak voltage-gated NaV currents lower action potential thresholds, and needed less current to induce action potentials. However, there was no difference in the input resistance, holding current or time constant of these two classes of cells. The intrinsic capacity to fire action potentials was mirrored in responses to light stimulation; single-spiking amacrine cells infrequently fired action potentials to light steps, while repetitive-spiking amacrine cells frequently fired numerous action potentials. These results indicate that there are two physiologically distinct classes of amacrine cells based on the intrinsic capacity to fire action potentials. PMID:17640411

  6. Enhanced flight symbology for wide-field-of-view helmet-mounted displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Steven P.; Asbury, Charles N.; Szoboszlay, Zoltan P.

    2003-09-01

    A series of studies was conducted to improve the Army aviator's ability to perform night missions by developing innovative symbols that capitalize on the advantages of new wide field-of-view (WFOV) helmet-mounted displays (HMDs). The most important outcomes of the research were two new symbol types called the Cylinder and the Flight Path Predictor. The Cylinder provides a large symbolic representation of real-world orientation that enables pilots to maintain the world frame of reference even if the visibility of the world is lost due to dust, smoke, snow, or inadvertent instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). Furthermore, the Cylinder is peripherally presented, supporting the "ambient" visual mode so that it does not require the conscious attention of the viewer. The Flight Path Predictor was developed to show the predicted flight path of a maneuvering aircraft using earth-referenced HMD symbology. The experimental evidence and the pilot interview results show that the new HMD symbology sets are capable of preventing spatial disorientation, improving flight safety, enhancing flight maneuver precision, and reducing workload so that the pilot can more effectively perform the critical mission tasks.

  7. WIDE-FIELD WIDE-BAND INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING: THE WB A-PROJECTION AND HYBRID ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, S.; Rau, U.; Golap, K. E-mail: rurvashi@nrao.edu

    2013-06-20

    Variations of the antenna primary beam (PB) pattern as a function of time, frequency, and polarization form one of the dominant direction-dependent effects at most radio frequency bands. These gains may also vary from antenna to antenna. The A-Projection algorithm, published earlier, accounts for the effects of the narrow-band antenna PB in full polarization. In this paper, we present the wide-band A-Projection algorithm (WB A-Projection) to include the effects of wide bandwidth in the A-term itself and show that the resulting algorithm simultaneously corrects for the time, frequency, and polarization dependence of the PB. We discuss the combination of the WB A-Projection and the multi-term multi-frequency synthesis (MT-MFS) algorithm for simultaneous mapping of the sky brightness distribution and the spectral index distribution across a wide field of view. We also discuss the use of the narrow-band A-Projection algorithm in hybrid imaging schemes that account for the frequency dependence of the PB in the image domain.

  8. EXOPLANETS FROM THE ARCTIC: THE FIRST WIDE-FIELD SURVEY AT 80 Degree-Sign N

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Nicholas M.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Carlberg, Raymond; Salbi, Pegah; Ngan, Wai-Hin Wayne; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang; Ahmadi, Aida; Steinbring, Eric; Murowinski, Richard

    2013-03-15

    Located within 10 Degree-Sign of the North Pole, northern Ellesmere Island offers continuous darkness in the winter months. This capability can greatly enhance the detection efficiency of planetary transit surveys and other time domain astronomy programs. We deployed two wide-field cameras at 80 Degree-Sign N, near Eureka, Nunavut, for a 152 hr observing campaign in 2012 February. The 16 megapixel camera systems were based on commercial f/1.2 lenses with 70 mm and 42 mm apertures, and they continuously imaged 504 and 1295 deg{sup 2}, respectively. In total, the cameras took over 44,000 images and produced better than 1% precision light curves for approximately 10,000 stars. We describe a new high-speed astrometric and photometric data reduction pipeline designed for the systems, test several methods for the precision flat fielding of images from very-wide-angle cameras, and evaluate the cameras' image qualities. We achieved a scintillation-limited photometric precision of 1%-2% in each 10 s exposure. Binning the short exposures into 10 minute chunks provided a photometric stability of 2-3 mmag, sufficient for the detection of transiting exoplanets around the bright stars targeted by our survey. We estimate that the cameras, when operated over the full Arctic winter, will be capable of discovering several transiting exoplanets around bright (m{sub V} < 9.5) stars.

  9. Brief wide-field photostimuli evoke and modulate oscillatory reverberating activity in cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Pulizzi, Rocco; Musumeci, Gabriele; Van den Haute, Chris; Van De Vijver, Sebastiaan; Baekelandt, Veerle; Giugliano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Cell assemblies manipulation by optogenetics is pivotal to advance neuroscience and neuroengineering. In in vivo applications, photostimulation often broadly addresses a population of cells simultaneously, leading to feed-forward and to reverberating responses in recurrent microcircuits. The former arise from direct activation of targets downstream, and are straightforward to interpret. The latter are consequence of feedback connectivity and may reflect a variety of time-scales and complex dynamical properties. We investigated wide-field photostimulation in cortical networks in vitro, employing substrate-integrated microelectrode arrays and long-term cultured neuronal networks. We characterized the effect of brief light pulses, while restricting the expression of channelrhodopsin to principal neurons. We evoked robust reverberating responses, oscillating in the physiological gamma frequency range, and found that such a frequency could be reliably manipulated varying the light pulse duration, not its intensity. By pharmacology, mathematical modelling, and intracellular recordings, we conclude that gamma oscillations likely emerge as in vivo from the excitatory-inhibitory interplay and that, unexpectedly, the light stimuli transiently facilitate excitatory synaptic transmission. Of relevance for in vitro models of (dys)functional cortical microcircuitry and in vivo manipulations of cell assemblies, we give for the first time evidence of network-level consequences of the alteration of synaptic physiology by optogenetics. PMID:27099182

  10. Blood vessel segmentation and width estimation in ultra-wide field scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Enrico; Robertson, Gavin; Trucco, Emanuele; MacGillivray, Tom J.; Lupascu, Carmen; van Hemert, Jano; Williams, Michelle C.; Newby, David E.; van Beek, Edwin JR; Houston, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Features of the retinal vasculature, such as vessel widths, are considered biomarkers for systemic disease. The aim of this work is to present a supervised approach to vessel segmentation in ultra-wide field of view scanning laser ophthalmoscope (UWFoV SLO) images and to evaluate its performance in terms of segmentation and vessel width estimation accuracy. The results of the proposed method are compared with ground truth measurements from human observers and with existing state-of-the-art techniques developed for fundus camera images that we optimized for UWFoV SLO images. Our algorithm is based on multi-scale matched filters, a neural network classifier and hysteresis thresholding. After spline-based refinement of the detected vessel contours, the vessel widths are estimated from the binary maps. Such analysis is performed on SLO images for the first time. The proposed method achieves the best results, both in vessel segmentation and in width estimation, in comparison to other automatic techniques. PMID:25574441

  11. LAIWO: a new wide-field CCD camera for Wise Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, Harald; Afonso, Cristina; Marien, Karl-Heinz; Klein, Ralf

    2006-06-01

    LAIWO is a new CCD wide-field camera for the 40-inch Ritchey-Chretien telescope at Wise Observatory in Mitzpe Ramon/Israel. The telescope is identical to the 40-in. telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, which is described in [2]. LAIWO was designed and built at Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. The scientific aim of the instrument is to detect Jupiter-sized extra-solar planets around I=14-15 magnitude stars with the transit method, which relies on the temporary drop in brightness of the parent star harboring the planet. LAIWO can observe a 1.4 x 1.4 degree field-of-view and has four CCDs with 4096*4096 pixels each The Fairchild Imaging CCDs have a pixel size of 15 microns. Since they are not 2-side buttable, they are arranged with spacings between the chips that is equal to the size of a single CCD minus a small overlap. The CCDs are cooled by liquid nitrogen to a temperature of about -100 °C. The four science CCDs and the guider CCD are mounted on a common cryogenic plate which can be adjusted in three degrees of freedom. Each of these detectors can also be adjusted independently by a similar mechanism. The instrument contains large shutter and filter mechanisms, both designed in a modular way for fast exchange and easy maintenance.

  12. Electrolocation-based underwater obstacle avoidance using wide-field integration methods.

    PubMed

    Dimble, Kedar D; Faddy, James M; Humbert, J Sean

    2014-03-01

    Weakly electric fish are capable of efficiently performing obstacle avoidance in dark and navigationally challenging aquatic environments using electrosensory information. This sensory modality enables extraction of relevant proximity information about surrounding obstacles by interpretation of perturbations induced to the fish's self-generated electric field. In this paper, reflexive obstacle avoidance is demonstrated by extracting relative proximity information using spatial decompositions of the perturbation signal, also called an electric image. Electrostatics equations were formulated for mathematically expressing electric images due to a straight tunnel to the electric field generated with a planar electro-sensor model. These equations were further used to design a wide-field integration based static output feedback controller. The controller was implemented in quasi-static simulations for environments with complicated geometries modelled using finite element methods to demonstrate sense and avoid behaviours. The simulation results were confirmed by performing experiments using a computer operated gantry system in environments lined with either conductive or non-conductive objects acting as global stimuli to the field of the electro-sensor. The proposed approach is computationally inexpensive and readily implementable, making underwater autonomous navigation in real-time feasible. PMID:24451219

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera imaging of the gravitational lens 2237 + 0305

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rix, Hans-Walter; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, John N.

    1992-01-01

    Images of the gravitational lens system 2237 + 0305, taken with the HST Wide Field Camera, are analyzed. Positions for the four quasar images, accurate to +/-0.015 arcsec, and relative magnitudes in U and R, accurate to +/-0.06 and 0.04 mag, respectively, are determined. The upper limits on the observed brightness of the fifth image are found to be less than or approximately equal to 7 percent of the brightest quasar image. The mass of the lens inside 0.9 arcsec is found to be 1.08 +/-0.02 x 10 exp 10 solar masses/h100 corresponding to a mass-to-light ratio in B of 12.3h100. This solar mass/solar luminosity estimate agrees with values obtained from stellar dynamics for other elliptical galaxies. A comparison of predictions from this mass model with the measured central velocity dispersion yields a distance-independent agreement to within 10 percent, assuming isotropic velocity dispersions.

  14. The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE): Mission Description and Initial On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Mainzer, Amy; Ressler, Michael E.; Cutri, Roc M.; Jarrett, Thomas; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Padgett, Deborah; McMillan, Robert S.; Skrutskie,Michael; Stanford, S. A.; Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.; Mather, John C.; Leisawitz, David; Gautier, Thomas N., III; McLean, Ian; Benford, Dominic; Lonsdale,Carol J.; Blain, Andrew; Mendez,Bryan; Irace, William R.; Duval, Valerie; Liu, Fengchuan; Royer, Don

    2010-01-01

    The all sky surveys done by the Palomar Observatory Schmidt, the European Southern Observatory Schmidt, and the United Kingdom Schmidt, the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite and the 2 Micron All Sky Survey have proven to be extremely useful tools for astronomy with value that lasts for decades. The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer is mapping the whole sky following its launch on 14 December 2009. WISE began surveying the sky on 14 Jan 2010 and completed its first full coverage of the sky on July 17. The survey will continue to cover the sky a second time until the cryogen is exhausted (anticipated in November 2010). WISE is achieving 5 sigma point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in bands centered at wavelengths of 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micrometers. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodiacal background. The angular resolution is 6.1", 6.4", 6.5" and 12.0" at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micrometers, and the astrometric precision for high SNR sources is better than 0.15".

  15. An accurate cluster selection function for the J-PAS narrow-band wide-field survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascaso, B.; Benítez, N.; Dupke, R.; Cypriano, E.; Lima-Neto, G.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Varela, J.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Broadhurst, T.; Cenarro, A. J.; Devi, N. Chandrachani; Díaz-García, L. A.; Fernandes, C. A. C.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Mei, S.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Molino, A.; Oteo, I.; Schoenell, W.; Sodré, L.; Viironen, K.; Marín-Franch, A.

    2016-03-01

    The impending Javalambre Physics of the accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) will be the first wide-field survey of ≳ 8500 deg2 to reach the `stage IV' category. Because of the redshift resolution afforded by 54 narrow-band filters, J-PAS is particularly suitable for cluster detection in the range z<1. The photometric redshift dispersion is estimated to be only ˜0.003 with few outliers ≲4 per cent for galaxies brighter than i ˜ 23 AB, because of the sensitivity of narrow band imaging to absorption and emission lines. Here, we evaluate the cluster selection function for J-PAS using N-body+semi-analytical realistic mock catalogues. We optimally detect clusters from this simulation with the Bayesian Cluster Finder, and we assess the completeness and purity of cluster detection against the mock data. The minimum halo mass threshold we find for detections of galaxy clusters and groups with both >80 per cent completeness and purity is Mh ˜ 5 × 1013 M⊙ up to z ˜ 0.7. We also model the optical observable, M^{*}_CL-halo mass relation, finding a non-evolution with redshift and main scatter of σ _{M^{*}_CL | M_h}˜ 0.14 dex down to a factor 2 lower in mass than other planned broad-band stage IV surveys, at least. For the Mh ˜ 1 × 1014 M⊙ Planck mass limit, J-PAS will arrive up to z ˜ 0.85 with a σ _{M^{*}_CL | M_h}˜ 0.12 dex. Therefore, J-PAS will provide the largest sample of clusters and groups up to z ˜ 0.8 with a mass calibration accuracy comparable to X-ray data.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Background galaxies in the WSRT wide-field Survey (Braun+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.; Thilker, D.; Walterbos, R. A. M.

    2003-08-01

    We have used the Westerbork array to carry out an unbiased wide-field survey for H I emission features, achieving an RMS sensitivity of about 18mJy/beam at a velocity resolution of 17km/s over 1800deg2 and between -1000optical associations are found within a 30' search radius for all but one of our HI detections in DSS images, although several are not previously catalogued or do not have published redshift determinations. Our detection without a DSS association is at low galactic latitude. Twenty-three of our objects are detected in HI for the first time. We classify almost half of our detections as "confused", since one or more companions is catalogued within a radius of 30' and a velocity interval of 400km/s. Nine of the detected galaxies fall so near the edges of the survey coverage (either spatially or in velocity) that their parameters can not be reliably determined. These nine objects are excluded from the enclosed table. (1 data file).

  17. SuperBIT: Wide-field, Sub-arcsecond Imaging from the Super Pressure Balloon Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Jason; Fraisse, Aurélien A.; Jones, William C.; Netterfield, Calvin Barth; Massey, Richard

    2014-06-01

    The scientific potential of near-diffraction-limited imaging from mid-latitude ultra-long duration balloon payloads is well known. The combination of diffraction-limited angular resolution, extreme stability, space-like backgrounds, and long integrations enables transformative opportunities in studies ranging from the weak lensing of galaxy clusters and cosmic shear to the search for exoplanets. Collaborators at the University of Toronto have recently integrated a half-meter class telescope with a prototype subarcsecond pointing system. SuperBIT will adapt the existing system to the requirements of the mid-latitude super-pressure balloon (SPB) payload, and demonstrate its imaging capability during an ultra-long duration balloon flight that will take off from Wanaka, New Zealand, in the 2016-17 Austral summer. The demonstration instrument will provide imaging with a half-degree field of view and 0.3-arcsecond resolution in five bands between 300 and1000 nm, with sensitivities in the shape-band exceeding 24th magnitude(>5 sigma) in 300 seconds of integration. Our observing schedule will be split between a performance verification sample, a photometric and spectroscopic calibration set, a deep field, and a science catalog. The performance verification set prioritizes a sample of thirty clusters that have been previously well studied with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys, the Chandra X-ray observatory, and for which there are Compton-Y parameter data from millimeter-wavelengths. The photometric calibration set will be selected from the COSMOS field. The science catalog will draw from a set of more than 150 Sunyaev-Zel’dovich, X-ray, and optically selected clusters spanning a wide range of cluster masses and morphologies. Aside from demonstrating the technical approach, these data will enable a systematic program to constrain the mass-observable relations over an unprecedented scale. A successful demonstration of the technical approach and the scientific potential will motivate future development of facility-class instruments on the SPB platform.

  18. Thermal Vacuum Test Performance of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Paul E.; Buchko, Matthew T.; Stavely, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    The Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) Assembly of the HST Wide Field Camera 3 was subjected to thermal vacuum (TN) environmental testing. The test program included both maximum and minimum environments as well as simulated on-orbit cycling. Elements of the VCHP assembly included a VCHP, an optical bench cold plate with an imbedded constant conductance heat pipe, and a VCHP reservoir radiator with a proportionally controlled heater. The purpose of the test was to characterize and demonstrate the assembly s ability to control the temperature of the cold plate, which provides a stable thermal environment for the instrument s optical bench. This paper discusses the VCHP Assembly control performance and control authority during the dynamic hot and cold 90-minute orbit cycling test phases.

  19. The Structure of Nuclear Star Clusters in Nearby Late-type Spiral Galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Daniel J.; Barth, Aaron J.; Seth, Anil C.; den Brok, Mark; Cappellari, Michele; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Neumayer, Nadine

    2015-05-01

    We obtained Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 imaging of a sample of ten of the nearest and brightest nuclear clusters (NCs) residing in late-type spiral galaxies, in seven bands that span the near-UV to the near-IR. Structural properties of the clusters were measured by fitting two-dimensional surface brightness profiles to the images using GALFIT. The clusters exhibit a wide range of structural properties, with F814W absolute magnitudes that range from -11.2 to -15.1 mag and F814W effective radii that range from 1.4 to 8.3 pc. For 6 of the 10 clusters in our sample, we find changes in the effective radius with wavelength, suggesting radially varying stellar populations. In four of the objects, the effective radius increases with wavelength, indicating the presence of a younger population that is more concentrated than the bulk of the stars in the cluster. However, we find a general decrease in effective radius with wavelength in two of the objects in our sample, which may indicate extended, circumnuclear star formation. We also find a general trend of increasing roundness of the clusters at longer wavelengths, as well as a correlation between the axis ratios of the NCs and their host galaxies. These observations indicate that blue disks aligned with the host galaxy plane are a common feature of NCs in late-type galaxies, but are difficult to detect in galaxies that are close to face-on. In color-color diagrams spanning the near-UV through the near-IR, most of the clusters lie far from single-burst evolutionary tracks, showing evidence for multi-age populations. Most of the clusters have integrated colors consistent with a mix of an old population (>1 Gyr) and a young population (˜100-300 Myr). The wide wavelength coverage of our data provides a sensitivity to populations with a mix of ages that would not be possible to achieve with imaging in optical bands only. The surface brightness profiles presented in this work will be used for future stellar population modeling and dynamical studies of the clusters. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-12163.

  20. Low coherence full field interference microscopy or optical coherence tomography: recent advances, limitations and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulhalim, I.

    2013-04-01

    Although low coherence microscopy (LCM) has been known for long time in the context of interference microscopy, coherence radar and white light interferometry, the whole subject has attracted a wide interest in the last two decades particularly accelerated by the entrance of OCT, as a noninvasive powerful technique for biomedical imaging. Today LCM can be classified into two types, both acts as three-dimensional imaging tool. The first is low temporal coherence microscopy; also known as optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is being used for medical diagnostics. The second is full field OCT in various modes and applied to various applications. FF-OCT uses low spatial and temporal coherence similar to the well-known coherence probe microscope (CPM) that have been in use for long time in optical metrology. The CPM has many advantages over conventional microscopy in its ability to discriminate between different transparent layers in a scattering medium thus allowing for precise noninvasive optical probing of dense tissue and other turbid media. In this paper the status of this technology in optical metrology applications will be discussed, on which we have been working to improve its performance, as well as its limitations and future prospective.