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1

The DESI wide field corrector optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Dark Energy Spectroscopic instrument (DESI) is a 5000 fiber multi-object spectrometer system under development for installation on the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Kitt Peak 4m telescope (the Mayall telescope). DESI is designed to perform a 14,000° (square) galaxy and Quasi-Stellar Object (QSO) redshift survey to improve estimates of the dark energy equation of state. The survey design imposes numerous constraints on a prime focus corrector design, including field of view, geometrical blur, stability, fiber injection efficiency, zenith angle, mass and cost. The DESI baseline wide-field optical design described herein provides a 3.2° diameter field of view with six 0.8- 1.14m diameter lenses and an integral atmospheric dispersion compensator.

Doel, Peter; Sholl, Michael J.; Liang, Ming; Brooks, David; Flaugher, Brenna; Gutierrez, Gaston; Kent, Stephen; Lampton, Michael; Miller, Timothy; Sprayberry, David

2014-08-01

2

Optical modeling of the wide-field imaging interferometry testbed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The technique of wide field imaging for optical/IR interferometers for missions like Space Infrared Interferometric (SPIRIT), Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF-I)/DARWIN has been demonstrated through the Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT). In this paper, we present an optical model of the WIIT testbed using the commercially available optical modeling and analysis software FRED. Interferometric results for some simple source targets are presented for a model with ideal surfaces and compared with theoretical closed form solutions. Measured surface deformation data of all mirror surfaces in the form of Zernike coefficients are then added to the optical model compared with results of some simple source targets to laboratory test data. We discuss the sources of error and approximations in the current FRED optical model. Future plans to refine the optical model are also be discussed.

Thompson, Anita K.; Martino, Anthony J.; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Frey, Bradley J.

2006-06-01

3

Adaptive optics wide-field microscopy using direct wavefront sensing  

E-print Network

Adaptive optics wide-field microscopy using direct wavefront sensing Oscar Azucena,1, * Justin, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA 3 Laboratory for Adaptive Optics many of the objects of interest require the sample to be in its original environment [1,2,6]. Adaptive

Sullivan, William T.

4

Silicon optics for wide field x-ray imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silicon pore optics (SPO)1 were originally designed to provide very large collecting areas combined with good angular resolution in narrow field X-ray telescopes. We describe modifications to the geometry and manufacture of SPO to facilitate wide field X-ray imaging applications. Modest changes can greatly improve the vignetting function and off-axis angular resolution of SPO in the Wolter I geometry. Reconfiguring SPO to form Kirkpatrick- Baez stacks in the Schmidt geometry can provide very large fields of view with high angular resolution and large collecting area.

Willingale, R.; Ackermann, M.; Collon, M.

2013-09-01

5

Time-resolved wide-field optically sectioned fluorescence microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the implementation of a fast wide-field optical sectioning technique called HiLo microscopy on a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope. HiLo microscopy is based on the fusion of two images, one with structured illumination and another with uniform illumination. Optically sectioned images are then digitally generated thanks to a fusion algorithm. HiLo images are comparable in quality with confocal images but they can be acquired faster over larger fields of view. We obtain 4D imaging by combining HiLo optical sectioning, time-gated detection, and z-displacement. We characterize the performances of this set-up in terms of 3D spatial resolution and time-resolved capabilities in both fixed- and live-cell imaging modes.

Dupuis, Guillaume; Benabdallah, Nadia; Chopinaud, Aurélien; Mayet, Céline; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine

2013-02-01

6

Ultra-High Precision, Ultra-Wide-Field Optical Photometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The low scintillation noise and the long continuous darkness are among the unique properties of the Dome-C site on the east Antarctic plateau. Ultra-high precision optical photometry is therefore among the techniques best suited for this particular site. We propose a telescope (ICE-T) optimized for ultra-high and ultra wide field photometry for Dome C. It consists of two 60cm optical ultra-wide-field Wynne-Schmidt telescopes and one 18cm narrow-field Maksutov spectrophotometric telescope on a single mount. ICE-T is currently a team effort of the German Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar Research, the Italian Universities of Padova and Perugia, the INAF Observatory Catania, and the Catalonian IEEC in Barcelona, Spain, and the AIP, with collaboration from the University of New South Wales, Australia and the University of St. Andrews, UK. In this paper, I discuss some of the many problems associated with sub-milli-mag photometry.

Strassmeier, K. G.

7

Wide-Field Optic for Autonomous Acquisition of Laser Link  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An innovation reported in Two-Camera Acquisition and Tracking of a Flying Target, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 8 (August 2008), p. 20, used a commercial fish-eye lens and an electronic imaging camera for initially locating objects with subsequent handover to an actuated narrow-field camera. But this operated against a dark-sky background. An improved solution involves an optical design based on custom optical components for the wide-field optical system that directly addresses the key limitations in acquiring a laser signal from a moving source such as an aircraft or a spacecraft. The first challenge was to increase the light collection entrance aperture diameter, which was approximately 1 mm in the first prototype. The new design presented here increases this entrance aperture diameter to 4.2 mm, which is equivalent to a more than 16 times larger collection area. One of the trades made in realizing this improvement was to restrict the field-of-view to +80 deg. elevation and 360 azimuth. This trade stems from practical considerations where laser beam propagation over the excessively high air mass, which is in the line of sight (LOS) at low elevation angles, results in vulnerability to severe atmospheric turbulence and attenuation. An additional benefit of the new design is that the large entrance aperture is maintained even at large off-axis angles when the optic is pointed at zenith. The second critical limitation for implementing spectral filtering in the design was tackled by collimating the light prior to focusing it onto the focal plane. This allows the placement of the narrow spectral filter in the collimated portion of the beam. For the narrow band spectral filter to function properly, it is necessary to adequately control the range of incident angles at which received light intercepts the filter. When this angle is restricted via collimation, narrower spectral filtering can be implemented. The collimated beam (and the filter) must be relatively large to reduce the incident angle down to only a few degrees. In the presented embodiment, the filter diameter is more than ten times larger than the entrance aperture. Specifically, the filter has a clear aperture of about 51 mm. The optical design is refractive, and is comprised of nine custom refractive elements and an interference filter. The restricted maximum angle through the narrow-band filter ensures the efficient use of a 2-nm noise equivalent bandwidth spectral width optical filter at low elevation angles (where the range is longest), at the expense of less efficiency for high elevations, which can be tolerated because the range at high elevation angles is shorter. The image circle is 12 mm in diameter, mapped to 80 x 360 of sky, centered on the zenith.

Page, Norman A.; Charles, Jeffrey R.; Biswas, Abhijit

2011-01-01

8

Performance Modeling of a Wide Field Ground Layer Adaptive Optics System  

E-print Network

Performance Modeling of a Wide Field Ground Layer Adaptive Optics System David R. Andersen1 , Jeff and Monte Carlo simulation codes, we have studied the performance of wide field ground layer adaptive optics on the science detector, but unlike traditional adaptive optics, images do not become diffraction-limited. Rather

Tokovinin, Andrei A.

9

Telescope with a wide field of view internal optical scanner  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A telescope with internal scanner utilizing either a single optical wedge scanner or a dual optical wedge scanner and a controller arranged to control a synchronous rotation of the first and/or second optical wedges, the wedges constructed and arranged to scan light redirected by topological surfaces and/or volumetric scatterers. The telescope with internal scanner further incorporates a first converging optical element that receives the redirected light and transmits the redirected light to the scanner, and a second converging optical element within the light path between the first optical element and the scanner arranged to reduce an area of impact on the scanner of the beam collected by the first optical element.

Degnan, III, John James (Inventor); Zheng, Yunhui (Inventor)

2012-01-01

10

The wide-field imaging interferometry testbed: I. progress, results and future plans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present recent results from the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT). Using a multi-pixel detector for spatial multiplexing, WIIT has demonstrated the ability to acquire wide-field imaging interferometry data. Specifically, these are "double Fourier" data that cover a field of view much larger than the subaperture diffraction spot size. This ability is of great import for a number of proposed missions, including the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT), the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF-I)/DARWIN. The recent results are discussed and analyzed, and future study directions are described.

Rinehart, Stephen A.; Armstrong, J. T.; Frey, Bradley J.; Kirk, Jeff; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Lobsinger, Luke W.; Lyon, Rick; Martino, Anthony J.; Pauls, Thomas A.; Mundy, Lee G.; Sears, E.

2004-10-01

11

Adaptive Optics Calibration for a Wide-Field Microscope Janice Castillo*  

E-print Network

Adaptive Optics Calibration for a Wide-Field Microscope Janice Castillo* and Thomas Bifano Boston University Photonics Center, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, MA, USA 02215 ABSTRACT Adaptive optics-based optimization performance to that of conventional adaptive optics optimization with a point source object

12

Performance Improvement of Near Earth Space Survey (NESS) Wide-Field Telescope (NESS2) Optics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We modified the optical system of 500 mm wide-field telescope of which point spread function showed an irregularity. The telescope has been operated for Near Earth Space Survey (NESS) located at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in Australia, and the optical system was brought back to Korea in January 2008. After performing a numerical simulation with the tested value of surface

Sung-Yeol Yu; Hyun-Su Yi; Jae Hyeob Lee; Hong-Suh Yim; Young-Jun Choi; Ho Soon Yang; Yun Woo Lee; Hong-Kyu Moon; Yong-Ik Byun; Wonyong Han

2010-01-01

13

Wide-Field Spatial Mapping of In Vivo Tattoo Skin Optical Properties Using Modulated Imaging  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives Modulated imaging is a new modality capable of wide-field, spatially resolved measurement of in vivo optical properties. Based on spatial light modulation, the method is inexpensive, non-contact, and allows spatial mapping of tissue absorption and reduced scattering coefficients at any wavelength between 450 and 1,100 nm. Currently, clinicians rely on qualitative visual inspection to guide parameter selection for laser-based tattoo removal. MI provides quantitative measurements of multi-colored tattooed skin which may help guide treatment and objectively assess response. Study Design/Materials and Methods We have measured the spatially varying optical properties of multicolored tattooed skin over a 50 mm × 50 mm field of view at wavelengths ranging from 650 to 970 nm using MI. These measurements were compared to a similar field of view of non-tattooed skin from an adjacent area. Results We have determined the differentiated optical properties in vivo of multi-colored tattooed skin versus non-tattooed skin. Conclusions MI provides spatially resolved quantitative information with potential for quantitative assessment of response to treatment and may provide guidance for laser tattoo removal in the future. PMID:19588528

Ayers, Frederick R.; Cuccia, David J.; Kelly, Kristen M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

2009-01-01

14

Wide Field Optical Camera for Search and Investigation of Fast Cosmic Transients  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the fast wide field optical camera (WFOC) is to perform continuous, alert-independent observations of optical transients and variable astrophysical sources simultaneously with space-born wide field X- and {gamma}-ray telescopes. In particular the camera can detect possible optical precursors and early prompt emission from cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts. The real-time source identification software generates alerts that also could be sent to global alert distribution networks such as the GCN. We estimate that in one year of continuous observation with the WFOC we will observe the following numbers of GRB error boxes simultaneously with space- borne telescopes: 1.6 (WXM/HETE-2), 0.5 (SPI/INTEGRAL), and 4 (BAT/SWIFT)

Pozanenko, A.; Loznikov, V. [IKI RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Beskin, G.; Karpov, S. [SAO RAS, Karachai-Cherkessia (Russian Federation); Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E. [Kosmoten Observatory, Karachai-Cherkessia (Russian Federation); Biryukov, A.; Zolotukhin, Y. [SAI MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [UC Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory (United States); Rumyantsev, V. [CrAO, Crimea (Ukraine)

2004-09-28

15

Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with integrated wide-field retinal imaging and tracking  

PubMed Central

We have developed a new, unified implementation of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) incorporating a wide-field line-scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) and a closed-loop optical retinal tracker. AOSLO raster scans are deflected by the integrated tracking mirrors so that direct AOSLO stabilization is automatic during tracking. The wide-field imager and large-spherical-mirror optical interface design, as well as a large-stroke deformable mirror (DM), enable the AOSLO image field to be corrected at any retinal coordinates of interest in a field of >25 deg. AO performance was assessed by imaging individuals with a range of refractive errors. In most subjects, image contrast was measurable at spatial frequencies close to the diffraction limit. Closed-loop optical (hardware) tracking performance was assessed by comparing sequential image series with and without stabilization. Though usually better than 10 ?m rms, or 0.03 deg, tracking does not yet stabilize to single cone precision but significantly improves average image quality and increases the number of frames that can be successfully aligned by software-based post-processing methods. The new optical interface allows the high-resolution imaging field to be placed anywhere within the wide field without requiring the subject to re-fixate, enabling easier retinal navigation and faster, more efficient AOSLO montage capture and stitching. PMID:21045887

Ferguson, R. Daniel; Zhong, Zhangyi; Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Deng, Cong; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

2010-01-01

16

Binospec: a dual-beam wide-field optical spectrograph for the converted MMT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Binospec is a wide-field, multi-object optical spectrograph to be used at the f/5 focus of the converted 6.5 m Multiple Mirror Telescope. Its dual beams will address adjacent 8' X 15' fields of view, yielding a total slit length of 30'. Binospec will offer approximately 1 - 6 Angstrom resolution at wavelengths between 0.39 and 1.0 micrometer with a 200 mm collimated beam diameter. Although it is difficult to design an f/5 wide-field collimator, f/5 optics are compact, allowing a small and stiff instrument structure. Binospec uses refractive optics throughout; the collimator contains three lens groups and the camera contains four lens groups. Three aspheric surfaces are used: two in the collimator and one in the camera. A pair of 2048 by 4608 pixel CCD detectors are used for each beam, yielding a sampling of 0.22' per pixel. Binospec's innovative optical design allows excellent image quality. Including the contribution of the MMT optics with the f/5 wide-field corrector, the RMS image diameter at Binospec's focal plane is 18 micrometer (1.3 pixels) averaged over field angles and colors.

Fabricant, Daniel G.; Fata, Robert G.; Epps, Harland W.

1998-07-01

17

TMT-AGE: wide field of regard multi-object adaptive optics for TMT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are conducting a feasibility study on a wide field of regard Multi-Object Adaptive Optics system for TMT (TMT-AGE:TMT-Analyzer for Galaxies in the Early universe). The wide FoR is crucial to effectively observe very high-redshift UV-bright galaxies at z>5, which have low surface number density. Simulations of an MOAO system show moderate AO correction can be achieved within 10 arcmin diameter FoR. We discuss overall system design of the wide FoR MOAO system considering the system constraint from the stroke of small-size deformable mirror.

Akiyama, Masayuki; Oya, S.; Ono, Y. H.; TMT-AGE Team

2014-07-01

18

Performance Modeling of a Wide Field Ground Layer Adaptive Optics System  

E-print Network

Using five independent analytic and Monte Carlo simulation codes, we have studied the performance of wide field ground layer adaptive optics (GLAO), which can use a single, relatively low order deformable mirror to correct the wavefront errors from the lowest altitude turbulence. GLAO concentrates more light from a point source in a smaller area on the science detector, but unlike traditional adaptive optics, images do not become diffraction-limited. Rather the GLAO point spread function (PSF) has the same functional form as a seeing-limited PSF, and can be characterized by familiar performance metrics such as Full-Width Half-Max (FWHM). The FWHM of a GLAO PSF is reduced by 0.1" or more for optical and near-infrared wavelengths over different atmospheric conditions. For the Cerro Pachon atmospheric model this correction is even greater when the image quality is worst, which effectively eliminates "bad-seeing" nights; the best seeing-limited image quality, available only 20% of the time, can be achieved 60 to 80% of the time with GLAO. This concentration of energy in the PSF will reduce required exposure times and improve the efficiency of an observatory up to 30 to 40%. These performance gains are relatively insensitive to a number of trades including the exact field of view of a wide field GLAO system, the conjugate altitude and actuator density of the deformable mirror, and the number and configuration of the guide stars.

D. Andersen; J. Stoesz; S. Morris; M. Lloyd-Hart; D. Crampton; T. Butterley; B. Ellerbroek; L. Jollissaint; N. M. Milton; R. Myers; K. Szeto; A. Tokovinin; J. -P. Veran; R. Wilson

2006-10-03

19

High-resolution wide-field imaging of retinal and choroidal blood perfusion with optical microangiography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present high-resolution wide-field imaging of retinal and choroidal blood perfusion with optical microangiography (OMAG) technology. Based on spatial frequency analysis, OMAG is capable of visualizing the vascular perfusion map down to capillary-level resolution. An OMAG system operating at 840 nm is used with an A-scan rate of 27,000 Hz, axial resolution of 8 ?m, and sensitivity of 98 dB. To achieve wide-field imaging, we capture 16 optical coherence tomography (OCT) 3-D datasets in a sequential order, which together provide an area of ~7.4×7.4 mm2 at the posterior segment of the human eye. For each of these datasets, the bulk tissue motion artifacts are eliminated by applying a phase compensation method based on histogram estimation of bulk motion phases, while the displacements occurring between adjacent B-frames are compensated for by 2-D cross correlation between two adjacent OMAG flow images. The depth-resolved capability of OMAG imaging also provides volumetric information on the ocular circulations. Finally, we compare the clinical fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography imaging results with the OMAG results of blood perfusion map within the retina and choroid, and show excellent agreement between these modalities.

An, Lin; Subhush, Hrebesh M.; Wilson, David J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

2010-03-01

20

Proto-Type Development of Optical Wide-field Patrol Network and Test Observation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a prototype system developed for optical satellite tracking and its early test observation results. The main objective of the OWL (Optical Wide-field patroL) network is to get orbital information for Korean domestic satellites using optical means only and to maintain their orbital elements. The network is composed of 5 small wide-field telescopes deployed over the world. Each observing station is operated in fully robotic manner from receiving observation schedule to reporting the result, and controlled by the headquarter located in Daejeon, Korea, where orbit calculation and observation strategy will be determined. We developed a compact telescope system for robotic observation and easy maintenance. The telescope is 0.5m of aperture diameter with Rechey-Cretian configuration and its field of view is 1.1 deg. It is equipped with 4K CCD with 9um pixel size, and its pixel scale is 1.2 arcsec/pixel. A chopper wheel with variable speed is adopted to get more points in a single shot. The CCD camera and all the rotating parts (chopper wheel, de-rotator, and filter wheel) are integrated into one compact component called a wheel station. Each observing station is equipped with a fully automatic dome and heavy duty environment monitoring system. We could get an image every 20 seconds and up to ~100 trail points in a single exposure. Each point is time-tagged by ~1/1000 second precision. For one of best cases, we could estimate satellite position with RMS ~ 0.5km accuracy in the along-track with only 4 exposures (~100 points). The first system was installed at the Mongolian site after completing verification test at the testbed site in Daejeon, Korea. The second and third system will be installed in the end of this year.

Park, J.; Choi, Y.; Jo, J.; Moon, H.; Yim, H.; Park, Y.; Hae, Y.; Park, S.; Choi, J.; Son, J.

2014-09-01

21

WINGS: a WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey. I. Optical imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is the first paper of a series that will present data and scientific results from the WINGS project, a wide-field, multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic survey of galaxies in 77 nearby clusters. The sample was extracted from the ROSAT catalogs of X-Ray emitting clusters, with constraints on the redshift (0.04< z<0.07) and distance from the galactic plane ({\\vert}b{\\vert}? 20 deg). The global goal of the WINGS project is the systematic study of the local cosmic variance of the cluster population and of the properties of cluster galaxies as a function of cluster properties and local environment. This data collection will allow the definition of a local, "zero-point" reference against which to gauge the cosmic evolution when compared to more distant clusters. The core of the project consists of wide-field optical imaging of the selected clusters in the B and V bands. We have also completed a multi-fiber, medium-resolution spectroscopic survey for 51 of the clusters in the master sample. The imaging and spectroscopy data were collected using, respectively, the WFC@INT and WYFFOS@WHT in the northern hemisphere, and the WFI@MPG and 2dF@AAT in the southern hemisphere. In addition, a NIR (J, K) survey of ˜50 clusters and an H?+U survey of some 10 clusters are presently ongoing with the WFCAM@UKIRT and WFC@INT, respectively, while a very-wide-field optical survey has also been programmed with OmegaCam@VST. In this paper we briefly outline the global objectives and the main characteristics of the WINGS project. Moreover, the observing strategy and the data reduction of the optical imaging survey (WINGS-OPT) are presented. We have achieved a photometric accuracy of ˜0.025 mag, reaching completeness to V˜ 23.5. Field size and resolution (FWHM) span the absolute intervals (1.6-2.7) Mpc and (0.7-1.7) kpc, respectively, depending on the redshift and on the seeing. This allows the planned studies to obtain a valuable description of the local properties of clusters and galaxies in clusters.

Fasano, G.; Marmo, C.; Varela, J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moles, M.; Pignatelli, E.; Bettoni, D.; Kjærgaard, P.; Rizzi, L.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.

2006-01-01

22

Tomographic reconstruction for wide-field adaptive optics systems: Fourier domain analysis and fundamental limitations.  

PubMed

Several wide-field-of-view adaptive optics (WFAO) concepts such as multi-conjugate AO (MCAO), multi-object AO (MOAO), and ground-layer AO (GLAO) are currently being studied for the next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). All these concepts will use atmospheric tomography to reconstruct the turbulent-phase volume. In this paper, we explore different reconstruction algorithms and their fundamental limitations, conducting this analysis in the Fourier domain. This approach allows us to derive simple analytical formulations for the different configurations and brings a comprehensive view of WFAO limitations. We then investigate model and statistical errors and their effect on the phase reconstruction. Finally, we show some examples of different WFAO systems and their expected performance on a 42 m telescope case. PMID:19109619

Neichel, Benoit; Fusco, Thierry; Conan, Jean-Marc

2009-01-01

23

Wide-field spectral domain-optical coherence tomography in central serous chorioretinopathy.  

PubMed

The aim the study was to describe wide-field spectral-domain optical coherence tomography morphologic relationships of the vitreous, retina, and choroid in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) eyes. Standardized horizontal, vertical, and two oblique (supertemporal to inferonasal and supranasal to inferotemporal) SD-OCT sections were collected for 40 patient with CSCR. For extramacular imaging, images were obtained from eight locations: (1) nasal to the optic disk, (2) extreme nasal periphery, (3) superior to the superotemporal vascular arcade, (4) extreme superior periphery, (5) inferior to the inferotemporal vascular arcade, (6) extreme inferior periphery, (7) temporal to the macula, and (8) extreme temporal periphery. Wide-angle montage images of OCT from equator to equator were composed with a montaging software. Average subfoveal choroidal thickness was 478 ± 114 µm (range 232-695 µm) at the macular level, 367 ± 94 µm in the superior periphery, 257 ± 103 µm in the inferior periphery, 431 ± 121 and 280 ± 88 µm in the nasal and in the temporal periphery, respectively. Wide-field EDI-OCT revealed a relative thinning of the inner choroidal layer in the periphery, including the small and medium large vessels, which ranged from 86 µm nasally to 120.1 µm superiorly, with a mean of 98.8 ± 13.6 µm. Beneath the thinned inner choroidal layer, hyporeflective lumina, corresponding to the outer choroidal layer, were identified in the periphery of all eyes. The outer choroidal layer thickness ranged from 175.5 µm temporally to 235.5 µm superiorly, with a mean of 217.8 ± 41.4 µm. The novel approach of montaging SD-OCT images to examine relationships between the choroid, retina, and associated structures adjacent to and outside of the macula may have a number of relevant applications in the study of pathologic features of central serous chorioretinopathy. PMID:25552349

Carrai, Paola; Pichi, Francesco; Bonsignore, Francesco; Ciardella, Antonio P; Nucci, Paolo

2015-04-01

24

A small animal time-resolved optical tomography platform using wide-field excitation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Small animal imaging plays a critical role in present day biomedical research by filling an important gap in the translation of research from the bench to the bedside. Optical techniques constitute an emerging imaging modality which have tremendous potential in preclinical applications. Optical imaging methods are capable of non-invasive assessment of the functional and molecular characteristics of biological tissue. The three-dimensional optical imaging technique, referred to as diffuse optical tomography, provides an approach for the whole-body imaging of small animal models and can provide volumetric maps of tissue functional parameters (e.g. blood volume, oxygen saturation etc.) and/or provide 3D localization and quantification of fluorescence-based molecular markers in vivo. However, the complex mathematical reconstruction problem associated with optical tomography and the cumbersome instrumental designs limits its adoption as a high-throughput quantitative whole-body imaging modality in current biomedical research. The development of new optical imaging paradigms is thus necessary for a wide-acceptance of this new technology. In this thesis, the design, development, characterization and optimization of a small animal optical tomography system is discussed. Specifically, the platform combines a highly sensitive time-resolved imaging paradigm with multi-spectral excitation capability and CCD-based detection to provide a system capable of generating spatially, spectrally and temporally dense measurement datasets. The acquisition of such data sets however can take long and translate to often unrealistic acquisition times when using the classical point source based excitation scheme. The novel approach in the design of this platform is the adoption of a wide-field excitation scheme which employs extended excitation sources and in the process allows an estimated ten-fold reduction in the acquisition time. The work described herein details the design of the imaging platform employing DLP-based excitation and time-gated intensified CCD detection and the optimal system operation parameters are determined. The feasibility this imaging approach and accuracy of the system in reconstructing functional parameters and fluorescence markers based on lifetime contrast is established through phantom studies. As a part of the system characterization, the effect of noise in time-resolved optical tomography is investigated and propagation of system noise in optical reconstructions is established. Furthermore, data processing and measurement calibration techniques aimed at reducing the effect of noise in reconstructions are defined. The optimization of excitation pattern selection is established through a novel measurement-guided iterative pattern correction scheme. This technique referred to as Adaptive Full-Field Optical Tomography was shown to improve reconstruction performances in murine models by reducing the dynamic range in photon flux measurements on the surface. Lastly, the application of the unique attributes of this platform to a biologically relevant imaging application, referred to as Forster Resonance Energy Transfer is described. The tomographic imaging of FRET interaction in vivo on a whole-body scale is achieved using the wide-field imaging approach based on lifetime contrast. This technique represents the first demonstration of tomographic FRET imaging in small animals and has significant potential in the development of optical imaging techniques in varied applications ranging from drug discovery to in vivo study of protein-protein interaction.

Venugopal, Vivek

25

Measuring galaxy [O ii] emission line doublet with future ground-based wide-field spectroscopic surveys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The next generation of wide-field spectroscopic redshift surveys will map the large-scale galaxy distribution in the redshift range 0.7 ? z ? 2 to measure baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO). The primary optical signature used in this redshift range comes from the [Oii] emission line doublet, which provides a unique redshift identification that can minimize confusion with other single emission lines. To derive the required spectrograph resolution for these redshift surveys, we simulate observations of the [Oii] (?? 3727, 3729) doublet for various instrument resolutions, and line velocities. We foresee two strategies for the choice of the resolution for future spectrographs for BAO surveys. For bright [Oii] emitter surveys ([Oii] flux ~30 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 like SDSS-IV/eBOSS), a resolution of R ~ 3300 allows the separation of 90 percent of the doublets. The impact of the sky lines on the completeness in redshift is less than 6 percent. For faint [Oii] emitter surveys ([Oii] flux ~10 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 like DESi), the detection improves continuously with resolution, so we recommend the highest possible resolution, the limit being given by the number of pixels (4k by 4k) on the detector and the number of spectroscopic channels (2 or 3).

Comparat, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Bacon, Roland; Mostek, Nick J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Schlegel, David J.; Yèche, Christophe

2013-11-01

26

Wide-field lensless fluorescent microscopy using a tapered fiber-optic faceplate on a chip†  

PubMed Central

We demonstrate lensless fluorescent microscopy over a large field-of-view of ~60 mm2 with a spatial resolution of <4 ?m. In this on-chip fluorescent imaging modality, the samples are placed on a fiber-optic faceplate that is tapered such that the density of the fiber-optic waveguides on the top facet is >5 fold larger than the bottom one. Placed on this tapered faceplate, the fluorescent samples are pumped from the side through a glass hemisphere interface. After excitation of the samples, the pump light is rejected through total internal reflection that occurs at the bottom facet of the sample substrate. The fluorescent emission from the sample is then collected by the smaller end of the tapered faceplate and is delivered to an opto-electronic sensor-array to be digitally sampled. Using a compressive sampling algorithm, we decode these raw lensfree images to validate the resolution (<4 ?m) of this on-chip fluorescent imaging platform using microparticles as well as labeled Giardia muris cysts. This wide-field lensfree fluorescent microscopy platform, being compact and high-throughput, might provide a valuable tool especially for cytometry, rare cell analysis (involving large area microfluidic systems) as well as for microarray imaging applications. PMID:21283900

Coskun, Ahmet F.; Sencan, Ikbal; Su, Ting-Wei; Ozcan, Aydogan

2011-01-01

27

Cryogenic telescope, scanner, and imaging optics for the wide-field infrared survey explorer (WISE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) instrument includes a cryogenic telescope, scanner, and imaging optics module that provides four channels of infrared imaging between 2.8 and 26 microns. The telescope is a 40 cm aperture reflecting five-mirror imager/collimator relay that provides 8X demagnification, a 47 x 86 arcminute field of regard, and a real exit pupil for scanning. It also provides distortion control to better than one part in a thousand to prevent image blur during internal scanning. A one-axis scan mirror at the exit pupil scans the detectors' field-of-view across the telescope field-of-regard, countering the orbital motion and freezing the line of sight during the multi-second exposure period. The imaging optics module is a five-mirror re-imager with dichroic beamsplitters that separate the energy into four channels. All modules operate below 17 Kelvin. The all-reflective system uses aluminum mirrors and metering structures. The scanner is a derivative of the SPIRIT III scanner flown previously. WISE has been selected by NASA for Phase B design.

Schwalm, Mark; Barry, Mark; Perron, Gerry; Sampath, Deepak; LaMalva, Fran; Guregian, James; Crowther, Blake

2005-08-01

28

Static and predictive tomographic reconstruction for wide-field multi-object adaptive optics systems.  

PubMed

Multi-object adaptive optics (MOAO) systems are still in their infancy: their complex optical designs for tomographic, wide-field wavefront sensing, coupled with open-loop (OL) correction, make their calibration a challenge. The correction of a discrete number of specific directions in the field allows for streamlined application of a general class of spatio-angular algorithms, initially proposed in Whiteley et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A15, 2097 (1998)], which is compatible with partial on-line calibration. The recent Learn & Apply algorithm from Vidal et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A27, A253 (2010)] can then be reinterpreted in a broader framework of tomographic algorithms and is shown to be a special case that exploits the particulars of OL and aperture-plane phase conjugation. An extension to embed a temporal prediction step to tackle sky-coverage limitations is discussed. The trade-off between lengthening the camera integration period, therefore increasing system lag error, and the resulting improvement in SNR can be shifted to higher guide-star magnitudes by introducing temporal prediction. The derivation of the optimal predictor and a comparison to suboptimal autoregressive models is provided using temporal structure functions. It is shown using end-to-end simulations of Raven, the MOAO science, and technology demonstrator for the 8 m Subaru telescope that prediction allows by itself the use of 1-magnitude-fainter guide stars. PMID:24561945

Correia, C; Jackson, K; Véran, J-P; Andersen, D; Lardière, O; Bradley, C

2014-01-01

29

Delineating breast ductal carcinoma using combined dye-enhanced wide-field polarization imaging and optical coherence tomography.  

PubMed

Intra-operative delineation of breast cancer is a challenging problem. We used dye-enhanced wide-field polarization imaging for rapid demarcation of en face cancer margins and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for cross-sectional evaluation. Ductal carcinoma specimens were stained with methylene blue. Wide-field reflectance images were acquired at 440 and 640 nm. Wide-field fluorescence images were excited at 640 nm and registered between 660 nm and 750 nm. OCT images were acquired using a 1310 nm swept-source system. The results were validated against histopathology. Both imaging modalities provided diagnostic information on cancer margins. Combined OCT and wide-field polarization imaging shows promise for intra-operative detection of ductal breast carcinoma. PMID:23008236

Patel, Rakesh; Khan, Ashraf; Kamionek, Michal; Kandil, Dina; Quinlan, Robert; Yaroslavsky, Anna N

2013-09-01

30

The New Milky Way: A Wide-Field Survey of Optical Transients near the Galactic plane  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Currently, it may take days for a bright nova outburst to be detected. With a few exceptions, little is known about novae behaviour prior to maximum light. A theoretically-predicted population of ultra-fast novae with t2<1d is evading observational discovery because it is not possible to routinely organize fast follow-up observations of nova candidates. With the aim of bringing the detection time of novae and other bright (V<13.5) optical transients from days down to hours or less, we developed an automated wide-field (8°×6°) system capable of surveying the whole Milky Way area visible from the observing site in one night. The system is built using low-cost mass-produced components and the transient detection pipeline is based on the open source VaST software. We describe the instrument design and report results of the first observations conducted in 2011 October-November and 2012 January-April. The results include the discovery of Nova Sagittarii 2012 No. 1 as well as two X-ray emitting cataclysmic variables 1RXS J063214.8+25362 and XMMSL1 J014956.7+533504. The rapid detection of Nova Sagittarii 2012 No. 1 enabled us to conduct its X-ray and UV observations with Swift 22 hours after discovery (˜eq 31 hour after the outburst onset). All images obtained during the transient search survey are available online.

Sokolovsky, K.; Korotkiy, S.; Lebedev, A.

2014-12-01

31

TMT-AGE: wide field of regard multi-object adaptive optics for TMT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce current status of the feasibility study on a wide field of regard (FoR) Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) system for TMT (TMT-AGE: TMT-Analyzer for Galaxies in the Early universe). MOAO is a system which realize high spatial-resolution observations of multiple objects scattered in a wide FoR. In this study, we put emphasise on the FoR as wide as 10' diameter. The wide FoR is crucial to effectively observe very high-redshift galaxies, which have low surface number density. Simulations of an MOAO system with 8 LGSs show close-to-diffraction-limited correction can be achieved within 5' diameter FoR and moderate AO correction can be achieved within 10' diameter FoR. We discuss overall system design of the wide FoR MOAO system considering the constraint from the stroke of small-size deformable mirror (DM). We also introduce current status of developments of key components of an MOAO system; high-dynamic range wavefront sensor (WFS) and large-stroke small-size DM, and real time computer (RTC) with fast tomographic reconstruction.

Akiyama, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Ono, Yoshito H.; Takami, Hideki; Ozaki, Shinobu; Hayano, Yutaka; Iwata, Ikuru; Hane, Kazuhiro; Wu, Tong; Yamamuro, Tomoyasu; Ikeda, Yuji

2014-07-01

32

ANDROMEDA (M31) OPTICAL AND INFRARED DISK SURVEY. I. INSIGHTS IN WIDE-FIELD NEAR-IR SURFACE PHOTOMETRY  

E-print Network

We present wide-field near-infrared J and K[subscript s] images of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) taken with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope as part of the Andromeda Optical and Infrared Disk Survey. This data set ...

Sick, Jonathan

33

Innovations of wide-field optical-sectioning fluorescence microscopy: toward high-speed volumetric bio-imaging with simplicity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical microscopy has become an indispensable tool for biological researches since its invention, mostly owing to its sub-cellular spatial resolutions, non-invasiveness, instrumental simplicity, and the intuitive observations it provides. Nonetheless, obtaining reliable, quantitative spatial information from conventional wide-field optical microscopy is not always intuitive as it appears to be. This is because in the acquired images of optical microscopy the information about out-of-focus regions is spatially blurred and mixed with in-focus information. In other words, conventional wide-field optical microscopy transforms the three-dimensional spatial information, or volumetric information about the objects into a two-dimensional form in each acquired image, and therefore distorts the spatial information about the object. Several fluorescence holography-based methods have demonstrated the ability to obtain three-dimensional information about the objects, but these methods generally rely on decomposing stereoscopic visualizations to extract volumetric information and are unable to resolve complex 3-dimensional structures such as a multi-layer sphere. The concept of optical-sectioning techniques, on the other hand, is to detect only two-dimensional information about an object at each acquisition. Specifically, each image obtained by optical-sectioning techniques contains mainly the information about an optically thin layer inside the object, as if only a thin histological section is being observed at a time. Using such a methodology, obtaining undistorted volumetric information about the object simply requires taking images of the object at sequential depths. Among existing methods of obtaining volumetric information, the practicability of optical sectioning has made it the most commonly used and most powerful one in biological science. However, when applied to imaging living biological systems, conventional single-point-scanning optical-sectioning techniques often result in certain degrees of photo-damages because of the high focal intensity at the scanning point. In order to overcome such an issue, several wide-field optical-sectioning techniques have been proposed and demonstrated, although not without introducing new limitations and compromises such as low signal-to-background ratios and reduced axial resolutions. As a result, single-point-scanning optical-sectioning techniques remain the most widely used instrumentations for volumetric imaging of living biological systems to date. In order to develop wide-field optical-sectioning techniques that has equivalent optical performance as single-point-scanning ones, this thesis first introduces the mechanisms and limitations of existing wide-field optical-sectioning techniques, and then brings in our innovations that aim to overcome these limitations. We demonstrate, theoretically and experimentally, that our proposed wide-field optical-sectioning techniques can achieve diffraction-limited optical sectioning, low out-of-focus excitation and high-frame-rate imaging in living biological systems. In addition to such imaging capabilities, our proposed techniques can be instrumentally simple and economic, and are straightforward for implementation on conventional wide-field microscopes. These advantages together show the potential of our innovations to be widely used for high-speed, volumetric fluorescence imaging of living biological systems.

Yu, Jiun-Yann

34

All-Weather Calibration of Wide-Field Optical and NIR Surveys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The science goals for ground-based large-area surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, Pan-STARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, require calibration of broadband photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the sky to precisions of a percent or better. This performance will need to be achieved with data taken over the course of many years, and often in less than ideal conditions. This paper describes a strategy to achieve precise internal calibration of imaging survey data taken in less than "photometric" conditions, and reports results of an observational study of the techniques needed to implement this strategy. We find that images of celestial fields used in this case study with stellar densities ~1 arcmin-2 and taken through cloudless skies can be calibrated with relative precision ~0.5% (reproducibility). We report measurements of spatial structure functions of cloud absorption observed over a range of atmospheric conditions, and find it possible to achieve photometric measurements that are reproducible to 1% in images that were taken through cloud layers that transmit as little as 25% of the incident optical flux (1.5 magnitudes of extinction). We find, however, that photometric precision below 1% is impeded by the thinnest detectable cloud layers. We comment on implications of these results for the observing strategies of future surveys.

Burke, David L.; Saha, Abhijit; Claver, Jenna; Axelrod, T.; Claver, Chuck; DePoy, Darren; Ivezi?, Željko; Jones, Lynne; Smith, R. Chris; Stubbs, Christopher W.

2014-01-01

35

Optical Design Trade Study for the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission concept was ranked first in new space astrophysics mission by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey incorporating the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)-Omega payload concept and multiple science white papers. This mission is based on a space telescope at L2 studying exoplanets [via gravitational microlensing], probing dark energy, and surveying the near infrared sky. Since the release of NWNH, the WFIRST project has been working with the WFIRST science definition team (SDT) to refine mission and payload concepts. We present the driving requirements. The current interim reference mission point design, based on the use of a 1.3m unobscured aperture three mirror anastigmat form, with focal imaging and slitless spectroscopy science channels, is consistent with the requirements, requires no technology development, and out performs the JDEM-Omega design.

Content, David A.; Goullioud, R.; Lehan, John P.; Mentzell, John E.

2011-01-01

36

Super-resolution wide-field optical microscopy by use of Evanescent standing waves  

E-print Network

The development of high resolution, high speed imaging techniques allows the study of dynamical processes in biological systems. Optical fluorescence microscopy is an essential tool for investigations in many disciplines ...

Chung, Euiheon

2007-01-01

37

Scanner-Free and Wide-Field Endoscopic Imaging by Using a Single Multimode Optical Fiber  

E-print Network

A single multimode fiber is considered an ideal optical element for endoscopic imaging due to the possibility of direct image transmission via multiple spatial modes. However, the wave distortion induced by the mode ...

Choi, Youngwoon

38

On-sky wide field adaptive optics correction using multiple laser guide stars at the MMT  

E-print Network

We describe results from the first astronomical adaptive optics system to use multiple laser guide stars, located at the 6.5-m MMT telescope in Arizona. Its initial operational mode, ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO), provides uniform stellar wavefront correction within the 2 arc minute diameter laser beacon constellation, reducing the stellar image widths by as much as 53%, from 0.70 to 0.33 arc seconds at lambda = 2.14 microns. GLAO is achieved by applying a correction to the telescope's adaptive secondary mirror that is an average of wavefront measurements from five laser beacons supplemented with image motion from a faint stellar source. Optimization of the adaptive optics system in subsequent commissioning runs will further improve correction performance where it is predicted to deliver 0.1 to 0.2 arc second resolution in the near-infrared during a majority of seeing conditions.

Christoph Baranec; Michael Hart; N. Mark Milton; Thomas Stalcup; Keith Powell; Miguel Snyder; Vidhya Vaitheeswaran; Don McCarthy; Craig Kulesa

2008-12-01

39

Narcissus analysis of cooled IR optical system with multi-magnification in wide field of view  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The designed Infra-red optical system with multi-magnification shows non-uniform thermal distribution only in Wide FOV and suspected to be narcissus effect. To analyze the system's artifacts more effectively, the optical system design was imported to analysis codes. Initial ray tracing was performed with a point source from the detector to identify main candidates of Narcissus effect by analyzing irradiance distribution and flux distribution. As a second step, a planer source was created at the detector and traced again. As a result, four major candidates were selected and the major contributor was identified among them. To confirm the result with experiment, replacement optical component was manufactured. We can confirm that the Narcissus effect was improved significantly by replacing the identified component.

Hong, Jinsuk; Kim, Youngsoo

2012-10-01

40

Accounting for anisoplanatic point spread function in deep wide-field adaptive optics images  

E-print Network

In this paper we present the approach we have used to determine and account for the anisoplanatic point spread function (PSF) in deep adaptive optics (AO) images for the Survey of a Wide Area with NACO (SWAN) at the ESO VLT. The survey comprises adaptive optics observations in the Ks band totaling ~ 30 arcmin^2, assembled from 42 discrete fields centered on different bright stars suitable for AO guiding. We develop a parametric model of the PSF variations across the field of view in order to build an accurate model PSF for every galaxy detected in each of the fields. We show that this approach is particularly convenient, as it uses only easily available data and makes no uncertain assumptions about the stability of the isoplanatic angle during any given night. The model was tested using simulated galaxy profiles to check its performance in terms of recovering the correct morphological parameters; we find that the results are reliable up to Ks ~ 20.5 (K_AB ~ 22.3) in a typical SWAN field. Finally, the model obtained was used to derive the first results from five SWAN fields, and to obtain the AO morphology of 55 galaxies brighter than Ks = 20. These preliminary results demonstrate the unique power of AO observations to derive the details of faint galaxy morphologies and to study galaxy evolution.

G. Cresci; R. I. Davies; A. J. Baker; M. D. Lehnert

2005-04-21

41

Improvements in Space Surveillance Processing for Wide Field of View Optical Sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For more than a decade, an autonomous satellite tracking system at the Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing (AMOS) observatory has been generating routine astrometric measurements of Earth-orbiting Resident Space Objects (RSOs) using small commercial telescopes and sensors. Recent work has focused on developing an improved processing system, enhancing measurement performance and response while supporting other sensor systems and missions. This paper will outline improved techniques in scheduling, detection, astrometric and photometric measurements, and catalog maintenance. The processing system now integrates with Special Perturbation (SP) based astrodynamics algorithms, allowing covariance-based scheduling and more precise orbital estimates and object identification. A merit-based scheduling algorithm provides a global optimization framework to support diverse collection tasks and missions. The detection algorithms support a range of target tracking and camera acquisition rates. New comprehensive star catalogs allow for more precise astrometric and photometric calibrations including differential photometry for monitoring environmental changes. This paper will also examine measurement performance with varying tracking rates and acquisition parameters.

Sydney, P.; Wetterer, C.

2014-09-01

42

Pan-STARRS: a wide-field optical survey telescope array  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii is developing a large optical synoptic survey telescope system; the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System. Pan-STARRS will consist of an array of four 1.8m telescopes with very large (7 square degree) field of view, giving it an etendue larger than all existing survey instruments combined. Each telescope will be equipped with a 1 billion pixel CCD camera with low noise and rapid read-out, and the data will be reduced in near real time to produce both cumulative static sky and difference images, from which transient, moving and variable objects can be detected. Pan-STARRS will be able to survey up to ?6,000 square degrees per night to a detection limit of approximately 24th magnitude. This unique combination of sensitivity and rate of area coverage will open up many new possibilities in time domain astronomy. A major goal for the project is to survey potentially dangerous asteroids, where Pan-STARRS will be able to detect most objects down to 300m size, much smaller than the km size objects accessible to existing search programs. In addition, the Pan-STARRS data products will used to address a wide range of astronomical problems in the Solar System, the Galaxy, and the Cosmos at large. Here, we first outline the Pan-STARRS science goals and describe the survey modes needed to support these. We then describe the design and performance goals, the data processing pipeline, and we review the basic data products. Finally, we present results from simulations that demonstrate Pan-STARRS' capability for detecting potentially hazardous asteroids.

Kaiser, Nicholas

2004-10-01

43

Extended resolution wide-field optical imaging: objective-launched standing-wave total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.  

PubMed

Standing-wave total-internal-reflection fluorescence (SW-TIRF) microscopy uses a super-diffraction-limited standing evanescent wave to extract the high-spatial-frequency content of an object through a diffraction-limited optical imaging system. The effective point-spread function is better than a quarter of the emission wavelength. With a 1.45 numerical aperture objective and 532 nm excitation wavelength, a Rayleigh resolution of approximately 100 nm can be achieved, which is better than twice the resolution of conventional TIRF microscopy. This first experimental realization of SW-TIRF in an objective-launched geometry demonstrates the potential for extended resolution imaging at high speed by using wide-field microscopy. PMID:16599220

Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Daekeun; So, Peter T C

2006-04-01

44

Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors.  

PubMed

Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey-and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces-the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5-2 degrees field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images. PMID:16353802

Lemaître, Gérard R; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

2005-12-01

45

Active feedback wide-field optical low-coherence interferometry for ultrahigh-speed three-dimensional morphometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel optical interferometric scheme for ultrahigh-speed three-dimensional morphometry is proposed. The system is based on wide-field optical coherence tomography (WF-OCT) but with optically chopped illumination. The chopping frequency is feedback-controlled to be always matched with the Doppler frequency of the OCT interferometer, which provides an efficient page-wide demodulation suitable for ultrahigh-speed volumetric imaging. To compensate the unwanted variation in the OCT Doppler frequency of the system, the illumination frequency is phase-locked with an auxiliary laser interferometer which shares the reference arm with the OCT interferometer. The two-dimensional (2D) interference signals projected on the 2D array pixels of a 200 Hz CCD are accumulated during one imaging frame of the CCD. Then, each pixel of the CCD demodulates the OCT signal automatically. Owing to the proposed active frequency-locked illumination scheme, the demodulation does not depend on the variation in the axial scanning speed. Volumetric topograms or/and tomograms of several samples were achieved and rendered with a sensitivity of 58 dB at an axial scan speed of 0.805 mm s-1.

Choi, Woo June; Na, Jihoon; Choi, Hae Young; Eom, Jonghyun; Lee, Byeong Ha

2010-04-01

46

Macroscopic optical imaging technique for wide-field estimation of fluorescence depth in optically turbid media for application in brain tumor surgical guidance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A diffuse imaging method is presented that enables wide-field estimation of the depth of fluorescent molecular markers in turbid media by quantifying the deformation of the detected fluorescence spectra due to the wavelength-dependent light attenuation by overlying tissue. This is achieved by measuring the ratio of the fluorescence at two wavelengths in combination with normalization techniques based on diffuse reflectance measurements to evaluate tissue attenuation variations for different depths. It is demonstrated that fluorescence topography can be achieved up to a 5 mm depth using a near-infrared dye with millimeter depth accuracy in turbid media having optical properties representative of normal brain tissue. Wide-field depth estimates are made using optical technology integrated onto a commercial surgical microscope, making this approach feasible for real-world applications.

Kolste, Kolbein K.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Valdés, Pablo A.; Jermyn, Michael; Wilson, Brian C.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Leblond, Frederic

2015-02-01

47

BOMBOLO: a Multi-Band, Wide-field, Near UV/Optical Imager for the SOAR 4m Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

BOMBOLO is a new multi-passband visitor instrument for SOAR observatory. The first fully Chilean instrument of its kind, it is a three-arms imager covering the near-UV and optical wavelengths. The three arms work simultaneously and independently, providing synchronized imaging capability for rapid astronomical events. BOMBOLO will be able to address largely unexplored events in the minute-to-second timescales, with the following leading science cases: 1) Simultaneous Multiband Flickering Studies of Accretion Phenomena; 2) Near UV/Optical Diagnostics of Stellar Evolutionary Phases; 3) Exoplanetary Transits and 4) Microlensing Follow-Up. BOMBOLO optical design consists of a wide field collimator feeding two dychroics at 390 and 550 nm. Each arm encompasses a camera, filter wheel and a science CCD230-42, imaging a 7 x 7 arcmin field of view onto a 2k x 2k image. The three CCDs will have different coatings to optimise the efficiencies of each camera. The detector controller to run the three cameras will be Torrent (the NOAO open-source system) and a PanView application will run the instrument and produce the data-cubes. The instrument is at Conceptual Design stage, having been approved by the SOAR Board of Directors as a visitor instrument in 2012 and having been granted full funding from CONICYT, the Chilean State Agency of Research, in 2013. The Design Phase is starting now and will be completed in late 2014, followed by a construction phase in 2015 and 2016A, with expected Commissioning in 2016B and 2017A.

Angeloni, R.; Guzmán, D.; Puzia, T. H.; Infante, L.

2014-10-01

48

O-6 Optical Property Degradation of the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera-2 Pick Off Mirror  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Degradation in the performance of optical components can be greatly affected by exposure to the space environment. Many factors can contribute to such degradation including surface contaminants; outgassing; vacuum, UV, and atomic oxygen exposure; temperature cycling; or combinations of parameters. In-situ observations give important clues to degradation processes, but there are relatively few opportunities to correlate those observations with post-flight ground analyses. The return of instruments from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) after its final servicing mission in May 2009 provided such an opportunity. Among the instruments returned from HST was the Wide-Field Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC-2), which had been exposed to the space environment for 16 years. This work focuses on the identifying the sources of degradation in the performance of the Pick-off mirror (POM) from WFPC-2. Techniques including surface reflectivity measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, FTIR (and ATR-FTIR) analyses, SEM/EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with and without ion milling, and wet and dry physical surface sampling were performed. Destructive and contact analyses took place only after completion of the non-destructive measurements. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was then repeated to determine the extent of contaminant removal by the destructive techniques, providing insight into the nature and extent of polymerization of the contaminant layer.

McNamara, Karen M.; Hughes, D. W.; Lauer, H. V.; Burkett, P. J.; Reed, B. B.

2011-01-01

49

High-resolution wide-field microscopy with adaptive optics for spherical aberration correction and motionless focusing  

PubMed Central

Summary Live imaging in cell biology requires three-dimensional data acquisition with the best resolution and signal-to-noise ratio possible. Depth aberrations are a major source of image degradation in three-dimensional microscopy, causing a significant loss of resolution and intensity deep into the sample. These aberrations occur because of the mismatch between the sample refractive index and the immersion medium index. We have built a wide-field fluorescence microscope that incorporates a large-throw deformable mirror to simultaneously focus and correct for depth aberration in three-dimensional imaging. Imaging fluorescent beads in water and glycerol with an oil immersion lens we demonstrate a corrected point spread function and a 2-fold improvement in signal intensity. We apply this new microscope to imaging biological samples, and show sharper images and improved deconvolution. PMID:20096044

Sedat, J.W.; Agard, D.A.; Kam, Z.

2010-01-01

50

Wide-Field Plate Database  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) and the possibilities for its application as a research tool in observational astronomy are presented. Currently the WFPDB comprises the descriptive data for 400 000 archival wide field photographic plates obtained with 77 instruments, from a total of 1 850 000 photographs stored in 269 astronomical archives all over the world since the end of last century. The WFPDB is already accessible for the astronomical community, now only in batch mode through user requests sent by e-mail. We are working on on-line interactive access to the data via INTERNET from Sofia and parallel from the Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg. (Initial information can be found on World Wide Web homepage URL http://www.wfpa.acad.bg.) The WFPDB may be useful in studies of a variety of astronomical objects and phenomena, andespecially for long-term investigations of variable objects and for multi-wavelength research. We have analysed the data in the WFPDB in order to derive the overall characteristics of the totality of wide-field observations, such as the sky coverage, the distributions by observation time and date, by spectral band, and by object type. We have also examined the totality of wide-field observations from point of view of their quality, availability and digitisation. The usefulness of the WFPDB is demonstrated by the results of identification and investigation of the photometrical behaviour of optical analogues of gamma-ray bursts.

Tsvetkov, M. K.; Stavrev, K. Y.; Tsvetkova, K. P.; Semkov, E. H.; Mutatov, A. S.

51

Angularly sensitive wide field of view micro-sensor construction and new processing paradigm: task oriented optical processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discussed is a novel method of manufacturing an Angularly Sensitive Micro-Sensor (ASMS). The process employed utilizes excimer laser ablation to write out the microlens on the curved surface of the master lens. This master lens element is manufactured with fused optical fibers, such that if the registration is maintained, the light from each microlens goes via the fiber to a

Jerome B. Franck

2007-01-01

52

Wide-field optical detection of nanoparticles using on-chip microscopy and self-assembled nanolenses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The direct observation of nanoscale objects is a challenging task for optical microscopy because the scattering from an individual nanoparticle is typically weak at optical wavelengths. Electron microscopy therefore remains one of the gold standard visualization methods for nanoparticles, despite its high cost, limited throughput and restricted field-of-view. Here, we describe a high-throughput, on-chip detection scheme that uses biocompatible wetting films to self-assemble aspheric liquid nanolenses around individual nanoparticles to enhance the contrast between the scattered and background light. We model the effect of the nanolens as a spatial phase mask centred on the particle and show that the holographic diffraction pattern of this effective phase mask allows detection of sub-100 nm particles across a large field-of-view of >20 mm2. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we report on-chip detection of individual polystyrene nanoparticles, adenoviruses and influenza A (H1N1) viral particles.

Mudanyali, Onur; McLeod, Euan; Luo, Wei; Greenbaum, Alon; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Hennequin, Yves; Allier, Cédric P.; Ozcan, Aydogan

2013-03-01

53

Wide-field optical detection of nanoparticles using on-chip microscopy and self-assembled nanolenses  

PubMed Central

The direct observation of nanoscale objects is a challenging task for optical microscopy because the scattering from an individual nanoparticle is typically weak at optical wavelengths. Electron microscopy therefore remains one of the gold standard visualization methods for nanoparticles, despite its high cost, limited throughput and restricted field-of-view. Here, we describe a high-throughput, on-chip detection scheme that uses biocompatible wetting films to self-assemble aspheric liquid nanolenses around individual nanoparticles to enhance the contrast between the scattered and background light. We model the effect of the nanolens as a spatial phase mask centred on the particle and show that the holographic diffraction pattern of this effective phase mask allows detection of sub-100 nm particles across a large field-of-view of >20 mm2. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we report on-chip detection of individual polystyrene nanoparticles, adenoviruses and influenza A (H1N1) viral particles. PMID:24358054

Mudanyali, Onur; McLeod, Euan; Luo, Wei; Greenbaum, Alon; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Hennequin, Yves; Allier, Cédric P.; Ozcan, Aydogan

2013-01-01

54

In vivo wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography of human oral cavity with a forward-viewing probe  

PubMed Central

We report multimodal imaging of human oral cavity in vivo based on simultaneous wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) with a forward-viewing imaging probe. Wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and PS-OCT were to provide both morphological and fluorescence information on the surface, and structural and birefringent information below the surface respectively. The forward-viewing probe was designed to access the oral cavity through the mouth with dimensions of approximately 10 mm in diameter and 180 mm in length. The probe had field of view (FOV) of approximately 5.5 mm in diameter, and adjustable depth of field (DOF) from 2 mm to 10 mm by controlling numerical aperture (NA) in the detection path. This adjustable DOF was to accommodate both requirements for image-based guiding with high DOF and high-resolution, high-sensitivity imaging with low DOF. This multimodal imaging system was characterized by using a tissue phantom and a mouse model in vivo, and was applied to human oral cavity. Information of surface morphology and vasculature, and under-surface layered structure and birefringence of the oral cavity tissues was obtained. These results showed feasibility of this multimodal imaging system as a tool for studying oral cavity lesions in clinical applications. PMID:25780742

Yoon, Yeoreum; Jang, Won Hyuk; Xiao, Peng; Kim, Bumju; Wang, Taejun; Li, Qingyun; Lee, Ji Youl; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Ki Hean

2015-01-01

55

Angularly sensitive wide field of view micro-sensor construction and new processing paradigm: task oriented optical processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Discussed is a novel method of manufacturing an Angularly Sensitive Micro-Sensor (ASMS). The process employed utilizes excimer laser ablation to write out the microlens on the curved surface of the master lens. This master lens element is manufactured with fused optical fibers, such that if the registration is maintained, the light from each microlens goes via the fiber to a specific pixel in a focal plane array (FPA). Such a system allows for a field of view greatly in excess of 180 degrees. If local imaging is required for specific tasks the fiber can send the angularly localized image to a pixel set. Image fusing may then be required. Infrared and ultraviolet versions can be manufactured. A more general application allows for a multi-spectral sensor. After one ASMS is constructed, then an inverse mask (mould) can be created and the monolithic sphere, retaining its registration, is covered in liquid plastic and placed into the mould and the exact replica is re-created. The advantage is low cost and rapid manufacture of the ASMS. The paper focuses on this sensor as a Task-Oriented Optical Processing (TOP) system; where the processing is performed primarily by the optics leaving a greatly reduced requirement for an electronic processor. This is a critical issue for micro, insect sized platforms where the weight budget is devoted to the energy and propulsive systems. An important aspect of this approach is that the sensor samples amplitude and angular space rather than amplitude and position space as conventional sensors currently do. This makes the ASMS processing paradigm completely different from conventional image processing. For example using several fiber/pixel elements to comprise a UV polarimeter allows for simple storage and processing of vector elements for simple navigation. The home position may be treated as "Look up table" reference matrix (RM). That base table can be modified to account for the passage of time (and hence change in solar position from the UV polarimeter, as appropriate). A second "real time" travel matrix (TRM) is then created. Eventually, a target matrix (TAM) would also be created. Simply driving changes in the TRM towards the RM would be used for navigating the return trip back to home base. When the difference between the two matrices goes to a null matrix the platform would be home.

Franck, Jerome B.

2007-04-01

56

Brightest X-Ray Clusters of Galaxies in the CFHTLS Wide Fields: Catalog and Optical Mass Estimator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) presents a unique data set for weak-lensing studies, having high-quality imaging and deep multiband photometry. We have initiated an XMM-CFHTLS project to provide X-ray observations of the brightest X-ray-selected clusters within the wide CFHTLS area. Performance of these observations and the high quality of CFHTLS data allow us to revisit the identification of X-ray sources, introducing automated reproducible algorithms, based on the multicolor red sequence finder. We have also introduced a new optical mass proxy. We provide the calibration of the red sequence observed in the Canada-France-Hawaii filters and compare the results with the traditional single-color red sequence and photo-z. We test the identification algorithm on the subset of highly significant XMM clusters and identify 100% of the sample. We find that the integrated z-band luminosity of the red sequence galaxies correlates well with the X-ray luminosity, with a surprisingly small scatter of 0.20 dex. We further use the multicolor red sequence to reduce spurious detections in the full XMM and ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) data sets, resulting in catalogs of 196 and 32 clusters, respectively. We made spectroscopic follow-up observations of some of these systems with HECTOSPEC and in combination with BOSS DR9 data. We also describe the modifications needed to the source detection algorithm in order to maintain high purity of extended sources in the shallow X-ray data. We also present the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity and velocity dispersion.

Mirkazemi, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Pereira, M. J.; Tanaka, M.; Lerchster, M.; Brimioulle, F.; Egami, E.; Kettula, K.; Erfanianfar, G.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Kneib, J. P.; Rykoff, E.; Seitz, S.; Erben, T.; Taylor, J. E.

2015-01-01

57

Simulator sickness when performing gaze shifts within a wide field of view optic flow environment: preliminary evidence for using virtual reality in vestibular rehabilitation  

PubMed Central

Background Wide field of view virtual environments offer some unique features that may be beneficial for use in vestibular rehabilitation. For one, optic flow information extracted from the periphery may be critical for recalibrating the sensory processes used by people with vestibular disorders. However, wide FOV devices also have been found to result in greater simulator sickness. Before a wide FOV device can be used in a clinical setting, its safety must be demonstrated. Methods Symptoms of simulator sickness were recorded by 9 healthy adult subjects after they performed gaze shifting tasks to locate targets superimposed on an optic flow background. Subjects performed 8 trials of gaze shifting on each of the six separate visits. Results The incidence of symptoms of simulator sickness while subjects performed gaze shifts in an optic flow environment was lower than the average reported incidence for flight simulators. The incidence was greater during the first visit compared with subsequent visits. Furthermore, the incidence showed an increasing trend over the 8 trials. Conclusion The performance of head unrestrained gaze shifts in a wide FOV optic flow environment is tolerated well by healthy subjects. This finding provides rationale for testing these environments in people with vestibular disorders, and supports the concept of using wide FOV virtual reality for vestibular rehabilitation. PMID:15679946

Sparto, Patrick J; Whitney, Susan L; Hodges, Larry F; Furman, Joseph M; Redfern, Mark S

2004-01-01

58

Self-Management of Patient Body Position, Pose, and Motion Using Wide-Field, Real-Time Optical Measurement Feedback: Results of a Volunteer Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We present the results of a clinical feasibility study, performed in 10 healthy volunteers undergoing a simulated treatment over 3 sessions, to investigate the use of a wide-field visual feedback technique intended to help patients control their pose while reducing motion during radiation therapy treatment. Methods and Materials: An optical surface sensor is used to capture wide-area measurements of a subject's body surface with visualizations of these data displayed back to them in real time. In this study we hypothesize that this active feedback mechanism will enable patients to control their motion and help them maintain their setup pose and position. A capability hierarchy of 3 different level-of-detail abstractions of the measured surface data is systematically compared. Results: Use of the device enabled volunteers to increase their conformance to a reference surface, as measured by decreased variability across their body surfaces. The use of visual feedback also enabled volunteers to reduce their respiratory motion amplitude to 1.7 ± 0.6 mm compared with 2.7 ± 1.4 mm without visual feedback. Conclusions: The use of live feedback of their optically measured body surfaces enabled a set of volunteers to better manage their pose and motion when compared with free breathing. The method is suitable to be taken forward to patient studies.

Parkhurst, James M. [Developing Technologies, Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Price, Gareth J., E-mail: gareth.price@christie.nhs.uk [Developing Technologies, Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sharrock, Phil J. [Developing Technologies, Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jackson, Andrew S.N. [Clinical Oncology, Southampton University Hospitals Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Stratford, Julie [Department of Radiotherapy, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Moore, Christopher J. [Developing Technologies, Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

2013-12-01

59

Probing the Physical Properties of High Redshift Optically Obscured Galaxies in the Bootes NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have surveyed a field covering 8.4 degrees2 within the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey region in Boötes with the Multiband Imaging Photometer on the Spitzer Space Telescope to a limiting 24 um flux density of 0.3 mJy, identifying ˜ 22,000 point sources. Thirty one sources from this survey with F(24 um) > 0.75 mJy , which are optically ``invisible'' (R > 26) or very faint (I > 24) have been observed with the low-resolution modules of the Infrared Spectrograph on SST. The spectra were extracted using the IRS SMART spectral analysis package in order to optimize their signal to noise. A suite of mid-IR spectral templates of well known galaxies, observed as part of the IRS GTO program, is used to perform formal fits to the spectral energy distribution of the Boötes sources. These fits enable us to measure their redshift, to calculate the depth of the 9.7 um silicate feature along with the strength of 7.7 um PAH, as well as to estimate their bolometric luminosities. We compare the mid-IR slope, the measured PAH luminosity, and the optical depth of these sources with those of galaxies in the local Universe. As a result we are able to estimate the contribution of a dust enshrouded active nucleus to the mid-IR and bolometric luminosity of these systems. This work is based [in part] on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Contract Number 1257184 issued by JPL/Caltech.

Higdon, S. J. U.; Weedman, D.; Higdon, J. L.; Houck, J. R.; Soifer, B. T.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Herter, T. L.; Brandl, B. R.; Brown, M. J. I.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B.; Le Floc'h, E.; Rieke, M.

2004-12-01

60

Lensless imaging for wide field of view  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is desirable to engineer a small camera with a wide field of view (FOV) because of current developments in the field of wearable cameras and computing products, such as action cameras and Google Glass. However, typical approaches for achieving wide FOV, such as attaching a fisheye lens and convex mirrors, require a trade-off between optics size and the FOV. We propose camera optics that achieve a wide FOV, and are at the same time small and lightweight. The proposed optics are a completely lensless and catoptric design. They contain four mirrors, two for wide viewing, and two for focusing the image on the camera sensor. The proposed optics are simple and can be simply miniaturized, since we use only mirrors for the proposed optics and the optics are not susceptible to chromatic aberration. We have implemented the prototype optics of our lensless concept. We have attached the optics to commercial charge-coupled device/complementary metal oxide semiconductor cameras and conducted experiments to evaluate the feasibility of our proposed optics.

Nagahara, Hajime; Yagi, Yasushi

2015-02-01

61

The XMM-Newton Wide-Field Survey in the COSMOS Field. III. Optical Identification and Multiwavelength Properties of a Large Sample of X-Ray-Selected Sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the optical identification of a sample of 695 X-ray sources detected in the first 1.3 deg2 of the COSMOS XMM-Newton survey, down to a 0.5-2 keV (2-10 keV) limiting flux of ~10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 (~5×10-15 erg cm-2 s-1). In order to identify the correct optical counterparts and to assess the statistical significance of the X-ray-to-optical associations we have used the ``likelihood ratio technique.'' Here we present the identification method and its application to the CFHT I-band and photometric catalogs. We were able to associate a candidate optical counterpart to ~90% (626) of the X-ray sources, while for the remaining ~10% of the sources we were not able to provide a unique optical association due to the faintness of the possible optical counterparts (IAB>25) or to the presence of multiple optical sources, with similar likelihoods of being the correct identification, within the XMM-Newton error circles. We also cross-correlated the candidate optical counterparts with the Subaru multicolor and ACS catalogs and with the Magellan/IMACS, zCOSMOS, and literature spectroscopic data; the spectroscopic sample comprises 248 objects (~40% of the full sample). Our analysis of this statistically meaningful sample of X-ray sources reveals that for ~80% of the counterparts there is a very good agreement between the spectroscopic classification, the morphological parameters as derived from ACS data, and the optical-to-near-infrared colors: the large majority of spectroscopically identified broad-line active galactic nuclei (BL AGNs) have a pointlike morphology on ACS data, blue optical colors in color-color diagrams, and an X-ray-to-optical flux ratio typical of optically selected quasars. Conversely, sources classified as narrow line AGNs or normal galaxies are on average associated with extended optical sources, have significantly redder optical-to-near-infrared colors, and span a larger range of X-ray-to-optical flux ratios. However, about 20% of the sources show an apparent mismatch between the morphological and spectroscopic classifications. All the ``extended'' BL AGNs lie at redshift <1.5, while the redshift distribution of the full BL AGN population peaks at z~1.5. The most likely explanation is that in these objects the nuclear emission is not dominant with respect to the host galaxy emission in the observed ACS band. Our analysis also suggests that the type 2/type 1 ratio decreases toward high luminosities, in qualitative agreement with the results from X-ray spectral analysis and the most recent modeling of the X-ray luminosity function evolution. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; also based on data collected at the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA), under NASA contract NAS 5-26555 the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under Large Program 175.A-0839 Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which are operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA), under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique de France and the University of Hawaii.

Brusa, M.; Zamorani, G.; Comastri, A.; Hasinger, G.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Finoguenov, A.; Mainieri, V.; Salvato, M.; Vignali, C.; Elvis, M.; Fiore, F.; Gilli, R.; Impey, C. D.; Lilly, S. J.; Mignoli, M.; Silverman, J.; Trump, J.; Urry, C. M.; Bender, R.; Capak, P.; Huchra, J. P.; Kneib, J. P.; Koekemoer, A.; Leauthaud, A.; Lehmann, I.; Massey, R.; Matute, I.; McCarthy, P. J.; McCracken, H. J.; Rhodes, J.; Scoville, N. Z.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.

2007-09-01

62

WIDE-FIELD ASTRONOMICAL MULTISCALE CAMERAS  

SciTech Connect

In order to produce sufficiently low aberrations with a large aperture, telescopes have a limited field of view. Because of this narrow field, large areas of the sky at a given time are unobserved. We propose several telescopes based on monocentric reflective, catadioptric, and refractive objectives that may be scaled to wide fields of view and achieve 1.''1 resolution, which in most locations is the practical seeing limit of the atmosphere. The reflective and Schmidt catadioptric objectives have relatively simple configurations and enable large fields to be captured at the expense of the obscuration of the mirror by secondary optics, a defect that may be managed by image plane design. The refractive telescope design does not have an obscuration but the objective has substantial bulk. The refractive design is a 38 gigapixel camera which consists of a single monocentric objective and 4272 microcameras. Monocentric multiscale telescopes, with their wide fields of view, may observe phenomena that might otherwise be unnoticed, such as supernovae, glint from orbital space debris, and near-earth objects.

Marks, Daniel L.; Brady, David J., E-mail: dbrady@ee.duke.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics, Box 90291, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

2013-05-15

63

Wide-field adaptive optics performance in cosmological deep fields for multi-object spectroscopy with the European Extremely Large Telescope  

E-print Network

A multi-object spectrograph on the forthcoming European Extremely Large Telescope will be required to operate with good sky coverage. Many of the interesting deep cosmological fields were deliberately chosen to be free of bright foreground stars, and therefore are potentially challenging for adaptive optics (AO) systems. Here we investigate multi-object AO performance using sub-fields chosen at random from within the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)-S field, which is the worst case scenario for five deep fields used extensively in studies of high-redshift galaxies. Our AO system model is based on that of the proposed MOSAIC instrument but our findings are equally applicable to plans for multi-object spectroscopy on any of the planned Extremely Large Telescopes. Potential guide stars within these sub-fields are identified and used for simulations of AO correction. We achieve ensquared energies within 75~mas of between 25-35\\% depending on the sub-field, which is sufficient to probe sub-kpc scale...

Basden, Alastair; Morris, Tim

2014-01-01

64

Imaging spectrometer wide field catadioptric design  

DOEpatents

A wide field catadioptric imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The catadioptric design has zero Petzval field curvature. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, a system with a catadioptric lens and a dioptric lens for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the system for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the system for receiving the light and the system for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light through the system for receiving the light to the detector array.

Chrisp; Michael P. (Danville, CA)

2008-08-19

65

Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer) mid-infrared photometry of young stellar object candidates in the Canis Majoris clouds at a distance of 1 kpc. WISE has identified 682 objects with apparent 12 and 22 micron excess emission in a 7 deg x 10 deg field around the CMa Rl cloud . While a substantial fraction of these candidates are likely galaxies, AGB stars, and artifacts from confusion along the galactic plane, others are part of a spectacular cluster of YSOs imaged by WISE along a dark filament in the R1 cloud. Palomar Double Spectrograph observations of several sources in this cluster confirm their identity as young A and B stars with strong emission lines. In this contribution, we plot the optical -mid-infrared spectral energy distribution for the WISE YSO candidates and discuss potential contaminants to the sample . The data demonstrate the utility of WISE in performing wide-area surveys for young stellar objects.

Padgett, Deborah

2012-01-01

66

Stereoscopic wide field of view imaging system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A stereoscopic imaging system incorporates a plurality of imaging devices or cameras to generate a high resolution, wide field of view image database from which images can be combined in real time to provide wide field of view or panoramic or omni-directional still or video images.

Prechtl, Eric F. (Inventor); Sedwick, Raymond J. (Inventor); Jonas, Eric M. (Inventor)

2011-01-01

67

Wide-field Infrared Explorer (WIRE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The wide-field infrared explorer (WIRE) is a small spaceborne telescope specifically designed to study the evolution of starburst galaxies. This powerful astronomical instrument will be capable of detecting typical starburst galaxies at a redshift of 0.5, ultraluminous infrared galaxies beyond a redshift of 2, and luminous protogalaxies beyond a redshift of 5. The WIRE survey, to be conducted during a four month period during 1998, will cover over 100 deg2 of high galactic latitude sky at 12 and 25 micrometer. WIRE will measure the ratio of 12 and 25 micrometer flux of detected sources, which is a powerful statistical luminosity indicator. The distribution of starburst galaxy 12-25 micrometer colors as a function of flux density will reveal their evolutionary history and perhaps the presence of protogalaxies at high redshifts. This mission, which is part of the NASA Small Explorer program, takes advantage of recent advances in infrared array detector technology to provide a large sensitivity gain over previously flown missions. During its four-month mission lifetime, WIRE will amass a catalog exceeding the size of the 1983 Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) Point Source Catalog at flux levels over 500 times fainter than the IRAS Faint Source Catalog. WIRE has been designed to maximize detections of high-redshift starburst galaxies using an extremely small and simple instrument. The 30 cm aperture Cassegrain telescope has no moving parts, no reimaging optics and a wide 33 by 33 arcminute field of view. The optics and detectors are cooled during the mission using a lightweight two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat. The three-axis stabilized spacecraft bus is provided by the Goddard Space Flight Center Small Explorer Project Team. The mission, to be launched in September 1998 using an Orbital Sciences Corporation Pegasus XL Launch Vehicle, is managed by GSFC.

Schember, Helene R.; Kemp, John C.; Ames, Harry O.; Hacking, Perry B.; Herter, Terry L.; Fafaul, Bryan; Everett, David; Sparr, Leroy

1996-06-01

68

Wide-Field Plate Database: Latest Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the Wide-Field Plate Database, a basic source of data and meta-data for astronomy's more than 2.4 million wide-field photographic images obtained with professional telescopes worldwide. The technology developed in Sofia for plate digitization with commercial high-quality flatbed scanners yields low-resolution digital images for quick visualization and easy online access, and optimal high-resolution ones for photometric and astrometric investigations.

Tsvetkov, Milcho; Tsvetkova, Katya

2012-04-01

69

Design and optimization of the wide-field spectrometer for the EDGE wide-field spectrometer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have been performing design and optimization of the optics for the Wide Field Spectrometer (WFS): one of the core instruments of the EDGE mission whose science targets are the studies of formation and evolution of large scale structures in the universe. WFS mirrors are based on a conical approximation of the Wolter-I design fabrication technique already applied for ASCA and SUZAKU satellites. In order to give both a large effective area and grasp with small TES detector we use a very short focal length with 1.2 m and 4 reflections system for the outer diameter. The effective area and grasp including the detector efficiency and the filter transmission are 1163 cm2 and 405 cm2deg2 at 0.6 keV respectively.

Sakurai, Ikuya; Tawara, Yuzuru; den Herder, Jan-Williem; Barbera, Marco; Cusumano, Giancarlo; Mineo, Teresa; Perianati, Emanuele

2007-09-01

70

Fiber Optics: A Bright Future.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of the impact of fiber optics on telecommunications and its application to information processing and library services, including information retrieval, news services, remote transmission of library services, and library networking. (RAA)

Rice, James, Jr.

1980-01-01

71

Developing wide-field spatio-spectral interferometry for far-infrared space applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interferometry is an affordable way to bring the benefits of high resolution to space far-IR astrophysics. We summarize an ongoing effort to develop and learn the practical limitations of an interferometric technique that will enable the acquisition of high-resolution far-IR integral field spectroscopic data with a single instrument in a future space-based interferometer. This technique was central to the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS) space mission design concepts, and it will first be used on the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII). Our experimental approach combines data from a laboratory optical interferometer (the Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed, WIIT), computational optical system modeling, and spatio-spectral synthesis algorithm development. We summarize recent experimental results and future plans.

Leisawitz, David; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.; Maher, Stephen F.; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Sinukoff, Evan J.

2012-07-01

72

Developing Wide-Field Spatio-Spectral Interferometry for Far-Infrared Space Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Interferometry is an affordable way to bring the benefits of high resolution to space far-IR astrophysics. We summarize an ongoing effort to develop and learn the practical limitations of an interferometric technique that will enable the acquisition of high-resolution far-IR integral field spectroscopic data with a single instrument in a future space-based interferometer. This technique was central to the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS) space mission design concepts, and it will first be used on the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII). Our experimental approach combines data from a laboratory optical interferometer (the Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed, WIIT), computational optical system modeling, and spatio-spectral synthesis algorithm development. We summarize recent experimental results and future plans.

Leisawitz, David; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.; Maher, Stephen F.; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Sinukoff, Evan J.

2012-01-01

73

Status and Calibration of the HST Wide Field Camera 3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wide Field Camera 3 was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope in May 2009. It is now in full scientific operation supporting over 170 GO programs and accounting for nearly half of all HST observations. Major advances have been made in characterizing and calibration WFC3 included improvements to its detector, photometric, astrometric, and flat field calibrations. We report on the current status of WFC3 and its calibration, the state of the data analysis software, and plans for future calibration.

MacKenty, John W.; WFC3 Team

2010-05-01

74

Wide-field camera for the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an ambitious new wide field IR camera for the 3.8m UK IR Telescope (UKIRT), located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The camera, currently under design at the UK Astronomy Technology Center, will include 4 2048 by 2048 pixel focal plane array IR detectors operating over a wavelength range of 1-2.5 micrometers . The optics provide a 1 degree

David M. Henry; Eli Atad-Ettedgui; Mark M. Casali; Richard J. Bennett; Alan Bridger; Derek J. Ives; R. G. Rae; Timothy G. Hawarden

2000-01-01

75

Wide-field spatio-spectral interferometry for far-infrared space applications: A progress report  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA Astrophysics Roadmap Committee adopted the far-IR community’s vision and recommended far-IR interferometry as a needed capability in the 15 - 30 year time frame. The three major enabling technologies for such a mission are low-noise, high-speed detectors in small arrays; a demonstrated capability to cool optical system components to 4 K and focal planes to tens of mK with cryo-coolers; and the spatio-spectral interferometry (“double Fourier”) technique through which wide-field integral field spectroscopic data are derived from interferometric measurements. This paper reports on the current status of wide-field spatio-spectral interferometry and plans for maturation of the technique to space-flight readiness. Relatively simple spatial-spectral test patterns have been observed with the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, and data cubes representing the observed scenes have been constructed based on the measured interferograms. A critical future milestone is the construction of an astronomically relevant, spatially and spectrally complex scene.

Leisawitz, David; Armstrong, J. T.; Bolcar, M. R.; Lyon, R.; Maher, S. F.; Memarsadeghi, N.; Rinehart, S.; Sinukoff, E.

2014-01-01

76

The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Recent Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present recent results from the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT). The data acquired with the WIIT is "double Fourier" data, including both spatial and spectral information within each data cube. We have been working with this data, and starting to develop algorithms, implementations, and techniques for reducing this data. Such algorithms and tools are of great importance for a number of proposed future missions, including the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT), the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I)/Darwin. Recent results are discussed and future study directions are described.

Rinehart, Stephen

2006-01-01

77

The wide-field imaging interferometry testbed: recent results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present recent results from the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT). The data acquired with the WIIT is "double Fourier" data, including both spatial and spectral information within each data cube. We have been working with this data, and starting to develop algorithms, implementations, and techniques for reducing this data. Such algorithms and tools are of great import for a number of future missions, including the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT), the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I)/Darwin. Recent results are discussed and future study directions are described.

Rinehart, S. A.; Armstrong, T.; Frey, Bradley J.; Jung, J.; Kirk, J.; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Lyon, R.; Martino, Anthony J.; Mundy, Lee G.; Pauls, T.; Thompson, A. K.

2006-06-01

78

Stellar objects identification using wide-field camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with evaluation and processing of astronomical image data, which are obtained by a wide-field all-sky image analyzing monitoring system (WILLIAM). The WILLIAM is an additional experimental camera for project MAIA equipped with wide field lens. The system can detect stellar objects as faint as 6th magnitude. Acquired image data are processed by an algorithm for stellar object detection and identification which is based on coordinates transfer function. Cartesian coordinates at the image data are transformed to horizontal coordinate system. This coordinate system allows searching in astronomical catalogues of stellar objects. This paper presents the components of WILLIAM, its measured electro-optical characteristics and some results of identification.

Janout, Petr; Páta, Petr; Bedná?, Jan; Anisimova, Elena; Blažek, Martin; Skala, Petr

2015-01-01

79

Selected aspects of wide-field stellar interferometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Michelson stellar interferometry, the high-resolution information about the source structure is detected by performing observations with widely separated telescopes, interconnected to form an interferometer. At optical wavelengths, this method provides a technically viable approach for achieving angular resolutions in the milliarcsecond range, comparable to those of a 100 m diameter telescope, whose realization is beyond the immediate engineering capabilities. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to the definition of dedicated interferometric instruments, which will allow to address ambitious astronomical tasks such as high-resolution imaging, astrometry at microarcsecond level, and the direct detection of exoplanets. Astrometry and related techniques employ the so-called wide field-of-view interferometric mode, where phase measurements are performed simultaneously at two (or more) sources; often, the actual observable is the instantaneous phase difference of the two object signals. The future success of wide-field interferometry critically depends on the development of techniques for the accurate control of field-dependent (anisoplanatic) phase errors. In this thesis, we address two aspects of this problem in detail. The first one is theoretical in nature. For ground-based measurements, atmospheric turbulence is the largest source of random phase fluctuations between the on- and the off-axis fringes. We developed a model of the temporal power spectrum of this disturbance, whose validity is not limited to low frequencies only, as it is the case with earlier models. This extension opens the possibility of the analysis of dynamic issues, such as the determination of the allowable coherent integration time T for the off-axis fringes. The spectrum turns out to be well approximated by a sequences of four power-law branches. In first instance, its overall form is determined by the values of the baseline length, telescope diameter, and average beam separation in the atmosphere. Due to the rapid decorrelation of the on- and off-axis phases for increasing star separation theta, the useful field for wide-field interferometry is limited to about |theta|<1', the so-called very narrow angle regime. For high-accuracy applications, this range decreases to a few arcseconds. We estimated that for the VLTI along baselines operating at lambda=2.2 mu, a turbulence-related error of less than lambda/10 rms is only available for field angles smaller than 7.3'' and 5.8'', for UT-UT and AT-AT pairs respectively. The bulk of the spectral power is confined at relatively low frequencies, typically below 1 Hz. Both smaller star separations and larger telescope sizes contribute in lowering the spectral content at hight frequencies. We found that in general, as compared to blind observations, wide-field measurements can make use of significantly longer off-axis integration times T, even at rather big star separations. For the long UT-UT baseline operating at lambda=2.2 mu, we have calculated a 5 % fringe visibility loss is reached for T=740 ms, 2.1 s and 12.7 s for star separations of 30'', 10'', and 5'', respectively. These figures are about 2, 5 and 32 times higher than for a blind observation. Finally, we point out that for large telescopes a significant fraction of the total phase error due to anisoplanatic turbulence is contributed by wavefront modes higher than piston. Therefore, we generalized the formalism used in out study to the analysis of (Zernike) wavefront modes of arbitrary order. This thesis also addresses an instrumental aspect of the problem of the control of anisoplanatic phase errors. A Michelson interferometric imager is suitable for wide-field operation only if the configuration of the pupil images forms a scaled replica of the total array aperture. This implies the factual coincidence of the magnification factors M and pupil rotations phi of all interferometric arms: for the VLTI, the matching accuracy requirements are as severe as dM< 1.9e-3, dphi < 3.8''. We addressed the problem of measuring dM, dphi, to

D'Arcio, Luigi Arsenio

1999-11-01

80

Rozhen Observatory wide-field plate archives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper provides an overview of the wide-field (>10) plate archives at disposal in the Institute of Astronomy and National Astronomical Observatory Rozhen of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The plates with total number 10093 are obtained in the period November 1978 - February 1998 with the 2 m RCC telescope and 50/70/172 cm Schmidt telescope. The available plate catalogues are upgraded with new information, as well as with link to the digitized logbooks (in JPEG file format). The digitization with high quality EPSON flatbed scanners of the available 2 m RCC telescope plates (with low resolution in JPEG, and with high resolution in standardized FITS file format) is accomplished. The digitization of the available 50/70/172 cm Schmidt telescope plates is running. The low resolution images of the scanned Rozhen plates are included in the Wide-Field Plate Database (http://wfpdb.org) and accessible online.

Tsvetkova, K.; Tsvetkov, M.

2013-01-01

81

The Wide-Field Infrared Explorer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

More than 30% of current star formation is taking place ingalaxies known as starburst galaxies. Do starburst galaxies play a central role in the evolution of all galaxies, and can they lead us to the birth of galaxies and the source of quasars? We have proposed to build the Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE), capable of detecting typical starburst galaxies at a redshift of 0.5, ultraluminous infrared galaxies behond a redshift of 2, and luminous protogalaxies beyond a redshift of 5.

Schember, Helene; Hacking, Perry

1993-01-01

82

Wide-field microscopy using microcamera arrays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A microcamera is a relay lens paired with image sensors. Microcameras are grouped into arrays to relay overlapping views of a single large surface to the sensors to form a continuous synthetic image. The imaged surface may be curved or irregular as each camera may independently be dynamically focused to a different depth. Microcamera arrays are akin to microprocessors in supercomputers in that both join individual processors by an optoelectronic routing fabric to increase capacity and performance. A microcamera may image ten or more megapixels and grouped into an array of several hundred, as has already been demonstrated by the DARPA AWARE Wide-Field program with multiscale gigapixel photography. We adapt gigapixel microcamera array architectures to wide-field microscopy of irregularly shaped surfaces to greatly increase area imaging over 1000 square millimeters at resolutions of 3 microns or better in a single snapshot. The system includes a novel relay design, a sensor electronics package, and a FPGA-based networking fabric. Biomedical applications of this include screening for skin lesions, wide-field and resolution-agile microsurgical imaging, and microscopic cytometry of millions of cells performed in situ.

Marks, Daniel L.; Youn, Seo Ho; Son, Hui S.; Kim, Jungsang; Brady, David J.

2013-02-01

83

The wide field imager instrument for Athena  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The "Hot and Energetic Universe" has been selected as the science theme for ESA's L2 mission, scheduled for launch in 2028. The proposed Athena X-ray observatory provides the necessary capabilities to achieve the ambitious goals of the science theme. The X-ray mirrors are based on silicon pore optics technology and will have a 12 m focal length. Two complementary camera systems are foreseen which can be moved in and out of the focal plane by an interchange mechanism. These instruments are the actively shielded micro-calorimeter spectrometer X-IFU and the Wide Field Imager (WFI). The WFI will combine an unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arcmin with a high countrate capability (approx. 1 Crab). It permits a state-of-the-art energy resolution in the energy band of 0.1 keV to 15 keV during the entire mission lifetime (e.g. FWHM <= 150 eV at 6 keV). This performance is accomplished by a set of DEPFET active pixel sensor matrices with a pixel size matching the angular resolution of 5 arcsec (on-axis) of the mirror system. Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450 micron thick silicon bulk. The signal electrons generated by an X-ray photon are collected in a so-called internal gate below the transistor channel. The resulting change of the conductivity of the transistor channel is proportional to the number of electrons and thus a measure for the photon energy. DEPFETs have already been developed for the "Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer" on-board of ESA's BepiColombo mission. For Athena we develop enhanced sensors with integrated electronic shutter and an additional analog storage area in each pixel. These features improve the peak-to-background ratio of the spectra and minimize dead time. The sensor will be read out with a new, fast, low-noise multi-channel analog signal processor with integrated sequencer and serial analog output. The architecture of sensor and readout ASIC allows readout in full frame mode and window mode as well by addressing selectively arbitrary sub-areas of the sensor allowing time resolution in the order of 10 ?s. The further detector electronics has mainly the following tasks: digitization, pre-processing and telemetry of event data as well as supply and control of the detector system. Although the sensor will already be equipped with an on-chip light blocking filter, a filter wheel is necessary to provide an additional external filter, an on-board calibration source, an open position for outgassing, and a closed position for protection of the sensor. The sensor concept provides high quantum efficiency over the entire energy band and we intend to keep the instrumental background as low as possible by designing a graded Z-shield around the sensor. All these properties make the WFI a very powerful survey instrument, significantly surpassing currently existing observatories and in addition allow high-time resolution of the brightest X-ray sources with low pile-up and high efficiency. This manuscript will summarize the current instrument concept and design, the status of the technology development, and the envisaged baseline performance.

Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Porro, Matteo; Rau, Arne; Santangelo, Andrea E.; Tenzer, Chris; Wilms, Jörn

2014-07-01

84

Wide Field Camera 3 Accommodations for HST Robotics Servicing Mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation discusses the objectives of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Robotics Servicing and Deorbit Mission (HRSDM), reviews the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), and also reviews the contamination accomodations for the WFC3. The objectives of the HRSDM are (1) to provide a disposal capability at the end of HST's useful life, (2) to upgrade the hardware by installing two new scientific instruments: replace the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR) with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS), and to replace the Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) with Wide Field Camera-3, and (3) Extend the Scientific life of HST for a minimum of 5 years after servicing. Included are slides showing the Hubble Robotic Vehicle (HRV) and slides describing what the HRV contains. There are also slides describing the WFC3. One of the mechanisms of the WFC3 is to serve partially as replacement gyroscopes for HST. There are also slides that discuss the contamination requirements for the Rate Sensor Units (RSUs), that are part of the Rate Gyroscope Assembly on the WFC3.

Ginyard, Amani

2005-01-01

85

Wide-field extended-resolution fluorescence microscopy with standing surface plasmon resonance waves  

E-print Network

The resolution of conventional SPR imaging has been limited by the diffraction nature of light. A wide-field extended-resolution optical imaging technique, standing-wave surface plasmon resonance fluorescence (SW-SPRF) ...

Kim, Yang-Hyo

86

WISE: Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This University of California-Berkeley website discusses the goal of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to "map the sky in infrared light, searching for the nearest and coolest stars, the origins of stellar and planetary systems, and the most luminous galaxies in the Universe." After reading an overview of the mission, users can find out about the science behind the mission including WISE's part in studying brown dwarfs. Professional astronomers can examine technical information about the spacecraft, its instrumentation, and data analysis. Educators and students can find classroom activities, interesting images, and informative movies and simulations.

87

WFILAS: Wide Field Imager Lyman Alpha Search  

E-print Network

The Wide Field Imager Lyman-Alpha Search (WFILAS) is a search for Lya emitting galaxies at z~5.7. Deep images from the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the ESO/MPI 2.2m telescope have been used to detect 7 bright Lya emitting candidates in three fields covering 0.74 sq. degree on the sky. For this we used three narrowband (FWHM ~70A), one encompassing intermediate band (FWHM \\~220A) and broadband B and R filters. One has thus far been spectroscopically confirmed as a Lya emitting galaxy at z=5.721 using FORS2 at the VLT. This galaxy shows a bright, well resolved asymmetric line profile, which is characteristic of Lya emitting galaxies. In one of our three fields, the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), we find an overdensity of Lya emitters in agreement with other surveys that have targeted this region. A statistically complete sample of our candidates probes the bright-end of the luminosity function, confirming earlier results from other smaller, deeper surveys.

Westra, E; Lidman, C; Athreya, R; Meisenheimer, K; Wolf, C; Szeifert, T; Pompei, E; Vanzi, L; Westra, Eduard; Lidman, Chris; Athreya, Ramana; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Wolf, Christian; Szeifert, Thomas; Pompei, Emanuela; Vanzi, Leonardo

2005-01-01

88

WFILAS: Wide Field Imager Lyman Alpha Search  

E-print Network

The Wide Field Imager Lyman-Alpha Search (WFILAS) is a search for Lya emitting galaxies at z~5.7. Deep images from the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the ESO/MPI 2.2m telescope have been used to detect 7 bright Lya emitting candidates in three fields covering 0.74 sq. degree on the sky. For this we used three narrowband (FWHM ~70A), one encompassing intermediate band (FWHM \\~220A) and broadband B and R filters. One has thus far been spectroscopically confirmed as a Lya emitting galaxy at z=5.721 using FORS2 at the VLT. This galaxy shows a bright, well resolved asymmetric line profile, which is characteristic of Lya emitting galaxies. In one of our three fields, the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), we find an overdensity of Lya emitters in agreement with other surveys that have targeted this region. A statistically complete sample of our candidates probes the bright-end of the luminosity function, confirming earlier results from other smaller, deeper surveys.

Eduard Westra; D. Heath Jones; Chris Lidman; Ramana Athreya; Klaus Meisenheimer; Christian Wolf; Thomas Szeifert; Emanuela Pompei; Leonardo Vanzi

2005-09-14

89

Toward Wide-Field Retinal Prosthesis  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this article is to present a wide field electrode array that may increase the field of vision in patients implanted with a retinal prosthesis. Mobility is often impaired in patients with low vision, particularly in those with peripheral visual loss. Studies on low vision patients as well as simulation studies on normally sighted individuals have indicated a strong correlation between the visual field and mobility. In addition, it has been shown that increased visual field is associated with a significant improvement in visual acuity and object discrimination. Current electrode arrays implanted in animals or human vary in size; however, the retinal area covered by the electrodes has a maximum projected visual field of about 10°. We have designed wide field electrode arrays that could potentially provide a visual field of 34°, which may significantly improve the mobility. Tests performed on a mechanical eye model showed that it was possible to fix flexible polyimide dummy electrode arrays of 10 mm wide onto the retina using a single retinal tack. They also showed that the arrays could conform to the inner curvature of the eye. Surgeries on an enucleated porcine eye model demonstrated feasibility of implantation of 10 mm wide arrays through a 5 mm eye wall incision. PMID:19458405

Ameri, Hossein; Ratanapakorn, Tanapat; Ufer, Stefan; Eckhardt, Helmut; Humayun, Mark S.; Weiland, James D.

2010-01-01

90

XUV wide field camera for ROSAT.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ROSAT carries a payload of two co-aligned imaging telescopes: the German X-ray Telescope (XRT) which operates in the soft X-ray band (0.1 - 2 keV or 6 - 100 Å) and the UK Wide Field Camera (WFC) which operates in the XUV band (0.02 - 0.2 keV or 60 - 600 Å). The authors review the design and performance of the WFC. The instrument is a grazing incidence telescope comprising a set of 3 nested, Wolter-Schwarzschild Type I, gold-coated, aluminum mirrors, with a microchannel plate detector at their common focus. Thin plastic and metal film filters define the wavelength passbands.

Sims, M. R.; Barstow, M. A.; Pye, J. P.; Wells, A.; Willingale, R.; Courtier, G. M.; Kent, B. J.; Reading, D.; Richards, A. G.; Cole, R. E.; Goodall, C. V.; Sumner, T. J.

1989-07-01

91

Optical MEMS: past, present and future  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spurred by the growth of the internet, Optical Telecommunications bandwidth, experienced unprecedented growth during late 1990's. During this time of great economic expansion, the creation of new enterprises was vast and the expansion of established component, system and services companies was breathtaking. Unfortunately, this positive economic state was short-lived. This period was followed in 2001-2004 by one of the most significant market crashes in history. During those 10 years of economic growth, about $20B in venture capital was invested in the optical telecom industry, most of this investment was lost in recent years. Many start-up industries which experienced unprecedented growth at the end of the 20th century were lost at the start of the 21st. (1) During this time many, innovative technologies were born and buried. However, many new capabilities emerged from this period of unrest; one such example is the advent of Optical MEMS (MOEMS). Many academics and corporate laboratories pursued the development of MOEMS during the economic boom and, in the author's view; MOEMS surfaced as a powerful and versatile tool set that has proved invaluable and in the last few years during economic downturn, stood the test of time. In the Telecommunications industry, for optical switching and wavelength management applications MOEMS has proven to be the technology of choice. (2) Variable Optical Attenuators (VOA), Wavelength Blockers (WB), Dynamic Gain Equalizers (DGE), and most recently Wavelength Selective Switches (WSS) are being used in the numerous recent network deployments. Moreover, agile networks of the future will have MOEMS at every node. This presentation will provide an overview of the history of MOEMS in Telecommunications, discuss its byproducts and offer a window into the future of the technology.

Ramani, Chandra Mouli

2005-09-01

92

Wide-field, high-resolution Fourier ptychographic microscopy.  

PubMed

In this article, we report an imaging method, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), which iteratively stitches together a number of variably illuminated, low-resolution intensity images in Fourier space to produce a wide-field, high-resolution complex sample image. By adopting a wavefront correction strategy, the FPM method can also correct for aberrations and digitally extend a microscope's depth-of-focus beyond the physical limitations of its optics. As a demonstration, we built a microscope prototype with a resolution of 0.78 ?m, a field-of-view of ~120 mm(2), and a resolution-invariant depth-of-focus of 0.3 mm (characterized at 632 nm). Gigapixel colour images of histology slides verify FPM's successful operation. The reported imaging procedure transforms the general challenge of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy from one that is coupled to the physical limitations of the system's optics to one that is solvable through computation. PMID:25243016

Zheng, Guoan; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

2013-09-01

93

Wide-field, high-resolution Fourier ptychographic microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report an imaging method, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), which iteratively stitches together a number of variably illuminated, low-resolution intensity images in Fourier space to produce a wide-field, high-resolution complex sample image. By adopting a wavefront correction strategy, the FPM method can also correct for aberrations and digitally extend a microscope's depth of focus beyond the physical limitations of its optics. As a demonstration, we built a microscope prototype with a resolution of 0.78 µm, a field of view of ~120 mm2 and a resolution-invariant depth of focus of 0.3 mm (characterized at 632 nm). Gigapixel colour images of histology slides verify successful FPM operation. The reported imaging procedure transforms the general challenge of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy from one that is coupled to the physical limitations of the system's optics to one that is solvable through computation.

Zheng, Guoan; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

2013-09-01

94

OAOWFC: Okayama Astrophysical Observatory NIR Wide-Field Camera  

SciTech Connect

In order to detect and trace the early phase of near-infrared (NIR) afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) quickly, we are now developing the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory Wide-Field Camera, OAOWFC. The aperture size of OAOWFC is 91 cm. The focal plane is covered by a 2Kx2K HAWAII2-RG detector with a pixel size of 18.5 {mu}mx18.5 {mu}m, resulting 0.95x0.95 deg{sup 2} field of view with an image scale of 1.6 arcsec/pixel. OAOWFC is designed to be a fully robotic instrument. This camera forms a part of Multicolor Imaging Telescopes for Survey and Monstrous Explosions (MITSuME), a multi telescope system dedicated to optical-NIR follow-up observations of GRB afterglows. Very wide field of view of OAOWFC enables us to catch GRB afterglows under less accurate localization sometimes given by the first alert. OAOWFC has an ability to detect bright GRB afterglow located at z = 10 easily, and it might be detectable at z = 18 if the conditions are met.

Yoshida, M.; Yanagisawa, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Okita, K.; Nagayama, S.; Toda, H. [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, Kamogata, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Ohta, K. [Department of Astronomy Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawai, N. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

2008-05-22

95

Wide-field Fizeau imaging telescope: experimental results.  

PubMed

A nine-aperture, wide-field Fizeau imaging telescope has been built at the Lockheed-Martin Advanced Technology Center. The telescope consists of nine, 125 mm diameter collector telescopes coherently phased and combined to form a diffraction-limited image with a resolution that is consistent with the 610 mm diameter of the telescope. The phased field of view of the array is 1 murad. The measured rms wavefront error is 0.08 waves rms at 635 nm. The telescope is actively controlled to correct for tilt and phasing errors. The control sensing technique is the method known as phase diversity, which extracts wavefront information from a pair of focused and defocused images. The optical design of the telescope and typical performance results are described. PMID:16778931

Kendrick, R L; Aubrun, Jean-Noel; Bell, Ray; Benson, Robert; Benson, Larry; Brace, David; Breakwell, John; Burriesci, Larry; Byler, Eric; Camp, John; Cross, Gene; Cuneo, Peter; Dean, Peter; Digumerthi, Ramji; Duncan, Alan; Farley, John; Green, Andy; Hamilton, Howard H; Herman, Bruce; Lauraitis, Kris; de Leon, Erich; Lorell, Kenneth; Martin, Rob; Matosian, Ken; Muench, Tom; Ni, Mel; Palmer, Alice; Roseman, Dennis; Russell, Sheldon; Schweiger, Paul; Sigler, Rob; Smith, John; Stone, Richard; Stubbs, David; Swietek, Gregg; Thatcher, John; Tischhauser, C; Wong, Harvey; Zarifis, Vassilis; Gleichman, Kurt; Paxman, Rick

2006-06-20

96

Wide-field surveys from the SNAP mission  

SciTech Connect

The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-borne observatory that will survey the sky with a wide-field optical/NIR imager. The images produced by SNAP will have an unprecedented combination of depth, solid-angle, angular resolution, and temporal sampling. Two 7.5 square-degree fields will be observed every four days over 16 months to a magnitude depth of AB = 27.7 in each of nine filters. Co-adding images over all epochs will give an AB = 30.3 per filter. A 300 square-degree field will be surveyed with no repeat visits to AB = 28 per filter. The nine filters span 3500-17000 {angstrom}. Although the survey strategy is tailored for supernova and weak gravitational lensing observations, the resulting data supports a broad range of auxiliary science programs.

agkim@lbl.gov

2002-07-23

97

Wide-Field Surveys from the SNAP Mission  

E-print Network

The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-borne observatory that will survey the sky with a wide-field optical/near-infrared (NIR) imager. The images produced by SNAP will have an unprecedented combination of depth, solid-angle, angular resolution, and temporal sampling. For 16 months each, two 7.5 square-degree fields will be observed every four days to a magnitude depth of AB=27.7 in each of the SNAP filters, spanning 3500-17000\\AA. Co-adding images over all epochs will give AB=30.3 per filter. In addition, a 300 square-degree field will be surveyed to AB=28 per filter, with no repeated temporal sampling. Although the survey strategy is tailored for supernova and weak gravitational lensing observations, the resulting data will support a broad range of auxiliary science programs.

A. Kim; for the SNAP Collaboration

2002-10-02

98

The University of Hawaii Wide-Field Imager (UHWFI)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of Hawaii Wide-Field Imager (UHWFI) is a focal compressor system designed to project the full half-degree field of the UH 2.2 m telescope onto the refurbished UH 8K × 8K CCD camera. The optics use Ohara glasses and are mounted in an oil-filled cell to minimize light loss and ghost images from the large number of internal lens surfaces. The UHWFI is equipped with a six-position filter wheel and a rotating sector blade shutter, both driven by stepper motors. The instrument saw first light in 2004 in an engineering mode. After filling the lens cell with index-matched oil, integrating all software components into the user interface, tuning the CCD performance, and purchasing the final filter set, the UHWFI is now fully commissioned at the UH 2.2 m telescope.

Hodapp, Klaus W.; Seifahrt, Andreas; Luppino, Gerard A.; Wainscoat, Richard; Sousa, Ed; Yamada, Hubert; Ryan, Alan; Shelton, Richard; Inouye, Mel; Pickles, Andrew J.; Ivanov, Yanko K.

2006-05-01

99

Deployment of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide field upgrade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is an innovative large telescope located in West Texas at the McDonald Observatory. The HET operates with a fixed segmented primary and has a tracker, which moves the four-mirror optical corrector and prime focus instrument package to track the sidereal and non-sidereal motions of objects. A major upgrade of the HET is in progress that will substantially increase the pupil size to 10 meters (from 9.2 m) and the field of view to 22 arcminutes (from 4 arcminutes) by replacing the corrector, tracker, and prime focus instrument package. In addition to supporting existing instruments, and a new low resolution spectrograph, this wide field upgrade will feed a revolutionary new integral field spectrograph called VIRUS, in support of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX§). The upgrade is being installed and this paper discusses the current status.

Hill, Gary J.; Drory, Niv; Good, John; Lee, Hanshin; Vattiat, Brian; Kriel, Herman; Bryant, Randy; Elliot, Linda; Landriau, Martin; Leck, Ron; Perry, David; Ramsey, Jason; Savage, Richard; Allen, Richard D.; Damm, George; DePoy, D. L.; Fowler, Jim; Gebhardt, Karl; Haeuser, Marco; MacQueen, Phillip; Marshall, J. L.; Martin, Jerry; Prochaska, Travis; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Shetrone, Matthew; Schroeder Mrozinski, Emily; Tuttle, Sarah E.; Cornell, Mark E.; Booth, John; Moreira, Walter

2014-07-01

100

Visibility retrieval in Michelson wide-field stellar interferometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wide-field interferometry has become a subject of increasing interest in recent years. New methods have been suggested in order to avoid the drawbacks of the standard wide-field method (homothetic mapping), which is not applicable when the aperture is highly diluted; for this reason, imaging with non-homothetic arrays is being extensively studied (E. Pedretti, et al., Astron. Astrophys. Suppl. Ser. 147 285 (2000); S. Gillet, et al., Astron. Astrophys. 400 393 (2003)). The field of view of a pupil-plane interferometer or a densified array consists of only a few resolution elements; in order to improve these systems, we have developed a new method consisting of a Michelson pupil-plane combination scheme where a wide field of view can be achieved in one shot. This technique, called the ‘staircase mirror’ approach, has been described in a previous paper (I. Montilla, S.F. Pereira and J.J.M. Braat, Appl. Optics 44 328 (2005)) and uses a stair-shaped mirror in the intermediate image plane of each telescope in the array, allowing for simultaneous correction of the differential delay for both the on- and off-axis image positions. Experimental results have been obtained showing the simultaneous recovery of the fringes of off-axis stars with an appreciable angular separation, and with a contrast similar to that of the on-axis reference star. With this example we demonstrate an increase of the field of view by a factor of 5, with no need for extra observation time. In this article, we present a further analysis of the method. We investigate how to retrieve the visibility when a star is focused on the edge of a step of the stair-shaped mirror. Even though the optical pathlength difference correction is discontinuous, we show both numerically and analytically that the visibility can be completely recovered, so that no information is lost. Our experimental results demonstrate that the visibility can be retrieved to within a 1% error.

Montilla, I.; Sellos, J.; Pereira, S. F.; Braat, J. J. M.

2006-04-01

101

The Future In Diamond-Machined Optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper is not a prognostication of the future, but rather a discussion of those aspects of the art, science, and technology of ultraprecision machining of optics critical to the continued development along paths already clearly defined. Visible and near-infrared applications require higher quality surfaces than can be produced ordinarily. The complexity of the finishing process, the materials, the characterization of the resultant surface, and the development of realistic functional specifications are all involved. This paper discusses specific aspects of the problem, including scattered light implications of surface finish/figure, subsurface damage/stability, tool and process improvements, as well as characterization techniques. A substantial effort must be expended in education, as many of the requisite pieces actually already exist--ready to be put into place.

Decker, D. L.

1987-02-01

102

Two-mirror, three-reflection telescopes as candidates for sky surveys in ground and space applications. The MINITRUST: an active optics warping telescope for wide-field astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A concept based on a two-mirror, three-reflection telescope has been investigated. Its anastigmatism and flat fielded properties, the compactness and optical performances over 2-2.5 arc deg field of view, make this optical system of high interest for the development of much larger telescopes than with Schmidt designs. The 2MTRT concept is a potential candidate for sky surveys with 2-3 meter class telescopes and particularily well adapted for UV space surveys. Preliminary developments have been carried out with the construction of a 30-cm prototype on Amoretti's design, providing encouraging results. At present, a 45-cm 2MTRT prototype has been realized for ground based sky survey of NEOs, based on active optics (MINITRUST), in order to overcome the difficulty of obtaining three aspherical surfaces. The primary and tertiary lie on the same double vase substrate, and have a rest profile. The hyperbolization is carried out in situ by air depressure. The secondary, in a tulip form substrate, has been hyperbolized by elastic relaxation. The project is planned for operation in 2003.

Viotti, Roberto F.; La Padula, Cesare D.; Vignato, Agostino; Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Dohlen, Kjetil

2002-12-01

103

Wide-field, high-resolution Fourier ptychographic microscopy  

PubMed Central

In this article, we report an imaging method, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), which iteratively stitches together a number of variably illuminated, low-resolution intensity images in Fourier space to produce a wide-field, high-resolution complex sample image. By adopting a wavefront correction strategy, the FPM method can also correct for aberrations and digitally extend a microscope’s depth-of-focus beyond the physical limitations of its optics. As a demonstration, we built a microscope prototype with a resolution of 0.78 ?m, a field-of-view of ~120 mm2, and a resolution-invariant depth-of-focus of 0.3 mm (characterized at 632 nm). Gigapixel colour images of histology slides verify FPM’s successful operation. The reported imaging procedure transforms the general challenge of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy from one that is coupled to the physical limitations of the system’s optics to one that is solvable through computation. PMID:25243016

Zheng, Guoan; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

2014-01-01

104

Wide-field-of-view star tracker camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A prototype wide-field-of-view (WFOV) star tracker camera has been fabricated and tested for use in spacecraft navigation. The most unique feature of this device is its 28 degree(s) X 44 degree(s) FOV, which views a large enough sector of the sky to ensure the existence of at least 5 stars of mv equals 4.5 or brighter in all viewing directions. The WFOV requirement and the need to maximize both collection aperture (F/1.28) and spectral input band (0.4 to 1.1 micrometers ) to meet the light gathering needs for the dimmest star have dictated the use of a novel concentric optical design, which employs a fiber optic faceplate field flattener. The main advantage of the WFOV configuration is the smaller star map required for position processing, which results in less processing power and faster matching. Additionally, a size and mass benefit is seen with a large FOV/smaller effective focal length (efl) sensor. Prototype hardware versions have included both image intensified and un-intensified CCD cameras. Integration times of

Lewis, Isabella T.; Ledebuhr, Arno G.; Axelrod, Timothy S.; Kordas, Joseph F.; Hills, Robert

1991-07-01

105

Workshop on future directions for optical information processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report presents the proceedings of the ARO-sponsored workshop on "Future Directions for Optical Information Processing" held at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, on May 20-22, 1980. Ten papers and a panel discussion consider the state-of-the-art and future areas for research in the field of optical information processing.

Walkup, J. F.; Krile, T. F.

1981-03-01

106

Wide-field stellar photometry in Piwnice Observatory  

E-print Network

In this paper research projects based on the wide-field CCD photometry performed in Piwnice Observatory are discussed. The used telescopes, as well as dedicated software pipeline for data reduction are presented. The prospects for collaboration between Polish and Bulgarian institutes in the field of wide-field photometry are also discussed.

Gracjan Maciejewski

2007-12-17

107

High-resolution LCD projector for extra-wide-field-of-view head-up display  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

LCD projection-based cockpit displays are beginning to make entry into military and commercial aircraft. Customers for commercial Head-Up Displays (HUDs)(including airframe manufacturers) are now interested in the adaptation of the technology into existing and future HUD optical systems. LCD projection can improve mean-time-between-failure rates because the LCDs are very robust and the light sources can be replaced with scheduled maintenance by the customer without the need for re-calibration. LCD projectors promise to lower the cost of the HUD because the cost of these displays continues to drop while the cost of CRTs remain stable. LCD projectors provide the potential for multi-colors, higher brightness raster, and all-digital communication between the flight computer and display unit. Another potential benefit of LCD projection is the ability to increase field of view and viewing eyebox without exceeding existing power budgets or reducing display lifetime and reliability compared to the capabilities provided by CRTs today. This paper describes the performance requirements and improved performance of a third-generation LCD projection image source for use in a wide field of view head-up display (HUD) optical system. This paper will focus on new HUD requirements and the application of various technologies such as LCOS microdisplays, arc lamps, and rear-projection screens. Measured performance results are compared to the design requirements.

Brown, Robert D.; Modro, David H.; Quast, Gerhardt A.; Wood, Robert B.

2003-09-01

108

Wide-field schematic eye models with gradient-index lens  

E-print Network

agreement with the measured values of the ocular aberrations. To make theoretical eye models more consistentWide-field schematic eye models with gradient-index lens Alexander V. Goncharov* and Chris Dainty-field schematic eye model, which provides a more realistic description of the optical system of the eye

Dainty, Chris

109

Solar Physics, Space Weather, and Wide-field X-ray Telescopes  

E-print Network

Solar Physics, Space Weather, and Wide-field X-ray Telescopes CREOL & FPCE: The College of Optics of the Earth). The detrimental effects of solar storm induced "space weather" ranges from disruption of our. The National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA are cooperating on a Solar X-ray Imager (SXI

Van Stryland, Eric

110

MIRIS: A Compact Wide-field Infrared Space Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A compact infrared space telescope called MIRIS (Multi-purpose Infra-Red Imaging System) was developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), and launched onboard the Science and Technology Satellite-3 of Korea (STSAT-3) in 2013 November. The main mission of MIRIS is the Paschen-? emission line survey along the Galactic plane and the cosmic infrared background (CIB) observation, particularly around the north ecliptic pole region. For these missions, a wide field of view (3.67 × 3.67°) with an angular resolution of 51.6? and wavelength coverage from 0.9 ˜ 2.0 ?m have been adopted for MIRIS, having optical components consisting of a 80 mm main lens and four other lenses with F/2 focal ratio optics. The opto-mechanical system was carefully designed to minimize any effects from shock during the launch process and thermal variation. Also, the telescope was designed to use a passive cooling technique to maintain the temperature around 200 K in order to reduce thermal noise. A micro Stirling cooler was used to cool down the Teledyne PICNIC infrared array to 90 K, which was equipped in a dewar with four filters for infrared passbands of I, H, and Paschen-? and a dual-band continuum line filter. MIRIS system was integrated into the STSAT-3 as its primary payload and successfully passed required tests in the laboratory, such as thermal-vacuum, vibration, and shock tests. MIRIS is now operating in sun synchronous orbits for initial tests and has observed its first images successfully.

Han, Wonyong; Lee, Dae-Hee; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Park, Youngsik; Moon, Bongkon; Park, Sung-Joon; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Kim, Il-Joong; Park, Won-Kee; Lee, Dukhang; Seon, Kwang-Il; Nam, Uk-Won; Cha, Sang-Mok; Park, Kwijong; Park, Jang-Hyun; Yuk, In-Soo; Hee Ree, Chang; Jin, Ho; Choel Yang, Sun; Park, Hong-Young; Shin, Goo-Hwan; Seo, Joung-Ki; Rhee, Seung-Wu; Park, Jong-Oh; Mok Lee, Hyung; Murakami, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Toshio

2014-11-01

111

Panoramic Radio Astronomy: Wide-field 1-2 GHz research on galaxy evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a burst of renewed vigor enabled by recent technological advancements, radio astronomers around the world are now developing a number of new telescopes and instruments. Within the coming few years, a major improvement will be achieved over current facilities. Interferometers such as ASKAP, MeerKAT and WSRT+APERTIF will provide a combination of larger field of view and increased simultaneous bandwidth, while maintaining good collecting area and angular resolution. They will achieve a survey speed 10-50 times larger at 1-2 GHz than what is currently possible, allowing for the first time optical-like all-sky extragalactic surveys at these frequencies. The way that radio astronomical research is carried out will change profoundly, marking a major step towards the capabilities sought after for the coming decades. Significant progress will be made in many fields of radio astronomy. One of the areas that will benefit most is research into the evolution of galaxies over the past few Gyr. In particular, wide-field observations at 1-2 GHz will provide an unprecedented panoramic view of the gas properties and star formation in galaxies, embedded in their environment, from z~0.2-0.5 to the present. We aim to bring together researchers in this field to discuss the optimal exploitation of the new radio observatories for future science programs. Within the framework of our current knowledge of the galaxy population at z<0.5, we will address: the key science questions that the new telescopes will permit us to answer in combination with complimentary work at other wavelengths; the observing/analysis modes/strategies which will allow us to most efficiently exploit the data; and the techniques for most effectively coping with the huge volume of survey products, so far unusual for the radio community. In keeping with the forward-looking spirit of this conference, we encourage potential speakers to present and discuss their plans for the instruments of the near future. The key points that the conference will address are: * Scope, depth and design of HI wide area surveys * Evolution of the HI mass function and its dependence on morphological type and environment * Evolution of galaxy scaling relations out to z~0.2 * The evolution of star formation and its relation to gas content in galaxies * Wide field-of-view deep HI observations of individual fields - nearby clusters, groups and galaxies * Continuum surveys: star-forming-galaxies and the role of AGN activity * Polarisation and magnetic fields in nearby galaxies

112

Automated Classification of Periodic Variable Stars Detected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a methodology to classify periodic variable stars identified using photometric time-series measurements constructed from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) full-mission single-exposure Source Databases. This will assist in the future construction of a WISE Variable Source Database that assigns variables to specific science classes as constrained by the WISE observing cadence with statistically meaningful classification probabilities. We have analyzed the WISE light curves of 8273 variable stars identified in previous optical variability surveys (MACHO, GCVS, and ASAS) and show that Fourier decomposition techniques can be extended into the mid-IR to assist with their classification. Combined with other periodic light-curve features, this sample is then used to train a machine-learned classifier based on the random forest (RF) method. Consistent with previous classification studies of variable stars in general, the RF machine-learned classifier is superior to other methods in terms of accuracy, robustness against outliers, and relative immunity to features that carry little or redundant class information. For the three most common classes identified by WISE: Algols, RR Lyrae, and W Ursae Majoris type variables, we obtain classification efficiencies of 80.7%, 82.7%, and 84.5% respectively using cross-validation analyses, with 95% confidence intervals of approximately ±2%. These accuracies are achieved at purity (or reliability) levels of 88.5%, 96.2%, and 87.8% respectively, similar to that achieved in previous automated classification studies of periodic variable stars.

Masci, Frank J.; Hoffman, Douglas I.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Cutri, Roc M.

2014-07-01

113

The Future of X-Ray Optics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The most important next step is the development of X-ray optics comparable to (or better than) Chandra in angular resolution that far exceed Chandra s effective area. Use the long delay to establish an adequately funded, competitive technology program along the lines I have recommended. Don't be diverted from this objective, except for Explorer-class missions. Progress in X-ray optics, with emphasis on the angular resolution, is central to the paradigm-shifting discoveries and the contributions of X-ray astronomy to multiwavelength astrophysics over the past 51 years.

Weisskopf, Martin C.

2013-01-01

114

Texas Supernova Search: A Wide Field Search for Nearby SNe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ROTSE-IIIb is one four robotic telescopes built by the University of Michigan to observe the prompt optical afterglows associated with gamma-ray bursts. At just 0.45m in diameter, it is the smallest research telescope at McDonald, but its 1.85 x 1.85 deg field of view and autonomous operation make it an excellent survey instrument for rare transient phenomena. We have been using ROTSE-IIIb for the past year to search for supernovae in nearby galaxy clusters such as the Virgo, Coma, and Ursa Major clusters. ROTSE-IIIb's wide field of view allows us to search the thousands of galaxies in these clusters, which cover hundreds of square degrees on the sky, in just a few tens of exposures. We can therefore observe all of these fields in a single night, and repeat the search every night. When we identify a new supernova candidate, we invoke our target of opportunity time on the neighboring 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) the following night to obtain a spectrum. Because of the rolling search and the quick spectral turn-around possible with the HET, we are able to capture spectra of the earliest phases of the explosion. By combining this information with spectra taken at later epochs, we can construct a complete description of the explosion. Through this work we aim to better understand the physical conditions of supernova explosions, identify any systematic effects that may affect how Type Ia supernovae are calibrated as standard candles and used to probe cosmology, and also to better calibrate Type II supernovae as standard candles.

Quimby, R. M.; Castro, F.; Gerardy, C. L.; Hoeflich, P.; Kannappan, S. J.; Mondol, P.; Sellers, M.; Wheeler, J. C.

2005-12-01

115

Update on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a NASA MIDEX mission, will survey the entire sky in four bands from 3.3 to 23 microns with a sensitivity 1000 times greater than the IRAS survey. The WISE survey will extend the Two Micron All Sky Survey into the thermal infrared and will provide an important catalog for the James Webb Space Telescope. Using 1024(sup 2) HgCdTe and Si:As arrays at 3.3, 4.7, 12 and 23 microns, WISE will find the most luminous galaxies in the universe, the closest stars to the Sun, and it will detect most of the main belt asteroids larger than 3 km. The single WISE instrument consists of a 40 cm diamond-turned aluminum afocal telescope, a two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat, a scan mirror mechanism, and reimaging optics giving 5 resolution (full-width-half-maximum). The use of dichroics and beamsplitters allows four color images of a 47' x47' field of view to be taken every 8.8 seconds, synchronized with the orbital motion to provide total sky coverage with overlap between revolutions. WISE will be placed into a Sun-synchronous polar orbit on a Delta 7320-10 launch vehicle. The WISE survey approach is simple and efficient. The three-axis-stabilized spacecraft rotates at a constant rate while the scan mirror freezes the telescope line of sight during each exposure. WISE has completed its mission Preliminary Design Review and its NASA Confirmation Review, and the project is awaiting confirmation from NASA to proceed to the Critical Design phase. Much of the payload hardware is now complete, and assembly of the payload will occur over the next year. WISE is scheduled to launch in late 2009; the project web site can be found at www.wise.ssl.berkeley.edu.

Mainzer, Amanda K.; Eisenhardt, Peter; Wright, Edward L.; Liu, Feng-Chuan; Irace, William; Heinrichsen, Ingolf; Cutri, Roc; Duval, Valerie

2006-01-01

116

Past, present, and future of optical design at the College of Optical Sciences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The College of Optical Sciences, OSC, has seen three periods of optical design teaching and development. The first years 1964-1969; the golden years 1970-1999; and the new millennia years. Today the college offers a comprehensive and professional curriculum in optical design learning, and enjoys a strong heritage in optical design. This paper provides a perspective into the history and future prospects in optical design at the OSC.

Sasián, José

2014-09-01

117

Foregrounds in Wide-Field Redshifted 21 cm Power Spectra  

E-print Network

Detection of 21 cm emission of HI from the epoch of reionization, at redshifts z>6, is limited primarily by foreground emission. We investigate the signatures of wide-field measurements and an all-sky foreground model using the delay spectrum technique that maps the measurements to foreground object locations through signal delays between antenna pairs. We demonstrate interferometric measurements are inherently sensitive to all scales, including the largest angular scales, owing to the nature of wide-field measurements. These wide-field effects are generic to all observations but antenna shapes impact their amplitudes substantially. A dish-shaped antenna yields the most desirable features from a foreground contamination viewpoint, relative to a dipole or a phased array. Comparing data from recent Murchison Widefield Array observations, we demonstrate that the foreground signatures that have the largest impact on the HI signal arise from power received far away from the primary field of view. We identify diffu...

Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Bowman, Judd D; Barry, N; Beardsley, A P; Bernardi, G; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Carroll, P; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Dillon, Joshua S; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Hewitt, J N; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P; Kratzenberg, E; Lenc, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Neben, A R; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B; Pober, J C; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Sethi, Shiv K; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Sullivan, I S; Tegmark, M; Tingay, S J; Trott, C M; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Wyithe, J S B

2015-01-01

118

Artist's Concept of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Artist's concept of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer.

A new NASA mission will scan the entire sky in infrared light in search of nearby cool stars, planetary construction zones and the brightest galaxies in the universe.

Called the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, the mission has been approved to proceed into the preliminary design phase as the next in NASA's Medium-class Explorer program of lower cost, highly focused, rapid-development scientific spacecraft. It is scheduled to launch in 2008.

2004-01-01

119

Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Spatial-Spectral Image Synthesis Algorithms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Developed is an algorithmic approach for wide field of view interferometric spatial-spectral image synthesis. The data collected from the interferometer consists of a set of double-Fourier image data cubes, one cube per baseline. These cubes are each three-dimensional consisting of arrays of two-dimensional detector counts versus delay line position. For each baseline a moving delay line allows collection of a large set of interferograms over the 2D wide field detector grid; one sampled interferogram per detector pixel per baseline. This aggregate set of interferograms, is algorithmically processed to construct a single spatial-spectral cube with angular resolution approaching the ratio of the wavelength to longest baseline. The wide field imaging is accomplished by insuring that the range of motion of the delay line encompasses the zero optical path difference fringe for each detector pixel in the desired field-of-view. Each baseline cube is incoherent relative to all other baseline cubes and thus has only phase information relative to itself. This lost phase information is recovered by having point, or otherwise known, sources within the field-of-view. The reference source phase is known and utilized as a constraint to recover the coherent phase relation between the baseline cubes and is key to the image synthesis. Described will be the mathematical formalism, with phase referencing and results will be shown using data collected from NASA/GSFC Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT).

Lyon, Richard G.; Leisawitz, David T.; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Sinukoff, Evan J.

2012-01-01

120

The Garching-Bonn Deep Survey (GaBoDS) Wide-Field-Imaging Reduction Pipeline  

E-print Network

We introduce our publicly available Wide-Field-Imaging reduction pipeline THELI. The procedures applied for the efficient pre-reduction and astrometric calibration are presented. A special emphasis is put on the methods applied to the photometric calibration. As a test case the reduction of optical data from the ESO Deep Public Survey including the WFI-GOODS data is described. The end-products of this project are now available via the ESO archive Advanced Data Products section.

H. Hildebrandt; T. Erben; M. Schirmer; J. P. Dietrich; P. Schneider

2007-05-03

121

Deepest Wide-Field Colour Image in the Southern Sky  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

LA SILLA CAMERA OBSERVES CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH ESO PR Photo 02a/03 ESO PR Photo 02a/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 437 pix - 95k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 873 pix - 904k] [HiRes - JPEG: 4000 x 4366 pix - 23.1M] Caption : PR Photo 02a/03 shows a three-colour composite image of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) , obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) camera on the 2.2-m MPG/ESO telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile). It was produced by the combination of about 450 images with a total exposure time of nearly 50 hours. The field measures 36 x 34 arcmin 2 ; North is up and East is left. Technical information is available below. The combined efforts of three European teams of astronomers, targeting the same sky field in the southern constellation Fornax (The Oven) have enabled them to construct a very deep, true-colour image - opening an exceptionally clear view towards the distant universe . The image ( PR Photo 02a/03 ) covers an area somewhat larger than the full moon. It displays more than 100,000 galaxies, several thousand stars and hundreds of quasars. It is based on images with a total exposure time of nearly 50 hours, collected under good observing conditions with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) - many of them extracted from the ESO Science Data Archive . The position of this southern sky field was chosen by Riccardo Giacconi (Nobel Laureate in Physics 2002) at a time when he was Director General of ESO, together with Piero Rosati (ESO). It was selected as a sky region towards which the NASA Chandra X-ray satellite observatory , launched in July 1999, would be pointed while carrying out a very long exposure (lasting a total of 1 million seconds, or 278 hours) in order to detect the faintest possible X-ray sources. The field is now known as the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) . The new WFI photo of CDF-S does not reach quite as deep as the available images of the "Hubble Deep Fields" (HDF-N in the northern and HDF-S in the southern sky, cf. e.g. ESO PR Photo 35a/98 ), but the field-of-view is about 200 times larger. The present image displays about 50 times more galaxies than the HDF images, and therefore provides a more representative view of the universe . The WFI CDF-S image will now form a most useful basis for the very extensive and systematic census of the population of distant galaxies and quasars, allowing at once a detailed study of all evolutionary stages of the universe since it was about 2 billion years old . These investigations have started and are expected to provide information about the evolution of galaxies in unprecedented detail. They will offer insights into the history of star formation and how the internal structure of galaxies changes with time and, not least, throw light on how these two evolutionary aspects are interconnected. GALAXIES IN THE WFI IMAGE ESO PR Photo 02b/03 ESO PR Photo 02b/03 [Preview - JPEG: 488 x 400 pix - 112k] [Normal - JPEG: 896 x 800 pix - 1.0M] [Full-Res - JPEG: 2591 x 2313 pix - 8.6M] Caption : PR Photo 02b/03 contains a collection of twelve subfields from the full WFI Chandra Deep Field South (WFI CDF-S), centred on (pairs or groups of) galaxies. Each of the subfields measures 2.5 x 2.5 arcmin 2 (635 x 658 pix 2 ; 1 pixel = 0.238 arcsec). North is up and East is left. Technical information is available below. The WFI CDF-S colour image - of which the full field is shown in PR Photo 02a/03 - was constructed from all available observations in the optical B- ,V- and R-bands obtained under good conditions with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the 2.2-m MPG/ESO telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile), and now stored in the ESO Science Data Archive. It is the "deepest" image ever taken with this instrument. It covers a sky field measuring 36 x 34 arcmin 2 , i.e., an area somewhat larger than that of the full moon. The observations were collected during a period of nearly four years, beginning in January 1999 when the WFI instrument was first installed (cf. ESO PR 02/99

2003-01-01

122

Wide-field imaging and OCT vs clinical evaluation of patients referred from diabetic retinopathy screening  

PubMed Central

Purpose Compare wide-field Optomap imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) with clinical examination in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Methods Patients referred from Diabetic Eye Screening Programmes to three centres underwent dilated ophthalmoscopy and were assigned a DR grade. Wide-field colour imaging and OCT were then examined by the same clinician at that visit and a combined grade was assigned. Independent graders later reviewed the images and assigned an imaging-only grade. These three grades (clinical, combined, and imaging) were compared. The method that detected the highest grade of retinopathy, including neovascularisation, was determined. Results Two thousand and forty eyes of 1023 patients were assessed. Wide-field imaging compared with clinical examination had a sensitivity and specificity of 73% and 96%, respectively, for detecting proliferative DR, 84% and 69% for sight-threatening DR, and 64% and 90% for diabetic macular oedema. Imaging alone found 35 more eyes with new vessels (19% of eyes with new vessels) and the combined grade found 14 more eyes than clinical examination alone. Conclusions Assessment of wide-field images and OCT alone detected more eyes with higher grades of DR compared with clinical examination alone or when combined with imaging in a clinical setting. The sensitivity was not higher as the techniques were not the same, with imaging alone being more sensitive. Wide-field imaging with OCT could be used to assess referrals from DR screening to determine management, to enhance the quality of assessment in clinics, and to follow-up patients whose DR is above the screening referral threshold but does not actually require treatment. PMID:25592127

Manjunath, V; Papastavrou, V; Steel, D H W; Menon, G; Taylor, R; Peto, T; Talks, J

2015-01-01

123

Wide-field imaging and OCT vs clinical evaluation of patients referred from diabetic retinopathy screening.  

PubMed

PurposeCompare wide-field Optomap imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) with clinical examination in diabetic retinopathy (DR).MethodsPatients referred from Diabetic Eye Screening Programmes to three centres underwent dilated ophthalmoscopy and were assigned a DR grade. Wide-field colour imaging and OCT were then examined by the same clinician at that visit and a combined grade was assigned. Independent graders later reviewed the images and assigned an imaging-only grade. These three grades (clinical, combined, and imaging) were compared. The method that detected the highest grade of retinopathy, including neovascularisation, was determined.ResultsTwo thousand and forty eyes of 1023 patients were assessed. Wide-field imaging compared with clinical examination had a sensitivity and specificity of 73% and 96%, respectively, for detecting proliferative DR, 84% and 69% for sight-threatening DR, and 64% and 90% for diabetic macular oedema. Imaging alone found 35 more eyes with new vessels (19% of eyes with new vessels) and the combined grade found 14 more eyes than clinical examination alone.ConclusionsAssessment of wide-field images and OCT alone detected more eyes with higher grades of DR compared with clinical examination alone or when combined with imaging in a clinical setting. The sensitivity was not higher as the techniques were not the same, with imaging alone being more sensitive. Wide-field imaging with OCT could be used to assess referrals from DR screening to determine management, to enhance the quality of assessment in clinics, and to follow-up patients whose DR is above the screening referral threshold but does not actually require treatment. PMID:25592127

Manjunath, V; Papastavrou, V; Steel, D H W; Menon, G; Taylor, R; Peto, T; Talks, J

2015-03-01

124

The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Enabling Techniques for High Angular Resolution Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) was designed to develop techniques for wide-field of view imaging interferometry, using "double-Fourier" methods. These techniques will be important for a wide range of future spacebased interferometry missions. We have provided simple demonstrations of the methodology already, and continuing development of the testbed will lead to higher data rates, improved data quality, and refined algorithms for image reconstruction. At present, the testbed effort includes five lines of development; automation of the testbed, operation in an improved environment, acquisition of large high-quality datasets, development of image reconstruction algorithms, and analytical modeling of the testbed. We discuss the progress made towards the first four of these goals; the analytical modeling is discussed in a separate paper within this conference.

Rinehart, S. A.; Armstrong, T.; Frey, Bradley J.; Jung, J.; Kirk, J.; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Lyon, R.; Maher, Stephen; Martino, Anthony J.; Pauls, T.

2007-01-01

125

Design and Plans for a Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future scientific observatories for NASA will utilize interferometry to image astronomical sources. Interferometry is particularly needed in the far-infrared and sub-millimeter because the long wavelength drives large baselines in order to achieve reasonable spatial resolution. However, the requirement to cover a wide field of view with interferometry has not been demonstrated. Because of this, we have been funded by NASA to develop a testbed for demonstrating wide field imaging interferometry that will also allow us to evaluate the system issues associated with this type of observatory. This paper will describe the drivers for this testbed, the design of this testbed, and the actual tests and algorithms we plan to run and demonstrate.

Feinberg, Lee D.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Leviton, D. B.; Danchi, B.; Zhang, X.; Obenschain, Arthur (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

126

System and methods for wide-field quantitative fluorescence imaging during neurosurgery.  

PubMed

We report an accurate, precise and sensitive method and system for quantitative fluorescence image-guided neurosurgery. With a low-noise, high-dynamic-range CMOS array, we perform rapid (integration times as low as 50 ms per wavelength) hyperspectral fluorescence and diffuse reflectance detection and apply a correction algorithm to compensate for the distorting effects of tissue absorption and scattering. Using this approach, we generated quantitative wide-field images of fluorescence in tissue-simulating phantoms for the fluorophore PpIX, having concentrations and optical absorption and scattering variations over clinically relevant ranges. The imaging system was tested in a rodent model of glioma, detecting quantitative levels down to 20 ng/ml. The resulting performance is a significant advance on existing wide-field quantitative imaging techniques, and provides performance comparable to a point-spectroscopy probe that has previously demonstrated significant potential for improved detection of malignant brain tumors during surgical resection. PMID:23903142

Valdes, Pablo A; Jacobs, Valerie L; Wilson, Brian C; Leblond, Frederic; Roberts, David W; Paulsen, Keith D

2013-08-01

127

In-Flight Performance of Wide Field Camera 3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a powerful new UVNisible/IR imager, was installed into HST during Servicing Mission 4. After a successful commissioning in the Servicing Mission Orbital Verification program, WFC3 has been engaged in an exciting program of scientific observations. I review here the in-flight scientific performance of the instrument, addressing such topics as image quality, sensitivity, detector performance, and stability.

Kimble, Randy

2010-01-01

128

Wide field fluorescence imaging in narrow passageways using scanning fiber endoscope technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) has been developed for high resolution imaging of regions in the body that are commonly inaccessible. The SFE produces 500 line color images at 30 Hz frame rate while maintaining a 1.2-1.7 mm outer diameter. The distal tip of the SFE houses a 9 mm rigid scan engine attached to a highly flexible tether (minimum bend radius < 8 mm) comprised of optical fibers and electrical wires within a protective sheath. Unlike other ultrathin technologies, the unique characteristics of this system have allowed the SFE to navigate narrow passages without sacrificing image quality. To date, the SFE has been used for in vivo imaging of the bile duct, esophagus and peripheral airways. In this study, the standard SFE operation was tailored to capture wide field fluorescence images and spectra. Green (523 nm) and blue (440 nm) lasers were used as illumination sources, while the white balance gain values were adjusted to accentuate red fluorescence signal. To demonstrate wide field fluorescence imaging of small lumens, the SFE was inserted into a phantom model of a human pancreatobiliary tract and navigated to a custom fluorescent target. Both wide field fluorescence and standard color images of the target were captured to demonstrate multimodal imaging.

Lee, Cameron M.; Chandler, John E.; Seibel, Eric J.

2010-02-01

129

Wide-field ganglion cells in macaque retinas  

PubMed Central

To describe the wide-field ganglion cells, they were injected intracellularly with Neurobiotin using an in vitro preparation of macaque retina and labeled with streptavidin-Cy3. The retinas were then labeled with antibodies to choline acetyltransferase and other markers to indicate the depth of the dendrites within the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and analyzed by confocal microscopy. There were eight different subtypes of narrowly unistratified cells that ramified in each of the 5 strata, S1–5, including narrow thorny, large sparse, large moderate, large dense, large radiate, narrow wavy, large very sparse, and fine very sparse. There were four types of broadly stratified cells with dendritic trees extending from S4 to S2. One type resembled the parvocellular giant cell and another the broad thorny type described previously in primates. Another broadly stratified cell was called multi-tufted based on its distinctive dendritic branching pattern. The fourth type had been described previously, but not named; we called it broad wavy. There was a bistratified type with its major arbor in S5, the same level as the blue cone bipolar cell; it resembled the large, bistratified cell with blue ON-yellow OFF responses described recently. Two wide-field ganglion cell types were classified as diffuse because they had dendrites throughout the IPL. One had many small branches and was named thorny diffuse. The second was named smooth diffuse because it had straighter dendrites that lacked these processes. Dendrites of the large moderate and multi-tufted cells cofasciculated with ON-starburst cell dendrites and were, therefore, candidates to be ON- and ON–OFF direction-selective ganglion cells, respectively. We concluded that there are at least 15 morphoplogical types of wide-field ganglion cells in macaque retinas. PMID:16212697

YAMADA, ELIZABETH S.; BORDT, ANDREA S.; MARSHAK, DAVID W.

2012-01-01

130

Optical Surveys of Galaxies: Past, Present, and Future  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A brief history is given of wide area optical surveys of galaxies and resulting catalogs, starting from the Shapley-Ames Catalog through POSS and CfA surveys to modern surveys. Scientific impacts of large surveys are described in terms of the complete sample, large homogeneous samples, and new discoveries. Upcoming and future ambitious surveys are also mentioned. A recent review of surveys in various wavelength regions is given by Djorgovski et al. (2012).

Okamura, Sadanori

2015-03-01

131

SSC Geopositional Assessment of the Advanced Wide Field Sensor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The geopositional accuracy of the standard geocorrected product from the Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) was evaluated using digital orthophoto quarter quadrangles and other reference sources of similar accuracy. Images were analyzed from summer 2004 through spring 2005. Forty to fifty check points were collected manually per scene and analyzed to determine overall circular error, estimates of horizontal bias, and other systematic errors. Measured errors were somewhat higher than the specifications for the data, but they were consistent with the analysis of the distributing vendor.

Ross, Kenton

2006-01-01

132

Dither and drizzle strategies for Wide Field Camera 3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hubble's 20th anniversary observation of Herbig-Haro object HH 901 in the Carina Nebula is used to illustrate observing strategies and corresponding data reduction methods for the new Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), which was installed during Servicing Mission 4 in May 2009. The key issues for obtaining optimal results with offline Multidrizzle processing of WFC3 data sets are presented. These pragmatic instructions in "cookbook" format are designed to help new WFC3 users quickly obtain good results with similar data sets.

Mutchler, Max

2010-07-01

133

The wide-field imaging interferometry testbed: II. Characterization and calibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss the procedure used to characterize the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) components and system, including spectral transmission, throughput, wavefront quality, mechanical and thermal stability, and susceptibility to turbulence. The sources of uncertainty and visibility loss are identified and evaluated, and we briefly discuss measures taken to mitigate these effects. We further discuss calibration techniques which can be used to compensate for visibility loss factors, and describe the applicability of these calibration techniques to the future space-based far-IR interferometry missions SPIRIT (Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope) and SPECS (Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure).

Rinehart, Stephen A.; Armstrong, J. T.; Frey, Bradley J.; Kirk, Jeff; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Lobsinger, Luke W.; Lyon, Richard G.; Martino, Anthony J.; Pauls, Thomas A.; Mundy, Lee G.; Sears, E.

2004-10-01

134

Imaging without lenses: achievements and remaining challenges of wide-field on-chip microscopy  

PubMed Central

We discuss unique features of lens-free computational imaging tools and report some of their emerging results for wide-field on-chip microscopy, such as the achievement of a numerical aperture (NA) of ~0.8–0.9 across a field of view (FOV) of more than 20 mm2 or an NA of ~0.1 across a FOV of ~18 cm2, which corresponds to an image with more than 1.5 gigapixels. We also discuss the current challenges that these computational on-chip microscopes face, shedding light on their future directions and applications. PMID:22936170

Greenbaum, Alon; Luo, Wei; Su, Ting-Wei; Göröcs, Zoltán; Xue, Liang; Isikman, Serhan O; Coskun, Ahmet F; Mudanyali, Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan

2012-01-01

135

Dwarf Irregular Galaxy Leo A: Suprime-Cam Wide-field Stellar Photometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have surveyed a complete extent of Leo A—an apparently isolated gas-rich low-mass dwarf irregular galaxy in the Local Group. The B, V, and I passband CCD images (typical seeing ~0.''8) were obtained with the Subaru Telescope equipped with the Suprime-Cam mosaic camera. The wide-field (20' × 24') photometry catalog of 38,856 objects (V ~ 16-26 mag) is presented. This survey is also intended to serve as "a finding chart" for future imaging and spectroscopic observation programs of Leo A. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

Stonkut?, Rima; Arimoto, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Takashi; Narbutis, Donatas; Tamura, Naoyuki; Vansevi?ius, Vladas

2014-10-01

136

Hyperspectral time-resolved wide-field fluorescence molecular tomography based on structured light and single-pixel detection.  

PubMed

We present a time-resolved fluorescence diffuse optical tomography platform that is based on wide-field structured illumination, single-pixel detection, and hyperspectral acquisition. Two spatial light modulators (digital micro-mirror devices) are employed to generate independently wide-field illumination and detection patterns, coupled with a 16-channel spectrophotometer detection module to capture hyperspectral time-resolved tomographic data sets. The main system characteristics are reported, and we demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring dense 4D tomographic data sets (space, time, spectra) for time domain 3D quantitative multiplexed fluorophore concentration mapping in turbid media. PMID:25680065

Pian, Qi; Yao, Ruoyang; Zhao, Lingling; Intes, Xavier

2015-02-01

137

The Wide-Field Imager for Solar Probe Plus (WISPR)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wide-field Imager for Solar PRobe Plus (WISPR) is the sole imager aboard the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission scheduled for launch in 2018. SPP will be a unique mission designed to orbit as close as 7 million km (9.86 solar radii) from Sun center. WISPR employs a 95? radial by 58? transverse field of view to image the fine-scale structure of the solar corona, derive the 3D structure of the large-scale corona, and determine whether a dust-free zone exists near the Sun. WISPR is the smallest heliospheric imager to date yet it comprises two nested wide-field telescopes with large-format (2 K × 2 K) APS CMOS detectors to optimize the performance for their respective fields of view and to minimize the risk of dust damage, which may be considerable close to the Sun. The WISPR electronics are very flexible allowing the collection of individual images at cadences up to 1 second at perihelion or the summing of multiple images to increase the signal-to-noise when the spacecraft is further from the Sun. The dependency of the Thomson scattering emission of the corona on the imaging geometry dictates that WISPR will be very sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. WISPR will be the first `local' imager providing a crucial link between the large-scale corona and the in-situ measurements.

Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell A.; Plunkett, Simon P.; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Thernisien, Arnaud F. R.; Wang, Dennis; Rich, Nathan; Carter, Michael T.; Chua, Damien H.; Socker, Dennis G.; Linton, Mark G.; Morrill, Jeff S.; Lynch, Sean; Thurn, Adam; Van Duyne, Peter; Hagood, Robert; Clifford, Greg; Grey, Phares J.; Velli, Marco; Liewer, Paulett C.; Hall, Jeffrey R.; DeJong, Eric M.; Mikic, Zoran; Rochus, Pierre; Mazy, Emanuel; Bothmer, Volker; Rodmann, Jens

2015-02-01

138

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is four-epoch infrared survey of ten square degrees in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The four epochs, which span the interval from 2003 to 2008, make it possible to identify nearby, high-proper-motion targets, as well as infrared-variable objects. SDWFS is a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy program (PID 40839). The SDWFS catalogs are publicly available, and contain roughly 7e5, 5e5, 1e5, and 1e5 distinct sources brighter than the 5-sigma survey limits of 19.8, 18.8, 16.5, and 15.8 Vega magnitudes at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns, respectively. In this contribution we describe the SDWFS survey and some initial findings. This work was supported by NASA grant number 1314516, administered by JPL.

Ashby, Matthew; Stern, D.; Brodwin, M.; Griffith, R.; Eisenhardt, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Bock, J.; Borys, C.; Brand, K.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cool, R.; Cooray, A.; Croft, S.; Dey, A.; Eisenstein, D.; Gonzalez, A.; Gorjian, V.; Grogin, N.; Ivison, R.; Jacob, J.; Jannuzi, B.; Mainzer, A.; Moustakas, L.; Rottgering, H.; Seymour, N.; Smith, H.; Stanford, A.; Stauffer, J. R.; Sullivan, I.; van Breugel, W.; Wright, E. L.; Willner, S. P.

2009-05-01

139

Wide field x-ray telescopes: Detecting x-ray transients/afterglows related to GRBs  

SciTech Connect

The recent discovery of X-ray afterglows of GRBs opens the possibility of analyses of GRBs by their X-ray detections. However, imaging X-ray telescopes in current use mostly have limited fields of view. Alternative X-ray optics geometries achieving very large fields of view have been theoretically suggested in the 70's but not constructed and used so far. We review the geometries and basic properties of the wide-field X-ray optical systems based on one- and two-dimensional lobster-eye geometry and suggest technologies for their development and construction. First results of the development of double replicated X-ray reflecting flats for use in one-dimensional X-ray optics of lobster-eye type are presented and discussed. The optimum strategy for locating GRBs upon their X-ray counterparts is also presented and discussed.

Hudec, Rene [Astronomical Institute of Czech Academy of Science, Observatory Ondrejov, 251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Pina, Ladislav [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Inneman, Adolf [Department of Precision Mechanics and Optics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Gorenstein, Paul [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

1998-05-16

140

Curvature wavefront sensing performance simulations for active correction of the Javalambre wide-field telescopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to maintain image quality during Javalambre wide field telescope operations, deformations and rigid body motions must be actively controlled to minimize optical disturbances. For JST/T250 the aberrations of the telescope will be measured with four curvature sensors at the focal plane. To correct the measured distortions, the secondary mirror position (with a hexapod support) and the camera position can be modified in a control closed loop. Multiple software tools have been developed to accomplish this goal, constituting the "Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre" (OAJ) Active Optics Pipeline. We present a comprehensive analysis of the wave-front sensing system, including the availability of reference stars, pupil registration, wavefront estimators and the iteration matrix evaluation techniques. Some preliminary simulations have been made using a telescope model with a Optical Ray Tracing Software.

Chueca, Sergio; Marín-Franch, Antonio; Cenarro, Andrés. Javier; Varela, Jesús; Ederoclite, Alessandro; Cristóbal-Hornillos, David; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Gruel, Nicolás.; Moles, Mariano; Yanes, Axel; Rueda, Fernando; Rueda, Sergio; Luis-Simoes, Roberto; Hernández-Fuertes, Javier; López-Sainz, Angel; Maícas-Sacristán, Natalio; Lamadrid, José Luis; Díaz-Martín, Miguel Chioare; Taylor, Keith

2012-09-01

141

The Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System: Spectral Variation on Kuiper Belt Objects  

E-print Network

Here we present additional photometry of targets observed as part of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. 12 targets were re-observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 in optical and NIR wavebands designed to compliment those used during the first visit. Additionally, all observations originally presented by Fraser and Brown (2012) were reanalyzed through the same updated photometry pipeline. A reanalysis of the optical and NIR colour distribution reveals a bifurcated optical colour distribution and only two identifiable spectral classes, each of which occupies a broad range of colours and have correlated optical and NIR colours, in agreement with our previous findings. We report the detection of significant spectral variations on 5 targets which cannot be attributed to photometry errors, cosmic rays, point spread function or sensitivity variations, or other image artifacts capable of explaining the magnitude of the variation. The spectrally variable objects are found to have ...

Fraser, Wesley C; Glass, Florian

2015-01-01

142

Narrow band imaging: a wide field of possibilities.  

PubMed

The application of opto-electronic in video-endoscopes aims to improve accuracy in diagnosis, through image processing and digital technology. Narrow band imaging (NBI), one of the most recent techniques, consists of using interference filters for the illumination of the target in narrowed red, green, and blue (R/G/B) bands of the spectrum. This results in different images at distinct levels in the mucosa and increases the contrast of the epithelial surface and of the subjacent vascular network. NBI is combined to magnifying endoscopy with an optical zoom. After being studied in prototypes the opto-electronic technique, now available in the most recent models of video-endoscopes that use the sequential R/G/B system of illumination, should be adapted in the near future for the instruments utilizing the non-sequential system of illumination. This new technique aims to characterize the surface of the distinct types of digestive epithelia, including intestinal metaplasia in the Barrett's esophagus. The technique also allows characterizing the disorganization of the vascular pattern in inflammatory disorders of the digestive mucosa and in superficial neoplastic lesions in the esophagus, stomach, and large bowel. PMID:19858605

Rey, J F; Kuznetsov, K; Lambert, R

2007-01-01

143

Wide Field X-Ray Telescope Mission Concept Study Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wide Field X-Ray Telescope (WFXT) is an astrophysics mission concept for detecting and studying extra-galactic x-ray sources, including active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies, in an effort to further understand cosmic evolution and structure. This Technical Memorandum details the results of a mission concept study completed by the Advanced Concepts Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in 2012. The design team analyzed the mission and instrument requirements, and designed a spacecraft that enables the WFXT mission while using high heritage components. Design work included selecting components and sizing subsystems for power, avionics, guidance, navigation and control, propulsion, structures, command and data handling, communications, and thermal control.

Hopkins, R. C.; Thomas, H. D.; Fabisinski, L. L.; Baysinger, M.; Hornsby, L. S.; Maples, C. D.; Purlee, T. E.; Capizzo, P. D.; Percy, T. K.

2014-01-01

144

Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers.  

PubMed

Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10(-6)/°C near 550 nm, which corresponds to ?800 m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations. PMID:21772398

Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

2011-07-20

145

Space infrared telescope facility wide field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The wide-field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC) is capable of two-dimensional photometry in either a wide-field or diffraction-limited mode over the wavelength range from 2 to 30 microns with a possible extension to 120 microns. A low-doped indium antimonide detector was developed for 1.8 to 5.0 microns, detectors were tested and optimized for the entire 1.8 to 30 micron range, beamsplitters were developed and tested for the 1.8 to 30 micron range, and tradeoff studies of the camera's optical system performed. Data are presented on the performance of InSb, Si:In, Si:Ga, and Si:Sb array detectors bumpbonded to a multiplexed CMOS readout chip of the source-follower type at SIRTF operating backgrounds (equal to or less than 1 x 10 to the 8th ph/sq cm/sec) and temperature (4 to 12 K). Some results at higher temperatures are also presented for comparison to SIRTF temperature results. Data are also presented on the performance of IRAC beamsplitters at room temperature at both 0 and 45 deg angle of incidence and on the performance of the all-reflecting optical system baselined for the camera.

Fazio, Giovanni G.

1988-01-01

146

Diffuse optical tomography: Present status and its future  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is one of the emerging modalities for the non-invasive imaging of thick biological tissues using near-infrared (NIR) light. This article reviews the fundamentals and development of DOT technology since its advent in the early 1990s, including the modeling of light propagation in biological tissues which strongly scatter and weakly absorb NIR light, the optical properties of biological tissues in the NIR wavelength range, three typical measurement methods, image reconstruction algorithms, and so forth. Then various studies are referred to for improvement of the DOT images, which are essentially low in quality due to the ill-conditioned and underdetermined problem. Studies and clinical applications presently attracting much attention are discussed in some detail. Finally, the expected future developments are summarized.

Yamada, Yukio; Okawa, Shinpei

2014-05-01

147

Twenty years of optical coherence tomography: challenges for the future  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical coherence tomography is nowadays an established imaging technique in Ophthalmology, with a key role on early detection of macular diseases, benefiting from the tremendous evolution in principles and technological developments of the last 20 years. In this paper the most important physical principles behind time-domain, spectral-domain and Fourier-domain OCT will be presented, along with examples of applications in different imaging fields, emphasizing the limitations of current systems, their performance parameters, as well as the challenges for the future within this field of development.

Carmelo Rosa, Carla

2011-05-01

148

Automatic detection of asteroids and meteoroids --- a wide-field survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The small Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) represent a potential risk but also an easily accessible space resource for future robotic or human in-situ space exploration or commercial activities. However, the population of 1--300 m NEAs is not well understood in terms of size- frequency and orbital distribution. NEAs with diameters below 200 m tend to have much faster spin rates than large objects and they are believed to be monolithic and not rubble-pile like their large counterparts. Moreover, the current surveys do not systematically search for the small NEAs that are mostly overlooked. We propose a low- cost robotic optical survey (ADAM-WFS) aimed at small NEAs based on four state-of-the-art telescopes having extremely wide fields of view. The four Houghton-Terebizh 30-cm astrographs (Fig. left) with 4096×4096 -pixel CCD cameras will acquire 96 square degrees in one exposure with the plate scale of 4.4 arcsec/pixel. In 30 seconds, the system will be able to reach +17.5 mag in unfiltered mode. The survey will be operated on semi-automatic basis, covering the entire night sky three times per night and optimized toward fast moving targets recognition. The advantage of the proposed system is the usage of existing of-the-shelf components and software for the image processing and object identification and linking (Denneau et al., 2013). The one-year simulation of the survey (Fig. right) at the testing location at AGO Modra observatory in Slovakia revealed that we will detect 60--240 NEAs between 1--300 m that get closer than 10 lunar distances from the Earth. The number of detections will rise by a factor of 1.5--2 in case the survey is placed at a superb observing location such as Canary Islands. The survey will also serve as an impact warning system for imminent impactors. Our simulation showed that we have a 20 % chance of finding a 50-m NEA on a direct impact orbit. The survey will provide multiple byproducts from the all-sky scans, such as comet discoveries, sparse light curves of bright main-belt asteroids, space-debris detection, and stationary transient events like novae, supernovae, variable stars, and microlensing. The budget for the prototype development and testing is estimated to be 1,000,000 EUR. The planned development time is one year.

Vereš, P.; Tóth, J.; Jedicke, R.; Tonry, J.; Denneau, L.; Wainscoat, R.; Kornoš, L.; Šilha, J.

2014-07-01

149

Characterization of the AWARE 10 two-gigapixel wide-field-of-view visible imager.  

PubMed

System requirements for many military electro-optic and IR camera systems reflect the need for both wide-field-of-view situational awareness as well as high-resolution imaging for target identification. In this work we present a new imaging system architecture designed to perform both functions simultaneously and the AWARE 10 camera as an example at visible wavelengths. We first describe the basic system architecture and user interface followed by a laboratory characterization of the system optical performance. We then describe a field experiment in which the camera was used to identify several maritime targets at varying range. The experimental results indicate that users of the system are able to correctly identify ~10 m targets at between 4 and 6 km with 70% accuracy. PMID:24921890

Marks, D L; Llull, P R; Phillips, Z; Anderson, J G; Feller, S D; Vera, E M; Son, H S; Youn, S-H; Kim, J; Gehm, M E; Brady, D J; Nichols, J M; Judd, K P; Duncan, M D; Waterman, J R; Stack, R A; Johnson, A; Tennill, R; Olson, C C

2014-05-01

150

Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Interim Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The New Worlds, New Horizons (NWNH) in Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010 Decadal Survey prioritized the community consensus for ground-based and space-based observatories. Recognizing that many of the community s key questions could be answered with a wide-field infrared survey telescope in space, and that the decade would be one of budget austerity, WFIRST was top ranked in the large space mission category. In addition to the powerful new science that could be accomplished with a wide-field infrared telescope, the WFIRST mission was determined to be both technologically ready and only a small fraction of the cost of previous flagship missions, such as HST or JWST. In response to the top ranking by the community, NASA formed the WFIRST Science Definition Team (SDT) and Project Office. The SDT was charged with fleshing out the NWNH scientific requirements to a greater level of detail. NWNH evaluated the risk and cost of the JDEM-Omega mission design, as submitted by NASA, and stated that it should serve as the basis for the WFIRST mission. The SDT and Project Office were charged with developing a mission optimized for achieving the science goals laid out by the NWNH re-port. The SDT and Project Office opted to use the JDEM-Omega hardware configuration as an initial start-ing point for the hardware implementation. JDEM-Omega and WFIRST both have an infrared imager with a filter wheel, as well as counter-dispersed moderate resolution spectrometers. The primary advantage of space observations is being above the Earth's atmosphere, which absorbs, scatters, warps and emits light. Observing from above the atmosphere enables WFIRST to obtain precision infrared measurements of the shapes of galaxies for weak lensing, infrared light-curves of supernovae and exoplanet microlensing events with low systematic errors, and infrared measurements of the H hydrogen line to be cleanly detected in the 1Wide-field Infrared Sur-vey Explorer (WISE) are all space missions that have produced stunning new scientific advances by going to space to observe in the infrared. This interim report describes progress as of June 2011 on developing a requirements flowdown and an evaluation of scientific performance. An Interim Design Reference Mission (IDRM) configuration is presented that is based on the specifications of NWNH with some refinements to optimize the design in accordance with the new scientific requirements. Analysis of this WFIRST IDRM concept is in progress to ensure the capability of the observatory is compatible with the science requirements. The SDT and Project will continue to refine the mission concept over the coming year as design, analysis and simulation work are completed, resulting in the SDT s WFIRST Design Reference Mission (DRM) by the end of 2012.

Green, J.; Schechter, P.; Baltay, C.; Bean, R.; Bennett, D.; Brown, R.; Conselice, C.; Donahue, M.; Gaudi, S.; Lauer, T.; Perlmutter, S.; Rauscher, B.; Rhodes, J.; Roellig, T.; Stern, D.; Sumi, T.; Gerhels, N.; Sambruna, R.; Barry, R. K.; Content, D.; Grady, K; Jackson, C.; Kruk, J.; Melton, M.; Rioux, N.

2011-01-01

151

Integration of wide field-of-view imagery functions in a detector dewar cooler assembly  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Today, both military and civilian applications require miniaturized optical systems in order to give an imagery function to vehicles with small payload capacity. After the development of megapixel focal plane arrays (FPA) with micro-sized pixels, this miniaturization will become feasible with the integration of optical functions in the detector area. In the field of cooled infrared imaging systems, the detector area is the Detector-Dewar-Cooler Assembly (DDCA). A dewar is a sealed environment where the detector is cooled on a cold plate. We show in this paper that wide field of view imagery functions can be simply added to the dewar. We investigate two ways of integration and make two demonstrators. The first one called FISBI consists in replacing the window by a fish-eye lens and in integrating a lens in the cold shield. This optical system has a field of view of 180°. The second one, called IR-Cam-on-Chip, consists in integrating the optics directly on the focal plane array. This optical system has a field of view of 120°. The additional mass of the optics is sufficiently small to be compatible with the cryogenic environment of the DDCA. The performance of these cameras will be discussed and several evolutions of these cameras will be introduced too.

Druart, Guillaume; de la Barriere, Florence; Guerineau, Nicolas; Lasfargues, Gilles; Fendler, Manuel; Lhermet, Nicolas; Taboury, Jean; Reibel, Yann; Moullec, Jean-Baptiste

2012-06-01

152

Wide-field motion tuning in nocturnal hawkmoths.  

PubMed

Nocturnal hawkmoths are known for impressive visually guided behaviours in dim light, such as hovering while feeding from nectar-bearing flowers. This requires tight visual feedback to estimate and counter relative motion. Discrimination of low velocities, as required for stable hovering flight, is fundamentally limited by spatial resolution, yet in the evolution of eyes for nocturnal vision, maintenance of high spatial acuity compromises absolute sensitivity. To investigate these trade-offs, we compared responses of wide-field motion-sensitive neurons in three species of hawkmoth: Manduca sexta (a crepuscular hoverer), Deilephila elpenor (a fully nocturnal hoverer) and Acherontia atropos (a fully nocturnal hawkmoth that does not hover as it feeds uniquely from honey in bees' nests). We show that despite smaller eyes, the motion pathway of D. elpenor is tuned to higher spatial frequencies and lower temporal frequencies than A. atropos, consistent with D. elpenor's need to detect low velocities for hovering. Acherontia atropos, however, presumably evolved low-light sensitivity without sacrificing temporal acuity. Manduca sexta, active at higher light levels, is tuned to the highest spatial frequencies of the three and temporal frequencies comparable with A. atropos. This yields similar tuning to low velocities as in D. elpenor, but with the advantage of shorter neural delays in processing motion. PMID:19906663

Theobald, Jamie C; Warrant, Eric J; O'Carroll, David C

2010-03-22

153

Status and Performance of HST/Wide Field Camera 3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The HST Wide Field Camera 3 is a panchromatic UV-visible-near infrared camera whose development is currently nearing completion, for a planned installation into the Hubble Space Telescope during Servicing Mission 4. WFC3 provides two imaging channels. The UVIS channel features a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD focal plane with sensitivity from 200 to 1000 nm and a 160 x 160 arcsec field of view. The UVIS channel provides unprecedented sensitivity and field of view in the near ultraviolet for HST. The IR channel features a 1014 x 1014 pixel HgCdTe focal plane covering 850 to 1700 nm with a 135 x 135 arcsec field of view, providing an order of magnitude increase in J+H band surveying efficiency for HST. WFC3 offers a rich complement of filters and grisms in each channel. The construction of WFC3 is nearly complete, and the instrument is well into its integration and test program. We present the current status of the instrument and its projected scientific performance.

Kimble, Randy

2004-01-01

154

Wide field-of-view fluorescence imaging of coral reefs.  

PubMed

Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys. PMID:25582836

Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P; Kline, David I; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L D; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

2015-01-01

155

Wide Field-of-View Fluorescence Imaging of Coral Reefs  

PubMed Central

Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys. PMID:25582836

Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P.; Kline, David I.; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

2015-01-01

156

Instrumental Direction-dependent Effects in Wide-field Wide-band Interferometric Imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many next generation radio telescopes, some now in operation, offer significant improvement in the sensitivity and angular resolution compared to the telescopes operated in the past decades. This improvement in sensitivity is achieved with the use of wide-band receivers and larger collecting area. The effects of wide instantaneous fractional bandwidths that classical calibration and imaging algorithms ignore, lead to errors higher than the sensitivity that these new telescopes offer. Examples, relevant for some of the telescopes already in operation include the effects of time and frequency variant primary beams, frequency dependence of the emission from the sky and antenna pointing errors. The effects of wide fractional bandwidth and ionospheric phase screen limit the imaging performance below ~1 GHz. Additionally, significant variations in the shape of the wide-band primary beams (PB) for aperture array telescopes leads to errors of similar magnitude. Corrections for these effects increases the required computing power by many orders of magnitude. Furthermore, both wide fractional bandwidths and larger collecting area lead to many orders of magnitude increase in the data volume also, putting severe constraints on the run-time performance of the algorithms for calibration and imaging. In this talk, I will review the state-of-the-art algorithms for wide-field wide-band imaging and the run-time costs of the different approaches for correction of various direction-dependent effects and discuss the computational challenges in thermal noise-limited wide-field imaging with current and future radio telescopes.

Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Rau, U.; Golap, K.

2014-04-01

157

Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future  

PubMed Central

Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations. PMID:24603424

Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

2014-01-01

158

Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future.  

PubMed

Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations. PMID:24603424

Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

2014-05-01

159

The Hot and Energetic Universe: The Wide Field Imager (WFI) for Athena+  

E-print Network

The Wide Field Imager (WFI) is one of the two scientific instruments proposed for the Athena+ X-ray observatory. It will provide imaging in the 0.1-15 keV band over a wide field, simultaneously with spectrally and time-resolved photon counting. The instrument is designed to make optimal use of the grasp (collecting area times solid angle product) provided by the optical design of the Athena+ mirror system (Willingale et al. 2013), by combining a sensitive approx. 40' diameter field of view (baseline; 50' goal) DEPFET detector with a pixel size properly sampling the angular resolution of 5 arc sec on-axis (half energy width).This synthesis makes the WFI a very powerful survey instrument, significantly surpassing currently existing capabilities (Nandra et al. 2013; Aird et al. 2013). In addition, the WFI will provide unprecedented simultaneous high-time resolution and high count rate capabilities for the observation of bright sources with low pile-up and high efficiency. In this paper, we summarize the instrume...

Rau, A; Nandra, K; Porro, M; Barret, D; Santangelo, A; Schmid, C; Struder, L; Tenzer, C; Wilms, J; Amoros, C; Andritschke, R; Aschauer, F; Bahr, A; Gunther, B; Furmetz, M; Ott, B; Perinati, E; Rambaud, D; Reiffers, J; Treis, J; von Kienlin, A; Weidenspointner, G

2013-01-01

160

Fundamental study of flow field generated by rotorcraft blades using wide-field shadowgraph  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vortex trajectory and vortex wake generated by helicopter rotors are visualized using a wide-field shadowgraph technique. Use of a retro-reflective Scotchlite screen makes it possible to investigate the flow field generated by full-scale rotors. Tip vortex trajectories are visible in shadowgraphs for a range of tip Mach number of 0.38 to 0.60. The effect of the angle of attack is substantial. At an angle of attack greater than 8 degrees, the visibility of the vortex core is significant even at relatively low tip Mach numbers. The theoretical analysis of the sensitivity is carried out for a rotating blade. This analysis demonstrates that the sensitivity decreases with increasing dimensionless core radius and increases with increasing tip Mach number. The threshold value of the sensitivity is found to be 0.0015, below which the vortex core is not visible and above which it is visible. The effect of the optical path length is also discussed. Based on this investigation, it is concluded that the application of this wide-field shadowgraph technique to a large wind tunnel test should be feasible. In addition, two simultaneous shadowgraph views would allow three-dimensional reconstruction of vortex trajectories.

Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

1985-01-01

161

Prototyping results for a wide-field fiber positioner for the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Given the physical size of the GSMT prime focus field is approximately equivalent to that of the Subaru telescope it is possible to directly apply current technology developed for the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument (FMOS, to be commissioned in 2005) and substantially reduce the risk associated with developing a new solution for wide-field multi-object spectroscopy on an ELT. The Anglo-Australian Observatory has recently completed a design study for an ~1000 fiber, Echidna-style positioner for the prime focus of the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope (GSMT). The positioner forms part of the wide-field Multi-Object Multi-Fiber Optical Spectrograph (MOMFOS), an ELT prime focus instrument offering a minimum of 800 fibers patrolling the corrected 20 arcmin field. The design study identified 2 components of an equivalent MOMFOS positioner design that required prototyping. Firstly, a higher spine packing density is required to satisfy the proposed scientific program. Secondly, the fiber position measurement system adopted for FMOS cannot be simply scaled and applied to MOMFOS given space constraints in the top end unit. As such a new and, if possible, simpler system was required. Prototyping results for both components are presented.

Moore, Anna M.; McGrath, Andrew J.

2004-07-01

162

The 64 Mpixel wide field imager for the Wendelstein 2m telescope: design and calibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wendelstein Observatory of Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich has recently been upgraded with a modern 2m robotic telescope. One Nasmyth port of the telescope has been equipped with a wide-field corrector which preserves the excellent image quality (<0.8 " median seeing) of the site (Hopp et al. 2008) over a field of view of 0.7 degrees diameter. The available field is imaged by an optical imager (WWFI, the Wendelstein Wide Field Imager) built around a customized 2×2 mosaic of 4 k×4 k 15 ?m e2v CCDs from Spectral Instruments. This paper provides an overview of the design and the WWFI's performance. We summarize the system mechanics (including a structural analysis), the electronics (and its electromagnetic interference (EMI) protection) and the control software. We discuss in detail detector system parameters, i.e. gain and readout noise, quantum efficiency as well as charge transfer efficiency (CTE) and persistent charges. First on sky tests yield overall good predictability of system throughput based on lab measurements.

Kosyra, Ralf; Gössl, Claus; Hopp, Ulrich; Lang-Bardl, Florian; Riffeser, Arno; Bender, Ralf; Seitz, Stella

2014-11-01

163

The 64 Mpixel wide field imager for the Wendelstein 2m telescope: design and calibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wendelstein Observatory of Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich has recently been upgraded with a modern 2m robotic telescope. One Nasmyth port of the telescope has been equipped with a wide-field corrector which preserves the excellent image quality (<0.8" median seeing) of the site (Hopp et al. 2008) over a field of view of 0.7 degrees diameter. The available field is imaged by an optical imager (WWFI, the Wendelstein Wide Field Imager) built around a customized 2×2 mosaic of 4k×4k 15 ?m e2v CCDs from Spectral Instruments. This paper provides an overview of the design and the WWFI's performance. We summarize the system mechanics (including a structural analysis), the electronics (and its electromagnetic interference (EMI) protection) and the control software. We discuss in detail detector system parameters, i.e. gain and readout noise, quantum efficiency as well as charge transfer efficiency (CTE) and persistent charges. First on sky tests yield overall good predictability of system throughput based on lab measurements.

Kosyra, Ralf; Gössl, Claus; Hopp, Ulrich; Lang-Bardl, Florian; Riffeser, Arno; Bender, Ralf; Seitz, Stella

2014-08-01

164

Characterization of High Proper Motion Objects from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analysis of high proper motion objects that we have found in a recent study and in this work with multi-epoch astrometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using photometry and proper motions from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey and WISE, we have identified the members of this sample that are likely to be late-type, nearby, or metal-poor. We have performed optical and near-infrared spectroscopy on 41 objects, from which we measure spectral types that range from M4-T2.5. This sample includes 11 blue L dwarfs and 5 subdwarfs; the latter were also classified as such in the recent study by Kirkpatrick and coworkers. Based on their spectral types and photometry, several of our spectroscopic targets may have distances of <20 pc with the closest at ~12 pc. The tangential velocities implied by the spectrophotometric distances and proper motions indicate that four of the five subdwarfs are probably members of the Galactic halo while several other objects, including the early-T dwarf WISE J210529.08-623558.7, may belong to the thick disk. Based on data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, the Two Micron All-Sky Survey, the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, Gemini Observatory, the SOAR Telescope, and the Magellan Telescopes.

Luhman, K. L.; Sheppard, Scott S.

2014-06-01

165

Improving the performances of current optical interferometers & future designs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The number of astrophysical studies making use of interferometers has steadily increased during the past 15 years. Nevertheless, the performances of interferometers are still limited: their sensitivity does not exceed magnitude V=12, and their imaging capability could yet be improved by increasing the number of telescopes/sub-apertures. In the context of the ELTs, it is not certain how future interferometry projects will be financed. However, interferometry remains the only way to observe compact astrophysical objects at very high angular resolution (< milli-arcsecond), like gravitational micro-lensing events, central engines of AGNs, proto-planetary disks, exoplanets, etc. The aim of this workshop was to review and discuss the development of technologies that could improve the performances of current and future interferometers: new optical designs; techniques to improve the accuracy of measurements (visibility, closure-phase, etc.); progress on delay-line performances; solutions without delay-lines; technologies for larger apertures at lower cost (ex: lightweight replica mirrors); optimized beam combiners (integrated optic, pupil densifier, etc.); fringe tracking systems; laser telemetry applied to interferometry; heterodyne interferometry; progress in heterodyne detection using new technologies (laser comb, time propagation technologies, etc.); progress in image reconstruction techniques; progress in nulling interferometry; and important science cases that could benefit from progress in interferometry (report of observations at the limit of current interferometers). Nearly 50 oral presentations have been delivered, followed by very lively discussions which eventually emerged with the proposition to organize the "Planet Formation Interferometer/Imager" (PFI) project. The present proceedings reflect most of the highlights of this international colloquium.

Arnold, L.; Le Coroller, H.; Surdej, J.

2014-04-01

166

Wide-field Functional Imaging of Blood Flow and Hemoglobin Oxygen Saturation in the Rodent Dorsal Window Chamber  

PubMed Central

The rodent dorsal window chamber is a widely used in vivo model of the microvasculature. The model consists of a 1cm region of exposed microvasculature in the rodent dorsal skin that is immobilized by surgically implanted titanium frames, allowing the skin microvasculature to be visualized. We describe a detailed protocol for surgical implantation of the dorsal window chamber which enables researchers to perform the window chamber implantation surgery. We further describe subsequent wide-field functional imaging of the chamber to obtain hemodynamic information in the form of blood oxygenation and blood flow on a cm size region of interest. Optical imaging techniques, such as intravital microscopy, have been applied extensively to the dorsal window chamber to study microvascular-related disease and conditions. Due to the limited field of view of intravital microscopy, detailed hemodynamic information typically is acquired from small regions of interest, typically on the order of hundreds of ?m. The wide-field imaging techniques described herein complement intravital microscopy, allowing researchers to obtain hemodynamic information at both microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales. Compared with intravital microscopy, wide-field functional imaging requires simple instrumentation, is inexpensive, and can give detailed metabolic information over a wide field of view. PMID:21787792

Moy, Austin J.; White, Sean M.; Indrawan, Elmer S.; Lotfi, Justin; Nudelman, Matthew J.; Costantini, Samantha J.; Agarwal, Nikita; Jia, Wangcun; Kelly, Kristen M.; Sorg, Brian S.; Choi, Bernard

2011-01-01

167

Wide-Field InfrarRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets WFIRST-AFTA 2015 Report  

E-print Network

This report describes the 2014 study by the Science Definition Team (SDT) of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission. It is a space observatory that will addresses the most compelling scientific problems in dark energy, exoplanets and general astrophysics using a 2.4m telescope with a wide-field infrared instrument and an optical coronagraph. The Astro2010 Decadal Survey recommended a Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope as its top priority for a new large space mission. As conceived by the decadal survey, WFIRST would carry out a dark energy science program, a microlensing program to determine the demographics of exoplanets, and a general observing program utilizing its ultra wide field. In October 2012, NASA chartered a Science Definition Team (SDT) to produce, in collaboration with the WFIRST Study Office at GSFC and the Program Office at JPL, a Design Reference Mission (DRM) for an implementation of WFIRST using one of the 2.4-m, Hubble-quality telescope assemblies recently made availabl...

Spergel, D; Baltay, C; Bennett, D; Breckinridge, J; Donahue, M; Dressler, A; Gaudi, B S; Greene, T; Guyon, O; Hirata, C; Kalirai, J; Kasdin, N J; Macintosh, B; Moos, W; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Rauscher, B; Rhodes, J; Wang, Y; Weinberg, D; Benford, D; Hudson, M; Jeong, W -S; Mellier, Y; Traub, W; Yamada, T; Capak, P; Colbert, J; Masters, D; Penny, M; Savransky, D; Sterns, D; Zimmerman, N; Barry, R; Bartusek, L; Carpenter, K; Cheng, E; Content, D; Dekens, F; Demers, R; Grady, K; Jackson, C; Kuan, G; Kruk, J; Melton, M; Nemati, B; Parvin, B; Poberezhskiy, I; Peddie, C; Ruffa, J; Wallace, J K; Whipple, A; Wollack, E; Zhao, F

2015-01-01

168

Optical surveillance for international safeguards present and future  

SciTech Connect

Optical surveillance, one of the principal Containment and Surveillance (C/S) measures employed by the IAEA, is accomplished using film camera and video systems. Improved film camera and video systems developed in several countries are in the final stages of Agency evaluation and are expected to be placed into routine safeguards use in the near future. One system is the Surveillance and Television Recording (STAR) System. This system is a dual camera high capability unit which is expected to replace the current IAEA systems as time progresses. Another is the MINISTAR which is a much smaller, single camera unit which incorporates recent technology advances, and retains many of the basic STAR features at a considerably lower cost. Beyond these near-term advances, it is expected that video camera and recording technology will soon be available which will make video systems competitive with the film camera systems. The introduction of such technology will provide for other advanced techniques, such as laser disc recording and image processing, which are expected to improve the effectiveness of optical surveillance systems.

Johnson, C.S.; Sonnier, C.S.; Waddoups, I.G.

1983-07-01

169

Optical surveillance for international safeguards - present and future  

SciTech Connect

Optical surveillance, one of the principal Containment and Surveillance (C/S) measures, employed by the IAEA, is accomplished using film camera and video systems. Improved film camera and video systems developed in several countries are in the final stages of Agency evaluation and are expected to be placed into routine safeguards use in the near future. One system is the Surveillance and Television Recording (STAR) System. This system is a dual camera high capability unit which is expected to replace the current IAEA systems as time progresses. Another is the MINISTAR which is a much smaller, single camera unit which incorporates recent technology advances, and retains many of the basic STAR features at a considerably lower cost. Beyond these near-term advances, it is expected that video camera and recording technology will soon be available which will make video systems competitive with the film camera systems. The introduction of such technology will provide for other advanced techniques, such as laser disc recording and image processing, which are expected to improve the effectiveness of optical surveillance systems.

Johnson, C.S.; Sonnier, C.S.; Waddoups, I.G.

1983-01-01

170

A fast, wide field of view, catadioptric telescope for Whipple  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe the optical design of a spaceborne f/1.3 catadioptric telescope with a 9 degree field and 77 cm aperture that is being proposed to study objects in the Kuiper belt, Sedna Region, and Oort cloud.

McGuire, James P.

2014-12-01

171

Three wide-field telescopes with spherical primary mirrors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents three optical designs based on the work of Maurice Paul. Paul's three-mirror anastigmats produce well-corrected, distortion-free fields of view. His design equations can be solved for a spherical primary mirror with one limitation: the image field is curved. Adding all-spherical refractive field-flattening optics yields well-corrected, flat image-fields of two degrees angular diameter or more. These designs can be scaled to very large telescopes with current technology.

Blanco, Dan

2014-07-01

172

Lessons Learned from the Wide Field Camera 3 TV1 Test Campaign and Correlation Effort  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In January 2004, shortly after the Columbia accident, future servicing missions to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were cancelled. In response to this, further work on the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument was ceased. Given the maturity level of the design, a characterization thermal test (TV1) was completed in case the mission was re-instated or an alternate mission found on which to fly the instrument. This thermal test yielded some valuable lessons learned with respect to testing configurations and modeling/correlation practices, including: 1. Ensure that the thermal design can be tested 2. Ensure that the model has sufficient detail for accurate predictions 3. Ensure that the power associated with all active control devices is predicted 4. Avoid unit changes for existing models. This paper documents the difficulties presented when these recommendations were not followed.

Peabody, Hume; Stavley, Richard; Bast, William

2007-01-01

173

Miniaturized high-resolution wide-field contact lens for panretinal photocoagulation  

PubMed Central

Background and objective We describe a miniaturized lightweight high-refractive-index panretinal contact lens for diagnostic and therapeutic visualization of the peripheral retina. Instrument design The miniaturized high-resolution wide-field contact lens includes three optical elements in a light (15 g) and miniaturized (16 mm footplate, 24 mm external aperture, and 21 mm vertical height) casing contributing to a total dioptric power of +171 diopters. This lens provides up to 165° visualization of the retina for diagnostic and therapeutic applications while allowing easier placement due to its miniaturization. Conclusion This new lens (50% lighter and 89% smaller) improves upon earlier contact lenses for visualization of the peripheral retina. PMID:24741290

Koushan, Keyvan; Chalam, KV

2014-01-01

174

Signal-to-noise ratio for the wide field-planetary camera of the Space Telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Signal-to-noise ratios for the Wide Field Camera and Planetary Camera of the Space Telescope were calculated as a function of integration time. Models of the optical systems and CCD detector arrays were used with a 27th visual magnitude point source and a 25th visual magnitude per arc-sq. second extended source. A 23rd visual magnitude per arc-sq. second background was assumed. The models predicted signal-to-noise ratios of 10 within 4 hours for the point source centered on a signal pixel. Signal-to-noise ratios approaching 10 are estimated for approximately 0.25 x 0.25 arc-second areas within the extended source after 10 hours integration.

Zissa, D. E.

1984-01-01

175

Wide-field retinal hemodynamic imaging with the tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Real time, high-speed image stabilization with a retinal tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) enables new approaches to established diagnostics. Large frequency range (DC to 19 kHz), wide-field (40-deg) stabilized Doppler flowmetry imaging was demonstrated in initial human subject tests. The fundus imaging method is a quasi-confocal line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (LSLO). The retinal tracking system uses a confocal reflectometer with a closed loop optical servo system to lock onto features in the ocular fundus and automatically re-lock after blinks. By performing a slow scan with the laser line imager, frequency-resolved retinal perfusion and vascular flow images were obtained free of eye motion artifacts. Normal adult subjects and patients were tested with and without mydriasis to characterize flow imaging performance.

Ferguson, R. Daniel; Hammer, Daniel X.; Elsner, Ann E.; Webb, Robert H.; Burns, Stephen A.; Weiter, John J.

2004-10-01

176

Wide-field retinal hemodynamic imaging with the tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope.  

PubMed

Real time, high-speed image stabilization with a retinal tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) enables new approaches to established diagnostics. Large frequency range (DC to 19 kHz), wide-field (40-deg) stabilized Doppler flowmetry imaging was demonstrated in initial human subject tests. The fundus imaging method is a quasi-confocal line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (LSLO). The retinal tracking system uses a confocal reflectometer with a closed loop optical servo system to lock onto features in the ocular fundus and automatically re-lock after blinks. By performing a slow scan with the laser line imager, frequency-resolved retinal perfusion and vascular flow images were obtained free of eye motion artifacts. Normal adult subjects and patients were tested with and without mydriasis to characterize flow imaging performance. PMID:19484077

Ferguson, R; Hammer, Daniel; Elsner, Ann; Webb, Robert; Burns, Stephen; Weiter, John

2004-10-18

177

Characterization of spatially varying aberrations for wide field-of-view microscopy  

PubMed Central

We describe a simple and robust approach for characterizing the spatially varying pupil aberrations of microscopy systems. In our demonstration with a standard microscope, we derive the location-dependent pupil transfer functions by first capturing multiple intensity images at different defocus settings. Next, a generalized pattern search algorithm is applied to recover the complex pupil functions at ~350 different spatial locations over the entire field-of-view. Parameter fitting transforms these pupil functions into accurate 2D aberration maps. We further demonstrate how these aberration maps can be applied in a phase-retrieval based microscopy setup to compensate for spatially varying aberrations and to achieve diffraction-limited performance over the entire field-of-view. We believe that this easy-to-use spatially-varying pupil characterization method may facilitate new optical imaging strategies for a variety of wide field-of-view imaging platforms. PMID:23842300

Zheng, Guoan; Ou, Xiaoze; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

2013-01-01

178

Quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of sickle red blood cells performed by wide field digital interferometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have applied wide-field digital interferometry (WFDI) to examine the morphology and dynamics of live red blood cells (RBCs) from individuals who suffer from sickle cell anemia (SCA), a genetic disorder that affects the structure and mechanical properties of RBCs. WFDI is a noncontact, label-free optical microscopy approach that can yield quantitative thickness profiles of RBCs and measurements of their membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale reflecting their stiffness. We find that RBCs from individuals with SCA are significantly stiffer than those from a healthy control. Moreover, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish classes of RBCs in SCA, including sickle RBCs with apparently normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs. We expect that this approach will be useful for diagnosis of SCA and for determining efficacy of therapeutic agents.

Shaked, Natan T.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Telen, Marilyn J.; Truskey, George A.; Wax, Adam

2011-03-01

179

WISPIR: A Wide-Field Imaging SPectrograph for the InfraRed for the SPICA Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have undertaken a study of a far infrared imaging spectrometer based on a Fourier transform spectrometer that uses well-understood, high maturity optics, cryogenics, and detectors to further our knowledge of the chemical and astrophysical evolution of the Universe as it formed planets, stars, and the variety of galaxy morphologies that we observe today. The instrument, Wide-field Imaging Spectrometer for the InfraRed (WISPIR), would operate on the SPICA observatory, and will feature a spectral range from 35 - 210 microns and a spectral resolving power of R=1,000 to 6,000, depending on wavelength. WISPIR provides a choice of full-field spectral imaging over a 2'x2' field or long-slit spectral imaging along a 2' slit for studies of astrophysical structures in the local and high-redshift Universe. WISPIR in long-slit mode will attain a sensitivity two orders of magnitude better than what is currently available.

Benford, Dominic J.; Mundy, Lee G.

2010-01-01

180

Wide field of view laser beacon system for three-dimensional aircraft position measurement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a new wide field of view laser beacon system for measurement, in three dimensions, of aircraft or other remote objects. The system is developed for aircraft collision hazard warning independent of ground-based hardware, as well as for flight research, helicopter-assisted construction and rescue, and robotic manipulation applications. Accurate information describing the relative range, elevation, and azimuth of the aircraft are generated by the sweep of a low-power fan-shaped rotating laser beacon past an array of optical detectors. The system achieves a wide angle of acceptance of laser beacon light through use of compound parabolic concentrators, which collimate the light for spectral filtering to minimize solar interference. An on-board microprocessor system converts the pulse sequence to aircraft position in real time. System reliability and performance are enhanced through narrow pass filtering of the pulse signals, digital logic design to mask spurious signals, and adaptive modulation of trigger threshold levels.

Sweet, L. M.; Miles, R. B.; Webb, S. G.; Wong, E. Y.

1981-01-01

181

Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Smaller Particle Impacts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The radiator shield on the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was subject to optical inspection following return from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009. The survey revealed over 600 impact features of > 300 micrometers diameter, from exposure in space for 16 years. Subsequently, an international collaborative programme of analysis was organized to determine the origin of hypervelocity particles responsible for the damage. Here we describe examples of the numerous smaller micrometeoroid (MM) impact features (< 700 micrometers diameter) which excavated zinc orthotitanate (ZOT) paint from the radiator surface, but did not incorporate material from underlying Al alloy; larger impacts are described by [3]. We discuss recognition and interpretation of impactor remains, and MM compositions found on WFPC2.

Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J.C.; Opiela, J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G.; Webb, R.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J.; Griffin, T.; Gerlach, L.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

2014-01-01

182

Sampling and Analysis of Impact Crater Residues Found on the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 Radiator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After nearly 16 years in low Earth orbit (LEO), the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) was recovered from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during the 12 day shuttle mission designated STS-125. The WFPC-2 radiator had been struck by approximately 700 impactors producing crater features 300 microns and larger in size. Following optical inspection in 2009, agreement was reached for joint NASA-ESA study of crater residues, in 2011. Over 480 impact features were extracted at NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Space Exposed Hardware clean-room and curation facility during 2012, and were shared between NASA and ESA. We describe analyses conducted using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) - energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX): by NASA at JSC's Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division; and for ESA at the Natural History Museum (NHM), with Ion beam analysis (IBA) using a scanned proton microbeam at the University of Surrey Ion Beam Centre (IBC).

Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G. W.; Colaux, J. L.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Webb, R, P.; Griffin, T. J.; Reed, B. B.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Kou, J.-C.; Robinson, G. A.; Opiela, J. N.; Gerlach, L.

2013-01-01

183

The EUV mini-survey with the ROSAT Wide Field Camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Following a successful launch on 1990 June 1, the Rosat spacecraft and its payload, consisting of an X-ray and an EUV telescope, underwent two months of in-orbit calibration and detailed performance checks. A preliminary observation of a small section of the sky, carried out over July 11-16 (the 'mini-survey') showed all Rosat systems to be functioning well and has allowed predictions to be made on the ultimate productivity of both Rosat all-sky surveys. An analysis of the mini-survey data from the UK Wide Field Camera, has revealed 35 EUV sources, including several white dwarf stars, a variety of active cool stars and several other objects. In all, 23 sources have probable optical counterparts. Consideration of the effective exposure and sky coverage in the mini-survey allows the prediction that the recently completed Rosat all-sky survey will yield in excess of a thousand new EUV sources.

Pounds, K. A.; Abbey, A. F.; Barstow, M. A.; Bentley, R. D.; Bewick, A.; Breeveld, E. R.; Cole, R. E.; Courtier, G. M.; Deeley, M.; Denby, M.; Goodall, C. V.; Gourlay, J. A.; Guttridge, P. R.; Harris, A. W.; Huckle, H. E.; Kent, B. J.; Lieu, R.; McCalden, A. J.; Page, C. G.; Pankiewicz, G. S.; Ponman, T. J.; Pye, J. P.; Reading, D. H.; Richards, A. G.; Ricketts, M. J.; Rochester, G. K.; Sansom, A. E.; Sembay, S. E.; Sidher, S.; Sims, M. R.; Spragg, J. E.; Sumner, T. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Vallance, R. J.; Watson, D. J.; Watson, M. G.; Wells, A. A.; Willingale, R.; Wright, J. S.

1991-11-01

184

Water-Immersible MEMS scanning mirror designed for wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By offering images with high spatial resolution and unique optical absorption contrast, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has gained increasing attention in biomedical research. Recent developments in OR-PAM have improved its imaging speed, but have sacrificed either the detection sensitivity or field of view or both. We have developed a wide-field fast-scanning OR-PAM by using a water-immersible MEMS scanning mirror (MEMS-ORPAM). Made of silicon with a gold coating, the MEMS mirror plate can reflect both optical and acoustic beams. Because it uses an electromagnetic driving force, the whole MEMS scanning system can be submerged in water. In MEMS-ORPAM, the optical and acoustic beams are confocally configured and simultaneously steered, which ensures uniform detection sensitivity. A B-scan imaging speed as high as 400 Hz can be achieved over a 3 mm scanning range. A diffraction-limited lateral resolution of 2.4 ?m in water and a maximum imaging depth of 1.1 mm in soft tissue have been experimentally determined. Using the system, we imaged the flow dynamics of both red blood cells and carbon particles in a mouse ear in vivo. By using Evans blue dye as the contrast agent, we also imaged the flow dynamics of lymphatic vessels in a mouse tail in vivo. The results show that MEMS-OR-PAM could be a powerful tool for studying highly dynamic and time-sensitive biological phenomena.

Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Martel, Catherine; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Gao, Liang; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

2013-03-01

185

FLAT-OPTICAL FIBRE FOR A FASTER FUTURE , C. Holmes1  

E-print Network

FLAT-OPTICAL FIBRE FOR A FASTER FUTURE S. Ambran1 , C. Holmes1 , J. C. Gates1 , A. S. Webb1 , M. F. Through rethinking the design of optical fibres, this work aims to address global demand for a faster an integrated planar optical device. The benefits offered by flat-fibre compared to standard optical fibres (and

Quartly, Graham

186

A Near IR Fabry-Perot Interferometer for Wide Field, Low Resolution Hyperspectral Imaging on the Next Generation Space Telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We discuss work in progress on a near-infrared tunable bandpass filter for the Goddard baseline wide field camera concept of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). This filter, the Demonstration Unit for Low Order Cryogenic Etalon (DULCE), is designed to demonstrate a high efficiency scanning Fabry-Perot etalon operating in interference orders 1 - 4 at 30K with a high stability DSP based servo control system. DULCE is currently the only available tunable filter for lower order cryogenic operation in the near infrared. In this application, scanning etalons will illuminate the focal plane arrays with a single order of interference to enable wide field lower resolution hyperspectral imaging over a wide range of redshifts. We discuss why tunable filters are an important instrument component in future space-based observatories.

Barry, R. K.; Satyapal, S.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Barclay, R.; Amato, D.; Arritt, B.; Brown, G.; Harvey, V.; Holt, C.; Kuhn, J.

2000-01-01

187

High spatial and temporal resolution wide-field imaging of neuron activity using quantum NV-diamond  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A quantitative understanding of the dynamics of biological neural networks is fundamental to gaining insight into information processing in the brain. While techniques exist to measure spatial or temporal properties of these networks, it remains a significant challenge to resolve the neural dynamics with subcellular spatial resolution. In this work we consider a fundamentally new form of wide-field imaging for neuronal networks based on the nanoscale magnetic field sensing properties of optically active spins in a diamond substrate. We analyse the sensitivity of the system to the magnetic field generated by an axon transmembrane potential and confirm these predictions experimentally using electronically-generated neuron signals. By numerical simulation of the time dependent transmembrane potential of a morphologically reconstructed hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that the imaging system is capable of imaging planar neuron activity non-invasively at millisecond temporal resolution and micron spatial resolution over wide-fields.

Hall, L. T.; Beart, G. C. G.; Thomas, E. A.; Simpson, D. A.; McGuinness, L. P.; Cole, J. H.; Manton, J. H.; Scholten, R. E.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Petrou, S.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

2012-05-01

188

A freeform-based, fast, wide-field, and distortion-free camera for ultralow surface brightness surveys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Testing the predictions of galaxy formation scenarios on mildly- and non-linear regimes requires the detection from space of ultra-low surface brightness features both around galaxies (dwarf satellites) and in the cosmic web (filaments). The requirements of such a space mission imply innovative concepts for fast, wide-field, distortion-free telescopes. Several optical designs, based on freeform mirrors, are presented and compared here to address these stringent constraints on space-borne, wide field drift-scanning imaging. An optimal solution is presented, showing that a telescope with f/2, 4° × 2° FoV, with a 50 cm pupil can achieve the required exquisite image quality, free of distortion, with an optimal SNR in the detection of ultra-low surface brightness.

Hugot, Emmanuel; Wang, Xin; Valls-Gabaud, David; Lemaître, Gérard; Agócs, Tibor; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu

2014-08-01

189

High-Resolution, Wide-Field-of-View Scanning Telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A proposed telescope would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view (<0.10 ) while scanning over a total field of view nominally 16 wide without need to slew the entire massive telescope structure. The telescope design enables resolution of a 1-m-wide object in a 50- km-wide area of the surface of the Earth as part of a 200-km-wide area field of view monitored from an orbit at an altitude of 700 km. The conceptual design of this telescope could also be adapted to other applications both terrestrial and extraterrestrial in which there are requirements for telescopes that afford both wide- and narrow-field capabilities. In the proposed telescope, the scanning would be effected according to a principle similar to that of the Arecibo radio telescope, in which the primary mirror is stationary with respect to the ground and a receiver is moved across the focal surface of the primary mirror. The proposed telescope would comprise (1) a large spherical primary mirror that would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view and (2) a small displaceable optical relay segment that would be pivoted about the center of an aperture stop to effect the required scanning (see figure). Taken together, both comprise a scanning narrow-angle telescope that does not require slewing the telescope structure. In normal operation, the massive telescope structure would stare at a fixed location on the ground. The inner moveable relay optic would be pivoted to scan the narrower field of view over the wider one, making it possible to retain a fixed telescope orientation, while obtaining high-resolution images over multiple target areas during an interval of 3 to 4 minutes in the intended orbit. The pivoting relay segment of the narrow-angle telescope would include refractive and reflective optical elements, including two aspherical mirrors, to counteract the spherical aberration of the primary mirror. Overall, the combination of the primary mirror and the smaller relay optic would provide narrow-angle, diffraction-limited high resolution at a wavelength of 500 nm.

Sepulveda, Cesar; Wilson, Robert; Seshadri, Suresh

2007-01-01

190

Optical Tecnology Developments in Biomedicine: History, Current and Future  

PubMed Central

Biomedical optics is a rapidly emerging field for medical imaging and diagnostics. This paper reviews several biomedical optical technologies that have been developed and translated for either clinical or pre-clinical applications. Specifically, we focus on the following technologies: 1) near-infrared spectroscopy and tomography, 2) optical coherence tomography, 3) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, and 4) optical molecular imaging. There representative biomedical applications are also discussed here. PMID:23905030

Nioka, Shoko; Chen, Yu

2011-01-01

191

Broadband and Wide Field-of-view Plasmonic Metasurface-enabled Waveplates  

PubMed Central

Quasi two-dimensional metasurfaces composed of subwavelength nanoresonator arrays can dramatically alter the properties of light in an ultra-thin planar geometry, enabling new optical functions such as anomalous reflection and refraction, polarization filtering, and wavefront modulation. However, previous metasurface-based nanostructures suffer from low efficiency, narrow bandwidth and/or limited field-of-view due to their operation near the plasmonic resonance. Here we demonstrate plasmonic metasurface-based nanostructures for high-efficiency, angle-insensitive polarization transformation over a broad octave-spanning bandwidth. The structures are realized by optimizing the anisotropic response of an array of strongly coupled nanorod resonators to tailor the interference of light at the subwavelength scale. Nanofabricated reflective half-wave and quarter-wave plates designed using this approach have measured polarization conversion ratios and reflection magnitudes greater than 92% over a broad wavelength range from 640 to 1290?nm and a wide field-of-view up to ±40°. This work outlines a versatile strategy to create metasurface-based photonics with diverse optical functionalities. PMID:25524830

Jiang, Zhi Hao; Lin, Lan; Ma, Ding; Yun, Seokho; Werner, Douglas H.; Liu, Zhiwen; Mayer, Theresa S.

2014-01-01

192

Broadband and wide field-of-view plasmonic metasurface-enabled waveplates.  

PubMed

Quasi two-dimensional metasurfaces composed of subwavelength nanoresonator arrays can dramatically alter the properties of light in an ultra-thin planar geometry, enabling new optical functions such as anomalous reflection and refraction, polarization filtering, and wavefront modulation. However, previous metasurface-based nanostructures suffer from low efficiency, narrow bandwidth and/or limited field-of-view due to their operation near the plasmonic resonance. Here we demonstrate plasmonic metasurface-based nanostructures for high-efficiency, angle-insensitive polarization transformation over a broad octave-spanning bandwidth. The structures are realized by optimizing the anisotropic response of an array of strongly coupled nanorod resonators to tailor the interference of light at the subwavelength scale. Nanofabricated reflective half-wave and quarter-wave plates designed using this approach have measured polarization conversion ratios and reflection magnitudes greater than 92% over a broad wavelength range from 640 to 1290 nm and a wide field-of-view up to ± 40°. This work outlines a versatile strategy to create metasurface-based photonics with diverse optical functionalities. PMID:25524830

Jiang, Zhi Hao; Lin, Lan; Ma, Ding; Yun, Seokho; Werner, Douglas H; Liu, Zhiwen; Mayer, Theresa S

2014-01-01

193

Broadband and Wide Field-of-view Plasmonic Metasurface-enabled Waveplates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quasi two-dimensional metasurfaces composed of subwavelength nanoresonator arrays can dramatically alter the properties of light in an ultra-thin planar geometry, enabling new optical functions such as anomalous reflection and refraction, polarization filtering, and wavefront modulation. However, previous metasurface-based nanostructures suffer from low efficiency, narrow bandwidth and/or limited field-of-view due to their operation near the plasmonic resonance. Here we demonstrate plasmonic metasurface-based nanostructures for high-efficiency, angle-insensitive polarization transformation over a broad octave-spanning bandwidth. The structures are realized by optimizing the anisotropic response of an array of strongly coupled nanorod resonators to tailor the interference of light at the subwavelength scale. Nanofabricated reflective half-wave and quarter-wave plates designed using this approach have measured polarization conversion ratios and reflection magnitudes greater than 92% over a broad wavelength range from 640 to 1290 nm and a wide field-of-view up to +/-40°. This work outlines a versatile strategy to create metasurface-based photonics with diverse optical functionalities.

Jiang, Zhi Hao; Lin, Lan; Ma, Ding; Yun, Seokho; Werner, Douglas H.; Liu, Zhiwen; Mayer, Theresa S.

2014-12-01

194

The Fabra-ROA Telescope at Montsec (TFRM): A Fully Robotic Wide-field Telescope for Space Surveillance and Tracking  

E-print Network

Since the beginning of the Space Age optical sensors have been one of the main instruments for positioning and tracking known space objects. Nowadays, the unrelenting growth of man-made objects together with the overcrowding of the useful satellite orbits, and the real space debris and NEO hazards, has made necessary to carry out surveys of the space looking for uncatalogued objects. Optical telescopes play a key role in the Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) as a primary Space Situational Awareness element and, it is known, that the best instrument for this task is a fully robotic wide-field telescope with a minimum aperture of 40cm. The Baker-Nunn Cameras (BNCs) were produced by the Smithsonian Institution during the late 50s as an optical tracking system for artificial satellites. These wide-field telescopes of 50cm of aperture were manufactured by Perkin- Elmer (optics) and Boller & Chivens (mechanics) with the highest quality specifications. The TFRM is a fully robotic refurbished BNC that exploit...

Montojo, F J; Muinos, J L; Nunez, J; Lopez-Morcillo, R; Baena, R; Boloix, J; Lopez-Moratalla, T; Merino, M

2011-01-01

195

Science Yield of an Improved Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) M. E. Levi1  

E-print Network

Science Yield of an Improved Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) M. E. Levi1 , A. G. Kim1, Berkeley CA 94720 2 Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 Abstract The Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey's highest recommended space mission was a Wide-Field Infrared

California at Berkeley, University of

196

OP09O-OP404-9 Wide Field Camera 3 CCD Quantum Efficiency Hysteresis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The HST/Wide Field Camera (WFC) 3 UV/visible channel CCD detectors have exhibited an unanticipated quantum efficiency hysteresis (QEH) behavior. At the nominal operating temperature of -83C, the QEH feature contrast was typically 0.1-0.2% or less. The behavior was replicated using flight spare detectors. A visible light flat-field (540nm) with a several times full-well signal level can pin the detectors at both optical (600nm) and near-UV (230nm) wavelengths, suppressing the QEH behavior. We are characterizing the timescale for the detectors to become unpinned and developing a protocol for flashing the WFC3 CCDs with the instrument's internal calibration system in flight. The HST/Wide Field Camera 3 UV/visible channel CCD detectors have exhibited an unanticipated quantum efficiency hysteresis (QEH) behavior. The first observed manifestation of QEH was the presence in a small percentage of flat-field images of a bowtie-shaped contrast that spanned the width of each chip. At the nominal operating temperature of -83C, the contrast observed for this feature was typically 0.1-0.2% or less, though at warmer temperatures contrasts up to 5% (at -50C) have been observed. The bowtie morphology was replicated using flight spare detectors in tests at the GSFC Detector Characterization Laboratory by power cycling the detector while cold. Continued investigation revealed that a clearly-related global QE suppression at the approximately 5% level can be produced by cooling the detector in the dark; subsequent flat-field exposures at a constant illumination show asymptotically increasing response. This QE "pinning" can be achieved with a single high signal flat-field or a series of lower signal flats; a visible light (500-580nm) flat-field with a signal level of several hundred thousand electrons per pixel is sufficient for QE pinning at both optical (600nm) and near-UV (230nm) wavelengths. We are characterizing the timescale for the detectors to become unpinned and developing a protocol for flashing the WFC3 CCDs with the instrument's internal calibration system in flight. A preliminary estimate of the decay timescale for one detector is that a drop of 0.1-0.2% occurs over a ten day period, indicating that relatively infrequent cal lamp exposures can mitigate the behavior to extremely low levels.

Collins, Nick

2009-01-01

197

Design of wide-field submillimeter-wave camera using SIS photon detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SIS photon detectors are niobium-based superconducting direct detectors for submillimeter-wave that show superior performance when compared with bolometric detectors for ground-based observations. We present the design and development of the SIS photon detectors together with optical and cryogenic components for wide field continuum observation system on Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). Using antenna coupled distributed junctions, SIS photon detectors give wide band response in a 650-GHz atmospheric window as well as high current sensitivity, shot noise limited operation, fast response and high dynamic range. Optical noise equivalent power (NEP) was measured to be 1.6x10-16 W/Hz0.5 that is less than the background photon fluctuation limit for ground based submillimeter-wave observations. Fabrication of focal plane array with 9 detector pixels is underway to install in ASTE. Readout electronics with Si-JFETs operating at about 100 K will be used for this array. Development of readout electronics for larger array is based on GaAs-JFETs operating at 0.3 K. For the purpose of installing 100 element array of SIS photon detectors, we have developed remotely operable low-vibration cryostat, which now cools bolometers for 350, 450, 850-µm observations down to 0.34 K. GM-type 4-K cooler and He3/He4 sorption cooler is used, which can be remotely recycled to keep detectors at 0.34 K. Since we have large optical window for this cryostat, sapphire cryogenic window is used to block infrared radiation. The sapphire window is ante-reflection coated with SiO2 by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The transmittance of the cryogenic window at 650 GHz is more than 95%.

Matsuo, Hiroshi; Ariyoshi, Seiichiro; Otani, Chiko; Ezawa, Hajime; Kobayashi, Jun; Mori, Yuko; Nagata, Hirohisa; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Fujiwara, Mikio; Akiba, Makoto; Hosako, Iwao

2004-10-01

198

Wide-field astronomy at Dome C with a compact two-mirror, three-reflection telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a project for a wide-field, compact telescope that has been deisgned for observation in difficult sites, such as in the Antacrtic Plateau. The basic optics is an F/3 two-mirror system (2MTRT), in which the primary acts as 1st and 3rd reflecting surface. The Amoretti design provides a corrected and unvignetted 2deg FOV and planarity of the focal plane. Three 2MTRT prototypes are described. We propose to put a robotic ~ 60 cm 2MTRT au Dome C with the following main aims: discovery and tracking potentially hazarduous NEOs, asteroseimsological researchs of rich stellar fields, identification of GRBs.

La Padula, C. D.; Carusi, A.; Lemaitre, G. R.; Montiel, P.; Nanni, D.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Vignato, A.; Viotti, R. F.

199

The Future of Fiber-Optic Computer Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author discusses research activities in the area of third-generation (all-optical) fiber-optic networks and where they are heading. Applications, the era of single unrepeated links, the characteristics of fiber paths in networks, forms of addressing, overall network throughput capacity, technologies, protocol layers, and making the communication layers invisible are discussed

Paul E. Green

1991-01-01

200

A DEEP, WIDE-FIELD H{alpha} SURVEY OF NEARBY CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: DATA  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a wide-field H{alpha} imaging survey of eight nearby (z = 0.02-0.03) Abell clusters. We have measured H{alpha} fluxes and equivalent widths for 465 galaxies, of which 360 are new detections. The survey was designed to obtain complete emission-line-selected inventories of star-forming galaxies in the inner regions of these clusters, extending to star formation rates below 0.1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This paper describes the observations, data processing, and source identification procedures, and presents an H{alpha} and R-band catalog of detected cluster members and other candidates. Future papers in the series will use these data to study the completeness of spectroscopically based star formation surveys, and to quantify the effects of cluster environment on the present-day populations of star-forming galaxies. The data will also provide a valuable foundation for imaging surveys of redshifted H{alpha} emission in more distant clusters.

Sakai, Shoko [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Moss, Chris [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom)

2012-04-01

201

Demonstration of the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometer Testbed Using a Calibrated Hyperspectral Image Projector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wide-field Imaging Interferometer testbed (WIIT) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center uses a dual-Michelson interferometric technique. The WIIT combines stellar interferometry with Fourier-transform interferometry to produce high-resolution spatial-spectral data over a large field-of-view. This combined technique could be employed on future NASA missions such as the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and the Sub-millimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS). While both SPIRIT and SPECS would operate at far-infrared wavelengths, the WIIT demonstrates the dual-interferometry technique at visible wavelengths. The WIIT will produce hyperspectral image data, so a true hyperspectral object is necessary. A calibrated hyperspectral image projector (CHIP) has been constructed to provide such an object. The CHIP uses Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology to produce customized, spectrally-diverse scenes. CHIP scenes will have approximately 1.6-micron spatial resolution and the capability of . producing arbitrary spectra in the band between 380 nm and 1.6 microns, with approximately 5-nm spectral resolution. Each pixel in the scene can take on a unique spectrum. Spectral calibration is achieved with an onboard fiber-coupled spectrometer. In this paper we describe the operation of the CHIP. Results from the WIIT observations of CHIP scenes will also be presented.

Bolcar, Matthew R.; Leisawitz, David; Maher, Steve; Rinehart, Stephen

2012-01-01

202

Demonstration of the wide-field imaging interferometer testbed using a calibrated hyperspectral image projector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wide-field Imaging Interferometer testbed (WIIT) at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center uses a dual-Michelson interferometric technique. The WIIT combines stellar interferometry with Fourier-transform interferometry to produce high-resolution spatial-spectral data over a large field-of-view. This combined technique could be employed on future NASA missions such as the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and the Sub-millimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS). While both SPIRIT and SPECS would operate at far-infrared wavelengths, the WIIT demonstrates the dual-interferometry technique at visible wavelengths. The WIIT will produce hyperspectral image data, so a true hyperspectral object is necessary. A calibrated hyperspectral image projector (CHIP) has been constructed to provide such an object. The CHIP uses Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology to produce customized, spectrally-diverse scenes. CHIP scenes will have approximately 1.6-micron spatial resolution and the capability of producing arbitrary spectra in the band between 380 nm and 1.6 microns, with approximately 5-nm spectral resolution. Each pixel in the scene can take on a unique spectrum. Spectral calibration is achieved with an onboard fiber-coupled spectrometer. In this paper we describe the operation of the CHIP. Results from the WIIT observations of CHIP scenes will also be presented.

Bolcar, Matthew R.; Leisawitz, David; Maher, Stephen; Rinehart, Stephen

2012-07-01

203

FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS  

SciTech Connect

We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

2013-03-01

204

Wide-field conserved scalar imaging in turbulent diffusion flames by a Raman and Rayleigh method  

SciTech Connect

A new experimental approach to two-dimensional (2D) measurements of mixture fraction and other scalars in turbulent flames has been developed, based on simultaneous fuel Raman and Rayleigh imaging. The inherently weak Raman signal is enhanced by high laser energy, low f-number optics, and a multipass cell. Measurements have been obtained in piloted flames of air-diluted methane, at Reynolds number 28,000--53,000. With the assumptions of unity Lewis number and a one-step reaction, single-shot images of mixture fraction, fuel mass fraction, and temperature have been derived with spatial resolution of about 10 Kolmogorov scales. Advantages and difficulties in the use of the multipass cell are discussed and some early results presented. The wide-field images enable determination of scalar turbulence macroscales that are found to be anisotropic and to vary with radius. The location of the instantaneous stoichiometric mixture fraction contours indicates that there is little reaction in the outer regions where entrainment takes place. Generally, the stoichiometric contour is aligned with regions of high scalar dissipation.

Kelman, J.B.; Masri, A.R.; Staarner, S.H.; Bilger, R.W. [Univ. of Sydney (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering

1994-12-31

205

Wide-field stabilized Doppler flowmetry with the tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Real time, high-speed image stabilization with a retinal tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) enables new approaches to established diagnostics. Large dynamic range, wide-field stabilized Doppler flowmetry imaging was demonstrated in initial human subject testing with a large frequency range and up to 40 deg fields of view. The retinal tracking system uses a confocal reflectometer with a closed loop optical servo system to lock onto features in the ocular fundus. The fundus imaging method is a quasi-confocal line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (LSLO). By locking to the retina and performing a slow scan of the laser line imager taking up to 30 seconds, frequency-resolved retinal perfusion and vascular flow images were obtained. The tracking system and auto-relock algorithms after blinks allowed the full image to be captured free of eye motion artifacts. Image cubes comprised of 512 by 512 spatial pixels by 512 or more temporal pixels were captured with a line rate of up to 20 kHz. The line sensor integrates, as opposed to conventional SLO flowmeters, thus minimizing aliasing that contributes to velocity errors. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) power spectra at each image pixel were computed. Image reconstruction accuracy was typically better than one pixel width. Doppler frequency resolution from 14 Hz to 3.675 kHz was demonstrated in this work. Pulsatile flow effects were observed. Normal adult subjects and patients were tested with or without mydriasis to characterize flow imaging performance.

Ferguson, R. D.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Elsner, Ann E.; Burns, Stephen A.; Webb, Robert H.; Weiter, John J.

2004-07-01

206

Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec: A New Robotic Wide Field Baker-Nunn Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Baker-Nunn Camera (BNC), originally installed at the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in 1958, was refurbished and robotized. The new facility, called Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec (TFRM), was installed at the Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec (OAdM). The process of refurbishment is described in detail. Most of the steps of the refurbishment project were accomplished by purchasing commercial components, which involve little posterior engineering assembling work. The TFRM is a 0.5 m aperture f/0.96 optically modified BNC, which offers a unique combination of instrumental specifications: fully robotic and remote operation, wide field of view (4°.4×4°.40), moderate limiting magnitude (V˜19.5 mag), ability of tracking at arbitrary right ascension (?) and declination (?) rates, as well as opening and closing CCD shutter at will during an exposure. Nearly all kinds of image survey programs can benefit from those specifications. Apart from other less time-consuming programs, since the beginning of science TFRM operations we have been conducting two specific and distinct surveys: super-Earths transiting around M-type dwarfs stars, and geostationary debris in the context of Space Situational Awareness/Space Surveillance and Tracking (SSA/SST) programs. Preliminary results for both cases will be shown.

Fors, Octavi; Núñez, Jorge; Luis Muiños, José; Javier Montojo, Francisco; Baena-Gallé, Roberto; Boloix, Jaime; Morcillo, Ricardo; Teresa Merino, María; Downey, Elwood C.; Mazur, Michael J.

2013-05-01

207

Miniature wide field-of-view star trackers for spacecraft attitude sensing and navigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Introducing a family of miniature, wide field-of-view star trackers for low cost, high performance spacecraft attitude determination and navigation applications. These devices, derivative of the WFOV Star Tracker Camera developed cooperatively by OCA Applied Optics and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Brilliant Pebbles program, offer a suite of options addressing a wide range of spacecraft attitude measurement and control requirements. These sensors employ much wider fields than are customary (ranging between 20 and 60 degrees) to assure enough bright stars for quick and accurate attitude determinations without long integration intervals. The key benefit of this approach are light weight, low power, reduced data processing loads and high information carrier rates for wide ACS bandwidths. Devices described range from the proven OCA/LLNL WFOV Star Tracker Camera (a low-cost, space-qualified star-field imager utilizing the spacecraft's own computer and centroiding and position-finding), to a new autonomous subsystem design featuring dual-redundant cameras and completely self-contained star-field data processing with output quaternion solutions accurate to 100 micro-rad, 3 sigma, for stand-alone applications.

Mccarty, William; Curtis, Eric; Hull, Anthony; Morgan, William

1993-01-01

208

[A wide-field push-broom hyperspectral imager based on curved prism].  

PubMed

A wide-field pushbroom hyperspectral imager covering short-wavelength infrared range is presented, which can be carried by space borne or airborne platform for remote sensing, acquiring hyperspectral data cube, and analyzing substance compositions and physicochemical properties. Curved prism which simultaneously possesses the functions of dispersion and imaging is used as the prismatic element, and the combination with Offner relay configuration substantially simplifies the design of spectrometer. Compared to conventional dispersive spectral imagers, this design is compact, light-weighted, and small-sized, and can efficiently correct unavoidable spectral line curve (smile) and spectral band (keystone or frown) by prismatic dispersion Compared to grating spectral imagers of the same configuration, the energy utilization efficiency of this design is much higher. The paraxial aberration theory and imaging characteristics of Offner relay configuration is briefly described. The optical layout and image evaluations, including spatial and spectral dimensions, are illustrated respectively, according to Monte Carlo ray-tracing results of seven principal wavelengths. PMID:22870671

Nie, Yun-Feng; Xiangli, Bin; Zhou, Jin-Song; Huang, Min

2012-06-01

209

Cost-effective and compact wide-field fluorescent imaging on a cell-phone.  

PubMed

We demonstrate wide-field fluorescent and darkfield imaging on a cell-phone with compact, light-weight and cost-effective optical components that are mechanically attached to the existing camera unit of the cell-phone. For this purpose, we used battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to pump the sample of interest from the side using butt-coupling, where the pump light was guided within the sample cuvette to uniformly excite the specimen. The fluorescent emission from the sample was then imaged using an additional lens that was positioned right in front of the existing lens of the cell-phone camera. Because the excitation occurs through guided waves that propagate perpendicular to our detection path, an inexpensive plastic colour filter was sufficient to create the dark-field background required for fluorescent imaging, without the need for a thin-film interference filter. We validate the performance of this platform by imaging various fluorescent micro-objects in 2 colours (i.e., red and green) over a large field-of-view (FOV) of ?81 mm(2) with a raw spatial resolution of ?20 ?m. With additional digital processing of the captured cell-phone images, through the use of compressive sampling theory, we demonstrate ?2 fold improvement in our resolving power, achieving ?10 ?m resolution without a trade-off in our FOV. Further, we also demonstrate darkfield imaging of non-fluorescent specimen using the same interface, where this time the scattered light from the objects is detected without the use of any filters. The capability of imaging a wide FOV would be exceedingly important to probe large sample volumes (e.g., >0.1 mL) of e.g., blood, urine, sputum or water, and for this end we also demonstrate fluorescent imaging of labeled white-blood cells from whole blood samples, as well as water-borne pathogenic protozoan parasites such as Giardia Lamblia cysts. Weighing only ?28 g (?1 ounce), this compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform attached to a cell-phone could be quite useful especially for resource-limited settings, and might provide an important tool for wide-field imaging and quantification of various lab-on-a-chip assays developed for global health applications, such as monitoring of HIV+ patients for CD4 counts or viral load measurements. PMID:21063582

Zhu, Hongying; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Su, Ting-Wei; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

2011-01-21

210

X-Ray Optics: Past, Present, and Future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

X-ray astronomy started with a small collimated proportional counter atop a rocket in the early 1960s. It was immediately recognized that focusing X-ray optics would drastically improve both source location accuracy and source detection sensitivity. In the past 5 decades, X-ray astronomy has made significant strides in achieving better angular resolution, large photon collection area, and better spectral and timing resolutions, culminating in the three currently operating X-ray observatories: Chandra, XMM/Newton, and Suzaku. In this talk I will give a brief history of X-ray optics, concentrating on the characteristics of the optics of these three observatories. Then I will discuss current X-ray mirror technologies being developed in several institutions. I will end with a discussion of the optics for the International X-ray Observatory that I have been developing at Goddard Space Flight Center.

Zhang, William W.

2010-01-01

211

Towards future systems with nano-optics contributions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The long anticipated deployment of nano-optics that can enable next generation computing has encountered several practical impediments that have delayed widespread adoption in commercial processes. However, the global market in nano-enabled products is expected to grow to over $80B USD within the next 3 years. In response, the research community is creating solutions to overcome challenging issues such as reliability and cost-effective fabrication. New approaches in sensing, continuous uptime powering, and post silicon manufacturing will maximize overall performance and allow unprecedented commercial applications. This paper reviews present limitations of nano-optics and then considers the new generation of devices and their manufacturing that may turn promises into reality. We highlight several recent innovations: high sensitivity/selectivity nano-optical sensing devices; sustainable power from polymer energy harvesting and storage; optical variable devices for visual authentication of secure documents; and nano-template masters for high-volume manufacturing.

Kaminska, Bozena; Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Chuo, Yindar; Landrock, Clint; Omrane, Badr; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

2013-03-01

212

A distributed optical grid network infrastructure for future easy-to-use innovative network services  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extending the researches on wavelength switched optical networks (WSON), efficient integration of the novel optical packet switching network and wavelength switching-based optical circuit switching network technologies which offers both best-effort packet delivery and QoS guaranteed lightpath services has been being studied. In addition, researches on the optical-layer transparent data processing, such as all-optical wavelength multicasting, all-optical 3R regeneration, etc, are conducted simultaneously. It is believed that future innovative optical network services (INSes) would be built on these novel future-proof technologies, and foster colorful applications in the new generation networks. Before the wide applications of INS in different fields, there would be a foreseeable strong requirement for INS firstly posed by pioneer grid applications, e.g., e-science, e-government, and e-banking, etc, which would require the high-performance underlying networks. Our research here is motivated to glue the optical networks and grid applications by integrating lightpath, geographically distributed INS systems and grid resources (e.g., computers, storages, instruments, etc.), and finally offering an easy-to-use high performance networked grid computing environment-optical grid network (OGN) to user applications. In this paper, we introduce our research activities of a distributed optical grid network infrastructure (OGNI), and the creation of the future easy-to-use INS based on OGNI. The proposals have been validated through fieldtrial experiments over a developed WSON testbed.

Xu, Sugang; Harai, Hiroaki; Wada, Naoya

2011-11-01

213

Wide-field computational imaging of pathology slides using lens-free on-chip microscopy.  

PubMed

Optical examination of microscale features in pathology slides is one of the gold standards to diagnose disease. However, the use of conventional light microscopes is partially limited owing to their relatively high cost, bulkiness of lens-based optics, small field of view (FOV), and requirements for lateral scanning and three-dimensional (3D) focus adjustment. We illustrate the performance of a computational lens-free, holographic on-chip microscope that uses the transport-of-intensity equation, multi-height iterative phase retrieval, and rotational field transformations to perform wide-FOV imaging of pathology samples with comparable image quality to a traditional transmission lens-based microscope. The holographically reconstructed image can be digitally focused at any depth within the object FOV (after image capture) without the need for mechanical focus adjustment and is also digitally corrected for artifacts arising from uncontrolled tilting and height variations between the sample and sensor planes. Using this lens-free on-chip microscope, we successfully imaged invasive carcinoma cells within human breast sections, Papanicolaou smears revealing a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, and sickle cell anemia blood smears over a FOV of 20.5 mm(2). The resulting wide-field lens-free images had sufficient image resolution and contrast for clinical evaluation, as demonstrated by a pathologist's blinded diagnosis of breast cancer tissue samples, achieving an overall accuracy of ~99%. By providing high-resolution images of large-area pathology samples with 3D digital focus adjustment, lens-free on-chip microscopy can be useful in resource-limited and point-of-care settings. PMID:25520396

Greenbaum, Alon; Zhang, Yibo; Feizi, Alborz; Chung, Ping-Luen; Luo, Wei; Kandukuri, Shivani R; Ozcan, Aydogan

2014-12-17

214

Simulation of miniature optical correlator for future generation of spacecraft precision landing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Future Mars\\/planets explorations call for precision and even pinpoint landing. Low cost optical correlator is one of the promising enabling technologies for pinpoint landing. JPL has developed a state-of-the-art miniature optical correlator (MOC) to demonstrate its feasibility. In this paper, we describe a simulation testbed under development for measuring MOC\\

Hanying Zhou; Tien-Hsin Chao; Bryan J. Martin; Nate Villaume

2003-01-01

215

APE: a breadboard to evaluate new phasing technologies for a future European Giant Optical Telescope  

E-print Network

APE: a breadboard to evaluate new phasing technologies for a future European Giant Optical and their calibration. The Active Phasing Experiment (APE) will be a technical instrument aimed at testing possible, segmented mirror, phasing wavefront sensor, active optics 1. INTRODUCTION The essential purpose of the APE

Liske, Jochen

216

A Wide-Field Survey of the Globular Cluster Systems of Giant Galaxies  

E-print Network

I present selected results from a wide-field CCD survey of the globular cluster systems of giant galaxies, including showing how measurements of the specific frequency of metal-poor globular clusters can constrain the redshift of their formation.

Katherine L. Rhode

2006-05-12

217

A unified calibration method with a parametric approach for wide-field-of-view multiprojector displays  

E-print Network

In this paper, we describe techniques for supporting a wide-field-of-view multiprojector curved screen display system. Our main contribution is in achieving automatic geometric calibration and efficient rendering for ...

Raskar, Ramesh

218

The discovery of y dwarfs using data from the wide-field infrared survey explorer (WISE)  

E-print Network

We present the discovery of seven ultracool brown dwarfs identified with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Near-infrared spectroscopy reveals deep absorption bands of H[subscript 2]O and CH[subscript 4] that ...

Cushing, Michael C.

219

Interferometric Imaging with the 32 Element Murchison Wide-Field Array  

E-print Network

The Murchison Wide-Field Array (MWA) is a low-frequency radio telescope, currently under construction, intended to search for the spectral signature of the epoch of reionization (EOR) and to probe the structure of the solar ...

Benkevitch, Leonid

220

Study of GLAO-corrected PSF evolution for the MUSE Wide Field Mode. Expected performance and requirements for PSF reconstruction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The second generation instrument MUSE for the VLT has been designed to profit of the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). The two Adaptive Optics (AO) modes (GLAO in Wide Field Mode [WFM] and LTAO in Narrow Field Mode [NFM]) will be used. To achieve its key science goals, MUSE will require information on the full system (Atmosphere, AO, telescope and instrument) image quality and its variation with Field position and wavelength. For example, optimal summation of a large number of deep field exposures in WFM will require a good knowledge of the PSF. In this paper, we will present an exhaustive analysis of the MUSE Wide Field Mode PSF evolution both spatially and spectrally. For that purpose we have coupled a complete AO simulation tool developed at ONERA with the MUSE instrumental PSF simulation. Relative impact of atmospheric and system parameters (seeing, Cn^2, LGS and NGS positions etc ...) with respect to differential MUSE aberrations per channel (i.e. slicer and IFU) is analysed. The results allow us (in close collaboration with astronomers) to define pertinent parameters (fit parameters using a Moffat function) for a PSF reconstruction process (estimation of this parameters using GLAO telemetry) and to propose an efficient and robust algorithm to be implemented in the MUSE pipeline. The extension of the spatial and spectral PSF analysis to the NFM case is discussed and preliminary results are given. Some specific requirements for the generalisation of the GLAO PSF reconstruction process to the LTAO case are derived from these early results.

Fusco, T.; Villecroze, R.; Jarno, A.; Bacon, R.

2011-09-01

221

The development of high-precision hexapod actuators for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide field upgrade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hexapods are finding increased use in telescope applications for positioning large payloads. Engineers from The University of Texas at Austin have been working with engineers from ADS International to develop large, high force, highly precise and controllable hexapod actuators for use on the Wide Field Upgrade (WFU) as part of the Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX)?. These actuators are installed in a hexapod arrangement, supporting the 3000+ kg instrument payload which includes the Wide Field Corrector (WFC), support structure, and other optical/electronic components. In addition to force capability, the actuators need to meet the tracking speed (pointing) requirements for accuracy and the slewing speed (rewind) requirements, allowing as many observations in one night as possible. The hexapod actuator stroke (retraction and extension) was very closely monitored during the design phase to make sure all of the science requirements could be met, while minimizing the risk of damaging the WFC optical hardware in the unlikely event of a hexapod actuator or controller failure. This paper discusses the design trade-offs between stiffness, safety, back-drivability, accuracy, and leading to selection of the motor, high ratio worm gear, roller screw, coupling, end mounts, and other key components.

Zierer, Joseph J.; Mock, Jason R.; Beno, Joseph H.; Good, John; Booth, John A.; Lazzarini, Paolo; Fumi, Pierluigi; Anaclerio, Enzo

2010-07-01

222

Architectural Options for a Future Deep Space Optical Communications Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides an overview of different options at Earth to provide Deep Space optical communication services. It is based mainly on work done for the Mars Laser Communications Demonstration (MLCD) Project, a joint project between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology (JPL), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory (MIT\\/LL).

B. L. Edwards; T. Benjamin; J. Scozzafava; F. Khatri; B. Parvin; P. E. Liebrecht

223

Deep-Space Optical Communications: Future Perspectives and Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of deep-space optical communica- tions was formulated shortly after the invention of lasers. The promise of laser communications, high data rate delivery with significantly reduced aperture size for the flight terminal, led to the pursuit of several successful experiments from Earth orbit and provided the incentive for further demonstrations to ex- tend the range to deep space. This

Hamid Hemmati; Abhijit Biswas; Ivan B. Djordjevic

2011-01-01

224

Key components and technologies for optical networks of the future  

Microsoft Academic Search

Explosive growth of Internet traffic and the convergence of telecommunication, Internet and broadcast networks and services are causing huge demand on bandwidth. DWDM networks are the only solution, which can cater to this ever-increasing bandwidth demand This paper presents developments and advances in some of the key components and technologies which are enabling the DWDM based optical transport network of

M. Kavitha; P. Nair; J. P. Raina; P. V. Pushpa; S. L. Maskara

2002-01-01

225

Retinal optical coherence tomography: past, present and future perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has undergone substantial changes since its first use in the 1990s. Although the first generation of OCT systems heralded a new era in the non-invasive diagnostic options in ophthalmology, they did not reveal much detail. Later devices offered more information and helped in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of pathological conditions, primarily of the

Wolfgang Geitzenauer; Christoph K Hitzenberger; Ursula M Schmidt-Erfurth

2010-01-01

226

Optical coherence elastography: current status and future applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has several advantages over other imaging modalities, such as angiography and ultrasound, due to its inherently high in vivo resolution, which allows for the identification of morphological tissue structures. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) benefits from the superior spatial resolution of OCT and has promising applications, including cancer diagnosis and the detailed characterization of arterial wall biomechanics, both of which are based on the elastic properties of the tissue under investigation. We present OCE principles based on techniques associated with static and dynamic tissue excitation, and their corresponding elastogram image-reconstruction algorithms are reviewed. OCE techniques, including the development of intravascular- or catheter-based OCE, are in their early stages of development but show great promise for surgical oncology or intravascular cardiology applications.

Sun, Cuiru; Standish, Beau; Yang, Victor X. D.

2011-04-01

227

A multichannel fiber optic photometer present performance and future developments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A three channel photometer for simultaneous multicolor observations was designed with the aim of making possible highly efficient photometry of fast variable objects like cataclysmic variables. Experiences with this instrument over a period of three years are presented. Aspects of the special techniques applied are discussed with respect to high precision photometry. In particular, the use of fiber optics is critically analyzed. Finally, the development of a new photometer concept is discussed.

Barwig, H.; Schoembs, R.; Huber, G.

1988-01-01

228

A Light and Effective Wide Field Monitor for Gamma Ray Bursts and Transient Sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present here a concept for a light and low-power wide field monitor working in the X-ray range, suitable for simultaneous imaging of large portions of the sky and GRB localizations. Our concept evolves from and improves on the design of the 5-kg SuperAGILE experiment, flying on the AGILE mission and currently delivering arcmin-localizations of GRBs at a rate of about 1/month. Similar to SuperAGILE, our concept is based on position sensitive silicon detectors equipped with one-dimensional coded masks. Different options are available for the detector, whose properties, combined with the scientific requirements, drive the design of the experiment. Our approach is based on a modular detector. The experiment design can then be tailored to specific scientific goals of the experiment or the mission (e.g., to cite GRBs only: the brightest GRBs/XRFs on a large field of view-FoV, or many low-fluence GRBs/XRFs on a smaller FoV, or the low energy spectrum of the prompt event, or the detection of high-z GRBs). In this paper we describe the concept, the main detector properties and outline some possible experiment configurations, with examples of their expected performance. Different experiment configurations in terms of area, FoV, angular resolution may be designed starting from the same detectors. Instead, the band-pass is mostly related to the detector properties. A key point of our project is the high degree of readiness of the detectors that are at production level and may be immediately proposed for a future experiment onboard missions with high readiness requirements.

Feroci, M.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L. A.; Bonvicini, V.; Campana, R.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Fiore, F.; Fuschino, F.; Israel, G. L.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Mastropietro, M.; Morelli, E.; Muleri, F.; Nicastro, F.; Orlandini, M.; Pacciani, L.; Perotti, F.; Rapisarda, M.; Rashevsky, A.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

2009-05-01

229

A Light and Effective Wide Field Monitor for Gamma Ray Bursts and Transient Sources  

SciTech Connect

We present here a concept for a light and low-power wide field monitor working in the X-ray range, suitable for simultaneous imaging of large portions of the sky and GRB localizations. Our concept evolves from and improves on the design of the 5-kg SuperAGILE experiment, flying on the AGILE mission and currently delivering arcmin-localizations of GRBs at a rate of about 1/month. Similar to SuperAGILE, our concept is based on position sensitive silicon detectors equipped with one-dimensional coded masks. Different options are available for the detector, whose properties, combined with the scientific requirements, drive the design of the experiment. Our approach is based on a modular detector. The experiment design can then be tailored to specific scientific goals of the experiment or the mission (e.g., to cite GRBs only: the brightest GRBs/XRFs on a large field of view - FoV, or many low-fluence GRBs/XRFs on a smaller FoV, or the low energy spectrum of the prompt event, or the detection of high-z GRBs). In this paper we describe the concept, the main detector properties and outline some possible experiment configurations, with examples of their expected performance. Different experiment configurations in terms of area, FoV, angular resolution may be designed starting from the same detectors. Instead, the band-pass is mostly related to the detector properties. A key point of our project is the high degree of readiness of the detectors that are at production level and may be immediately proposed for a future experiment onboard missions with high readiness requirements.

Feroci, M.; Campana, R.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Lazzarotto, F.; Mastropietro, M.; Muleri, F.; Pacciani, L.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica-Roma (Italy); Amati, L.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Morelli, E.; Orlandini, M. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica-Bologna (Italy); Antonelli, L. A.; Fiore, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma-Monteporzio Catone (Italy)] (and others)

2009-05-25

230

Discovery of two new Galactic candidate luminous blue variables with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the discovery of two new Galactic candidate luminous blue variable (LBV) stars via detection of circular shells (typical of confirmed and candidate LBVs) and follow-up spectroscopy of their central stars. The shells were detected at 22 ?m in the archival data of the Mid-Infrared All Sky Survey carried out with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Follow-up optical spectroscopy of the central stars of the shells conducted with the renewed Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) showed that their spectra are very similar to those of the well-known LBVs P Cygni and AG Car, and the recently discovered candidate LBV MN112, which implies the LBV classification for these stars as well. The LBV classification of both stars is supported by detection of their significant photometric variability: one of them brightened in the R and I bands by 0.68 ± 0.10 and 0.61 ± 0.04 mag, respectively, during the last 13-18 years, while the second one (known as Hen 3-1383) varies its B, V, R, I and Ks brightnesses by ?0.5-0.9 mag on time-scales from 10 d to decades. We also found significant changes in the spectrum of Hen 3-1383 on a time-scale of ?3 months, which provides additional support for the LBV classification of this star. Further spectrophotometric monitoring of both stars is required to firmly prove their LBV status. We discuss a connection between the location of massive stars in the field and their fast rotation, and suggest that the LBV activity of the newly discovered candidate LBVs might be directly related to their possible runaway status. a USNO B-1 (Monet et al. 2003); bDENIS; c2MASS; dSALT; ePROMPT.

Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Langer, N.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Todt, H.; Hamann, W.-R.; Grebel, E. K.; Buckley, D.; Crause, L.; Crawford, S.; Gulbis, A.; Hettlage, C.; Hooper, E.; Husser, T.-O.; Kotze, P.; Loaring, N.; Nordsieck, K. H.; O'Donoghue, D.; Pickering, T.; Potter, S.; Romero Colmenero, E.; Vaisanen, P.; Williams, T.; Wolf, M.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; Nysewander, M. C.; LaCluyze, A. P.

2012-04-01

231

Preliminary Design of The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)  

E-print Network

The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a NASA MIDEX mission, will survey the entire sky in four bands from 3.3 to 23 microns with a sensitivity 1000 times greater than the IRAS survey. The WISE survey will extend the Two Micron All Sky Survey into the thermal infrared and will provide an important catalog for the James Webb Space Telescope. Using 1024x1024 HgCdTe and Si:As arrays at 3.3, 4.7, 12 and 23 microns, WISE will find the most luminous galaxies in the universe, the closest stars to the Sun, and it will detect most of the main belt asteroids larger than 3 km. The single WISE instrument consists of a 40 cm diamond-turned aluminum afocal telescope, a two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat, a scan mirror mechanism, and reimaging optics giving 5" resolution (full-width-half-maximum). The use of dichroics and beamsplitters allows four color images of a 47'x47' field of view to be taken every 8.8 seconds, synchronized with the orbital motion to provide total sky coverage with overlap between revolutions. WISE will be placed into a Sun-synchronous polar orbit on a Delta 7320-10 launch vehicle. The WISE survey approach is simple and efficient. The three-axis-stabilized spacecraft rotates at a constant rate while the scan mirror freezes the telescope line of sight during each exposure. WISE is currently in its Preliminary Design Phase, with the mission Preliminary Design Review scheduled for July, 2005. WISE is scheduled to launch in mid 2009; the project web site can be found at www.wise.ssl.berkeley.edu.

A. K. Mainzer; P. Eisenhardt; E. L. Wright; F. Liu; W. Irace; I. Heinrichsen; R. Cutri; V. Duval

2005-08-10

232

Wide-field photometry of the Galactic globular cluster M22  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present wide-field photometry of the Galactic globular cluster M22 in the B, V and I passbands for more than 186 000 stars. The study is complemented by the photometry in two narrow-band filters centred on H? and the adjacent continuum, and by infrared J, H and K magnitudes derived from the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey for ~2000 stars. Profiting from this huge data base, we completely characterized the evolved stellar sequences of the cluster by determining a variety of photometric parameters, including new photometric estimates of the mean metallicity, reddening and distance to the cluster. In particular, from our multiwavelength analysis, we re-examined the long-standing metallicity spread problem in M22. According to our data set, we conclude that most of the observed width of the red giant branch must be due to differential reddening, which amounts to a maximum of ?E(B-V) ~= 0.06, although the presence of a small metallicity spread cannot be completely ruled out. More specifically, the maximum metallicity spread allowed by our data is of the order of ?[Fe/H]~= 0.1-0.2 dex, i.e. not much more than that allowed by the photometric errors. Finally, we identified most of the known variable stars and peculiar objects in our field of view. In particular, we have found additional evidence supporting previous optical identifications of the central star of the planetary nebula IRAS 18333-2357, which is associated with M22.

Monaco, L.; Pancino, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Bellazzini, M.

2004-04-01

233

High Resolution Observations using Adaptive Optics: Achievements and Future Needs  

E-print Network

Over the last few years, several interesting observations were obtained with the help of solar Adaptive Optics (AO). In this paper, few observations made using the solar AO are enlightened and briefly discussed. A list of disadvantages with the current AO system are presented. With telescopes larger than 1.5m are expected during the next decade, there is a need to develop the existing AO technologies for large aperture telescopes. Some aspects of this development are highlighted. Finally, the recent AO developments in India are also presented.

K. Sankarasubramanian; T. Rimmele

2008-01-21

234

MOA-cam3: a wide-field mosaic CCD camera for a gravitational microlensing survey in New Zealand  

E-print Network

We have developed a wide-field mosaic CCD camera, MOA-cam3, mounted at the prime focus of the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA) 1.8-m telescope. The camera consists of ten E2V CCD4482 chips, each having 2kx4k pixels, and covers a 2.2 deg^2 field of view with a single exposure. The optical system is well optimized to realize uniform image quality over this wide field. The chips are constantly cooled by a cryocooler at -80C, at which temperature dark current noise is negligible for a typical 1-3 minute exposure. The CCD output charge is converted to a 16-bit digital signal by the GenIII system (Astronomical Research Cameras Inc.) and readout is within 25 seconds. Readout noise of 2--3 ADU (rms) is also negligible. We prepared a wide-band red filter for an effective microlensing survey and also Bessell V, I filters for standard astronomical studies. Microlensing studies have entered into a new era, which requires more statistics, and more rapid alerts to catch exotic light curves. Our new system is a powerful tool to realize both these requirements.

T. Sako; T. Sekiguchi; M. Sasaki; K. Okajima; F. Abe; I. A. Bond; J. B. Hearnshaw; Y. Itow; K. Kamiya; P. M. Kilmartin; K. Masuda; Y. Matsubara; Y. Muraki; N. J. Rattenbury; D. J. Sullivan; T. Sumi; P. Tristram; T. Yanagisawa; P. C. M. Yock

2008-04-04

235

Upconverting nanoparticles: a versatile platform for wide-field two-photon microscopy and multi-modal in vivo imaging.  

PubMed

Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) have recently attracted enormous attention in the field of biological imaging owing to their unique optical properties: (1) efficient upconversion photoluminescence, which is intense enough to be detected at the single-particle level with a (nonscanning) wide-field microscope setup equipped with a continuous wave (CW) near-infrared (NIR) laser (980 nm), and (2) resistance to photoblinking and photobleaching. Moreover, the use of NIR excitation minimizes adverse photoinduced effects such as cellular photodamage and the autofluorescence background. Finally, the cytotoxicity of UCNPs is much lower than that of other nanoparticle systems. All these advantages can be exploited simultaneously without any conflicts, which enables the establishment of a novel UCNP-based platform for wide-field two-photon microscopy. UCNPs are also useful for multimodal in vivo imaging because simple variations in the composition of the lattice atoms and dopant ions integrated into the particles can be easily implemented, yielding various distinct biomedical activities relevant to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET). These multiple functions embedded in a single type of UCNPs play a crucial role in precise disease diagnosis. The application of UCNPs is extended to therapeutic fields such as photodynamic and photothermal cancer therapies through advanced surface conjugation schemes. PMID:25042637

Park, Yong Il; Lee, Kang Taek; Suh, Yung Doug; Hyeon, Taeghwan

2015-03-10

236

Active illumination for wide-field time-resolved fluorescence imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The large dynamic range of fluorescence emission collected is one of the major challenges in wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging. To overcome this challenge, we developed an active illumination strategy to acquire optimal fluorescence signals over the sample imaged even in the presence of large fluorophore concentration distributions. We validated the stability of our approach in a multi-well plate setting with fluorophore concentrations ranging <2 orders of magnitude. We report the ability of our method to retrieve accurately the lifetime over this concentration range based on optimized wide-field data. Our results demonstrate that active wide-field illumination can improve the signal-to-noise ratio and weak-signal sensitivity for enhanced accuracy of fluorescence decay curve fitting and lifetime estimation at high acquisition speed.

Zhao, Lingling; Abe, Ken; Barroso, Margarida; Intes, Xavier

2013-06-01

237

Nonlinear compensation technologies for future optical communication systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Digital nonlinear compensation techniques have been thought to be keys to realize further spectrally efficient optical fiber communication systems. The most critical issue of the digital nonlinear compensation algorithms has been their computational complexity, or gate count of digital signal processing circuit. Among several approaches, digital nonlinear compensation algorithms based on perturbation analysis are attractive in terms of the hardware efficiency because the algorithms can compensate the accumulated nonlinear noise over all transmission spans with only one stage. In this paper, we discuss three approaches to sophisticate the perturbation nonlinear compensation. First, we illustrate a perturbation-based post-equalization method to improve the robustness to transceiver device imperfections. We next propose and numerically evaluate a symbol degeneration method to extend the perturbation nonlinear compensation methods to higher-order QAM without increasing the computational complexity. Finally, we discuss a sub-band processing of perturbation nonlinear compensation for further computational complexity reduction. By combining the perturbation method with Nyquist frequency division multiplexing, the computational complexity of perturbation calculation is reduced by a factor of more than 10 for 3000-km single-channel transmission of 128 Gbit/s dualpolarization QPSK with only 0.1 dB performance degradation.

Oyama, Tomofumi; Hoshida, Takeshi; Nakashima, Hisao; Oda, Shoichiro; Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Tanimura, Takahito; Dou, Liang; Zhao, Ying; Tao, Zhenning; Rasmussen, Jens C.

2015-01-01

238

Flight performance of an advanced CZT imaging detector in a balloon-borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope—ProtoEXIST1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We successfully carried out the first high-altitude balloon flight of a wide-field hard X-ray coded-aperture telescope ProtoEXIST1, which was launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico on October 9, 2009. ProtoEXIST1 is the first implementation of an advanced CdZnTe (CZT) imaging detector in our ongoing program to establish the technology required for next generation wide-field hard X-ray telescopes such as the High Energy Telescope (HET) in the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST). The CZT detector plane in ProtoEXIST1 consists of an 8×8 array of closely tiled 2 cm×2 cm×0.5 cm thick pixellated CZT crystals, each with 8×8 pixels, mounted on a set of readout electronics boards and covering a 256 cm2 active area with 2.5 mm pixels. A tungsten mask, mounted at 90 cm above the detector provides shadowgrams of X-ray sources in the 30-600 keV band for imaging, allowing a fully coded field of view of 9°×9° (and 19°×19° for 50% coding fraction) with an angular resolution of 20?. In order to reduce the background radiation, the detector is surrounded by semi-graded (Pb/Sn/Cu) passive shields on the four sides all the way to the mask. On the back side, a 26 cm×26 cm×2 cm CsI(Na) active shield provides signals to tag charged particle induced events as well as ?100keV background photons from below. The flight duration was only about 7.5 h due to strong winds (60 knots) at float altitude (38-39 km). Throughout the flight, the CZT detector performed excellently. The telescope observed Cyg X-1, a bright black hole binary system, for ˜1h at the end of the flight. Despite a few problems with the pointing and aspect systems that caused the telescope to track about 6.4° off the target, the analysis of the Cyg X-1 data revealed an X-ray source at 7.2? in the 30-100 keV energy band at the expected location from the optical images taken by the onboard daytime star camera. The success of this first flight is very encouraging for the future development of the advanced CZT imaging detectors (ProtoEXIST2, with 0.6 mm pixels), which will take advantage of the modularization architecture employed in ProtoEXIST1.

Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelemy, S.; Baker, R.; Garson, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Apple, J.; Cleveland, W. H.

2011-10-01

239

Segmented X-Ray Optics for Future Space Telescopes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightweight and high resolution mirrors are needed for future space-based X-ray telescopes to achieve advances in high-energy astrophysics. The slumped glass mirror technology in development at NASA GSFC aims to build X-ray mirror modules with an area to mass ratio of approx.17 sq cm/kg at 1 keV and a resolution of 10 arc-sec Half Power Diameter (HPD) or better at an affordable cost. As the technology nears the performance requirements, additional engineering effort is needed to ensure the modules are compatible with space-flight. This paper describes Flight Mirror Assembly (FMA) designs for several X-ray astrophysics missions studied by NASA and defines generic driving requirements and subsequent verification tests necessary to advance technology readiness for mission implementation. The requirement to perform X-ray testing in a horizontal beam, based on the orientation of existing facilities, is particularly burdensome on the mirror technology, necessitating mechanical over-constraint of the mirror segments and stiffening of the modules in order to prevent self-weight deformation errors from dominating the measured performance. This requirement, in turn, drives the mass and complexity of the system while limiting the testable angular resolution. Design options for a vertical X-ray test facility alleviating these issues are explored. An alternate mirror and module design using kinematic constraint of the mirror segments, enabled by a vertical test facility, is proposed. The kinematic mounting concept has significant advantages including potential for higher angular resolution, simplified mirror integration, and relaxed thermal requirements. However, it presents new challenges including low vibration modes and imperfections in kinematic constraint. Implementation concepts overcoming these challenges are described along with preliminary test and analysis results demonstrating the feasibility of kinematically mounting slumped glass mirror segments.

McClelland, Ryan S.

2013-01-01

240

Segmented X-ray optics for future space telescopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lightweight and high resolution mirrors are needed for future space-based X-ray telescopes to achieve advances in high-energy astrophysics. The slumped glass mirror technology in development at NASA GSFC aims to build X-ray mirror modules with an area to mass ratio of ~17 cm2/kg at 1 keV and a resolution of 10 arc-sec Half Power Diameter (HPD) or better at an affordable cost. As the technology nears the performance requirements, additional engineering effort is needed to ensure the modules are compatible with space-flight. This paper describes Flight Mirror Assembly (FMA) designs for several X-ray astrophysics missions studied by NASA and defines generic driving requirements and subsequent verification tests necessary to advance technology readiness for mission implementation. The requirement to perform X-ray testing in a horizontal beam, based on the orientation of existing facilities, is particularly burdensome on the mirror technology, necessitating mechanical over-constraint of the mirror segments and stiffening of the modules in order to prevent self-weight deformation errors from dominating the measured performance. This requirement, in turn, drives the mass and complexity of the system while limiting the testable angular resolution. Design options for a vertical X-ray test facility alleviating these issues are explored. An alternate mirror and module design using kinematic constraint of the mirror segments, enabled by a vertical test facility, is proposed. The kinematic mounting concept has significant advantages including potential for higher angular resolution, simplified mirror integration, and relaxed thermal requirements. However, it presents new challenges including low vibration modes and imperfections in kinematic constraint. Implementation concepts overcoming these challenges are described along with preliminary test and analysis results demonstrating the feasibility of kinematically mounting slumped glass mirror segments.

McClelland, R. S.

241

Probing other solar systems with current and future adaptive optics  

SciTech Connect

Over the past decade, the study of extrasolar planets through indirect techniques--primarily Doppler measurements--has revolutionized our understanding of other solar systems. The next major step in this field will be the direct detection and characterization, via imaging and spectroscopy, of the planets themselves. To achieve this, we must separate the light from the faint planet from the extensive glare of its parent star. We pursued this goal using the current generation of adaptive optics (AO) systems on large ground-based telescopes, using infrared imaging to search for the thermal emission from young planets and developing image processing techniques to distinguish planets from telescope-induced artifacts. Our new Angular Differential Imaging (ADI) technique, which uses the sidereal rotation of the Earth and telescope, is now standard for ground-based high-contrast imaging. Although no young planets were found in our surveys, we placed the strongest limits yet on giant planets in wide orbits (>30 AU) around young stars and characterized planetary companion candidates. The imaging of planetary companions on solar-system-like scales (5-30 AU) will require a new generation of advanced AO systems that are an order of magnitude more powerful than the LLNL-built Keck AO system. We worked to develop and test the key technologies needed for these systems, including a spatially-filtered wavefront sensor, efficient and accurate wavefront reconstruction algorithms, and precision AO wavefront control at the sub-nm level. LLNL has now been selected by the Gemini Observatory to lead the construction of the Gemini Planet Imager, a $24M instrument that will be the most advanced AO system in the world.

Macintosh, B; Marois, C; Phillion, D; Poyneer, L; Graham, J; Zuckerman, B; Gavel, D; Veran, J; Wilhelmsen-Evans, J; Mellis, C

2008-09-08

242

The wide-field Fourier spectroscopic-imaging of the radiation heat from the object itself in the middle infrared region for the health monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are aiming at the realization of the wide-field spectroscopic-imaging-sensor that is available for the health monitoring or the plant factory. Conventionally, the body temperature is measured by the thermography as a total intensity of the middle infrared radiation. We are trying to analyze the spectroscopic characteristics of the radiation heat from the human body in detail to measure the blood glucose or the moisture-retaining properties of the human skin. The proposed imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy can measure the radiation heat from the object itself with the wide field of view and the wide wavelength-band. In this proposed method, we install the phase-shifter on the optical Fourier-transform-plane of the imaging optics to give the arbitrary phase-shift to the half flux of the object beams. Thus, the interferogram can be formed on the imaging plane in each bright point by the phase-shift interference-phenomena between the object beams that are emitted from the each corresponding bright point on the objective surface. In this report, we mention the feasibility results of the wide-field spectroscopic-imaging using the black body for the basic optical evaluation and the house plants for measuring the glucose distribution with the infrared camera(wavelength: 8?m-14?m).

Qi, Wei; Takuma, Takashi; Inui, Asuka; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Yuzuriha, Takehiko; Kagiyama, Hiroyasu; Kojima, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ishimaru, Ichirou

2012-03-01

243

Preliminary results on the various U.V. straylight sources for the VWFC onboard SL 1. [Very Wide Field Camera  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technical difficulties encountered using the Very Wide Field Camera (VWFC) during the Spacelab 1 Shuttle mission are reported. The VWFC is a wide low resolution (5 arcmin half-half width) photographic camera, capable of operating in both spectrometric and photometric modes. The bandpasses of the photometric mode of the VWFC are defined by three Al + MgF2 interference filters. A piggy-back spectrograph attached to the VWFC was used for observations in the spectrometric mode. A total of 48 astronomical frames were obtained using the VWFC, of which only 20 were considered to be of adequate quality for astronomical data processing. Preliminary analysis of the 28 poor-quality images revealed the following possible defects in the VWFC: darkness in the spacing frames, twilight/dawn UV straylight, and internal UV straylight. Improvements in the VWFC astronomical data processing scheme are expected to help identify and eliminate UV straylight sources in the future.

Viton, M.; Courtes, G.; Sivan, J. P.; Decher, R.; Gary, A.

1985-01-01

244

KOALA: a wide-field 1000 element integral-field unit for the Anglo-Australian Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

KOALA, the Kilofibre Optimised Astronomical Lenslet Array, is a wide-field, high efficiency integral field unit being designed for use with the bench mounted AAOmega spectrograph on the AAT. KOALA will have 1000 fibres in a rectangular array with a selectable field of view of either 1390 or 430 sq. arcseconds with a spatial sampling of 1.25" or 0.7" respectively. To achieve this KOALA will use a telecentric double lenslet array with interchangeable fore-optics. The IFU will feed AAOmega via a 31m fibre run. The efficiency of KOALA is expected to be ? 52% at 3700A and ? 66% at 6563°Å with a throughput of > 52% over the entire wavelength range.

Ellis, S. C.; Ireland, M.; Lawrence, J. S.; Tims, J.; Staszak, N.; Brzeski, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sharp, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Case, S.; Colless, M.; Croom, S.; Couch, W.; De Marco, O.; Glazebrook, K.; Saunders, W.; Webster, R.; Zucker, D. B.

2012-09-01

245

Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Sace Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Ion Beam Analysis of Subtle Impactor Traces  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recognition of origin for particles responsible for impact damage on spacecraft such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) relies upon postflight analysis of returned materials. A unique opportunity arose in 2009 with collection of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) from HST by shuttle mission STS-125. A preliminary optical survey confirmed that there were hundreds of impact features on the radiator surface. Following extensive discussion between NASA, ESA, NHM and IBC, a collaborative research program was initiated, employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ion beam analysis (IBA) to determine the nature of the impacting grains. Even though some WFPC2 impact features are large, and easily seen without the use of a microscope, impactor remnants may be hard to find.

Grime, G. W.; Webb, R. P.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Colaux, J. L.; Kearsley, A. T.; Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Opiela, J.; Griffin, T.; Gerlach, L.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

2014-01-01

246

The ROSAT Wide Field Camera all-sky survey of extreme-ultraviolet sources. I - The Bright Source Catalogue  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

First comprehensive results from an initial processing of the ROSAT Wide Field Camera all-sky survey for cosmic sources of extreme-ultraviolet radiation are presented. The reduction of the survey data has yielded a catalog of 383 relatively bright EUV sources, forming the WFC Bright Source Catalogue. Details of the EUV source positions and count rates are given, as are optical identifications where known. It is found that the log N-log S distributions are unusually flat for the white dwarf stars, but almost Euclidean for the nearby main-sequence late-type stars. The sky distribution of identified white dwarfs is highly nonuniform, suggesting gross variations in the opacity of the interstellar medium within about 100 pc.

Pounds, K. A.; Allan, D. J.; Barber, C.; Barstow, M. A.; Bertram, D.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Brebner, G. E. C.; Buckley, D.; Bromage, G. E.; Cole, R. E.; Courtier, M.; Cruise, A. M.; Culhane, J. L.; Denby, M.; Donoghue, D. O.; Dunford, E.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Goodall, C. V.; Gondhalekar, P. M.; Gourlay, J. A.; Harris, A. W.; Hassall, B. J. M.; Hellier, C.; Hodgkin, S.; Jeffries, R. D.; Kellett, B. J.; Kent, B. J.; Lieu, R.; Lloyd, C.; McGale, P.; Mason, K. O.; Matthews, L.; Mittaz, J. P. D.; Page, C. G.; Pankiewicz, G. S.; Pike, C. D.; Ponman, T. J.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.; Pye, J. P.; Quenby, J. J.; Ricketts, M. J.; Rosen, S. R.; Sansom, A. E.; Sembay, S.; Sidher, S.; Sims, M. R.; Stewart, B. C.; Sumner, T. J.; Vallance, R. J.; Watson, M. G.; Warwick, R. S.; Wells, A. A.; Willingale, R.; Willmore, A. P.; Willoughby, G. A.; Wonnacott, D.

1993-01-01

247

Wide field of view helmet mounted display systems for helicopter simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper elaborates on visually-coupled Wide Field of View Helmet Mounted Display (WFOVHMD) system technology as a viable visual presentation system for helicopter simulation. Critical research issues on helmet mounted displays are reviewed. Tradeoffs associated with this mode of presentation as well as research and training applications are discussed.

Haworth, Loran A.; Bucher, Nancy M.; Hennessy, Robert T.

1988-01-01

248

The status of NASA's wide-field meteor camera network and preliminary results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) recently established two wide-field cameras to detect meteors in the millimeter-size-range. This paper outlines the concepts of the system, the hardware and software, and results of 3,440 orbits seen from December 13, 2012 until May 14, 2014.

Blaauw, R.; Cooke, W.; Kingery, A.; Suggs, R.

2014-04-01

249

Wide field-of-view digital night vision head-mounted display  

Microsoft Academic Search

SA Photonics has developed (with support from the Air Force Research Lab, the US Army and Vision Systems International) an innovative wide field of view digital night vision head mounted display (HMD). This HMD has an 80 degree field of view to greatly improve operator situational awareness. By using creating an all-digital system, we provide the capability to enhance and

Michael P. Browne

2011-01-01

250

The First Hundred Brown Dwarfs Discovered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)  

E-print Network

We present ground-based spectroscopic verification of 6 Y dwarfs (see also Cushing et al.), 89 T dwarfs, 8 L dwarfs, and 1 M dwarf identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Eighty of these are cold brown ...

Bochanski, John J.

251

Saturn's hydrogen aurora: Wide field and planetary camera 2 imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wide field and planetary camera 2\\/Hubble Space Telescope (WFPC2\\/HST) images of Saturn's far ultraviolet aurora reveal emissions confined to a narrow band of latitudes near Saturn's north and south poles. The aurorae are most prominent in the morning sector with patterns that appear fixed in local time. The geographic distribution and vertical extent of the auroral emissions seen in these

John T. Trauger; John T. Clarke; Gilda E. Ballester; Robin W. Evans; Christopher J. Burrows; David Crisp; John S. Gallagher; Richard E. Griffiths; J. Jeff Hester; John G. Hoessel; Jon A. Holtzman; John E. Krist; Jeremy R. Mould; Raghvendra Sahai; Paul A. Scowen; Karl R. Stapelfeldt; Alan M. Watson

1998-01-01

252

Wide-Field Millimagnitude Photometry with the HAT: A Tool for Extrasolar Planet Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss the system requirements for obtaining millimagnitude photometric precision over a wide field using small-aperture, short focal length telescope systems such as those being developed by a number of research groups to search for transiting extrasolar planets. We describe a Hungarian Automated Telescope (HAT) system, which attempts to meet these requirements. The attainable precision of HAT has been significantly

G. Bakos; R. W. Noyes; G. Kovács; K. Z. Stanek; D. D. Sasselov; I. Domsa

2004-01-01

253

Orientation imaging of single molecules by wide-field epifluorescence microscopy  

E-print Network

Orientation imaging of single molecules by wide-field epifluorescence microscopy Martin Bo imaging method for direct determination of single-molecule orientations is presented that uses a wide, allowing for direct determination of single-molecule orientation based on the characteristic intensity

Enderlein, Jörg

254

Focal plane instrumentation for the Wide-Field X-ray Telescope  

E-print Network

The three X-ray imaging focal planes of the Wide-Field X-ray Telescope (WFXT) Mission will each have a field of view up to 1 degree square, pixel pitch smaller than 1 arcsec, excellent X-ray detection efficiency and spectral ...

Bautz, Marshall W.

255

Estimating crop production in Iowa from Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) data  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Indian National Remote Sensing Agency ResourceSat-1 Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) data for the USA is being provided online by the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) and Arctic Slope Regional Corporation – Management Services (ASRC-MS). Because of the frequent revisit time and pixel sizes...

256

The Status of NASA's Wide-Field Meteor Camera Network and Preliminary Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) recently established two wide-field cameras to detect meteors in the millimeter-size-range. This paper outlines the concepts of the system, the hardware and software, and results of 3,440 orbits seen from December 13, 2012 until May 14, 2014.

Blaauw, R.; Cooke, W.; Kingery, A.; Suggs, R.

2014-01-01

257

UVUDF: Ultraviolet Imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field with Wide-Field Camera 3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an overview of a 90 orbit Hubble Space Telescope treasury program to obtain near-ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using the Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS detector with the F225W, F275W, and F336W filters. This survey is designed to: (1) investigate the episode of peak star formation activity in galaxies at 1 < z < 2.5; (2) probe the evolution of massive galaxies by resolving sub-galactic units (clumps); (3) examine the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from galaxies at z ~ 2-3; (4) greatly improve the reliability of photometric redshift estimates; and (5) measure the star formation rate efficiency of neutral atomic-dominated hydrogen gas at z ~ 1-3. In this overview paper, we describe the survey details and data reduction challenges, including both the necessity of specialized calibrations and the effects of charge transfer inefficiency. We provide a stark demonstration of the effects of charge transfer inefficiency on resultant data products, which when uncorrected, result in uncertain photometry, elongation of morphology in the readout direction, and loss of faint sources far from the readout. We agree with the STScI recommendation that future UVIS observations that require very sensitive measurements use the instrument's capability to add background light through a "post-flash." Preliminary results on number counts of UV-selected galaxies and morphology of galaxies at z ~ 1 are presented. We find that the number density of UV dropouts at redshifts 1.7, 2.1, and 2.7 is largely consistent with the number predicted by published luminosity functions. We also confirm that the image mosaics have sufficient sensitivity and resolution to support the analysis of the evolution of star-forming clumps, reaching 28-29th magnitude depth at 5? in a 0.''2 radius aperture depending on filter and observing epoch. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are #12534.

Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc; Kurczynski, Peter; Bond, Nicholas A.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Atek, Hakim; Brown, Thomas M.; Coe, Dan; Colbert, James W.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Gronwall, Caryl; Hanish, Daniel J.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; de Mello, Duilia F.; Ravindranath, Swara; Ryan, Russell E.; Siana, Brian D.; Scarlata, Claudia; Soto, Emmaris; Voyer, Elysse N.; Wolfe, Arthur M.

2013-12-01

258

History of optical theory of reflecting telescopes and implications for future projects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This contribution, The History of Optical Theory of Reflecting Telescopes and Implications for Future Projects, is a shortened form of the Karl Schwarzschild lecture given in Bochum in September 1993. Some material has been added from an invited paper given in Padua in December 1992. For a full account, with figures and tables, the reader is referred to these two papers.

Wilson, Raymond N.

1997-03-01

259

Sampling and Analysis of Impact Crater Residues found on the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 Radiator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After nearly 16 years on orbit, the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC-2) was recovered from the Hubble Space Telescope in May 2009 during the 12 day shuttle mission designated STS-125. During that exposure to the low Earth orbit environment, the WFPC-2 radiator was struck by approximately 700 impactors producing crater features 300 micrometers and larger in size. Following an optical inspection of these features in 2009, an agreement was reached for the joint NASA-ESA examination and characterization of crater residues, the remnants of the projectile, in 2011. Active examination began in 2012, with 486 of the impact features being cored at NASA Johnson Space Center fs (JSC) Space Exposed Hardware cleanroom and curation facility. The core samples were subsequently divided between NASA and ESA. NASA's analysis was conducted at JSC fs Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/ energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) methods, and ESA's analysis was conducted at the Natural History Museum (NHM) again using SEM/EDS, and at the University of Surrey Ion Beam Centre (IBC) using ion beam analysis (IBA) with a scanned proton microbeam. As detailed discussion of the joint findings remains premature at this point, this paper reports on the coring technique developed; the practical taxonomy developed to classify residues as belonging either to anthropogenic "orbital debris" or micrometeoroids; and the protocols for examination of crater residues. Challenges addressed in coring were the relative thickness of the surface to be cut, protection of the impact feature from contamination while coring, and the need to preserve the cleanroom environment so as to preclude or minimize cross-contamination. Classification criteria are summarized, including the assessment of surface contamination and surface cleaning. Finally, we discuss the analytical techniques used to examine the crater residues. We employed EDS from either electron excitation (SEM-EDS) and, in a minority of cases for cores assessed as "difficult" targets, proton excitation (IBA). All samples were documented by electron imagery: backscattered electron imagery in the SEM, and where appropriate, secondary electron imagery during IBA.

Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G. W.; Colaux, J. L.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Webb, R. P.; Griffin, T. J.; Reed, B. B.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Kou, J.-C.; Robinson, G. A.; Opiela, J. N.; Gerlach, L.

2013-01-01

260

Effects of spatial and spectral frequencies on wide-field functional imaging (wifi) characterization of preclinical breast cancer models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A common strategy to study breast cancer is the use of the preclinical model. These models provide a physiologically relevant and controlled environment in which to study both response to novel treatments and the biology of the cancer. Preclinical models, including the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model, are very amenable to optical imaging and to this end, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument that is perfectly suited to studying tumor metabolism in preclinical models. WiFI combines two optical imaging modalities, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm x 5 cm) field of view. Using SFDI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are determined, which are then used to extract tissue chromophore concentrations in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. In the current study, we employ Monte Carlo simulations of SFDI light propagation in order to characterize the penetration depth of light in both the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model. Preliminary results suggest that different spatial frequency and wavelength combinations have different penetration depths, suggesting the potential depth sectioning capability of the SFDI component of WiFI.

Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Choi, Bernard

2010-02-01

261

A wide-field photometric study of the globular cluster system of NGC 4636  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous smaller-scale studies of the globular cluster system of NGC 4636, an elliptical galaxy in the southern part of the Virgo cluster, have revealed an unusually rich globular cluster system. We re-investigate the cluster system of NGC 4636 with wide-field Washington photometry. The globular cluster luminosity function can be followed roughly 1 mag beyond the turn-over magnitude found at {V}

Boris Dirsch; Ylva Schuberth; Tom Richtler

2005-01-01

262

A Wide-Field Spectroscopic Survey In The Cluster Lens Cl0024+17  

E-print Network

We present a detailed velocity histogram from a wide-field spectroscopic survey in the field of the cluster lens Cl0024 showing an unrelaxed foreground structure in addition to the relaxed main cluster. This finding reduces the velocity dispersion of the main cluster compared to previous studies by a factor of about 2 and thus resolves the discrepancy between previous mass estimates for this cluster.

Oliver Czoske; Genevieve Soucail; Jean-Paul Kneib; Terry Bridges; Jean-Charles Cuillandre; Yannick Mellier

1999-09-02

263

Hubble Space Telescope: Wide field and planetary camera instrument handbook. Version 2.1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is presented of the development and construction of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WF/PC). The WF/PC is a duel two dimensional spectrophotometer with rudimentary polarimetric and transmission grating capabilities. The instrument operates from 1150 to 11000 A with a resolution of 0.1 arcsec per pixel or 0.043 arcsec per pixel. Data products and standard calibration methods are briefly summarized.

Griffiths, Richard (editor)

1990-01-01

264

Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST]: Telescope Design and Simulated Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey proposed multiple missions with NIR focal planes and 3 mirror wide field telescopes in the 1.5m aperture range. None of them would have won as standalone missions WFIRST is a combination of these missions, created by Astro 2010 committee. WFIRST Science Definition Team (SDT) tasked to examine the design. Project team is a GSFC-JPL-Caltech collaboration. This interim mission design is a result of combined work by the project team with the SDT.

Goullioud, R.; Content, D. A.; Kuan, G. M.; Moore, J. D.; Chang, Z.; Sunada, E. T.; Villalvazo, J.; Hawk, J. P.; Armani, N. V.; Johnson, E. L.; Powell, C. A.

2012-01-01

265

The Wide Field Cameras onboard the BeppoSAX X-ray Astronomy Satellite  

Microsoft Academic Search

The two Wide Field Cameras (WFCs) currently flying on the Italian\\/Dutch X-ray satellite BeppoSAX, image the X-ray sky in the energy range of 1.8 - 28 keV. The field of view is 20 degrees, the angular resolution is 5 arcmin and the energy resolution is 20% at 6 keV, while the source location accuracy will generally be better than one

R. Jager; W. A. Mels; A. C. Brinkman; M. Y. Galama; H. Goulooze; J. Heise; P. Lowes; J. M. Muller; A. Naber; A. Rook; R. Schuurhof; J. J. Schuurmans; G. Wiersma

1997-01-01

266

The Kepler Mission: A wide-field transit search for terrestrial planets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery mission which will continuously monitor the brightness of at least 100,000 main sequence stars, to detect the transits of terrestrial and larger planets. It is scheduled to be launched in 2007 into an Earth-trailing heliocentric orbit. It is a wide-field photometer with a Schmidt-type telescope and array of 42 CCDs covering the 100

Gibor Basri; William J. Borucki; David Koch

2005-01-01

267

Prime Focus Spectrograph - Subaru's future -  

E-print Network

The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) of the Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts (SuMIRe) project has been endorsed by Japanese community as one of the main future instruments of the Subaru 8.2-meter telescope at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. This optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph targets cosmology with galaxy surveys, Galactic archaeology, and studies of galaxy/AGN evolution. Taking advantage of Subaru's wide field of view, which is further extended with the recently completed Wide Field Corrector, PFS will enable us to carry out multi-fiber spectroscopy of 2400 targets within 1.3 degree diameter. A microlens is attached at each fiber entrance for F-ratio transformation into a larger one so that difficulties of spectrograph design are eased. Fibers are accurately placed onto target positions by positioners, each of which consists of two stages of piezo-electric rotary motors, through iterations by using back-illuminated fiber position measurements with a wide-field metrology camera. Fibers then carry l...

Sugai, Hajime; Takato, Naruhisa; Tamura, Naoyuki; Shimono, Atsushi; Ohyama, Youichi; Ueda, Akitoshi; Ling, Hung-Hsu; de Arruda, Marcio Vital; Barkhouser, Robert H; Bennett, Charles L; Bickerton, Steve; Braun, David F; Bruno, Robin J; Carr, Michael A; Oliveira, João Batista de Carvalho; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Dekany, Richard G; Dominici, Tania Pereira; Ellis, Richard S; Fisher, Charles D; Gunn, James E; Heckman, Timothy M; Ho, Paul T P; Hu, Yen-Shan; Jaquet, Marc; Karr, Jennifer; Kimura, Masahiko; Fèvre, Olivier Le; Mignant, David Le; Loomis, Craig; Lupton, Robert H; Madec, Fabrice; Marrara, Lucas Souza; Martin, Laurent; Murayama, Hitoshi; de Oliveira, Antonio Cesar; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; de Oliveira, Ligia Souza; Orndorff, Joe D; Vilaça, Rodrigo de Paiva; Macanhan, Vanessa Bawden de Paula; Prieto, Eric; Santos, Jesulino Bispo dos; Seiffert, Michael D; Smee, Stephen A; Smith, Roger M; Sodré, Laerte; Spergel, David N; Surace, Christian; Vives, Sebastien; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Yan, Chi-Hung

2012-01-01

268

Wide-field four-channel fluorescence imager for biological applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A wide-field four-channel fluorescence imager has been developed. The instrument uses four expanded laser beams to image a large section (6 mm×9 mm). An object can be sequentially illuminated with any combination of 408-, 532-, 658-, and 784-nm lasers for arbitrary (down to 1 ms) exposure times for each laser. Just two notch filters block scattered light from all four lasers. The design approach described here offers great flexibility in treatment of objects, very good sensitivity, and a wide field of view at low cost. There appears to be no commercial instrument capable of simultaneous fluorescence imaging of a wide field of view with four-laser excitation. Some possible applications are following events such as flow and mixing in microchannel systems, the transmission of biological signals across a culture, and following simulations of biological membrane diffusion. It can also be used in DNA sequencing by synthesis to follow the progress of the photolytic removal of dye and terminator. Without utilizing its time resolution, it can be used to obtain four independent images of a single tissue section stained with four targeting agents, with each coupled to a different dye matching one of the lasers.

Thakur, Madhuri; Melnik, Dmitry; Barnett, Heather; Daly, Kevin; Moran, Christine H.; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan; Bucher, Christopher Theodore; Kittrell, Carter; Curl, Robert

2010-03-01

269

Encoding wide-field motion and direction in the central complex of the cockroach Blaberus discoidalis.  

PubMed

In the arthropod brain, the central complex (CX) receives various forms of sensory signals and is associated with motor functions, but its precise role in behavior is controversial. The optomotor response is a highly conserved turning behavior directed by visual motion. In tethered cockroaches, 20% procaine injected into the CX reversibly blocked this behavior. We then used multichannel extracellular recording to sample unit activity in the CX in response to wide-field visual motion stimuli, moving either horizontally or vertically at various temporal frequencies. For the 401 units we sampled, we identified five stereotyped response patterns: tonically inhibited or excited responses during motion, phasically inhibited or excited responses at the initiation of motion, and phasically excited responses at the termination of motion. Sixty-seven percent of the units responded to horizontal motion, while only 19% responded to vertical motion. Thirty-eight percent of responding units were directionally selective to horizontal motion. Response type and directional selectivity were sometimes conditional with other stimulus parameters, such as temporal frequency. For instance, 16% of the units that responded tonically to low temporal frequencies responded phasically to high temporal frequencies. In addition, we found that 26% of wide-field motion responding units showed a periodic response that was entrained to the temporal frequency of the stimulus. Our results show a diverse population of neurons within the CX that are variably tuned to wide-field motion parameters. Our behavioral data further suggest that such CX activity is required for effective optomotor responses. PMID:25278467

Kathman, Nicholas D; Kesavan, Malavika; Ritzmann, Roy E

2014-11-15

270

A PANCHROMATIC CATALOG OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT IN THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE FIELD  

SciTech Connect

In the first of a series of forthcoming publications, we present a panchromatic catalog of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) from observations in the Early Release Science (ERS) program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) field. Our ETGs span a large redshift range, 0.35 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.5, with each redshift spectroscopically confirmed by previous published surveys of the ERS field. We combine our measured WFC3 ERS and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) GOODS-S photometry to gain continuous sensitivity from the rest-frame far-UV to near-IR emission for each ETG. The superior spatial resolution of the HST over this panchromatic baseline allows us to classify the ETGs by their small-scale internal structures, as well as their local environment. By fitting stellar population spectral templates to the broadband photometry of the ETGs, we determine that the average masses of the ETGs are comparable to the characteristic stellar mass of massive galaxies, 10{sup 11} < M{sub *}[M{sub Sun }]<10{sup 12}. By transforming the observed photometry into the Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV and NUV, Johnson V, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey g' and r' bandpasses we identify a noteworthy diversity in the rest-frame UV-optical colors and find the mean rest-frame (FUV-V) = 3.5 and (NUV-V) = 3.3, with 1{sigma} standard deviations {approx_equal}1.0. The blue rest-frame UV-optical colors observed for most of the ETGs are evidence for star formation during the preceding gigayear, but no systems exhibit UV-optical photometry consistent with major recent ({approx}<50 Myr) starbursts. Future publications which address the diversity of stellar populations likely to be present in these ETGs, and the potential mechanisms by which recent star formation episodes are activated, are discussed.

Rutkowski, M. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Kaviraj, S.; Crockett, R. M.; Silk, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); O'Connell, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Hathi, N. P.; McCarthy, P. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Koekemoer, A.; Bond, H. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Yan, H. [Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Kimble, R. A. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Disney, M. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Dopita, M. A. [Research School of Physics and Astronomy, The Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia); Frogel, J. A. [Astronomy Department, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Hall, D. N. B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

2012-03-01

271

Utilization of a Curved Focal Surface Array in a 3.5m Wide Field of View Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wide field of view optical telescopes have a range for uses in both the astronomical and space surveillance purposes. In designing these systems, a number of factors must be taken into account and design trades accomplished to best balance the performance and cost of the system to meet various program constraints. One design trade that has been discussed of the past decade is the curving of the digital focal surface array to meet the field curvature versus the utilization of optical elements to flatten the field curvature for a more traditional focal plane array. For the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) 3.5m Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) the choice was made to curve the array to best satisfy the stressing telescope performance parameters, along with programmatic challenges. The results of this design choice led to a system that meets all of the initial program goals and stands ready to dramatically improve the nation's space surveillance capabilities. This paper will discuss the implementation of the curved focal surface array, the performance achieved by the array and the delta cost difference in the curved array versus a typical flat array.

Blake, T.; Faccenda, W.; Lambour, R.; Shah, R.; Smith, A.; Gregory, J. G.; Pearce, E. C.; Woods, D.; Sundbeck, S.; Bolden, M.

2013-09-01

272

Cryogenic optical performance of a lightweighted mirror assembly for future space astronomical telescopes: correlating optical test results and thermal optical model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 43cm diameter stacked core mirror demonstrator was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two CNC pocket milled face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE® mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

Eng, Ron; Arnold, William R.; Baker, Markus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Burdick, Gregory; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Hanson, Craig; Hogue, William D.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Kirk, Charlie; Maffett, Steven P.; Matthews, Gary W.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl, H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.

2013-09-01

273

Cryogenic Optical Performance of a Light-weight Mirror Assembly for Future Space Astronomical Telescopes: Optical Test Results and Thermal Optical Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 40 cm diameter mirror assembly was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5 m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Baker, Markus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Carpenter, James R.; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Hogue, William D.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl. H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.; Kirk, Charles S.; Hanson, Craig; Burdick, Gregory; Maffett, Steven

2013-01-01

274

Serial ultra wide field imaging for following up acute retinal necrosis cases  

PubMed Central

We describe two cases of acute retinal necrosis (ARN) in a post renal transplant diabetic patient and a pregnant female in the first trimester. Serial ultra wide field imaging (UWFI) with comprehensive ocular examination was done to monitor the progression of the disease. All the cases responded favorably with intravenous followed by oral acyclovir, which was captured with UWFI. UWFI provides objective proof of response to therapy in ARN. UWFI may also improve patient education and counseling for this peripheral retinal disorder. PMID:25709284

Tripathy, Koushik; Sharma, Yog Raj; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep; Singh, Subodh Kumar; Vohra, Rajpal

2015-01-01

275

Far ultraviolet wide field imaging and photometry - Spartan-202 Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory' Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera, which is expected to be a primary scientific instrument aboard the Spartan-202 Space Shuttle mission, is described. This camera is intended to obtain FUV wide-field imagery of stars and extended celestial objects, including diffuse nebulae and nearby galaxies. The observations will support the HST by providing FUV photometry of calibration objects. The Mark II camera is an electrographic Schmidt camera with an aperture of 15 cm, a focal length of 30.5 cm, and sensitivity in the 1230-1600 A wavelength range.

Carruthers, George R.; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Opal, Chet B.; Witt, Adolf N.; Henize, Karl G.

1988-01-01

276

Wide field integrated beam control demonstration status (Advanced Beam Control System Program)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An integrated beam control demonstration (IBCD) is being fabricated and tested under the direction of the Naval Surface Warfare Center for the SDIO. The IBCD demonstrates the key technologies required for implementing a three-mirror, wide field of view (WFOV), Advanced Beam Control System for a space-based laser. This paper describes an overview of the IBCD and progress in the fabrication and testing of the WFOV beam expander, the outgoing wavefront sensor, the deformable mirror, the dynamic steering mirrors, the wavefront control subsystem, and the high speed diagnostic interferometer. The results include photos of the IBCD and hardware assemblies and evaluation of wavefront control performance.

Kaplan, Leonard; Shen, Gon-Yen; Maccabee, Bruce

1992-07-01

277

Wide-field in vivo background free imaging by selective magnetic modulation of nanodiamond fluorescence  

PubMed Central

The sensitivity and resolution of fluorescence-based imaging in vivo is often limited by autofluorescence and other background noise. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a wide-field background-free imaging technique based on magnetic modulation of fluorescent nanodiamond emission. Fluorescent nanodiamonds are bright, photo-stable, biocompatible nanoparticles that are promising probes for a wide range of in vitro and in vivo imaging applications. Our readily applied background-free imaging technique improves the signal-to-background ratio for in vivo imaging up to 100-fold. This technique has the potential to significantly improve and extend fluorescent nanodiamond imaging capabilities on diverse fluorescence imaging platforms. PMID:24761300

Sarkar, Susanta K.; Bumb, Ambika; Wu, Xufeng; Sochacki, Kem A.; Kellman, Peter; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Neuman, Keir C.

2014-01-01

278

Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Larger Particles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was returned from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by shuttle mission STS-125 in 2009. In space for 16 years, the surface accumulated hundreds of impact features on the zinc orthotitanate paint, some penetrating through into underlying metal. Larger impacts were seen in photographs taken from within the shuttle orbiter during service missions, with spallation of paint in areas reaching 1.6 cm across, exposing alloy beneath. Here we describe larger impact shapes, the analysis of impactor composition, and the micrometeoroid (MM) types responsible.

Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G. W.; Webb, R. P.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J. L.; Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Opiela, J.; Griffin, G. T.; Gerlach, L.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

2014-01-01

279

Wide Field Camera 3: A Powerful New Imager for the Hubble Space Telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a powerful UV/visible/near-infrared camera in development for installation into the Hubble Space Telescope during upcoming Servicing Mission 4. WFC3 provides two imaging channels. The UVIS channel incorporates a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD focal plane with sensitivity from 200 to 1000 nm. The IR channel features a 1024 x 1024 pixel HgCdTe focal plane covering 850 to 1700 nm. We report here on the design of the instrument, the performance of its flight detectors, results of the ground test and calibration program, and the plans for the Servicing Mission installation and checkout.

Kimble, Randy

2008-01-01

280

The First Hundred Brown Dwarfs Discovered by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present ground-based spectroscopic verification of six Y dwarfs also Cushing et al.), eighty-nine T dwarfs, eight L dwarfs, and one M dwarf identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Eighty of these are cold brown dwarfs with spectral types > or =T6, six of which have been announced earlier in Mainzer et al. and I3urgasser et al. We present color-color and colortype diagrams showing the locus of M, L, T, and Y dwarfs in WISE color space. "

Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Michael C.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Wright, Edward L.; Mainzer, Amanda K.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; McLean, Ian S.; Bauer, James M.; Benford, Dominic J.; Lake, Sean E.; Petty, Sara M.; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Beichman, Charles; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Stern, Daniel; Vacca, William D.

2011-01-01

281

The Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS): Performance and Data Reduction  

E-print Network

This paper describes the on-telescope performance of the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS). The design characteristics of this instrument, at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA) of the Australian National University (ANU) and mounted on the ANU 2.3m telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory has been already described in an earlier paper (Dopita et al. 2007). Here we describe the throughput, resolution and stability of the instrument, and describe some minor issues which have been encountered. We also give a description of the data reduction pipeline, and show some preliminary results.

Dopita, Michael; Farage, Catherine; McGregor, Peter; Bloxham, Gabe; Green, Anthony; Roberts, Bill; Nielson, Jon; Wilson, Greg; Young, Peter; 10.1007/s10509-010-0335-9

2010-01-01

282

Astronomical wide-field imaging with the Mitsubishi PtSi 1040x1040 CSD  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new infrared camera equipped with a 1040 by 1040 PtSi CSD array is in operation as a common-use instrument at Kiso Observatory of the University of Tokyo. The camera attached to the prime focus (F/3.1) of the 105 cm Schmidt telescope gives a field of view of 18'.4 by 18'.4 with a spatial resolution f 1'.1 per pixel. The image resolution, detection limit, and other performances in an astronomical application are presented. Based on the observations of nearby galaxies and Galactic objects, we demonstrate that the camera is very powerful for wide-field imaging in astronomy.

Ichikawa, Takashi; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Itoh, Nobunari

1996-06-01

283

The optical antenna system design research on earth integrative network laser link in the future  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earth integrated information network can be real-time acquisition, transmission and processing the spatial information with the carrier based on space platforms, such as geostationary satellites or in low-orbit satellites, stratospheric balloons or unmanned and manned aircraft, etc. It is an essential infrastructure for China to constructed earth integrated information network. Earth integrated information network can not only support the highly dynamic and the real-time transmission of broadband down to earth observation, but the reliable transmission of the ultra remote and the large delay up to the deep space exploration, as well as provide services for the significant application of the ocean voyage, emergency rescue, navigation and positioning, air transportation, aerospace measurement or control and other fields.Thus the earth integrated information network can expand the human science, culture and productive activities to the space, ocean and even deep space, so it is the global research focus. The network of the laser communication link is an important component and the mean of communication in the earth integrated information network. Optimize the structure and design the system of the optical antenna is considered one of the difficulty key technologies for the space laser communication link network. Therefore, this paper presents an optical antenna system that it can be used in space laser communication link network.The antenna system was consisted by the plurality mirrors stitched with the rotational paraboloid as a substrate. The optical system structure of the multi-mirror stitched was simulated and emulated by the light tools software. Cassegrain form to be used in a relay optical system. The structural parameters of the relay optical system was optimized and designed by the optical design software of zemax. The results of the optimal design and simulation or emulation indicated that the antenna system had a good optical performance and a certain reference value in engineering. It can provide effective technical support to realize interconnection of earth integrated laser link information network in the future.

Liu, Xianzhu; Fu, Qiang; He, Jingyi

2014-11-01

284

Wide field nulling imager for TPF: the Boeing-SVS hypertelescope concept  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission is aimed at providing direct images of Earth-like planets orbiting nearby stars and characterizing their atmospheres (low resolution spectroscopy). The BOEING/SVS hypertelescope concept, NRLA (Non-Redundant Linear Array), uses a 35m baseline interferometric rotating array of six 2.3-meter telescopes operating in the infrared (7 to 12 microns) to produce wide field images of exoplanetary systems. The full (u,v) plane coverage of the array offers very good imaging capabilities, which is essential to unambiguously confirm the detection of planets, and also provides an outstanding capability for high resolution/high dynamic range imaging for general astrophysics. Thanks to a novel approach combining pupil densification, phase mask coronagraphy and pupil redilution, this concept combines wide field of view imaging and interferometric nulling of the central star. We first briefly present the techniques used by this concept (phase mask coronagraphy, pupil densification and redilution, aperture synthesis imaging) and demonstrate how they can be used to overcome the limitations commonly encountered by interferometers (low (u,v) plane coverage, small field of view, low dynamical range). A complete computer simulation of the concept has been written and is used to study the performance of the array for exoplanet imaging and spectroscopy. We show that with this concept, detection (S/N=5) of Earth-like planets at 10pc with a 5 microns spectral bandwidth can be achieved in less than an hour (for a 100% quantum efficiency).

Guyon, Olivier

2003-02-01

285

Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 Instrument Handbook v. 10.0  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was placed aboard the Hubble Space Telescope in December, 1993 during the first servicing mission (SM1). It is due to be replaced by Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) during SM4, currently scheduled for Fall, 2008. The instrument is a two-dimensional imaging photometer, located at the center of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) focal plane and covers the spectral range between approximately 1150Å to 10500Å. It simultaneously images a 150" × 150" "L"-shaped region with a spatial sampling of 0.1" per pixel, and a smaller 34" × 34" square field with 0.046" per pixel. The total system quantum efficiency (WFPC2+HST) ranges from 4% to 14% at visual wavelengths, and drops to ~0.1% in the far UV. Detection of faint targets is limited by either the sky background (for broad band filters) or by noise in the read-out electronics (for narrow band and UV filters) with an RMS equivalent to 5 detected photons. Bright targets can cause saturation (>53000 detected photons per pixel), but there are no related safety issues.

McMaster, M.; et al.

2008-08-01

286

Wide-field shadowgraph flow visualization of tip vortices generated by a helicopter rotor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The vortex trajectory and vortex wake generated by helicopter rotors were visualized using a wide-field shadowgraph technique. Use of a retro-reflective Scotchlite screen made it possible to investigate the flow field generated by full-scale tail rotors. Tip vortex trajectories were visible in shadowgraphs for a range for tip Mach number of 0.38 - 0.60. The effect of the angle of attack was substantial. At an angle of attack greater than 8 degrees, the visibility of the vortex core was significant even at relatively low tip Mach numbers. The theoretical analysis of the visibility was carried out for a rotating blade. This analysis demonstrated that the visibility decreases with increasing dimensionless core radius (ro/c) and increases with increasing tip Mach number. Based on this investigation, it is concluded that the wide-field shadowgraph flow visualization technique should be feasible to study the flow field generated by a large main rotor in a wind tunnel and in an outdoor full-scale test stand. Of note is that the shadowgraph technique could easily be used with other on-going tests such as aerodynamic performance study, noise measurements, velocity measurements with LDV or hot-wire anemometer, local pressure measurement on the rotor surface, etc.

Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

1985-01-01

287

Using Wide-Field Meteor Cameras to Actively Engage Students in Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy has always afforded teachers an excellent topic to develop students' interest in science. New technology allows the opportunity to inexpensively outfit local school districts with sensitive, wide-field video cameras that can detect and track brighter meteors and other objects. While the data-collection and analysis process can be mostly automated by software, there is substantial human involvement that is necessary in the rejection of spurious detections, in performing dynamics and orbital calculations, and the rare recovery and analysis of fallen meteorites. The continuous monitoring allowed by dedicated wide-field surveillance cameras can provide students with a better understanding of the behavior of the night sky including meteors and meteor showers, stellar motion, the motion of the Sun, Moon, and planets, phases of the Moon, meteorological phenomena, etc. Additionally, some students intrigued by the possibility of UFOs and "alien visitors" may find that actual monitoring data can help them develop methods for identifying "unknown" objects. We currently have two ultra-low light-level surveillance cameras coupled to fish-eye lenses that are actively obtaining data. We have developed curricula suitable for middle or high school students in astronomy and earth science courses and are in the process of testing and revising our materials.

Kuehn, D. M.; Scales, J. N.

2012-08-01

288

Astro-WISE Processing of Wide-field Images and Other Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astro-WISE (Vriend et al. 2012) is the Astronomical Wide-field Imaging System for Europe (Valentijn et al. 2007). It is a scientific information system which consists of hardware and software federated over about a dozen institutes throughout Europe. It has been developed to exploit the ever increasing avalanche of data produced by astronomical surveys and data intensive scientific experiments in general. The demo explains the architecture of the Astro-WISE information system and shows the use of Astro-WISE interfaces. Wide-field astronomical images are derived from the raw image to the final catalog according to the user's request. The demo is based on the standard Astro-WISE guided tour, which can be accessed from the Astro-WISE website. The typical Astro-WISE data processing chain is shown, which can be used for data handling for a variety of different instruments, currently 14, including OmegaCAM, MegaCam, WFI, WFC, ACS/HST, etc.

Buddelmeijer, H.; Williams, O. R.; McFarland, J. P.; Belikov, A.

2012-09-01

289

Improved wide-field collimator for dynamic testing of the GOES imager and sounder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The GOES Imager and Sounder instruments each observe the full Earth disk, 17.4° in diameter, from geostationary orbit. Pre-launch, each instrument's dynamic scanning performance is tested using the projection of a test pattern from a wide-field collimator. We are fabricating a second wide-field collimator (WFC2) to augment this test program. The WFC2 has several significant advantages over the existing WFC1. The WFC2 target illumination system uses an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) radiating at 680nm, which is within the visible bands of both the Imager and Sounder. The light from the LEDs is projected through a non-Lambertian diffuser plate and the target plate to the pupil of the projection lens. The WFC2's power dissipation is much lower than that of WFC1, decreasing stabilization time and eliminating the need for cooling fans. The WFC2's custom-designed 5-element projection lens has the same effective focal length (EFL) as the WFC1 projection lens. The WFC2 lens is optimized for the LED's narrow spectral band simplifying the design and improving image quality. The target plate is mounted in a frame with a mechanized micro-positioner system that controls three degrees of freedom: tip, tilt, and focus. The tip and tilt axes intersect in the WFC's image plane, and all adjustments are controlled remotely by the operator observing the target plate through an auto-collimating telescope.

Bremer, James C.; Etemad, Shahriar; Zukowski, Barbara J.; Pasquale, Bert A.; Zukowski, Tmitri J.; Prince, Robert E.; Holmes, Vincent; Ryskewich, John A.; O'Neill, Patrick; Murphy-Morris, Jeanine E.

2002-09-01

290

Hubble Space Telescope Spectroscopy of Brown Dwarfs Discovered with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer  

E-print Network

We present a sample of brown dwarfs identified with the {\\it Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} (WISE) for which we have obtained {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} ({\\it HST}) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) near-infrared grism spectroscopy. The sample (twenty-two in total) was observed with the G141 grism covering 1.10$-$1.70 $\\mu$m, while fifteen were also observed with the G102 grism, which covers 0.90$-$1.10 $\\mu$m. The additional wavelength coverage provided by the G102 grism allows us to 1) search for spectroscopic features predicted to emerge at low effective temperatures (e.g.\\ ammonia bands) and 2) construct a smooth spectral sequence across the T/Y boundary. We find no evidence of absorption due to ammonia in the G102 spectra. Six of these brown dwarfs are new discoveries, three of which are found to have spectral types of T8 or T9. The remaining three, WISE J082507.35$+$280548.5 (Y0.5), WISE J120604.38$+$840110.6 (Y0), and WISE J235402.77$+$024015.0 (Y1) are the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first spec...

Schneider, Adam C; Kirkpatrick, J Davy; Gelino, Christopher R; Mace, Gregory N; Wright, Edward L; Eisenhardt, Peter R; Skrutskie, M F; Griffith, Roger L; Marsh, Kenneth A

2015-01-01

291

A comparison of super wide field microscopy systems in mohs surgery.  

PubMed

Microscopic frozen section interpretation is one of the cornerstones of Mohs surgery. The recent development of super wide field (SWF) microscopy can improve accuracy and efficiency while reading microscope sections, and also decrease the physician's musculoskeletal and ocular strain. Super wide field microscopy systems increase viewable field area (VA) by combining low magnification objectives, eg, 1x or 2x (Figure 1), with eyepieces that have a higher field number. This article reviews 3 SWF microscopy systems: Leica DM2000 (Leica Microsystems, Wetzlar, Germany), Nikon Eclipse Ni (Nikon Instruments Inc., Melville, NY), and Olympus BX43 (Olympus, Center Valley, PA). The Leica DM2000's 1.25x objective results in a VA of 314.16 mm2. The Nikon Eclipse Ni's 1x objective results in a VA of 490.87 mm2. The Olympus BX43's 1.25x objective results in a VA of 352.99 mm2. The maximum VA at the lowest objective for Nikon is nearly 40% greater than for the Olympus and over 50% greater than for the Leica. The Nikon Eclipse Ni has a significantly higher maximum VA than the other 2 systems. PMID:25607789

Goldsberry, Anne; Hanke, C William; Countryman, Nicholas B

2014-12-01

292

Lessons Learned from the Wide Field Camera 3 TV1 and TV2 Thermal Vacuum Test Campaigns  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument has undergone two complete thermal vacuum tests (TV1 and TV2), during which valuable lessons were learned regarding test configuration, test execution, model capabilities, and modeling practices. The very complex thermal design of WFC3 produced a number of challenging aspects to ground testing with numerous ThermoElectric Coolers and heat pipes, not all of which were functional. Lessons learned during TV1 resulted in significant upgrades to the model capabilities and a change in the test environment approach for TV2. These upgrades proved invaluable during TV2 when pretest modeling assumptions proved to be false. Each of the lessons learned relate to one of two following broad statements: 1. Ensure the design can be tested and that the effect of non-flight like conditions is well understood, particularly with respect to non passive devices (TECs, Heat Pipes, etc) 2. Ensure that the model is sufficiently detailed and is capable of predicting off-nominal behavior and the power dissipation of any thermal devices, especially TECs This paper outlines a number of the lessons learned over these two test campaigns with respect to the thermal design, model, and test configuration and presents recommendations for future tests.

Peabody, Hume; Stavely, Richard; Bast, William

2008-01-01

293

Wide-field imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells in blood by fluorescent nanodiamond labeling and time gating  

PubMed Central

Nanodiamonds containing high density ensembles of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV?) centers are promising fluorescent biomarkers due to their excellent photostability and biocompatibility. The NV? centers in the particles have a fluorescence lifetime of up to 20?ns, which distinctly differs from those (<10?ns) of cell and tissue autofluorescence, making it possible to achieve background-free detection in vivo by time gating. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as optical labels for wide-field time-gated fluorescence imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells with a nanosecond intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) as the detector. The combined technique has allowed us to acquire fluorescence images of FND-labeled HeLa cells in whole blood covered with a chicken breast of ~0.1-mm thickness at the single cell level, and to detect individual FND-labeled HeLa cells in blood flowing through a microfluidic device at a frame rate of 23?Hz, as well as to locate and trace FND-labeled lung cancer cells in the blood vessels of a mouse ear. It opens a new window for real-time imaging and tracking of transplanted cells (such as stem cells) in vivo. PMID:24994610

Hui, Yuen Yung; Su, Long-Jyun; Chen, Oliver Yenjyh; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Chang, Huan-Cheng

2014-01-01

294

A payload-centric integration and test approach on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission was successfully launched on December 14, 2009. All spacecraft subsystems and the single instrument consisting of four imaging bands from 3.4 to 22 microns, a 40 cm afocal telescope, reimaging optics, and a two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat have performed nominally on orbit, enabling the trouble-free survey of the entire infrared sky. Among the many factors that contributed to the WISE post-launch success is the thorough pre-launch system integration and test (I&T) approach tailored to the cryogenic payload. The simple and straightforward interfaces between the spacecraft and the payload allowed the payload to be fully tested prior to integration with the spacecraft. A payload high-fidelity thermal, mass and dynamic simulator allowed the spacecraft I&T to proceed independently through the system-level thermal vacuum test and random vibration test. A payload electrical simulator, a high-rate data processor and a science data ingest processor enabled very early end-to-end data flow and radio-frequency testing using engineering model payload electronics and spacecraft avionics, which allowed engineers to identify and fix developmental issues prior to building flight electronics. This paper describes in detail the WISE I&T approach, its benefits, challenges encountered and lessons learned.

Liu, Fengchuan; Abid, Mohamed; Duval, Valerie; Eisenhardt, Peter; Elwell, John; Heinrichsen, Ingolf; Irace, William R.; LaPointe, Jason; Larsen, Mark; Shannon, Mark; Taylor, Nicholas; Wright, Edward

2010-08-01

295

Wide-field imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells in blood by fluorescent nanodiamond labeling and time gating  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanodiamonds containing high density ensembles of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centers are promising fluorescent biomarkers due to their excellent photostability and biocompatibility. The NV- centers in the particles have a fluorescence lifetime of up to 20 ns, which distinctly differs from those (<10 ns) of cell and tissue autofluorescence, making it possible to achieve background-free detection in vivo by time gating. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as optical labels for wide-field time-gated fluorescence imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells with a nanosecond intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) as the detector. The combined technique has allowed us to acquire fluorescence images of FND-labeled HeLa cells in whole blood covered with a chicken breast of ~0.1-mm thickness at the single cell level, and to detect individual FND-labeled HeLa cells in blood flowing through a microfluidic device at a frame rate of 23 Hz, as well as to locate and trace FND-labeled lung cancer cells in the blood vessels of a mouse ear. It opens a new window for real-time imaging and tracking of transplanted cells (such as stem cells) in vivo.

Hui, Yuen Yung; Su, Long-Jyun; Chen, Oliver Yenjyh; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Chang, Huan-Cheng

2014-07-01

296

Wide-field imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells in blood by fluorescent nanodiamond labeling and time gating.  

PubMed

Nanodiamonds containing high density ensembles of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) centers are promising fluorescent biomarkers due to their excellent photostability and biocompatibility. The NV(-) centers in the particles have a fluorescence lifetime of up to 20?ns, which distinctly differs from those (<10?ns) of cell and tissue autofluorescence, making it possible to achieve background-free detection in vivo by time gating. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of using fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as optical labels for wide-field time-gated fluorescence imaging and flow cytometric analysis of cancer cells with a nanosecond intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) as the detector. The combined technique has allowed us to acquire fluorescence images of FND-labeled HeLa cells in whole blood covered with a chicken breast of ~0.1-mm thickness at the single cell level, and to detect individual FND-labeled HeLa cells in blood flowing through a microfluidic device at a frame rate of 23?Hz, as well as to locate and trace FND-labeled lung cancer cells in the blood vessels of a mouse ear. It opens a new window for real-time imaging and tracking of transplanted cells (such as stem cells) in vivo. PMID:24994610

Hui, Yuen Yung; Su, Long-Jyun; Chen, Oliver Yenjyh; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Chang, Huan-Cheng

2014-01-01

297

Simulation of optical response of retroreflectors for future lunar laser ranging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We numerically examined various retroreflectors as laser ranging targets for future missions to the Moon. The geometric conditions, such as the angle of incidence and velocity aberration, with lunar targets are much more restricted than those with most of the earth-orbiting artificial satellites. The numerical optical response simulation carried out in this study indicates that a single retroreflector with a diameter of 150-250 mm performs similar to the existing Apollo retroreflector arrays. Further, no dihedral angle is required for small retroreflectors with diameters below 150 mm for uncoated ones and below 100 mm for coated and hollow ones. Retroreflectors with larger diameters require dihedral angles of 0.20, 0.25, and 0.35 arcsec for coated, uncoated and hollow types, respectively. The objective of this fundamental study is to underlie the development of future laser ranging targets that are to be placed on the Moon.

Otsubo, Toshimichi; Kunimori, Hiroo; Noda, Hirotomo; Hanada, Hideo

2010-03-01

298

A Very Wide-Field Hybrid (Focusing/Coded Mask) X-Ray Telescope Concept  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The success of Swift at detecting and positioning variable hard X-ray sources, most notably gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), demonstrates that investigations with a very wide field telescope should continue permanently, like the continuing search for supernovas, and its scope expanded. The softer X-ray band is likely to be an even richer arena in which to search for ever more distant GRBs. The X-ray component of their spectra will be enriched by the redshift especially at large distances where the redshift increases very rapidly with distance. Furthermore most GRBs are likely to have an X-ray afterglow, which a very wide field telescope would detect from its birth. Multiple X-ray afterglows can be studied simultaneously. Some GRB models predict that X-ray afterglows will be more numerous than GRBs because they are less narrowly beamed. In addition many other types of variable X-ray sources can be monitored even more effectively than by scanning instruments. There are three possible approaches to a very wide field X-ray telescope, a 2D coded mask like Swift, a 2D lobster-eye telescope, and a hybrid that is a lobster-eye telescope in one dimension and a coded mask in the other. For the same field of view and the same focal length all three could use the same detector system including an omni-directional gamma-ray detector. We offer reasons why the hybrid, which is composed of identical flat mirrors, is the best of the three. It has much less background from diffuse X-rays and known X-ray sources than the 2D coded mask, and has substantially more area and bandwidth than the 2D lobster-eye. While positions are expected to be an arc minute or better, a small number of the mirrors used to fabricate the hybrid can be configured as a KB telescope that when pointed refines positions to arc second precision.

Gorenstein, Paul

2011-09-01

299

WISH, the Wide-field Imaging Surveyor for High-redshifts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

WISH, the Wide-field Imaging Surveyor for High-redshifts, is an infrared Japanese (JAXA/ISAS) space mission concept to conduct very deep and wide-field infrared cosmological surveys at wavelengths from 1-5um to study the properties of galaxies at very high redshift, beyond the epoch of cosmic reionization. Our group at CfA has proposed to the NASA SALMON-2 Mission of Opportunity to provide the characterized focal plane for WISH, building on our experience with Spitzer -IRAC. The WISH mission concept has been developed and studied since 2008, and will be proposed for the upcoming JAXA/ISAS opportunity. WISH has a 1.5m-diameter primary mirror and a wide-field imager covering 850 sq-arcmin, with a pixel scale of 0.155 arcsec for 18um pitch, which fully samples the diffraction-limited image at 1.5um. The telescope is passive cooled and the baseline focal plane uses Teledyne H2RG arrays with a total coverage of about 128 million pixels, although alternatives are being evaluated. The main WISH scientific program is the Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) covering 100 sq-deg down to 28AB mag in at least in five broad infrared bands between about 1-5um. We expect to detect 10^4-5 galaxies at z=8-9, 10^3-4 galaxies at z= 11-12, and 50-100 galaxies at z> 14, many of which are likely to be targets for deep spectroscopy with JWST and extremely large ground-based telescopes. Another main science goal of the mission is the detection of type Ia SNe; our planned, recurrent deep observations will be able to detect them and monitor their light curves in rest-frame infrared wavelengths. During the mission’s 5 year observation lifetime, we expect to detect and monitor >2000 type-Ia SNe up to z ~2. WISH also conducts an Ultra Wide Survey, covering 1000sq-deg down to 24-25AB mag, and an Extreme Survey, covering a limited number of fields of view down to 29-30AB mag. We here report the progress of the WISH project including the basic telescope and satellite design.

Fazio, Giovanni G.; Yamada, T.; Melnick, G. J.; Smith, H. A.; Iwata, I.; Ashby, M. N.; Hora, J. L.; Huang, J.; Wang, Z.; Willner, S. P.; WISH Team

2013-01-01

300

FINDING PERSISTENT SOURCES WITH THE BeppoSAX/WIDE FIELD CAMERA: AN IN-DEPTH ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

During the operational life of the Italian/Dutch X-ray satellite (1996-2002), BeppoSAX, its two Wide Field Cameras (WFCs) performed observations that covered the full sky at different epochs. Although the majority of analysis performed on BeppoSAX WFC data concentrated on the detection of transient sources, we have now applied the same techniques developed for the INTEGRAL/IBIS survey to produce the same work with the BeppoSAX WFC data. This work represents the first unbiased source list compilation produced from the overall WFC data set optimized for faint persistent source detection. This approach recovered 182 more sources compared to the previous WFC catalog reported in Verrecchia et al. The catalog contains 404 sources detected between 3 and 17 keV, 10 of which are yet to be seen by the new generation of telescopes.

Capitanio, F.; Fiocchi, M.; Ubertini, P. [INAF IASF-Roma, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00033 Rome (Italy); Bird, A. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Scaringi, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2011-07-01

301

A wide field-of-view scanning endoscope for whole anal canal imaging  

PubMed Central

We report a novel wide field-of-view (FOV) scanning endoscope, the AnCam, which is based on contact image sensor (CIS) technology used in commercialized business card scanners. The AnCam can capture the whole image of the anal canal within 10 seconds with a resolution of 89 ?m, a maximum FOV of 100 mm × 120 mm, and a depth-of-field (DOF) of 0.65 mm at 5.9 line pairs per mm (lp/mm). We demonstrate the performance of the AnCam by imaging the entire anal canal of pigs and tracking the dynamics of acetowhite testing. We believe the AnCam can potentially be a simple and convenient solution for screening of the anal canal for dysplasia and for surveillance in patients following treatment for anal cancer. PMID:25780750

Han, Chao; Huangfu, Jiangtao; Lai, Lily L.; Yang, Changhuei

2015-01-01

302

A wide field-of-view scanning endoscope for whole anal canal imaging.  

PubMed

We report a novel wide field-of-view (FOV) scanning endoscope, the AnCam, which is based on contact image sensor (CIS) technology used in commercialized business card scanners. The AnCam can capture the whole image of the anal canal within 10 seconds with a resolution of 89 ?m, a maximum FOV of 100 mm × 120 mm, and a depth-of-field (DOF) of 0.65 mm at 5.9 line pairs per mm (lp/mm). We demonstrate the performance of the AnCam by imaging the entire anal canal of pigs and tracking the dynamics of acetowhite testing. We believe the AnCam can potentially be a simple and convenient solution for screening of the anal canal for dysplasia and for surveillance in patients following treatment for anal cancer. PMID:25780750

Han, Chao; Huangfu, Jiangtao; Lai, Lily L; Yang, Changhuei

2015-02-01

303

Interference visibility of the wide-field-of-view polarization interference imaging spectrometer (WPIIS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wide-field-of-view polarization interference imaging spectrometer (WPIIS) is one kind of birefringent interferometers utilized for imaging and spectroscopy. WPIIS employs polarization components (the polarizer, analyzer, the field-widened Savart polariscope and an achromatic half wave plate (AHWP) sandwiched between the two Savart plates) for interferogram acquisition. To acquire excellent reconstructed spectrum, the whole system should ensure high fringe visibility. In this work, polarization deviation and retardation deviation of polarization components are considered into the interference visibility. The resultant visibility is investigated in detail. It is shown that polarization and retardation deviations would severely degrade the final spectrum estimations. The corresponding quantitative tolerances are also provided in which cases we can get attractive visibility higher than 0.97. This work would provide actual suggestions for system design, spectroscopic estimations and performance optimization of any system composed of polarization components.

Wu, Haiying; Zhang, Sanxi; Zhang, Chunmin

2014-12-01

304

A Powerful New Imager for HST: Performance and Early Science Results from Wide Field Camera 3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope during the highly successful Servicing Mission 4 in May, 2009. WFC3 offers sensitive, high resolution imaging over a broad wavelength range from the near UV through the visible to the near IR (200nm - 1700nm). Its capabilities in the near UV and near IR ends of that range represent particularly large advances vs. those of previous HST instruments. In this talk, I will review the purpose and design of the instrument, describe its performance in flight, and highlight some of the initial scientific results from the instrument, including its use in deep infrared surveys in search of galaxies at very high redshift, in investigations of the global processes of star formation in nearby galaxies, and in the study of the recent impact on Jupiter.

Kimble, Randy

2009-01-01

305

The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer: from wide field surveys to the TMT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE) is planned to become the world's only fully dedicated 10m-class spectroscopic facility. It will operate at a range of spectral resolutions, from R~2000 to R>=20000, and obtain simultaneously data for more than 3000 sources over a wide (~1.5sq.deg) field of view. It will fill the gap between wide field imaging surveys and TMT, by being the key follow-up facility for surveys such as LSST and Euclid. It will identify from hundreds of thousands of possible targets those objects that should be fed into TMT. I will discuss the current status of MSE, its defining capabilities, its driving science, and the unique scientific synergies provided by MSE and TMT.

McConnachie, Alan

2014-07-01

306

Deconvolution of wide field-of-view radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation. I - Theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The theory of deconvolution of wide field-of-view (WFOV) radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation provides a technique by which the resolution of such measurements can be enhanced to provide radiant exitance at the top of the atmosphere with a finer resolution than the field of view. An analytical solution for the earth-emitted radiant exitance in terms of WFOV radiometer measurements is derived for the nonaxisymmetric (or regional) case, in which the measurements and radiant exitance are considered to be functions of both latitude and longitude. This solution makes it possible to deconvolve a set of WFOV radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation and obtain information with a finer resolution than the instantaneous field of view of the instrument. It is shown that there are tradeoffs involved in the selection between WFOV and scanning radiometers.

Smith, G. L.; Green, R. N.

1981-01-01

307

In-flight Performance of the Detectors on HST/Wide Field Camera 3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a powerful new imager recently installed on the Hubble Space Telescope during Servicing Mission 4. WFC3 covers wavelengths from the near UV (200nm) to the near infrared (out to 1.7microns), in two channels. The UV/visible (UVIS) channel utilizes two low-noise, UV-enhanced 2Kx4K CCD detectors from e2v, while the IR channel incorporates a 1Kx1K 1.7micron cutoff HgCdTe array, custom-developed for the WFC3 program by Teledyne. We report here on the performance of the detectors in-flight as observed in this summer's Servicing Mission Orbital Verification program.

Kimble, Randy

2009-01-01

308

Background estimation in a wide-field background-limited instrument such as Fermi GBM  

E-print Network

The supporting instrument on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is a wide-field gamma-ray monitor composed of 14 individual scintillation detectors, with a field of view which encompasses the entire unocculted sky. Primarily designed as transient monitors, the conventional method for background determination with GBM-like instruments is to time interpolate intervals before and after the source as a polynomial. This is generally sufficient for sharp impulsive phenomena such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) which are characterised by impulsive peaks with sharp rises, often highly structured, and easily distinguishable against instrumental backgrounds. However, smoother long lived emission, such as observed in solar flares and some GRBs, would be difficult to detect in a background-limited instrument using this method. We present here a description of a technique which uses the rates from adjacent days when the satellite has approximately the same geographical footprint to dis...

Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael

2012-01-01

309

The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) molecular adsorber  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A device has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, for the adsorption of contaminants inside a space instrument during flight. The molecular adsorber was developed for use on the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, and it has been shown to perform at its design specifications in the WFPC-2. The basic principle of the molecular adsorber is a zeolite-coated ceramic honeycomb. The arrangement is efficient for adsorption and also provides the needed rigidity to retain the special zeolite coating during the launch vibrational environment. The adsorber, on other forms, is expected to be useful for all flight instruments sensitive to internal sources of contamination. Typically, some internal contamination is unavoidable. A common design solution is to increase the venting to the exterior. However, for truly sensitive instruments, the external contamination environment is more severe. The molecular adsorber acts as a one-way vent to solve this problem. Continued development is planned for this device.

Barengoltz, Jack; Moore, Sonya; Soules, David; Voecks, Gerald

1995-01-01

310

Performance analysis of a filtered wide field-of-view radiometer for earth radiation budget measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proposed Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System (ERBSS) of the 1980's will include a wide field-of-view (WFOV) fixed axes earth radiator discriminator consisting of a shortwave channel and a total (unfiltered) channel. The broadband spectral isolation required for the shortwave channel is achieved by use of a hemispherical fused silica (Suprasil W) dome filter placed in front of a wire wound thermopile radiation detector. A description is presented of the thermal response of the single-fused silica dome filter in the ERBSS WFOV shortwave channel conceptual design and the impact of that response on the channel measurement. Results from design definition and performance analysis studies are included. Problems associated with achieving the desired levels of confidence in a high accuracy filtered, WFOV radiometer are discussed. Design approaches, ground calibration, and data reduction techniques which minimize measurement uncertainties are explained.

Cooper, J. E.; Luther, M. R.

1978-01-01

311

VARIABILITY FLAGGING IN THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER PRELIMINARY DATA RELEASE  

SciTech Connect

The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Preliminary Data Release Source Catalog contains over 257 million objects. We describe the method used to flag variable source candidates in the Catalog. Using a method based on the chi-square of single-exposure flux measurements, we generated a variability flag for each object, and have identified almost 460,000 candidate sources that exhibit significant flux variability with greater than {approx}7{sigma} confidence. We discuss the flagging method in detail and describe its benefits and limitations. We also present results from the flagging method, including example light curves of several types of variable sources including Algol-type eclipsing binaries, RR Lyr, W UMa, and a blazar candidate.

Hoffman, D. I.; Cutri, R. M.; Masci, F. J.; Fowler, J. W.; Marsh, K. A.; Jarrett, T. H., E-mail: dhoffman@ipac.caltech.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-05-15

312

Cortical activation following chronic passive implantation of a wide-field suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Objective. The research goal is to develop a wide-field retinal stimulating array for prosthetic vision. This study aimed at evaluating the efficacy of a suprachoroidal electrode array in evoking visual cortex activity after long term implantation. Approach. A planar silicone based electrode array (8 mm × 19 mm) was implanted into the suprachoroidal space in cats (ntotal = 10). It consisted of 20 platinum stimulating electrodes (600 ?m diameter) and a trans-scleral cable terminated in a subcutaneous connector. Three months after implantation (nchronic = 6), or immediately after implantation (nacute = 4), an electrophysiological study was performed. Electrode total impedance was measured from voltage transients using 500 ?s, 1 mA pulses. Electrically evoked potentials (EEPs) and multi-unit activity were recorded from the visual cortex in response to monopolar retinal stimulation. Dynamic range and cortical activation spread were calculated from the multi-unit recordings. Main results. The mean electrode total impedance in vivo following 3 months was 12.5 ± 0.3 k?. EEPs were recorded for 98% of the electrodes. The median evoked potential threshold was 150 nC (charge density 53 ?C cm-2). The lowest stimulation thresholds were found proximal to the area centralis. Mean thresholds from multiunit activity were lower for chronic (181 ± 14 nC) compared to acute (322 ± 20 nC) electrodes (P < 0.001), but there was no difference in dynamic range or cortical activation spread. Significance. Suprachoroidal stimulation threshold was lower in chronic than acute implantation and was within safe charge limits for platinum. Electrode-tissue impedance following chronic implantation was higher, indicating the need for sufficient compliance voltage (e.g. 12.8 V for mean impedance, threshold and dynamic range). The wide-field suprachoroidal array reliably activated the retina after chronic implantation.

Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B.; Nayagam, David A. X.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Luu, Chi D.; Allen, Penelope J.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Williams, Chris E.

2014-08-01

313

Fire Spectroscopy of Five Late-Type T Dwarfs Discovered with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer  

E-print Network

We present the discovery of five late-type T dwarfs identified with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Low-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy obtained with the Magellan Folded-port InfraRed Echellette reveal ...

Burgasser, Adam

314

Ray tracing simulations for the wide-field x-ray telescope of the Einstein Probe mission based on Geant4 and XRTG4  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Einstein Probe (EP) is a proposed small scientific satellite dedicated to time-domain astrophysics working in the soft X-ray band. It will discover transients and monitor variable objects in 0.5-4 keV, for which it will employ a very large instantaneous field-of-view (60° × 60°), along with moderate spatial resolution (FWHM ˜ 5 arcmin). Its wide-field imaging capability will be achieved by using established technology in novel lobster-eye optics. In this paper, we present Monte-Carlo simulations for the focusing capabilities of EP's Wide-field X-ray Telescope (WXT). The simulations are performed using Geant4 with an X-ray tracer which was developed by cosine (http://cosine.nl/) to trace X-rays. Our work is the first step toward building a comprehensive model with which the design of the X-ray optics and the ultimate sensitivity of the instrument can be optimized by simulating the X-ray tracing and radiation environment of the system, including the focal plane detector and the shielding at the same time.

Zhao, Donghua; Zhang, Chen; Yuan, Weimin; Willingale, Richard; Ling, Zhixing; Feng, Hua; Li, Hong; Ji, Jianfeng; Wang, Wenxin; Zhang, Shuangnan

2014-07-01

315

Thermal Vacuum Test Performance of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Assembly  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) Assembly of the HST Wide Field Camera 3 was subjected to thermal vacuum (TN) environmental testing. The test program included both maximum and minimum environments as well as simulated on-orbit cycling. Elements of the VCHP assembly included a VCHP, an optical bench cold plate with an imbedded constant conductance heat pipe, and a VCHP reservoir radiator with a proportionally controlled heater. The purpose of the test was to characterize and demonstrate the assembly s ability to control the temperature of the cold plate, which provides a stable thermal environment for the instrument s optical bench. This paper discusses the VCHP Assembly control performance and control authority during the dynamic hot and cold 90-minute orbit cycling test phases.

Cleveland, Paul E.; Buchko, Matthew T.; Stavely, Richard A.

2003-01-01

316

Futurity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Futurity website features "the latest discoveries by scientists at top research universities in the US, UK, Canada and Australia." Currently, some of the participating universities include Boston University, Duke University, McGill University, and the University of Sheffield. Visitors to the homepage will note that there are four areas on the site: Earth & Environment, Health & Medicine, Science & Technology, and Society & Culture. Recently profiled news items include a compelling new discovery from New York University about the reality of a tractor beam that can pull microscopic particles. The Society & Culture section is a real find, as it contains engaging pieces like "Is zero tolerance too hard on students?" and "Big banks loom over finance 'ecosystem'." Also, visitors can browse news items by school or by topic area. Finally, the Week's Most Discussed area is a great way to learn about compelling new stories from around the globe.

317

A new x-ray optics laboratory (XROL) at the ALS: mission, arrangement, metrology capabilities, performance, and future plans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The X-Ray Optics Laboratory (XROL) at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a unique optical metrology lab, has been recently moved to a new, dedicated clean-room facility that provides improved environmental and instrumental conditions vitally required for high accuracy metrology with state-of-the-art X-ray optics. Besides the ALS, the XROL serves several DOE labs that lack dedicated on-site optical metrology capabilities, including the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC and LBNL's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO). The major role of XROL is to proactively support the development and optimal beamline use of x-ray optics. The application of different instruments available in the lab enables separate, often complementary, investigations and addresses of different potential sources of error affecting beamline performance. At the beamline, all the perturbations combine to produce a cumulative effect on the performance of the optic that makes it difficult to optimize the optic's operational performance. Ex situ metrology allows us to address the majority of the problems before the installation of the optic at a beamline, and to provide feedback on design and guidelines for the best usage of optics. We will review the ALS XROL mission, lab design and arrangement, ex situ metrology capabilities and performance, as well as the future plans for instrumentation upgrades. The discussion will be illustrated with the results of a broad spectrum of measurements of x-ray optics and optical systems performed at the XROL.

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Lacey, Ian; McKinney, Wayne R.; Padmore, Howard A.

2014-09-01

318

THE FIRST ULTRA-COOL BROWN DWARF DISCOVERED BY THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER  

SciTech Connect

We report the discovery of the first new ultra-cool brown dwarf (BDs) found with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The object's preliminary designation is WISEPC J045853.90+643451.9. Follow-up spectroscopy with the LUCIFER instrument on the Large Binocular Telescope indicates that it is a very late-type T dwarf with a spectral type approximately equal to T9. Fits to an IRTF/SpeX 0.8-2.5 {mu}m spectrum to the model atmospheres of Marley and Saumon indicate an effective temperature of approximately 600 K as well as the presence of vertical mixing in its atmosphere. The new BD is easily detected by WISE, with a signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}36 at 4.6 {mu}m. Current estimates place it at a distance of 6-10 pc. This object represents the first in what will likely be hundreds of nearby BDs found by WISE that will be suitable for follow-up observations, including those with the James Webb Space Telescope. One of the two primary scientific goals of the WISE mission is to find the coolest, closest stars to our Sun; the discovery of this new BD proves that WISE is capable of fulfilling this objective.

Mainzer, A.; Cushing, Michael C.; Eisenhardt, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Skrutskie, M.; Beaton, R. [University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Gelino, C. R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Jarrett, T.; Masci, F.; Marsh, K.; Padgett, D. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Saumon, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wright, E.; McLean, I. [UCLA Astronomy, P.O. Box 91547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Dietrich, M. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Garnavich, P.; Rueff, K. [University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Kuhn, O. [Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Leisawitz, D., E-mail: amainzer@jpl.nasa.gov [Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Rd., Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-01-01

319

The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE): Mission Description and Initial On-Orbit Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The all sky surveys done by the Palomar Observatory Schmidt, the European Southern Observatory Schmidt, and the United Kingdom Schmidt, the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite and the 2 Micron All Sky Survey have proven to be extremely useful tools for astronomy with value that lasts for decades. The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer is mapping the whole sky following its launch on 14 December 2009. WISE began surveying the sky on 14 Jan 2010 and completed its first full coverage of the sky on July 17. The survey will continue to cover the sky a second time until the cryogen is exhausted (anticipated in November 2010). WISE is achieving 5 sigma point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in bands centered at wavelengths of 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micrometers. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodiacal background. The angular resolution is 6.1", 6.4", 6.5" and 12.0" at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micrometers, and the astrometric precision for high SNR sources is better than 0.15".

Wright, Edward L.; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Mainzer, Amy; Ressler, Michael E.; Cutri, Roc M.; Jarrett, Thomas; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Padgett, Deborah; McMillan, Robert S.; Skrutskie,Michael; Stanford, S. A.; Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.; Mather, John C.; Leisawitz, David; Gautier, Thomas N., III; McLean, Ian; Benford, Dominic; Lonsdale,Carol J.; Blain, Andrew; Mendez,Bryan; Irace, William R.; Duval, Valerie; Liu, Fengchuan; Royer, Don

2010-01-01

320

Proto-Model of an Infrared Wide-Field Off-Axis Telescope  

E-print Network

We develop a proto-model of an off-axis reflective telescope for infrared wide-field observations based on the design of Schwarzschild-Chang type telescope. With only two mirrors, this design achieves an entrance pupil diameter of 50 mm and an effective focal length of 100 mm. We can apply this design to a mid-infrared telescope with a field of view of 8 deg X 8 deg. In spite of the substantial advantages of off-axis telescopes in the infrared compared to refractive or on-axis reflective telescopes, it is known to be difficult to align the mirrors in off-axis systems because of their asymmetric structures. Off-axis mirrors of our telescope are manufactured at the Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI). We analyze the fabricated mirror surfaces by fitting polynomial functions to the measured data. We accomplish alignment of this two-mirror off-axis system using a ray tracing method. A simple imaging test is performed to compare a pinhole image with a simulated prediction.

Kim, Sanghyuk; Chang, Seunghyuk; Kim, Geon Hee; Yang, Sun Choel; Kim, Myung Sang; Lee, Sungho; Lee, Hanshin; 10.5303/JKAS.2010.43.5.169

2010-01-01

321

A new era of wide-field submillimetre imaging: on-sky performance of SCUBA-2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SCUBA-2 is the largest submillimetre wide-field bolometric camera ever built. This 43 square arc- minute field-of-view instrument operates at two wavelengths (850 and 450 microns) and has been installed on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. SCUBA-2 has been successfully commissioned and operational for general science since October 2011. This paper presents an overview of the on-sky performance of the instrument during and since commissioning in mid- 2011. The on-sky noise characteristics and NEPs of the 450 ?m and 850 ?m arrays, with average yields of approximately 3400 bolometers at each wavelength, will be shown. The observing modes of the instrument and the on-sky calibration techniques are described. The culmination of these efforts has resulted in a scientifically powerful mapping camera with sensitivities that allow a square degree of sky to be mapped to 10 mJy/beam rms at 850 ?m in 2 hours and 60 mJy/beam rms at 450 ?m in 5 hours in the best weather.

Dempsey, Jessica T.; Holland, Wayne S.; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Berry, David S.; Bintley, Daniel; Chapin, Edward L.; Craig, Simon C.; Coulson, Iain M.; Davis, Gary R.; Friberg, Per; Jenness, Tim; Gibb, Andy G.; Parsons, Harriet A. L.; Scott, Douglas; Thomas, Holly S.; Tilanus, Remo P. J.; Robson, Ian; Walther, Craig A.

2012-09-01

322

Wide-field computational color imaging using pixel super-resolved on-chip microscopy  

PubMed Central

Lens-free holographic on-chip imaging is an emerging approach that offers both wide field-of-view (FOV) and high spatial resolution in a cost-effective and compact design using source shifting based pixel super-resolution. However, color imaging has remained relatively immature for lens-free on-chip imaging, since a ‘rainbow’ like color artifact appears in reconstructed holographic images. To provide a solution for pixel super-resolved color imaging on a chip, here we introduce and compare the performances of two computational methods based on (1) YUV color space averaging, and (2) Dijkstra’s shortest path, both of which eliminate color artifacts in reconstructed images, without compromising the spatial resolution or the wide FOV of lens-free on-chip microscopes. To demonstrate the potential of this lens-free color microscope we imaged stained Papanicolaou (Pap) smears over a wide FOV of ~14 mm2 with sub-micron spatial resolution. PMID:23736466

Greenbaum, Alon; Feizi, Alborz; Akbari, Najva; Ozcan, Aydogan

2013-01-01

323

Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

2012-01-01

324

Subaru next-generation wide-field camera: HyperSuprime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We summarize the design and the specification of a next generation instrument for Subaru Telescope: a very wide-field (2°?) CCD camera which we name HyperSuprime. The latest design of the corrector ensures 80% encircled energy diameter of 0".3 from 600 nm to 1100 nm over the 2°? field of view. The size of the focal plane is 612 mm in diameter and covered by about 170 four side buttable 2kx4k CCDs. Fully depleted CCD which is now being developed is the primary candidate for HyperSuprime. The readout electronics is connected behind the CCD and this CCD package is screwed to the cold plate with three positioning pins. The large entrance window of the dewar is supported with additional ribs so that the dewar is evacuated and CCDs are cooled down to about -80°C. HyperSuprime equips with a filter exchanger which can accommodate four large mosaicked filters and a roll-type shutter.

Komiyama, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Furusawa, Hisanori; Takeshi, Kunio

2004-09-01

325

Recalibrating the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) W4 Filter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a revised effective wavelength and photometric calibration for the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer W4 band, including tests of empirically motivated modifications to its pre-launch laboratory-measured relative system response curve. We derived these by comparing measured W4 photometry with photometry synthesised from spectra of galaxies and planetary nebulae. The difference between measured and synthesised photometry using the pre-launch laboratory-measured W4 relative system response can be as large as 0.3 mag for galaxies and 1 mag for planetary nebulae. We find the W4 effective wavelength should be revised upward by 3.3%, from 22.1 to 22.8 ?m, and the W4 AB magnitude of Vega should be revised from m W4 = 6.59 to m W4 = 6.66. In an attempt to reproduce the observed W4 photometry, we tested three modifications to the pre-launch laboratory-measured W4 relative system response curve, all of which have an effective wavelength of 22.8 ?m. Of the three relative system response curve models tested, a model that matches the laboratory-measured relative system response curve, but has the wavelengths increased by 3.3% (or ? 0.73 ?m) achieves reasonable agreement between the measured and synthesised photometry.

Brown, M. J. I.; Jarrett, T. H.; Cluver, M. E.

2014-12-01

326

THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER (WISE): MISSION DESCRIPTION AND INITIAL ON-ORBIT PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

The all sky surveys done by the Palomar Observatory Schmidt, the European Southern Observatory Schmidt, and the United Kingdom Schmidt, the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite, and the Two Micron All Sky Survey have proven to be extremely useful tools for astronomy with value that lasts for decades. The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) is mapping the whole sky following its launch on 2009 December 14. WISE began surveying the sky on 2010 January 14 and completed its first full coverage of the sky on July 17. The survey will continue to cover the sky a second time until the cryogen is exhausted (anticipated in 2010 November). WISE is achieving 5{sigma} point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1, and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in bands centered at wavelengths of 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 {mu}m. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodiacal background. The angular resolution is 6.''1, 6.''4, 6.''5, and 12.''0 at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 {mu}m, and the astrometric precision for high signal-to-noise sources is better than 0.''15.

Wright, Edward L.; McLean, Ian [UCLA Astronomy, P.O. Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Ressler, Michael E.; Gautier, Thomas N. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cutri, Roc M.; Jarrett, Thomas; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Padgett, Deborah [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); McMillan, Robert S. [University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Skrutskie, Michael [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Stanford, S. A. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G. [Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, 200 8th Street, Marina, CA 93933 (United States); Mather, John C.; Leisawitz, David; Benford, Dominic [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lonsdale, Carol J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Blain, Andrew, E-mail: wright@astro.ucla.ed [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2010-12-15

327

Blood vessel segmentation and width estimation in ultra-wide field scanning laser ophthalmoscopy  

PubMed Central

Features of the retinal vasculature, such as vessel widths, are considered biomarkers for systemic disease. The aim of this work is to present a supervised approach to vessel segmentation in ultra-wide field of view scanning laser ophthalmoscope (UWFoV SLO) images and to evaluate its performance in terms of segmentation and vessel width estimation accuracy. The results of the proposed method are compared with ground truth measurements from human observers and with existing state-of-the-art techniques developed for fundus camera images that we optimized for UWFoV SLO images. Our algorithm is based on multi-scale matched filters, a neural network classifier and hysteresis thresholding. After spline-based refinement of the detected vessel contours, the vessel widths are estimated from the binary maps. Such analysis is performed on SLO images for the first time. The proposed method achieves the best results, both in vessel segmentation and in width estimation, in comparison to other automatic techniques. PMID:25574441

Pellegrini, Enrico; Robertson, Gavin; Trucco, Emanuele; MacGillivray, Tom J.; Lupascu, Carmen; van Hemert, Jano; Williams, Michelle C.; Newby, David E.; van Beek, Edwin JR; Houston, Graeme

2014-01-01

328

The Araucaria Project. Bright Variable Stars in NGC 6822 from a Wide-Field Imaging Survey  

E-print Network

We have performed a search for variable stars in the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 using wide-field multi-epoch VI photometry down to a limiting magnitude $V$ $\\sim$ 22. Apart from the Cepheid variables in this galaxy already reported in an earlier paper by Pietrzynski et al. (2004), we have found 1019 "non-periodic" variable stars, 50 periodically variable stars with periods ranging from 0.12 to 66 days and 146 probably periodic variables. Twelve of these stars are eclipsing binaries and fifteen are likely new, low-amplitude Cepheids. Interestingly, seven of these Cepheid candidates have periods longer than 100 days, have very low amplitudes (less than 0.2 mag in $I$), and are very red. They could be young, massive Cepheids still embedded in dusty envelopes. The other objects span a huge range in colours and represent a mixture of different types of luminous variables. Many of the variables classified as non-periodic in the present study may turn out to be {\\it periodic} variables once a much longer time baseline will be available to study them. We provide the catalogue of photometric parameters and show the atlas of light curves for the new variable stars. Our present catalogue is complementary to the one of Baldacci et al. (2005) which has focussed on very short-period and fainter variables in a subfield in NGC 6822.

R. E. Mennickent; W. Gieren; I. Soszynski; G. Pietrzynski

2006-01-18

329

The Araucaria Project. Bright Variable Stars in NGC 6822 from a Wide-Field Imaging Survey  

E-print Network

We have performed a search for variable stars in the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 using wide-field multi-epoch VI photometry down to a limiting magnitude $V$ $\\sim$ 22. Apart from the Cepheid variables in this galaxy already reported in an earlier paper by Pietrzynski et al. (2004), we have found 1019 "non-periodic" variable stars, 50 periodically variable stars with periods ranging from 0.12 to 66 days and 146 probably periodic variables. Twelve of these stars are eclipsing binaries and fifteen are likely new, low-amplitude Cepheids. Interestingly, seven of these Cepheid candidates have periods longer than 100 days, have very low amplitudes (less than 0.2 mag in $I$), and are very red. They could be young, massive Cepheids still embedded in dusty envelopes. The other objects span a huge range in colours and represent a mixture of different types of luminous variables. Many of the variables classified as non-periodic in the present study may turn out to be {\\it periodic} variables once a much longer time b...

Mennickent, R E; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I

2006-01-01

330

The Araucaria project. Bright variable stars in NGC 6822 from a wide-field imaging survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have performed a search for variable stars in the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 using wide-field multi-epoch VI photometry down to a limiting magnitude V ˜ 22. Apart from the Cepheid variables in this galaxy already reported in an earlier paper by Pietrzynski et al. (2004), we have found 1019 "non-periodic" variable stars, 50 periodically variable stars with periods ranging from 0.12 to 66 days and 146 probably periodic variables. Twelve of these stars are eclipsing binaries and fifteen are likely new, low-amplitude Cepheids. Interestingly, seven of these Cepheid candidates have periods longer than 100 days, have very low amplitudes (less than 0.2 mag in I), and are very red. They could be young, massive Cepheids still embedded in dusty envelopes. The other objects span a huge range in colours and represent a mixture of different types of luminous variables. Many of the variables classified as non-periodic in the present study may turn out to be periodic variables once a much longer time baseline will be available to study them. We provide the catalogue of photometric parameters and show the atlas of light curves for the new variable stars. Our present catalogue is complementary to the one of Baldacci et al. (2005) which has focussed on very short-period and fainter variables in a subfield in NGC 6822.

Mennickent, R. E.; Gieren, W.; Soszy?ski, I.; Pietrzy?ski, G.

2006-05-01

331

A TECHNIQUE FOR PRIMARY BEAM CALIBRATION OF DRIFT-SCANNING, WIDE-FIELD ANTENNA ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

We present a new technique for calibrating the primary beam of a wide-field, drift-scanning antenna element. Drift-scan observing is not compatible with standard beam calibration routines, and the situation is further complicated by difficult-to-parameterize beam shapes and, at low frequencies, the sparsity of accurate source spectra to use as calibrators. We overcome these challenges by building up an interrelated network of source 'crossing points'-locations where the primary beam is sampled by multiple sources. Using the single assumption that a beam has 180 Degree-Sign rotational symmetry, we can achieve significant beam coverage with only a few tens of sources. The resulting network of crossing points allows us to solve for both a beam model and source flux densities referenced to a single calibrator source, circumventing the need for a large sample of well-characterized calibrators. We illustrate the method with actual and simulated observations from the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization.

Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jacobs, Daniel C. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bradley, Richard F.; Parashare, Chaitali R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Carilli, Chris L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); Gugliucci, Nicole E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

2012-02-15

332

Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) for GOES Imager and Sounder  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two of the GOES instruments, the Imager and the Sounder, perform scans of the Earth to provide a full disc picture of the Earth. To verify the entire scan process, an image of a target that covers an 18 deg. circular field-of-view is collimated and projected into the field of regard of each instrument. The Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) has many advantages over its predecessor, WFC1, including lower thermal dissipation higher fir field MTF, smaller package, and a more intuitive (faster) focusing process. The illumination source is an LED array that emits in a narrow spectral band centered at 689 nm, within the visible spectral bands of the Imager and Sounder. The illumination level can be continuously adjusted electronically. Lower thermal dissipation eliminates the need for forced convection cooling and minimizes time to reach thermal stability. The lens system has been optimized for the illumination source spectral output and athernalized to remain in focus during bulk temperature changes within the laboratory environment. The MTF of the lens is higher than that of the WFC1 at the edge of FOV. The target is focused in three orthogonal motions, controlled by an ergonomic system that saves substantial time and produces a sharper focus. Key words: Collimator, GOES, Imager, Sounder, Projector

Etemad, Shahriar; Bremer, James C.; Zukowski, Barbara J.; Pasquale, Bert A.; zukowski, Tmitri J.; Prince, Robert E.; O'Neill, Patrick A.; Ross, Robert W.

2004-01-01

333

The Wide Field Imager for the Athena X-ray Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wide Field Imager (WFI) is one of the two scientific instruments of the Athena mission concept proposed for ESA's next large X-ray Observatory. The instrument will make optimal use of the grasp provided by the Athena mirror system, by combining a sensitive 40' diameter field of view DEPFET detector with an excellent spectral resolution and a pixel size properly sampling the angular resolution of 5" on-axis (half energy width). This synthesis makes the WFI a very powerful survey instrument, exceeding existing facilities by up to a factor of 100 in survey power. This will allow, e.g., to observe the earliest low-luminosity AGNs in the Universe, unraveling the seeds and growth mechanism of AGN at high-redshift. In addition, the WFI will provide unprecedented high-time resolution and high count rate capabilities for the observation of bright sources with low pile-up and high efficiency. I will present the instrument concept, the status of the hardware development, and highlight the breakthrough scientific capabilities of the instrument.

Rau, A.

2014-07-01

334

The Wide Field Imager for the Athena X-ray Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wide Field Imager (WFI) is one of the two scientific instruments of the Athena mission concept proposed for ESA's next large X-ray Observatory. The instrument will make optimal use of the grasp provided by the Athena mirror system, by combining a sensitive 40' diameter field of view DEPFET detector with an excellent spectral resolution and a pixel size properly sampling the angular resolution of 5" on-axis (half energy width). This synthesis makes the WFI a very powerful survey instrument, exceeding existing facilities by up to a factor of 100 in survey power. This will allow, e.g., to observe the earliest low-luminosity AGNs in the Universe, unraveling the seeds and growth mechanism of AGN at high-redshift. In addition, the WFI will provide unprecedented high-time resolution and high count rate capabilities for the observation of bright sources with low pile-up and high efficiency. I will present the instrument concept, the status of the hardware development, and highlight the breakthrough scientific capabilities of the instrument.

Rau, Arne

335

Nearby M, L, and T Dwarfs Discovered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In our effort to complete the census of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in the immediate solar neighborhood, we present spectra, photometry, proper motions, and distance estimates for 42 low-mass star and brown dwarf candidates discovered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We also present additional follow-up information on 12 candidates selected using WISE data but previously published elsewhere. The new discoveries include 15 M dwarfs, 17 L dwarfs, five T dwarfs, and five objects of other types. Among these discoveries is a newly identified ""unusually red L dwarf"" (WISE J223527.07+451140.9), four peculiar L dwarfs whose spectra are most readily explained as unresolved L+T binary systems, and a T9 dwarf (WISE J124309.61+844547.8). We also show that the recently discovered red L dwarf WISEP J004701.06+680352.1 may be a low-gravity object and hence young and potentially low-mass (<25 MJup).

Thompson, Maggie A.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Mace, Gregory N.; Cushing, Michael C.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Wright, Edward L.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mix, Katholeen J.; Beichman, Charles A.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Toloza, Odette; Ferrara, Jocelyn; Apodaca, Brian; McLean, Ian S.; Bloom, Joshua S.

2013-07-01

336

The DECam NEO Survey: A sensitive, wide-field search for near-Earth asteroids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report preliminary results from a survey for near-Earth asteroids with the Dark Energy Camera. DECam is a facility-class 520 Megapixel wide-field imager on the 4m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-american Observatory. It has a 3.2 square degree field of view, and a focal plane consisting of 62 2Kx4K red-optimized CCDs. In spite of its large number of pixels, DECam reads out in less than 30 seconds, making it possible to cover a large area of sky efficiently. Compared to the largest aperture of the currently most productive NEO searches, the Blanco has an aperture that is several times larger and a comparable field of view. Our goal is to measure the size distribution of NEOs well below 140m, and we have been allocated 30 nights through the NOAO Survey program to achieve it. Here we report on results from the first 10 nights of our survey.

Allen, Lori; Trilling, David; Valdes, Frank; Fuentes, Cesar; James, David; Herrera, David; Rajagopal, Jayadev; Burt, Brian; Axelrod, Tim

2014-11-01

337

WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the 'fireworks hypothesis' since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Padgett, D. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Rebull, L. M. [Spitzer Science Center (SSC), California Institute of Technology, M/S 220-6, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Assef, R. J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 169-530, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2012-01-10

338

Examining the Range of Cometary Dust Characteristics with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cometary dust provides insight into the composition of nuclei, as well as the forces behind its ejection and evolution. In this work, we will explore the characteristics of dust as seen in the near-nucleus environments around more than 100 active comets that were observed by the Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WISE) mission. WISE conducted an all-sky survey at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths (3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns) between January and December 2010. Many of the comets detected showed comae, tails, and/or trails, making this a rich dataset with which to examine the ensemble properties of cometary dust in the Solar System. Our work includes computing thermal fits for the dust, creating color temperature maps, and constraining the grain size distributions around the comets. With these results, we aim to provide context for the Rosetta mission results as well as a broad understanding of the range of cometary dust traits within the Solar System.

Stevenson, R.; Bauer, J. M.; Kramer, E.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Grav, T.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Lisse, C. M.; Meech, K. J.; Weissman, P. R.; Tholen, D.; Walker, R.; Wright, E. L.

2012-12-01

339

The on-chip guiding system of the wide-field infrared camera at CFHT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) is commissioning a new Wide field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) that uses a mosaic of 4 HAWAII-2RG near-infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell. At the heart of the instrument is an On-Chip Guiding System (OCGS) that exploits the unique parallel science/guide frame readout capability of the HAWAII-2RG detectors. A small subsample of each array is continuously read at a rate of 50 Hz while the integration of the science image is ongoing with the full arrays. Each of these guiding windows is centered on a star to provide an error signal for the telescope guiding. An Image Stabilizer Unit (ISU) (i.e. a tip-tilt silica plate), provides the corrections. A Proportional Integral Differential (PID) closed loop controls the ISU such that telescope tracking is corrected at a rate of 5 Hz. The guide window size and readout rate are adjustable but typical numbers are 8×8-16×16 boxes read at 50 or 1.5 Hz. This paper presents the technical architecture of the guiding system and performance measurements on the sky with WIRCam.

Albert, Loic; Riopel, Martin; Teeple, Douglas; Ward, Jeff; Barrick, Greg

2005-08-01

340

Infrared guiding with faint stars with the wide-field infrared camera at CFHT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) is commissioning a new Wide field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) that uses a mosaic of 4 HAWAII-2RG near- infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell. At the heart of the instrument is an On-Chip Guiding System (OCGS) that exploits the unique parallel science/guide frame readout capability of the HAWAII-2RG detectors. A small sub sample of each array is continuously read at a rate of up to 50 Hz while the integration of the science image is ongoing with the full arrays (read at a maximal rate of 1.4 s per full frame). Each of these guiding windows is centered on a star to provide an error signal for the telescope guiding. An Image Stabilizer Unit (ISU) (i.e. a tip-tilt silica plate), provides the corrections. A Proportional Integral Differential (PID) closed loop controls the ISU such that telescope tracking is corrected at a rate of 5 Hz. This paper presents the technical architecture of the guiding system and performance measurements on the sky in engineering runs with WIRCam with faint stars up to magnitude 14.

Teeple, Douglas; Riopel, Martin; Baril, Marc; Barrick, Gregory; Albert, Loic; Vermeulen, Tom; Ward, Jeff

2006-06-01

341

EXOPLANETS FROM THE ARCTIC: THE FIRST WIDE-FIELD SURVEY AT 80 Degree-Sign N  

SciTech Connect

Located within 10 Degree-Sign of the North Pole, northern Ellesmere Island offers continuous darkness in the winter months. This capability can greatly enhance the detection efficiency of planetary transit surveys and other time domain astronomy programs. We deployed two wide-field cameras at 80 Degree-Sign N, near Eureka, Nunavut, for a 152 hr observing campaign in 2012 February. The 16 megapixel camera systems were based on commercial f/1.2 lenses with 70 mm and 42 mm apertures, and they continuously imaged 504 and 1295 deg{sup 2}, respectively. In total, the cameras took over 44,000 images and produced better than 1% precision light curves for approximately 10,000 stars. We describe a new high-speed astrometric and photometric data reduction pipeline designed for the systems, test several methods for the precision flat fielding of images from very-wide-angle cameras, and evaluate the cameras' image qualities. We achieved a scintillation-limited photometric precision of 1%-2% in each 10 s exposure. Binning the short exposures into 10 minute chunks provided a photometric stability of 2-3 mmag, sufficient for the detection of transiting exoplanets around the bright stars targeted by our survey. We estimate that the cameras, when operated over the full Arctic winter, will be capable of discovering several transiting exoplanets around bright (m{sub V} < 9.5) stars.

Law, Nicholas M.; Sivanandam, Suresh [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Carlberg, Raymond; Salbi, Pegah; Ngan, Wai-Hin Wayne; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Ahmadi, Aida [University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Steinbring, Eric; Murowinski, Richard, E-mail: law@di.utoronto.ca [National Science Infrastructure, National Research Council Canada, Victoria, British Columbia, V9E 2E7 (Canada)

2013-03-15

342

Exoplanets from the Arctic: The First Wide-field Survey at 80°N  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Located within 10° of the North Pole, northern Ellesmere Island offers continuous darkness in the winter months. This capability can greatly enhance the detection efficiency of planetary transit surveys and other time domain astronomy programs. We deployed two wide-field cameras at 80°N, near Eureka, Nunavut, for a 152 hr observing campaign in 2012 February. The 16 megapixel camera systems were based on commercial f/1.2 lenses with 70 mm and 42 mm apertures, and they continuously imaged 504 and 1295 deg2, respectively. In total, the cameras took over 44,000 images and produced better than 1% precision light curves for approximately 10,000 stars. We describe a new high-speed astrometric and photometric data reduction pipeline designed for the systems, test several methods for the precision flat fielding of images from very-wide-angle cameras, and evaluate the cameras' image qualities. We achieved a scintillation-limited photometric precision of 1%-2% in each 10 s exposure. Binning the short exposures into 10 minute chunks provided a photometric stability of 2-3 mmag, sufficient for the detection of transiting exoplanets around the bright stars targeted by our survey. We estimate that the cameras, when operated over the full Arctic winter, will be capable of discovering several transiting exoplanets around bright (mV < 9.5) stars.

Law, Nicholas M.; Carlberg, Raymond; Salbi, Pegah; Ngan, Wai-Hin Wayne; Ahmadi, Aida; Steinbring, Eric; Murowinski, Richard; Sivanandam, Suresh; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang

2013-03-01

343

Electrolocation-based underwater obstacle avoidance using wide-field integration methods.  

PubMed

Weakly electric fish are capable of efficiently performing obstacle avoidance in dark and navigationally challenging aquatic environments using electrosensory information. This sensory modality enables extraction of relevant proximity information about surrounding obstacles by interpretation of perturbations induced to the fish's self-generated electric field. In this paper, reflexive obstacle avoidance is demonstrated by extracting relative proximity information using spatial decompositions of the perturbation signal, also called an electric image. Electrostatics equations were formulated for mathematically expressing electric images due to a straight tunnel to the electric field generated with a planar electro-sensor model. These equations were further used to design a wide-field integration based static output feedback controller. The controller was implemented in quasi-static simulations for environments with complicated geometries modelled using finite element methods to demonstrate sense and avoid behaviours. The simulation results were confirmed by performing experiments using a computer operated gantry system in environments lined with either conductive or non-conductive objects acting as global stimuli to the field of the electro-sensor. The proposed approach is computationally inexpensive and readily implementable, making underwater autonomous navigation in real-time feasible. PMID:24451219

Dimble, Kedar D; Faddy, James M; Humbert, J Sean

2014-03-01

344

Pulsed light imaging for wide-field dosimetry of photodynamic therapy in the skin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photodynamic therapy using aminoluvelinic acid (ALA) is an FDA-approved treatment for actinic keratoses, pre-cancerous skin lesions which pose a significant risk for immunocompromised individuals, such as organ transplant recipients. While PDT is generally effective, response rates vary, largely due to variations in the accumulation of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) after ALA application. The ability to quantify PpIX production before treatment could facilitate the use of additional interventions to improve outcomes. While many groups have demonstrated the ability to image PpIX in the clinic, these systems generally require darkening the room lights during imaging, which is unpopular with clinicians. We have developed a novel wide-field imaging system based on pulsed excitation and gated acquisition to image photosensitizer activity in the skin. The tissue is illuminated using four pulsed LED's to excite PpIX, and the remitted light acquired with a synchronized ICCD. This approach facilitates real-time background subtraction of ambient light, precluding the need to darken the exam room. Delivering light in short bursts also allows the use of elevated excitation intensity while remaining under the maximum permissible exposure limits, making the modality more sensitive to photosensitizer fluorescence than standard approaches. Images of tissue phantoms indicate system sensitivity down to 250nM PpIX and images of animals demonstrate detection of PpIX fluorescence in vivo under normal room light conditions.

Davis, Scott C.; Sexton, Kristian; Chapman, Michael Shane; Maytin, Edward; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

2014-03-01

345

Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars.We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks.We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Assef, R. J.

2011-01-01

346

Highlights from a Wide-field Photometric Survey of the Globular Cluster Populations of Giant Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I will present recent results from a wide-field imaging survey of the globular cluster populations of a sample of giant galaxies, along with selected results from several spin-off projects made possible by the survey data. We use mosaic CCD cameras on the WIYN 3.5-m and Kitt Peak 4-m telescopes to image the globular cluster populations out to their full radial extent and select point-source globular cluster candidates in three filters (BVR or gri) to minimize contamination and enable analysis of the globular cluster color distributions. The ~35 galaxies observed to date for the survey have a range of morphological types (spiral, S0, elliptical), luminosities (M_V ~ -19 to -23), and environments (field, group, cluster) and each galaxy hosts anywhere from ~50 to several thousand globular clusters. I will summarize our findings regarding the total numbers,spatial distributions, and color (metallicity) distributions of the globular cluster populations of the target galaxies. I will also highlight results from several applications of the survey data, including an investigation of the possible link between supermassive black holes and globular cluster populations and follow-up spectroscopic studies that have yielded globular cluster metallicities, kinematics, and galaxy mass profiles for a subset of the galaxies so far. This work is supported by NSF FAculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award AST-0847109.

Rhode, Katherine L.

2014-01-01

347

SuperBIT: Wide-field, Sub-arcsecond Imaging from the Super Pressure Balloon Platform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The scientific potential of near-diffraction-limited imaging from mid-latitude ultra-long duration balloon payloads is well known. The combination of diffraction-limited angular resolution, extreme stability, space-like backgrounds, and long integrations enables transformative opportunities in studies ranging from the weak lensing of galaxy clusters and cosmic shear to the search for exoplanets. Collaborators at the University of Toronto have recently integrated a half-meter class telescope with a prototype subarcsecond pointing system. SuperBIT will adapt the existing system to the requirements of the mid-latitude super-pressure balloon (SPB) payload, and demonstrate its imaging capability during an ultra-long duration balloon flight that will take off from Wanaka, New Zealand, in the 2016-17 Austral summer. The demonstration instrument will provide imaging with a half-degree field of view and 0.3-arcsecond resolution in five bands between 300 and1000 nm, with sensitivities in the shape-band exceeding 24th magnitude(>5 sigma) in 300 seconds of integration. Our observing schedule will be split between a performance verification sample, a photometric and spectroscopic calibration set, a deep field, and a science catalog. The performance verification set prioritizes a sample of thirty clusters that have been previously well studied with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys, the Chandra X-ray observatory, and for which there are Compton-Y parameter data from millimeter-wavelengths. The photometric calibration set will be selected from the COSMOS field. The science catalog will draw from a set of more than 150 Sunyaev-Zel’dovich, X-ray, and optically selected clusters spanning a wide range of cluster masses and morphologies. Aside from demonstrating the technical approach, these data will enable a systematic program to constrain the mass-observable relations over an unprecedented scale. A successful demonstration of the technical approach and the scientific potential will motivate future development of facility-class instruments on the SPB platform.

Rhodes, Jason; Fraisse, Aurélien A.; Jones, William C.; Netterfield, Calvin Barth; Massey, Richard

2014-06-01

348

Polymer Nanocomposites for Electro-Optics: Perspectives on Processing Technologies, Material Characterization, and Future Application  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This review concentrates on semiconductors and carbon nanotubes as the inorganic component of organic-inorganic nanomaterials. One of the cornerstones of the current push towards future improvements in electronics and in optics technology is the decrease in size of the various components used for device manufacture. This paper discusses the character of nanocomposites for optics and electronics, their preparation, and the properties of semiconductor nanoparticles such as ZnS, ZnO, ZnS:Mn, TiO2, CdSe, and CdS. Research in this area has shown the great potential advantages of novel materials composed of semiconductor nanocrystals and a polymer matrix. A short characterization of the nature of carbon-based materials (i.e., fullerenes and nanotubes) is given to provide a brief review of these materials. Then, the characterization of non-conjugated (PMMA, PS, and PVDF) and conjugated (PT, PVK, PPV, and PANI) polymer matrices and nanocomposites is described. Finally, the most advanced applications of the nanocomposites are presented.

Matras-Postolek, Katarzyna; Bogdal, Dariusz

349

Light weight optics made by glass thermal forming for future x-ray telescopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Future X-ray observatory missions, such as IXO or Gen-X, require grazing incidence optics of large collecting area in combination with a very good angular resolution. Wolter type I X-ray telescopes made of slumped glass segments could be a possible alternative to silicon pore optics. To achieve these requirements we develop slumping methods for high accuracy segments by experimental means. In particular, we follow the approach of indirect slumping and aim to produce parabola and hyperbola in one piece. In order to avoid internal stress in the glass segments the thermal expansion coefficient of the glass should closely match the thermal expansion of the mould material. Currently we focus on a combination of the alloy KOVAR for the mould and D263 for the glass; additionally a platinum-coated silica as mould material is studied. We investigate the behaviour of both materials during slumping in order to obtain the ideal environment for the slumping process. Additionally we report on the design of different metrology methods to measure the figure and thickness variations of the glass segments in visual light, e.g. interference, and on bearings used for shape measurements and integration.

Winter, Anita; Vongehr, Monika; Friedrich, Peter

2010-07-01

350

Etendue is inversely proportional to survey time for a very wide-field survey;  

E-print Network

, it is to be a "plug and play" IR dewar that can be mounted in place of the red channel optical dewar. L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 F and the dewar window of the IWI cryostat. Encircled energy curves for the LBC-Red + IWI optical layout. The LBC

Rhoads, James

351

Including detector effects in the design of wide-field imaging systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most imaging systems today include a mosaic detector array in the focal plane. Optical designers of astronomical telescopes typically produce a design that yields a superb on-axis aerial image in the focal plane, and detector effects are included only in the analysis of the final system performance. Aplanatic optical designs (corrected for spherical aberration and coma) are widely considered to

James E. Harvey; Martina Atanassova; Andrey Krywonos

2004-01-01

352

Experience Using the Heidelberg Retina Angiograph 2 with a Wide-Field Contact Lens System in Diabetic Retinopathy Cases  

PubMed Central

Introduction: HRA (Heiderberg Retina Angiograph) 2 uses a confocal scanning laser system which can provide high quality digital images but its imaging field is only 30°at most. HRA2 with a wide-field contact lens system allows an imaging field of up to 150°. Methods: We examined the advantages and disadvantages of HRA2, with a wide-field contact lens, for the evaluating diabetic retinopathy (DR). Results: HRA2 was beneficial for obtaining images of the entire retina simultaneously, without missing peripheral retinal non-perfusion and neovascularization. On the other hand, clear images connot be acquired in cases with media opacities such as corneal dystrophy, cataract and asteroid hyalosis, or in those with yellow tinted IOL. Conclusions: HRA2 with a wide-field contact lens is useful for visualizing peripheral retinal lesions in DR cases. PMID:24082980

Shiibashi, Miyo; Yoshimoto, Miwako; Shigeeda, Takashi; Kitano, Shigehiko; Kato, Satoshi

2013-01-01

353

Systems, computer-implemented methods, and tangible computer-readable storage media for wide-field interferometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Disclosed herein are systems, computer-implemented methods, and tangible computer-readable storage media for wide field imaging interferometry. The method includes for each point in a two dimensional detector array over a field of view of an image: gathering a first interferogram from a first detector and a second interferogram from a second detector, modulating a path-length for a signal from an image associated with the first interferogram in the first detector, overlaying first data from the modulated first detector and second data from the second detector, and tracking the modulating at every point in a two dimensional detector array comprising the first detector and the second detector over a field of view for the image. The method then generates a wide-field data cube based on the overlaid first data and second data for each point. The method can generate an image from the wide-field data cube.

Lyon, Richard G. (Inventor); Leisawitz, David T. (Inventor); Rinehart, Stephen A. (Inventor); Memarsadeghi, Nargess (Inventor)

2012-01-01

354

Design of a compact wide field telescope for space situational awareness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The European Space Agency, in the framework of its Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Preparatory Programme, has commissioned a study for a global network of surveillance telescopes to monitor the ever increasing number of objects in Earth orbit. A possible scenario identified by the study is a network of 20 SSA Telescopes located at various observatory sites. This paper presents the conceptual design of a telescope system optimised for wide field, short exposures and fast tracking - all requirements of SSA. The requirements of the SSA telescope will be presented followed by a brief review of potential telescope technologies. Following a trade study analysis a 1 m compact Schmidt telescope design was chosen. This design provides a field of view of 3.4 degrees diameter. The design is achromatic and covers the wavelength range 380 - 900 nm. The sensitivity of the telescope is such that it can monitor the orbital parameters of objects as small as 1 cm in low Earth orbit. This is equivalent to 17th magnitude in 0.07 seconds at a signal to noise ratio of 5. The telescope is mounted on an Altitude- Azimuth type mount that enables wide coverage of the sky and fast tracking speeds. The entire telescope is contained within a Calotte type enclosure. The camera, detector control, and telescope control system design will also be presented. Systems engineering aspects will be addressed, with particular attention given to the analysis and flow-down of requirements and a practical and pragmatic process of system-level design trade-offs.

Lee, David; Born, Andrew; Parr-Burman, Philip; Hastings, Peter; Stobie, Brian; Bezawada, Naidu

2012-09-01

355

Wide-field Fluorescent Microscopy and Fluorescent Imaging Flow Cytometry on a Cell-phone  

PubMed Central

Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, lightweight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. ~ 10 ?m over a very large field-of-view of ~ 81 mm2. This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water. PMID:23603893

Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

2013-01-01

356

A Deep Wide-Field Variable Star Catalog of Omega Centauri  

E-print Network

We present a variable star catalog of an extensive ground-based wide-field variability survey in the globular cluster omega Centauri. Using the ANU 40-inch (1m) telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, the cluster was observed with a 52'x52' (0.75 deg^2) field for 25 nights. A total of 187 variable stars were identified in the field, 81 of which are new discoveries. This work comprises the widest field variability survey yet undertaken for this cluster. Here we present the V+R lightcurves and preliminary analysis of the detected variable stars, comprising 58 eclipsing binaries, 69 RR Lyrae stars, 36 long period variables (P>=2d) and 24 miscellaneous pulsators including 15 SX Phoenicis stars and two Type II Cepheids. Analysis of the eclipsing binary radial distribution has revealed an apparent lack of binaries in the 8'-15' range, perhaps indicating two separate binary populations. Four detached binaries have short periods (<2.5d) and are likely composed of low-mass M-dwarf components, useful for testing stellar evolution models. One further detached system has a period of 0.8 days and due to the blueness of the system could be composed of white dwarf stars. Analysis of the RR Lyrae sample has produced a reddening corrected distance modulus (also accounting for metallicity spread) for the cluster of 13.68+-0.27, a result consistent with previously published values. This paper also presents a total stellar database comprising V and I photometry (with astrometry better than 0.25'') for 203,892 stars with 12.0

David T. F Weldrake; Penny D Sackett; Terry J Bridges

2006-10-24

357

A Wide-field near- and Mid-infrared Census of Young Stars in NGC 6334  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a study of the rate and efficiency of star formation in the NGC 6334 star-forming region. We obtained observations at J, H, and Ks taken with the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager and combined them with observations taken with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope at wavelengths = 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 ?m. We also analyzed previous observations taken at 24 ?m using the Spitzer MIPS camera as part of the MIPSGAL survey. We have produced a point source catalog with >700, 000 entries. We have identified 2283 young stellar object (YSO) candidates, 375 Class I YSOs, and 1908 Class II YSOs using a combination of existing IRAC-based color classification schemes that we have extended and validated to the near-IR for use with warm Spitzer data. We have identified multiple new sites of ongoing star formation activity along filamentary structures extending tens of parsecs beyond the central molecular ridge of NGC 6334. By mapping the extinction, we derived an estimate for the gas mass, 2.2 × 105 M ?. The heavy concentration of protostars along the dense filamentary structures indicates that NGC 6334 may be undergoing a "mini-starburst" event with ?SFR > 8.2 M ? Myr-1 pc-2 and SFE > 0.10. We have used these estimates to place NGC 6334 in the Kennicutt-Schmidt diagram to help bridge the gap between observations of local low-mass star-forming regions and star formation in other galaxies.

Willis, S.; Marengo, M.; Allen, L.; Fazio, G. G.; Smith, H. A.; Carey, S.

2013-12-01

358

THE DISCOVERY OF Y DWARFS USING DATA FROM THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER (WISE)  

SciTech Connect

We present the discovery of seven ultracool brown dwarfs identified with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Near-infrared spectroscopy reveals deep absorption bands of H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} that indicate all seven of the brown dwarfs have spectral types later than UGPS J072227.51-054031.2, the latest-type T dwarf currently known. The spectrum of WISEP J182831.08+265037.8 is distinct in that the heights of the J- and H-band peaks are approximately equal in units of f{sub {lambda}}, so we identify it as the archetypal member of the Y spectral class. The spectra of at least two of the other brown dwarfs exhibit absorption on the blue wing of the H-band peak that we tentatively ascribe to NH{sub 3}. These spectral morphological changes provide a clear transition between the T dwarfs and the Y dwarfs. In order to produce a smooth near-infrared spectral sequence across the T/Y dwarf transition, we have reclassified UGPS 0722-05 as the T9 spectral standard and tentatively assign WISEP J173835.52+273258.9 as the Y0 spectral standard. In total, six of the seven new brown dwarfs are classified as Y dwarfs: four are classified as Y0, one is classified as Y0 (pec?), and WISEP J1828+2650 is classified as >Y0. We have also compared the spectra to the model atmospheres of Marley and Saumon and infer that the brown dwarfs have effective temperatures ranging from 300 K to 500 K, making them the coldest spectroscopically confirmed brown dwarfs known to date.

Cushing, Michael C.; Mainzer, A.; Eisenhardt, Peter R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 321-520, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Beichman, Charles A. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Skrutskie, Michael F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Burgasser, Adam J. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Prato, Lisa A. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Simcoe, Robert A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Building 37, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Marley, Mark S.; Freedman, Richard S. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 254-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Saumon, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS F663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wright, Edward L., E-mail: michael.cushing@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2011-12-10

359

Tracker controls development and control architecture for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Wide Field Upgrade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To enable the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Wide Field Upgrade, the University of Texas Center for Electromechanics and McDonald Observatory are developing a precision tracker system - a 15,000 kg robot to position a 3,100 kg payload within 10 microns of a desired dynamic track. Performance requirements to meet science needs and safety requirements that emerged from detailed Failure Modes and Effects Analysis resulted in a system of 14 precision controlled actuators and 100 additional analog and digital devices (primarily sensors and safety limit switches). This level of system complexity and emphasis on fail-safe operation is typical of large modern telescopes and numerous industrial applications. Due to this complexity, demanding accuracy requirements, and stringent safety requirements, a highly versatile and easily configurable centralized control system that easily links with modeling and simulation tools during the hardware and software design process was deemed essential. The Matlab/Simulink simulation environment, coupled with dSPACE controller hardware, was selected for controls development and realization. The dSPACE real-time operating system collects sensor information; motor commands are transmitted over a PROFIBUS network to servo amplifiers and drive motor status is received over the same network. Custom designed position feedback loops, supplemented by feed forward force commands for enhanced performance, and algorithms to accommodate self-locking gearboxes (for safety), reside in dSPACE. To interface the dSPACE controller directly to absolute Heidenhain sensors with EnDat 2.2 protocol, a custom communication board was developed. This paper covers details of software and hardware, design choices and analysis, and supporting simulations (primarily Simulink).

Mock, Jason R.; Beno, Joe; Rafferty, Tom H.; Cornell, Mark E.

2010-07-01

360

Wide Field Imaging. I. Applications of Neural Networks to object detection and star/galaxy classification  

E-print Network

[Abriged] Astronomical Wide Field Imaging performed with new large format CCD detectors poses data reduction problems of unprecedented scale which are difficult to deal with traditional interactive tools. We present here NExt (Neural Extractor): a new Neural Network (NN) based package capable to detect objects and to perform both deblending and star/galaxy classification in an automatic way. Traditionally, in astronomical images, objects are first discriminated from the noisy background by searching for sets of connected pixels having brightnesses above a given threshold and then they are classified as stars or as galaxies through diagnostic diagrams having variables choosen accordingly to the astronomer's taste and experience. In the extraction step, assuming that images are well sampled, NExt requires only the simplest a priori definition of "what an object is" (id est, it keeps all structures composed by more than one pixels) and performs the detection via an unsupervised NN approaching detection as a clustering problem which has been thoroughly studied in the artificial intelligence literature. In order to obtain an objective and reliable classification, instead of using an arbitrarily defined set of features, we use a NN to select the most significant features among the large number of measured ones, and then we use their selected features to perform the classification task. In order to optimise the performances of the system we implemented and tested several different models of NN. The comparison of the NExt performances with those of the best detection and classification package known to the authors (SExtractor) shows that NExt is at least as effective as the best traditional packages.

S. Andreon; G. Gargiulo; G. Longo; R. Tagliaferri; N. Capuano

2000-06-08

361

Measuring Dark Energy with the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph (WFMOS)  

E-print Network

Dark energy is one of the greatest scientific challenges of the 21st century. One of the key questions facing cosmologists is whether dark energy is either a breakdown of General Relativity on large scales or a new form of matter in the Universe with a negative effective pressure. This question can only be answered through a suite of different observations as a function of redshift. In this paper, I briefly review various dark energy reports published in the last year, which all highlight the importance of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) for probing the "dark physics" of the Universe. I also summarize the recent measurements of the BAO in large galaxy redshift surveys. I then look forward to a new instrument planned by the Subaru and Gemini communities called the "Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph" (WFMOS) for the Subaru telescope. The baseline design of this facility includes ~4500 spectroscopic fibers over a field-of-view of 1.5 degree diameter, covering a wavelength range of 0.39 to 1 microns. The instrument is schedule for first-light early next decade and will perform massive spectroscopic surveys of both distant galaxies and faint stars in our own Galaxy. The WFMOS dark energy surveys will deliver ~1% errors on the angular-diameter distance and Hubble parameter to high redshift. WFMOS will also be a unique user-facility allowing astronomers to address a host of astrophysical problems like galaxy evolution, the intergalactic medium and calibrate photometric redshifts. The WFMOS archive will also provide a rich resource for further ancillary science much like the present-day SDSS archive.

Robert Nichol

2006-11-27

362

NOTE: Multileaf collimator end leaf leakage: implications for wide-field IMRT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The multi-leaf collimator (MLC) of a particular linear accelerator vendor (Millennium MLC, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) has a maximum leaf extension of 14.5 cm. To achieve intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for fields wider than 14.5 cm all closed leaf pairs are restricted to placement inside the field. Due to the rounded leaf end design of the MLC end leaf leakage will occur in the treatment field. The implementation of direct aperture optimization in the IMRT module of a radiotherapy treatment planning system (Pinnacle, Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Milpitas, CA) has facilitated the delivery of IMRT fields wider than 14.5 cm. The end leaf leakage of the Millennium MLC has been characterized for 6 MV photons using gafchromic and radiographic film, and the accuracy of the planning system verified. The maximum leakage measured for a single field was 0.39 cGy MU-1 for a 0 mm leaf gap and 0.51 cGy MU-1 for a 0.6 mm leaf gap. For a clinical IMRT field leaf end leakage contributed an additional 2-3 Gy over the course of treatment. The planning system underestimated the magnitude of end leaf leakage by 20-40%. The ability to deliver IMRT fields wider than 14.5 cm with the Millennium MLC has improved the efficiency and flexibility of IMRT treatments; however, significant extra dose can be introduced due to end leaf leakage. Caution should be exercised when delivering wide field IMRT as it is not a complete panacea. Any significant occurrences of end leaf leakage predicted by the planning system should be independently verified prior to delivery.

Hardcastle, N.; Metcalfe, P.; Ceylan, A.; Williams, M. J.

2007-11-01

363

Ocular findings in patients with alopecia areata: role of ultra-wide-field retinal imaging.  

PubMed

Alopecia areata is understood as an autoimmune disease T cell-mediated mainly involving hair follicles in humans. It is a multifactorial aetiologic disease characterised by non-scarring alopecia and asymptomatic areas, affecting approximately 2 % of dermatology patients. Recent studies suggest that the pathogenesis of AA plays an important role in the association of certain HLA groups, neuroendocrine parameters and immunogenic factors. During 3 months (March to May 2013) at Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, 22 patients with severe alopecia areata underwent ophthalmic examination to determine whether there were ocular findings in the following parameters: Best-corrected visual acuity on decimal Snellen optotype, anterior segment slit-lamp examination and photograph, intraocular pressure measurement and dilated fundoscopy. Ultra-wide-field retinal imaging with or without red-free photograph was carried out with the Optomap 200 Tx (Optos, DunFermline, UK). Forty-four eyes of 22 patients were analysed [15 females (68.2 %)]. The mean age was 38.9 (SD 13.7) and mean time of evolution was 19.9 years (SD 16.3). Alopecia areata clinical patterns were multifocal [n = 10 (45.5 %)], universalis [n = 7 (31.8 %)], totalis [n = 3 (13.6 %)] and focal [n = 2 (9.1 %)]. Best-corrected visual acuity was 1.0 in almost all patients, but only three eyes (6.8 %) had vision of 0.7. Ocular findings were as follows: madarosis [n = 7 partial loss of eyelashes (31.85 %) and n = 4 total loss (18.2 %)], lens changes [n = 4 (18.2 %)], cataract [n = 3 (13.65 %)]. Ultra-wide fundus photography examination showed peripheral drusen [n = 17 eyes (38.6 %)], white-without-pressure changes [n = 8 eyes (18.22 %)] and peripheral retinal degenerations [n = 3 eyes (6.81 %)]. Ocular findings in patients with alopecia areata are reported and discussed by dermatologic and ophthalmic evaluation. PMID:25450413

De Andrade, Francisco Assis; Giavedoni, Priscila; Keller, Johannes; Sainz-de-la-Maza, Maria Tereza; Ferrando, Juan

2014-12-01

364

THERMAL MODEL CALIBRATION FOR MINOR PLANETS OBSERVED WITH WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER/NEOWISE  

SciTech Connect

With the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we have observed over 157,000 minor planets. Included in these are a number of near-Earth objects, main-belt asteroids, and irregular satellites which have well measured physical properties (via radar studies and in situ imaging) such as diameters. We have used these objects to validate models of thermal emission and reflected sunlight using the WISE measurements, as well as the color corrections derived in Wright et al. for the four WISE bandpasses as a function of effective temperature. We have used 50 objects with diameters measured by radar or in situ imaging to characterize the systematic errors implicit in using the WISE data with a faceted spherical near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) to compute diameters and albedos. By using the previously measured diameters and H magnitudes with a spherical NEATM model, we compute the predicted fluxes (after applying the color corrections given in Wright et al.) in each of the four WISE bands and compare them to the measured magnitudes. We find minimum systematic flux errors of 5%-10%, and hence minimum relative diameter and albedo errors of {approx}10% and {approx}20%, respectively. Additionally, visible albedos for the objects are computed and compared to the albedos at 3.4 {mu}m and 4.6 {mu}m, which contain a combination of reflected sunlight and thermal emission for most minor planets observed by WISE. Finally, we derive a linear relationship between subsolar temperature and effective temperature, which allows the color corrections given in Wright et al. to be used for minor planets by computing only subsolar temperature instead of a faceted thermophysical model. The thermal models derived in this paper are not intended to supplant previous measurements made using radar or spacecraft imaging; rather, we have used them to characterize the errors that should be expected when computing diameters and albedos of minor planets observed by WISE using a spherical NEATM model.

Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Ressler, M.; Eisenhardt, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Grav, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wright, E. [UCLA Astronomy, P.O. Box 91547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Cutri, R. M. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); McMillan, R. S. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Blvd., Kuiper Space Science Bldg. 92, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Cohen, M., E-mail: amainzer@jpl.nasa.gov [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-08-01

365

Present and Future Optics Challenges at CHESS and for Proposed Energy Recovery Linac Source of Synchrotron Radiation  

E-print Network

Present and Future Optics Challenges at CHESS and for Proposed Energy Recovery Linac Source.V. Bazarov1 , and S. Gruner1,3 1 Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) 2 School of Applied sources at CHESS and for the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL) source at Cornell. For the existing

Shen, Qun

366

DEEP, WIDE-FIELD CCD PHOTOMETRY FOR THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 3532  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a deep, wide-field CCD survey for the open cluster NGC 3532. Our new BV(RI){sub c} photometry effectively covers a one square degree area and reaches an unprecedented depth of V {approx} 21 to reveal that NGC 3532 is a rich open cluster that harbors a large number of faint, low-mass stars. We employ a number of methods to reduce the impact of field star contamination in the cluster color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), including supplementing our photometry with JHK{sub s} data from the 2MASS catalog. These efforts allow us to define a robust sample of candidate main-sequence stars suitable for a purely empirical determination of the cluster's parameters by comparing them to the well-established Hyades main sequence. Our results confirm previous findings that NGC 3532 lies fairly near to the Sun [(m - M){sub 0} = 8.46 {+-} 0.05; 492{sup +12}{sub -11} pc] and has an extremely low reddening for its location near the Galactic plane [E(B - V) = 0.028 {+-} 0.006]. Moreover, an age of {approx}300 Myr has been derived for the cluster by fitting a set of overshooting isochrones to the well-populated upper main sequence. This new photometry also extends faint enough to reach the cluster white dwarf sequence, as confirmed by our photometric recovery of eight spectroscopically identified members of the cluster. Using the location of these eight members, along with the latest theoretical cooling tracks, we have identified {approx}30 additional white dwarf stars in the [V, (B - V)] CMD that have a high probability of belonging to NGC 3532. Reassuringly, the age we derive from fitting white dwarf isochrones to the locus of these stars, 300 {+-} 100 Myr, is consistent with the age derived from the turnoff. Our analysis of the photometry also includes an estimation of the binary star fraction as well as a determination of the cluster's luminosity and mass functions.

Clem, James L.; Landolt, Arlo U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie, E-mail: jclem@phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: landolt@phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: hoard@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: wachter@ipac.caltech.edu [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., MC 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2011-04-15

367

Characterizing AGB stars in Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) bands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims: Since asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are bright and extended infrared objects, most Galactic AGB stars saturate the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) detectors and therefore the WISE magnitudes that are restored by applying point-spread-function fitting need to be verified. Statistical properties of circumstellar envelopes around AGB stars are discussed on the basis of a WISE AGB catalog verified in this way. Methods: We cross-matched an AGB star sample with the WISE All-Sky Source Catalog and the Two Mircon All Sky Survey catalog. Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) spectra of a subsample of WISE AGB stars were also exploited. The dust radiation transfer code DUSTY was used to help predict the magnitudes in the W1 and W2 bands, the two WISE bands most affected by saturation, for calibration purpose, and to provide physical parameters of the AGB sample stars for analysis. Results: DUSTY is verified against the ISO spectra to be a good tool to reproduce the spectral energy distributions of these AGB stars. Systematic magnitude-dependent offsets have been identified in WISE W1 and W2 magnitudes of the saturated AGB stars, and empirical calibration formulas are obtained for them on the basis of 1877 (W1) and 1558 (W2) AGB stars that are successfully fit with DUSTY. According to the calibration formulas, the corrections for W1 at 5 mag and W2 at 4 mag are -0.383 and 0.217 mag, respectively. In total, we calibrated the W1/W2 magnitudes of 2390/2021 AGB stars. The model parameters from the DUSTY and the calibrated WISE W1 and W2 magnitudes are used to discuss the behavior of the WISE color-color diagrams of AGB stars. The model parameters also reveal that O-rich AGB stars with opaque circumstellar envelopes are much rarer than opaque C-rich AGB stars toward the anti-Galactic center direction, which we attribute to the metallicity gradient of our Galaxy. The synthetic photometry and input parameters for the model grid are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/564/A84

Lian, Jianhui; Zhu, Qingfeng; Kong, Xu; He, Jinhua

2014-04-01

368

The Software Design for the Wide-Field Infrared Explorer Attitude Control System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE), currently scheduled for launch in September 1998, is the fifth of five spacecraft in the NASA/Goddard Small Explorer (SMEX) series. This paper presents the design of WIRE's Attitude Control System flight software (ACS FSW). WIRE is a momentum-biased, three-axis stabilized stellar pointer which provides high-accuracy pointing and autonomous acquisition for eight to ten stellar targets per orbit. WIRE's short mission life and limited cryogen supply motivate requirements for Sun and Earth avoidance constraints which are designed to prevent catastrophic instrument damage and to minimize the heat load on the cryostat. The FSW implements autonomous fault detection and handling (FDH) to enforce these instrument constraints and to perform several other checks which insure the safety of the spacecraft. The ACS FSW implements modules for sensor data processing, attitude determination, attitude control, guide star acquisition, actuator command generation, command/telemetry processing, and FDH. These software components are integrated with a hierarchical control mode managing module that dictates which software components are currently active. The lowest mode in the hierarchy is the 'safest' one, in the sense that it utilizes a minimal complement of sensors and actuators to keep the spacecraft in a stable configuration (power and pointing constraints are maintained). As higher modes in the hierarchy are achieved, the various software functions are activated by the mode manager, and an increasing level of attitude control accuracy is provided. If FDH detects a constraint violation or other anomaly, it triggers a safing transition to a lower control mode. The WIRE ACS FSW satisfies all target acquisition and pointing accuracy requirements, enforces all pointing constraints, provides the ground with a simple means for reconfiguring the system via table load, and meets all the demands of its real-time embedded environment (16 MHz Intel 80386 processor with 80387 coprocessor running under the VRTX operating system). The mode manager organizes and controls all the software modules used to accomplish these goals, and in particular, the FDH module is tightly coupled with the mode manager.

Anderson, Mark O.; Barnes, Kenneth C.; Melhorn, Charles M.; Phillips, Tom

1998-01-01

369

Stellar photometry in the inner bulge of M31 using the Hubble Space Telescope wide field camera  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present photometry of two fields in the M31 bulge imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camara (WFC). The nuclear field (r less than 40 arcsecs = 150 pc) giant branch extends to I = 19.5, M(sub I) = -5 (Cousins system), a full 0.9 mag brighter than the giant-branch tips of metal-poor Galactic globular clusters and M31 halo fields. This is also approximately = 1.5 mag brighter than the giant branches of metal-rich Galactic globular clusters, but is no brighter than Mould's (1986) M31 bulge field 1 kpc from the nucleus. The data also suggest that the brighter stars may be preferentially concentrated to the center. The 648 luminous stars detected in 2 x 10(exp 9) solar luminosity is approximately = 25% that expected from a hypothetical population of evolved asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with lifetimes approximately = 10(exp 5) yr, with the cautionary note that we are near the detection limit. The number of bright stars is also consistent with the progeny of blue stragglers, if one uses a lifetime for the thermal-pulsing AGB of 2 x 10(exp 6) yr. We strongly caution that incompleteness becomes severe below I = 19.9 mag and that future surveys are likely to find numbers of bright stars too large to accomodate the blue straggler progeny hypothesis. We have imaged an additional field 2 arcmin = 500 pc south of the nucleus. The brightest stars in this field are also I = 19.5, but bright stars appear less numerous than in the nuclear field. If the population resembles that of the Galactic bulge, then M(sub bol) = -4.5 is a lower limit to the giant-branch tip luminosity; infrared studies should reveal stars 0.5 mag or more brighter. Either high-metallicity or (more likely) age approximately = 10 Gyr may be responsible for the presence of these luminous AGB stars. These observations confirm that previous ground-based infrared studies (e.g., Rich & Mould 1991) very likely detect an extended giant branch and not spurious luminous stars caused by crowding or disk contamination. However, published integrated colors for the M31 bulge/nucleus are extremely red, making it difficult to accomodate a young or intermediate-age population.

Rich, R. M.; Mighell, K. J.

1995-01-01

370

ProtoEXIST: balloon-borne technology development for wide-field hard X-ray imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the development of the ProtoEXIST balloon-borne experiment for development of wide-field coded aperture imaging with high spatial resolution imaging Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) arrays in close-tiled, large area configurations. ProtoEXIST1 will incorporate two coded aperture telescopes, each with 16 x 16cm close-tiled imaging CZT with 2.5mm pixels that maintain registration across the full detector. The detector plane incorporates new-technology low powered ASIC readout on each 20 x 20 x 5mm CZT crystal. A 2 x 4 array of such crystals are closetiled on a single board (DCA) with vertical integration to a controlling and readout-enabling FPGA. Detector readout modes can be commanded through the FPGA and selected in flight: from simple peak pixel, to peak plus neighbor pixels to larger pixel-selected modes, which will improve spatial/spectral resolution as well as allow for future tests of Compton imaging. The full readout consists of a 2 x 4 array of DCAs for each of the two telescopes. The detector plane is shielded from below by an active shield (2cm CsI) on one telescope vs. an equivalent graded-passive shield on the other to enable direct imaging comparisons of background rejection in a balloon environment. Both telescopes incorporate otherwise identical graded-passive side shields and laminated coded aperture masks (5mm pixels, laser-cut in W sheet). The telescopes each have 20o x 20o fields of view (FWHM), with 21arcmin resolution across the field. The ProtoEXIST gondola is derived from the old Harvard EXITE gondola but now with new pointing system and daytime star camera as developed at MSFC for the HERO balloon payload. A first flight is planned for September/October, 2008. Tests will include not only the first tests of this multipixel, controllable ASIC-readout system but also tests of the scanning coded aperture imaging as planned for the proposed EXIST mission. Followup flight(s) will test the higher-spatial resolution CZT imager (0.6mm pixels) now planned for the full EXIST mission.

Grindlay, Jonathan

371

UV-curable hybrid polymers for optical applications: technical challenges, industrial solutions, and future developments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advanced micro- and nanofabrication processes are constantly evolving from academic R&D environment towards real production technology. Therefore, the availability of suitable polymers for optical applications plays a crucial role to satisfy not only application based requirements but also the compatibility to industrial production technologies. In this context, UV-curable hybrid polymers, i.e. inorganic-organic materials obtained by sol-gel chemistry, were recently implemented into mass production environment, e.g. for micro-lenses in mobile device applications. In this contribution, we report on the development of innovative hybrid polymers and their tailoring towards an easy and fast processing with reliable and reproducible performance output for industrial large-scale production. Based on a discussion on standard process parameters with respect to optimize the material's performance, the technical demands of industrial manufacture to the hybrid polymers will be subsequently reviewed by giving selective examples. This will be complemented by a brief description of current R&D activities adapting hybrid polymers to future patterning technologies.

Gruetzner, G.; Klein, J.; Vogler, M.; Schleunitz, A.

2014-03-01

372

A wide field of view radar for Sense and Avoid on UAV using space coloring waveforms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Up to now, UAV are employed in crisis or war times. For training purposes, some areas are especially attributed for UAV deployment in a limited space area and in a limited time slot. In the future, both for emerging civilian applications and for training purpose, these limitations will no longer be acceptable and UAV will have to be inserted in

Stéphane KEMKEMIAN; Myriam NOUVEL-FIANI; Pascal CORNIC; Patrick GARREC

2010-01-01

373

Image-based calibration of a deformable mirror in wide-field microscopy  

E-print Network

in a microscope setting. © 2010 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 110.1080, 180.2520. 1. Introduction Light between light and tissue are convention- ally discussed in terms of two extremes: "scattering" typically into the images [4]. An extreme case of such tilted imaging is found in a light-sheet-based microscopic technique

Holy, Timothy

374

A Wide-Field Infrared Camera for the Palomar 200-inch Telescope  

E-print Network

, includes a 4-element refractive collimator, two 7-position filter wheels that straddle a Lyot stop, and a 5 with a 0.25 arcsec per pixel plate scale at the detector. The entire optical train is contained within with its Hawaii-I 1024-square detector and a 0.25 arcsec / pixel plate scale. An upgrade to a Hawaii

Galis, Frietson

375

Satellite Ocean Biology: Past, Present, Future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1978 when the first satellite ocean color proof-of-concept sensor, the Nimbus-7 Coastal Zone Color Scanner, was launched, much progress has been made in refining the basic measurement concept and expanding the research applications of global satellite time series of biological and optical properties such as chlorophyll-a concentrations. The seminar will review the fundamentals of satellite ocean color measurements (sensor design considerations, on-orbit calibration, atmospheric corrections, and bio-optical algorithms), scientific results from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) missions, and the goals of future NASA missions such as PACE, the Aerosol, Cloud, Ecology (ACE), and Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GeoCAPE) missions.

McClain, Charles R.

2012-01-01

376

Design considerations and preliminary performance evaluation for a technology demonstration of off-the-visor wide-field-of-view HMD  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) evaluated a wide field of view HMD technology demonstrator developed by Kaiser Electronics. Primary performance and design characteristics addressed are total field of view, system contrast transfer function, eye box parameters, binocular alignment/stability, residual distortion and head borne mass. The HMD technology demonstrator was designed and built within one year between 1999 to 2000 and was developed to prove novel design and fabrication concepts in the visor, relay optics, optical interfaces, and optical platform structure. The HMD technology demonstrator system is based on a modified HGU-55 helmet and utilizes a bifurcated visor design resulting in a total head borne weight of 4.11 lbs (including MBU-20P Oxygen mask). The system provides a maximum binocular field of view of 52.7° X 29.6°and binocular overlap of 29.5° with an on-axis limiting resolution of 0.76 cy/mr. The uncompensated binocular misalignment was less than 0.29 mr RMS horizontal and 0.24 mr RMS vertical. Other useful system characteristics include right/left independently adjustable IPD mechanisms and a visor/display retraction and removal mechanism operable with a single gloved hand.

Draper, Russell S.; Balogh, Charles D.; Robbins, Steven J.

2003-09-01

377

NIRMOS: a wide-field near-infrared spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NIRMOS (Near-Infrared Multiple Object Spectrograph) is a 0.9 to 2.5 μm imager/spectrograph concept proposed for the Giant Magellan Telescope1 (GMT). Near-infrared observations will play a central role in the ELT era, allowing us to trace the birth and evolution of galaxies through the era of peak star formation. NIRMOS' large field of view, 6.5′ by 6.5′, will be unique among imaging spectrographs developed for ELTs. NIRMOS will operate in Las Campanas' superb natural seeing and is also designed to take advantage of GMT's ground-layer adaptive optics system. We describe NIRMOS' high-performance optical and mechanical design.

Fabricant, Daniel; Fata, Robert; Brown, Warren R.; McLeod, Brian; Mueller, Mark; Gauron, Thomas; Roll, John; Bergner, Henry; Geary, John; Kradinov, Vladimir; Norton, Tim; Smith, Matt; Zajac, Joseph

2012-09-01

378

An off-axis, wide-field, diffraction-limited, reflective Schmidt Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Off-axis telescopes with unobstructed pupils offer great advantages in terms of emissivity, throughput, and diffractionlimited energy concentration. For most telescope designs, implementation of an off-axis configuration imposes enormous penalties in terms of cost, optical difficulty and performance, and for this reason off-axis telescopes are rarely constructed. However, for the reflective Schmidt design, implementation of an off-axis configuration is very straightforward, and involves only a modest optical penalty. Moreover, the reflective Schmidt gets particular benefits, avoiding the obstruction of its large focal plane and support column, and gaining a highly accessible, gravity-invariant prime focus, capable of accommodating very large instrumentation. We present an off-axis f/8 reflective Schmidt design for the proposed 'KDUST' Chinese infrared telescope at Dome A on the Antarctic plateau, which offers simultaneous diffraction-limited NIR imaging over 1°, and close to diffraction-limited imaging out to 2° for fibre-fed NIR spectroscopy.

Saunders, Will

2010-07-01

379

A wide field of view force protection system for ground vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The latest generation of heavily armored vehicles and the proliferation of IEDs in urban combat environments dictate that electro-optical systems play a greater role in situational awareness for ground vehicles. FLIR systems has been addressing the needs of the ground vehicle community by developing unique sensor systems combining thermal imaging and electro-optical sensors, advanced image processing, and networking capabilities into compact, cost effective packages. This paper will discuss one of those new products, the WideEye II. The WideEye II combines long wave infrared and electro-optical sensors in a 180 degree field of view, single integrated package to meet the critical needs of the warfighter. It includes seamless electronic stitching of the 180 degree image, and state of the art networking capability to allow it to be operated standalone or to be fully integrated with modern combat vehicle systems. The paper will discuss system tradeoffs and capabilities of this new product and show potential applications for its use.

Way, Scott; Archer, Cynthia; Jolivet, Noel; Cannon, Bruce; Hansen, Joel; Holt, Jordon; Olsen, Steven; Sarao, Jeremy

2009-05-01

380

New results from a wide-field imaging survey of globular cluster systems: Clues to the formation and evolution of giant galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As some of the oldest and most luminous stellar populations in galaxies, globular clusters (GCs) provide an observable record of the formation and evolutionary history of their host galaxy. Theories for the origin and evolution of galaxies need to be able to explain the properties of both the host galaxy and the ensemble properties of the GC system. Therefore quantifying the global properties of galaxy GC systems over a range of galaxy luminosities, masses, and environments is an important step towards a comprehensive picture of the formation of giant galaxies. In this dissertation, I present new measurements of the ensemble properties of six early-type giant galaxy GC systems: total numbers of GCs, specific frequencies, their spatial distributions, color distributions, and color gradients. I combine ground-based, wide-field optical imaging with analyses of archival Hubble Space Telescope data to study the GC populations from the galaxy's inner regions out to several tens of kpc around the host galaxies. I perform surface photometry to derive surface brightness profiles and color gradients for the host galaxies in order to directly compare the galaxy and GC system properties. For example, my wide-field imaging study of the field S0 galaxy NGC 7457 shows a highly elliptical GC spatial distribution and evidence that unequal mass mergers may have played an important role in the galaxy's formation. In my wide-field CCD study of the GC systems of five moderate-luminosity giant galaxies, I find that the GC system of the elliptical galaxy NGC 5813 shows a significant color gradient that results from the differing spatial distributions of the metal-poor and metal-rich GC subpopulations. I use a subsample of galaxies from our ongoing GC system survey to explore previously under-studied aspects of extragalactic GC populations. I quantify the azimuthal spatial distributions of four galaxy GC systems (including the metal-rich and metal-poor subpopulations) and find elliptical shapes consistent with the host galaxy light. Lastly, I compare the results of the azimuthal distribution analyses to galaxy formation scenarios and discuss my dissertation results in the context of our ongoing GC system survey.

Hargis, Jonathan Robert

381

New optical telescope projects at Devasthal Observatory  

E-print Network

Devasthal, located in the Kumaun region of Himalayas is emerging as one of the best optical astronomy site in the continent. The minimum recorded ground level atmospheric seeing at the site is 0.6 arcsec with median value at 1.1 arcsec. Currently, a 1.3-m fast (f/4) wide field-of-view (66 arcmin) optical telescope is operating at the site. In near future, a 4-m liquid mirror telescope in collaboration with Belgium and Canada, and a 3.6-m optical telescope in collaboration with Belgium are expected to be installed in 2013. The telescopes will be operated by Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences. The first instruments on the 3.6-m telescope will be in-house designed and assembled faint object spectrograph and camera. The second generation instruments will be including a large field-of-view optical imager, high resolution optical spectrograph, integral field unit and an optical near-infrared spectrograph. The 1.3-m telescope is primarily used for wide field photometry imaging while the liquid m...

Sagar, Ram; Omar, Amitesh; Pandey, A K; 10.1117/12.925634

2013-01-01

382

Application of wide-field optical coherence tomography to monitoring of viability of rat brain in vivo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated the feasibility of OCT in monitoring the viability of the brain. It was confirmed that after an overdose of pentobarbital sodium salt for an euthanasia, the OCT signal intensity increased before cardiac arrest and finally became 2.7 times, and by periodically changing the tissue temperature from 20 to 32 °C in vivo, average correlation coefficients between the ratio of signal intensity (RSI) and temperature were determined to be -0:42 to -0:50. RSI reversibly changed with subsequent variations of temperatures and finally increased rapidly just before cardiac arrest. These results indicate that RSI could correspond to decreases in viability.

Sato, Manabu; Nishidate, Izumi

2014-05-01

383

Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations of Neptune  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two groups have recently used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2) to acquire new high-resolution images of the planet Neptune. Members of the WFPC-2 Science Team, lead by John Trauger, acquired the first series of images on 27 through 29 June 1994. These were the highest resolution images of Neptune taken since the Voyager-2 flyby in August of 1989. A more comprehensive program is currently being conducted by Heidi Hammel and Wes Lockwood. These two sets of observations are providing a wealth of new information about the structure, composition, and meteorology of this distant planet's atmosphere.

Neptune is currently the most distant planet from the sun, with an orbital radius of 4.5 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles, or 30 Astronomical Units). Even though its diameter is about four times that of the Earth (49,420 vs. 12,742 km), ground-based telescopes reveal a tiny blue disk that subtends less than 1/1200 of a degree (2.3 arc-seconds). Neptune has therefore been a particularly challenging object to study from the ground because its disk is badly blurred by the Earth's atmosphere. In spite of this, ground-based astronomers had learned a great deal about this planet since its position was first predicted by John C. Adams and Urbain Leverrier in 1845. For example, they had determined that Neptune was composed primarily of hydrogen and helium gas, and that its blue color caused by the presence of trace amounts of the gas methane, which absorbs red light. They had also detected bright cloud features whose brightness changed with time, and tracked these clouds to infer a rotation period between 17 and 22 hours.

When the Voyager-2 spacecraft flew past the Neptune in 1989, its instruments revealed a surprising array of meteorological phenomena, including strong winds, bright, high-altitude clouds, and two large dark spots attributed to long-lived giant storm systems. These bright clouds and dark spots were tracked as they moved across the planet's disk, revealing wind speeds as large as 325 meters per second (730 miles per hour). The largest of the giant, dark storm systems, called the 'Great Dark Spot', received special attention because it resembled Jupiter's Great Red Spot, a storm that has persisted for more than three centuries. The lifetime of Neptune's Great Dark Spot could not be determined from the Voyager data alone, however, because the encounter was too brief. Its evolution was impossible to monitor with ground-based telescopes, because it could not be resolved on Neptune's tiny disk, and its contribution to the disk-integrated brightness of Neptune confused by the presence of a rapidly-varying bright cloud feature, called the 'Bright Companion' that usually accompanied the Great Dark spot.

The repaired Hubble Space Telescope provides new opportunities to monitor these and other phenomena in the atmosphere of the most distant planet. Images taken with WFPC-2's Planetary Camera (PC) can resolve Neptune's disk as well as most ground-based telescopes can resolve the disk of Jupiter. The spatial resolution of the HST WFPC-2 images is not as high as that obtained by the Voyager-2 Narrow-Angle Camera during that spacecraft's closest approach to Neptune, but they have a number of other assets that enhance their scientific value, including improved ultra-violet and infrared sensitivity, better signal-to-noise, and, and greater photometric accuracy.

The images of Neptune acquired by the WFPC-2 Science team in late June clearly demonstrate these capabilities. The side of the planet facing the Earth at the start of the program (11:36 Universal Time on July 27) was imaged in color filters spanning the ultraviolet (255 and 300-nm), visible (467, 588, 620, and 673- nm), and near-infrared (890-nm) parts of the spectrum. The planet then rotated 180 degrees in longitude, and the opposite hemisphere was imaged in a subset of these colors (300, 467, 588, 620, and 673-nm). The HST/WFPC-2 program more recently conducted by Hammel and Lockwood provides better lo

1995-01-01

384

FLAMINGOS-2: the facility near-infrared wide-field imager and multi-object spectrograph for Gemini  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the design, on-sky performance, and status of the FLAMINGOS-2 instrument - the fully-cryogenic facility near-infrared imager and multi-object spectrograph for the Gemini 8-meter telescopes. FLAMINGOS-2 has a refractive all-spherical optical system providing 0.18-arcsecond pixels and a 6.2-arcminute circular field-of-view on a 2048x2048- pixel HAWAII-2 0.9-2.4 ?m detector array. A slit/decker wheel mechanism allows the selection of up to 9 multi-object laser-machined plates or 3 long slits for spectroscopy over a 6x2-arcminute field of view, and selectable grisms provide resolutions from ~1300 to ~3000 over the entire spectrograph bandpass. FLAMINGOS-2 is also compatible with the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics system, providing multi-object spectroscopic capabilities over a 3x1-arcminute field with high spatial resolution (0.09-arcsec/pixel). We review the designs of optical, mechanical, electronics, software, and On-Instrument WaveFront Sensor subsystems. We also present the on-sky performance measured during acceptance testing in 2009, as well as current status of the project and future plans.

Eikenberry, Stephen; Bandyopadhyay, Reba; Bennett, J. Greg; Bessoff, Aaron; Branch, Matt; Charcos, Miguel; Corley, Richard; Dewitt, Curtis; Eriksen, John-David; Elston, Richard; Frommeyer, Skip; Gonzalez, Anthony; Hanna, Kevin; Herlevich, Michael; Hon, David; Julian, Jeff; Julian, Roger; Lasso, Nestor; Marin-Franch, Antonio; Marti, Jose; Murphey, Charlie; Raines, S. N.; Rambold, William; Rashkind, David; Warner, Craig; Leckie, Brian; Gardhouse, W. R.; Fletcher, Murray; Hardy, Tim; Dunn, Jennifer; Wooff, Robert; Pazder, John

2012-09-01

385

FLAMINGOS-2: the facility near-infrared wide-field imager and multi-object spectrograph for Gemini  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the design and status of the FLAMINGOS-2 instrument - a fully-cryogenic facility near-infrared imager and multi-object spectrograph for the Gemini 8-meter telescopes. FLAMINGOS-2 has a refractive all-spherical optical system providing 0.18-arcsecond pixels and a 6.2-arcminute circular field-of-view on a 2048×2048-pixel HAWAII-2 0.9-2.4 ?m detector array. A slit/decker wheel mechanism allows the selection of up to 9 multi-object laser-machined plates or 3 long slits for spectroscopy over a 6×2-arcminute field of view, and selectable grisms provide resolutions from ~1300 to ~3000 over the entire spectrograph bandpass. FLAMINGOS-2 is also compatible with the Gemini Multi- Conjugate Adaptive Optics system, providing multi-object spectroscopic capabilities over a 3×1-arcminute field with high spatial resolution (0.09-arcsec/pixel). We review the designs of optical, mechanical, electronics, software, and On- Instrument WaveFront Sensor subsystems. We also present the current status of the project and future plans, including on-sky delivery planned for late 2008.

Eikenberry, Stephen; Elston, Richard; Raines, S. Nicholas; Julian, Jeff; Hanna, Kevin; Warner, Craig; Julian, Roger; Bandyopadhyay, Reba; Bennett, J. Greg; Bessoff, Aaron; Branch, Matt; Corley, Richard; Dewitt, Curtis; Eriksen, John-David; Frommeyer, Skip; Gonzalez, Anthony; Herlevich, Michael; Hon, David; Marin-Franch, Antonio; Marti, Jose; Murphey, Charlie; Rambold, William; Rashkin, David; Leckie, Brian; Gardhouse, W. Rusty; Fletcher, Murray; Hardy, Tim; Dunn, Jennifer; Wooff, Robert

2008-07-01

386

The cryo-mechanical design of SCUBA2: a wide-field imager for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope  

Microsoft Academic Search

The SCUBA-2 instrument is a new wide-field imager under development for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii and due to be operational in 2006. The instrument has two separate focal planes and is designed to observe simultaneously at wavelengths of 450 and 850mum. The instrument cryostat will weigh around 2500kg and has a volume of approximately

David Gostick; Dave Montgomery; Bob Wall; Helen McGregor; Mark Cliffe; Adam Woodcraft; Fred Gannaway

2004-01-01

387

Observations of Near-Earth Asteroid 2010 CN141 with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The near-Earth asteroid 2010 CN141 was discovered by NASA's Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) in February 2010, with follow-up observations from Mauna Kea by M. Micheli, G. T. Elliott, and D. J. Tholen from February to April. 2010 CN141's low visual albedo and its proximity to Earth caught the attention of observers, and it was selected for more detailed analysis.

Sean Marshall; E. L. Wright

2011-01-01

388

Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations of Leo A: A Predominantly Young Galaxy within the Local Group  

Microsoft Academic Search

The unprecedented detail of the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of the resolved stellar population of Leo A presented here allows us to determine a new distance and an accurate star formation history for this extremely metal-poor Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy. From the position of the red clump, the helium-burning blue loops, and the tip

Eline Tolstoy; J. S. Gallagher; A. A. Cole; J. G. Hoessel; A. Saha; R. C. Dohm-Palmer; E. D. Skillman; Mario Mateo; D. Hurley-Keller

1998-01-01

389

PS2: managing the next step in the Pan-STARRS wide field survey system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) is unique among the existing or planned major ground-based optical survey systems as the only "distributed aperture" system. The concept of increasing system étendue by replicating small telescopes and digital cameras presents both management opportunities and challenges. The focus in this paper is on management lessons learned from PS1, and how those have been used to form the management plan for PS2. The management plan components emphasized here include technical development, financial and schedule planning, and critical path and risk management. Finally, the status and schedule for PS2 are presented.

Burgett, William S.

2012-09-01

390

A low-latency, high-throughput on-chip optical router architecture for future chip multiprocessors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tens and eventually hundreds of processing cores are projected to be integrated onto future microprocessors, making the global interconnect a key component to achieving scalable chip performance within a given power envelope. While CMOS-compatible nanophotonics has emerged as a leading candidate for replacing global wires beyond the 16nm timeframe, on-chip optical interconnect architectures are typically limited in scalability or are

Mark J. Cianchetti; David H. Albonesi

2011-01-01

391

New Mexico Fiber-Optic Link Marks Giant Leap Toward Future of Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SOCORRO, NM -- Scientists and engineers at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) have made a giant leap toward the future of radio astronomy by successfully utilizing the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in conjunction with an antenna of the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) using the longest fiber-optic data link ever demonstrated in radio astronomy. The 65-mile fiber link will allow scientists to use the two National Science Foundation (NSF) facilities together in real time, and is the first step toward expanding the VLA to include eight proposed new radio-telescope antennas throughout New Mexico. LEFT: Miller Goss, NRAO's director of VLA/VLBA Operations, unveils graphic showing success of the Pie Town-VLA fiber link. The project, funded by the NSF and Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), which operates NRAO for the NSF, links the VLA and the VLBA antenna in Pie Town, NM, using a Western New Mexico Telephone Co. fiber-optic cable. The successful hookup was announced at a ceremony that also marked the 10th anniversary of NRAO's Operations Center in Socorro. "Linking the Pie Town antenna to the VLA quadruples the VLA's ability to make detailed images of astronomical objects," said Paul Vanden Bout, NRAO's Director. "This alone makes the link an advance for science, but its greater importance is that it clearly demonstrates the technology for improving the VLA's capabilities even more in the future." "Clearly, the big skies and wide open spaces in New Mexico create near perfect conditions for the incredible astronomical assets located in our state. This new fiber-optic link paves the way for multiplying the already breathtaking scientific capabilities of the VLA," Senator Pete Domenici (R-NM) said. The VLA is a system of 27 radio-telescope antennas distributed over the high desert west of Socorro, NM, in the shape of a giant "Y." Made famous in movies, commercials and numerous published photos, the VLA has been one of the most productive and versatile astronomical observatories in the world since its dedication in 1980. The VLBA is a continent-wide system of 10 radio telescopes distributed across the continental United States, Hawaii and St. Croix in the Caribbean. In both the VLA and VLBA, the cosmic radio waves received by each antenna are combined with those received from every other antenna in the system to produce images with extremely great resolving power, or ability to see fine detail. The more widely separated the antennas, the greater the resolving power. The greatest separation between antennas of the VLA is 20 miles; in the VLBA, 5,000 miles. If your eyes could see the same level of detail as the VLA, you could, at the distance from New York to Los Angeles, make out an object the size of a small car. With the resolving power of the VLBA, you could read the owner's manual. The VLBA can make images hundreds of times more detailed than those available from the Hubble Space Telescope. However, because of the way in which such multi-antenna radio telescopes, called interferometers, work, there is a gap between the levels of detail obtainable with the VLA and the VLBA. Linking the VLA to the VLBA Pie Town antenna is the first step toward filling in that gap and allowing astronomers to see all scales of structure -- small, medium-sized, and large -- in objects such as stars, galaxies and quasars. Additional antennas, distributed throughout New Mexico, would fully fill that gap. Adding the new antennas to the VLA "would provide the capability to image astronomical objects on all spatial scales, from the very largest to the very smallest. The combination of the VLA and VLBA then would be the only single instrument in astronomy covering such a range of spatial scales, and thus a tool of great and unique value to science," said Vanden Bout. LEFT: NRAO Director Paul Vanden Bout, left, speaks with U.S. Senator Pete Domenici, right, following the ceremony at the Array Operations Center in Socorro Dec. 15. Nobel Laureate Robert Wilson is in the ba

1998-12-01

392

A Wide-Field HI Study of the NGC 1566 Group  

E-print Network

We report on neutral hydrogen observations of a ~ 5.5 x 5.5 degree field around the NGC 1566 galaxy group with the multibeam narrow-band system on the 64-m Parkes telescope. We detected thirteen HI sources in the field, including two galaxies not previously known to be members of the group, bringing the total number of confirmed galaxies in this group to 26. Each of the HI galaxies can be associated with an optically catalogued galaxy. No 'intergalactic HI clouds' were found to an HI mass limit of ~ 3.5 x 10^8 Msun. We have estimated the expected HI content of the late-type galaxies in this group and find the total detected HI is consistent with our expectations. However, while no global HI deficiency is inferred for this group, two galaxies exhibit individual HI deficiencies. Further observations are needed to determine the gas removal mechanisms in these galaxies.

Virginia A. Kilborn; Baerbel S. Koribalski; Duncan A. Forbes; David G. Barnes; Ruth C. Musgrave

2004-09-30

393

Wide-field imaging design for a multiple-capillary DNA-sequencing system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A laser-induced fluorescence detection system compatible with a capillary electrophoresis array was developed. The design incorporates fiber-optic excitation and a detection system including a diffraction grating and a CCD camera. The system employs no moving parts and is capable of producing data comparable to commercially available systems. It is based on a spectrally-resolved four-dye sequencing scheme. The conceptual design was proven, however, refinements must be made to optimize performance for high-throughput capillary-array DNA sequencing. Automated sample preparation and loading in combination with a refillable separation- matrix capillary-array system could prove to be an invaluable tool for completion of the Human Genome Project.

Nay, Lyle M.; Sinclair, Robert; Swerdlow, Harold

1997-05-01

394

THE HUBBLE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 TEST OF SURFACES IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM: THE COMPOSITIONAL CLASSES OF THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

We present the first results of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. The purpose of this survey was to measure the surface properties of a large number of Kuiper Belt objects and attempt to infer compositional and dynamical correlations. We find that the Centaurs and the low-perihelion scattered disk and resonant objects exhibit virtually identical bifurcated optical color distributions and make up two well-defined groups of objects. Both groups have highly correlated optical and NIR colors that are well described by a pair of two-component mixture models that have different red components but share a common neutral component. The small, H{sub 606} {approx}> 5.6 high-perihelion excited objects are entirely consistent with being drawn from the two branches of the mixing model, suggesting that the color bifurcation of the Centaurs is apparent in all small excited objects. On the other hand, objects larger than H{sub 606} {approx} 5.6 are not consistent with the mixing model, suggesting some evolutionary process avoided by the smaller objects. The existence of a bifurcation amongst all excited populations argues that the two separate classes of object existed in the primordial disk before the excited Kuiper Belt was populated. The cold classical objects exhibit a different type of surface that has colors that are consistent with being drawn from the red branch of the mixing model, but with much higher albedos.

Fraser, Wesley C.; Brown, Michael E., E-mail: fraserw@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-04-10

395

The Araucaria Project: The Distance to the Sculptor Group Galaxy NGC 247 from Cepheid Variables Discovered in a Wide-Field  

E-print Network

We report on the discovery of a Cepheid population in the Sculptor Group spiral galaxy NGC 247 for the first time. On the basis of wide-field images collected in photometric surveys in V and I bands which were conducted with three different telescopes and cameras, 23 Cepheid variables were discovered with periods ranging from 17 to 131 days. We have constructed the period-luminosity relations from these data and obtain distance moduli to NGC 247 of 28.20 $\\pm$ 0.05 mag (internal error) in V, 28.04 $\\pm$ 0.06 mag in I, and 27.80 $\\pm$ 0.09 mag in the reddening-independent Wesenheit index. From our optical data we have determined the total mean reddening of the Cepheids in NGC 247 as E(B-V)=0.13 mag, which brings the true distance modulus determinations from the V and I bands into excellent agreement with the distance determination in the Wesenheit index. The best estimate for the true distance modulus of NGC 247 from our optical Cepheid photometry is 27.80 $\\pm$0.09 (internal error) $\\pm$ 0.09 mag (systematic ...

Garcia-Varela, A; Gieren, W; Udalski, A; Soszynski, I; Walker, A; Bresolin, F; Kudritzki, R P; Szewczyk, O; Szymanski, M; Kubiak, M; Wyrzykowski, L

2008-01-01

396

THE INFRARED EYE OF THE WIDE-FIELD CAMERA 3 ON THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE REVEALS MULTIPLE MAIN SEQUENCES OF VERY LOW MASS STARS IN NGC 2808  

SciTech Connect

We use images taken with the infrared channel of the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope to study the multiple main sequences (MSs) of NGC 2808. Below the turnoff, the red, the middle, and the blue MS, previously detected from visual-band photometry, are visible over an interval of about 3.5 F160W magnitudes. The three MSs merge together at the level of the MS bend. At fainter magnitudes, the MS again splits into two components containing {approx}65% and {approx}35% of stars, with the most-populated MS being the bluest one. Theoretical isochrones suggest that the latter is connected to the red MS discovered in the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and hence corresponds to the first stellar generation, having primordial helium and enhanced carbon and oxygen abundances. The less-populated MS in the faint part of the near-IR CMD is helium-rich and poor in carbon and oxygen, and it can be associated with the middle and the blue MS of the optical CMD. The finding that the photometric signature of abundance anti-correlation is also present in fully convective MS stars reinforces the inference that they have a primordial origin.

Milone, A. P.; Aparicio, A.; Monelli, M., E-mail: milone@iac.es, E-mail: aparicio@iac.es, E-mail: monelli@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); and others

2012-08-01

397

Direct design approach to calculate a two-surface lens with an entrance pupil for application in wide field-of-view imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, a multifields optical design method aiming to calculate two high-order aspheric lens profiles with an embedded entrance pupil is proposed. This direct design algorithm is capable of partially coupling more than three ray bundles that enter the same pupil with only two surfaces. Both infinite and finite conjugate objectives can be designed with this approach. Additional constraints such as surface continuity and smoothness are taken into account to calculate smooth and accurate surface contours described by point clouds. The calculated points are then fitted with rotationally symmetric functions commonly used in optical design tools. A presented subaperture sampling strategy that introduces a weighting function for different fields allows for a very well-balanced imaging performance over a wide field of view (FOV). As an example, a ±45 deg f/7.5 wide-angle objective is designed and analyzed to demonstrate the potential of this design method. It provides an excellent starting point for further optimization of the surfaces' coefficients and initial design parameters, resulting in a very good and well-balanced imaging performance over the entire FOV.

Nie, Yunfeng; Duerr, Fabian; Thienpont, Hugo

2015-01-01

398

Wide Field Astronomy at Dome C: two IR surveys complementary to SNAP  

E-print Network

Surveys provide a wealth of data to the astronomical community that are used well after their completion. In this paper, we propose a project that would take the maximum benefit of Dome C in Antarctica by performing two surveys, in the wavelength range from 1-5 micron, complementary to SNAP space surveys. The first one over 1000 sq. deg. (1 KdF) for 4 years and the second one over 15 sq. deg (SNAP-IR) for the next 4 years at the same time as SNAP 0.35-1.7 microns survey. By using a Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics system, we would be able to recover, at the ice level and over at least half a degree in radius, the 300 mas angular resolution available above the 30-m high turbulent layer. Such a survey, combining a high angular resolution with high sensitivities in the NIR and MIR, should also play the role of a pre-survey for JWST and ALMA.

D. Burgarella; M. Ferrari; T. Fusco; M. Langlois; B. Leroux; G. Moretto; M. Nicole

2006-11-17

399

Wide field imaging of solar system objects with an 8192 x 8192 CCD mosaic  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of this program, we successfully completed the construction of the world's largest CCD camera, an 8192 x 8192 CCD mosaic. The system employs 8 2K x 4K 3-edge buttable CCDs arranged in a 2 x 4 chip mosaic. The focal plane has small gaps (less than 1 mm) between mosaic elements and measures over 120 mm x 120 mm. The initial set of frontside illuminated CCDs were developed with Loral-Fairchild in a custom foundry run. The initial lots yielded of order 20 to 25 functional devices, of which we selected the best eight for inclusion for the camera. We have designed a custom 3-edge-buttable package that ensures the CCD dies are mounted flat to plus or minus 10 microns over the entire area of the mosaic. The mosaic camera system consists of eight separate readout signal chains controlled by two independent DSP microcontrollers. These are in turn interfaced to a Sun Sparc-10 workstation through two high speed fiber optic interfaces. The system saw first-light on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea in March 1995. First-light on the University of Hawaii 2.2-M Telescope on Mauna Kea was in July 1995. Both runs were quite successful. A sample of some of the early science from the first light run is reported in the publication, 'Observations of Weak Lensing in Clusters with an 8192 x 8192 CCD Mosaic Camera'.

Hall, Donald N. B.

1995-01-01

400

AO modelling for wide-field E-ELT instrumentation using Monte-Carlo simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extensive simulations of AO performance for several E-ELT instruments (including EAGLE, MOSAIC, HIRES and MAORY) have been ongoing using the Monte-Carlo Durham AO Simulation Package. We present the latest simulation results, including studies into DM requirements, dependencies of performance on asterism, detailed point spread function generation, accurate telescope modelling, and studies of laser guide star effects. Details of simulations will be given, including the use of optical models of the E-ELT to generate wave- front sensor pupil illumination functions, laser guide star modelling, and investigations of different many-layer atmospheric profiles. We discuss issues related to ELT-scale simulation, how we have overcome these, and how we will be approaching forthcoming issues such as modelling of advanced wavefront control, multi-rate wavefront sensing, and advanced treatment of extended laser guide star spots. We also present progress made on integrating simulation with AO real-time control systems. The impact of simulation outcomes on instrument design studies will be discussed, and the ongoing work plan presented.

Basden, Alastair; Morris, Simon; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard

2014-08-01

401

Wide-field flexible endoscope for simultaneous color and NIR fluorescence image acquisition during surveillance colonoscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common form of cancer and, despite recent declines in both incidence and mortality, it still remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the western world. Colonoscopy is the standard for detection and removal of premalignant lesions to prevent CRC. The major challenges that physicians face during surveillance colonoscopy are the high adenoma miss-rates and the lack of functional information to facilitate decision-making concerning which lesions to remove. Targeted imaging with NIR fluorescence would address these limitations. Tissue penetration is increased in the NIR range while the combination with targeted NIR fluorescent agents provides molecularly specific detection of cancer cells, i.e. a red-flag detection strategy that allows tumor imaging with optimal sensitivity and specificity. The development of a flexible endoscopic fluorescence imaging method that can be integrated with standard medical endoscopes and facilitates the clinical use of this potential is described in this work. A semi-disposable coherent fiber optic imaging bundle that is traditionally employed in the exploration of biliary and pancreatic ducts is proposed, since it is long and thin enough to be guided through the working channel of a traditional video colonoscope allowing visualization of proximal lesions in the colon. A custom developed zoom system magnifies the image of the proximal end of the imaging bundle to fill the dimensions of two cameras operating in parallel providing the simultaneous color and fluorescence video acquisition.

García-Allende, P. Beatriz; Nagengast, Wouter B.; Glatz, Jürgen; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

2013-03-01

402

Thermostructural Analysis of the SOFIA Fine Field and Wide Field Imagers Subjected to Convective Thermal Shock  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a highly modified Boeing 747-SP with a 17- ton infrared telescope installed in the aft portion of the aircraft. Unlike ground- and space-based platforms, SOFIA can deploy to make observations anytime, anywhere, in the world. The originally designed aircraft configuration included a ground pre-cool system, however, due to various factors in the history of the project, that system was not installed. This lack of ground pre-cooling was the source of the concern about whether or not the imagers would be exposed to a potentially unsafe thermostructural environment. This concern was in addition to the already-existing concern of some project members that the air temperature rate of change during flight (both at the same altitude as well as ascent or descent) could cause the imagers to be exposed to an unsafe thermostructural environment. Four optical components were identified as the components of concern: two of higher concern (one in each imager), and two of lower concern (one in each imager). The analysis effort began by analyzing one component, after which the analyses for the other components was deemed unnecessary. The purpose of this report is to document these findings as well as lessons learned from the effort.

Kostyk, Christopher B.

2012-01-01

403

Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from DES Science Verification Data  

E-print Network

Weak gravitational lensing allows one to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the projected mass density across the sky. These "mass maps" provide a powerful tool for studying cosmology as they probe both luminous and dark matter. In this paper, we present a weak lensing mass map reconstructed from shear measurements in a 139 deg^2 area from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data overlapping with the South Pole Telescope survey. We compare the distribution of mass with that of the foreground distribution of galaxies and clusters. The overdensities in the reconstructed map correlate well with the distribution of optically detected clusters. Cross-correlating the mass map with the foreground galaxies from the same DES SV data gives results consistent with mock catalogs that include the primary sources of statistical uncertainties in the galaxy, lensing, and photo-z catalogs. The statistical significance of the cross-correlation is at the 6.8 sigma level with 20 arcminute smoothing. A maj...

Vikram, V; Jain, B; Bacon, D; Amara, A; Becker, M; Bernstein, G; Bonnett, C; Bridle, S; Brout, D; Busha, M; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Hartley, W; Jarvis, M; Kacprzak, T; Lahav, O; Leistedt, B; Lin, H; Melchior, P; Peiris, H; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E; Sanchez, C; Sheldon, E; Troxel, M; Wechsler, R; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Armstrong, R; Banerji, M; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Levy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Cunha, C E; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Gerdes, D; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; March, M; Marshall, J; Martini, Paul; Merritt, K W; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Walker, A R; Weller, J

2015-01-01

404

Megacam: A Wide-Field CCD Imager for the MMT and Magellan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Megacam is a large-format optical camera that can be operated at the f/5 Cassegrain foci of the MMT on Mount Hopkins, Arizona, and the Magellan Clay telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Megacam's focal plane is composed of 36 closely packed e2v CCD42-90 CCDs, each with 2048 × 4608 pixels, assembled in an 18,432 × 18,432 array. Two additional CCD42-90s are provided for autoguiding and focus control. The CCDs have 13.5 ?m square pixels that subtend at the f/5 foci, yielding a 25' × 25' field-of-view. The camera system includes a focal plane shutter, two filter wheels, two liquid nitrogen reservoirs, a central chamber that holds the CCD mosaic array, and two electronics boxes. Megacam is equipped with a variety of broadband and narrowband filters. Software features include automatic calculation of twilight flat exposure times.

McLeod, Brian; Geary, John; Conroy, Maureen; Fabricant, Daniel; Ordway, Mark; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Amato, Stephen; Ashby, Matthew; Caldwell, Nelson; Curley, Dylan; Gauron, Thomas; Holman, Matthew; Norton, Timothy; Pieri, Mario; Roll, John; Weaver, David; Zajac, Joseph; Palunas, Povilas; Osip, David

2015-04-01

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Installing the Future. Fiber Optics Program Readies Students for Lucrative Jobs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A fiber optics program at Somerset County Technical Institute (SCTI) prepares college students and trades workers for telecommunication's new wave of installation. The program was born of a partnership among an electricians' union, AT&T, and SCTI to meet the expected need for fiber optic technicians. (JOW)

Serrano, Kenneth M.

1995-01-01