Science.gov

Sample records for futuro policial nas

  1. Policy Recommendations to VA Leave NAS at Odds with Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, John

    1978-01-01

    Describes adverse congressional reaction to a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommendation that the Veteran's Administration's (VA) health care system be phased into a general health care system. (SL)

  2. Science Policy: Former NAS Official Reviews World Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Thomas F.

    1982-01-01

    Issues discussed with Thomas F. Malone (former Foreign Secretary-National Academy of Sciences) include: scientists role in dealing with such global problems as nuclear war and needs in developing countries; scientific relations with China/Soviet Union; scientific enterprise/human rights; science/technology role in foreign policy; and political…

  3. New NAS journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In April 1984 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) will begin publishing a new quarterly focusing on science policy. Written primarily for legislators, diplomats, corporate managers, security analysts, and other public policy analysts, the new journal will deal with such diverse topics as arms control, economic competition, social change, and health care.Original articles are expected to create a 120-page periodical that will discuss policy issues on a sophisticated but nonspecialist level, in a manner similar to that which Foreign Affairs uses to discuss U.S. foreign policy topics, according to NAS.

  4. Los biocombustibles y el futuro

    NASA Video Gallery

    ¿Cómo podremos utilizar los biocombustibles en el futuro? La ingeniera aeroespacial de la NASA, Diana Centeno Gómez nos explica el futuro de los biocombustibles y cómo un día podrías trabajar con d...

  5. NATIONAL ALCOHOL SURVEY (NAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Alcohol Survey (NAS) is designed to assess the trends in drinking practices and problems in the national population, including attitudes, norms, treatment and experiences and adverse consequences. It also studies the effects of public policy on drinking practices (i.e., ...

  6. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.; Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.; Bailey, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program, which is designed to provide a leading-edge capability to computational aerodynamicists, is traced back to its origin in 1975. Factors motivating its development and examples of solutions to successively refined forms of the governing equations are presented. The NAS Processing System Network and each of its eight subsystems are described in terms of function and initial performance goals. A proposed usage allocation policy is discussed and some initial problems being readied for solution on the NAS system are identified.

  7. NAS: The first year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.; Kutler, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are the capabilities of NASA's Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program and its application as an advanced supercomputing system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research. First, the paper describes the NAS computational system, called the NAS Processing System Network, and the advanced computational capabilities it offers as a consequence of carrying out the NAS pathfinder objective. Second, it presents examples of pioneering CFD research accomplished during NAS's first operational year. Examples are included which illustrate CFD applications for predicting fluid phenomena, complementing and supplementing experimentation, and aiding in design. Finally, pacing elements and future directions for CFD and NAS are discussed.

  8. NAS Panel faults export controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    A study prepared by a top-level panel says that current export controls on militarily sensitive U.S. technology may be “overcorrecting” previous weaknesses in that system, resulting in “a complex and confusing control system” that makes it more difficult for U.S. businesses to compete in international markets. Moreover, this control system has “an increasingly corrosive effect” on U.S. relations with allies. The panel recommended that the United States concentrate more effort on bringing about uniformity in the export control policies of countries belonging to the Coordinating Committee on Multilateral Export Controls (CoCom), i.e., most of the member nations in NATO (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization) and Japan.The 21-member panel was appointed by the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), a joint unit of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The panel, composed of administrators, researchers, and former government officials, was chaired by AGU member Lew Allen, Jr., director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, Calif.) and former chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force. Their report was supported by NAS funds, by a number of private organizations (including AGU), by the U.S. Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and State, by the National Science Foundation, and by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Judith L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue is devoted to discussions of early childhood policy issues. "Creating a Shared Vision: How Policy Affects Early Childhood Care and Development" (Judith L. Evans) defines policy, discusses the motivation for changing or creating national policy and the process for changing such policies, and provides a sample design for an early…

  10. FUTURO REMOTO 2015: researchers meet people.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Maddalena; Fedele, Alessandro; Esposito, Roberta; Torello, Vincenzo; Nave, Rosella; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Russo, Massimo; Alessio, Giuliana; Gaudiosi, Germana; Nappi, Rosa; Belviso, Pasquale; Carandente, Antonio; De Cesare, Walter; Sansivero, Fabio; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Borgstrom, Sven; Milano, Girolamo; Pasquale Ricciardi, Giovanni; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    As participant of the 29th Edition of the cultural initiative "Futuro Remoto 2015", the INGV section of Naples Osservatorio Vesuviano has realized a temporary exhibition aimed to build bridges between the scientific community and the public. The event, a festival of art, culture, science and technology, has taken place on October 15th - 19th 2015, in Naples, Italy, in the city center, and was organized by "Città della Scienza", the science center of the city of Naples, belonging to the ECSITE netwok.. The total number of visitors was about 130.000 people. It was a free and open access event, funded by public institutions. Sharing their scientific expertise with the public, in the "Terra" ("Earth") stand the INGV-OV researchers have shown, with interactive labs, how progress in technology and research develope and allow a better understanding of the dynamic processes and of the evolution of our planet. Popularizing science, when widely accessible to the people, make the knowledge not remaining confined to an elite, being efficiently spread in society, with deep implications in the social role of researchers. Practical activities and labs, dialogues and interaction with researchers of INGV-OV have allowed young and adult public, schools, students, experts or simply curious people to deepen burning issues in an area exposed to high seismic and volcanic risk.

  11. UAS Integration into the NAS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the UAS Integration in the NAS Project is to contribute capabilities that reduce technical barriers related to the safety and operational challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS This goal will be accomplished through a two-phased approach of system-level integration of key concepts, technologies and/or procedures, and demonstrations of integrated capabilities in an operationally relevant environment. Technical objectives include: PHASE 1: a) Validating the key technical areas identified by this project. System-level analyses, a State of the Art Analysis (SOAA), and a ConOps will identify the challenges and barriers preventing routine UAS access to the NAS. b) Developing a national roadmap and gap analysis identifying specific deliverables in the area of operations, procedures, and technologies that will impact future policy decisions. PHASE 2: a) Provide regulators with a methodology for developing airworthiness requirements for UAS and data to support development of certifications standards and regulatory guidance. b) Provide systems-level integrated testing of concepts and/or capabilities that address barriers to routine access to the NAS. Through simulation and flight testing, address issues including separation assurance, communications requirements, and Pilot Aircraft Interfaces (PAIs) in operationally relevant environments

  12. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.

    2009-11-15

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) are a suite of parallel computer performance benchmarks. They were originally developed at the NASA Ames Research Center in 1991 to assess high-end parallel supercomputers. Although they are no longer used as widely as they once were for comparing high-end system performance, they continue to be studied and analyzed a great deal in the high-performance computing community. The acronym 'NAS' originally stood for the Numerical Aeronautical Simulation Program at NASA Ames. The name of this organization was subsequently changed to the Numerical Aerospace Simulation Program, and more recently to the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Center, although the acronym remains 'NAS.' The developers of the original NPB suite were David H. Bailey, Eric Barszcz, John Barton, David Browning, Russell Carter, LeoDagum, Rod Fatoohi, Samuel Fineberg, Paul Frederickson, Thomas Lasinski, Rob Schreiber, Horst Simon, V. Venkatakrishnan and Sisira Weeratunga. The original NAS Parallel Benchmarks consisted of eight individual benchmark problems, each of which focused on some aspect of scientific computing. The principal focus was in computational aerophysics, although most of these benchmarks have much broader relevance, since in a much larger sense they are typical of many real-world scientific computing applications. The NPB suite grew out of the need for a more rational procedure to select new supercomputers for acquisition by NASA. The emergence of commercially available highly parallel computer systems in the late 1980s offered an attractive alternative to parallel vector supercomputers that had been the mainstay of high-end scientific computing. However, the introduction of highly parallel systems was accompanied by a regrettable level of hype, not only on the part of the commercial vendors but even, in some cases, by scientists using the systems. As a result, it was difficult to discern whether the new systems offered any fundamental performance advantage

  13. NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subhash, Saini; Bailey, David H.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) were developed in 1991 at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a pencil and paper fashion i.e. the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. In this paper, we present new NPB performance results for the following systems: (a) Parallel-Vector Processors: Cray C90, Cray T'90 and Fujitsu VPP500; (b) Highly Parallel Processors: Cray T3D, IBM SP2 and IBM SP-TN2 (Thin Nodes 2); (c) Symmetric Multiprocessing Processors: Convex Exemplar SPP1000, Cray J90, DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/300, and SGI Power Challenge XL. We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks. We also mention NAS future plans of NPB.

  14. Phthalates and Cumulative Risk Assessment (NAS Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment has become a dominant public policy tool for making choices, based on limited resources, to protect public health and the environment. NAS_phthalates_cover.jpg" vspace = "5" hspace="5" align="left" border="1" alt="Cover ...

  15. NAS Applications and Advanced Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Biswas, Rupak; VanDerWijngaart, Rob; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the applications most commonly run on the supercomputers at the Numerical Aerospace Simulation (NAS) facility. It analyzes the extent to which such applications are fundamentally oriented to vector computers, and whether or not they can be efficiently implemented on hierarchical memory machines, such as systems with cache memories and highly parallel, distributed memory systems.

  16. NASA's UAS NAS Access Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    The vision of the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project is "A global transportation system which allows routine access for all classes of UAS." The goal of the UAS Integration in the NAS Project is to "contribute capabilities that reduce technical barriers related to the safety and operational challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS." This goal will be accomplished through a two-phased approach based on development of system-level integration of key concepts, technologies and/or procedures, and demonstrations of integrated capabilities in an operationally relevant environment. Phase 1 will take place the first two years of the Project and Phase 2 will take place the following three years. The Phase 1 and 2 technical objectives are: Phase 1: Developing a gap analysis between current state of the art and the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) UAS Concept of Operations . Validating the key technical areas identified by this Project . Conducting initial modeling, simulation, and flight testing activities . Completing Sub-project Phase 1 deliverables (spectrum requirements, comparative analysis of certification methodologies, etc.) and continue Phase 2 preparation (infrastructure, tools, etc.) Phase 2: Providing regulators with a methodology for developing airworthiness requirements for UAS, and data to support development of certifications standards and regulatory guidance . Providing systems-level, integrated testing of concepts and/or capabilities that address barriers to routine access to the NAS. Through simulation and flight testing, address issues including separation assurance, communications requirements, and human systems integration in operationally relevant environments. The UAS in the NAS Project will demonstrate solutions in specific technology areas, which will address operational/safety issues related to UAS access to the NAS. Since the resource allocation for

  17. New NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Saphir, William; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Woo, Alex; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NPB2 (NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks 2) is an implementation, based on Fortran and the MPI (message passing interface) message passing standard, of the original NAS Parallel Benchmark specifications. NPB2 programs are run with little or no tuning, in contrast to NPB vendor implementations, which are highly optimized for specific architectures. NPB2 results complement, rather than replace, NPB results. Because they have not been optimized by vendors, NPB2 implementations approximate the performance a typical user can expect for a portable parallel program on distributed memory parallel computers. Together these results provide an insightful comparison of the real-world performance of high-performance computers. New NPB2 features: New implementation (CG), new workstation class problem sizes, new serial sample versions, more performance statistics.

  18. The NAS Computational Aerosciences Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miceli, Kristina D.; Globus, Al; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In order to further the state-of-the-art in computational aerosciences (CAS) technology, researchers must be able to gather and understand existing work in the field. One aspect of this information gathering is studying published work available in scientific journals and conference proceedings. However, current scientific publications are very limited in the type and amount of information that they can disseminate. Information is typically restricted to text, a few images, and a bibliography list. Additional information that might be useful to the researcher, such as additional visual results, referenced papers, and datasets, are not available. New forms of electronic publication, such as the World Wide Web (WWW), limit publication size only by available disk space and data transmission bandwidth, both of which are improving rapidly. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center is in the process of creating an archive of CAS information on the WWW. This archive will be based on the large amount of information produced by researchers associated with the NAS facility. The archive will contain technical summaries and reports of research performed on NAS supercomputers, visual results (images, animations, visualization system scripts), datasets, and any other supporting meta-information. This information will be available via the WWW through the NAS homepage, located at http://www.nas.nasa.gov/, fully indexed for searching. The main components of the archive are technical summaries and reports, visual results, and datasets. Technical summaries are gathered every year by researchers who have been allotted resources on NAS supercomputers. These summaries, together with supporting visual results and references, are browsable by interested researchers. Referenced papers made available by researchers can be accessed through hypertext links. Technical reports are in-depth accounts of tools and applications research projects

  19. The NAS Computational Aerosciences Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miceli, Kristina D.; Globus, Al; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In order to further the state-of-the-art in computational aerosciences (CAS) technology, researchers must be able to gather and understand existing work in the field. One aspect of this information gathering is studying published work available in scientific journals and conference proceedings. However, current scientific publications are very limited in the type and amount of information that they can disseminate. Information is typically restricted to text, a few images, and a bibliography list. Additional information that might be useful to the researcher, such as additional visual results, referenced papers, and datasets, are not available. New forms of electronic publication, such as the World Wide Web (WWW), limit publication size only by available disk space and data transmission bandwidth, both of which are improving rapidly. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center is in the process of creating an archive of CAS information on the WWW. This archive will be based on the large amount of information produced by researchers associated with the NAS facility. The archive will contain technical summaries and reports of research performed on NAS supercomputers, visual results (images, animations, visualization system scripts), datasets, and any other supporting meta-information. This information will be available via the WWW through the NAS homepage, located at http://www.nas.nasa.gov/, fully indexed for searching. The main components of the archive are technical summaries and reports, visual results, and datasets. Technical summaries are gathered every year by researchers who have been allotted resources on NAS supercomputers. These summaries, together with supporting visual results and references, are browsable by interested researchers. Referenced papers made available by researchers can be accessed through hypertext links. Technical reports are in-depth accounts of tools and applications research projects

  20. Supercomputing 2002: NAS Demo Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The hyperwall is a new concept in visual supercomputing, conceived and developed by the NAS Exploratory Computing Group. The hyperwall will allow simultaneous and coordinated visualization and interaction of an array of processes, such as a the computations of a parameter study or the parallel evolutions of a genetic algorithm population. Making over 65 million pixels available to the user, the hyperwall will enable and elicit qualitatively new ways of leveraging computers to accomplish science. It is currently still unclear whether we will be able to transport the hyperwall to SC02. The crucial display frame still has not been completed by the metal fabrication shop, although they promised an August delivery. Also, we are still working the fragile node issue, which may require transplantation of the compute nodes from the present 2U cases into 3U cases. This modification will increase the present 3-rack configuration to 5 racks.

  1. Handler Reflects on NAS, Science Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepkowski, Wil

    1978-01-01

    The current president of the National Academy of Science (NAS) is interviewed in this article. He discusses the reorganization of NAS and the National Research Council during his term of office. Concerns over environmental science, biochemistry research, and the decreasing role of science advisors to the Pentagon are presented. (MA)

  2. NAS-current status and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.

    1987-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) has met its first major milestone, the NAS Processing System Network (NPSN) Initial Operating Configuration (IOC). The program has met its goal of providing a national supercomputer facility capable of greatly enhancing the Nation's research and development efforts. Furthermore, the program is fulfilling its pathfinder role by defining and implementing a paradigm for supercomputing system environments. The IOC is only the begining and the NAS Program will aggressively continue to develop and implement emerging supercomputer, communications, storage, and software technologies to strengthen computations as a critical element in supporting the Nation's leadership role in aeronautics.

  3. NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) User Services Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandori, John; Hamilton, Chris; Niggley, C. E.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing), its goals, and its mainframe computer assets. Also covered are its functions, including systems monitoring and technical support.

  4. UAS NAS IHITL Test Readiness Review (TRR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jim; Brignola, Michael P.; Rorie, Conrad; Santiago, Confesor; Guminsky, Mike; Cross, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Requesting release of IHITL test readiness review (TRR) charts to ensure UAS-NAS project primary stakeholders, the Federal Aviation Administration through the RTCA special committee -228 and the Office of the Secretary of Defense Sense and Avoid Science and Research Panel, are well informed on the IHITL test plan and expected outcomes as they relate to their needs to safely fly UAS in the NAS.

  5. Simultaneous Estimation of Hydrochlorothiazide, Hydralazine Hydrochloride, and Reserpine Using PCA, NAS, and NAS-PCA

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chetan; Badyal, Pragya Nand; Rawal, Ravindra K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, new and feasible UV-visible spectrophotometric and multivariate spectrophotometric methods were described for the simultaneous determination of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), hydralazine hydrochloride (H.HCl), and reserpine (RES) in combined pharmaceutical tablets. Methanol was used as a solvent for analysis and the whole UV region was scanned from 200–400 nm. The resolution was obtained by using multivariate methods such as the net analyte signal method (NAS), principal component analysis (PCA), and net analyte signal-principal component analysis (NAS-PCA) applied to the UV spectra of the mixture. The results obtained from all of the three methods were compared. NAS-PCA showed a lot of resolved data as compared to NAS and PCA. Thus, the NAS-PCA technique is a combination of NAS and PCA methods which is advantageous to obtain the information from overlapping results. PMID:26839841

  6. Status and projections of the NAS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Frank R.

    1986-01-01

    NASA's Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program has completed development of the initial operating configuration of the NAS Processing System Network (NPSN). This is the first milestone in the continuing and pathfinding effort to provide state-of-the-art supercomputing for aeronautics research and development. The NPSN, available to a nation-wide community of remote users, provides a uniform UNIX environment over a network of host computers ranging from the Cray-2 supercomputer to advanced scientific workstations. This system, coupled with a vendor-independent base of common user interface and network software, presents a new paradigm for supercomputing environments. Background leading to the NAS program, its programmatic goals and strategies, technical goals and objectives, and the development activities leading to the current NPSN configuration are presented. Program status, near-term plans, and plans for the next major milestone, the extended operating configuration, are also discussed.

  7. UAS in the NAS: Survey Responses by ATC, Manned Aircraft Pilots, and UAS Pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, James R., Jr.; McAdaragh, Raymon; Ghatas, Rania W.; Burdette, Daniel W.; Trujillo, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    NASA currently is working with industry and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to establish future requirements for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) flying in the National Airspace System (NAS). To work these issues NASA has established a multi-center "UAS Integration in the NAS" project. In order to establish Ground Control Station requirements for UAS, the perspective of each of the major players in NAS operations was desired. Three on-line surveys were administered that focused on Air Traffic Controllers (ATC), pilots of manned aircraft, and pilots of UAS. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with some survey respondents. The survey questions addressed UAS control, navigation, and communications from the perspective of small and large unmanned aircraft. Questions also addressed issues of UAS equipage, especially with regard to sense and avoid capabilities. From the civilian ATC and military ATC perspectives, of particular interest are how mixed operations (manned / UAS) have worked in the past and the role of aircraft equipage. Knowledge gained from this information is expected to assist the NASA UAS Integration in the NAS project in directing research foci thus assisting the FAA in the development of rules, regulations, and policies related to UAS in the NAS.

  8. UAS in the NAS: Survey Responses by ATC, Manned Aircraft Pilots, and UAS Pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, James R., Jr.; McAdaragh, Raymon; Ghatas, Rania W.; Burdette, Daniel W.; Trujillo, Anna C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA currently is working with industry and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to establish future requirements for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) flying in the National Airspace System (NAS). To work these issues NASA has established a multi-center UAS Integration in the NAS project. In order to establish Ground Control Station requirements for UAS, the perspective of each of the major players in NAS operations was desired. Three on-line surveys were administered that focused on Air Traffic Controllers (ATC), pilots of manned aircraft, and pilots of UAS. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with some survey respondents. The survey questions addressed UAS control, navigation, and communications from the perspective of small and large unmanned aircraft. Questions also addressed issues of UAS equipage, especially with regard to sense and avoid capabilities. From the ATC and military ATC perspective, of particular interest is how mixed-operations (manned/UAS) have worked in the past and the role of aircraft equipage. Knowledge gained from this information is expected to assist the NASA UAS in the NAS project in directing research foci thus assisting the FAA in the development of rules, regulations, and policies related to UAS in the NAS.

  9. Security Controls Hurt Research, NAS Warns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1982-01-01

    A National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report found no evidence that leaks of technical information from universities or other research centers have damaged national security. However, in areas where control is warranted, decisions should be based on criteria. These criteria and issues related to security control and technological transfer are…

  10. UAS Integration in the NAS Project - Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Chuck

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the UAS integration in the NAS Project is to contribute capabili1es that reduce technical barriers related to the safety and opera1onal challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS.

  11. NAS Panel endorses science center concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Science and technology centers, as proposed by President Ronald Reagan in his January 1987 State of the Union message, could make “significant contributions to science and to the nation's economic competitiveness,” according to a new report by a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) panel. What will be necessary to realize these contributions, the panel cautioned, are proper management, adequate resources, and, “above all, the selection of programs for which the centers are the most effective form of organization.”NSF plans to support science and technology centers, beginning October 1, 1988, which is the start of fiscal year 1988. NSF requested guidance from the NAS panel in implementing the program. Although other government agencies will participate in the program, NSF will play the primary role.

  12. NAS Grid Benchmarks. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob; Frumkin, Michael; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We provide a paper-and-pencil specification of a benchmark suite for computational grids. It is based on the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) and is called the NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB). NGB problems are presented as data flow graphs encapsulating an instance of a slightly modified NPB task in each graph node, which communicates with other nodes by sending/receiving initialization data. Like NPB, NGB specifies several different classes (problem sizes). In this report we describe classes S, W, and A, and provide verification values for each. The implementor has the freedom to choose any language, grid environment, security model, fault tolerance/error correction mechanism, etc., as long as the resulting implementation passes the verification test and reports the turnaround time of the benchmark.

  13. NAS Technical Summaries, March 1993 - February 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA created the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program in 1987 to focus resources on solving critical problems in aeroscience and related disciplines by utilizing the power of the most advanced supercomputers available. The NAS Program provides scientists with the necessary computing power to solve today's most demanding computational fluid dynamics problems and serves as a pathfinder in integrating leading-edge supercomputing technologies, thus benefitting other supercomputer centers in government and industry. The 1993-94 operational year concluded with 448 high-speed processor projects and 95 parallel projects representing NASA, the Department of Defense, other government agencies, private industry, and universities. This document provides a glimpse at some of the significant scientific results for the year.

  14. Implementation of NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Schultz, Matthew; Jin, Hao-Qiang; Yan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    A number of features make Java an attractive but a debatable choice for High Performance Computing (HPC). In order to gauge the applicability of Java to the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) we have implemented NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java. The performance and scalability of the benchmarks point out the areas where improvement in Java compiler technology and in Java thread implementation would move Java closer to Fortran in the competition for CFD applications.

  15. NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results 3-95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Bailey, David H.; Walter, Howard (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) were developed in 1991 at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a "pencil and paper" fashion, i.e., the complete details of the problem are given in a NAS technical document. Except for a few restrictions, benchmark implementors are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. In this paper, we present new NPB performance results for the following systems: (a) Parallel-Vector Processors: CRAY C90, CRAY T90 and Fujitsu VPP500; (b) Highly Parallel Processors: CRAY T3D, IBM SP2-WN (Wide Nodes), and IBM SP2-TN2 (Thin Nodes 2); and (c) Symmetric Multiprocessors: Convex Exemplar SPPIOOO, CRAY J90, DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/300, and SGI Power Challenge XL (75 MHz). We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks. We also mention future NAS plans for the NPB.

  16. 78 FR 21084 - Proposed Amendment of Class D and E Airspace, and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Oceana NAS, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of... Traffic Control Tower at Oceana NAS (Apollo Soucek Field) operating on a part time basis. This action...-0038; Airspace Docket No. 13-AEA-2, at the beginning of your comments. You may also submit and...

  17. 78 FR 46497 - Amendment of Class D and E Airspace, and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Oceana NAS, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... airspace, and establish Class E airspace at Oceana Naval Air Station, (NAS), VA, (78 FR 21084). Interested... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The...

  18. Carrier spin relaxation in GaInNAsSb/GaNAsSb/GaAs quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Asami, T.; Nosho, H.; Tackeuchi, A.; Li, L. H.; Harmand, J. C.; Lu, S. L.

    2011-12-23

    We have investigated the carrier spin relaxation in GaInNAsSb/GaNAsSb/GaAs quantum well (QW) by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurement. The sample consists of an 8-nm-thick GaIn{sub 0.36}N{sub 0.006}AsSb{sub 0.015} well, 5-nm-thick GaN{sub 0.01}AsSb{sub 0.11} intermediate barriers and 100-nm-thick GaAs barriers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a GaAs(100) substrate. The spin relaxation time and recombination lifetime at 10 K are measured to be 228 ps and 151 ps, respectively. As a reference, we have also obtained a spin relaxation time of 125 ps and a recombination lifetime of 63 ps for GaInNAs/GaNAs/GaAs QW. This result shows that crystal quality is slightly improved by adding Sb, although these short carrier lifetimes mainly originate from a nonradiative recombination. These spin relaxation times are longer than the 36 ps spin relaxation time of InGaAs/InP QWs and shorter than the 2 ns spin relaxation time of GaInNAs/GaAs QW.

  19. Dynamics of time-resolved photoluminescence in GaInNAs and GaNAsSb solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report a time-resolved photoluminescence study for GaInNAs and GaNAsSb p-i-n bulk solar cells grown on GaAs(100). In particular, we studied the extent to which the carrier lifetime decreases with the increase of N content. Rapid thermal annealing proved to significantly increase the decay times by a factor of 10 to 12 times, for both GaInNAs and GaNAsSb heterostructures, while for the 1-eV bandgap GaNAsSb structure, grown at the same growth conditions as the GaInNAs, the photoluminescence decay time remained slightly below 100 ps after annealing; the approximately 1.15-eV GaInNAs p-i-n solar cell exhibited a lifetime as long as 900 ps. PACS 78.47.D; 78.55.Cr; 88.40.hj PMID:24533702

  20. NAS Parallel Benchmarks. 2.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new problem size, called Class D, for the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB), whose MPI source code implementation is being released as NPB 2.4. A brief rationale is given for how the new class is derived. We also describe the modifications made to the MPI (Message Passing Interface) implementation to allow the new class to be run on systems with 32-bit integers, and with moderate amounts of memory. Finally, we give the verification values for the new problem size.

  1. Pasado, presente y futuro de la epidemiología. Una perspective latinoamericana

    PubMed Central

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Este artículo intenta contestar tres preguntas. Sobre el pasado: ¿Por qué no existió una epidemiología precolombina? Sobre el presente: ¿Cuáles son los orígenes de la epidemiología moderna, incluyendo sus raíces sudamericanas? Y sobre el futuro, escogí un título surrealista para enfatizar el hecho que estoy consciente de que es siempre delicado hacer predicciones: ¿Por qué fenómenos complejos son los “objetos oscuros del deseo” epidemiológico? PMID:25124247

  2. Remote access for NAS: Supercomputing in a university environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G.; Olson, B.; Swisshelm, J.; Pryor, D.; Ziebarth, J.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment was designed to assist the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Project Office in the testing and evaluation of long haul communications for remote users. The objectives of this work were to: (1) use foreign workstations to remotely access the NAS system; (2) provide NAS with a link to a large university-based computing facility which can serve as a model for a regional node of the Long-Haul Communications Subsystem (LHCS); and (3) provide a tail circuit to the University of Colorado a Boulder thereby simulating the complete communications path from NAS through a regional node to an end-user.

  3. NAS Parallel Benchmarks, Multi-Zone Versions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Haopiang, Jin

    2003-01-01

    We describe an extension of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) suite that involves solving the application benchmarks LU, BT and SP on collections of loosely coupled discretization meshes. The solutions on the meshes are updated independently, but after each time step they exchange boundary value information. This strategy, which is common among structured-mesh production flow solver codes in use at NASA Ames and elsewhere, provides relatively easily exploitable coarse-grain parallelism between meshes. Since the individual application benchmarks also allow fine-grain parallelism themselves, this NPB extension, named NPB Multi-Zone (NPB-MZ), is a good candidate for testing hybrid and multi-level parallelization tools and strategies.

  4. An Implementation Plan for NFS at NASA's NAS Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Terance L.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This document discusses how NASA's NAS can benefit from the Sun Microsystems' Network File System (NFS). A case study is presented to demonstrate the effects of NFS on the NAS supercomputing environment. Potential problems are addressed and an implementation strategy is proposed.

  5. [The NAS system: Nursing Activities Score in mobile technology].

    PubMed

    Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Silveira, Denise Tolfo; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado; Borges, Gilberto Cabral de Mello

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to present the computerized structure that enables the use of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) in mobile technology. It is a project for the development of technology production based on software engineering, founded on the theory of systems development life cycle. The NAS system was built in two modules: the search module, which is accessed using a personal computer (PC), and Data Collection module, which is accessed through a mobile device (Smartphone). The NAS system was constructed to allow other forms, in addition to the NAS tool, to be included in the future. Thus, it is understood that the development of the NAS will bring nurses closer to mobile technology and facilitate their accessibility to the data of the instrument relating to patients, thus assisting in decision-making and in staffing to provide nursing care. PMID:22241201

  6. The Need for Vendor Source Code at NAS. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Russell; Acheson, Steve; Blaylock, Bruce; Brock, David; Cardo, Nick; Ciotti, Bob; Poston, Alan; Wong, Parkson; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Facility has a long standing practice of maintaining buildable source code for installed hardware. There are two reasons for this: NAS's designated pathfinding role, and the need to maintain a smoothly running operational capacity given the widely diversified nature of the vendor installations. NAS has a need to maintain support capabilities when vendors are not able; diagnose and remedy hardware or software problems where applicable; and to support ongoing system software development activities whether or not the relevant vendors feel support is justified. This note provides an informal history of these activities at NAS, and brings together the general principles that drive the requirement that systems integrated into the NAS environment run binaries built from source code, onsite.

  7. Functional Requirements Document for HALE UAS Operations in the NAS: Step 1. Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this Functional Requirements Document (FRD) is to compile the functional requirements needed to achieve the Access 5 Vision of "operating High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) routinely, safely, and reliably in the national airspace system (NAS)" for Step 1. These functional requirements could support the development of a minimum set of policies, procedures and standards by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and various standards organizations. It is envisioned that this comprehensive body of work will enable the FAA to establish and approve regulations to govern safe operation of UAS in the NAS on a routine or daily "file and fly" basis. The approach used to derive the functional requirements found within this FRD was to decompose the operational requirements and objectives identified within the Access 5 Concept of Operations (CONOPS) into the functions needed to routinely and safely operate a HALE UAS in the NAS. As a result, four major functional areas evolved to enable routine and safe UAS operations for an on-demand basis in the NAS. These four major functions are: Aviate, Navigate, Communicate, and Avoid Hazards. All of the functional requirements within this document can be directly traceable to one of these four major functions. Some functions, however, are traceable to several, or even all, of these four major functions. These cross-cutting functional requirements support the "Command / Control: function as well as the "Manage Contingencies" function. The requirements associated to these high-level functions and all of their supporting low-level functions are addressed in subsequent sections of this document.

  8. El Proyecto Sismico "LARSE" - Trabajando Hacia un Futuro con Mas Seguridad para Los Angeles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henyey, Thomas L.; Fuis, Gary S.; Benthien, Mark L.; Burdette, Thomas R.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Clayton, Robert W.; Criley, Edward E.; Davis, Paul M.; Hendley, James W., II; Kohler, Monica D.; Lutter, William J.; McRaney, John K.; Murphy, Janice M.; Okaya, David A.; Ryberg, Trond; Simila, Gerald W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1999-01-01

    La region de Los Angeles contiene una red de fallas activas, incluyendo muchas fallas por empuje que son profundas y no rompen la superficie de la tierra. Estas fallas ocultas incluyen la falla anteriormente desconocida que fue responsable por la devastacion que ocurrio durante el terremoto de Northridge en enero de 1994, el terremoto mas costoso en la historia de los Estados Unidos. El Experimento Sismico en la Region de Los Angeles (Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, LARSE), esta localizando los peligros ocultos de los terremotos debajo de la region de Los Angeles para mejorar la construccion de las estructuras que pueden apoyar terremotos que son inevitables en el futuro, y que ayudaran a los cientificos determinar donde occurira el sacudimento mas fuerte y poderoso.

  9. UAS Integration in the NAS Project - FY 14 Annual Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindle, Laurie; Randall, Debra; Hackenberg, Davis

    2014-01-01

    This briefing gives insight into the research activities and efforts being executed in order to integrate unmanned aircraft systems into the national airspace system. This briefing is to inform others of the UAS-NAS Projects progress and future directions.

  10. UAS Integration in the NAS FY15 Annual Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindle, Laurie; Randall, Debra; Hackenburg, Davis

    2015-01-01

    This presentation gives insight into the research activities and efforts being executed in order to integrate unmanned aircraft systems into the national airspace system. This briefing is to inform others of the UAS-NAS progress and future directions.

  11. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks 2.1 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saphir, William; Woo, Alex; Yarrow, Maurice

    1996-01-01

    We present performance results for version 2.1 of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) on the following architectures: IBM SP2/66 MHz; SGI Power Challenge Array/90 MHz; Cray Research T3D; and Intel Paragon. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks are a widely-recognized suite of benchmarks originally designed to compare the performance of highly parallel computers with that of traditional supercomputers.

  12. Experimental studies on atmospheric Stirling engine NAS-2

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Hiroichi; Isshiki, Naotsugu; Ohtomo, Michihiro

    1996-12-31

    Atmospheric hot air Stirling engine NAS-1 and 2 have a simple flat rubber sheet diaphragm as their power piston, and they have been experimentally studied at Nihon University for several years continuously, with the target of to get more than 100 watts shaft power by atmospheric air with simple construction and cheap material. The first NAS-1 was intended to be a solar heated engine using television glass and wood for cheap cost, but it failed by thermal break of glass, so the improved NAS-2 is changed to be heated by gas burner, using metallic materials in all parts except rubber power piston. Other than this rubber sheet diaphragm, NAS-2 has many features as using James Watt crank mechanism, high finny copper tube for conventional commercial heat exchanger, and two kinds of hot gas heaters, etc. About the rubber sheet for the power piston, the thickness of the sheet was changed from 2 mm to 6 mm gradually to known what thickness is best, and it is found that about 5 mm is best for this engine. After trying many improvements on this engine, NAS-2 has produced about 130 watt shaft power with indicated power of 350 watt at 1994. In this paper detail of many features, history, results and experiments of these NAS engines are reported.

  13. Natural attenuation software (NAS): Assessing remedial strategies and estimating timeframes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, E.; Widdowson, M.; Chapelle, F.; Casey, C.

    2005-01-01

    Natural Attenuation Software (NAS) is a screening tool to estimate remediation timeframes for monitored natural attenuation (MNA) and to assist in decision-making on the level of source zone treatment in conjunction with MNA using site-specific remediation objectives. Natural attenuation processes that NAS models include are advection, dispersion, sorption, non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) dissolution, and biodegradation of either petroleum hydrocarbons or chlorinated ethylenes. Newly-implemented enhancements to NAS designed to maximize the utility of NAS for site managers were observed. NAS has expanded source contaminant specification options to include chlorinated ethanes and chlorinated methanes, and to allow for the analysis of any other user-defined contaminants that may be subject to microbially-mediated transformations (heavy metals, radioisotopes, etc.). Included is the capability to model co-mingled plumes, with constituents from multiple contaminant categories. To enable comparison of remediation timeframe estimates between MNA and specific engineered remedial actions , NAS was modified to incorporate an estimation technique for timeframes associated with pump-and-treat remediation technology for comparison to MNA. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  14. Photoreflectance spectroscopy of step-like GaInNAs/GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrawiec, R.; Andrzejewski, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Gollub, D.; Forchel, A.

    2005-05-01

    Photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy has been applied to study of step-like GaInNAs/GaInNAs/GaAs double quantum well (DQW) structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. PR features related to optical transitions in the active part of the step-like QW structure, i.e. GaInNAs/GaInNAs QW, as well as PR features related to transitions above the step-like barrier (SLB) have been clearly observed and analysed in this paper. The analysis of the QW transitions gives information about the number of confined states in the active part of the step-like QW structure. In addition, the analysis of the second portion of PR signal gives information about the band gap energy of the SLB and optical transitions between hole and electron levels confined above the SLB.

  15. RNA sequence requirements for NasR-mediated, nitrate-responsive transcription antitermination of the Klebsiella oxytoca M5al nasF operon leader.

    PubMed

    Chai, W; Stewart, V

    1999-09-17

    In Klebsiella oxytoca, enzymes required for nitrate assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. Nitrate and nitrite induction of nasF operon expression is determined by a transcriptional antitermination mechanism, in which the nasR gene product responds to nitrate or nitrite and overcomes transcription termination at the factor-independent terminator site located in the nasF upstream leader region. Previous studies led to the hypothesis that the NasR protein mediates transcription antitermination through interaction with nasF leader RNA. Here, we report a DNA sequence comparison that reveals conserved 1:2 and 3:4 RNA secondary structures in the nasF leader RNAs from two Klebsiella species. Additionally, we found that specific binding of the NasR protein to nasF leader RNA was stimulated by nitrate and nitrite. We combined mutational analysis, in vivo and in vitro antitermination assays, and an RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay to define regions in the nasF leader that are essential for antitermination and for NasR-RNA interaction. Formation of the 1:2 stem structure and the specific sequence of the 1:2 hexanucleotide loop were required for both nitrate induction and for NasR-RNA interaction. Mutations in the 1:2 stem-loop region that abolished nitrate induction also interfered with NasR-leader RNA interaction. Finally, nucleotide alterations or additions in the linker region between the 1:2 and 3:4 stem-loops were deleterious to nasF operon induction but not to NasR-leader RNA interaction. We hypothesize that NasR protein recognizes the 1:2 stem-loop structure in the nasF leader RNA to mediate transcription antitermination in response to nitrate or nitrite. PMID:10493869

  16. Ecological risk assessment framework -- the NAS perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1993-06-01

    A Workshop on Ecological Risk Assessment was held on February 26--March 1, 1991, at Airlie House, Warrenton, Virginia. In addition to presentation and discussion of the case study papers, the workshop included breakout sessions to discuss conceptual and technical aspects of ecological risk assessment. A general consensus emerged that an ecological version of the 1983 framework is desirable and feasible. The committee concluded that the 1983 human health framework could be expanded to accomodate both human health and ecological risk assessment. For general applicability to ecological assessments, the 1983 scheme requires augmentation to address some of the interfaces between science and management, primarily because of the need to focus on appropriate questions relevant to applicable environmental law and policy under different circumstances. Specifically, the scheme needs modification to address (1) the influence of legal and regulatory considerations on the initial stages of ecological risk assessment and (2) the importance of characterizing ecological risks in terms that are intelligible to risk managers. The committee`s opinion is that these augmentations are as important for human health risk assessment as they are for ecological risk assessment. This paper briefly describes the framework recommended by the Committee and compares it to EPA`s recently-published Framework for Ecological Risk Assessment.

  17. National Air Space (NAS) Data Exchange Environment Through 2060

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project focuses on capabilities to improve safety, capacity and efficiency of the National Air Space (NAS). In order to achieve those objectives, NASA sought industry-Government partnerships to research and identify solutions for traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations, airport surface operations and similar forward-looking air-traffic modernization (ATM) concepts. Data exchanges over NAS being the key enabler for most of these ATM concepts, the Sub-Topic area 3 of the CTD project sought to identify technology candidates that can satisfy air-to-air and air/ground communications needs of the NAS in the year 2060 timeframe. Honeywell, under a two-year contract with NASA, is working on this communications technology research initiative. This report summarizes Honeywell's research conducted during the second year of the study task.

  18. Upgrades to the Probabilistic NAS Platform Air Traffic Simulation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, George; Boisvert, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This document is the final report for the project entitled "Upgrades to the Probabilistic NAS Platform Air Traffic Simulation Software." This report consists of 17 sections which document the results of the several subtasks of this effort. The Probabilistic NAS Platform (PNP) is an air operations simulation platform developed and maintained by the Saab Sensis Corporation. The improvements made to the PNP simulation include the following: an airborne distributed separation assurance capability, a required time of arrival assignment and conformance capability, and a tactical and strategic weather avoidance capability.

  19. UAS in the NAS Flight Test Series 3 Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The UAS Integration in the NAS Project is conducting a series of flight tests to acheive the following objectives: 1.) Validate results previously collected during project simulations with live data 2.) Evaluate TCAS IISS interoperability 3.) Test fully integrated system in a relevant live test environment 4.) Inform final DAA and C2 MOPS 5.) Reduce risk for Flight Test Series 4.

  20. Unstructured Adaptive (UA) NAS Parallel Benchmark. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak; Mavriplis, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    We present a complete specification of a new benchmark for measuring the performance of modern computer systems when solving scientific problems featuring irregular, dynamic memory accesses. It complements the existing NAS Parallel Benchmark suite. The benchmark involves the solution of a stylized heat transfer problem in a cubic domain, discretized on an adaptively refined, unstructured mesh.

  1. The nasB operon and nasA gene are required for nitrate/nitrite assimilation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, K; Akagawa, E; Yamane, K; Sun, Z W; LaCelle, M; Zuber, P; Nakano, M M

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis can use either nitrate or nitrite as a sole source of nitrogen. The isolation of the nasABCDEF genes of B. subtilis, which are required for nitrate/nitrite assimilation, is reported. The probable gene products include subunits of nitrate/nitrite reductases and an enzyme involved in the synthesis of siroheme, a cofactor for nitrite reductase. PMID:7868621

  2. Nitrogen regulation of nasA and the nasB operon, which encode genes required for nitrate assimilation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, M M; Yang, F; Hardin, P; Zuber, P

    1995-01-01

    The divergently transcribed nasA gene and nasB operon are required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation in Bacillus subtilis. The beta-galactosidase activity of transcriptional lacZ fusions from the nasA and nasB promoters was high when cells were grown in minimal glucose medium containing poor nitrogen sources such as nitrate, proline, or glutamate. The expression was very low when ammonium or glutamine was used as the sole nitrogen source. The repression of the genes during growth on good sources of nitrogen required wild-type glutamine synthetase (GlnA), but not GlnR, the repressor of the glnRA operon. Primer extension analysis showed that the -10 region of each promoter resembles those of sigma A-recognized promoters. Between the divergently oriented nasA and nasB promoters is a region of dyad symmetry. Mutational analysis led to the conclusion that this sequence is required in cis for the activation of both nasA and nasB. The derepression of these genes in a glnA mutant also required this sequence. These results suggest that an unidentified transcriptional activator and glutamine synthetase function in the regulation of nasA and the nasB operon. PMID:7836289

  3. Applications Performance on NAS Intel Paragon XP/S - 15#

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Simon, Horst D.; Copper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division received an Intel Touchstone Sigma prototype model Paragon XP/S- 15 in February, 1993. The i860 XP microprocessor with an integrated floating point unit and operating in dual -instruction mode gives peak performance of 75 million floating point operations (NIFLOPS) per second for 64 bit floating point arithmetic. It is used in the Paragon XP/S-15 which has been installed at NAS, NASA Ames Research Center. The NAS Paragon has 208 nodes and its peak performance is 15.6 GFLOPS. Here, we will report on early experience using the Paragon XP/S- 15. We have tested its performance using both kernels and applications of interest to NAS. We have measured the performance of BLAS 1, 2 and 3 both assembly-coded and Fortran coded on NAS Paragon XP/S- 15. Furthermore, we have investigated the performance of a single node one-dimensional FFT, a distributed two-dimensional FFT and a distributed three-dimensional FFT Finally, we measured the performance of NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) on the Paragon and compare it with the performance obtained on other highly parallel machines, such as CM-5, CRAY T3D, IBM SP I, etc. In particular, we investigated the following issues, which can strongly affect the performance of the Paragon: a. Impact of the operating system: Intel currently uses as a default an operating system OSF/1 AD from the Open Software Foundation. The paging of Open Software Foundation (OSF) server at 22 MB to make more memory available for the application degrades the performance. We found that when the limit of 26 NIB per node out of 32 MB available is reached, the application is paged out of main memory using virtual memory. When the application starts paging, the performance is considerably reduced. We found that dynamic memory allocation can help applications performance under certain circumstances. b. Impact of data cache on the i860/XP: We measured the performance of the BLAS both assembly coded and Fortran

  4. NAS Grid Benchmarks: A Tool for Grid Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present an approach for benchmarking services provided by computational Grids. It is based on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) and is called NAS Grid Benchmark (NGB) in this paper. We present NGB as a data flow graph encapsulating an instance of an NPB code in each graph node, which communicates with other nodes by sending/receiving initialization data. These nodes may be mapped to the same or different Grid machines. Like NPB, NGB will specify several different classes (problem sizes). NGB also specifies the generic Grid services sufficient for running the bench-mark. The implementor has the freedom to choose any specific Grid environment. However, we describe a reference implementation in Java, and present some scenarios for using NGB.

  5. 48 CFR 852.236-83 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (including NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... construction contracts (including NAS). 852.236-83 Section 852.236-83 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Provisions and Clauses 852.236-83 Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (including NAS). As... Analysis System (NAS).” Payments Under Fixed-Price Construction Contracts (JUL 2002) The clause...

  6. NASA UAS Integration into the NAS Project: Human Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Jay

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the work the Human Systems Integration (HSI) sub-project has done on detect and avoid (DAA) displays while working on the UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) Integration into the NAS project. The most recent simulation on DAA interoperability with Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) is discussed in the most detail. The relationship of the work to the larger UAS community and next steps are also detailed.

  7. Implementation of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael A.; Schultz, Matthew; Jin, Haoqiang; Yan, Jerry; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several features make Java an attractive choice for High Performance Computing (HPC). In order to gauge the applicability of Java to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), we have implemented the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks in Java. The performance and scalability of the benchmarks point out the areas where improvement in Java compiler technology and in Java thread implementation would position Java closer to Fortran in the competition for CFD applications.

  8. Performance and Scalability of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael A.; Schultz, Matthew; Jin, Haoqiang; Yan, Jerry; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several features make Java an attractive choice for scientific applications. In order to gauge the applicability of Java to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), we have implemented the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks in Java. The performance and scalability of the benchmarks point out the areas where improvement in Java compiler technology and in Java thread implementation would position Java closer to Fortran in the competition for scientific applications.

  9. Evaluating the Information Power Grid using the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaartm Rob F.; Frumkin, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    The NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) are a collection of synthetic distributed applications designed to rate the performance and functionality of computational grids. We compare several implementations of the NGB to determine programmability and efficiency of NASA's Information Power Grid (IPG), whose services are mostly based on the Globus Toolkit. We report on the overheads involved in porting existing NGB reference implementations to the IPG. No changes were made to the component tasks of the NGB can still be improved.

  10. Advanced Intermediate-Temperature Na-S Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Kirby, Brent W.; Xu, Wu; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-11-12

    In this study, we reported an intermediate-temperature (~150°C) sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery. With a reduced operating temperature, this novel battery can potentially reduce the cost and safety issues associated with the conventional high-temperature (300~350°C) Na-S battery. A dense β"-Al2O3 solid membrane and tetraglyme were utilized as the electrolyte separator and catholyte solvent in this battery. Solubility tests indicated that cathode mixture of Na2S4 and S exhibited extremely high solubility in tetraglyme (e.g., > 4.1 M for Na2S4 + 4 S). CV scans of Na2S4 in tetraglyme revealed two pairs of redox couples with peaks at around 2.22 and 1.75 V, corresponding to the redox reactions of polysulfide species. The discharge/charge profiles of the Na-S battery showed a slope region and a plateau, indicating multiple steps and cell reactions. In-situ Raman measurements during battery operation suggested that polysulfide species were formed in the sequence of Na2S5 + S → Na2S5 + Na2S4→ Na2S4 + Na2S2 during discharge and in a reverse order during charge. This battery showed dramatic improvement in rate capacity and cycling stability over room-temperature Na-S batteries, which makes it attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

  11. Graded band gap GaInNAs solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, F.; Perl, S.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2015-06-08

    Dilute nitride GaInN(Sb)As with a band gap (E{sub g}) of 1.0 eV is a promising material for the integration in next generation multijunction solar cells. We have investigated the effect of a compositionally graded GaInNAs absorber layer on the spectral response of a GaInNAs sub cell. We produced band gap gradings (ΔE{sub g}) of up to 39 meV across a 1 μm thick GaInNAs layer. Thereby, the external quantum efficiency—compared to reference cells—was increased due to the improved extraction of photo-generated carriers from 34.0% to 36.7% for the wavelength range from 900 nm to 1150 nm. However, this device figure improvement is accompanied by a small decrease in the open circuit voltage of about 20 mV and the shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths.

  12. Hybrid Network Architectures for the Next Generation NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madubata, Christian

    2003-01-01

    To meet the needs of the 21st Century NAS, an integrated, network-centric infrastructure is essential that is characterized by secure, high bandwidth, digital communication systems that support precision navigation capable of reducing position errors for all aircraft to within a few meters. This system will also require precision surveillance systems capable of accurately locating all aircraft, and automatically detecting any deviations from an approved path within seconds and be able to deliver high resolution weather forecasts - critical to create 4- dimensional (space and time) profiles for up to 6 hours for all atmospheric conditions affecting aviation, including wake vortices. The 21st Century NAS will be characterized by highly accurate digital data bases depicting terrain, obstacle, and airport information no matter what visibility conditions exist. This research task will be to perform a high-level requirements analysis of the applications, information and services required by the next generation National Airspace System. The investigation and analysis is expected to lead to the development and design of several national network-centric communications architectures that would be capable of supporting the Next Generation NAS.

  13. Autotasked Performance in the NAS Workload: A Statistical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, R. L.; Stockdale, I. E.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the workload performance of a production quality FORTRAN code for five different Cray Y-MP hardware and system software configurations is performed. The analysis was based on an experimental procedure that was designed to minimize correlations between the number of requested CPUs and the time of day the runs were initiated. Observed autotasking over heads were significantly larger for the set of jobs that requested the maximum number of CPUs. Speedups for UNICOS 6 releases show consistent wall clock speedups in the workload of around 2. which is quite good. The observed speed ups were very similar for the set of jobs that requested 8 CPUs and the set that requested 4 CPUs. The original NAS algorithm for determining charges to the user discourages autotasking in the workload. A new charging algorithm to be applied to jobs run in the NQS multitasking queues also discourages NAS users from using auto tasking. The new algorithm favors jobs requesting 8 CPUs over those that request less, although the jobs requesting 8 CPUs experienced significantly higher over head and presumably degraded system throughput. A charging algorithm is presented that has the following desirable characteristics when applied to the data: higher overhead jobs requesting 8 CPUs are penalized when compared to moderate overhead jobs requesting 4 CPUs, thereby providing a charging incentive to NAS users to use autotasking in a manner that provides them with significantly improved turnaround while also maintaining system throughput.

  14. Study of GaInNAs Epilayers Using Optical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yutsung

    Photovoltaic devices that convert sun's energy into electricity have the potential to influence energy needs on a global scale. A major limitation of single junction solar cells is that only photons with energy slightly above the bandgap are absorbed efficiently. One of the methods is to split the energy of the incoming spectrum into multiple bands each of which is absorbed separately for more efficient collection. That is why multijunction solar cells formed from III-V compound semiconductors are the highest efficiency photovoltaic devices today. To achieve this goal, researchers stack a number of junctions made of different materials with the highest gap material at the top and the lowest at the bottom since each material is transparent to photons with energy smaller than its bandgap. Kurtz [1] predicted an improvement in the performance of multijunction solar cells if a fourth material with bandgap in the 1.0eV-1.05eV range is included between the GaAs (bandgap = 1.42 eV) and Ge (bandgap = 0.67 eV) in the solar cell. In order for this fourth material to be easily incorporated into the GaInP/ GaAs/Ge triple junction device, it must also be lattice matched to germanium. Since it is preferred to grow multijunction solar cells monolithically lattice matching is required making the options for the 1 eV material rather limited. The most promising material for the fourth junction is currently GaInNAs. This is the reason why this thesis concentrates on the study of this material. In this thesis, we have conducted PL, optical pumping, magneto-PL, reflectance and transmission spectroscopic studies of undoped and p-type doped GaInNAs epilayers. The objective of these studies is to investigate the following phenomena in our samples: (a) Localized excitons and free excitons at low temperatures in GaInNAs epilayers: The exciton localization at low temperatures in undoped GaInNAs epilayers results in the S-shape of the PL peaks versus temperature plot. On the other hand, the

  15. Policy Problematization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, P. Taylor

    2014-01-01

    This article places Michel Foucault's concept of "problematization" in relation to educational policy research. My goal is to examine a key assumption of policy related to "solving problems" through such technologies. I discuss the potential problematization has to alter conceptions of policy research; and, through this…

  16. High electron mobility in Ga(In)NAs films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Okada, Yoshitaka; Inagaki, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2012-11-26

    We report the highest mobility values above 2000 cm{sup 2}/Vs in Si doped GaNAs film grown by molecular beam epitaxy. To understand the feature of the origin which limits the electron mobility in GaNAs, temperature dependences of mobility were measured for high mobility GaNAs and referential low mobility GaInNAs. Temperature dependent mobility for high mobility GaNAs is similar to the GaAs case, while that for low mobility GaInNAs shows large decrease in lower temperature region. The electron mobility of high quality GaNAs can be explained by intrinsic limiting factor of random alloy scattering and extrinsic factor of ionized impurity scattering.

  17. NAS Requirements Checklist for Job Queuing/Scheduling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, James Patton

    1996-01-01

    The increasing reliability of parallel systems and clusters of computers has resulted in these systems becoming more attractive for true production workloads. Today, the primary obstacle to production use of clusters of computers is the lack of a functional and robust Job Management System for parallel applications. This document provides a checklist of NAS requirements for job queuing and scheduling in order to make most efficient use of parallel systems and clusters for parallel applications. Future requirements are also identified to assist software vendors with design planning.

  18. Navigation in Grid Space with the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a navigational tool for computational grids. The navigational process is based on measuring the grid characteristics with the NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) and using the measurements to assign tasks of a grid application to the grid machines. The tool allows the user to explore the grid space and to navigate the execution at a grid application to minimize its turnaround time. We introduce the notion of gridscape as a user view of the grid and show how it can be me assured by NGB, Then we demonstrate how the gridscape can be used with two different schedulers to navigate a grid application through a rudimentary grid.

  19. UAS-NAS Project Demo - Mini HITL Week 2 Stats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, James R.; Fern, Lisa C.; Rorie, Robert C.; Shively, Robert; Jovic, Srboljub

    2016-01-01

    The UAS-NAS Project demo will showcase recent research efforts to ensure the interoperability between proposed UAS detect and avoid (DAA) human machine interface requirements (developed within RTCA SC-228) and existing collision avoidance displays. Attendees will be able to view the current state of the art of the DAA pilot traffic, alerting and guidance displays integrated with Traffic advisory and Collision Avoidance (TCAS) II in the UAS-NAS Project's research UAS ground control station (developed in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory). In addition, attendees will have the opportunity to interact with the research UAS ground control station and "fly" encounters, using the DAA and TCAS II displays to avoid simulated aircraft. The display of the advisories will be hosted on a laptop with an external 30" monitor, running the Vigilant Spirit system. DAA advisories will be generated by the JADEM software tool, connected to the system via the LVC Gateway. A repeater of the primary flight display will be shown on a 55" monitor mounted on a stand at the back of the booth to show the pilot interaction to the passersby.

  20. Concepts of Integration for UAS Operations in the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing the integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is the lack of an onboard pilot that can comply with the legal requirement identified in the US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) that pilots see and avoid other aircraft. UAS will be expected to demonstrate the means to perform the function of see and avoid while preserving the safety level of the airspace and the efficiency of the air traffic system. This paper introduces a Sense and Avoid (SAA) concept for integration of UAS into the NAS that is currently being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and identifies areas that require additional experimental evaluation to further inform various elements of the concept. The concept design rests on interoperability principles that take into account both the Air Traffic Control (ATC) environment as well as existing systems such as the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS). Specifically, the concept addresses the determination of well clear values that are large enough to avoid issuance of TCAS corrective Resolution Advisories, undue concern by pilots of proximate aircraft and issuance of controller traffic alerts. The concept also addresses appropriate declaration times for projected losses of well clear conditions and maneuvers to regain well clear separation.

  1. Parallelization of NAS Benchmarks for Shared Memory Multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry C.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents our experiences of parallelizing the sequential implementation of NAS benchmarks using compiler directives on SGI Origin2000 distributed shared memory (DSM) system. Porting existing applications to new high performance parallel and distributed computing platforms is a challenging task. Ideally, a user develops a sequential version of the application, leaving the task of porting to new generations of high performance computing systems to parallelization tools and compilers. Due to the simplicity of programming shared-memory multiprocessors, compiler developers have provided various facilities to allow the users to exploit parallelism. Native compilers on SGI Origin2000 support multiprocessing directives to allow users to exploit loop-level parallelism in their programs. Additionally, supporting tools can accomplish this process automatically and present the results of parallelization to the users. We experimented with these compiler directives and supporting tools by parallelizing sequential implementation of NAS benchmarks. Results reported in this paper indicate that with minimal effort, the performance gain is comparable with the hand-parallelized, carefully optimized, message-passing implementations of the same benchmarks.

  2. Data communication requirements for the advanced NAS network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Eugene; Eaton, C. K.; Young, Bruce

    1986-01-01

    The goal of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program is to provide a powerful computational environment for advanced research and development in aeronautics and related disciplines. The present NAS system consists of a Cray 2 supercomputer connected by a data network to a large mass storage system, to sophisticated local graphics workstations, and by remote communications to researchers throughout the United States. The program plan is to continue acquiring the most powerful supercomputers as they become available. In the 1987/1988 time period it is anticipated that a computer with 4 times the processing speed of a Cray 2 will be obtained and by 1990 an additional supercomputer with 16 times the speed of the Cray 2. The implications of this 20-fold increase in processing power on the data communications requirements are described. The analysis was based on models of the projected workload and system architecture. The results are presented together with the estimates of their sensitivity to assumptions inherent in the models.

  3. Weather Requirements and Procedures for Step 1: High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Flight Operations in the National Air Space (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This cover sheet is for version 2 of the weather requirements document along with Appendix A. The purpose of the requirements document was to identify and to list the weather functional requirements needed to achieve the Access 5 vision of "operating High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) routinely, safely, and reliably in the National Airspace System (NAS) for Step 1." A discussion of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) references and related policies, procedures, and standards is provided as basis for the recommendations supported within this document. Additional procedures and reference documentation related to weather functional requirements is also provided for background. The functional requirements and related information are to be proposed to the FAA and various standards organizations for consideration and approval. The appendix was designed to show that sources of flight weather information are readily available to UAS pilots conducting missions in the NAS. All weather information for this presentation was obtained from the public internet.

  4. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Chingakham R.; Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  5. nasST, two genes involved in the induction of the assimilatory nitrite-nitrate reductase operon (nasAB) of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, J C; Ramos, F; Ortner, L; Tortolero, M

    1995-11-01

    An operon including two new genes (nasS and nasT) has been defined, cloned and sequenced. The deduced NASS protein is homologous to NRTA from Synechococcus sp. and to NASF from Klebsiella pneumoniae, two proteins involved in nitrate uptake. The predicted NAST polypeptide is homologous to the regulator proteins of the two-component regulatory systems. NASS plays a negative regulatory role in the synthesis of the nitrate and nitrite reductase. NAST is required for the expression of the nitrite-nitrate reductase operon (nasAB). Expression of the nasST operon is not under the control of the NTR system and is not regulated by the nitrogen source. A Phi(nasA-lacZ) fusion has been used to analyse expression of the nasAB operon in three different genetic backgrounds with altered nitrate reductase activity. Beta-galactosidase activity in two of them was independent of nitrate but in a mutant unable to reduce nitrate, nas-4, it was normally induced by nitrate. PMID:8748040

  6. The nasFEDCBA operon for nitrate and nitrite assimilation in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    PubMed

    Lin, J T; Goldman, B S; Stewart, V

    1994-05-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilation pathway. We previously identified structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases, nasA and nasB, respectively. We report here our further identification of four genes, nasFEDC, upstream of the nasBA genes. The nasFEDCBA genes probably form an operon. Mutational and complementation analyses indicated that both the nasC and nasA genes are required for nitrate assimilation. The predicted NASC protein is homologous to a variety of NADH-dependent oxidoreductases. Thus, the NASC protein probably mediates electron transfer from NADH to the NASA protein, which contains the active site for nitrate reduction. The deduced NASF, NASE, and NASD proteins are homologous to the NRTA, NRTB, and NRTD proteins, respectively, that are involved in nitrate uptake in Synechococcus sp. (T. Omata, X. Andriesse, and A. Hirano, Mol. Gen. Genet. 236:193-202, 1993). Mutational and complementation studies indicated that the nasD gene is required for nitrate but not nitrite assimilation. By analogy with the Synechococcus nrt genes, we propose that the nasFED genes are involved in nitrate transport in K. pneumoniae. PMID:8169203

  7. The nasFEDCBA operon for nitrate and nitrite assimilation in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J T; Goldman, B S; Stewart, V

    1994-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilation pathway. We previously identified structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases, nasA and nasB, respectively. We report here our further identification of four genes, nasFEDC, upstream of the nasBA genes. The nasFEDCBA genes probably form an operon. Mutational and complementation analyses indicated that both the nasC and nasA genes are required for nitrate assimilation. The predicted NASC protein is homologous to a variety of NADH-dependent oxidoreductases. Thus, the NASC protein probably mediates electron transfer from NADH to the NASA protein, which contains the active site for nitrate reduction. The deduced NASF, NASE, and NASD proteins are homologous to the NRTA, NRTB, and NRTD proteins, respectively, that are involved in nitrate uptake in Synechococcus sp. (T. Omata, X. Andriesse, and A. Hirano, Mol. Gen. Genet. 236:193-202, 1993). Mutational and complementation studies indicated that the nasD gene is required for nitrate but not nitrite assimilation. By analogy with the Synechococcus nrt genes, we propose that the nasFED genes are involved in nitrate transport in K. pneumoniae. PMID:8169203

  8. An improved NAS-RIF algorithm for blind image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Jiang, Yanbin; Lou, Shuntian

    2007-01-01

    Image restoration is widely applied in many areas, but when operating on images with different scales for the representation of pixel intensity levels or low SNR, the traditional restoration algorithm lacks validity and induces noise amplification, ringing artifacts and poor convergent ability. In this paper, an improved NAS-RIF algorithm is proposed to overcome the shortcomings of the traditional algorithm. The improved algorithm proposes a new cost function which adds a space-adaptive regularization term and a disunity gain of the adaptive filter. In determining the support region, a pre-segmentation is used to form it close to the object in the image. Compared with the traditional algorithm, simulations show that the improved algorithm behaves better convergence, noise resistance and provides a better estimate of original image.

  9. NAS Miramar Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell demonstration status

    SciTech Connect

    Scroppo, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Part of M-C Power`s Technology Development Program, this MCFC power plant is designed to supply 250 kW of electricity to Naval Air Station (NAS) Miramar. It also cogenerates steam for the district heating system. The power plant is a fully integrated unit incorporating an advanced design fuel cell based on years of laboratory tests and a prior field test. This demonstration incorporates many innovative features, one of which is the plate type reformer which processes the natural gas fuel for use in the fuel cell. M-C Power Corp. has completed the design, fabrication, and conditioning of a 250-cell fuel cell stack, which was shipped to the site where it will be installed, tested, and evaluated as a 250 kW Proof-of-Concept MCFC Power Plant. (Originally going to Kaiser Permanente`s Sand Diego Medical Center, it was relocated to Miramar.)

  10. Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) Impact on the National Airspace System (NAS) Work Package: Automation Impacts of ROA's in the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the impact of Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) operations on current and planned Air Traffic Control (ATC) automation systems in the En Route, Terminal, and Traffic Flow Management domains. The operational aspects of ROA flight, while similar, are not entirely identical to their manned counterparts and may not have been considered within the time-horizons of the automation tools. This analysis was performed to determine if flight characteristics of ROAs would be compatible with current and future NAS automation tools. Improvements to existing systems / processes are recommended that would give Air Traffic Controllers an indication that a particular aircraft is an ROA and modifications to IFR flight plan processing algorithms and / or designation of airspace where an ROA will be operating for long periods of time.

  11. Looking Backward: Parting Reflections on Higher Education Reform from NAS's Founding President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-five years at the helm of the National Association of Scholars (NAS) have left the author with vivid memories: of knocks and bruises, peaks of exhilaration and, especially, unforgettable characters. But as for lessons learned, that's a very different story. In this article, the author shares some of the successes that happened in NAS for…

  12. Genome-wide identification, classification and expression profiling of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) gene family in maize

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nicotianamine (NA), a ubiquitous molecule in plants, is an important metal ion chelator and the main precursor for phytosiderophores biosynthesis. Considerable progress has been achieved in cloning and characterizing the functions of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) in plants including barley, Arabidopsis and rice. Maize is not only an important cereal crop, but also a model plant for genetics and evolutionary study. The genome sequencing of maize was completed, and many gene families were identified. Although three NAS genes have been characterized in maize, there is still no systematic identification of maize NAS family by genomic mining. Results In this study, nine NAS genes in maize were identified and their expression patterns in different organs including developing seeds were determined. According to the evolutionary relationship and tissue specific expression profiles of ZmNAS genes, they can be subgrouped into two classes. Moreover, the expression patterns of ZmNAS genes in response to fluctuating metal status were analysed. The class I ZmNAS genes were induced under Fe deficiency and were suppressed under Fe excessive conditions, while the expression pattern of class II genes were opposite to class I. The complementary expression patterns of class I and class II ZmNAS genes confirmed the classification of this family. Furthermore, the histochemical localization of ZmNAS1;1/1;2 and ZmNAS3 were determined using in situ hybridization. It was revealed that ZmNAS1;1/1;2, representing the class I genes, mainly expressed in cortex and stele of roots with sufficient Fe, and its expression can expanded in epidermis, as well as shoot apices under Fe deficient conditions. On the contrary, ZmNAS3, one of the class II genes, was accumulated in axillary meristems, leaf primordia and mesophyll cells. These results suggest that the two classes of ZmNAS genes may be regulated on transcriptional level when responds to various demands for iron uptake, translocation

  13. Natural Attenuation Software (NAS): A computer program for estimating remediation times of contaminated groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, E.; Widdowson, M.; Brauner, S.; Chapelle, F.; Casey, C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a modeling system called Natural Attenuation Software (NAS). NAS was designed as a screening tool to estimate times of remediation (TORs), associated with monitored natural attenuation (MNA), to lower groundwater contaminant concentrations to regulatory limits. Natural attenuation processes that NAS models include advection, dispersion, sorption, biodegradation, and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) dissolution. This paper discusses the three main interactive components of NAS: 1) estimation of the target source concentration required for a plume extent to contract to regulatory limits, 2) estimation of the time required for NAFL contaminants in the source area to attenuate to a predetermined target source concentration, and 3) estimation of the time required for a plume extent to contract to regulatory limits after source reduction. The model's capability is illustrated by results from a case study at a MNA site, where NAS time of remediation estimates compared well with observed monitoring data over multiple years.

  14. Population policy.

    PubMed

    1987-03-01

    Participants in the Seminar on Population Policies for Top-level Policy Makers and Program Managers, meeting in Thailand during January 1987, examined the challenges now facing them regarding the implementation of fertility regulation programs in their respective countries -- Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, and Thailand. This Seminar was organized to coincide with the completion of an Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) study investigating the impact and efficiency of family planning programs in the region. Country studies were reviewed at the Seminar along with policy issues about the status of women, incentive and disincentive programs, and socioeconomic factors affecting fertility. In Bangladesh the government recognizes population growth as its top priority problem related to the socioeconomic development of the country and is working to promote a reorientation strategy from the previous clinic-oriented to a multidimensional family welfare program. China's family planning program seeks to postpone marraige, space the births of children between 3-5 years, and promote the 1-child family. Its goal is to reduce the rate of natural increase from 12/1000 in 1978 to 5/1000 by 1985 and 0 by 2000. India's 7th Five-Year-Plan (1986-90) calls for establishing a 2-child family norm by 2000. In Indonesia the government's population policy includes reducing the rate of population growth, achieving a redistribution of the population, adjusting economic factors, and creating prosperous families. The government of Indonesia reversed its policy to reduce the population growth rate in 1984 and announced its goal of achieving a population of 70 million by 2100 in order to support mass consumption industries. It has created an income tax deduction system favoring large families and maternity benefits for women who have up to 5 children as incentives. Nepal's official policy is to

  15. NasFED proteins mediate assimilatory nitrate and nitrite transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Stewart, V

    1998-03-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein (NasD). The NasF protein and the related NrtA and CmpA proteins of cyanobacteria contain leader (signal) sequences with the double-arginine motif that is hypothesized to direct prefolded proteins to an alternate protein export pathway. The NasE protein and the related NrtB and CmpB proteins of cyanobacteria contain unusual variants of the EAA loop sequence that defines membrane-intrinsic proteins of ABC transporters. To characterize nitrate and nitrite transport, we constructed in-frame nonpolar deletions of the chromosomal nasFED genes. Growth tests coupled with nitrate and nitrite uptake assays revealed that the nasFED genes are essential for nitrate transport and participate in nitrite transport as well. Interestingly, the delta nasF strain exhibited leaky phenotypes, particularly at elevated nitrate concentrations, suggesting that the NasED proteins are not fully dependent on the NasF protein. PMID:9495773

  16. NasFED Proteins Mediate Assimilatory Nitrate and Nitrite Transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qitu; Stewart, Valley

    1998-01-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein (NasD). The NasF protein and the related NrtA and CmpA proteins of cyanobacteria contain leader (signal) sequences with the double-arginine motif that is hypothesized to direct prefolded proteins to an alternate protein export pathway. The NasE protein and the related NrtB and CmpB proteins of cyanobacteria contain unusual variants of the EAA loop sequence that defines membrane-intrinsic proteins of ABC transporters. To characterize nitrate and nitrite transport, we constructed in-frame nonpolar deletions of the chromosomal nasFED genes. Growth tests coupled with nitrate and nitrite uptake assays revealed that the nasFED genes are essential for nitrate transport and participate in nitrite transport as well. Interestingly, the ΔnasF strain exhibited leaky phenotypes, particularly at elevated nitrate concentrations, suggesting that the NasED proteins are not fully dependent on the NasF protein. PMID:9495773

  17. Performance Comparison of HPF and MPI Based NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash

    1997-01-01

    Compilers supporting High Performance Form (HPF) features first appeared in late 1994 and early 1995 from Applied Parallel Research (APR), Digital Equipment Corporation, and The Portland Group (PGI). IBM introduced an HPF compiler for the IBM RS/6000 SP2 in April of 1996. Over the past two years, these implementations have shown steady improvement in terms of both features and performance. The performance of various hardware/ programming model (HPF and MPI) combinations will be compared, based on latest NAS Parallel Benchmark results, thus providing a cross-machine and cross-model comparison. Specifically, HPF based NPB results will be compared with MPI based NPB results to provide perspective on performance currently obtainable using HPF versus MPI or versus hand-tuned implementations such as those supplied by the hardware vendors. In addition, we would also present NPB, (Version 1.0) performance results for the following systems: DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/440, Fujitsu CAPP Series (VX, VPP300, and VPP700), HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, IBM RS/6000 SP P2SC node (120 MHz), NEC SX-4/32, SGI/CRAY T3E, and SGI Origin2000. We would also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks.

  18. A Programming Model Performance Study Using the NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shan, Hongzhang; Blagojević, Filip; Min, Seung-Jai; Hargrove, Paul; Jin, Haoqiang; Fuerlinger, Karl; Koniges, Alice; Wright, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Harnessing the power of multicore platforms is challenging due to the additional levels of parallelism present. In this paper we use the NAS Parallel Benchmarks to study three programming models, MPI, OpenMP and PGAS to understand their performance and memory usage characteristics on current multicore architectures. To understand these characteristics we use the Integrated Performance Monitoring tool and other ways to measure communication versus computation time, as well as the fraction of the run time spent in OpenMP. The benchmarks are run on two different Cray XT5 systems and an Infiniband cluster. Our results show that in general the threemore » programming models exhibit very similar performance characteristics. In a few cases, OpenMP is significantly faster because it explicitly avoids communication. For these particular cases, we were able to re-write the UPC versions and achieve equal performance to OpenMP. Using OpenMP was also the most advantageous in terms of memory usage. Also we compare performance differences between the two Cray systems, which have quad-core and hex-core processors. We show that at scale the performance is almost always slower on the hex-core system because of increased contention for network resources.« less

  19. Performance Characteristics of the Multi-Zone NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Haoqiang; VanderWijngaart, Rob F.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new suite of computational benchmarks that models applications featuring multiple levels of parallelism. Such parallelism is often available in realistic flow computations on systems of grids, but had not previously been captured in bench-marks. The new suite, named NPB Multi-Zone, is extended from the NAS Parallel Benchmarks suite, and involves solving the application benchmarks LU, BT and SP on collections of loosely coupled discretization meshes. The solutions on the meshes are updated independently, but after each time step they exchange boundary value information. This strategy provides relatively easily exploitable coarse-grain parallelism between meshes. Three reference implementations are available: one serial, one hybrid using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) and OpenMP, and another hybrid using a shared memory multi-level programming model (SMP+OpenMP). We examine the effectiveness of hybrid parallelization paradigms in these implementations on three different parallel computers. We also use an empirical formula to investigate the performance characteristics of the multi-zone benchmarks.

  20. NAS Parallel Benchmark Results 11-96. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Bailey, David; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks have been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a "pencil and paper" fashion. In other words, the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. These results represent the best results that have been reported to us by the vendors for the specific 3 systems listed. In this report, we present new NPB (Version 1.0) performance results for the following systems: DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/440, Fujitsu VPP Series (VX, VPP300, and VPP700), HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, IBM RS/6000 SP P2SC node (120 MHz), NEC SX-4/32, SGI/CRAY T3E, SGI Origin200, and SGI Origin2000. We also report High Performance Fortran (HPF) based NPB results for IBM SP2 Wide Nodes, HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, and SGI/CRAY T3D. These results have been submitted by Applied Parallel Research (APR) and Portland Group Inc. (PGI). We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks.

  1. Performance Analysis of the NAS Y-MP Workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergeron, Robert J.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the performance characteristics of the computational workloads on the NAS Cray Y-MP machines, a Y-MP 832 and later a Y-MP 8128. Hardware measurements indicated that the Y-MP workload performance matured over time, ultimately sustaining an average throughput of 0.8 GFLOPS and a vector operation fraction of 87%. The measurements also revealed an operation rate exceeding 1 per clock period, a well-balanced architecture featuring a strong utilization of vector functional units, and an efficient memory organization. Introduction of the larger memory 8128 increased throughput by allowing a more efficient utilization of CPUs. Throughput also depended on the metering of the batch queues; low-idle Saturday workloads required a buffer of small jobs to prevent memory starvation of the CPU. UNICOS required about 7% of total CPU time to service the 832 workloads; this overhead decreased to 5% for the 8128 workloads. While most of the system time went to service I/O requests, efficient scheduling prevented excessive idle due to I/O wait. System measurements disclosed no obvious bottlenecks in the response of the machine and UNICOS to the workloads. In most cases, Cray-provided software tools were- quite sufficient for measuring the performance of both the machine and operating, system.

  2. Investigation of Deep Levels in GaInNas

    SciTech Connect

    Abulfotuh, F.; Balcioglu, A.; Friedman, D.; Geisz, J.; Kurtz, S.

    1998-11-12

    This paper presents and discusses the first Deep-Level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) data obtained from measurements carried out on both Schottky barriers and homojunction devices of GaInNAs. The effect of N and In doping on the electrical properties of the GaNInAs devices, which results in structural defects and interface states, has been investigated. Moreover, the location and densities of deep levels related to the presence of N, In, and N+In are identified and correlated with the device performance. The data confirmed that the presence of N alone creates a high density of shallow hole traps related to the N atom and structural defects in the device. Doping by In, if present alone, also creates low-density deep traps (related to the In atom and structural defects) and extremely deep interface states. On the other hand, the co-presence of In and N eliminates both the interface states and levels related to structural defects. However, the device still has a high density of the shallow and deep traps that are responsible for the photocurrent loss in the GaNInAs device, together with the possible short diffusion length.

  3. Academic Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago City Colleges, IL.

    This statement outlines the academic policies of the City Colleges of Chicago. Part I outlines the Institution's academic standards, covering: (1) student class attendance; (2) the grading system; (3) mid-term grades; (4) the use of non-grade designations; i.e., administrative initiated withdrawal, auditor, no-show withdrawal, incomplete, and…

  4. [Study on the Application of NAS-Based Algorithm in the NIR Model Optimization].

    PubMed

    Geng, Ying; Xiang, Bing-ren; He, Lan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, net analysis signal (NAS)-based concept was introduced to the analysis of multi-component Ginkgo biloba leaf extracts. NAS algorithm was utilized for the preprocessing of spectra, and NAS-based two-dimensional correlation analysis was used for the optimization of NIR model building. Simultaneous quantitative models for three flavonol aglycones: quercetin, keampferol and isorhamnetin were established respectively. The NAS vectors calculated using two algorithms introduced from Lorber and Goicoechea and Olivieri (HLA/GO) were applied in the development of calibration models, the reconstructed spectra were used as input of PLS modeling. For the first time, NAS-based two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy was used for wave number selection. The regions appeared in the main diagonal were selected as useful regions for model building. The results implied that two NAS-based preprocessing methods were successfully used for the analysis of quercetin, keampferol and isorhamnetin with a decrease of factor number and an improvement of model robustness. NAS-based algorithm was proven to be a useful tool for the preprocessing of spectra and for optimization of model calibration. The above research showed a practical application value for the NIRS in the analysis of complex multi-component petrochemical medicine with unknown interference. PMID:26904808

  5. Determination of composition of non-homogeneous GaInNAs layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucicki, D.; Bielak, K.; Ściana, B.; Radziewicz, D.; Latkowska-Baranowska, M.; Kováč, J.; Vincze, A.; Tłaczała, M.

    2016-01-01

    Dilute nitride GaInNAs alloys grown on GaAs have become perspective materials for so called low-cost GaAs-based devices working within the optical wavelength range up to 1.6 μm. The multilayer structures of GaInNAs/GaAs multi-quantum well (MQW) samples usually are analyzed by using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements. However, demands for precise structural characterization of the GaInNAs containing heterostructures requires taking into consideration all inhomogeneities of such structures. This paper describes some of the material challenges and progress in structural characterization of GaInNAs layers. A new algorithm for structural characterization of dilute nitrides which bounds contactless electro-reflectance (CER) or photo-reflectance (PR) measurements and HRXRD analysis results together with GaInNAs quantum well band diagram calculation is presented. The triple quantum well (3QW) GaInNAs/GaAs structures grown by atmospheric-pressure metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (AP-MOVPE) were investigated according to the proposed algorithm. Thanks to presented algorithm, more precise structural data including the nonuniformity in the growth direction of GaInNAs/GaAs QWs were achieved. Therefore, the proposed algorithm is mentioned as a nondestructive method for characterization of multicomponent inhomogeneous semiconductor structures with quantum wells.

  6. The nitrate-sensing NasST system regulates nitrous oxide reductase and periplasmic nitrate reductase in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Cristina; Itakura, Manabu; Okubo, Takashi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Gotoh, Aina; Hidaka, Masafumi; Uchida, Takafumi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-10-01

    The soybean endosymbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum is able to scavenge the greenhouse gas N2O through the N2O reductase (Nos). In previous research, N2O emission from soybean rhizosphere was mitigated by B. japonicum Nos(++) strains (mutants with increased Nos activity). Here, we report the mechanism underlying the Nos(++) phenotype. Comparative analysis of Nos(++) mutant genomes showed that mutation of bll4572 resulted in Nos(++) phenotype. bll4572 encodes NasS, the nitrate (NO3(-))-sensor of the two-component NasST regulatory system. Transcriptional analyses of nosZ (encoding Nos) and other genes from the denitrification process in nasS and nasST mutants showed that, in the absence of NO3(-) , nasS mutation induces nosZ and nap (periplasmic nitrate reductase) via nasT. NO3(-) addition dissociated the NasS-NasT complex in vitro, suggesting the release of the activator NasT. Disruption of nasT led to a marked decrease in nosZ and nap transcription in cells incubated in the presence of NO3(-). Thus, although NasST is known to regulate the NO3(-)-mediated response of NO3(-) assimilation genes in bacteria, our results show that NasST regulates the NO3(-) -mediated response of nosZ and napE genes, from the dissimilatory denitrification pathway, in B. japonicum. PMID:24947409

  7. 78 FR 12951 - TRICARE; Elimination of the Non-Availability Statement (NAS) Requirement for Non-Emergency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... (NAS) Requirement for Non-Emergency Inpatient Mental Health Care AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... NAS is needed for non-emergency inpatient mental health care in order for a TRICARE Standard beneficiary's claim to be paid. Currently, NAS are required for non-emergency inpatient mental health care...

  8. Internet Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehr, William H.; Pupillo, Lorenzo Maria

    The Internet is now widely regarded as essential infrastructure for our global economy and society. It is in our homes and businesses. We use it to communicate and socialize, for research, and as a platform for E-commerce. In the late 1990s, much was predicted about what the Internet has become at present; but now, we have actual experience living with the Internet as a critical component of our everyday lives. Although the Internet has already had profound effects, there is much we have yet to realize. The present volume represents a third installment in a collaborative effort to highlight the all-encompassing, multidisciplinary implications of the Internet for public policy. The first installment was conceived in 1998, when we initiated plans to organize an international conference among academic, industry, and government officials to discuss the growing policy agenda posed by the Internet. The conference was hosted by the European Commission in Brussels in 1999 and brought together a diverse mix of perspectives on what the pressing policy issues would be confronting the Internet. All of the concerns identified remain with us today, including how to address the Digital Divide, how to modify intellectual property laws to accommodate the new realities of the Internet, what to do about Internet governance and name-space management, and how to evolve broadcast and telecommunications regulatory frameworks for a converged world.

  9. Identification and structure of the nasR gene encoding a nitrate- and nitrite-responsive positive regulator of nasFEDCBA (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, B S; Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1994-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilatory pathway. The structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases together with genes necessary for nitrate transport form an operon, nasFEDCBA. Expression of the nasF operon is regulated both by general nitrogen control and also by nitrate or nitrite induction. We have identified a gene, nasR, that is necessary for nitrate and nitrite induction. The nasR gene, located immediately upstream of the nasFEDCBA operon, encodes a 44-kDa protein. The NasR protein shares carboxyl-terminal sequence similarity with the AmiR protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the positive regulator of amiE (aliphatic amidase) gene expression. In addition, we present evidence that the nasF operon is not autogenously regulated. Images PMID:8051020

  10. Identification and structure of the nasR gene encoding a nitrate- and nitrite-responsive positive regulator of nasFEDCBA (nitrate assimilation) operon expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    PubMed

    Goldman, B S; Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1994-08-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources through the nitrate assimilatory pathway. The structural genes for assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases together with genes necessary for nitrate transport form an operon, nasFEDCBA. Expression of the nasF operon is regulated both by general nitrogen control and also by nitrate or nitrite induction. We have identified a gene, nasR, that is necessary for nitrate and nitrite induction. The nasR gene, located immediately upstream of the nasFEDCBA operon, encodes a 44-kDa protein. The NasR protein shares carboxyl-terminal sequence similarity with the AmiR protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the positive regulator of amiE (aliphatic amidase) gene expression. In addition, we present evidence that the nasF operon is not autogenously regulated. PMID:8051020

  11. Performance assessment of multijunction solar cells incorporating GaInNAsSb.

    PubMed

    Aho, Arto; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Guina, Mircea

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the characteristics of molecular beam epitaxy grown GaInNAsSb solar cells with different bandgaps using AM1.5G real sun illumination. Based on the solar cell diode characteristics and known parameters for state-of-the-art GaInP/GaAs and GaInP/GaAs/Ge cells, we have calculated the realistic potential efficiency increase for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb and GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb/Ge multijunction solar cells for different current matching conditions. The analyses reveal that realistic GaInNAsSb solar cell parameters, render possible an extraction efficiency of over 36% at 1-sun AM1.5D illumination. PACS: 88.40.hj; 88.40.jm; 88.40.jp; 81.15.Hi. PMID:24498981

  12. Low temperature grown GaNAsSb: A promising material for photoconductive switch application

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K. H.; Yoon, S. F.; Wicaksono, S.; Loke, W. K.; Li, D. S.; Saadsaoud, N.; Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Lampin, J. F.; Decoster, D.; Chazelas, J.

    2013-09-09

    We report a photoconductive switch using low temperature grown GaNAsSb as the active material. The GaNAsSb layer was grown at 200 °C by molecular beam epitaxy in conjunction with a radio frequency plasma-assisted nitrogen source and a valved antimony cracker source. The low temperature growth of the GaNAsSb layer increased the dark resistivity of the switch and shortened the carrier lifetime. The switch exhibited a dark resistivity of 10{sup 7} Ω cm, a photo-absorption of up to 2.1 μm, and a carrier lifetime of ∼1.3 ps. These results strongly support the suitability of low temperature grown GaNAsSb in the photoconductive switch application.

  13. The influence of nitrogen and antimony on the optical quality of InNAs(Sb) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latkowska, M.; Baranowski, M.; Linhart, W. M.; Janiaka, F.; Misiewicz, J.; Segercrantz, N.; Tuomisto, F.; Zhuang, Q.; Krier, A.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present detailed studies of the influence of nitrogen and antimony on the optical quality of InNAs(Sb) alloys. We employed photoluminescence, photoreflectance and positron annihilation spectroscopy to reveal the role of antimony and nitrogen on the improvement/degradation of the optical qualities of InNAs(Sb) alloys. A series of 1 μm-thick InNAs(Sb) layers with different nitrogen and antimony concentrations were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results of these investigations show that Sb atoms serve as a surfactant which effectively improves the optical quality of InNAsSb alloys. The influence of nitrogen on the optical quality however is not the same as to what has been reported for other dilute nitrides. We observed an improvement of the optical quality for some nitrogen contents. These issues are comprehensively examined and explained.

  14. Performance assessment of multijunction solar cells incorporating GaInNAsSb

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the characteristics of molecular beam epitaxy grown GaInNAsSb solar cells with different bandgaps using AM1.5G real sun illumination. Based on the solar cell diode characteristics and known parameters for state-of-the-art GaInP/GaAs and GaInP/GaAs/Ge cells, we have calculated the realistic potential efficiency increase for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb and GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb/Ge multijunction solar cells for different current matching conditions. The analyses reveal that realistic GaInNAsSb solar cell parameters, render possible an extraction efficiency of over 36% at 1-sun AM1.5D illumination. PACS 88.40.hj; 88.40.jm; 88.40.jp; 81.15.Hi PMID:24498981

  15. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project Subcommittee Final

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Chuck; Griner, James H.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Shively, Robert J.; Consiglio, Maria; Muller, Eric; Murphy, James; Kim, Sam

    2012-01-01

    UAS Integration in the NAS Project overview with details from each of the subprojects. Subprojects include: Communications, Certification, Integrated Test and Evaluation, Human Systems Integration, and Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability.

  16. Structural basis for proteasome formation controlled by an assembly chaperone nas2.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tadashi; Saeki, Yasushi; Hiromoto, Takeshi; Wang, Ying-Hui; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Yagi, Hirokazu; Yoshihara, Hidehito; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Mizushima, Tsunehiro; Tanaka, Keiji; Kato, Koichi

    2014-05-01

    Proteasome formation does not occur due to spontaneous self-organization but results from a highly ordered process assisted by several assembly chaperones. The assembly of the proteasome ATPase subunits is assisted by four client-specific chaperones, of which three have been structurally resolved. Here, we provide the structural basis for the working mechanisms of the last, hereto structurally uncharacterized assembly chaperone, Nas2. We revealed that Nas2 binds to the Rpt5 subunit in a bivalent mode: the N-terminal helical domain of Nas2 masks the Rpt1-interacting surface of Rpt5, whereas its C-terminal PDZ domain caps the C-terminal proteasome-activating motif. Thus, Nas2 operates as a proteasome activation blocker, offering a checkpoint during the formation of the 19S ATPase prior to its docking onto the proteolytic 20S core particle. PMID:24685148

  17. Shadow Mode Assessment Using Realistic Technologies for the National Airspace (SMART NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2014-01-01

    Develop a simulation and modeling capability that includes: (a) Assessment of multiple parallel universes, (b) Accepts data feeds, (c) Allows for live virtual constructive distribute environment, (d) Enables integrated examinations of concepts, algorithms, technologies and National Airspace System (NAS) architectures.

  18. NasR, a novel RNA-binding protein, mediates nitrate-responsive transcription antitermination of the Klebsiella oxytoca M5al nasF operon leader in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chai, W; Stewart, V

    1998-10-23

    In Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae), enzymes required for nitrate assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. Previous genetic studies led to the conclusion that nitrate and nitrite induction of nasF operon expression is determined by a transcriptional antitermination mechanism. In the presence of nitrate or nitrite, the nasR gene product is hypothesized to inhibit transcription termination at the factor-independent terminator site located in the nasF operon leader region. To test this model in vitro, we first purified NasR as both a maltose binding protein fusion form (MBP-NasR) and a His6-tagged form (His6-NasR). Templates for in vitro transcription contained the nasF operon leader region, with a substitution of the sigma70-dependent tac promoter for the native sigmaN-dependent promoter. We found that in vitro transcription of the leader template terminated at the terminator site, and that MBP-NasR and His6-NasR proteins both caused transcription readthrough of this site in response to nitrate or nitrite. Half-maximal antitermination required nitrate or nitrite at moderate (1 to 10 microM) concentrations, and several other anions tested, including chlorate, were without effect. Previous in vivo analysis of leader deletions identified regions required for both negative regulation (the terminator) and for positive regulation. Results from in vitro transcription of these deletion templates correlated fully with the in vivo analysis. Finally, electrophoresis mobility shift analysis revealed that His6-NasR bound specifically to nasF leader RNA. This binding was independent of nitrate in vitro. These results strongly support the conclusions drawn from previous in vivo analysis, and establish that NasR mediates ligand-responsive transcription antitermination through interaction with nasF leader RNA. PMID:9769209

  19. GaInNAs Junctions for Next-Generation Concentrators: Progress and Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, D. J.; Ptak, A. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Geisz, J. F.; Kiehl, J.

    2005-08-01

    We discuss progress in the development of GaInNAs junctions for application in next-generation multijunction concentrator cells. A significant development is the demonstration of near-100% internal quantum efficiencies in junctions grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Testing at high currents validates the compatibility of these devices with concentrator operation. The efficiencies of several next-generation multijunction structures incorporating these state-of-the-art GaInNAs junctions are projected.

  20. Policy opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Richard; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Acton, Loren W.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Bless, Robert C.; Brown, Robert A.; Burbidge, Geoffrey; Burke, Bernard F.; Clark, George W.; Cordova, France A.

    1991-01-01

    Recommendations are given regarding National Science Foundation (NSF) astronomy programs and the NASA Space Astrophysics program. The role of ground based astronomy is reviewed. The role of National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO) in ground-based night-time astronomical research is discussed. An enhanced Explored Program, costs and management of small and moderate space programs, the role of astrophysics within NASA's space exploration initiative, suborbital and airborne astronomical research, the problems of the Hubble Space Telescope, and astronomy education are discussed. Also covered are policy issues related to the role of science advisory committees, international cooperation and competition, archiving and distribution of astronomical data, and multi-wavelength observations of variable sources.

  1. The NAS Alert System: a look at the first eight years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Pam L.; Neilson, Matt; Huge, Dane H.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) database program (http://nas.er.usgs.gov) tracks the distribution of introduced aquatic organisms across the United States. Awareness of, and timely response to, novel species introductions by those involved in nonindigenous aquatic species management and research requires a framework for rapid dissemination of occurrence data as it is incorporated into the NAS database. In May 2004, the NAS program developed an alert system to notify registered users of new introductions as part of a national early detection/rapid response system. This article summarizes information on system users and dispatched alerts from the system's inception through the end of 2011. The NAS alert system has registered over 1,700 users, with approximately 800 current subscribers. A total of 1,189 alerts had been transmitted through 2011. More alerts were sent for Florida (134 alerts) than for any other state. Fishes comprise the largest taxonomic group of alerts (440), with mollusks, plants, and crustaceans each containing over 100 alerts. Most alerts were for organisms that were intentionally released (414 alerts), with shipping, escape from captivity, and hitchhiking also representing major vectors. To explore the archive of sent alerts and to register, the search and signup page for the alert system can be found online at http://nas.er.usgs.gov/AlertSystem/default.aspx.

  2. Hydrazine N Source for Growth of GaInNAs for Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, G. F.; Kurtz, S. R.; Norman, A. G.; Yeh, Y. C. M.

    1999-05-25

    We evaluate hydrazine (Hy) as a nitrogen precursor source for the growth of GaNAs and GaInNAs for application in 1-eV solar cells lattice-matched to GaAs, and compare it to the more commonly used dimethylhydrazine (DMHy). The incorporation efficiency of N into the GaNAs alloy is found to be one to two orders of magnitude higher with Hy than with DMHy. This high N incorporation makes convenient the growth of GaNAs at higher growth temperatures, Tg=650 C, and arsine flows, AsH3/III=44, than are generally possible with the use of DMHy. GaInNAs and GaNAs solar cells are grown under these growth conditions and compared to a GaAs cell grown under the same conditions to determine the extent to which the poor minority-carrier properties routinely observed for the N-containing material can be attributed to the growth conditions. Finally, the background carrier concentrations for Hy- and DMHy-grown material are compared, and little difference is found between the two sources..

  3. Dilute-As AlNAs Alloy for Deep-Ultraviolet Emitter

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chee-Keong; Borovac, Damir; Sun, Wei; Tansu, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The band structures of dilute-As AlNAs alloys with As composition ranging from 0% up to 12.5% are studied by using First-Principle Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculation. The energy band gap shows remarkable reduction from 6.19 eV to 3.87 eV with small amount of As content in the AlNAs alloy, which covers the deep ultraviolet (UV) spectral regime. A giant bowing parameter of 30.5 eV ± 0.5 eV for AlNAs alloy is obtained. In addition, our analysis shows that the crossover between crystal field split-off (CH) band and heavy hole (HH) bands occurs in the dilute-As AlNAs alloy with As-content of ~1.5%. This result implies the possibility of dominant transverse electric (TE)-polarized emission by using AlNAs alloy with dilute amount of As-content. Our findings indicate the potential of dilute-As AlNAs alloy as the new active region material for TE-polarized III-Nitride-based deep UV light emitters. PMID:26905060

  4. Policy Actors: Doing Policy Work in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen J.; Maguire, Meg; Braun, Annette; Hoskins, Kate

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the "policy work" of teacher actors in schools. It focuses on the "problem of meaning" and offers a typology of roles and positions through which teachers engage with policy and with which policies get "enacted". It argues that "policy work" is made up of a set of complex and differentiated activities which involve both…

  5. NAS Parallel Benchmark. Results 11-96: Performance Comparison of HPF and MPI Based NAS Parallel Benchmarks. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subash; Bailey, David; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High Performance Fortran (HPF), the high-level language for parallel Fortran programming, is based on Fortran 90. HALF was defined by an informal standards committee known as the High Performance Fortran Forum (HPFF) in 1993, and modeled on TMC's CM Fortran language. Several HPF features have since been incorporated into the draft ANSI/ISO Fortran 95, the next formal revision of the Fortran standard. HPF allows users to write a single parallel program that can execute on a serial machine, a shared-memory parallel machine, or a distributed-memory parallel machine. HPF eliminates the complex, error-prone task of explicitly specifying how, where, and when to pass messages between processors on distributed-memory machines, or when to synchronize processors on shared-memory machines. HPF is designed in a way that allows the programmer to code an application at a high level, and then selectively optimize portions of the code by dropping into message-passing or calling tuned library routines as 'extrinsics'. Compilers supporting High Performance Fortran features first appeared in late 1994 and early 1995 from Applied Parallel Research (APR) Digital Equipment Corporation, and The Portland Group (PGI). IBM introduced an HPF compiler for the IBM RS/6000 SP/2 in April of 1996. Over the past two years, these implementations have shown steady improvement in terms of both features and performance. The performance of various hardware/ programming model (HPF and MPI (message passing interface)) combinations will be compared, based on latest NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmark (NPB) results, thus providing a cross-machine and cross-model comparison. Specifically, HPF based NPB results will be compared with MPI based NPB results to provide perspective on performance currently obtainable using HPF versus MPI or versus hand-tuned implementations such as those supplied by the hardware vendors. In addition we would also present NPB (Version 1.0) performance results for

  6. Testing New Programming Paradigms with NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, H.; Frumkin, M.; Schultz, M.; Yan, J.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past decade, high performance computing has evolved rapidly, not only in hardware architectures but also with increasing complexity of real applications. Technologies have been developing to aim at scaling up to thousands of processors on both distributed and shared memory systems. Development of parallel programs on these computers is always a challenging task. Today, writing parallel programs with message passing (e.g. MPI) is the most popular way of achieving scalability and high performance. However, writing message passing programs is difficult and error prone. Recent years new effort has been made in defining new parallel programming paradigms. The best examples are: HPF (based on data parallelism) and OpenMP (based on shared memory parallelism). Both provide simple and clear extensions to sequential programs, thus greatly simplify the tedious tasks encountered in writing message passing programs. HPF is independent of memory hierarchy, however, due to the immaturity of compiler technology its performance is still questionable. Although use of parallel compiler directives is not new, OpenMP offers a portable solution in the shared-memory domain. Another important development involves the tremendous progress in the internet and its associated technology. Although still in its infancy, Java promisses portability in a heterogeneous environment and offers possibility to "compile once and run anywhere." In light of testing these new technologies, we implemented new parallel versions of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPBs) with HPF and OpenMP directives, and extended the work with Java and Java-threads. The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of alternative programming paradigms. NPBs consist of five kernels and three simulated applications that mimic the computation and data movement of large scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. We started with the serial version included in NPB2.3. Optimization of memory and cache usage

  7. Agriculture Policy Is Health Policy

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Richard J.; Minjares, Ray; Naumoff, Kyra S.; Shrimali, Bina Patel; Martin, Lisa K.

    2009-01-01

    The Farm Bill is meant to supplement and secure farm incomes, ensure a stable food supply, and support the American farm economy. Over time, however, it has evolved into a system that creates substantial health impacts, both directly and indirectly. By generating more profit for food producers and less for family farmers; by effectively subsidizing the production of lower-cost fats, sugars, and oils that intensify the health-destroying obesity epidemic; by amplifying environmentally destructive agricultural practices that impact air, water, and other resources, the Farm Bill influences the health of Americans more than is immediately apparent. In this article, we outline three major public health issues influenced by American farm policy. These are (1) rising obesity; (2) food safety; and (3) environmental health impacts, especially exposure to toxic substances and pesticides. PMID:23144677

  8. Management Matters. Selection Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most important policy documents for a school library media center is the selection policy or the collection development policy. A well-developed selection policy provides a rationale for the selection decisions made by the school library media specialist. A selection policy represents the criteria against which a challenged book is…

  9. Pegram Lecture: Science Policy & Current Policy Issues

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Marburger, III

    2008-11-18

    Drawing on his experience as a research scientist, academic administrator, national laboratory director and presidential science advisor, Marburger focuses on the intellectual machinery of science policy and current policy issues.

  10. General Nitrogen Regulation of Nitrate Assimilation Regulatory Gene nasR Expression in Klebsiella oxytoca M5al

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Stephen Qitu; Chai, Weihang; Lin, Janine T.; Stewart, Valley

    1999-01-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can assimilate nitrate and nitrite by using enzymes encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. Expression of the nasF operon is controlled by general nitrogen regulation (Ntr) via the NtrC transcription activator and by pathway-specific nitrate and nitrite induction via the NasR transcription antiterminator. This paper reports our analysis of nasR gene expression. We constructed strains bearing single-copy Φ(nasR-lacZ) operon fusions within the chromosomal rhaBAD-rhaSR locus. The expression of ΔrhaBS::[Φ(nasR-lacZ)] operon fusions was induced about 10-fold during nitrogen-limited growth. Induction was reduced in both ntrC and rpoN null mutants, indicating that Ntr control of nasR gene expression requires the NtrC and ςN (ς54) proteins. Sequence inspection of the nasR control region reveals an apparent ςN-dependent promoter but no apparent NtrC protein binding sites. Analysis of site-specific mutations coupled with primer extension analysis authenticated the ςN-dependent nasR promoter. Fusion constructs with only about 70 nucleotides (nt) upstream of the transcription initiation site exhibited patterns of β-galactosidase expression indistinguishable from Φ(nasR-lacZ) constructs with about 470 nt upstream. Expression was independent of the Nac protein, implying that NtrC is a direct activator of nasR transcription. Together, these results indicate that nasR gene expression does not require specific upstream NtrC-binding sequences, as previously noted for argT gene expression in Salmonella typhimurium (G. Schmitz, K. Nikaido, and G. F.-L. Ames, Mol. Gen. Genet. 215:107–117, 1988). PMID:10572131

  11. Identification and functional analysis of a nitrate assimilation operon nasACKBDEF from Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhihui; Gao, Jin; Ding, Xiaoming; Wang, Jin; Chiao, Juishen; Zhao, Guoping

    2011-07-01

    Nitrate assimilation has been well studied for Gram-negative bacteria but not so much in the Gram-positive actinomycetes up to date. In a rifamycin SV-producing actinomycete, Amycolatopsis mediterranei strain U32, nitrate not only can be used as a sole nitrogen source but also remarkably stimulates the antibiotic production along with regulating the related metabolic enzymes. A gene cluster of nasACKBDEF was cloned from a U32 genomic library by in situ hybridization screening with a heterogeneous nasB probe and confirmed later by whole genome sequence, corresponding to the protein coding genes of AMED_1121 to AMED_1127. These genes were co-transcribed as an operon, concomitantly repressed by ammonium while activated with supplement of either nitrate or nitrite. Genetic and biochemical analyses identified the essential nitrate/nitrite assimilation functions of the encoded proteins, orderly, the assimilatory nitrate reductase catalytic subunit (NasA), nitrate reductase electron transfer subunit (NasC), nitrate/nitrite transporter (NasK), assimilatory nitrite reductase large subunit (NasB) and small subunit (NasD), bifunctional uroporphyrinogen-III synthase (NasE), and an unknown function protein (NasF). Comparing rifamycin SV production and the level of transcription of nasB and rifE from U32 and its individual nas mutants in Bennet medium with or without nitrate indicated that nitrate assimilation function encoded by the nas operon played an essential role in the "nitrate stimulated" rifamycin production but had no effect upon the transcription regulation of the primary and secondary metabolic genes related to rifamycin biosynthesis. PMID:21424691

  12. General nitrogen regulation of nitrate assimilation regulatory gene nasR expression in Klebsiella oxytoca M5al.

    PubMed

    Wu, S Q; Chai, W; Lin, J T; Stewart, V

    1999-12-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can assimilate nitrate and nitrite by using enzymes encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. Expression of the nasF operon is controlled by general nitrogen regulation (Ntr) via the NtrC transcription activator and by pathway-specific nitrate and nitrite induction via the NasR transcription antiterminator. This paper reports our analysis of nasR gene expression. We constructed strains bearing single-copy Phi(nasR-lacZ) operon fusions within the chromosomal rhaBAD-rhaSR locus. The expression of DeltarhaBS::[Phi(nasR-lacZ)] operon fusions was induced about 10-fold during nitrogen-limited growth. Induction was reduced in both ntrC and rpoN null mutants, indicating that Ntr control of nasR gene expression requires the NtrC and sigma(N) (sigma(54)) proteins. Sequence inspection of the nasR control region reveals an apparent sigma(N)-dependent promoter but no apparent NtrC protein binding sites. Analysis of site-specific mutations coupled with primer extension analysis authenticated the sigma(N)-dependent nasR promoter. Fusion constructs with only about 70 nucleotides (nt) upstream of the transcription initiation site exhibited patterns of beta-galactosidase expression indistinguishable from Phi(nasR-lacZ) constructs with about 470 nt upstream. Expression was independent of the Nac protein, implying that NtrC is a direct activator of nasR transcription. Together, these results indicate that nasR gene expression does not require specific upstream NtrC-binding sequences, as previously noted for argT gene expression in Salmonella typhimurium (G. Schmitz, K. Nikaido, and G. F.-L. Ames, Mol. Gen. Genet. 215:107-117, 1988). PMID:10572131

  13. English and Spanish "Para Un Futuro"--Or Just English? Immigrant Family Perspectives on Two-Way Immersion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorner, Lisa Marie

    2010-01-01

    This article considers immigrants' perspectives on language immersion education. Data are drawn from a longitudinal research project that examined one suburban school district's construction of a two-way immersion (TWI), bilingual education policy. Analyses focus on 18 months of participant observation with six Mexican immigrant families who had…

  14. Examination of Frameworks for Safe Integration of Intelligent Small UAS into the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed framework for the safe integration of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS). The paper briefly examines the potential uses of sUAS to build an understanding of the location and frequency of potential future flight operations based on the future applications of the sUAS systems. The paper then examines the types of systems that would be required to meet the application-level demand to determine "classes" of platforms and operations. A framework for categorization of the "intelligence" level of the UAS is postulated for purposes of NAS integration. Finally, constraints on the intelligent systems are postulated to ensure their ease of integration into the NAS.

  15. Epitaxial growth and picosecond carrier dynamics of GaInAs/GaInNAs superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.; Mangeney, J.; Travers, L.; Harmand, J. C.; Mauguin, O.; Patriarche, G.

    2009-10-05

    We study GaInAs/GaInNAs superlattice structures grown on InP substrate as potential candidates for photoconductive terahertz devices or saturable absorbers working at 1.55 {mu}m wavelength. The N-rich GaInNAs layers are flat, with no three-dimensional islanding, and act as trapping layers where carriers can recombine rapidly. The carrier lifetime in GaInAs/GaInNAs superlattice was measured for various growth parameters using time-resolved differential transmission experiments at 1.55 {mu}m wavelength. The carrier lifetime is found to depend strongly on N content and can be reduced down to 3.8 ps for samples with 14% of N. The mechanisms involved in the capture process of photocarriers are discussed.

  16. GaNAsP: An intermediate band semiconductor grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y. J.; Yu, K. M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Luce, A. V.; Ting, M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Tu, C. W.

    2013-03-01

    Dilute nitride GaNAsP thin films were grown via a GaAsP metamorphic buffer on GaP(100) substrate with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The compositions of this III-V-V-V compound were determined by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis. Photoreflectance shows two distinctive transitions from the valence band to the split conduction bands due to N incorporation. Photoluminescence and optical absorption show the fundamental bandgap of Ga(N)AsP is largely tailored by the small amount of N. The observed multiband characteristics and the bandgap tunability of GaNAsP are two merits that fit into the intermediate-band solar cell roadmap, and GaNAsP of high crystal quality provides a strong candidate for intermediate band solar cell materials.

  17. Improved performance in GaInNAs solar cells by hydrogen passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.; Whiteside, V. R.; Keay, J. C.; Meleco, A.; Sellers, I. R.; Hossain, K.; Golding, T. D.; Leroux, M.; Al Khalfioui, M.

    2015-04-06

    The effect of UV-activated hydrogenation on the performance of GaInNAs solar cells is presented. A proof-of-principle investigation was performed on non-optimum GaInNAs cells, which allowed a clearer investigation of the role of passivation on the intrinsic nitrogen-related defects in these materials. Upon optimized hydrogenation of GaInNAs, a significant reduction in the presence of defect and impurity based luminescence is observed as compared to that of unpassivated reference material. This improvement in the optical properties is directly transferred to an improved performance in solar cell operation, with a more than two-fold improvement in the external quantum efficiency and short circuit current density upon hydrogenation. Temperature dependent photovoltaic measurements indicate a strong contribution of carrier localization and detrapping processes, with non-radiative processes dominating in the reference materials, and evidence for additional strong radiative losses in the hydrogenated solar cells.

  18. GaNAsP: An intermediate band semiconductor grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Y. J.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Kudrawiec, R.; Luce, A. V.; Ting, M.; Tu, C. W.

    2013-03-18

    Dilute nitride GaNAsP thin films were grown via a GaAsP metamorphic buffer on GaP(100) substrate with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The compositions of this III-V-V-V compound were determined by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis. Photoreflectance shows two distinctive transitions from the valence band to the split conduction bands due to N incorporation. Photoluminescence and optical absorption show the fundamental bandgap of Ga(N)AsP is largely tailored by the small amount of N. The observed multiband characteristics and the bandgap tunability of GaNAsP are two merits that fit into the intermediate-band solar cell roadmap, and GaNAsP of high crystal quality provides a strong candidate for intermediate band solar cell materials.

  19. TRICARE; elimination of the non-availability statement (NAS) requirement for non-emergency inpatient mental health care. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-02-26

    This final rule eliminates the requirement that states a NAS is needed for non-emergency inpatient mental health care in order for a TRICARE Standard beneficiary's claim to be paid. Currently, NAS are required for non-emergency inpatient mental health care for TRICARE Standard beneficiaries who live within a military treatment facility catchment area. At this time, the number of NASs issued is negligible as most mental health admissions are emergency admissions. Requiring a NAS for a relatively few non-emergency inpatient mental health admissions is disproportionate to the cost of maintaining the systems necessary to process and coordinate the NAS. PMID:23476989

  20. Solar cells with (BGaIn)As and (InGa)(NAs) as absorption layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibiger, G.; Krahmer, C.; Bauer, J.; Herrnberger, H.; Gottschalch, V.

    2004-12-01

    (BGaIn)As and (InGa)(NAs) have been tested for the application in solar cells. Single layers have been grown lattice matched on GaAs using MOVPE at low growth temperatures. Optical properties, i.e. band-gap energies and optical constants have been determined with photoluminescence and spectroscopic ellipsometry. n- and p-Type doping have been achieved with disilane and diethylzinc as doping precursors, respectively. Corresponding free carrier properties are discussed based on Hall measurements. Different solar cell structures with n- and p-doped (BGaIn)As and (InGa)(NAs) as base layer have been grown and successfully tested.

  1. Compositional dependence of the band gap in Ga(NAsP) quantum well heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandieri, K.; Ludewig, P.; Wegele, T.; Beyer, A.; Kunert, B.; Springer, P.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Koch, S. W.; Volz, K.; Stolz, W.

    2015-08-01

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of the composition dependence of the direct band gap energy in Ga(NAsP)/GaP quantum well heterostructures grown on either (001) GaP- or Si-substrates. The theoretical description takes into account the band anti-crossing model for the conduction band as well as the modification of the valence subband structure due to the strain resulting from the pseudomorphic epitaxial growth on the respective substrate. The composition dependence of the direct band gap of Ga(NAsP) is obtained for a wide range of nitrogen and phosphorus contents relevant for laser applications on Si-substrate.

  2. The role of specialized processors in the NAS program - Retrospective/prospective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Eugene; Preston, Frank

    1988-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program was initiated by NASA to establish a national resource for scientific research and engineering applications of computational fluid dynamics. This paper examines the changing views of the roles of general purpose and special purpose processors in this program in response to changes in technology as well as changes in perceived needs. The time period covered extends from more than 10 years ago, through the present, and concludes with some speculative concepts for the future roles of specialized processors in the advanced NAS system.

  3. Compositional dependence of the band gap in Ga(NAsP) quantum well heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Jandieri, K. Ludewig, P.; Wegele, T.; Beyer, A.; Kunert, B.; Springer, P.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Koch, S. W.; Volz, K.; Stolz, W.

    2015-08-14

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of the composition dependence of the direct band gap energy in Ga(NAsP)/GaP quantum well heterostructures grown on either (001) GaP- or Si-substrates. The theoretical description takes into account the band anti-crossing model for the conduction band as well as the modification of the valence subband structure due to the strain resulting from the pseudomorphic epitaxial growth on the respective substrate. The composition dependence of the direct band gap of Ga(NAsP) is obtained for a wide range of nitrogen and phosphorus contents relevant for laser applications on Si-substrate.

  4. Comparison of Na/S and LiAl/FeS batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoedler, R.

    NaS and LiAl/FeS batteries, both promising candidates for electric-vehicle propulsion and load leveling applications, are compared by assessing 25 different properties of each system. The most important of these properties, including the specific energy of cells and batteries, maximum specific power, lifetime, safety, key technical problems, and economic considerations, are discussed in detail. It is shown that both types of batteries qualify as high-performance batteries. The NaS system has a slight advantage for applications in West Germany (mainly electric vehicle propulsion; no Li resources); for applications in the United States (electric vehicle propulsion and load leveling), both systems are equally suitable.

  5. Space Policy and Humanities Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frodeman, Robert

    2005-05-01

    In his 14 January 2004 speech on the future of space exploration, U.S. President George W. Bush proposed a return to the Moon followed by ``human missions to Mars and to worlds beyond.'' Bush's proposal called for robotic missions and new manned space vehicles to replace an aging set of space shuttles, and sought a new justification for space exploration. In the words of former NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe, in The Vision for Space Exploration, this plan is not ``merely for the sake of adventure, however exciting that might be, but seeks answers to profound scientific and philosophic questions.'' Bush's proposal stimulated renewed reflection on the goals of our nation's space policy and on the means (financial and otherwise) for achieving these goals. A return to such first-order questioning of our goals for space has been long overdue. The Columbia Accident Investigation Board, which was convened by NASA in 2003 following the shuttle disaster, described ``a lack, over the past three decades, of any national mandate providing NASA a compelling mission requiring human presence in space'' [Keiper, 2003].

  6. Transcriptional profile reveals altered hepatic lipid and cholesterol metabolism in hyposulfatemic NaS1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul Anthony; Gardiner, Brooke; Grimmond, Sean; Markovich, Daniel

    2006-07-12

    Sulfate plays an essential role in human growth and development, and its circulating levels are maintained by the renal Na+-SO42- cotransporter, NaS1. We previously generated a NaS1 knockout (Nas1-/-) mouse, an animal model for hyposulfatemia, that exhibits reduced growth and liver abnormalities including hepatomegaly. In this study, we investigated the hepatic gene expression profile of Nas1-/- mice using oligonucleotide microarrays. The mRNA expression levels of 92 genes with known functional roles in metabolism, cell signaling, cell defense, immune response, cell structure, transcription, or protein synthesis were increased (n = 51) or decreased (n = 41) in Nas1-/- mice when compared with Nas1+/+ mice. The most upregulated transcript levels in Nas1-/- mice were found for the sulfotransferase genes, Sult3a1 (approximately 500% increase) and Sult2a2 (100% increase), whereas the metallothionein-1 gene, Mt1, was among the most downregulated genes (70% decrease). Several genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism, including Scd1, Acly, Gpam, Elov16, Acsl5, Mvd, Insig1, and Apoa4, were found to be upregulated (> or = 30% increase) in Nas1-/- mice. In addition, Nas1-/- mice exhibited increased levels of hepatic lipid (approximately 16% increase), serum cholesterol (approximately 20% increase), and low-density lipoprotein (approximately 100% increase) and reduced hepatic glycogen (approximately 50% decrease) levels. In conclusion, these data suggest an altered lipid and cholesterol metabolism in the hyposulfatemic Nas1-/- mouse and provide new insights into the metabolic state of the liver in Nas1-/- mice. PMID:16621889

  7. Teachers and the Policy Reform Agenda: Becoming Policy Aware, Policy Wise and Policy Active.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidu, Sham

    2011-01-01

    Stemming from my article entitled, "Teachers and the Policy Reform Agenda: The Changing Emphasis in Educational Policy Analysis," this article describes the changing landscape of educational policy analysis. Here, I illustrate that traditionally teachers have been, to a certain degree, involved in policy processes. However, the degree to which…

  8. Operations Policy Manual, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teacher Education Accreditation Council, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Teacher Education Accreditation Council's (TEAC's) "Operations Policy Manual" outlines all of TEAC's current policies and procedures related to TEAC members, TEAC administration, and the public, and includes the Bylaws of the Teacher Education Accreditation Council. Contents include: (1) Policies Related to TEAC Members; (2) Policies Related…

  9. 48 CFR 852.236-82 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (without NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (without NAS). 852.236-82 Section 852.236-82 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses...

  10. Composition modulation in GaInNAs quantum wells: Comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, M.; González, D.; Hopkinson, M.; Gutiérrez, M.; Navaretti, P.; Liu, H. Y.; García, R.

    2005-04-01

    Composition modulation observed in GaInNAs quantum wells imposes an important handicap to their potential application within optical components, particularly as the indium and nitrogen contents are increased to reach longer wavelengths. In this paper, we compare our experimental results of phase separation in GaInNAs quantum wells grown at different temperatures with recent theoretical models of spinodal decomposition from the literature. This comparison has shown that the regular solution approximation, which explains the higher composition modulation compared to GaInAs samples, provides a more appropriate explanation of GaInNAs decomposition than the usual delta lattice-parameter approximation. Transmission electron microscopy shows no composition modulation contrasts with the chemical sensitive 002 dark field reflection and a strong increase in the intensity of the strain contrasts observed with 220 bright field reflection as the growth temperature increases from 360to460°C. These observations can be explained by an uncoupling between N and In composition profiles forming separate In-rich and N-rich regions according to the regular solution approximation model. We therefore believe that the compositional fluctuations in GaInNAs are not only due to GaInAs decomposition, but that an uncoupled modulation of the III and V elements is also present.

  11. 48 CFR 852.236-83 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (including NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Failure either to meet schedules in Section Network Analysis System (NAS), or to process the Interim Arrow Diagram/Complete Project Arrow Diagram; (iii) Failure to present submittals in a timely manner; or (iv... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payments under...

  12. Beyond the NAS Parallel Benchmarks: Measuring Dynamic Program Performance and Grid Computing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Biswas, Rupak; Frumkin, Michael; Feng, Huiyu; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The contents include: 1) A brief history of NPB; 2) What is (not) being measured by NPB; 3) Irregular dynamic applications (UA Benchmark); and 4) Wide area distributed computing (NAS Grid Benchmarks-NGB). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  13. A thermo-mechanical stress prediction model for contemporary planar sodium sulfur (NaS) cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Keeyoung; Colker, Jeffrey P.; Cao, Yuzhe; Kim, Goun; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a comprehensive finite-element analysis (FEA) computational model to accurately predict the thermo-mechanical stresses at heterogeneous joints and components of large-size sodium sulfur (NaS) cells during thermal cycling. Quantification of the thermo-mechanical stress is important because the accumulation of stress during cell assembly and/or operation is one of the critical issues in developing practical planar NaS cells. The computational model is developed based on relevant experimental assembly and operation conditions to predict the detailed stress field of a state-of-the-art planar NaS cell. Prior to the freeze-and-thaw thermal cycle simulation, residual stresses generated from the actual high temperature cell assembly procedures are calculated and implemented into the subsequent model. The calculation results show that large stresses are developed on the outer surface of the insulating header and the solid electrolyte, where component fracture is frequently observed in the experimental cell fabrication process. The impacts of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of glass materials and the thicknesses of cell container on the stress accumulation are also evaluated to improve the cell manufacturing procedure and to guide the material choices for enhanced thermo-mechanical stability of large-size NaS cells.

  14. Comparison of Origin 2000 and Origin 3000 Using NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, Raymond D.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes results of benchmark tests on the Origin 3000 system currently being installed at the NASA Ames National Advanced Supercomputing facility. This machine will ultimately contain 1024 R14K processors. The first part of the system, installed in November, 2000 and named mendel, is an Origin 3000 with 128 R12K processors. For comparison purposes, the tests were also run on lomax, an Origin 2000 with R12K processors. The BT, LU, and SP application benchmarks in the NAS Parallel Benchmark Suite and the kernel benchmark FT were chosen to determine system performance and measure the impact of changes on the machine as it evolves. Having been written to measure performance on Computational Fluid Dynamics applications, these benchmarks are assumed appropriate to represent the NAS workload. Since the NAS runs both message passing (MPI) and shared-memory, compiler directive type codes, both MPI and OpenMP versions of the benchmarks were used. The MPI versions used were the latest official release of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks, version 2.3. The OpenMP versiqns used were PBN3b2, a beta version that is in the process of being released. NPB 2.3 and PBN 3b2 are technically different benchmarks, and NPB results are not directly comparable to PBN results.

  15. 48 CFR 852.236-82 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (without NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (without NAS). 852.236-82 Section 852.236-82 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses...

  16. UAS Integration in the NAS Project: Integrated Test and LVC Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jim; Hoang, Ty

    2015-01-01

    Overview presentation of the Integrated Test and Evaluation sub-project of the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS). The emphasis of the presentation is the Live, Virtual, and Constructive (LVC) system (a broadly used name for classifying modeling and simulation) infrastructure and use of external assets and connection.

  17. UAS-NAS Integrated Human in the Loop: Test Environment Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jim; Otto, Neil; Jovic, Srba

    2015-01-01

    The desire and ability to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is of increasing urgency. The application of unmanned aircraft to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UAS to the NAS. UAS represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the NAS. NASA's UAS Integration in the NAS Project is conducting research in the areas of Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability (SSI), Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Communication to support reducing the barriers of UAS access to the NAS. This research was broken into two research themes namely, UAS Integration and Test Infrastructure. UAS Integration focuses on airspace integration procedures and performance standards to enable UAS integration in the air transportation system, covering Sense and Avoid (SAA) performance standards, command and control performance standards, and human systems integration. The focus of the Test Infrastructure theme was to enable development and validation of airspace integration procedures and performance standards, including the execution of integrated test and evaluation. In support of the integrated test and evaluation efforts, the Project developed an adaptable, scalable, and schedulable relevant test environment incorporating live, virtual, and constructive elements capable of validating concepts and technologies for unmanned aircraft systems to safely operate in the NAS. To accomplish this task, the Project planned to conduct three integrated events: a Human-in-the-Loop simulation and two Flight Test series that integrated key concepts, technologies and/or procedures in a relevant air traffic environment. Each of

  18. Meeting of Experts on NASA's Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace Systems (NAS) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Jean; Bauer, Jeff; Bixby, C.J.; Lauderdale, Todd; Shively, Jay; Griner, James; Hayhurst, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Topics discussed include: Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Integrated Systems Research Program (ISRP) and UAS Integration in the NAS Project; UAS Integration into the NAS Project; Separation Assurance and Collision Avoidance; Pilot Aircraft Interface Objectives/Rationale; Communication; Certification; and Integrated Tests and Evaluations.

  19. 76 FR 57690 - TRICARE; Elimination of the Non-Availability Statement (NAS) Requirement for Non-Emergency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... (NAS) Requirement for Non-Emergency Inpatient Mental Health Care AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... states a NAS is needed for non-emergency inpatient mental health care in order for a TRICARE Standard... the MTF catchment area for non-emergency inpatient mental health care. Currently, the number of...

  20. Defect study of molecular beam epitaxy grown undoped GaInNAsSb thin film using junction-capacitance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2013-02-18

    Defects in undoped GaInNAsSb thin film (i-GaInNAsSb) were investigated by junction-capacitance technique using admittance and transient photocapacitance (TPC) spectroscopy. An electron trap D2 was identified at 0.34 eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}) of i-GaInNAsSb using admittance spectroscopy. Optical transition of valance band (E{sub V}) electrons to a localized state OH1 (E{sub V} + 0.75 eV) was manifested in negative TPC signal. Combined activation energy of OH1 and D2 defect corresponds to the band-gap of i-GaInNAsSb, suggesting that OH1/D2 acts as an efficient recombination center. TPC signal at {approx}1.59 eV above E{sub V} was attributed to the nitrogen-induced localized state in GaInNAsSb.

  1. Nitrogen and oxygen regulation of Bacillus subtilis nasDEF encoding NADH-dependent nitrite reductase by TnrA and ResDE.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M M; Hoffmann, T; Zhu, Y; Jahn, D

    1998-10-01

    The nitrate and nitrite reductases of Bacillus subtilis have two different physiological functions. Under conditions of nitrogen limitation, these enzymes catalyze the reduction of nitrate via nitrite to ammonia for the anabolic incorporation of nitrogen into biomolecules. They also function catabolically in anaerobic respiration, which involves the use of nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors. Two distinct nitrate reductases, encoded by narGHI and nasBC, function in anabolic and catabolic nitrogen metabolism, respectively. However, as reported herein, a single NADH-dependent, soluble nitrite reductase encoded by the nasDE genes is required for both catabolic and anabolic processes. The nasDE genes, together with nasBC (encoding assimilatory nitrate reductase) and nasF (required for nitrite reductase siroheme cofactor formation), constitute the nas operon. Data presented show that transcription of nasDEF is driven not only by the previously characterized nas operon promoter but also from an internal promoter residing between the nasC and nasD genes. Transcription from both promoters is activated by nitrogen limitation during aerobic growth by the nitrogen regulator, TnrA. However, under conditions of oxygen limitation, nasDEF expression and nitrite reductase activity were significantly induced. Anaerobic induction of nasDEF required the ResDE two-component regulatory system and the presence of nitrite, indicating partial coregulation of NasDEF with the respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI during nitrate respiration. PMID:9765565

  2. Nitrogen and Oxygen Regulation of Bacillus subtilis nasDEF Encoding NADH-Dependent Nitrite Reductase by TnrA and ResDE

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Michiko M.; Hoffmann, Tamara; Zhu, Yi; Jahn, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    The nitrate and nitrite reductases of Bacillus subtilis have two different physiological functions. Under conditions of nitrogen limitation, these enzymes catalyze the reduction of nitrate via nitrite to ammonia for the anabolic incorporation of nitrogen into biomolecules. They also function catabolically in anaerobic respiration, which involves the use of nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors. Two distinct nitrate reductases, encoded by narGHI and nasBC, function in anabolic and catabolic nitrogen metabolism, respectively. However, as reported herein, a single NADH-dependent, soluble nitrite reductase encoded by the nasDE genes is required for both catabolic and anabolic processes. The nasDE genes, together with nasBC (encoding assimilatory nitrate reductase) and nasF (required for nitrite reductase siroheme cofactor formation), constitute the nas operon. Data presented show that transcription of nasDEF is driven not only by the previously characterized nas operon promoter but also from an internal promoter residing between the nasC and nasD genes. Transcription from both promoters is activated by nitrogen limitation during aerobic growth by the nitrogen regulator, TnrA. However, under conditions of oxygen limitation, nasDEF expression and nitrite reductase activity were significantly induced. Anaerobic induction of nasDEF required the ResDE two-component regulatory system and the presence of nitrite, indicating partial coregulation of NasDEF with the respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI during nitrate respiration. PMID:9765565

  3. An Integrated Gate Turnaround Management Concept Leveraging Big Data Analytics for NAS Performance Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, William W.; Ingram, Carla D.; Ahlquist, Douglas Kurt; Chachad, Girish H.

    2016-01-01

    "Gate Turnaround" plays a key role in the National Air Space (NAS) gate-to-gate performance by receiving aircraft when they reach their destination airport, and delivering aircraft into the NAS upon departing from the gate and subsequent takeoff. The time spent at the gate in meeting the planned departure time is influenced by many factors and often with considerable uncertainties. Uncertainties such as weather, early or late arrivals, disembarking and boarding passengers, unloading/reloading cargo, aircraft logistics/maintenance services and ground handling, traffic in ramp and movement areas for taxi-in and taxi-out, and departure queue management for takeoff are likely encountered on the daily basis. The Integrated Gate Turnaround Management (IGTM) concept is leveraging relevant historical data to support optimization of the gate operations, which include arrival, at the gate, departure based on constraints (e.g., available gates at the arrival, ground crew and equipment for the gate turnaround, and over capacity demand upon departure), and collaborative decision-making. The IGTM concept provides effective information services and decision tools to the stakeholders, such as airline dispatchers, gate agents, airport operators, ramp controllers, and air traffic control (ATC) traffic managers and ground controllers to mitigate uncertainties arising from both nominal and off-nominal airport gate operations. IGTM will provide NAS stakeholders customized decision making tools through a User Interface (UI) by leveraging historical data (Big Data), net-enabled Air Traffic Management (ATM) live data, and analytics according to dependencies among NAS parameters for the stakeholders to manage and optimize the NAS performance in the gate turnaround domain. The application will give stakeholders predictable results based on the past and current NAS performance according to selected decision trees through the UI. The predictable results are generated based on analysis of the

  4. Ubiquity and Diversity of Heterotrophic Bacterial nasA Genes in Diverse Marine Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuexia; Dang, Hongyue; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase) gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III). Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be

  5. Ubiquity and diversity of heterotrophic bacterial nasA genes in diverse marine environments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuexia; Dang, Hongyue; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase) gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III). Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be

  6. Decentralization and Policy Design. CPRE Policy Briefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Policy Research in Education, New Brunswick, NJ.

    This policy brief focuses on design issues surrounding decentralization policies, drawing from the following three reports: "Working Models of Choice in Public Education," by Richard F. Elmore; "Diversity Amidst Standardization: State Differential Treatment of Districts," by Susan H. Fuhrman; and "School District Restructuring in Santa Fe, New…

  7. [Energy policy rather than climate policy].

    PubMed

    Kroonenberg, Salomon B

    2009-01-01

    Energy policy and climate policy are two different issues and should not be treated as if they were the same. Whether the climate gets warmer or colder, saving energy and developing sustainable forms of energy production remain of paramount importance because fossil hydrocarbons are likely to be exhausted soon. But climate policy is a fallacy: it is human arrogance to think we can control the climate by reducing emissions and by storing CO2 underground. In spite of rising CO2 levels, the climate has cooled down slightly over the past decade. Since the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) did not predict this, it is questionable whether they can reliably predict warming. Other factors such as solar activity are probably more important for climate than greenhouse gases. The danger of coupling energy policy to climate policy is evident: if the climate cools down, people will lose belief in the greenhouse effect and therefore also lose interest in saving energy. PMID:20025789

  8. First-principle natural band alignment of GaN / dilute-As GaNAs alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Chee-Keong Tansu, Nelson

    2015-01-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the local density approximation (LDA) functional are employed to investigate the band alignment of dilute-As GaNAs alloys with respect to the GaN alloy. Conduction and valence band positions of dilute-As GaNAs alloy with respect to the GaN alloy on an absolute energy scale are determined from the combination of bulk and surface DFT calculations. The resulting GaN / GaNAs conduction to valence band offset ratio is found as approximately 5:95. Our theoretical finding is in good agreement with experimental observation, indicating the upward movements of valence band at low-As content dilute-As GaNAs are mainly responsible for the drastic reduction of the GaN energy band gap. In addition, type-I band alignment of GaN / GaNAs is suggested as a reasonable approach for future device implementation with dilute-As GaNAs quantum well, and possible type-II quantum well active region can be formed by using InGaN / dilute-As GaNAs heterostructure.

  9. Object-Oriented Implementation of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks using Charm++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Sanjeev; Bhandarkar, Milind; Kale, Laxmikant V.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes experiences with implementing the NAS Computational Fluid Dynamics benchmarks using a parallel object-oriented language, Charm++. Our main objective in implementing the NAS CFD kernel benchmarks was to develop a code that could be used to easily experiment with different domain decomposition strategies and dynamic load balancing. We also wished to leverage the object-orientation provided by the Charm++ parallel object-oriented language, to develop reusable abstractions that would simplify the process of developing parallel applications. We first describe the Charm++ parallel programming model and the parallel object array abstraction, then go into detail about each of the Scalar Pentadiagonal (SP) and Lower/Upper Triangular (LU) benchmarks, along with performance results. Finally we conclude with an evaluation of the methodology used.

  10. Influence of N cluster states on band dispersion in GaInNAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, S. B.; Lindsay, A.; O'Reilly, E. P.

    2006-05-01

    We use a modified band-anticrossing (BAC) model to investigate the band dispersion in a GaNxAs1-x/AlGaAs quantum well (QW) as a function of hydrostatic pressure. The band edge mass increases considerably more quickly with pressure than in the case of a GaAs/AlGaAs QW, and the subband separation also decreases significantly. We predict that the strong anticrossing interaction between the GaAs host conduction band and isolated N levels will inhibit tunnelling through the QW for a range of energy above the isolated N levels. The energy of N resonant states depends strongly on details of the local environment, giving a broader calculated distribution of N states in GaInNAs compared to GaNAs.

  11. Moth eye antireflection coated GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Arto; Tommila, Juha; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Niemi, Tapio; Guina, Mircea

    2014-09-01

    The performance of a GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell incorporating AlInP moth eye antireflection coating is reported and compared with the performance of a similar cell comprising TiO2/SiO2 antireflection coating. The moth eye coating exhibits an average reflectance of only 2% within the spectral range from 400 nm to 1600 nm. EQE measurements revealed absorption-related losses in the AlInP moth eye coating at wavelengths below 510 nm. Short wavelength absorption decreases the current generation in the top GaInP junction by 10%. Despite the absorption losses, the moth eye patterned GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell exhibited higher current generation under AM1.5G real sun illumination.

  12. NAS technical summaries. Numerical aerodynamic simulation program, March 1992 - February 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    NASA created the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program in 1987 to focus resources on solving critical problems in aeroscience and related disciplines by utilizing the power of the most advanced supercomputers available. The NAS Program provides scientists with the necessary computing power to solve today's most demanding computational fluid dynamics problems and serves as a pathfinder in integrating leading-edge supercomputing technologies, thus benefitting other supercomputer centers in government and industry. The 1992-93 operational year concluded with 399 high-speed processor projects and 91 parallel projects representing NASA, the Department of Defense, other government agencies, private industry, and universities. This document provides a glimpse at some of the significant scientific results for the year.

  13. Enhanced-Depletion-Width GaInNAs Solar Cells Grown by Molecular-Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Ptak, A. J.; Friedman, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    The 3-junction, GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cell is a non-optimized structure due to excess light falling on the Ge junction. Because of this, a fourth junction inserted between the GaAs and Ge subcells could use the excess light and provide an increase in device efficiency. Unfortunately, the leading candidate material, GaInNAs, suffers from very low minority-carrier diffusion lengths compared to its parent compound, GaAs. These low diffusion lengths do not allow for the collection of adequate current to keep the overall 4-junction structure current matched. If the currents generated from the GaInNAs subcell are increased, the possibility exists for practical efficiencies of greater than 40% from this structure.

  14. The temperature dependence of atomic incorporation characteristics in growing GaInNAs films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingling; Gao, Fangliang; Wen, Lei; Zhou, Shizhong; Zhang, Shuguang E-mail: msgli@scut.edu.cn; Li, Guoqiang E-mail: msgli@scut.edu.cn

    2015-02-07

    We have systematically studied the temperature dependence of incorporation characteristics of nitrogen (N) and indium (In) in growing GaInNAs films. With the implementation of Monte-Carlo simulation, the low N adsorption energy (−0.10 eV) is demonstrated. To understand the atomic incorporation mechanism, temperature dependence of interactions between Group-III and V elements are subsequently discussed. We find that the In incorporation behaviors rather than that of N are more sensitive to the T{sub g}, which can be experimentally verified by exploring the compositional modulation and structural changes of the GaInNAs films by means of high-resolution X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy.

  15. Institutional Policy and Its Abuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogue, E. G.; Riggs, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews the role of institutional policy, cites frequent abuses of institutional policy, and delineates several principles of policy management (development, communication, execution and evaluation). (Author/PG)

  16. Large-scale structural analysis: The structural analyst, the CSM Testbed and the NAS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Macy, Steven C.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) activity is developing advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers. Methods are developed in the framework of the CSM testbed software system and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the CSM testbed methods development environment is presented and some numerical methods developed on a CRAY-2 are described. Selected application studies performed on the NAS CRAY-2 are also summarized.

  17. NAS Parallel Benchmarks I/O Version 2.4. 2.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Parkson; VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a benchmark problem, based on the Block-Tridiagonal (BT) problem of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB), which is used to test the output capabilities of high-performance computing systems, especially parallel systems. We also present a source code implementation of the benchmark, called NPBIO2.4-MPI, based on the MPI implementation of NPB, using a variety of ways to write the computed solutions to file.

  18. Nitrogen incorporation effects on gain properties of GaInNAs lasers : experiment and theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Thranhardt, A.; Mawst, L. J.; Hader, J.; Schlichenmaier, C.; Tansu, N.; Yeh, J. -Y.; Belenky, G.; Chow, Weng Wah; Shterengas, L.; Moloney, Jerome V.; Koch, S. W.; Kuznetsova, I.

    2005-05-01

    Gain properties of GaInNAs lasers with different nitrogen concentrations in the quantum wells are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Whereas nitrogen incorporation induces appreciable modifications in the spectral extension and the carrier density dependence of the gain, it is found that the linewidth enhancement factor is reduced by inclusion of nitrogen, but basically unaffected by different nitrogen content due to the balancing between gain and index changes.

  19. Applications Performance Under MPL and MPI on NAS IBM SP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Simon, Horst D.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    On July 5, 1994, an IBM Scalable POWER parallel System (IBM SP2) with 64 nodes, was installed at the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Facility Each node of NAS IBM SP2 is a "wide node" consisting of a RISC 6000/590 workstation module with a clock of 66.5 MHz which can perform four floating point operations per clock with a peak performance of 266 Mflop/s. By the end of 1994, 64 nodes of IBM SP2 will be upgraded to 160 nodes with a peak performance of 42.5 Gflop/s. An overview of the IBM SP2 hardware is presented. The basic understanding of architectural details of RS 6000/590 will help application scientists the porting, optimizing, and tuning of codes from other machines such as the CRAY C90 and the Paragon to the NAS SP2. Optimization techniques such as quad-word loading, effective utilization of two floating point units, and data cache optimization of RS 6000/590 is illustrated, with examples giving performance gains at each optimization step. The conversion of codes using Intel's message passing library NX to codes using native Message Passing Library (MPL) and the Message Passing Interface (NMI) library available on the IBM SP2 is illustrated. In particular, we will present the performance of Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) kernel from NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) under MPL and MPI. We have also optimized some of Fortran BLAS 2 and BLAS 3 routines, e.g., the optimized Fortran DAXPY runs at 175 Mflop/s and optimized Fortran DGEMM runs at 230 Mflop/s per node. The performance of the NPB (Class B) on the IBM SP2 is compared with the CRAY C90, Intel Paragon, TMC CM-5E, and the CRAY T3D.

  20. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James H.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's UAS Integration in the NAS project, has partnered with Rockwell Collins to develop a concept Control and Non-Payload Communication system prototype radio, operating on recently allocated UAS frequency spectrum bands. The prototype radio will be used to validate initial proposed performance requirements for UAS control communications. This presentation will give an overview of the current status of the design, development, and flight test planning for this prototype radio.

  1. Carrier trapping and escape times in p-i-n GaInNAs MQW structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We used a semi-classical model to describe carrier capture into and thermionic escape from GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs) situated within the intrinsic region of a GaAs p-i-n junction. The results are used to explain photocurrent oscillations with applied bias observed in these structures, in terms of charge accumulation and resonance tunnelling. PMID:24417767

  2. Reference Service Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, William F.

    This reference service policy manual provides general guidelines to encourage reference service of the highest possible quality and to insure uniform practice. The policy refers only to reference service in the University Libraries and is intended for use in conjunction with other policies and procedures issued by the Reference Services Division.…

  3. When Policy Joins Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Joellen; Davin, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Policy influences practice. Policy has the capacity to strengthen practice by demanding accountability for both process and results through clear expectations as well as deliberate sanctions for failure to meet those expectations. Policies can also provide resources to meet expectations. In this article, the authors discuss how several national…

  4. Communication Policies in Yugoslavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekovic, Zdravko; Bjelica, Mihalo

    This report on communication policies in Yugoslavia is part of a larger project, sponsored by UNESCO and intended to analyze communication policies as they exist at public, institutional, and professional levels in selected countries. Included in this report are: (1) the premise of Yugoslavian communication policy; (2) historical development of…

  5. Ethnography of Language Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David Cassels

    2009-01-01

    While theoretical conceptualizations of language policy have grown increasingly rich, empirical data that test these models are less common. Further, there is little methodological guidance for those who wish to do research on language policy interpretation and appropriation. The ethnography of language policy is proposed as a method which makes…

  6. Materials Selection Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulsa City-County Library System, OK.

    The emphasis of the revised Tulsa (Oklahoma) City-County Library System selection policy is on meeting needs of the community rather than balancing the collection in any one library. The policy includes the "Library Bill of Rights" and covers objectives, responsibilities, maintenance of the collection, controversial materials, gifts, policy in…

  7. Telecommunications Regulations and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimmer, Karl W.

    1981-01-01

    Addresses shifts in basic telecommunication common carrier regulatory policies over the past decade; technological and economic changes prompting these policy shifts; major regulatory action resulting from these policy shifts; and the emerging regulatory issue of alternatives to local telephone service and its possible implication for online…

  8. Structural properties of GaNAs nanowires probed by micro-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, S.; Ishikawa, F.; Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    GaNAs-based nanowires (NWs) form a novel material system of potential importance for applications in advanced optoelectronic and photonic devices, thanks to the advantages provided by band-structure engineering, one-dimensional architecture and the possibility to combine them with mainstream silicon technology. In this work we utilize the micro-Raman scattering technique to systematically study the structural properties of such GaAs/GaNAs core/shell NW structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si substrate. It is shown that the employed one-dimensional architecture allows the fabrication of a GaNAs shell with a low degree of alloy disorder and weak residual strain, at least within the studied range of nitrogen (N) compositions [N] < 0.6%. Raman scattering by the GaAs-like and GaN-like phonons is found to be enhanced when the excitation energy approaches the E+ transition energy. Since this effect is found to be more pronounced for the GaN-like phonons, the involved intermediate states are concluded to be localized in proximity to N impurities, i.e. they likely represent N-related cluster states located in proximity to E+.

  9. Effects of Bismuth on Wide-Depletion-Width GaInNAs Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ptak, A. J.; France, R.; Jiang, C.-S.; Reedy, R. C.

    2008-05-01

    GaInNAs solar cells could be useful in next-generation multijunction solar cells if issues surrounding low photocurrents and photovoltages are surmounted. Wide-depletion-width devices generate significant photocurrent using a p-i-n structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy, but these depletion widths are only realized in a region of parameter space that leads to rough surface morphologies. Here, bismuth is explored as a surfactant for the growth of GaInNAs solar cells. Very low fluxes of Bi are effective at maintaining smooth surfaces, even at high growth temperatures and In contents. However, Bi also increases the net donor concentration in these materials, manifested in our n-on-p device structures as a pn-junction that moves deeper into the base layer with increasing Bi fluxes. Quantum efficiency modeling and scanning kelvin probe microscopy measurements confirm the type conversion of the base layer from p type to n type. Bi incorporation in GaAsBi samples shows signs of surface segregation, leading to a finite buildup time, and this effect may lead to slow changes in the electrical properties of the GaInNAs(Bi) devices. Bi also appears to create a defect level, although this defect level is not deleterious enough to increase the dark current in the devices.

  10. Determination of composition and energy gaps of GaInNAsSb layers grown by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, A.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Isoaho, R.; Malinen, P.; Tukiainen, A.; Honkanen, M.; Guina, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to accurately determine the composition of GaInNAsSb heterostructures and a modified band anti-crossing model to calculate the corresponding bandgaps. The composition determination method is based on combining x-ray diffractometry and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy measurements. The modified band anti-crossing model was derived from the model known for GaInNAs and using band-gap composition relations for GaInAs, GaInSb, InAsSb and GaAsSb. The model parameters were defined by fitting with experimental bandgap data retrieved from photoluminescence. For validation and data fitting we used experimental samples with N composition in the range of 0-0.06, In composition from 0 to 0.17, and Sb composition in the range of 0-0.08. All samples were thermally annealed to minimize the band gap shift caused by the short range ordering effects in GaInNAsSb crystal. The modified model yields an excellent fit to the experimental band gap data with an accuracy of ~20 meV, and is a practical tool for designing, fabricating and analyzing optoelectronics devices.

  11. NAS technical summaries: Numerical aerodynamic simulation program, March 1991 - February 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA created the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program in 1987 to focus resources on solving critical problems in aeroscience and related disciplines by utilizing the power of the most advanced supercomputers available. The NAS Program provides scientists with the necessary computing power to solve today's most demanding computational fluid dynamics problems and serves as a pathfinder in integrating leading-edge supercomputing technologies, thus benefiting other supercomputer centers in Government and industry. This report contains selected scientific results from the 1991-92 NAS Operational Year, March 4, 1991 to March 3, 1992, which is the fifth year of operation. During this year, the scientific community was given access to a Cray-2 and a Cray Y-MP. The Cray-2, the first generation supercomputer, has four processors, 256 megawords of central memory, and a total sustained speed of 250 million floating point operations per second. The Cray Y-MP, the second generation supercomputer, has eight processors and a total sustained speed of one billion floating point operations per second. Additional memory was installed this year, doubling capacity from 128 to 256 megawords of solid-state storage-device memory. Because of its higher performance, the Cray Y-MP delivered approximately 77 percent of the total number of supercomputer hours used during this year.

  12. Toward transparent clinical policies.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, Richard N; Marcuse, Edgar K; Moyer, Virginia A; Neuspiel, Daniel R; Hodgson, Elizabeth Susan; Glade, Gordon; Harbaugh, Norman; Miller, Marlene R; Sevilla, Xavier; Simpson, Lisa; Takata, Glenn

    2008-03-01

    Clinical policies of professional societies such as the American Academy of Pediatrics are valued highly, not only by clinicians who provide direct health care to children but also by many others who rely on the professional expertise of these organizations, including parents, employers, insurers, and legislators. The utility of a policy depends, in large part, on the degree to which its purpose and basis are clear to policy users, an attribute known as the policy's transparency. This statement describes the critical importance and special value of transparency in clinical policies, guidelines, and recommendations; helps identify obstacles to achieving transparency; and suggests several approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:18310217

  13. Federal water policy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Federal Water Policy is a statement of the federal government's philosophy and goals for the nation's freshwater resources, and of the proposed ways of achieving them in cooperation with provincial governments. This document provides an overview of the policy, then presents details on the policy itself, the strategies for achievement of that policy, methods of applying it, and specific policy statements. These statements cover such topics as the management of toxic chemicals, water quality, ground water contamination, municipal water and sewer infrastructure, safe drinking water, wetlands preservation, hydroelectric development, navigation, native water rights, and Canada-US boundary management, among others.

  14. Effect of antimony on the deep-level traps in GaInNAsSb thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Muhammad Monirul Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro

    2014-09-15

    Admittance spectroscopy has been performed to investigate the effect of antimony (Sb) on GaInNAs material in relation to the deep-level defects in this material. Two electron traps, E1 and E2 at an energy level 0.12 and 0.41 eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}), respectively, were found in undoped GaInNAs. Bias-voltage dependent admittance confirmed that E1 is an interface-type defect being spatially localized at the GaInNAs/GaAs interface, while E2 is a bulk-type defect located around mid-gap of GaInNAs layer. Introduction of Sb improved the material quality which was evident from the reduction of both the interface and bulk-type defects.

  15. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project. NASA Contributions to the SARP WC Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Debra K.; Consiglio, Maria Cristina; Santiago, Confesor

    2014-01-01

    To better inform sense and avoid research needs and to understand ongoing investigation of potential solutions that ultimately lead to the assisting the FAA with their Congressional mandate to fly UAS in the NAS.

  16. Anisotropic Lattice Deformation of InAs Self-Assembled Quantum Dots Embedded in GaNAs Strain Compensating Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, N.; Muto, S.; Ganapathy, S.; Suemune, I.; Numata, K.; Yabuta, K.

    2006-01-01

    Lattice deformations of InAs self-assembled quantum dots, which were grown on (001)GaAs substrates and embedded in GaNAs strain compensating layers (SCLs), were examined with an ion-channeling method in Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The channeling experiments demonstrated that the increase of the nitrogen concentrations in the GaNAs SCLs caused the indium lattice displacements along the [001] growth direction while those parallel to the (001) crystal plane were kept unchanged.

  17. 75 FR 28610 - Draft EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ...EPA is announcing a 90-day public comment period for the external review draft entitled, ``EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments'' (EPA/600/R- 10/038A). This draft report responds to the key recommendations and comments included in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2006 report. In addition, it includes new analyses on potential human......

  18. The CAS-NAS forum for new leaders in space science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David H.

    The space science community is thoroughly international, with numerous nations now capable of launching scientific payloads into space either independently or in concert with others. As such, it is important for national space-science advisory groups to engage with like-minded groups in other spacefaring nations. The Space Studies Board of the US National Academy of Sciences' (NAS') National Research Council has provided scientific and technical advice to NASA for more than 50 years. Over this period, the Board has developed important multilateral and bilateral partnerships with space scientists around the world. The primary multilateral partner is COSPAR, for which the Board serves as the US national committee. The Board's primary bilateral relationship is with the European Science Foundation’s European Space Science Committee. Burgeoning Chinese space activities have resulted in several attempts in the past decade to open a dialogue between the Board and space scientists in China. On each occasion, the external political environment was not conducive to success. The most recent efforts to engage the Chinese space researchers began in 2011 and have proved particularly successful. Although NASA is currently prohibited from engaging in bilateral activities with China, the Board has established a fruitful dialogue with its counterpart in the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). A joint NAS-CAS activity, the Forum for New Leaders in Space Science, has been established to provide opportunities for a highly select group of young space scientists from China and the United States to discuss their research activities in an intimate and collegial environment at meetings to be held in both nations. The presentation will describe the current state of US-China space relations, discuss the goals of the joint NAS-CAS undertaking and report on the activities at the May, 2014, Forum in Beijing and the planning for the November, 2014, Forum in Irvine, California.

  19. UAS Integration Into the NAS: An Examination of Baseline Compliance in the Current Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa; Kenny, Caitlin A.; Shively, Robert J.; Johnson, Walter

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are expected to be integrated into the National Airspace System (NAS) by 2015. Several human factors challenges need to be addressed before UAS can safely and routinely fly in the NAS with manned aircraft. Perhaps the most significant challenge is for the UAS to be non-disruptive to the air traffic management system. Another human factors challenge is how to provide UAS pilots with intuitive traffic information in order to support situation awareness (SA) of their airspace environment as well as a see-and-avoid capability comparable to manned aircraft so that a UAS pilot could safely maneuver the aircraft to maintain separation and collision avoidance if necessary. A simulation experiment was conducted to examine baseline compliance of UAS operations in the current airspace system. Researchers also examined the effects of introducing a Cockpit Situation Display (CSD) into a UAS Ground Control Station (GCS) on UAS pilot performance, workload and situation awareness while flying in a positively controlled sector. Pilots were tasked with conducting a highway patrol police mission with a Medium Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) UAS in L.A. Center airspace with two mission objectives: 1) to reroute the UAS when issued new instructions from their commander, and 2) to communicate with Air Traffic Control (ATC) to negotiate flight plan changes and respond to vectoring and altitude change instructions. Objective aircraft separation data, workload ratings, SA data, and subjective ratings regarding UAS operations in the NAS were collected. Results indicate that UAS pilots were able to comply appropriately with ATC instructions. In addition, the introduction of the CSD improved pilot SA and reduced workload associated with UAS and ATC interactions.

  20. Extended Policies case

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2016 (AEO2016) Extended Policies case includes selected policies that go beyond current laws and regulations. Existing tax credits that have scheduled reductions and sunset dates are assumed to remain unchanged through 2040. Other efficiency policies, including corporate average fuel economy standards, appliance standards, and building codes, are expanded beyond current provisions; and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Power Plan (CPP) regulations that reduce carbon dioxide emissions from electric power generation are tightened after 2030.

  1. Communication Improvement for the LU NAS Parallel Benchmark: A Model for Efficient Parallel Relaxation Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The first release of the MPI version of the LU NAS Parallel Benchmark (NPB2.0) performed poorly compared to its companion NPB2.0 codes. The later LU release (NPB2.1 & 2.2) runs up to two and a half times faster, thanks to a revised point access scheme and related communications scheme. The new scheme sends substantially fewer messages. is cache "friendly", and has a better load balance. We detail the, observations and modifications that resulted in this efficiency improvement, and show that the poor behavior of the original code resulted from deriving a message passing scheme from an algorithm originally devised for a vector architecture.

  2. High power frequency doubled GaInNAs semiconductor disk laser emitting at 615 nm.

    PubMed

    Härkönen, Antti; Rautiainen, Jussi; Guina, Mircea; Konttinen, Janne; Tuomisto, Pietari; Orsila, Lasse; Pessa, Markus; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2007-03-19

    We report on an optically-pumped intracavity frequency doubled GaInNAs/GaAs -based semiconductor disk laser emitting around 615 nm. The laser operates at fundamental wavelength of 1230 nm and incorporates a BBO crystal for light conversion to the red wavelength. Maximum output power of 172 mW at 615 nm was achieved from a single output. Combined power from two outputs was 320 mW. The wavelength of visible emission could be tuned by 4.5 nm using a thin glass etalon inside the cavity. PMID:19532562

  3. The OpenMP Implementation of NAS Parallel Benchmarks and its Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Hao-Qiang; Frumkin, Michael; Yan, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    As the new ccNUMA architecture became popular in recent years, parallel programming with compiler directives on these machines has evolved to accommodate new needs. In this study, we examine the effectiveness of OpenMP directives for parallelizing the NAS Parallel Benchmarks. Implementation details will be discussed and performance will be compared with the MPI implementation. We have demonstrated that OpenMP can achieve very good results for parallelization on a shared memory system, but effective use of memory and cache is very important.

  4. A Framework for Safe Integration of Small UAS Into the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Michael J.; Bland, Geoffrey; Murray, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed framework for the safe integration of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS). The paper examines the potential uses of sUAS to build an understanding of the location and frequency of potential future flight operations based on the future applications of the sUAS systems. The paper then examines the types of systems that would be required to meet the application-level demand to determine classes of platforms and operations. Finally, a framework is proposed for both airworthiness and operations that attempts to balance safety with utility for these important systems.

  5. NAS (Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program) technical summaries, March 1989 - February 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Given here are selected scientific results from the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program's third year of operation. During this year, the scientific community was given access to a Cray-2 and a Cray Y-MP supercomputer. Topics covered include flow field analysis of fighter wing configurations, large-scale ocean modeling, the Space Shuttle flow field, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes for rotary-wing airloads and performance prediction, turbulence modeling of separated flows, airloads and acoustics of rotorcraft, vortex-induced nonlinearities on submarines, and standing oblique detonation waves.

  6. Modelling for policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Environmental economist Jonah Busch worked with a team of economists, geographers and policy specialists to assess different incentive structures for reducing emissions from deforestation in Indonesia.

  7. UAS Integration in the NAS Project: Integrated Test and Evaluation (IT&E) Flight Test 3. Revision E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The desire and ability to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is of increasing urgency. The application of unmanned aircraft to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UAS to the NAS. UAS represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the NAS. NASA's UAS Integration into the NAS Project is conducting research in the areas of Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability, Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Communication to support reducing the barriers of UAS access to the NAS. This research is broken into two research themes namely, UAS Integration and Test Infrastructure. UAS Integration focuses on airspace integration procedures and performance standards to enable UAS integration in the air transportation system, covering Sense and Avoid (SAA) performance standards, command and control performance standards, and human systems integration. The focus of Test Infrastructure is to enable development and validation of airspace integration procedures and performance standards, including the integrated test and evaluation. In support of the integrated test and evaluation efforts, the Project will develop an adaptable, scalable, and schedulable relevant test environment capable of evaluating concepts and technologies for unmanned aircraft systems to safely operate in the NAS. To accomplish this task, the Project will conduct a series of Human-in-the-Loop and Flight Test activities that integrate key concepts, technologies and/or procedures in a relevant air traffic environment. Each of the integrated events will build on the technical achievements, fidelity and complexity of the previous tests and

  8. Growth and characterisation of Ga(NAsBi) alloy by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushell, Z. L.; Ludewig, P.; Knaub, N.; Batool, Z.; Hild, K.; Stolz, W.; Sweeney, S. J.; Volz, K.

    2014-06-01

    This paper summarises results of the epitaxial growth of Ga(NAsBi) by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and the subsequent optical and structural characterisations of the samples. Ga(NAsBi)/GaAs multi-quantum well (MQW) samples are grown at 400 °C and single layers at 450 °C on GaAs (001) substrates. Triethylgallium (TEGa), tertiarybutylarsine (TBAs), trimethylbismuth (TMBi) and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMHy) are used as precursors. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) shows that the Bi content is independent of the N content in the alloy. It is found that the N content depends on both UDMHy and TMBi supply during growth. High resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements show that samples with good crystalline quality can be realised. For samples containing 1.8% Bi and up to 1.8% N grown at 450 °C, photoreflectance spectroscopy (PR) shows a decrease in the band gap with increasing N content of 141±22 meV/% N.

  9. Web Prep: How to Prepare NAS Reports For Publication on the Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela; Balakrishnan, Prithika; Clucas, Jean; McCabe, R. Kevin; Felchle, Gail; Brickell, Cristy

    1996-01-01

    This document contains specific advice and requirements for NASA Ames Code IN authors of NAS reports. Much of the information may be of interest to other authors writing for the Web. WebPrep has a graphic Table of Contents in the form of a WebToon, which simulates a discussion between a scientist and a Web publishing consultant. In the WebToon, Frequently Asked Questions about preparing reports for the Web are linked to relevant text in the body of this document. We also provide a text-only Table of Contents. The text for this document is divided into chapters: each chapter corresponds to one frame of the WebToons. The chapter topics are: converting text to HTML, converting 2D graphic images to gif, creating imagemaps and tables, converting movie and audio files to Web formats, supplying 3D interactive data, and (briefly) JAVA capabilities. The last chapter is specifically for NAS staff authors. The Glossary-Index lists web related words and links to topics covered in the main text.

  10. Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Integrated Systems Research Program (ISRP) and UAS Integration in the NAS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Program Goal: Conduct research at an integrated system-level on promising concepts and technologies and explore, assess, or demonstrate the benefits in a relevant environment.Criteria for selection of projects for Integrated Systems Research: a) Technology has attained enough maturity in the foundational research program that they merit more in-depth evaluation at an integrated system level in a relevant environment. b) Technologies which systems analysis indicates have the most potential for contributing to the simultaneous attainment of goals. c) Technologies identified through stakeholder input as having potential for simultaneous attainment of goals. d) Research not being done by other government agencies and appropriate for NASA to conduct. e) Budget augmentation. Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project Explore and assess new vehicle concepts and enabling technologies through system-level experimentation to simultaneously reduce fuel burn, noise, and emissions Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project Contribute capabilities that reduce technical barriers related to the safety and operational challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS Innovative Concepts for Green Aviation (ICGA) Project Spur innovation by offering research opportunities to the broader aeronautics community through peer-reviewed proposals, with a focus on making aviation more eco-friendly. Establish incentive prizes similar to the Centennial Challenges and sponsor innovation demonstrations of selected technologies that show promise of reducing aviation s impact on the environment

  11. InGaN/Dilute-As GaNAs Interface Quantum Well for Red Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chee-Keong; Borovac, Damir; Sun, Wei; Tansu, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The design of InGaN/dilute-As GaNAs interface quantum well (QW) leads to significant redshift in the transition wavelength with improvement in electron-hole wave function overlap and spontaneous emission rate as compared to that of the conventional In0.2Ga0.8N QW. By using self-consistent six-band k·p band formalism, the nitride active region consisting of 30 Å In0.2Ga0.8N and 10 Å GaN0.95As0.05 interface QW leads to 623.52 nm emission wavelength in the red spectral regime. The utilization of 30 Å In0.2Ga0.8N/10 Å GaN0.95As0.05 interface QW also leads to 8.5 times enhancement of spontaneous emission rate attributed by the improvement in electron-hole wavefunction overlap, as compared to that of conventional 30 Å In0.35Ga0.65N QW for red spectral regime. In addition, the transition wavelength of the interface QW is relatively unaffected by the thickness of the dilute-As GaNAs interface layer (beyond 10 Å). The analysis indicates the potential of using interface QW concept in nitride-based light-emitting diodes for long wavelength emission. PMID:26758552

  12. Growth optimization and optical properties of AlGaNAs alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kolhatkar, Gitanjali; Boucherif, Abderraouf; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Wallace, Steven G.; Fafard, Simon

    2014-04-28

    The effect of Al on the surface morphology of chemical beam epitaxy grown AlGaNAs alloys is studied. Pits attributed to N clustering appearing on the dilute nitride surface become smaller, denser, and more uniformly distributed in the presence of Al. This reveals that the introduction of Al results in more homogenous N atoms spatial distribution. A growth temperature study reveals the formation of 3D structures at high temperature due to phase separation. The density of these structures decreases, while their diameter and height increase when the temperature is raised from 380 °C to 565 °C. At growth temperatures in the 380–420 °C range, the phase separation is suppressed and the growth mode is 2D. At 420 °C, the N incorporation is also maximized, making it the optimum temperature. The absorption coefficient and the bandgap of AlGaNAs alloys are extracted from transmittance measurement. A good agreement is obtained between the experimentally measured bandgap and the theoretical values calculated using the band anticrossing model. A bandgap as low as 1.22 eV was reached using Al and N concentrations of ∼15% and ∼3.4%, respectively.

  13. Mentoring, Policy and Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Gary

    2007-01-01

    In this policy brief, former P/PV President Gary Walker asks, "Is mentoring now a durable part of American social policy? If so, is this unalloyed good news?" Adapted from an article that first appeared in "The Handbook of Youth Mentoring" (DuBois and Karcher, ed. 2005), the brief reflects on the impact and appeal of mentoring, addresses various…

  14. Public Policy Agenda, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. This paper is intended to serve as a point of reference for the association's members and other interested organizations, as well as federal and state policymakers.…

  15. Policy Research and Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskell, Jane

    1988-01-01

    Explores what it means to do research intended to be relevant for public policy. Argues against perception of policy research as politically neutral technical exercise. Discusses political implications of methodology. Discusses research examples to illustrate point. Discusses implications for how research might be used in political process.…

  16. Neutrality in Language Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wee, Lionel

    2010-01-01

    The unavoidability of language makes it critical that language policies appeal to some notion of language neutrality as part of their rationale, in order to assuage concerns that the policies might otherwise be unduly discriminatory. However, the idea of language neutrality is deeply ideological in nature, since it is not only an attempt to treat…

  17. Substance Abuse. Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This paper presents the policy statement on substance abuse from the National Collaboration for Youth (NCY). The policy statement section lists programs and activities supported by the NCY. A section on background includes a statement of the issue of substance abuse. Areas examined in this section include alcohol abuse and drunk driving among…

  18. Public Policy and You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolak, Eric

    2008-01-01

    This article is devoted to public policies and child care providers. The author talks about how these policies affect providers and their work with young children. The author stresses that child care providers should help legislators by keeping them aware of what goes on in the child care communities.

  19. Public Policy Agenda, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. The document is intended to serve as a point of reference for the association's members and other interested organizations as well as federal and state policymakers.…

  20. Public Policy Agenda, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. The document is intended to serve as a point of reference for federal and state policymakers, the association's members, and other interested organizations and…

  1. Income and Employment Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, William; And Others

    This paper isolates critical rural economic development issues and identifies needed federal policy interventions. Despite a long history of federal efforts to improve rural economic conditions, recent policies and programs aimed at stimulating rural development have had little impact. Reasons include: (1) narrowly focused economic development…

  2. Social Policy Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherrod, Lonnie, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document is comprised of the four 2001 issues of a publication providing a forum for scholarly reviews and discussion of developmental research and implications for social policies affecting children. The topics featured in each of the issues are: (1) "Youth Civic Development: Implications of Research for Social Policy and Programs"…

  3. Public Policy Agenda, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. The document is intended to serve as a point of reference for federal and state policymakers, the association's members, and other interested organizations and…

  4. Morality and Foreign Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissinger, Henry

    1985-01-01

    Morality as an enduring element in United States foreign policy is discussed. In order to strengthen the steady purpose and responsible involvement of the American people, human rights policy must be presented in the context of a realistic assessment of world affairs. (RM)

  5. Cultural Policies in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depaigne, Jacques

    The booklet presents a synopsis of reports on national cultural policies by government officials of nations belonging to the Council of Europe. The main purpose of the document is to provide an overview of institutional facilities, financial resources, and goals of cultural policy. The document is presented in five major sections. Section I…

  6. Government Information Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearstyne, Bruce W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Six articles discuss government information policy in context of technology and electronic records; policies on information resources management from OMB (Office of Management and Budget); state information resources, including Council of State Governments (CSG); state record laws and preservation of archival records; and management of electronic…

  7. Operations Policy Manual, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teacher Education Accreditation Council, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) "Operations Policy Manual" outlines all of TEAC's current policies and procedures related to TEAC members, TEAC administration, and the public, and includes the Bylaws of the Teacher Education Accreditation Council, Inc. An index is also included.

  8. Procedures and Policies Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jane M.

    2006-01-01

    This document was developed by the Middle Tennessee State University James E. Walker Library Collection Management Department to provide policies and procedural guidelines for the cataloging and processing of bibliographic materials. This document includes policies for cataloging monographs, serials, government documents, machine-readable data…

  9. A Web Policy Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elliott

    2001-01-01

    Sound technology policies can spell the difference between an effective website and an online nightmare. An effective web development policy addresses six key areas: roles and responsibilities, content/educational value, privacy and safety, adherence to copyright laws, technical standards, and use of commercial sites and services. (MLH)

  10. The Subject of Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    I work selectively with poststructuralist theories in order to give an account of the subject of policy as a constitutive relationship between social policy and the embodied human subject. Drawing on theories of subjectivity, narrative and governmentality, I articulate possibilities for analysing narrated accounts of experience as a mode of…

  11. Intercultural Policies and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goncalves, Susana, Ed.; Carpenter, Markus A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Intercultural Policies and Education is concerned with educational challenges in multicultural societies. Educational policies, practices and strategies for fruitful coexistence in the multicultural school and classroom are explored and analysed through a collection of chapters designed and selected to provide readers with international,…

  12. Protective Policy Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehrin, Donald D.

    1994-01-01

    Offers ways to help student affairs administrators understand protective policy laws and regulations. Looks at how such federal guidelines affect campus policies, practices, and procedures. Examines the Buckley Amendment, student consumer information, student right-to-know, campus security, and the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act. (Includes…

  13. Analysing the Policy Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humes, Walter M.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the recent development of educational policy analysis as a research field within Scottish education. Discusses "inside" and "outside" approaches to policy analysis; the value of theoretical models for making sense of source material; the potential of discourse analysis, illustrated by reference to Foucault and Lyotard; and the need for…

  14. Action Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman-Peck, Lorraine; Murray, Jane

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between action research and policy and the kind of confidence teachers, policy makers and other potential users may have in such research. Many published teacher action research accounts are criticised on the grounds that they do not fully meet the conventional standards for reporting social scientific…

  15. Employment Policy and Territories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthet, Thierry; Cuntigh, Philippe; Guitton, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    France's employment policy has historically been governed by a strategy of interventions aimed at specific categories of individuals, including victims of industrial restructuring, entry workers, the long-term unemployed, and the disabled. Since the 1980s, France has had the following main lines of employment policy: (1) assistance to victims of…

  16. Policy as Assemblage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorur, Radhika

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author tells the story of her search for appropriate tools to conceptualise policy work. She had set out to explore the relationship between the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and Australia's education policy, but early interview data…

  17. Language Policy in Slovenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak-Lukanovic, Sonja; Limon, David

    2012-01-01

    The historical background, political changes, migration processes, EU membership and the current socio-linguistic situation have all influenced language policy and language planning in Slovenia. This article presents the most important aspects of language policy in Slovenia with a focus on the concept of linguistic diversity. The ethnic make-up of…

  18. Communication Policies in Hungary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szecsko, Tamas; Fodor, Gabor

    This book is one of a series of studies--undertaken as part of the program adopted by the General Conference of UNESCO--related to the analysis of communication policies as they exist at the public, institutional, and professional levels in selected countries. Discussed in this book about Hungary's communication policies are such topics as mass…

  19. Policies and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, William D.; McKenna, Bernard

    1997-01-01

    States that, although policies and procedure documents play an important role in developing and maintaining a consistent quality of interaction in organizations, research literature is weak in this area. Initiates further discussion by defining and describing policy/procedure documents. Identifies a third kind, work instructions. Uses a genre…

  20. Intellectual Property: Policies and Policy Makers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Diana W.

    2001-01-01

    Used modified version of 1978 National Association of College and University Business Officers survey instrument to investigate intellectual-property policies at 38 (of 210) 4-year institutions of higher education in the 15 Southern Regional Education Board states. Finds, for example, that in the majority of institutions, top administrators are…

  1. Advanced Placement: Model Policy Components. Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP), launched in 1955 by the College Board as a program to offer gifted high school students the opportunity to complete entry-level college coursework, has since expanded to encourage a broader array of students to tackle challenging content. This Education Commission of the State's Policy Analysis identifies key components of…

  2. Fact-Challenged Policy. Policy Memorandum #182

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a response on the topic of school reform efforts being promoted by Bill Gates and other prominent education policy advocates. Last week, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates published an op-ed in the Washington Post, "How Teacher Development could Revolutionize our Schools," proposing that American public schools should do a better job of…

  3. First-principles study on structure stabilities of α-S and Na-S battery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momida, Hiroyoshi; Oguchi, Tamio

    2014-03-01

    To understand microscopic mechanisms of charge and discharge reactions in Na-S batteries, there has been increasing needs to study fundamental atomic and electronic structures of elemental S as well as that of Na-S phases. The most stable form of S is known to be an orthorhombic α-S crystal at ambient temperature and pressure, and α-S consists of puckered S8 rings which crystallize in space group Fddd . In this study, the crystal structure of α-S is examined by using first-principles calculations with and without the van der Waals interaction corrections of Grimme's method, and results clearly show that the van der Waals interactions between the S8 rings have crucial roles on cohesion of α-S. We also study structure stabilities of Na2S, NaS, NaS2, and Na2S5 phases with reported crystal structures. Using calculated total energies of the crystal structure models, we estimate discharge voltages assuming discharge reactions from 2Na+ xS -->Na2Sx, and discharge reactions in Na/S battery systems are discussed by comparing with experimental results. This work was partially supported by Elements Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB) of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT), Japan.

  4. Comparison of 250 MHz R10K Origin 2000 and 400 MHz Origin 2000 Using NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, Raymond D.; Thigpen, William W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes results of benchmark tests on Steger, a 250 MHz Origin 2000 system with R10K processors, currently installed at the NASA Ames National Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) facility. For comparison purposes, the tests were also run on Lomax, a 400 MHz Origin 2000 with R12K processors. The BT, LU, and SP application benchmarks in the NAS Parallel Benchmark Suite and the kernel benchmark FT were chosen to measure system performance. Having been written to measure performance on Computational Fluid Dynamics applications, these benchmarks are assumed appropriate to represent the NAS workload. Since the NAS runs both message passing (MPI) and shared-memory, compiler directive type codes, both MPI and OpenMP versions of the benchmarks were used. The MPI versions used were the latest official release of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks, version 2.3. The OpenMP versions used were PBN3b2, a beta version that is in the process of being released. NPB 2.3 and PBN3b2 are technically different benchmarks, and NPB results are not directly comparable to PBN results.

  5. GaNAs as Strain Compensating Layer for 1.55 μm Light Emission from InAs Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, Sasikala; Zhang, Xi Qing; Suemune, Ikuo; Uesugi, Katsuhiro; Kumano, Hidekazu; Kim, B. J.; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2003-09-01

    GaNAs strain-compensating layers (SCLs) are applied to bury InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on GaAs substrates. The main idea is the compensation of the compressive strain induced by InAs QDs with the tensile strain in the GaNAs SCLs to keep the total strain of the system minimum. The application of the GaNAs SCLs resulted in a systematic shift of photoluminescence (PL) peaks of the InAs QDs toward the longer wavelengths with the increase of the nitrogen (N) composition in GaNAs, and luminescence at a wavelength of 1.55 μm has been achieved from the InAs QDs for the N composition of 2.7% in the GaNAs SCL. This result is promising for the application of GaNAs SCL for InAs-QDs-based long-wavelength light sources for optical-fiber communication systems.

  6. Research in geosciences policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunner, Ronald D.

    1992-01-01

    The general task was to look beyond the adverse physical impacts and to defining the policy problem. In order for policy actions to be effective, they must address the right policy problems, which will be different from and broader than the physical problems. We will work on defining the policy problems with a view to indicating how practical solutions might be implemented. In particular, public officials need advice on what should be said, and done, and for what purposes. That advice needs to be based on systematic analysis of: (1) the scholarly literature in the social sciences, and related disciplines; (2) the charging content of the policy debate at the center of attention; and (3) how citizens perceive and understand issues related to global change. We will conduct this analysis. Chapter 1 and 2 each reports work on defining the policy problem and analyzing the scholarly literature. Chapters 3 and 4, respectively, address the policy debate and citizen viewpoints in issues related to global change.

  7. NasT-Mediated Antitermination Plays an Essential Role in the Regulation of the Assimilatory Nitrate Reductase Operon in Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Leland S.; Rensing, Christopher; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K.; Kennedy, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a well-studied model system for nitrogen fixation in bacteria. Regulation of nitrogen fixation in A. vinelandii is independent of NtrB/NtrC, a conserved nitrogen regulatory system in proteobacteria. Previous work showed that an ntrC mutation in A. vinelandii resulted in a loss of induction of assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases encoded by the nasAB operon. In addition to NtrC, several other proteins, including NasT, a protein containing a potential RNA-binding domain ANTAR (AmiR and NasR transcription antitermination regulators), have been implicated in nasAB regulation. In this work, we characterize the sequence upstream of nasA and identify several DNA sequence elements, including two potential NtrC binding sites and a putative intrinsic transcriptional terminator upstream of nasA that are potentially involved in nasAB regulation. Our analyses confirm that the nasAB promoter, PnasA, is under NtrC control. However, unlike NtrC-regulated promoters in enteric bacteria, PnasA shows high activity in the presence of ammonium; in addition, the PnasA activity is altered in the nifA gene mutation background. We discuss the implication of these results on NtrC-mediated regulation in A. vinelandii. Our study provides direct evidence that induction of nasAB is regulated by NasT-mediated antitermination, which occurs within the leader region of the operon. The results also support the hypothesis that NasT binds the promoter proximal hairpin of nasAB for its regulatory function, which contributes to the understanding of the regulatory mechanism of ANTAR-containing antiterminators. PMID:22773651

  8. Efficient GaInNAs Gain Mirrors for Semiconductor Disk Lasers at 1.18 {mu}m and 1.22 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Korpijaervi, Ville-Markus; Puustinen, Janne; Leinonen, Tomi; Rautiainen, Jussi; Haerkoenen, Antti; Hakkarainen, Teemu; Guina, Mircea

    2010-11-10

    We report two GaInNAs/GaAs semiconductor disk lasers emitting at the wavelengths of 1180 nm and 1220 nm. The lasers generated 5 W and 7 W output powers, respectively, at a mount temperature of 15 deg. C. Both the gain mirrors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and consisted of a GaAs/AlAs distributed Bragg reflector and an active region with 10 GaInNAs/GaNAs/GaAs QWs.

  9. Determination of the nitrogen distribution in InGaNAs/GaAs quantum wells by transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinov, D.; Gerthsen, D.; Rosenauer, A.; Hetterich, M.; Grau, A.; Gilet, Ph.; Grenouillet, L.

    2004-10-25

    We report on measurements of the nitrogen-concentration profile in an InGaNAs heterostructure by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Two samples grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs(001) substrates were investigated which contain InGaAs and InGaNAs wells with the same thickness and In concentration. The indium concentration was determined by high-resolution x-ray diffractometry. Indium-concentration profiles were obtained with the composition evaluation by lattice fringe analysis (CELFA) technique from the sample with the InGaAs wells exploiting the chemical sensitivity of the diffracted (002) beam. Nitrogen-concentration profiles were measured in the InGaNAs wells by comparison of the CELFA results observed in the samples with and without nitrogen.

  10. Benefits of a Unified LaSRS++ Simulation for NAS-Wide and High-Fidelity Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Patricia; Madden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The LaSRS++ high-fidelity vehicle simulation was extended in 2012 to support a NAS-wide simulation mode. Since the initial proof-of-concept, the LaSRS++ NAS-wide simulation is maturing into a research-ready tool. A primary benefit of this new capability is the consolidation of the two modeling paradigms under a single framework to save cost, facilitate iterative concept testing between the two tools, and to promote communication and model sharing between user communities at Langley. Specific benefits of each type of modeling are discussed along with the expected benefits of the unified framework. Current capability details of the LaSRS++ NAS-wide simulations are provided, including the visualization tool, live data interface, trajectory generators, terminal routing for arrivals and departures, maneuvering, re-routing, navigation, winds, and turbulence. The plan for future development is also described.