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Sample records for g6pd deficiency assessment

  1. G6PD Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  2. Impact of the Method of G6PD Deficiency Assessment on Genetic Association Studies of Malaria Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Marla K.; Clark, Tamara D.; Njama-Meya, Denise; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Parikh, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    Background Clinical association studies have yielded varied results regarding the impact of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency upon susceptibility to malaria. Analyses have been complicated by varied methods used to diagnose G6PD deficiency. Methodology/Prinicipal Findings We compared the association between uncomplicated malaria incidence and G6PD deficiency in a cohort of 601 Ugandan children using two different diagnostic methods, enzyme activity and G6PD genotype (G202A, the predominant East African allele). Although roughly the same percentage of males were identified as deficient using enzyme activity (12%) and genotype (14%), nearly 30% of males who were enzymatically deficient were wild-type at G202A. The number of deficient females was three-fold higher with assessment by genotype (21%) compared to enzyme activity (7%). Heterozygous females accounted for the majority (46/54) of children with a mutant genotype but normal enzyme activity. G6PD deficiency, as determined by G6PD enzyme activity, conferred a 52% (relative risk [RR] 0.48, 95% CI 0.31–0.75) reduced risk of uncomplicated malaria in females. In contrast, when G6PD deficiency was defined based on genotype, the protective association for females was no longer seen (RR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.70–1.39). Notably, restricting the analysis to those females who were both genotypically and enzymatically deficient, the association of deficiency and protection from uncomplicated malaria was again demonstrated in females, but not in males (RR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.37–0.88 for females). Conclusions/Significance This study underscores the impact that the method of identifying G6PD deficient individuals has upon association studies of G6PD deficiency and uncomplicated malaria. We found that G6PD-deficient females were significantly protected against uncomplicated malaria, but this protection was only seen when G6PD deficiency is described using enzyme activity. These observations may help to

  3. Assessment of Point-of-Care Diagnostics for G6PD Deficiency in Malaria Endemic Rural Eastern Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Satyagraha, Ari W.; Sadhewa, Arkasha; Elvira, Rosalie; Elyazar, Iqbal; Feriandika, Denny; Antonjaya, Ungke; Oyong, Damian; Subekti, Decy; Rozi, Ismail E.; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Harahap, Alida R.; Baird, J. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients infected by Plasmodium vivax or Plasmodium ovale suffer repeated clinical attacks without primaquine therapy against latent stages in liver. Primaquine causes seriously threatening acute hemolytic anemia in patients having inherited glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Access to safe primaquine therapy hinges upon the ability to confirm G6PD normal status. CareStart G6PD, a qualitative G6PD rapid diagnostic test (G6PD RDT) intended for use at point-of-care in impoverished rural settings where most malaria patients live, was evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings This device and the standard qualitative fluorescent spot test (FST) were each compared against the quantitative spectrophotometric assay for G6PD activity as the diagnostic gold standard. The assessment occurred at meso-endemic Panenggo Ede in western Sumba Island in eastern Indonesia, where 610 residents provided venous blood. The G6PD RDT and FST qualitative assessments were performed in the field, whereas the quantitative assay was performed in a research laboratory at Jakarta. The median G6PD activity ≥5 U/gHb was 9.7 U/gHb and was considered 100% of normal activity. The prevalence of G6PD deficiency by quantitative assessment (<5 U/gHb) was 7.2%. Applying 30% of normal G6PD activity as the cut-off for qualitative testing, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for G6PD RDT versus FST among males were as follows: 100%, 98.7%, 89%, and 100% versus 91.7%, 92%, 55%, and 99%; P = 0.49, 0.001, 0.004, and 0.24, respectively. These values among females were: 83%, 92.7%, 17%, and 99.7% versus 100%, 92%, 18%, and 100%; P = 1.0, 0.89, 1.0 and 1.0, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The overall performance of G6PD RDT, especially 100% negative predictive value, demonstrates suitable safety for G6PD screening prior to administering hemolytic drugs like primaquine and many others. Relatively poor diagnostic performance

  4. G6PD Deficiency (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are high-risk areas for the infectious disease malaria . Researchers have found evidence that the parasite that ... deficiency may have developed as a protection against malaria. continue G6PD Deficiency Symptom Triggers Kids with G6PD ...

  5. Low-grade haemolysis and assessment of iron status during the steady state in G6PD-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Ragusa, R; Di Cataldo, A; Gangarossa, S; Lo Nigro, L; Schilirò, G

    1993-01-01

    We evaluated the iron status of 50 Sicilian patients with G6PD deficiency under steady-state conditions and compared our results with those for 50 control patients. We studied haemolysis and iron indices to evaluate the iron balance. These patients could be considered to be at risk of iron overload as a result of increased bone marrow activity. Reticulocytosis and macrocytosis with reduced levels of haptoglobin were found in the G6PD-deficient subjects, both of which are evidence of a moderate haemolysis. Iron status within the normal range, without iron overload or iron deficiency, was found. PMID:8237270

  6. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare. PMID:12012283

  7. On the relation between malaria and G-6-PD deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bottini, E.; Gloria-Bottini, F.; Maggioni, G.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of the hypothesis that in the regions where favism is present a high correlation exists between endemic malaria and the frequency of G-6-PD deficiency, Huheey and Martin (1975) in a recent paper suggest that the haemolytic event in a malarial environment is a favourable selective factor. Therefore, the fitness of the G-6-PD-deficient individual who shows haemolysis is higher than that of those who do not show haemolysis. Modiano (1976) also suggested that haemolysis may not be a negative component of the selective forces which act on the G-6-PD-deficient variants. In this paper, some facts which make these hypotheses unlikely are considered. Other, more promising, lines for the analysis of the complex relation between malaria and G-6-PD deficiency are suggested. In Sardinia and in the area of the Po Delta, even though favism is present, there is a very low correlation between the frequency of G-6-PD deficiency and past malarial morbidity. Therefore, the situation is similar to that observed in other parts of the world, in which malaria is highly endemic, but where favism is absent. The following facts seem to be in contrast with the possibility that haemolysis could `by itself' be a favourable event: (1) In the hemizygous male, haemolysis due to favism is generally severe and there is a high mortality rate; (2) In the heterozygous female, the erythrocytes with G-6-PD deficiency seem to show a low parasite rate compared to normal cells, and it is just these erythrocytes that are destroyed during the haemolytic crisis; (3) In malarial environments, enzymopenic variants associated with continuous haemolysis have not been selected. A positive selection of such variants would be expected if haemolysis was `by itself' a positive factor. Several observations suggest that the G-6-PD system interacts with various factors, both genetical (thalassaemia, erythrocyte acid phosphatase, adenosine deaminase) and environmental (Vicia Faba, altitude, viral and protozoal

  8. G6PD Deficiency Does Not Enhance Susceptibility for Acquiring Helicobacter pylori Infection in Sardinian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Maria Pina; Marras, Giuseppina; Rocchi, Chiara; Soro, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may be more susceptible to infections due to impaired leukocyte bactericidal activity. The disorder is common in the Mediterranean area. The aim of this study was to investigate whether G6PD deficiency may be a risk factor for acquiring H. pylori infection. Methods We performed a retrospective study. Data from clinical records of 6565 patients (2278 men and 4287 women, median age 51, range 7‒94) who underwent upper endoscopy between 2002 and 2014 were collected. H. pylori status, assessed by histology plus rapid urease test or 13C-urea breath test, and G6PD status were also reported. A multiple logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between G6PD deficiency and H. pylori infection. Results Enzyme deficiency was detected in 12% (789/6565) of the entire cohort, and more specifically in 8.3% of men and in 14.0% of women. Overall, the proportion of patients positive for H. pylori was 50.6% and 51.5% among G6PD deficient and non-deficient patients (χ² = 0.271; p = 0.315). Moreover, among G6PD-deficient and normal patients the frequency of previous H. pylori infection was similar. After adjustment for age and gender the risk for acquiring H. pylori infection was similar in G6PD-deficient and normal patients. Only age was a strong statistically significant risk predictor. Conclusions These results demonstrate for the first time that G6PD deficiency does not enhance patients’ susceptibility to acquire H. pylori infection in Sardinia. PMID:27467818

  9. Molecular Characterization of G6PD Deficient Variants in Nineveh Province, Northwestern Iraq.

    PubMed

    Kashmoola, Muna A; Eissa, Adil A; Al-Takay, Dahlia T; Al-Allawi, Nasir A S

    2015-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency considered to be the commonest inherited enzymopathies disorders worldwide including Iraq. Studies have addressed its prevalence and molecular characterization in several parts of the country, but no data were available from Nineveh province, northwestern-Iraq regarding molecular basis of this inherited enzymopathy. To determine the molecular basis of G6PD deficient variants in Nineveh province. A total of 61 G6PD deficient male individuals from Nineveh province were enrolled in this study. DNA from all enrolled individuals were extracted and analyzed for four deficient molecular variants using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment polymorphism method. These deficient variants were G6PD-Mediterranean (563 C→T), G6PD-Chatham (1003 G→A), G6PD-A-(202 G→A) and G6PD-Cosenza (1376 G→C). Also enrolled individuals were screened for silent 1311 (C→T) mutation. It was found that 46 (75.41 %) were G6PD-Mediterranean, 1(1.64 %) were G6PD-Chatham, another 1(1.64 %) were G6PD-A-, and 13 (21.31 %) were remained uncharacterized. Also all G6PD-Mediterranean as well as one uncharacterized individuals were carriers of silent 1311 (C→T) mutation. This study documented that G6PD-Mediterranean constitute the bulk of G6PD deficient variants in this province and G6PD-Chatham and A- were encountered less frequently. Also that silent 1311 (C→T) mutation were common among G6PD-Mediterranean deficient variants individuals. PMID:25548459

  10. Suitability of Capillary Blood for Quantitative Assessment of G6PD Activity and Performances of G6PD Point-of-Care Tests

    PubMed Central

    Bancone, Germana; Chu, Cindy S.; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Somsakchaicharoen, Raweewan; Wilaisrisak, Pornpimon; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; Bansil, Pooja; McGray, Sarah; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Nosten, François H.

    2015-01-01

    The use of primaquine and other 8-aminoquinolines for malaria elimination is hampered by, among other factors, the limited availability of point-of-care tests for the diagnosis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Historically, the most used source of blood for G6PD analyses is venous blood, whereas diagnostic devices used in the field require the use of capillary blood; data have shown that the two sources of blood often differ with respect to hemoglobin concentration and number of red blood cells. Therefore, we have analyzed, in both capillary and venous blood drawn from the same healthy donors, the correlation of G6PD activity assessed by two qualitative tests (the Fluorescent Spot test and the CareStart test) with the gold standard quantitative spectrophotometric assay. Results obtained on 150 subjects with normal, intermediate, and deficient G6PD phenotypes show that, although differences exist between the aforementioned characteristics in capillary and venous blood, these do not impact on the quantitative assessment of G6PD activity after corrected for hemoglobin concentration or red blood cell count. Furthermore, we have assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the two qualitative tests against the gold standard spectrophotometric assay at different activity thresholds of residual enzymatic activity in both blood sources. PMID:25646252

  11. Nucleotide 1376 G-->T mutation in G6PD-deficient Chinese in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ainoon, O; Joyce, J; Boo, N Y; Cheong, S K; Hamidah, N H

    1995-12-01

    G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and affects 200 million people worldwide. To date more than 400 biochemical variants and at least 60 different point mutations in the G6PD locus have been discovered. In Malaysia the overall incidence of G6PD deficiency among males is 3.1%, being more prevalent among the Chinese and Malays and less common among the Indians. As part of our initial effort to characterise G6PD deficiency in the Malaysian population, we investigated 18 G6PD deficient Chinese male neonates for the G6PD mutation G-->T at nt 1376, a common mutation seen among the Chinese in Taiwan and mainland China. The mutation was detected by a PCR-based technique using primers that artificially create a site for restriction enzyme Xho I. We found 61% (11 out of 18) of the Chinese G6PD deficient male neonates positive for this mutation. Study of enzyme electrophoretic mobility in 7 of the cases positive for this mutation revealed three different patterns of mobility. 107% (5 out of 7), 103% (1 out of 7) and 100% (1 out of 7). This study shows that mutation G-->T at nt 1376 is a common allele causing G6PD deficiency in Malaysians of Chinese origin. The finding of different patterns of electrophoretic mobility among the 7 cases positive for 1376 G-->T mutation supports the notion that diverse biochemical variants may share the same mutation. PMID:8935127

  12. Spatial distribution of G6PD deficiency variants across malaria-endemic regions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Primaquine is essential for malaria control and elimination since it is the only available drug preventing multiple clinical attacks by relapses of Plasmodium vivax. It is also the only therapy against the sexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum infectious to mosquitoes, and is thus useful in preventing malaria transmission. However, the difficulties of diagnosing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd) greatly hinder primaquine’s widespread use, as this common genetic disorder makes patients susceptible to potentially severe and fatal primaquine-induced haemolysis. The risk of such an outcome varies widely among G6PD gene variants. Methods A literature review was conducted to identify surveys of G6PD variant frequencies among representative population groups. Informative surveys were assembled into two map series: (1) those showing the relative proportions of the different variants among G6PDd individuals; and (2) those showing allele frequencies of G6PD variants based on population surveys without prior G6PDd screening. Results Variants showed conspicuous geographic patterns. A limited repertoire of variants was tested for across sub-Saharan Africa, which nevertheless indicated low genetic heterogeneity predominated by the G6PD A- 202A mutation, though other mutations were common in western Africa. The severe G6PD Mediterranean variant was widespread across western Asia. Further east, a sharp shift in variants was identified, with high variant heterogeneity in the populations of China and the Asia-Pacific where no single variant dominated. Conclusions G6PD variants exhibited distinctive region-specific distributions with important primaquine policy implications. Relative homogeneity in the Americas, Africa, and western Asia contrasted sharply with the heterogeneity of variants in China, Southeast Asia and Oceania. These findings will inform rational risk assessments for primaquine in developing public health strategies for malaria control

  13. G6PD Deficiency and Antimalarial Efficacy for Uncomplicated Malaria in Bangladesh: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Benedikt; Alam, Mohammad Shafiul; Thriemer, Kamala; Hossain, Mohammad Sharif; Kibria, Mohammad Golam; Auburn, Sarah; Poirot, Eugenie; Price, Ric N.; Khan, Wasif Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background The Bangladeshi national treatment guidelines for uncomplicated malaria follow WHO recommendations but without G6PD testing prior to primaquine administration. A prospective observational study was conducted to assess the efficacy of the current antimalarial policy. Methods Patients with uncomplicated malaria, confirmed by microscopy, attending a health care facility in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh, were treated with artemether-lumefantrine (days 0–2) plus single dose primaquine (0.75mg/kg on day2) for P. falciparum infections, or with chloroquine (days 0–2) plus 14 days primaquine (3.5mg/kg total over 14 days) for P. vivax infections. Hb was measured on days 0, 2 and 9 in all patients and also on days 16 and 30 in patients with P. vivax infection. Participants were followed for 30 days. The study was registered with the clinical trials website (NCT02389374). Results Between September 2014 and February 2015 a total of 181 patients were enrolled (64% P. falciparum, 30% P. vivax and 6% mixed infections). Median parasite clearance times were 22.0 (Interquartile Range, IQR: 15.2–27.3) hours for P. falciparum, 20.0 (IQR: 9.5–22.7) hours for P. vivax and 16.6 (IQR: 10.0–46.0) hours for mixed infections. All participants were afebrile within 48 hours, two patients with P. falciparum infection remained parasitemic at 48 hours. No patient had recurrent parasitaemia within 30 days. Adjusted male median G6PD activity was 7.82U/gHb. One male participant (1/174) had severe G6PD deficiency (<10% activity), five participants (5/174) had mild G6PD deficiency (10–60% activity). The Hb nadir occurred on day 2 prior to primaquine treatment in P. falciparum and P. vivax infected patients; mean fractional fall in Hb was -8.8% (95%CI -6.7% to -11.0%) and -7.4% (95%CI: -4.5 to -10.4%) respectively. Conclusion The current antimalarial policy remains effective. The prevalence of G6PD deficiency was low. Main contribution to haemolysis in G6PD normal

  14. Performance of BinaxNOW G6PD Deficiency Point-of-Care Diagnostic in P. vivax-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Lyda; Carter, Nick; Arthur, Preetam; Bancone, Germana; Gopalan, Sowmya; Gupta, Sandeep K.; Noedl, Harald; Kochar, Sanjay K.; Kochar, Dhanpat K.; Krudsood, Srivicha; Lacerda, Marcus V.; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Rueangweerayut, Ronnatrai; Srinivasan, Ramadurai; Treiber, Moritz; Möhrle, Jörg J.; Green, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is required to avoid the risk of acute hemolysis associated with 8-aminoquinoline treatment. The performance of the BinaxNOW G6PD test compared with the quantitative spectrophotometric analysis of G6PD activity was assessed in 356 Plasmodium vivax-infected subjects in Brazil, Peru, Thailand, and India. In the quantitative assay, the median G6PD activity was 8.81 U/g hemoglobin (range = 0.05–20.19), with 11 (3%) subjects identified as deficient. Sensitivity of the BinaxNOW G6PD to detect deficient subjects was 54.5% (6 of 11), and specificity was 100% (345 of 345). Room temperatures inadvertently falling outside the range required to perform the rapid test (18–25°C) together with subtlety of color change and insufficient training could partially explain the low sensitivity found. Ensuring safe use of 8-aminoquinolines depends on additional development of simple, highly sensitive G6PD deficiency diagnostic tests suitable for routine use in malaria-endemic areas. PMID:25385861

  15. G6PD Deficiency in an HIV Clinic Setting in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Xu, Julia Z; Francis, Richard O; Lerebours Nadal, Leonel E; Shirazi, Maryam; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Hod, Eldad A; Jhang, Jeffrey S; Stotler, Brie A; Spitalnik, Steven L; Nicholas, Stephen W

    2015-10-01

    Because human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receive prophylaxis with oxidative drugs, those with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may experience hemolysis. However, G6PD deficiency has not been studied in the Dominican Republic, where many individuals have African ancestry. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Dominican HIV-infected patients and to attempt to develop a cost-effective algorithm for identifying such individuals. To this end, histories, chart reviews, and G6PD testing were performed for 238 consecutive HIV-infected adult clinic patients. The overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency (8.8%) was similar in males (9.3%) and females (8.5%), and higher in Haitians (18%) than Dominicans (6.4%; P = 0.01). By logistic regression, three clinical variables predicted G6PD status: maternal country of birth (P = 0.01) and a history of hemolysis (P = 0.01) or severe anemia (P = 0.03). Using these criteria, an algorithm was developed, in which a patient subset was identified that would benefit most from G6PD screening, yielding a sensitivity of 94.7% and a specificity of 97.2%, increasing the pretest probability (8.8-15.1%), and halving the number of patients needing testing. This algorithm may provide a cost-effective strategy for improving care in resource-limited settings. PMID:26240158

  16. G6PD deficiency: a classic example of pharmacogenetics with on-going clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Seneca, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    That primaquine and other drugs can trigger acute haemolytic anaemia in subjects who have an inherited mutation of the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene has been known for over half a century: however, these events still occur, because when giving the drug either the G6PD status of a person is not known, or the risk of this potentially life-threatening complication is under-estimated. Here we review briefly the genetic basis of G6PD deficiency, and then the pathophysiology and the clinical features of drug-induced haemolysis; we also update the list of potentially haemolytic drugs (which includes rasburicase). It is now clear that it is not good practice to give one of these drugs before testing a person for his/her G6PD status, especially in populations in whom G6PD deficiency is common. We discuss therefore how G6PD testing can be done reconciling safety with cost; this is once again becoming of public health importance, as more countries are moving along the pathway of malaria elimination, that might require mass administration of primaquine. Finally, we sketch the triangular relationship between malaria, antimalarials such as primaquine, and G6PD deficiency: which is to some extent protective against malaria, but also a genetically determined hazard when taking primaquine. PMID:24372186

  17. Attempts to validate a possible predictive animal model for human erythrocyte G-6-PD deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, H.M.; Calabrese, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of Dorset sheep erythrocytes as a model for human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes was investigated. Seven pharmaceuticals were examined for oxidant stressor effects using a liver microsomal enzyme system to generate metabolites of the drugs. The pharmaceuticals examined were salicyclic acid, dapsone, naphthalene, B-naphtol, p-aminobenzoic acid, sulfanilamide and sulfapyridine. The test compounds were incubated with Dorset sheep erythrocytes and oxidant stressor effects were measured through reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and methemaglobin formation. The response of the Dorset sheep erythrocytes to the seven agents was compared to previous studies revealing the response of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes to these agents. The results indicated that metabolites of the pharmaceuticals, B-naphthol, dapsone, and sulfanilamide, are oxidant stressor agents towards sheep G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes. These results agreed with studies on the response of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes. The metabolized naphthalene and sulfapyridine did not cause oxidant stress in the sheep erythrocytes, despite the fact that these two agents caused oxidizing effects in human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes in previous studies. None of the non-metabolized parent compounds caused oxidant stress in the sheep erythrocytes, which agreed with the responses of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes.

  18. Field Trial Evaluation of the Performances of Point-of-Care Tests for Screening G6PD Deficiency in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Roca-Feltrer, Arantxa; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Chy, Sophy; Canier, Lydie; Kerleguer, Alexandra; Tor, Pety; Chuor, Char Meng; Kheng, Sim; Siv, Sovannaroth; Kachur, Patrick S.; Taylor, Walter R. J.; Hwang, Jimee; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background User-friendly, accurate, point-of-care rapid tests to detect glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd) are urgently needed at peripheral level to safely recommend primaquine for malaria elimination. Methods The CareStart G6PD RDT (AccessBio, New Jersey, USA), a novel rapid diagnostic test and the most commonly used test, the fluorescent spot test (FST) were assessed against the quantitatively measured G6PD enzyme activity for detecting G6PDd. Subjects were healthy males and non-pregnant females aged 18 years or older residing in six villages in Pailin Province, western Cambodia. Findings Of the 938 subjects recruited, 74 (7.9%) were severe and moderately severe G6PD deficient (enzyme activity <30%), mostly in male population; population median G6PD activity was 12.0 UI/g Hb. The performances of the CareStart G6PD RDT and the FST, according to different cut-off values used to define G6PDd were very similar. For the detection of severe and moderately severe G6PDd (enzyme activity <30%, <3.6 UI/g Hb) in males and females, sensitivity and negative (normal status) predictive value were 100% for both point-of-care tools. When the G6PDd cut-off value increased (from <40% to <60%), the sensitivity for both PoCs decreased: 93.3% to 71.7% (CareStart G6PD RDT, p = 10−6) and 95.5% to 73.2% (FST, p = 10−6) while the specificity for both PoCs remained similar: 97.4% to 98.3% (CareStart G6PD RDT, p = 0.23) and 98.7% to 99.6% (FST, p = 0.06). The cut-off values for classifying individuals as normal were 4.0 UI/g Hb and 4.3 UI/g Hb for the CareStart G6PD RDT and the FST, respectively. Conclusions The CareStart G6PD RDT reliably detected moderate and severe G6PD deficient individuals (enzyme activity <30%), suggesting that this novel point-of-care is a promising tool for tailoring appropriate primaquine treatment for malaria elimination by excluding individuals with severe G6PDd for primaquine treatment. PMID:25541721

  19. G6PD Deficiency and Hemoglobinopathies: Molecular Epidemiological Characteristics and Healthy Effects on Malaria Endemic Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min; Yang, Li Ye; Xie, Dong De; Chen, Jiang Tao; Nguba, Santiago-m Monte; Ehapo, Carlos Sala; Zhan, Xiao Fen; Eyi, Juan Urbano Monsuy; Matesa, Rocio Apicante; Obono, Maximo Miko Ondo; Yang, Hui; Yang, Hui Tian; Cheng, Ji Dong

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and hemoglobinopathies were the inherited conditions found mostly in African. However, few epidemiological data of these disorders was reported in Equatorial Guinea (EQG). This study aimed to assess the prevalence and healthy effects of G6PD deficiency and hemoglobinopathies among the people on malaria endemic Bioko Island, EQG. Materials and Methods Blood samples from 4,144 unrelated subjects were analyzed for G6PD deficieny by fluorescence spot test (FST), high-resolution melting assay and PCR-DNA sequencing. In addition, 1,186 samples were randomly selected from the 4,144 subjects for detection of hemoglobin S (HbS), HbC, and α-thalassemia deletion by complete blood count, PCR-DNA sequencing and reverse dot blot (RDB). Results The prevalence of malaria and anemia was 12.6% (522/4,144) and 32.8% (389/1,186), respectively. Overall, 8.7% subjects (359/4,144) were G6PD-deficient by FST, including 9.0% (249/2,758) males and 7.9% (110/1,386) females. Among the 359 G6PD-deficient individuals molecularly studied, the G6PD A- (G202A/A376G) were detected in 356 cases (99.2%), G6PD Betica (T968C/A376G) in 3 cases. Among the 1,186 subjects, 201 cases were HbS heterozygotes, 35 cases were HbC heterozygotes, and 2 cases were HbCS double heterozygotes; 452 cases showed heterozygous α-thalassemia 3.7 kb deletion (-α3.7 kb deletion) and 85 homozygous - α3.7 kb deletion. The overall allele frequencies were HbS 17.1% (203/1186); HbC, 3.1% (37/1186); and –α3.7 kb deletion 52.4% (622/1186), respectively. Conclusions High G6PD deficiency in this population indicate that diagnosis and management of G6PD deficiency is necessary on Bioko Island. Obligatory newborn screening, prenatal screening and counseling for these genetic disorders, especially HbS, are needed on the island. PMID:25915902

  20. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guidelines for Rasburicase Therapy in the context of G6PD Deficiency Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Relling, Mary V.; McDonagh, Ellen M.; Chang, Tamara; Caudle, Kelly E.; McLeod, Howard L.; Haidar, Cyrine E.; Klein, Teri; Luzzatto, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is associated with development of acute hemolytic anemia (AHA) induced by a number of drugs. We provide guidance as to which G6PD genotypes are associated with G6PD deficiency in males and females. Rasburicase is contraindicated in G6PD deficient patients due to the risk of AHA and possibly methemoglobinemia. Unless preemptive genotyping has established a positive diagnosis of G6PD deficiency, quantitative enzyme assay remains the mainstay of screening prior to rasburicase use. PMID:24787449

  1. [Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency--a cause of anaemia in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, Małgorzata; Zimny, Anna

    2003-11-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is one of the most important cytoprotective enzymes for oxidative stress. The WHO classification of G6PD deficiency, based on enzyme activity and clinical significance, distinguishes five variants. Chronic haemolytic process is rare and the main factors causing haemolysis are: infections, substances derived from plants, drugs with high oxidation-reduction potential, stress, ketoacidosis in diabetes and surgery operations. We report two cases of women belonging to the class 3 of the WHO classification in whom haemolysis occured during pregnancy. One of the patients developed two incidents of haemolytic anaemia. The cause of the first episode, nine months before pregnancy, was probably infection of the urinary tract caused by Escherichia coli, but the influence of the drugs also cannot be excluded. Because of the genetic background of this enzymopathy we also examined members of the patients, families but did not find any evidence of G6PD deficiency among them. The reported cases indicate that haemolytic anaemia caused by G6PD deficiency may occur during pregnancy what can lead to many not only haematological but also serious obstetrical complications such as infertility, fetus malformations and even its death. We also draw attention to several difficulties in diagnosing G6PD deficiency especially during haemolysis. PMID:16737003

  2. G6PD deficiency and fava bean consumption do not produce hemolysis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kitayaporn, D; Charoenlarp, P; Pattaraarechachai, J; Pholpoti, T

    1991-06-01

    Favism, a hemolytic condition associated with fava bean consumption among the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient persons, is well described in the Middle East and Mediterranean areas. However, it is not well documented among the Thais or other Southeast Asians. It is possible that it does exist but that hemolysis which develops is of very minor degree and thus escapes clinical detection. This cross-sectional study hypothesizes that if the fava bean and G6PD deficiency interact in the Thai population, they should cause a significant difference in hematocrit level. The study was carried out in a community hospital in a malaria endemic area. We found that there was a trivial difference of the hematocrit (approximately 1%) which was too small to warrant any clinical significance after controlling for the extraneous effects of age, sex, use of malaria chemoprophylaxis, falciparum infection, use of analgesics/antipyretics and admission status of the patients (p = 0.668). This may be due to the presence of different G6PD mutants to those found elsewhere or due to different consumption patterns of fava beans among the Thais compared to people in other areas with high prevalence of G6PD deficiency. PMID:1948276

  3. G6PD Deficiency at Sumba in Eastern Indonesia Is Prevalent, Diverse and Severe: Implications for Primaquine Therapy against Relapsing Vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Satyagraha, Ari Winasti; Sadhewa, Arkasha; Baramuli, Vanessa; Elvira, Rosalie; Ridenour, Chase; Elyazar, Iqbal; Noviyanti, Rintis; Coutrier, Farah Novita; Harahap, Alida Roswita; Baird, J. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Safe treatment of Plasmodium vivax requires diagnosis of both the infection and status of erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity because hypnozoitocidal therapy against relapse requires primaquine, which causes a mild to severe acute hemolytic anemia in G6PD deficient patients. Many national malaria control programs recommend primaquine therapy without G6PD screening but with monitoring due to a broad lack of G6PD deficiency screening capacity. The degree of risk in doing so hinges upon the level of residual G6PD activity among the variants present in any given area. We conducted studies on Sumba Island in eastern Indonesia in order to assess the potential threat posed by primaquine therapy without G6PD screening. We sampled 2,033 residents of three separate districts in western Sumba for quantitative G6PD activity and 104 (5.1%) were phenotypically deficient (<4.6U/gHb; median normal 10U/gHb). The villages were in two distinct ecosystems, coastal and inland. A positive correlation occurred between the prevalence of malaria and G6PD deficiency: 5.9% coastal versus inland 0.2% for malaria (P<0.001), and 6.7% and 3.1% for G6PD deficiency (P<0.001) at coastal and inland sites, respectively. The dominant genotypes of G6PD deficiency were Vanua Lava, Viangchan, and Chatham, accounting for 98.5% of the 70 samples genotyped. Subjects expressing the dominant genotypes all had less than 10% of normal enzyme activities and were thus considered severe variants. Blind administration of anti-relapse primaquine therapy at Sumba would likely impose risk of serious harm. PMID:25746733

  4. Molecular heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency in an Amazonian population and description of four new variants.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Arno Rolf; Cabral, Isabel Rosa; Sales, Tereza Sueko Ide; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Olalla Saad, Sara Teresinha

    2002-01-01

    To characterize the molecular variation in the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (G6PD), 196 asymptomatic and unrelated male G6PD-deficient blood donors from Belém, an Amazonian metropolis (Brazil), were analyzed. This deficiency was detected by horizontal agarose gel electrophoresis and quantitative spectrophotometric assay for enzyme activity. The mutations were searched by PCR/RFLP, SSCP, and direct DNA sequencing. The most frequent G6PD variant was the widespread and common G6PD A- (202G --> A, 376A --> G) observed in 161 subjects (82.1%). Besides this, we found another form of G6PD A- (968T --> C, 376A --> G) in 14 (7.1%) individuals, G6PD Seattle (844G --> C) in 4.6%, G6PD Santamaria (542A --> T, 376A --> G) in 2.5%, and G6PD Tokyo (1246G --> A) in one blood donor. Four novel variants were also identified: G6PD Belém (409C --> T; Pro137His), G6PD Ananindeua (376A --> G, 871G --> A; Asn126Asp, Val291Met), G6PD Crispim with four point mutations (375G --> T, 379G --> T, 383T --> C, and 384C --> T) leading to three amino acid substitutions (Met125Ile, Ala127Ser, and Leu128Pro), and G6PD Amazonia (185C --> A; Pro62His). The reported frequencies do not reflect the real values for blood donors from Belém, since an excess of individuals with "non A-" phenotype was included in this study to enhance the probability to find rare variants. Haplotype analyses were carried out for the less common G6PD variants identified in our study using PCR/RFLP for five polymorphic sites (FokI, PvuII, PstI, BclI, NlaIII). G6PD Crispim and G6PD Amazonia variants presented the most common haplotype found in G6PD B (- - + - -). G6PD Belém presented two haplotypes (- - + + +, - + + + +) and G6PD Ananindeua was found with the + - + - + haplotype. The reported heterogeneity probably is due to the great miscegenation, characteristic of the population of the Amazonian region, besides the apparently common occurrence of recurrent mutations in the G6PD gene. PMID:12367584

  5. Acute haemolytic episodes & fava bean consumption in G6PD deficient Iraqis.

    PubMed

    Yahya, H I; al-Allawi, N A

    1993-12-01

    The relation between fava bean ingestion and the occurrence of a haemolytic episode was studied in 102 glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenate (G6PD) deficient Iraqi patients. None of the patients (mean age 12.8 yr) had a documented similar illness earlier, although all of them gave history of reported regular fava bean ingestion in the past. Further, none of the three patients who were rechallenged (2-3 months later) by the beans developed any clinical or laboratory evidence of haemolysis. The incidence of the haemolytic episodes was found to peak in April, while the fava bean season extends from February to June. This study thus does not support a causal relation between the bean ingestion and the haemolytic episodes in G6PD deficient Iraqis. Possibly, some other factor such as a viral infection may be involved. PMID:8132232

  6. Single Low Dose Primaquine (0.25mg/kg) Does Not Cause Clinically Significant Haemolysis in G6PD Deficient Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bancone, Germana; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Somsakchaicharoen, Raweewan; Poodpanya, Lalita; Moo, Paw Khu; Gornsawun, Gornpan; Kajeechiwa, Ladda; Thwin, May Myo; Rakthinthong, Santisuk; Nosten, Suphak; Thinraow, Suradet; Nyo, Slight Naw; Ling, Clare L.; Wiladphaingern, Jacher; Kiricharoen, Naw Lily; Moore, Kerryn A.; White, Nicholas J.; Nosten, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Background Primaquine is the only drug consistently effective against mature gametocytes of Plasmodium falciparum. The transmission blocking dose of primaquine previously recommended was 0.75mg/kg (adult dose 45mg) but its deployment was limited because of concerns over haemolytic effects in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. G6PD deficiency is an inherited X-linked enzymatic defect that affects an estimated 400 million people around the world with high frequencies (15–20%) in populations living in malarious areas. To reduce transmission in low transmission settings and facilitate elimination of P. falciparum, the World Health Organization now recommends adding a single dose of 0.25mg/kg (adult dose 15mg) to Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies (ACTs) without G6PD testing. Direct evidence of the safety of this low dose is lacking. Adverse events and haemoglobin variations after this treatment were assessed in both G6PD normal and deficient subjects in the context of targeted malaria elimination in a malaria endemic area on the North-Western Myanmar-Thailand border where prevalence of G6PD deficiency (Mahidol variant) approximates 15%. Methods and Findings The tolerability and safety of primaquine (single dose 0.25 mg base/kg) combined with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ) given three times at monthly intervals was assessed in 819 subjects. Haemoglobin concentrations were estimated over the six months preceding the ACT + primaquine rounds of mass drug administration. G6PD deficiency was assessed with a phenotypic test and genotyping was performed in male subjects with deficient phenotypes and in all females. Fractional haemoglobin changes in relation to G6PD phenotype and genotype and primaquine round were assessed using linear mixed-effects models. No adverse events related to primaquine were reported during the trial. Mean fractional haemoglobin changes after each primaquine treatment in G6PD deficient subjects (-5

  7. Prevalence of G6PD deficiency among recruits in the Singapore Armed Forces.

    PubMed

    Lim, M K; Tan, E H; Wan, A; Chao, A K

    1995-03-01

    Between 1986 and 1990, 107,397 National Servicemen between the ages of 17 to 18 years were screened on enlistment for Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme activity by fluorescent spot test. The overall prevalence rate was 1.6% with ethnic differences as follows: 1.62% for Chinese, 1.80% for Malay, 0.76% for Indian and 0.68% for other races. The majority had no prior knowledge of their G6PD deficiency status (89.9%), or of any significant haemolytic episode (93.3%). The rest gave a history of neonatal jaundice, non-neonatal jaundice, anaemia and haemoglobinuria. Maloprim, fava beans, sulphur drugs and aspirin were cited as triggering factors. PMID:7653979

  8. Safety of 8-aminoquinolines given to people with G6PD deficiency: protocol for systematic review of prospective studies

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, Olalekan A; Saunders, Rachel; Sinclair, David; Graves, Patricia; Gelband, Hellen; Clarke, Aileen; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A single dose or short course of primaquine given to people infected with malaria may reduce transmission of Plasmodium falciparum through its effects on gametocytes. Primaquine is also known to cause haemolysis in people with variants of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the risk of adverse effects in people with G6PD deficiency given primaquine or other 8-aminoquinoline (8AQ) as a single dose or short course (less than 7 days). Methods and analysis We will search the following databases: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS. Prospective cohort studies, randomised and quasi-randomised trials that evaluated 8AQs for whatever reason in adults or children with a known G6PD deficiency will be included. Two authors will independently assess each study for eligibility, risk of bias and extract data. Ethics and dissemination This systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. Brief reports of the review findings will be disseminated directly to the appropriate audiences and the WHO Technical Expert Group in Malaria Chemotherapy. As no primary data collection will be undertaken, no additional formal ethical assessment and informed consent are required. Protocol registration in PROSPERO The protocol is registered with PROSPERO, registration number CRD42013006518. PMID:24833685

  9. Methaemoglobinaemia in a G6PD-deficient child treated with rasburicase.

    PubMed

    Bontant, Thomas; Le Garrec, Sophie; Avran, David; Dauger, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy from the Congo, was admitted for hyperleucocytic acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, with a high risk of tumour lysis syndrome (TLS). He had splenomegaly and mediastinal lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray. We started steroids and hyperhydration with rasburicase to prevent TLS. Respiratory failure with mediastinal enlargement developed rapidly. A few hours after intensive care unit (ICU) admission, he was started on mechanical ventilation. Chemotherapy was started immediately given the strong suspicion of mediastinal compression. Low oxygen saturation with high partial arterial oxygen pressure persisted. Blood tests confirmed 20% methaemoglobinaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Allopurinol was substituted for rasburicase. The methaemoglobinaemia disappeared rapidly and he was discharged from the ICU after 72 h. In case of rasburicase use, a close clinical monitoring is mandatory, especially in populations where G6PD deficiency is highly prevalent. Methaemoglobinaemia must be suspected in case of low oxygen saturation when all other potential causes have been ruled out. PMID:25115783

  10. Methaemoglobinaemia in a G6PD-deficient child treated with rasburicase

    PubMed Central

    Bontant, Thomas; Le Garrec, Sophie; Avran, David; Dauger, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy from the Congo, was admitted for hyperleucocytic acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, with a high risk of tumour lysis syndrome (TLS). He had splenomegaly and mediastinal lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray. We started steroids and hyperhydration with rasburicase to prevent TLS. Respiratory failure with mediastinal enlargement developed rapidly. A few hours after intensive care unit (ICU) admission, he was started on mechanical ventilation. Chemotherapy was started immediately given the strong suspicion of mediastinal compression. Low oxygen saturation with high partial arterial oxygen pressure persisted. Blood tests confirmed 20% methaemoglobinaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Allopurinol was substituted for rasburicase. The methaemoglobinaemia disappeared rapidly and he was discharged from the ICU after 72 h. In case of rasburicase use, a close clinical monitoring is mandatory, especially in populations where G6PD deficiency is highly prevalent. Methaemoglobinaemia must be suspected in case of low oxygen saturation when all other potential causes have been ruled out. PMID:25115783

  11. Haemolytic episode in G6 PD deficient workers exposed to TNT.

    PubMed Central

    Djerassi, L S; Vitany, L

    1975-01-01

    This is a report on three cases of acute haemolytic disease in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient workers exposed to trinitroluene (TNT). The courses of the haemolytic crises have several features in common, the most striking being the onset of the disease within two to four days after the start of exposure, and the fact that this has been the first and so far the only haemolytic episode in their lives in spite of detailed medical records of past diseases, injuries, and medications during 12 to 16 years preceding the haemolytic crisis and five to nine years following the disease. The lowest haemoglobin levels for the three patients were 4-0, 6-8, and 8-2 g/dl respectively; haematocrit values were 17 and 24%; reticulocytes rose in case 1 to 26-2%, in case 2 to 26%, and in case 3 to 10%. Indirect bilirubinaemia was increased in two patients (5-1 and 2-6 mg/100 ml) and stercobilinogen was as high as 2150 mg/24 hr in one patient. The presence of the metabolite monoamino 2-6 dinitrotoluene was proved in the urine of case 3 and reached 21 gamma%. The possibility of a dose-response relationship is briefly discussed and the risk of exposing G6 PD individuals in chemical processes is mentioned. PMID:1125128

  12. A Novel de novo Mutation in the G6PD Gene in a Korean Boy with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Ji-Yoon; Lee, Ki-O; Kim, Sun-Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive hemolytic anemia caused by a mutation in the G6PD gene on Xq28. Herein, we describe a Korean boy with G6PD deficiency resulting from a novel mutation in G6PD. A 20-month-old boy with hemolytic anemia was referred for molecular diagnosis. He had no relevant family history. The G6PD activity was severely decreased at 0.2 U/g Hb (severe deficiency). Direct sequencing analyses on the G6PD gene revealed that he was hemizygous for a novel missense variant, c.1187C>G (p.Pro396Arg), in exon 10 of G6PD. Family study involving his parents revealed the de novo occurrence of the mutation. This is the first report of genetically confirmed G6PD deficiency in Korea. PMID:26275698

  13. G6PD A- Deficiency and Severe Malaria in The Gambia: Heterozygote Advantage and Possible Homozygote Disadvantage

    PubMed Central

    Sirugo, Giorgio; Predazzi, Irene M.; Bartlett, Jacquelaine; Tacconelli, Alessandra; Walther, Michael; Williams, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is frequent in Africa, because it confers resistance to Plasmodium falciparum malaria; however, the nature of the protection and the genotypes associated with it have been controversial. In 1972, Bienzle and others described protection from malaria in West African females heterozygous for G6PD A-. They determined that G6PD A- heterozygotes had lower parasite counts than A- homozygotes, hemizygous males, and normal individuals. However, other studies have reached different conclusions about the protective genotypes. DNA samples from 135 children with severe malaria and 146 children with mild malaria from The Gambia were genotyped for the G6PD A- mutation that is most frequent among Gambians (G6PD 968 T->C); there was a marked deficiency of heterozygotes and an excess of homozygotes with severe malaria, producing a strong deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Our results support the protective effect in G6PD A- heterozygous females and suggest that homozygotes might be more susceptible to severe malaria attacks. PMID:24615128

  14. EFFECT OF METHYL LINOLEATE HYDROPEROXIDE (MLHP), A POSSIBLE TOXIC INTERMEDIATE OF OZONE, ON HUMAN NORMAL AND GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (G-6-PD) DEFICIENT ERYTHROCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Erythrocytes of both normal and G-6-PD deficient humans responded in a dose-dependent manner to the oxidant stress of MLHP as measured by decreases in G-6-PD activity, increases in methemoglobin (METHB) levels and decreases in reduced glutahione (GSH). The G-6-PD deficient erythr...

  15. Favism, the commonest form of severe hemolytic anemia in Palestinian children, varies in severity with three different variants of G6PD deficiency within the same community.

    PubMed

    Reading, N Scott; Sirdah, Mahmoud M; Shubair, Mohammad E; Nelson, Benjamin E; Al-Kahlout, Mustafa S; Al-Tayeb, Jamal M; Aboud, Lina N; Shaban, Maysaa Abu; Luzzatto, Lucio; Prchal, Josef T

    2016-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common genetic abnormality known to predispose to acute hemolytic anemia (AHA), which can be triggered by certain drugs or infection. However, the commonest trigger is fava beans (Vicia faba) ingestion, causing AHA (favism), which may be life-threatening especially in children. G6PD deficiency is genetically highly heterogeneous, as nearly 200 different mutations have been observed. We have investigated the hematological features of acute favism in the Palestinian Gaza community that is characterized by the polymorphic coexistence of three different G6PD deficiency genes (G6PD A-, G6PD Cairo, G6PD Med). We have found by comparison to the general population (485 adults and 466 newborns) that children with favism, in terms of relative frequency, G6PD A- was under-represented, whereas G6PD Med was over-represented. We also found that the severity of anemia was significantly greater with G6PD Med and G6PD Cairo than with G6PD A-; and with G6PD Cairo, compared to the other two variants, there was greater hyperbilirubinemia, as well as persistence of mild anemia and reticulocytosis for as long as 4months after recovery from favism. This is the first report determining a differential impact of different G6PD mutations on the clinical features of favism in the same population and the same environment. PMID:27519946

  16. Large Cohort Screening of G6PD Deficiency and the Mutational Spectrum in the Dongguan District in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Keze; Li, Wenrui; Ma, Qiang; He, Xiaoguang; He, Yuejing; He, Ting; Lu, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common enzymatic disorder of the erythrocytes that affects 400 million people worldwide. We developed a PCR-reverse dot blot (RDB) assay to screen twenty genotypes of seventeen Chinese G6PD mutations and investigate the spectrum of G6PD deficiency mutations in Dongguan District, Guangdong Province, in southern China. Method The PCR-RDB assay consists of multiplex PCR amplification of seven fragments in the G6PD target sequence of wild-type and mutant genomic DNA samples followed by hybridization to a test strip containing allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. A total of 16,464 individuals were analyzed by a combination of phenotypic screening and genotypic detection using the PCR-RDB assay and DNA sequence analysis. Results The PCR-RDB assay had a detection rate of 98.1%, which was validated by direct sequencing in a blind study with 100% concordance. The G6PD deficiency incidence rate in Dongguan District is 4.08%. Thirty-two genotypes from 469 individuals were found. The two most common variants were c.1376G>T and c.1388G>A, followed by c.95A>G, c.871G>A, c.392G>T, and c.1024 C>T. In addition, two rare mutations (c.703C>A and c.406C>T) were detected by DNA sequencing analysis. In our study, 65 cases harbored the C1311T/IVS polymorphism and 67 cases were homozygote. Conclusion The PCR-RDB assay we established is a reliable and effective method for screening G6PD mutations in the Chinese population. Data on the spectrum of mutations in the Dongguan District is beneficial to the clinical diagnosis and prevention of G6PD deficiency. PMID:25775246

  17. Screening for G6PD Deficiency Among Neonates with Neonatal Jaundice Admitted to Tertiary Care Center: A Need in Disguise.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kishwer; Sohaila, Arjumand; Tikmani, Shiyam Sunder; Khan, Iqtidar Ahmed; Zafar, Anila

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the association of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency among neonates admitted with jaundice at the neonatal intensive care unit, well baby nursery and neonatal step down nursery of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from January to June 2010. A total of 205 neonates following the selection criteria were included. All selected neonates have their venous blood drawn, saved in EDTA bottle and sent to laboratory of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH). The laboratory results of whether G-6-PD deficiency was present or not was recorded in the proforma. G-6-PD was deficient in 19 neonates (9.3%). All neonates were male. PMID:26305316

  18. G6PD deficiency in Latin America: systematic review on prevalence and variants.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Wuelton M; Val, Fernando F A; Siqueira, André M; Franca, Gabriel P; Sampaio, Vanderson S; Melo, Gisely C; Almeida, Anne C G; Brito, Marcelo A M; Peixoto, Henry M; Fuller, Douglas; Bassat, Quique; Romero, Gustavo A S; Maria Regina F, Oliveira; Marcus Vinícius G, Lacerda

    2014-08-01

    Plasmodium vivax radical cure requires the use of primaquine (PQ), a drug that induces haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient (G6PDd) individuals, which further hampers malaria control efforts. The aim of this work was to study the G6PDd prevalence and variants in Latin America (LA) and the Caribbean region. A systematic search of the published literature was undertaken in August 2013. Bibliographies of manuscripts were also searched and additional references were identified. Low prevalence rates of G6PDd were documented in Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay, but studies from Curaçao, Ecuador, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, Suriname and Trinidad, as well as some surveys carried out in areas of Brazil, Colombia and Cuba, have shown a high prevalence (> 10%) of G6PDd. The G6PD A-202A mutation was the variant most broadly distributed across LA and was identified in 81.1% of the deficient individuals surveyed. G6PDd is a frequent phenomenon in LA, although certain Amerindian populations may not be affected, suggesting that PQ could be safely used in these specific populations. Population-wide use of PQ as part of malaria elimination strategies in LA cannot be supported unless a rapid, accurate and field-deployable G6PDd diagnostic test is made available. PMID:25141282

  19. G6PD deficiency in Latin America: systematic review on prevalence and variants

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Wuelton M; Val, Fernando FA; Siqueira, André M; Franca, Gabriel P; Sampaio, Vanderson S; Melo, Gisely C; Almeida, Anne CG; Brito, Marcelo AM; Peixoto, Henry M; Fuller, Douglas; Bassat, Quique; Romero, Gustavo AS; Maria Regina F, Oliveira; Marcus Vinícius G, Lacerda

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax radical cure requires the use of primaquine (PQ), a drug that induces haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient (G6PDd) individuals, which further hampers malaria control efforts. The aim of this work was to study the G6PDd prevalence and variants in Latin America (LA) and the Caribbean region. A systematic search of the published literature was undertaken in August 2013. Bibliographies of manuscripts were also searched and additional references were identified. Low prevalence rates of G6PDd were documented in Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay, but studies from Curaçao, Ecuador, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, Suriname and Trinidad, as well as some surveys carried out in areas of Brazil, Colombia and Cuba, have shown a high prevalence (> 10%) of G6PDd. The G6PD A-202A mutation was the variant most broadly distributed across LA and was identified in 81.1% of the deficient individuals surveyed. G6PDd is a frequent phenomenon in LA, although certain Amerindian populations may not be affected, suggesting that PQ could be safely used in these specific populations. Population-wide use of PQ as part of malaria elimination strategies in LA cannot be supported unless a rapid, accurate and field-deployable G6PDd diagnostic test is made available. PMID:25141282

  20. [Hemolytic anemia after voluntary ingestion of henna (Lawsonia inermis) decoction by a young girl with G6PD deficiency].

    PubMed

    Perinet, I; Lioson, E; Tichadou, L; Glaizal, M; de Haro, L

    2011-06-01

    Henna (Lawsonia inermis) is a shrub bearing leaves that are crushed and used for cosmetic purposes in Asia and Africa. In several countries, henna decoction is ingested as a traditional drug to induce abortion. One component of Henna, known as Lawsone, can induce hemolysis in G6PD-deficient patients after cutaneous exposure or ingestion. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of severe hemolytic anemia after voluntary ingestion of Henna decoction to induce abortion. This complication led to diagnosis of partial moderate G6PD-deficiency in the 17-year-old patient living in Mayotte in the Indian Ocean. This report emphasizes the life-threatening hazards associated with some plant extracts used as traditional medicines. PMID:21870562

  1. High prevalence of hemoglobin disorders and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the Republic of Guinea (West Africa).

    PubMed

    Millimono, Tamba S; Loua, Kovana M; Rath, Silvia L; Relvas, Luis; Bento, Celeste; Diakite, Mandiou; Jarvis, Martin; Daries, Nathalie; Ribeiro, Leticia M; Manco, Licínio; Kaeda, Jaspal S

    2012-01-01

    Reliable and accurate epidemiological data is a prerequisite for a cost effective screening program for inherited disorders, which however, is lacking in a number of developing countries. Here we report the first detailed population study in the Republic of Guinea, a sub-Saharan West African country, designed to assess the frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and hemoglobinopathies, including screening for thalassemia. Peripheral blood samples from 187 Guinean adults were screened for hemoglobin (Hb) variants by standard hematological methods. One hundred and ten samples from males were screened for G6PD deficiency by the fluorescent spot test. Molecular analysis was performed for the most common α-thalassemia (α-thal) deletions, β-globin gene mutations, G6PD variants B (376A), A (376G), A- (376G/202A) and Betica (376G/968C), using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing. Of the 187 subjects screened, 36 were heterozygous for Hb S [β6(A3)Glu→Val, GAG>GTG] (allele frequency 9.62%). Sixty-four subjects were heterozygous and seven were homozygous for the -α(3.7) kb deletion (allele frequency 20.85%). β-Thalassemia alleles were detected in five subjects, four with the -29 (A>G) mutation (allele frequency 1.07%) and one with codon 15 (TGG>TAG) (allele frequency 0.96%). The G6PD A- and G6PD Betica deficient variants were highly prevalent with a frequency of 5.7 and 3.3%, respectively. While we did not test for ferritin levels or α(0)-thal, four females (5.2%) had red cell indices strongly suggestive of iron deficient anemia: Hb <9.7 g/dL; MCH <19.3 pg; MCV <68.2; MCHC <31.6 g/dl; RDW >19.8%. Our results are consistent with high frequency of alleles such as Hb S, α-thal and G6PD deficient alleles associated with malaria resistance. Finding a 9.6% Hb S allele frequency supports the notion for a proficient neonatal screening to identify the sickle cell patients, who might benefit

  2. Origins and implications of neglect of G6PD deficiency and primaquine toxicity in Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Most of the tens of millions of clinical attacks caused by Plasmodium vivax each year likely originate from dormant liver forms called hypnozoites. We do not systematically attack that reservoir because the only drug available, primaquine, is poorly suited to doing so. Primaquine was licenced for anti-relapse therapy in 1952 and became available despite threatening patients having an inborn deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) with acute haemolytic anaemia. The standard method for screening G6PD deficiency, the fluorescent spot test, has proved impractical where most malaria patients live. The blind administration of daily primaquine is dangerous, but so too are the relapses invited by withholding treatment. Absent G6PD screening, providers must choose between risking harm by the parasite or its treatment. How did this dilemma escape redress in science, clinical medicine and public health? This review offers critical historic reflection on the neglect of this serious problem in the chemotherapy of P. vivax. PMID:25943156

  3. Serum lipoprotein pattern as modified in G6PD-deficient children during haemolytic anaemia induced by fava bean ingestion.

    PubMed

    Dessì, S; Batetta, B; Spano, O; Pulisci, D; Mulas, M F; Muntoni, S; Armeni, M; Sanna, C; Antonucci, R; Pani, P

    1992-04-01

    In the present study, plasma lipid concentrations were determined at different times after admission in sera from G6PD-deficient children during haemolytic crisis induced by fava bean ingestion. Reductions in total, LDL and HDL cholesterol were found in association with the maximum of bone marrow hyperplasia. A return towards normal values occurred with regression of the disease. No changes in other lipid parameters were observed. These data suggest that alterations of lipoprotein pattern, other than in experimental animals, are also present in humans with non-malignant proliferative processes. These changes appear to be a consequence of the disease, probably due to an increased utilization of cholesterol by proliferating cells. PMID:1571275

  4. Hemolytic crisis in a G6PD-deficient infant after ingestion of pumpkin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 8 month-old infant presented with acute onset of severe jaundice, anemia requiring transfusion and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. The infant did not take drugs, he did not consume fava beans, but fava beans DNA was found on pumpkin he consumed the day before jaundice onset. This is the first case of hemolysis triggered by ingestion of food cross-contaminated with fava beans. PMID:25048415

  5. Haemolytic anaemia after nitrofurantoin treatment in a pregnant woman with G6PD deficiency

    PubMed Central

    van de Mheen, Lidewij; Smits, Simone M; Terpstra, Wim E; Leyte, Anja; Bekedam, Dick J; van den Akker, Eline S A

    2014-01-01

    We present a normotensive, pregnant woman with severe haemolytic anaemia in the third trimester of pregnancy. Owing to normal platelet count diagnoses other than HELLP syndrome were considered and investigated. The patient was treated with nitrofurantoin 3 weeks before presentation and she turned out to have a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. After treatment with blood transfusion, vitamin B12 and folic acid the patient recovered completely. Caesarean delivery was performed because of maternal hypertension and fetal distress at 33 weeks’ gestation. PMID:24789148

  6. Molecular Heterogeneity of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Burkina Faso: G-6-PD Betica Selma and Santamaria in People with Symptomatic Malaria in Ouagadougou

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Abdoul Karim; Yameogo, Pouiré; Diarra, Birama; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Yonli, Albert; Compaore, Tegwindé Rebeca; Soubeiga, Serge Théophile; Djigma, Florencia Wenkuuni; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The G-6-PD deficiency has an important polymorphism with genotypic variants such as 202A/376G, 376G/542T and 376G/968T known in West African populations. It would confer protection against severe forms of malaria although there are differences between the various associations in different studies. In this study we genotyped six (06) variants of the G-6-PD gene in people with symptomatic malaria in urban areas in Burkina Faso. One hundred and eighty-two (182) patients who tested positive using rapid detection test and microscopy were included in this study. A regular PCR with the GENESPARK G6PD African kit was run followed by electrophoresis, allowing initially to genotype six SNPs (G202A, A376G, A542T, G680T, C563T and T968C). Women carrying the mutations 202A and/or 376G were further typed by real-time PCR using TaqMan probes rs1050828 and rs1050829. In the study population the G-6-PD deficiency prevalence was 9.9%. In addition of G-6-PD A- (202A/376G) variant, 376G/542T and 376G/968T variants were also detected. Hemoglobin electrophoresis revealed that 22.5% (41/182) of the individuals had HbAC compared with2.2% with HbAS and one individual had double heterozygous HbSC. There was no correlation between the G-6-PD deficiency or haemoglobinopathies and symptomatic malaria infections in this study. Our study confirms that the G-6-PD deficiency does not confer protection against Plasmodium falciparum infections. As opposed to previous genotyping studies carried out in Burkina Faso, this study shows for the first time the presence of the variant A- (376G/968C) and warrants further investigation at the national level and in specific ethnic groups. PMID:27413522

  7. Severe G6PD Deficiency Due to a New Missense Mutation in an Infant of Northern European Descent.

    PubMed

    Warny, Marie; Lausen, Birgitte; Birgens, Henrik; Knabe, Niels; Petersen, Jesper

    2015-11-01

    We report a term male infant born to parents of Danish descent, who on the second day of life developed jaundice peaking at 67 hours and decreasing on applied double-sided phototherapy. In the weeks following, the infant showed signs of ongoing hemolysis. Laboratory tests showed very low glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzymatic activity, and sequencing of the G6PD gene revealed a previously uncharacterized missense mutation c. 592 C>A (Arg198Ser). Oral DNA from the infant had the same G6PD mutation, suggesting a spontaneous maternal germline mutation as the mutation was not observed in leukocytes from the mother. PMID:26479991

  8. G6PD Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... features allow us to collect responses and distribute critical information. About Us Events Blog Resources Glossary Contact Privacy Policy Sitemap Chicago Web Design © 2016 Center for Jewish Genetics

  9. Life and Death of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficient Erythrocytes – Role of Redox Stress and Band 3 Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Arese, Paolo; Gallo, Valentina; Pantaleo, Antonella; Turrini, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Summary G6PD catalyzes the first, pace-making reaction of pentosephosphate cycle (PPC) which produces NADPH. NADPH maintains glutathione and thiol groups of proteins and enzymes in the reduced state which is essential for protection against oxidative stress. Individuals affected by G6PD deficiency are unable to regenerate reduced glutathione (GSH) and are undefended against oxidative stress. G6PD deficiency accelerates normal senescence and enhances the precocious removal of chronologically young, yet biologically old cells. The term hemolytic anemia is misleading because RBCs do not lyse but are removed by phagocytosis. Acute hemolysis by fava bean ingestion in G6PD deficient individuals (favism) is described being the best-studied natural model of oxidant damage. It bears strong analogies to hemolysis by oxidant drugs or chemicals. Membrane alterations observed in vivo during favism are superimposable to changes in senescent RBCs. In summary, RBC membranes isolated from favic patients contained elevated amounts of complexes between IgG and the complement fragment C3b/C3c and were prone to vesiculation. Anti-band 3 IgG reacted to aggregated band 3-complement complexes. In favism extensive clustering of band 3 and membrane deposition of hemichromes were also observed. Severely damaged RBCs isolated from early crises had extensive membrane cross-bonding and very low GSH levels and were phagocytosed 10-fold more intensely compared to normal RBCs. PMID:23801924

  10. Molecular identification of Gd A- and Gd B- G6PD deficient variants by ARMS-PCR in a Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Haloui, Sabrine; Laouini, Naouel; Sahli, Chaima Abdelhafidh; Daboubi, Rim; Becher, Mariem; Jouini, Latifa; Kazdaghli, Kalthoum; Tinsa, Faten; Cherif, Semia; Khemiri, Monia; Fredj, Sondess Hadj; Othmani, Rim; Ouali, Faida; Siala, Hajer; Toumi, Nour El Houda; Barsaoui, Sihem; Bibi, Amina; Messaoud, Taieb

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzymopathy. More than 200 mutations in the G6PD gene have been described. In Tunisia, the A-African and the B-Mediterranean mutations predominate the mutational spectrum. The purpose of this study was to apply the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS-PCR) to the identification of Gd A+, Gd A- and Gd B- variants in a cohort of deficient individuals and to establish a phenotype/genotype association. 90 subjects were screened for enzymatic deficiency by spectrophotometric assay. The molecular analyses were performed in a group of 50 unrelated patients. Of the 54 altered chromosomes examined, 60% had the Gd A- mutation, 18% showed the Gd B- mutation and in 20% of cases, no mutations have been identified. The ARMS-PCR showed complete concordance with the endonuclease cleavage reference method and agreed perfectly with previous Tunisian studies where Gd A- and Gd B- were the most encountered. Also, similarities in spectrum mutations with North African and Mediterranean countries suggest gene migration from Africa to Europe through Spain. In conclusion, ARMS has been introduced in this study for common G6PD alleles identification in Tunisia. It gives some advantages compared to the traditional endonuclease digestion method since it is more convenient and timesaving and also offers the possibility to be applied in mass screening surveys. PMID:27029726

  11. G6PD: The Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is it used? Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme testing is used to screen for and help ... and the District of Columbia. G6PD is an enzyme found in all cells, including red blood cells ( ...

  12. G6PD deficiency and absence of α-thalassemia increase the risk for cerebral vasculopathy in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Garnier, Nathalie; Kebaili, Kamila; Renoux, Céline; Dony, Arthur; Cheikh, Nathalie; Renard, Cécile; Ceraulo, Antony; Cuzzubbo, Daniela; Pondarré, Corinne; Martin, Cyril; Pialoux, Vincent; Francina, Alain; Bertrand, Yves; Connes, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test the association between hematological/genetic factors and cerebral vasculopathy in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). A group with cerebral vasculopathy (VASC) was composed of children who had stroke (n = 6), silent infarct (n = 11), or an abnormal transcranial Doppler (n = 5). Eighty-four patients had neither positive history of stroke or silent infarct, nor abnormal transcranial Doppler (NORM group). An intermediate group (COND; n = 15) was composed of SCA children with a conditional transcranial Doppler. Biological analyses were performed on samples obtained at steady state and before the beginning of any chronic treatment. The comparisons of the three groups demonstrated a protective effect of α-thalassemia against cerebral vasculopathy through its effects on hemoglobin and reticulocyte levels. Moreover, we observed higher frequency of G6PD deficiency in the VASC group compared with the other groups. Our study confirms the key role of α-thalassemia and G6PD status in the pathophysiology of cerebral vasculopathy in SCA children. PMID:26072930

  13. The challenges of introducing routine G6PD testing into radical cure: a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Ley, Benedikt; Luter, Nick; Espino, Fe Esperanza; Devine, Angela; Kalnoky, Michael; Lubell, Yoel; Thriemer, Kamala; Baird, J Kevin; Poirot, Eugenie; Conan, Nolwenn; Kheong, Chong Chee; Dysoley, Lek; Khan, Wasif Ali; Dion-Berboso, April G; Bancone, Germana; Hwang, Jimee; Kumar, Ritu; Price, Ric N; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2015-01-01

    The only currently available drug that effectively removes malaria hypnozoites from the human host is primaquine. The use of 8-aminoquinolines is hampered by haemolytic side effects in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient individuals. Recently a number of qualitative and a quantitative rapid diagnostic test (RDT) format have been developed that provide an alternative to the current standard G6PD activity assays. The WHO has recently recommended routine testing of G6PD status prior to primaquine radical cure whenever possible. A workshop was held in the Philippines in early 2015 to discuss key challenges and knowledge gaps that hinder the introduction of routine G6PD testing. Two point-of-care (PoC) test formats for the measurement of G6PD activity are currently available: qualitative tests comparable to malaria RDT as well as biosensors that provide a quantitative reading. Qualitative G6PD PoC tests provide a binomial test result, are easy to use and some products are comparable in price to the widely used fluorescent spot test. Qualitative test results can accurately classify hemizygous males, heterozygous females, but may misclassify females with intermediate G6PD activity. Biosensors provide a more complex quantitative readout and are better suited to identify heterozygous females. While associated with higher costs per sample tested biosensors have the potential for broader use in other scenarios where knowledge of G6PD activity is relevant as well. The introduction of routine G6PD testing is associated with additional costs on top of routine treatment that will vary by setting and will need to be assessed prior to test introduction. Reliable G6PD PoC tests have the potential to play an essential role in future malaria elimination programmes, however require an improved understanding on how to best integrate routine G6PD testing into different health settings. PMID:26416229

  14. G6PD Deficiency Prevalence and Estimates of Affected Populations in Malaria Endemic Countries: A Geostatistical Model-Based Map

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Rosalind E.; Piel, Frédéric B.; Patil, Anand P.; Nyangiri, Oscar A.; Gething, Peter W.; Dewi, Mewahyu; Hogg, Mariana M.; Battle, Katherine E.; Padilla, Carmencita D.; Baird, J. Kevin; Hay, Simon I.

    2012-01-01

    Background Primaquine is a key drug for malaria elimination. In addition to being the only drug active against the dormant relapsing forms of Plasmodium vivax, primaquine is the sole effective treatment of infectious P. falciparum gametocytes, and may interrupt transmission and help contain the spread of artemisinin resistance. However, primaquine can trigger haemolysis in patients with a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDd). Poor information is available about the distribution of individuals at risk of primaquine-induced haemolysis. We present a continuous evidence-based prevalence map of G6PDd and estimates of affected populations, together with a national index of relative haemolytic risk. Methods and Findings Representative community surveys of phenotypic G6PDd prevalence were identified for 1,734 spatially unique sites. These surveys formed the evidence-base for a Bayesian geostatistical model adapted to the gene's X-linked inheritance, which predicted a G6PDd allele frequency map across malaria endemic countries (MECs) and generated population-weighted estimates of affected populations. Highest median prevalence (peaking at 32.5%) was predicted across sub-Saharan Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Although G6PDd prevalence was generally lower across central and southeast Asia, rarely exceeding 20%, the majority of G6PDd individuals (67.5% median estimate) were from Asian countries. We estimated a G6PDd allele frequency of 8.0% (interquartile range: 7.4–8.8) across MECs, and 5.3% (4.4–6.7) within malaria-eliminating countries. The reliability of the map is contingent on the underlying data informing the model; population heterogeneity can only be represented by the available surveys, and important weaknesses exist in the map across data-sparse regions. Uncertainty metrics are used to quantify some aspects of these limitations in the map. Finally, we assembled a database of G6PDd variant occurrences to inform a national-level index of

  15. Comparison of Three Screening Test Kits for G6PD Enzyme Deficiency: Implications for Its Use in the Radical Cure of Vivax Malaria in Remote and Resource-Poor Areas in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Fe Esperanza; Sornillo, Johanna Beulah; Tan, Alvin; von Seidlein, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Objective We evaluated a battery of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase diagnostic point-of-care tests (PoC) to assess the most suitable product in terms of performance and operational characteristics for remote areas. Methods Samples were collected in Puerto Princesa City, Palawan, Philippines and tested for G6PD deficiency with a fluorescent spot test (FST; Procedure 203, Trinity Biotech, Ireland), the semiquantitative WST8/1-methoxy PMS (WST; Dojindo, Japan) and the Carestart G6PD Rapid Diagnostic Test (CSG; AccessBio, USA). Results were compared to spectrophotometry (Procedure 345, Trinity Biotech, Ireland). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each test with cut-off activities of 10%, 20%, 30% and 60% of the adjusted male median. Results The adjusted male median was 270.5 IU/1012 RBC. FST and WST were tested on 621 capillary blood samples, the CSG was tested on venous and capillary blood on 302 samples. At 30% G6PD activity, sensitivity for the FST was between 87.7% (95%CI: 76.8% to 93.9%) and 96.5% (95%CI: 87.9% to 99.5%) depending on definition of intermediate results; the WST was 84.2% (95%CI: 72.1% to 92.5%); and the CSG was between 68.8% (95%CI: 41.3% to 89.0%) and 93.8% (95%CI: 69.8% to 99.8%) when the test was performed on capillary or venous blood respectively. Sensitivity of FST and CSG (tested with venous blood) were comparable (p>0.05). The analysis of venous blood samples by the CSG yielded significantly higher results than FST and CSG performed on capillary blood (p<0.05). Sensitivity of the CSG varied depending on source of blood used (p<0.05). Conclusion The operational characteristics of the CSG were superior to all other test formats. Performance and operational characteristics of the CSG performed on venous blood suggest the test to be a good alternative to the FST. PMID:26849445

  16. G6PD testing in support of treatment and elimination of malaria: recommendations for evaluation of G6PD tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Malaria elimination will be possible only with serious attempts to address asymptomatic infection and chronic infection by both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Currently available drugs that can completely clear a human of P. vivax (known as “radical cure”), and that can reduce transmission of malaria parasites, are those in the 8-aminoquinoline drug family, such as primaquine. Unfortunately, people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency risk having severe adverse reactions if exposed to these drugs at certain doses. G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect, affecting approximately 400 million people worldwide. Scaling up radical cure regimens will require testing for G6PD deficiency, at two levels: 1) the individual level to ensure safe case management, and 2) the population level to understand the risk in the local population to guide Plasmodium vivax treatment policy. Several technical and operational knowledge gaps must be addressed to expand access to G6PD deficiency testing and to ensure that a patient’s G6PD status is known before deciding to administer an 8-aminoquinoline-based drug. In this report from a stakeholder meeting held in Thailand on October 4 and 5, 2012, G6PD testing in support of radical cure is discussed in detail. The focus is on challenges to the development and evaluation of G6PD diagnostic tests, and on challenges related to the operational aspects of implementing G6PD testing in support of radical cure. The report also describes recommendations for evaluation of diagnostic tests for G6PD deficiency in support of radical cure. PMID:24188096

  17. High Incidence of Malaria Along the Sino-Burmese Border Is Associated With Polymorphisms of CR1, IL-1A, IL-4R, IL-4, NOS, and TNF, But Not With G6PD Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ren, Na; Kuang, Ying-Min; Tang, Qiong-Lin; Cheng, Long; Zhang, Chun-Hua; Yang, Zao-Qing; He, Yong-Shu; Zhu, Yue-Chun

    2015-10-01

    Malaria is highly endemic in Yunnan Province, China, with the incidence of malaria being highest along the Sino-Burmese border. The aim of our study was to determine whether genetic polymorphisms are associated with the prevalence of malaria among Chinese residents of the Sino-Burmese border region. Fourteen otherwise healthy people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, 50 malaria patients, and 67 healthy control subjects were included in our cross-sectional study. We analyzed the frequency of the G3093T and T520C single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CR1. Logistic regression was used to calculate the prevalence odds ratio (POR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of malaria for the T520C SNP of CR1 and SNPs of G6PD, IL-4, IL-4R, IL-1A, NOS, CD40LG, TNF, and LUC7L. The frequency of the 3093T/3093T genotype of CR1 in the malaria group (0.16) was significantly higher than that in the control group (0.045, P < 0.05), and significantly lower than that in the G6PD deficiency group (0.43, P < 0.01). The frequency of the 520T/520T genotype of CR1 was significantly higher in the malaria patients (0.78) than that in the control group (0.67, P < 0.05) and G6PD-deficiency group (0.36, P < 0.05). The T allele of the T520C variant of CR1 was significantly associated with the prevalence of malaria (POR: 1.460; 95% CI: 0.703-3.034). Polymorphisms of G6PD did not significantly influence the prevalence malaria (P > 0.05). A GTGTGTC haplotype consisting of IL-1A (rs17561), IL-4 (rs2243250), TNF (rs1800750), IL-4R (rs1805015), NOS (rs8078340), CD40LG (rs1126535), and LUC7L (rs1211375) was significantly associated with the prevalence of malaria (POR: 1.822, 95% CI: 0.998-3.324). The 3093G/3093G and 520T/520T genotypes are the predominant genetic variants of CR1 among Chinese residents near the Sino-Burmese border, and the T allele of T520C is associated with the prevalence of malaria in this region. Although G6PD deficiency does not protect against malaria, it may

  18. Validation of G6PD Point-of-Care Tests among Healthy Volunteers in Yangon, Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Maw, Lwin Zar; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Bansil, Pooja; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Htun, Moh Moh; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Htut, Ye; Nosten, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Primaquine and other 8-amnoquinoline based anti-malarials can cause haemolysis in subjects with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Correct diagnosis of G6PD status in patients is crucial for safe treatment of both relapsing stages of Plasmodium vivax and transmitting forms of Plasmodium falciparum. Lack of suitable point-of-care tests has hampered a much needed wide use of primaquine for malaria elimination. In this study we have assessed the performances of two qualitative tests, the fluorescent spot test (FST) and the G6PD CareStart test (CST), against the gold standard quantitative spectrophotometric assay in a population of 1000 random adult healthy volunteers living in Yangon, Myanmar. The prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the Bamar, Karen and in the whole sample set was 6.6% (10.1% in males), 9.2% (21.0% in males) and 6.8% (11.1% in males) respectively. The FST and CST showed comparable performances with sensitivity over 95% and specificity over 90%, however for cases with severe G6PD activity the FTS had improved performance. If used with a conservative interpretation of the signal, the CareStart test has the potential to be used in the field and, by allowing a wider use of primaquine, to help malaria elimination. PMID:27035821

  19. Validation of G6PD Point-of-Care Tests among Healthy Volunteers in Yangon, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Oo, Nwe Nwe; Bancone, Germana; Maw, Lwin Zar; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Bansil, Pooja; Domingo, Gonzalo J; Htun, Moh Moh; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Htut, Ye; Nosten, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Primaquine and other 8-amnoquinoline based anti-malarials can cause haemolysis in subjects with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Correct diagnosis of G6PD status in patients is crucial for safe treatment of both relapsing stages of Plasmodium vivax and transmitting forms of Plasmodium falciparum. Lack of suitable point-of-care tests has hampered a much needed wide use of primaquine for malaria elimination. In this study we have assessed the performances of two qualitative tests, the fluorescent spot test (FST) and the G6PD CareStart test (CST), against the gold standard quantitative spectrophotometric assay in a population of 1000 random adult healthy volunteers living in Yangon, Myanmar. The prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the Bamar, Karen and in the whole sample set was 6.6% (10.1% in males), 9.2% (21.0% in males) and 6.8% (11.1% in males) respectively. The FST and CST showed comparable performances with sensitivity over 95% and specificity over 90%, however for cases with severe G6PD activity the FTS had improved performance. If used with a conservative interpretation of the signal, the CareStart test has the potential to be used in the field and, by allowing a wider use of primaquine, to help malaria elimination. PMID:27035821

  20. Effects of G6PD activity inhibition on the viability, ROS generation and mechanical properties of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zishui; Jiang, Chengrui; Feng, Yi; Chen, Rixin; Lin, Xiaoying; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Han, Luhao; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Hongyi; Guo, Yibin; Jiang, Weiying

    2016-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has been revealed to be involved in the efficacy to anti-cancer therapy but the mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the anti-cancer mechanism of G6PD deficiency. In our study, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and shRNA technology were used for inhibiting the activity of G6PD of cervical cancer cells. Peak Force QNM Atomic Force Microscopy was used to assess the changes of topography and biomechanical properties of cells and detect the effects on living cells in a natural aqueous environment. Flow cytometry was used to detect the apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe cell morphology. Moreover, a laser scanning confocal microscope was used to observe the alterations in cytoskeleton to explore the involved mechanism. When G6PD was inhibited by DHEA or RNA interference, the abnormal Young's modulus and increased roughness of cell membrane were observed in HeLa cells, as well as the idioblasts. Simultaneously, G6PD deficiency resulted in decreased HeLa cells migration and proliferation ability but increased ROS generation inducing apoptosis. What's more, the inhibition of G6PD activity caused the disorganization of microfilaments and microtubules of cytoskeletons and cell shrinkage. Our results indicated the anti-cervix cancer mechanism of G6PD deficiency may be involved with the decreased cancer cells migration and proliferation ability as a result of abnormal reorganization of cell cytoskeleton and abnormal biomechanical properties caused by the increased ROS. Suppression of G6PD may be a promising strategy in developing novel therapeutic methods for cervical cancer. PMID:27217331

  1. High Incidence of Malaria Along the Sino–Burmese Border Is Associated With Polymorphisms of CR1, IL-1A, IL-4R, IL-4, NOS, and TNF, But Not With G6PD Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Na; Kuang, Ying-Min; Tang, Qiong-Lin; Cheng, Long; Zhang, Chun-Hua; Yang, Zao-Qing; He, Yong-Shu; Zhu, Yue-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Malaria is highly endemic in Yunnan Province, China, with the incidence of malaria being highest along the Sino–Burmese border. The aim of our study was to determine whether genetic polymorphisms are associated with the prevalence of malaria among Chinese residents of the Sino–Burmese border region. Fourteen otherwise healthy people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, 50 malaria patients, and 67 healthy control subjects were included in our cross-sectional study. We analyzed the frequency of the G3093T and T520C single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CR1. Logistic regression was used to calculate the prevalence odds ratio (POR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of malaria for the T520C SNP of CR1 and SNPs of G6PD, IL-4, IL-4R, IL-1A, NOS, CD40LG, TNF, and LUC7L. The frequency of the 3093T/3093T genotype of CR1 in the malaria group (0.16) was significantly higher than that in the control group (0.045, P < 0.05), and significantly lower than that in the G6PD deficiency group (0.43, P < 0.01). The frequency of the 520T/520T genotype of CR1 was significantly higher in the malaria patients (0.78) than that in the control group (0.67, P < 0.05) and G6PD-deficiency group (0.36, P < 0.05). The T allele of the T520C variant of CR1 was significantly associated with the prevalence of malaria (POR: 1.460; 95% CI: 0.703–3.034). Polymorphisms of G6PD did not significantly influence the prevalence malaria (P > 0.05). A GTGTGTC haplotype consisting of IL-1A (rs17561), IL-4 (rs2243250), TNF (rs1800750), IL-4R (rs1805015), NOS (rs8078340), CD40LG (rs1126535), and LUC7L (rs1211375) was significantly associated with the prevalence of malaria (POR: 1.822, 95% CI: 0.998–3.324). The 3093G/3093G and 520T/520T genotypes are the predominant genetic variants of CR1 among Chinese residents near the Sino–Burmese border, and the T allele of T520C is associated with the prevalence of malaria in this region. Although G6PD deficiency

  2. Two new class III G6PD variants [G6PD Tunis (c.920A>C: p.307Gln>Pro) and G6PD Nefza (c.968T>C: p.323 Leu>Pro)] and overview of the spectrum of mutations in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Ikbel; Moradkhani, Kamran; Moumni, Imen; Wajcman, Henri; Hafsia, Raouf; Ghanem, Abderraouf; Abbès, Salem; Préhu, Claude

    2013-02-01

    We screened 423 patients referred to our laboratory after hemolysis triggered by fava beans ingestion, neonatal jaundice or drug hemolysis. Others were asymptomatic but belonged to a family with a history of G6PD deficiency. The determination of enzymatic activity using spectrophotometric method, revealed 293 deficient (143 males and 150 females). The molecular analysis was performed by a combination of PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing to characterize the mutations causing G6PD deficiency. 14 different genotypes have been identified : G6PD A(-) (376A>G;202G>A) (46.07%) and G6PD Med (33.10%) were the most common variants followed by G6PD Santamaria (5.80%), G6PD Kaiping (3.75%), the association [c.1311T and IVS11 93c] (3.75%), G6PD Chatham (2.04%), G6PD Aures (1.70%), G6PD A(-) Betica (0.68%), the association [ 376G;c.1311T;IVS11 93c] (0.68%), G6PD Malaga, G6PD Canton and G6PD Abeno respectively (0.34%). Two novel missense mutations were identified (c.920A>C: p.307Gln>Pro and c.968T>C: p.323 Leu>Pro). We designated these two class III variants as G6PD Tunis and G6PD Nefza. A mechanism which could account for the defective activity is discussed. PMID:22963789

  3. Activity of divicine in Plasmodium vinckei-infected mice has implications for treatment of favism and epidemiology of G-6-PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Clark, I A; Cowden, W B; Hunt, N H; Maxwell, L E; Mackie, E J

    1984-07-01

    Intravenous injection of divicine into mice infected with Plasmodium vinckei rapidly killed the parasites and caused haemolysis. Degenerating parasites were observed frequently inside intact circulating erythrocytes, implying that parasite death was not a passive consequence of haemolysis. Both parasite death and haemolysis were prevented by the iron chelator desferrioxamine. In vitro, divicine caused the accumulation of malonyldialdehyde and the depletion of reduced glutathione in normal mouse erythrocytes. Desferrioxamine inhibited the former event, but not the latter. These observations support the hypothesis advanced by Huheey & Martin (Experientia, 31, 1145, 1975) to explain the patchy geographical distribution of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in historic malarial areas and also suggest that desferrioxamine, a drug already in clinical use, is a potential treatment for favism and other examples of oxidative haemolysis. PMID:6743567

  4. National G6PD neonatal screening program in Gaza Strip of Palestine: rationale, challenges and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, M M; Al-Kahlout, M S; Reading, N S

    2016-09-01

    Congenital genetic disorders affecting neonates or young children can have serious clinical consequences if undiagnosed and left untreated. Early detection and an accurate diagnosis are, therefore, of major importance for preventing negative patient outcomes. Even though the occurrence of each specific metabolic disorder may be rare, their collective impact of preventable complications may be of considerable importance to the public health. Our previous studies showed that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a problem of public health importance that has been shown to be a predominant cause of acute hemolytic anemia requiring hospitalization in Palestinian young children in Gaza Strip. Intriguingly, the majority of these children had one of the three variants, Mediterranean(c.) (563T) , African G6PD A-(c.) (202A) (/c.) (376G) and heretofore unrecognized as a common G6PD-deficient variant G6PD Cairo(c.) (404C) . The high prevalence of G6PD deficiency, as well as dietary factors in the region that precipitate anemia, argues for a need to protect the Palestinian children from a treatable and manageable genetic and metabolic disorder. This work reviews and discusses rationales and challenges of G6PD screening program in Gaza Strip. We advocate adopting a national neonatal G6PD screening program in Gaza Strip to identify children at risk and promote wellness and health for Palestine. PMID:27064064

  5. Characterization of G6PD genotypes and phenotypes on the northwestern Thailand-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Bancone, Germana; Chu, Cindy S; Somsakchaicharoen, Raweewan; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Parker, Daniel M; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; White, Nicholas J; Nosten, François H

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene result in red blood cells with increased susceptibility to oxidative damage. Significant haemolysis can be caused by primaquine and other 8-aminoquinoline antimalarials used for the radical treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria. The distribution and phenotypes of mutations causing G6PD deficiency in the male population of migrants and refugees in a malaria endemic region on the Thailand-Myanmar border were characterized. Blood samples for G6PD fluorescent spot test (FST), G6PD genotyping, and malaria testing were taken from 504 unrelated males of Karen and Burman ethnicities presenting to the outpatient clinics. The overall frequency of G6PD deficiency by the FST was 13.7%. Among the deficient subjects, almost 90% had the Mahidol variant (487G>A) genotype. The remaining subjects had Chinese-4 (392G>T), Viangchan (871G>A), Açores (595A>G), Seattle (844G>C) and Mediterranean (563C>T) variants. Quantification of G6PD activity was performed using a modification of the standard spectrophotometric assay on a subset of 24 samples with Mahidol, Viangchan, Seattle and Chinese-4 mutations; all samples showed a residual enzymatic activity below 10% of normal and were diagnosed correctly by the FST. Further studies are needed to characterise the haemolytic risk of using 8-aminoquinolines in patients with these genotypes. PMID:25536053

  6. Characterization of G6PD Genotypes and Phenotypes on the Northwestern Thailand-Myanmar Border

    PubMed Central

    Somsakchaicharoen, Raweewan; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Parker, Daniel M.; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; White, Nicholas J.; Nosten, François H.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene result in red blood cells with increased susceptibility to oxidative damage. Significant haemolysis can be caused by primaquine and other 8-aminoquinoline antimalarials used for the radical treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria. The distribution and phenotypes of mutations causing G6PD deficiency in the male population of migrants and refugees in a malaria endemic region on the Thailand-Myanmar border were characterized. Blood samples for G6PD fluorescent spot test (FST), G6PD genotyping, and malaria testing were taken from 504 unrelated males of Karen and Burman ethnicities presenting to the outpatient clinics. The overall frequency of G6PD deficiency by the FST was 13.7%. Among the deficient subjects, almost 90% had the Mahidol variant (487G>A) genotype. The remaining subjects had Chinese-4 (392G>T), Viangchan (871G>A), Açores (595A>G), Seattle (844G>C) and Mediterranean (563C>T) variants. Quantification of G6PD activity was performed using a modification of the standard spectrophotometric assay on a subset of 24 samples with Mahidol, Viangchan, Seattle and Chinese-4 mutations; all samples showed a residual enzymatic activity below 10% of normal and were diagnosed correctly by the FST. Further studies are needed to characterise the haemolytic risk of using 8-aminoquinolines in patients with these genotypes. PMID:25536053

  7. Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia in infants with G6PD c.563C > TVariant

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a strong correlation between glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia with a rare but potential threat of devastating acute bilirubin encephalopathy. G6PD deficiency was observed in 4–14% of hospitalized icteric neonates in Pakistan. G6PD c.563C > T is the most frequently reported variant in this population. The present study was aimed at evaluating the time to onset of hyperbilirubinemia and the postnatal bilirubin trajectory in infants having G6PD c.563C > T. Methods This was a case–control study conducted at The Aga Khan University, Pakistan during the year 2008. We studied 216 icteric male neonates who were re-admitted for phototherapy during the study period. No selection was exercised. Medical records showed that 32 were G6PD deficient while 184 were G6PD normal. Each infant was studied for birth weight, gestational age, age at the time of presentation, presence of cephalhematoma, sepsis and neurological signs, peak bilirubin level, age at peak bilirubin level, days of hospitalization, whether phototherapy or exchange blood transfusion was initiated, and the outcome. During hospital stay, each baby was tested for complete blood count, reticulocyte count, ABO and Rh blood type, direct antiglobulin test and quantitative G6PD estimation [by kinetic determination of G6PDH]. G6PDgenotype was analyzed in 32 deficient infants through PCR-RFLP analysis and gene sequencing. Results G6PD variants c.563C > T and c.131 C > G were observed in 21 (65%) and three (9%) of the 32 G6PD deficient infants, respectively. DNA of eight (25%) newborns remained uncharacterized. In contrast to G6PD normal neonates, infants with c.563C > T variant had significantly lower enzyme activity (mean ± 1SD; 0.3 ± 0.2 U/gHb vs. 14.0 ± 4.5 U/gHb, p < 0.001) experienced higher peak levels of total serum bilirubin (mean ± 1SD; 16.8 ± 5.4 mg/dl vs. 13.8 ± 4.6 mg/dl, p = 0.008) which peaked earlier after

  8. Evidence for Balancing Selection from Nucleotide Sequence Analyses of Human G6PD

    PubMed Central

    Verrelli, Brian C.; McDonald, John H.; Argyropoulos, George; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Froment, Alain; Drousiotou, Anthi; Lefranc, Gerard; Helal, Ahmed N.; Loiselet, Jacques; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations that result in reduced enzyme activity have been implicated in malarial resistance and constitute one of the best examples of selection in the human genome. In the present study, we characterize the nucleotide diversity across a 5.2-kb region of G6PD in a sample of 160 Africans and 56 non-Africans, to determine how selection has shaped patterns of DNA variation at this gene. Our global sample of enzymatically normal B alleles and A, A−, and Med alleles with reduced enzyme activities reveals many previously uncharacterized silent-site polymorphisms. In comparison with the absence of amino acid divergence between human and chimpanzee G6PD sequences, we find that the number of G6PD amino acid polymorphisms in human populations is significantly high. Unlike many other G6PD-activity alleles with reduced activity, we find that the age of the A variant, which is common in Africa, may not be consistent with the recent emergence of severe malaria and therefore may have originally had a historically different adaptive function. Overall, our observations strongly support previous genotype-phenotype association studies that proposed that balancing selection maintains G6PD deficiencies within human populations. The present study demonstrates that nucleotide sequence analyses can reveal signatures of both historical and recent selection in the genome and may elucidate the impact that infectious disease has had during human evolution. PMID:12378426

  9. A New Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Variant, G6PD Orissa (44 Ala→Gly), is the Major Polymorphic Variant in Tribal Populations in India

    PubMed Central

    Kaeda, J. S.; Chhotray, G. P.; Ranjit, M. R.; Bautista, J. M.; Reddy, P. H.; Stevens, D.; Naidu, J. M.; Britt, R. P.; Vulliamy, T. J.; Luzzatto, L.; Mason, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is usually found at high frequencies in areas of the world where malaria has been endemic. The frequency and genetic basis of G6PD deficiency have been studied in Africa, around the Mediterranean, and in the Far East, but little such information is available about the situation in India. To determine the extent of heterogeneity of G6PD, we have studied several different Indian populations by screening for G6PD deficiency, followed by molecular analysis of deficient alleles. The frequency of G6PD deficiency varies between 3% and 15% in different tribal and urban groups. Remarkably, a previously unreported deficient variant, G6PD Orissa (44 Ala→Gly), is responsible for most of the G6PD deficiency in tribal Indian populations but is not found in urban populations, where most of the G6PD deficiency is due to the G6PD Mediterranean (188 Ser→Phe) variant. The K of G6PD Orissa is fivefold higher than that of the normal enzyme. This may be due to the fact that the alanine residue that is replaced by glycine is part of a putative coenzyme-binding site. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:8533762

  10. A new glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variant, G6PD Orissa (44 Ala{yields}Gly), is the major polymorphic variant in tribal populations in India

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeda, J.S.; Bautista, J.M.; Stevens, D.

    1995-12-01

    Deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is usually found at high frequencies in areas of the world where malaria has been epidemic. The frequency and genetic basis of G6PD deficiency have been studied in Africa, around the Mediterranean, and in the Far East, but little such information is available about the situation in India. To determine the extent of heterogeneity of G6PD, we have studied several different Indian populations by screening for G6PD deficiency, followed by molecular analysis of deficient alleles. The frequency of G6PD deficiency varies between 3% and 15% in different tribal and urban groups. Remarkably, a previously unreported deficient variant, G6PD Orissa (44 Ala{yields}Gly), is responsible for most of the G6PD deficiency in tribal Indian populations but is not found in urban populations, where most of the G6PD deficiency is due to the G6PD Mediterranean (188 Ser{yields}Phe) variant. The K{sup NADP}{sub m} of G6PD Orissa is fivefold higher than that of the normal enzyme. This may be due to the fact that the alanine residue that is replaced by glycine is part of a putative coenzyme-binding site. 37 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Parental education and the WHO neonatal G-6-PD screening program: a quarter century later.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M; Hammerman, C; Bhutani, V K

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency in any population with a male frequency >3-5%, combined with parental education regarding the dietary, environmental and sepsis-related triggers for hemolysis was recommended by the WHO (World Health Organization) Working Group in 1989. As the aim of identifying G-6-PD deficiency in the newborn period is to avert or detect extreme hyperbilirubinemia developing at home, before the development of kernicterus, the parental role in identifying evolving icterus was considered integral to any screening program. Now, a quarter century after publication of this report, severe bilirubin neurotoxicity associated with G-6-PD deficiency continues to be encountered worldwide. Screening programs have not been universally introduced but several national or regional maternal child health programs have implemented neonatal G-6-PD screening. Some reports detail the role of parental education, based on the above mentioned principles, through a variety of audio-visual materials. The paucity of randomized controlled trials or validated evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of the contribution of parental education fails to meet the ideal testable evidence-based approach. However, our review of the cumulative experience and evidence currently available does supply certain information reflecting a positive impact of screening programs combined with parental input. We propose that the current information is sufficient to continue to support and apply the Working Group's recommendations. In order not to waste unnecessary time available, data may be used in lieu of randomized trials to continue to recommend screening programs, as suggested, in high-risk regions. If the incidence of kernicterus associated with G-6-PD deficiency is to be diminished, G-6-PD screening in combination with parental explanation may be one instance in which the consensus approach suggested by the WHO Working Group, rather than reliance

  12. Case Report: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in a woman heterozygous for G6PD A-

    PubMed Central

    Perdigones, Nieves; Morales, Mariela; Mason, Philip; Bessler, Monica

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) in a woman who is heterozygous for the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase A-   ( G6PDA-) allele. PNH is associated with one or more clones of cells that lack complement inhibition due to loss of function somatic mutations in the PIGA gene.  PIGA encodes the enzyme phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis, class A, which catalyses the first step of glycosylphosphatidylinisotol ( GPI)  anchor synthesis. Two GPI anchored red cell surface antigens regulate complement lysis. G6PD catalyses the first step of the pentose phosphate pathway and enzyme variants, frequent in some populations have been selected because they confer resistance to malaria, are associated with hemolysis in the presence of oxidizing agents including several drugs. The patient had suffered a hemolytic attack after taking co-trimoxazole, a drug that precipitates hemolysis in G6PD deficient individuals. Since both G6PD and PIGA are X-linked we hypothesized that the PIGA mutation was on the X-chromosome carrying the G6PDA- allele. Investigations showed that in fact the PIGA mutation was on the X-chromosome carrying the normal G6PD B allele. We speculate that complement activation on G6PD A- red cells exposed to Bactrim might have triggered complement activation inducing the lysis of G6PD B PNH Type II red blood cells or that the patient may have had a PNH clone expressing G6PDA- at the time of the hemolytic episode. PMID:25713697

  13. Case Report: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in a woman heterozygous for G6PD A-.

    PubMed

    Perdigones, Nieves; Morales, Mariela; Mason, Philip; Bessler, Monica

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) in a woman who is heterozygous for the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase A-   ( G6PDA-) allele. PNH is associated with one or more clones of cells that lack complement inhibition due to loss of function somatic mutations in the PIGA gene.  PIGA encodes the enzyme phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis, class A, which catalyses the first step of glycosylphosphatidylinisotol ( GPI)  anchor synthesis. Two GPI anchored red cell surface antigens regulate complement lysis. G6PD catalyses the first step of the pentose phosphate pathway and enzyme variants, frequent in some populations have been selected because they confer resistance to malaria, are associated with hemolysis in the presence of oxidizing agents including several drugs. The patient had suffered a hemolytic attack after taking co-trimoxazole, a drug that precipitates hemolysis in G6PD deficient individuals. Since both G6PD and PIGA are X-linked we hypothesized that the PIGA mutation was on the X-chromosome carrying the G6PDA- allele. Investigations showed that in fact the PIGA mutation was on the X-chromosome carrying the normal G6PD B allele. We speculate that complement activation on G6PD A- red cells exposed to Bactrim might have triggered complement activation inducing the lysis of G6PD B PNH Type II red blood cells or that the patient may have had a PNH clone expressing G6PDA- at the time of the hemolytic episode. PMID:25713697

  14. Prevalence and distribution of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) variants in Thai and Burmese populations in malaria endemic areas of Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background G6PD deficiency is common in malaria endemic regions and is estimated to affect more than 400 million people worldwide. Treatment of malaria patients with the anti-malarial drug primaquine or other 8-aminoquinolines may be associated with potential haemolytic anaemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of G6PD variants in Thai population who resided in malaria endemic areas (western, northern, north-eastern, southern, eastern and central regions) of Thailand, as well as the Burmese population who resided in areas along the Thai-Myanmar border. Methods The ten common G6PD variants were investigated in dried blood spot samples collected from 317 Thai (84 males, 233 females) and 183 Burmese (11 males, 172 females) populations residing in malaria endemic areas of Thailand using PCR-RFLP method. Results Four and seven G6PD variants were observed in samples collected from Burmese and Thai population, with prevalence of 6.6% (21/317) and 14.2% (26/183), respectively. Almost all (96.2%) of G6PD mutation samples collected from Burmese population carried G6PD Mahidol variant; only one sample (3.8%) carried G6PD Kaiping variant. For the Thai population, G6PD Mahidol (8/21: 38.1%) was the most common variant detected, followed by G6PD Viangchan (4/21: 19.0%), G6PD Chinese 4 (3/21: 14.3%), G6PD Canton (2/21: 9.5%), G6PD Union (2/21: 9.5%), G6PD Kaiping (1/21: 4.8%), and G6PD Gaohe (1/21: 4.8%). No G6PD Chinese 3, Chinese 5 and Coimbra variants were found. With this limited sample size, there appeared to be variation in G6PD mutation variants in samples obtained from Thai population in different regions particularly in the western region. Conclusions Results indicate difference in the prevalence and distribution of G6PD gene variants among the Thai and Burmese populations in different malaria endemic areas. Dosage regimen of primaquine for treatment of both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria may need to be optimized, based

  15. Regulation of G6PD acetylation by SIRT2 and KAT9 modulates NADPH homeostasis and cell survival during oxidative stress#

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Zhou, Li-Sha; Zhao, Yu-Zheng; Wang, Shi-Wen; Chen, Lei-Lei; Liu, Li-Xia; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Hu, Fu-Jun; Sun, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Ye; Yang, Chen; Yang, Yi; Xiong, Yue; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a key enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and plays an essential role in the oxidative stress response by producing NADPH, the main intracellular reductant. G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. Here, we show that G6PD is negatively regulated by acetylation on lysine 403 (K403), an evolutionarily conserved residue. The K403 acetylated G6PD is incapable of forming active dimers and displays a complete loss of activity. Knockdown of G6PD sensitizes cells to oxidative stress, and re-expression of wild-type G6PD, but not the K403 acetylation mimetic mutant, rescues cells from oxidative injury. Moreover, we show that cells sense extracellular oxidative stimuli to decrease G6PD acetylation in a SIRT2-dependent manner. The SIRT2-mediated deacetylation and activation of G6PD stimulates PPP to supply cytosolic NADPH to counteract oxidative damage and protect mouse erythrocytes. We also identified KAT9/ELP3 as a potential acetyltransferase of G6PD. Our study uncovers a previously unknown mechanism by which acetylation negatively regulates G6PD activity to maintain cellular NADPH homeostasis during oxidative stress. PMID:24769394

  16. Regulation of G6PD acetylation by SIRT2 and KAT9 modulates NADPH homeostasis and cell survival during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Zhou, Li-Sha; Zhao, Yu-Zheng; Wang, Shi-Wen; Chen, Lei-Lei; Liu, Li-Xia; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Hu, Fu-Jun; Sun, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Ye; Yang, Chen; Yang, Yi; Xiong, Yue; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Dan

    2014-06-17

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a key enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and plays an essential role in the oxidative stress response by producing NADPH, the main intracellular reductant. G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. Here, we show that G6PD is negatively regulated by acetylation on lysine 403 (K403), an evolutionarily conserved residue. The K403 acetylated G6PD is incapable of forming active dimers and displays a complete loss of activity. Knockdown of G6PD sensitizes cells to oxidative stress, and re-expression of wild-type G6PD, but not the K403 acetylation mimetic mutant, rescues cells from oxidative injury. Moreover, we show that cells sense extracellular oxidative stimuli to decrease G6PD acetylation in a SIRT2-dependent manner. The SIRT2-mediated deacetylation and activation of G6PD stimulates PPP to supply cytosolic NADPH to counteract oxidative damage and protect mouse erythrocytes. We also identified KAT9/ELP3 as a potential acetyltransferase of G6PD. Our study uncovers a previously unknown mechanism by which acetylation negatively regulates G6PD activity to maintain cellular NADPH homeostasis during oxidative stress. PMID:24769394

  17. Variant G6PD levels promote tumor cell proliferation or apoptosis via the STAT3/5 pathway in the human melanoma xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), elevated in tumor cells, catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose-phosphate pathway. The regulation mechanism of G6PD and pathological change in human melanoma growth remains unknown. Methods HEM (human epidermal melanocyte) cells and human melanoma cells with the wild-type G6PD gene (A375-WT), G6PD deficiency (A375-G6PD∆), G6PD cDNA overexpression (A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-WT), and mutant G6PD cDNA (A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-G487A) were subcutaneously injected into 5 groups of nude mice. Expressions of G6PD, STAT3, STAT5, cell cycle-related proteins, and apoptotic proteins as well as mechanistic exploration of STAT3/STAT5 were determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results Delayed formation and slowed growth were apparent in A375-G6PD∆ cells, compared to A375-WT cells. Significantly decreased G6PD expression and activity were observed in tumor tissues induced by A375-G6PD∆, along with down-regulated cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, p53, and S100A4. Apoptosis-inhibited factors Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl were up-regulated; however, apoptosis factor Fas was down-regulated, compared to A375-WT cells. Moderate protein expressions were observed in A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-WT and A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-G487A cells. Conclusions G6PD may regulate apoptosis and expression of cell cycle-related proteins through phosphorylation of transcription factors STAT3 and STAT5, thus mediating formation and growth of human melanoma cells. Further study will, however, be required to determine potential clinical applications. PMID:23693134

  18. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II associated with G6PD Seattle in a Sicilian child.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, S; Romano, V; Miraglia del Giudice, E; Perrotta, S; Iolascon, A; Schiliro, G

    1995-01-01

    A 2-year-old Sicilian boy was investigated because of chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) associated with hepatosplenomegaly. Appropriate studies revealed deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase type Seattle (G6PD Seattle). In addition, bone marrow morphology, serological studies and analysis of red cell membrane proteins revealed congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) type II (or HEMPAS). Because G6PD Seattle on its own does not cause CNSHA, we believe that the clinical manifestations in this patient are essentially due to the CDA type II abnormality. However, the coexistence of these two different red cell abnormalities may affect the clinical picture specifically by making CDA type II more hemolytic than it would have been otherwise. PMID:7725848

  19. G6PD haplotypes spanning Xq28 from F8C to red/green color vision

    SciTech Connect

    Filosa, S.; Lania, G.; Martini, G. ); Brancati, C.; Tagarelli, A. ); Calabro, V. Hammersmith Hospital, London ); Vulliamy, T.J.; Luzzatto, L. )

    1993-07-01

    The most telomeric region of the human X chromosome within band Xq28 consists of a gene-rich region of about 3 Mb which contains the genes for coagulation factor VIIIc, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and red/green color vision. The authors have studied five polymorphic sites from this region, in a sample of normal people from the Cosenza province of Southern Italy. These sites, which span a distance of some 350 kb, are in strong linkage disequilibrium. Of the 32 possible haplotypes only 10 were found, and 4 of these account for 80% of all X chromosomes analyzed. In addition, they found that all G6PD-deficient people with the G6PD Mediterranean mutation belong to only two haplotypes. One of these (Med 1) is found only within a small subregion of the area investigated, west of the Appennine mountain range. Most remarkably, all Med 1 G6PD-deficient individuals also had red/green color blindness. The more frequent haplotype (Med 2) is the same in Calabria and in Sardinia, where it accounts for about 90% of the G6PD Mediterranean mutations, despite the fact that gene flow between the populations of Sardinia and Southern Italy must have been limited. These data do not enable determination of whether the two types of G6PD Mediterranean have arisen through two separate identical mutational events or through a single mutational event followed by recombination. However, the data indicate relatively little recombination over an extended region of the X chromosome and they suggest that the G6PD Mediterranean mutation is recent by comparison to the other polymorphisms investigated. 44 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Two new mutations of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene associated with haemolytic anaemia: clinical, biochemical and molecular relationships.

    PubMed

    Zarza, R; Pujades, A; Rovira, A; Saavedra, R; Fernandez, J; Aymerich, M; Vives Corrons, J L

    1997-09-01

    In two unrelated Spanish males with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and haemolytic anaemia, and two different novel point mutations in the G6PD gene, have been identified. A C to T transition at nucleotide 406 resulting in a (136) Arg to Cys substitution and a C to G transition at nucleotide 1155 resulting in a (385) Cys to Trp substitution. These two molecular defects have not been described before and are designated G6PD Valladolid 406 C-->T and G6PD Madrid 1155 C-->G. In vitro biochemical characterization of both mutant enzymes showed important differences in their molecular properties according to their different clinical behaviour. In G6PD Valladolid, the mutation of which is located in exon 5, the normal in vitro heat stability may explain its mild clinical expression (low-grade haemolysis interrupted by an acute haemolytic crisis at age 70). In G6PD Madrid, the mutation, located in exon 10, results in a deficient variant associated with neonatal jaundice and life-long chronic nonspherocytic haemolytic anaemia (CNSHA). This finding further emphasizes the importance of this specific region of the G6PD gene in the stabilization of the G6PD molecule. Putative relationships between these single point mutations and the molecular properties of the mutant enzymes are also discussed. PMID:9332310

  1. Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome not related to G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schulkes, Karlijn J G; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Rijken, Feiko; Haas, Lenneke E M

    2015-01-01

    Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is a rare, but potentially life-threatening reaction to dapsone. We describe a 55-year-old Caucasian woman with normal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase levels presenting with an extensive skin eruption, high-grade fever, pneumonitis and hepatitis, which occurred within 3 weeks after initiation of dapsone. In addition to supportive care, the patient was successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroids and antibiotics. The combination of high-grade fever, skin rash, lung and liver involvement made a dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome very likely. PMID:26682839

  2. Rapid and Reliable Detection of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Gene Mutations in Han Chinese Using High-Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing-bin; Xu, Hong-ping; Xiong, Can; Ren, Zhao-rui; Tian, Guo-li; Zeng, Fanyi; Huang, Shu-zhen

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, an X-linked inherited disease, is one of the most common enzymopathies and affects over 400 million people worldwide. In China at least 21 distinct point mutations have been identified so far. In this study high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to screen for G6PD mutations in 260 unrelated Han Chinese individuals, and the rapidity and reliability of this method was investigated. The mutants were readily differentiated by using HRM analysis, which produced distinct melting curves for each tested mutation. Interestingly, G1388A and G1376T, the two most common variants accounting for 50% to 60% of G6PD deficiency mutations in the Chinese population, could be differentiated in a single reaction. Further, two G6PD mutations not previously reported in the Chinese population were identified in this study. One of these mutations, designated “G6PD Jiangxi G1340T,” involved a G1340T substitution in exon 11, predicting a Gly447Val change in the protein. The other mutation involved a C406T substitution in exon 5. The frequencies of the common polymorphism site C1311T/IVS (intervening sequence) XI t93c between patients with G6PD and healthy volunteers were not significantly different. Thus, HRM analysis will be a useful alternative for screening G6PD mutations. PMID:20203002

  3. Rapid and reliable detection of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene mutations in Han Chinese using high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-bin; Xu, Hong-ping; Xiong, Can; Ren, Zhao-rui; Tian, Guo-li; Zeng, Fanyi; Huang, Shu-zhen

    2010-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, an X-linked inherited disease, is one of the most common enzymopathies and affects over 400 million people worldwide. In China at least 21 distinct point mutations have been identified so far. In this study high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to screen for G6PD mutations in 260 unrelated Han Chinese individuals, and the rapidity and reliability of this method was investigated. The mutants were readily differentiated by using HRM analysis, which produced distinct melting curves for each tested mutation. Interestingly, G1388A and G1376T, the two most common variants accounting for 50% to 60% of G6PD deficiency mutations in the Chinese population, could be differentiated in a single reaction. Further, two G6PD mutations not previously reported in the Chinese population were identified in this study. One of these mutations, designated "G6PD Jiangxi G1340T," involved a G1340T substitution in exon 11, predicting a Gly447Val change in the protein. The other mutation involved a C406T substitution in exon 5. The frequencies of the common polymorphism site C1311T/IVS (intervening sequence) XI t93c between patients with G6PD and healthy volunteers were not significantly different. Thus, HRM analysis will be a useful alternative for screening G6PD mutations. PMID:20203002

  4. Diminished COX-2/PGE2-Mediated Antiviral Response Due to Impaired NOX/MAPK Signaling in G6PD-Knockdown Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Wei-Chen; Yang, Chuen-Mao; Chiu, Daniel Tsun-Yee

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) provides the reducing agent NADPH to meet the cellular needs for reductive biosynthesis and the maintenance of redox homeostasis. G6PD-deficient cells experience a high level of oxidative stress and an increased susceptibility to viral infections. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a key mediator in the regulation of viral replication and inflammatory response. In the current study, the role of G6PD on the inflammatory response was determined in both scramble control and G6PD-knockdown (G6PD-kd) A549 cells upon tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation. A decreased expression pattern of induced COX-2 and reduced production of downstream PGE2 occurred upon TNF-α stimulation in G6PD-kd A549 cells compared with scramble control A549 cells. TNF-α-induced antiviral activity revealed that decreased COX-2 expression enhanced the susceptibility to coronavirus 229E infection in G6PD-kd A549 cells and was a result of the decreased phosphorylation levels of MAPK (p38 and ERK1/2) and NF-κB. The impaired inflammatory response in G6PD-kd A549 cells was found to be mediated through NADPH oxidase (NOX) signaling as elucidated by cell pretreatment with a NOX2-siRNA or NOX inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). In addition, NOX activity with TNF-α treatment in G6PD-kd A549 cells was not up-regulated and was coupled with a decrease in NOX subunit expression at the transcriptional level, implying that TNF-α-mediated NOX signaling requires the participation of G6PD. Together, these data suggest that G6PD deficiency affects the cellular inflammatory response and the decreased TNF-α-mediated antiviral response in G6PD-kd A549 cells is a result of dysregulated NOX/MAPK/NF-κB/COX-2 signaling. PMID:27097228

  5. Diminished COX-2/PGE2-Mediated Antiviral Response Due to Impaired NOX/MAPK Signaling in G6PD-Knockdown Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Ru; Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Yen, Wei-Chen; Yang, Chuen-Mao; Chiu, Daniel Tsun-Yee

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) provides the reducing agent NADPH to meet the cellular needs for reductive biosynthesis and the maintenance of redox homeostasis. G6PD-deficient cells experience a high level of oxidative stress and an increased susceptibility to viral infections. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a key mediator in the regulation of viral replication and inflammatory response. In the current study, the role of G6PD on the inflammatory response was determined in both scramble control and G6PD-knockdown (G6PD-kd) A549 cells upon tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation. A decreased expression pattern of induced COX-2 and reduced production of downstream PGE2 occurred upon TNF-α stimulation in G6PD-kd A549 cells compared with scramble control A549 cells. TNF-α-induced antiviral activity revealed that decreased COX-2 expression enhanced the susceptibility to coronavirus 229E infection in G6PD-kd A549 cells and was a result of the decreased phosphorylation levels of MAPK (p38 and ERK1/2) and NF-κB. The impaired inflammatory response in G6PD-kd A549 cells was found to be mediated through NADPH oxidase (NOX) signaling as elucidated by cell pretreatment with a NOX2-siRNA or NOX inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). In addition, NOX activity with TNF-α treatment in G6PD-kd A549 cells was not up-regulated and was coupled with a decrease in NOX subunit expression at the transcriptional level, implying that TNF-α-mediated NOX signaling requires the participation of G6PD. Together, these data suggest that G6PD deficiency affects the cellular inflammatory response and the decreased TNF-α-mediated antiviral response in G6PD-kd A549 cells is a result of dysregulated NOX/MAPK/NF-κB/COX-2 signaling. PMID:27097228

  6. Influence of dehydroepiandrosterone on G-6-PD activity and /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake of human lymphocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ennas, M.G.; Laconi, S.; Dessi, S.; Milia, G.; Murru, M.R.; Manconi, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) was found to inhibit experimental cancer development in mouse and rat lung, colon and mammary gland. Since DHEA is a potent inhibitor of mammalian G-6-PD, the hypothesis that the compound could inhibit cell proliferation through an inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway has been formulated. We studied the effects of DHEA on the proliferation in vitro of human lymphocytes induced by several mitogens (PHA, ConA and PWM), measuring /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake. DHEA inhibited /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake of mitogen-stimulated cells from both G-6-PD+ and G-6-PD- (mediterranean type deficiency) individuals in a dose-dependent and reversible fashion. The inhibitory effect was found even if DHEA was added to cells in the last hours of culture, simultaneously with the addition of /sup 3/H-thymidine. These data suggest that the inhibition of thymidine uptake induced by DHEA on human lymphocytes probably does not depend on the inhibition of G-6-PD.

  7. Identification of Mutation of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehy–drogenase (G6PD) in Iran: Meta- analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    MOOSAZADEH, Mahmood; NEKOEI-MOGHADAM, Mahmood; ALIRAM–ZANY, Maryam; AMIRESMAILI, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is one of the most common genetic deficiencies, which approximately 400 million people in the world suffer from. According to authors’ initial search, numerous studies have been carried out in Iran regarding molecular variants of this enzyme. Thus, this meta-analysis presented a reliable estimation about prevalence of different types of molecular mutations of G6PD Enzyme in Iran. Methods Keywords “glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase or G6PD, Mediterranean or Chatham or Cosenza and mutation, Iran or Iranian and their Persian equivalents” were searched in different databases. Moreover, reference list of the published studies were examined to increase sensitivity and to select more studies. After studying titles and abstracts of retrieved articles, excluding the repeated and unrelated ones, and evaluating quality of articles, documents were selected. Data was analyzed using STATA. Results After performing systematic review, 22 papers were entered this meta-analysis and 1698 subjects were examined concerning G6PD molecular mutation. In this meta-analysis, prevalence of Mediterranean mutation, Chatham mutation and Cosenza mutation in Iran was estimated 78.2%, 9.1% and 0.5% respectively. Conclusions This meta-analysis showed that in spite of prevalence of different types of G6PD molecular mutations in center, north, north-west and west of Iran, the most common molecular mutations in people with G6PD deficiency in Iran, like other Mediterranean countries and countries around Persian Gulf, were Mediterranean mutation, Chatham mutation and Cosenza mutation. It is also recommended that future studies may focus on races and regions which haven’t been taken into consideration up to now. PMID:26060661

  8. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G-6-PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Churchill Livingston; 2008:chap 45. Golan DER. Hemolytic anemias: red cell membrane and metabolic defects. In: Goldman ...

  9. Brief report: linkage between G6PD and fragile-X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Filippi, G; Rinaldi, A; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M; Balazs, I; Siniscalco, M

    1983-05-01

    Eighteen Sardinian pedigrees segregating for the X-fragile site syndrome were studied with respect to the segregation of the fragile site (FS) at Xq28, mental retardation, and macro-orchidism. No exception was found in the association of this symptomatic triad (MOM-X) in 41 out of 42 patients examined. The exceptional individual had micro- rather than macro-orchidism and was found to have a 47, XXY sex chromosome complement. In six informative sibships, the MOM-X syndrome was found to segregate in close linkage association with G6PD-deficiency or protan colorblindness. The maximum likelihood estimate of recombination if 6% with 90% fiducial limits between 2.5 and 19.5% and an odds ratio in favor of measurable linkage of 428:1. However, no hint of measurable linkage was found in six pedigrees segregating for G6PD and the Renpenning syndrome or other unspecified types of X-linked mental retardation. These data give strong support to the generally held hypothesis that the FS at Zq28, characteristic of the MOM-X syndrome, is a direct expression of a genetic change in the same chromosomal region. They also clearly suggest that X-linked MR without FS may be the result of different allelic mutations at the same locus. PMID:6602550

  10. A Population Survey of the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) 563C>T (Mediterranean) Mutation in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Jamornthanyawat, Natsuda; Awab, Ghulam R.; Tanomsing, Naowarat; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Yamin, Fazel; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Woodrow, Charles J.; Imwong, Mallika

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common inherited enzyme defect and an important problem in areas with Plasmodium vivax infection because of the risk of haemolysis following administration of primaquine to treat the liver forms of the parasite. We undertook a genotypic survey of 713 male individuals across nine provinces of Afghanistan in which malaria is found, four in the north and five in the east. RFLP typing at nucleotide position 563 detected 40 individuals with the Mediterranean mutation 563C>T, an overall prevalence of 5.6%. This varied according to self-reported ethnicity, with prevalence in the Pashtun/Pashai group of 33/369 (8.9%) compared to 7/344 individuals in the rest of the population (2.0%; p<0.001, Chi-squared test). Multivariate analysis of ethnicity and geographical location indicated an adjusted odds ratio of 3.50 (95% CI 1.36–9.02) for the Pashtun/Pashai group, while location showed only a trend towards higher prevalence in eastern provinces (adjusted odds ratio = 1.73, 0.73–4.13). Testing of known polymorphic markers (1311C>T in exon 11, and C93T in intron XI) in a subset of 82 individuals wild-type at C563 revealed a mixture of 3 haplotypes in the background population and was consistent with data from the 1000 Genomes Project and published studies. By comparison individuals with G6PD deficiency showed a highly skewed haplotype distribution, with 95% showing the CT haplotype, a finding consistent with relatively recent appearance and positive selection of the Mediterranean variant in Afghanistan. Overall, the data confirm that the Mediterranean variant of G6PD is common in many ethnic groups in Afghanistan, indicating that screening for G6PD deficiency is required in all individuals before radical treatment of P. vivax with primaquine. PMID:24586352

  11. SIRT2 activates G6PD to enhance NADPH production and promote leukaemia cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuang-Nian; Wang, Tian-Shi; Li, Xi; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Like most other types of cancer cells, leukaemia cells undergo metabolic reprogramming to support rapid proliferation through enhancing biosynthetic processes. Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) plays a pivotal role in meeting the anabolic demands for cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which PPP contributes to leukaemia remains elusive. Here, we report that leukaemia cell proliferation is dependent on the oxidative branch of PPP, in particular the first and rate-limiting enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Knockdown of G6PD reduces NADPH level in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cell lines. Exogenous lipid supplements partially restore the proliferation of G6PD-depleted cells. Deacetylase SIRT2 promotes NADPH production through deacetylating G6PD at lysine 403 (K403). Activation of G6PD by SIRT2 supports the proliferation and clonogenic activity of leukaemia cells. Chemical inhibitors against SIRT2 suppress G6PD activity, leading to reduced cell proliferation of leukaemia cells, but not normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Importantly, SIRT2 is overexpressed in clinical AML samples, while K403 acetylation is downregulated and G6PD catalytic activity is increased comparing to that of normal control. Together, our study reveals that acetylation regulation of G6PD is involved in the metabolic reprogramming of AML, and SIRT2 serves as a promising target for further therapeutic investigations. PMID:27586085

  12. SIRT2 activates G6PD to enhance NADPH production and promote leukaemia cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuang-Nian; Wang, Tian-Shi; Li, Xi; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Like most other types of cancer cells, leukaemia cells undergo metabolic reprogramming to support rapid proliferation through enhancing biosynthetic processes. Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) plays a pivotal role in meeting the anabolic demands for cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which PPP contributes to leukaemia remains elusive. Here, we report that leukaemia cell proliferation is dependent on the oxidative branch of PPP, in particular the first and rate-limiting enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Knockdown of G6PD reduces NADPH level in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cell lines. Exogenous lipid supplements partially restore the proliferation of G6PD-depleted cells. Deacetylase SIRT2 promotes NADPH production through deacetylating G6PD at lysine 403 (K403). Activation of G6PD by SIRT2 supports the proliferation and clonogenic activity of leukaemia cells. Chemical inhibitors against SIRT2 suppress G6PD activity, leading to reduced cell proliferation of leukaemia cells, but not normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Importantly, SIRT2 is overexpressed in clinical AML samples, while K403 acetylation is downregulated and G6PD catalytic activity is increased comparing to that of normal control. Together, our study reveals that acetylation regulation of G6PD is involved in the metabolic reprogramming of AML, and SIRT2 serves as a promising target for further therapeutic investigations. PMID:27586085

  13. G6PD protects from oxidative damage and improves healthspan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nóbrega-Pereira, Sandrina; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Brioche, Thomas; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Flores, Juana M.; Viña, Jose; Serrano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly generated by cells and ROS-derived damage contributes to ageing. Protection against oxidative damage largely relies on the reductive power of NAPDH, whose levels are mostly determined by the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Here, we report a transgenic mouse model with moderate overexpression of human G6PD under its endogenous promoter. Importantly, G6PD-Tg mice have higher levels of NADPH, lower levels of ROS-derived damage, and better protection from ageing-associated functional decline, including extended median lifespan in females. The G6PD transgene has no effect on tumour development, even after combining with various tumour-prone genetic alterations. We conclude that a modest increase in G6PD activity is beneficial for healthspan through increased NADPH levels and protection from the deleterious effects of ROS. PMID:26976705

  14. Point-of-care G6PD diagnostics for Plasmodium vivax malaria is a clinical and public health urgency.

    PubMed

    Baird, J Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax threatens over 2 billion people globally and sickens tens of millions annually. Recent clinical evidence discredits the long-held notion of this infection as intrinsically benign revealing an often threatening course associated with mortality. Most acute attacks by this species derive from latent forms in the human liver called hypnozoites. Radical cure for P. vivax malaria includes therapy aimed both at the acute attack (blood schizontocidal) and against future attacks (hypnozoitocidal). The only hypnozoitocide available is primaquine, a drug causing life-threatening acute hemolytic anemia in patients with the inherited blood disorder glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. This disorder affects 400 million people worldwide, at an average prevalence of 8 % in malaria-endemic nations. In the absence of certain knowledge regarding the G6PD status of patients infected by P. vivax, providers must choose between the risk of harm caused by primaquine and that caused by the parasite by withholding therapy. Resolving this dilemma requires the availability of point-of-care G6PD diagnostics practical for use in the impoverished rural tropics where the vast majority of malaria patients seek care. PMID:26652887

  15. NADP(+) binding effects tryptophan accessibility, folding and stability of recombinant B. malayi G6PD.

    PubMed

    Verma, Anita; Chandra, Sharat; Suthar, Manish Kumar; Doharey, Pawan Kumar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Brugia malayi Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase apoenzyme (BmG6PD) was expressed and purified by affinity chromatography to study the differences in kinetic properties of enzyme and the effect of the cofactor NADP(+) binding on enzyme stability. The presence of cofactor NADP(+) influenced the tertiary structure of enzyme due to significant differences in the tryptophan microenvironment. However, NADP(+) binding have no effect on secondary structure of the enzyme. Quenching with acrylamide indicated that two or more tryptophan residues became accessible upon cofactor binding. Unfolding and cross linking study of BmG6PD showed that NADP(+) stabilized the protein in presence of high concentration of urea/GdmCl. A homology model of BmG6PD constructed using human G6PD (PDB id: 2BH9) as a template indicated 34% α-helix, 19% β-sheet and 47% random coil conformations in the predicted model of the enzyme. In the predicted model binding of NADP(+) to BmG6PD was less tight with the structural sites (-10.96kJ/mol binding score) as compared with the coenzyme site (-15.47kJ/mol binding score). PMID:26763177

  16. SIRT5 promotes IDH2 desuccinylation and G6PD deglutarylation to enhance cellular antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lisha; Wang, Fang; Sun, Renqiang; Chen, Xiufei; Zhang, Mengli; Xu, Qi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Shiwen; Xiong, Yue; Guan, Kun-Liang; Yang, Pengyuan; Yu, Hongxiu; Ye, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Excess in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) is considered as a major cause of cellular oxidative stress. NADPH, the main intracellular reductant, has a key role in keeping glutathione in its reduced form GSH, which scavenges ROS and thus protects the cell from oxidative damage. Here, we report that SIRT5 desuccinylates and deglutarylates isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), respectively, and thus activates both NADPH-producing enzymes. Moreover, we show that knockdown or knockout of SIRT5 leads to high levels of cellular ROS SIRT5 inactivation leads to the inhibition of IDH2 and G6PD, thereby decreasing NADPH production, lowering GSH, impairing the ability to scavenge ROS, and increasing cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress. Our study uncovers a SIRT5-dependent mechanism that regulates cellular NADPH homeostasis and redox potential by promoting IDH2 desuccinylation and G6PD deglutarylation. PMID:27113762

  17. In silico evaluation of miRNA binding site in mutated 3'UTR mRNA of G6PD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Syarifah Anis Wafa Binti Syed Mohd; Noorden, Mohd Shihabudin; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd; Ismail, Endom

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non coding RNA sized 21-25 nucleotide. It has the ability to bind to the 3'- untranslated regions (3'UTR) of their target genes. Consequently, the binding of miRNA in the 3'UTR of targeted mRNA will regulate the expression of this gene. Thus, changes in 3'UTR may affect miRNA binding to mRNA of their target gene, leading to aberrations in mRNA regulations or expression and likely contribute to the various phenotypic changes or clinical risk for certain diseases in man. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate candidate miRNAs species involved during the regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mRNA with and without a specific 3'UTR nucleotide change that was previously shown to be responsible for G6PD deficiency in a Negrito sub-group of the Malaysian Orang Asli. We have conducted in silico analysis using TargetScan, PITA, RegRNA 2.0 and miRanda platform. Our results indicate that three potential miRNAs may have a functional role towards the regulated expression of those bearing the 3'UTR mutation. The role of these eleven miRNA can be investigated in future in vitro expression studies in order to verify its miRNA:mRNA relationship.

  18. O-GlcNAcylation of G6PD promotes the pentose phosphate pathway and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiongjian; Duan, Xiaotao; Mao, Weimin; Li, Xuexia; Li, Zhonghua; Li, Qian; Zheng, Zhiguo; Xu, Haimiao; Chen, Min; Wang, Peng G.; Wang, Yingjie; Shen, Binghui; Yi, Wen

    2015-01-01

    The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) plays a critical role in macromolecule biosynthesis and maintaining cellular redox homoeostasis in rapidly proliferating cells. Upregulation of the PPP has been shown in several types of cancer. However, how the PPP is regulated to confer a selective growth advantage on cancer cells is not well understood. Here we show that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme of the PPP, is dynamically modified with an O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine sugar in response to hypoxia. Glycosylation activates G6PD activity and increases glucose flux through the PPP, thereby providing precursors for nucleotide and lipid biosynthesis, and reducing equivalents for antioxidant defense. Blocking glycosylation of G6PD reduces cancer cell proliferation in vitro and impairs tumor growth in vivo. Importantly, G6PD glycosylation is increased in human lung cancers. Our findings reveal a mechanistic understanding of how O-glycosylation directly regulates the PPP to confer a selective growth advantage to tumours. PMID:26399441

  19. BAG3 elevation inhibits cell proliferation via direct interaction with G6PD in hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kong, De-Hui; Li, Si; Du, Zhen-Xian; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Bao-Qin; Li, Chao; Zong, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hua-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Bcl-2 associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) contains multiple protein-binding motifs to mediate potential interactions with chaperons and/or other proteins, which is possibly ascribed to the multifaceted functions assigned to BAG3. The current study demonstrated that BAG3 directly interacted with glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). BAG3 suppressed the PPP flux, de novo DNA synthesis and cell growth in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). The growth defect of HCCs with forced BAG3 expression can be rescued by enforced G6PD expression. However, BAG3 elevation did not cause a reduction in cellular NADPH concentrations, another main product of G6PD. In addition, supplement of nucleosides alone was sufficient to recover the growth defect mediated by BAG3 elevation. Collectively, the current study established a tumor suppressor-like function of BAG3 via direct interaction with G6PD in HCCs at the cellular level. PMID:26621836

  20. Triplo-X constitution of mother explains apparent occurrence of two recombinants in sibship segregating at two closely X-linked loci (G6PD and deutan).

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, A; Velivasakis, M; Latte, B; Filippi, G; Siniscalco, M

    1978-01-01

    Two male sibs believed to be examples of meiotic recombinants between the closely linked loci for G6PD deficiency of Mediterranean type and severe deutan color blindness proved to be simple segregants of a triplo-X mother of genotype d--GdMediterranean/d+GdMediterranean/d+GdB. This finding suggests that in Sardinia the linkage between the two loci under consideration may be tighter than previously assumed. PMID:309723

  1. Targeted disruption of the housekeeping gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD): G6PD is dispensable for pentose synthesis but essential for defense against oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfi, P P; Sonati, F; Rivi, R; Mason, P; Grosveld, F; Luzzatto, L

    1995-01-01

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a housekeeping enzyme encoded in mammals by an X-linked gene. It has important functions in intermediary metabolism because it catalyzes the first step in the pentose phosphate pathway and provides reductive potential in the form of NADPH. In human populations, many mutant G6PD alleles (some present at polymorphic frequencies) cause a partial loss of G6PD activity and a variety of hemolytic anemias, which vary from mild to severe. All these mutants have some residual enzyme activity, and no large deletions in the G6PD gene have ever been found. To test which, if any, function of G6PD is essential, we have disrupted the G6PD gene in male mouse embryonic stem cells by targeted homologous recombination. We have isolated numerous clones, shown to be recombinant by Southern blot analysis, in which G6PD activity is undetectable. We have extensively characterized individual clones and found that they are extremely sensitive to H2O2 and to the sulfydryl group oxidizing agent, diamide. Their markedly impaired cloning efficiency is restored by reducing the oxygen tension. We conclude that G6PD activity is dispensable for pentose synthesis, but is essential to protect cells against even mild oxidative stress. Images PMID:7489710

  2. Chemically Assisted Enucleation Results in Higher G6PD Expression in Early Bovine Female Embryos Obtained by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Clara Slade; Tetzner, Tatiane Almeida Drummond; de Lima, Marina Ragagnin; de Melo, Danilas Salinet; Niciura, Simone Cristina Méo; Garcia, Joaquim Mansano

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Despite extensive efforts, low efficiency is still an issue in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The hypothesis of our study was that the use of cytoplasts produced by chemically assisted enucleation (EN) would improve nuclear reprogramming in nuclear transfer (NT)–derived embryos because it results in lower damage and higher cytoplasm content than conventional EN. For that purpose, we investigated the expression of two X-linked genes: X inactive-specific transcript (XIST) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). In the first experiment, gene expression was assessed in day-7 female blastocysts from embryonic cell NT (ECNT) groups [conventional, ECNT conv; chemically assisted, ECNT deme (demecolcine)]. Whereas in the ECNT conv group, only one embryo (25%; n=4) expressed XIST transcripts, most embryos showed XIST expression (75%; n=4) in the ECNT deme group. However, no significant differences in transcript abundance of XIST and G6PD were found when comparing the embryos from all groups. In a second experiment using somatic cells as nuclear donors, we evaluated gene expression profiles in female SCNT-derived embryos. No significant differences in relative abundance (RA) of XIST transcripts were observed among the groups. Nonetheless, higher (p<0.05) levels of G6PD were observed in SCNT deme and in vitro–derived groups in comparison to SCNT conv. To know whether higher G6PD expression in embryos derived from SCNT chemically assisted EN indicates higher metabolism in embryos considered of superior quality or if the presence of higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels generated by the increased oxygen consumption triggers G6PD activation, the expression of genes related to stress response should be investigated in embryos produced by that technique. PMID:22908977

  3. AB104. Glucose-6 phospate dehydrogenase deficiency among mongolian neonates

    PubMed Central

    Batjargal, Khishigjargal; Nansal, Gerelmaa; Zagd, Gerelmaa; Ganbaatar, Erdenetuya

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans, affecting 400 million people worldwide and a high prevalence in persons of African, Middle Asian countries. The most common clinical manifestations are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which is caused by the impairment of erythrocyte’s ability to remove harmful oxidative stress triggered by exogenous agents such as drugs, infection, or fava bean ingestion. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by G6PD is strongly associated with mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment. The study aims to determine a level of G6PD in healthy neonates. Methods We obtained blood spot samples from 268 infants around 24-72 hours in their age who has unsuspected intranatal and neonatal disorders. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase “Perkin Elmer, Finland” level is determined by Victor 2D Fluorometer assay, developing of neonatal jaundice is examined by recall. Results The76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PD, other 23.5% (n=63) was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. In the both sex, 51.5% of male 0.88±0.46 Ug/Hb (n=33) and 47.6% of female (n=30) 0.97±0.55 Ug/Hb was assessed with G6PD deficiency. Developing Jaundice period in number of 63 neonates with G6PD deficiency, 86% of neonates (n=54) was in 1-4 days, 4% of neonates (n=3) was in 5-7 days and there is no sign of jaundice in 9% (n=6). Therefore neonates with G6PD deficiency, 53.9% (n=34) continued jaundice more than two weeks. Conclusions G6PD deficiency was determined in male neonates (51.5%) more than female (47.6%). The 76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PDH other 23.5% (n=63) of all participants was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. It shows that G6PD might be one potential risk of neonatal jaundice and hyperbilirubinemia in neonates in Mongolia.

  4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G6PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Gallagher PG. Hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Janz ...

  5. Medications and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Youngster, Ilan; Arcavi, Lidia; Schechmaster, Renata; Akayzen, Yulia; Popliski, Hen; Shimonov, Janna; Beig, Svetlana; Berkovitch, Matitiahu

    2010-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect and one of the most common genetic disorders worldwide, with an estimated 400 million people worldwide carrying a mutation in the G6PD gene that causes deficiency of the enzyme. Although drug-induced haemolysis is considered the most common adverse clinical consequence of G6PD deficiency, significant confusion exists regarding which drugs can cause haemolytic anaemia in patients with G6PD deficiency. In the absence of consensus among physicians, patients are subject to conflicting advice, causing uncertainty and distress. In the current review we aimed, by thorough search of the medical literature, to collect evidence on which to base decisions either to prohibit or allow the use of various medications in patients with G6PD deficiency. A literature search was conducted during May 2009 for studies and case reports on medication use and G6PD deficiency using the following sources: MEDLINE (1966-May 2009), PubMed (1950-May 2009), the Cochrane database of systematic reviews (2009), and major pharmacology, internal medicine, haematology and paediatric textbooks. After assessing the literature, we divided medications into one of three groups: medications that should be avoided in individuals with G6PD deficiency, medications that were considered unsafe by at least one source, but according to our review can probably be given safely in normal therapeutic dosages to individuals with G6PD deficiency as evidence does not contravene their use, and medications where no evidence at all was found to contravene their use in G6PD-deficient patients. It is reasonable to conclude that, over time, many compounds have been wrongly cited as causing haemolysis because they were administered to patients experiencing an infection-related haemolytic episode. We found solid evidence to prohibit only seven currently used medications: dapsone, methylthioninium chloride (methylene blue), nitrofurantoin

  6. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations database: review of the "old" and update of the new mutations.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Angelo; Moradkhani, Kamran; Hwang, Ming Jing; Zuppi, Cecilia; Giardina, Bruno; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2012-03-15

    In the present paper we have updated the G6PD mutations database, including all the last discovered G6PD genetic variants. We underline that the last database has been published by Vulliamy et al. [1] who analytically reported 140 G6PD mutations: along with Vulliamy's database, there are two main sites, such as http://202.120.189.88/mutdb/ and www.LOVD.nl/MR, where almost all G6PD mutations can be found. Compared to the previous mutation reports, in our paper we have included for each mutation some additional information, such as: the secondary structure and the enzyme 3D position involving by mutation, the creation or abolition of a restriction site (with the enzyme involved) and the conservation score associated with each amino acid position. The mutations reported in the present tab have been divided according to the gene's region involved (coding and non-coding) and mutations affecting the coding region in: single, multiple (at least with two bases involved) and deletion. We underline that for the listed mutations, reported in italic, literature doesn't provide all the biochemical or bio-molecular information or the research data. Finally, for the "old" mutations, we tried to verify features previously reported and, when subsequently modified, we updated the specific information using the latest literature data. PMID:22293322

  8. SMYD1 and G6PD modulation are critical events for miR-206-mediated differentiation of rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Coda, Davide Martino; Lingua, Marcello Francesco; Morena, Deborah; Foglizzo, Valentina; Bersani, Francesca; Ala, Ugo; Ponzetto, Carola; Taulli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Rhadomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood. RMS cells resemble fetal myoblasts but are unable to complete myogenic differentiation. In previous work we showed that miR-206, which is low in RMS, when induced in RMS cells promotes the resumption of differentiation by modulating more than 700 genes. To better define the pathways involved in the conversion of RMS cells into their differentiated counterpart, we focused on 2 miR-206 effectors emerged from the microarray analysis, SMYD1 and G6PD. SMYD1, one of the most highly upregulated genes, is a H3K4 histone methyltransferase. Here we show that SMYD1 silencing does not interfere with the proliferative block or with the loss anchorage independence imposed by miR-206, but severely impairs differentiation of ERMS, ARMS, and myogenic cells. Thus SMYD1 is essential for the activation of muscle genes. Conversely, among the downregulated genes, we found G6PD, the enzyme catalyzing the rate-limiting step of the pentose phosphate shunt. In this work, we confirmed that G6PD is a direct target of miR-206. Moreover, we showed that G6PD silencing in ERMS cells impairs proliferation and soft agar growth. However, G6PD overexpression does not interfere with the pro-differentiating effect of miR-206, suggesting that G6PD downmodulation contributes to - but is not an absolute requirement for - the tumor suppressive potential of miR-206. Targeting cancer metabolism may enhance differentiation. However, therapeutic inhibition of G6PD is encumbered by side effects. As an alternative, we used DCA in combination with miR-206 to increase the flux of pyruvate into the mitochondrion by reactivating PDH. DCA enhanced the inhibition of RMS cell growth induced by miR-206, and sustained it upon miR-206 de-induction. Altogether these results link miR-206 to epigenetic and metabolic reprogramming, and suggest that it may be worth combining differentiation-inducing with metabolism-directed approaches. PMID:25644430

  9. Prevalence and molecular basis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Afghan populations: implications for treatment policy in the region

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD), an x-linked inherited enzymopathy, is a barrier to malaria control because primaquine cannot be readily applied for radical cure in individuals with the condition. In endemic areas, including in Afghanistan, the G6PD status of vivax patients is not routinely determined so the drug is rarely, if ever, prescribed even though it is included as a recommended treatment in local, regional and global guidelines. This study assessed the prevalence and genotype of G6PD deficiency in Afghan populations and examined the need for routine G6PD testing as a malaria treatment and control tool. Methods A cross-sectional household survey was conducted using random sampling in five Afghan cities to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Afghan ethnic groups. Filter-paper blood spots were analysed for phenotypic G6PD deficiency using a fluorescent spot test. Molecular analysis was conducted to identify the genetic basis of the disorder. Results Overall, 45/1,436 (3.1%) people were G6PD deficient, 36/728 (5.0%) amongst males and 9/708 (1.3%) amongst females. Amongst males the prevalence was highest in the Pashtun ethnic group (10%, 26/260) while in Tajik males it was 8/250 (3.2%); in Hazara males it was 1/77 (1.3%) and in Uzbek males is was 0/125. Genetic testing in those with deficiency showed that all were of the Mediterranean type (Med-) characterized by a C-T change at codon 563 of the G6PD gene. Conclusion Prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Afghanistan varies considerably by ethnic group and is predominantly of the Mediterranean type. G6PD deficient individuals are susceptible to potentially severe and life-threatening haemolysis after standard primaquine treatment. If the aim of increasing access to radical treatment of vivax is to be successful reliable G6PD testing needs to be made routinely available within the health system. PMID:23834949

  10. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Haemoglobin Drop after Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine Use for Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria during Pregnancy in Ghana – A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Ruth; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Mahama, Emmanuel; Awini, Elizabeth; Anyorigiya, Thomas; Dosoo, David; Amu, Alberta; Jakpa, Gabriel; Ofei, Emmanuel; Segbaya, Sylvester; Oduro, Abraham Rexford; Gyapong, Margaret; Hodgson, Abraham; Bart-Plange, Constance; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Background Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) is still the only recommended antimalarial for use in intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) in some malaria endemic countries including Ghana. SP has the potential to cause acute haemolysis in G6PD deficient people resulting in significant haemoglobin (Hb) drop but there is limited data on post SP-IPTp Hb drop. This study determined the difference, if any in proportions of women with significant acute haemoglobin drop between G6PD normal, partial deficient and full deficient women after SP-IPTp. Methods and Findings Prospectively, 1518 pregnant women who received SP for IPTp as part of their normal antenatal care were enrolled. Their G6PD status were determined at enrollment followed by assessments on days 3, 7,14 and 28 to document any adverse effects and changes in post-IPTp haemoglobin (Hb) levels. The three groups were comparable at baseline except for their mean Hb (10.3 g/dL for G6PD normal, 10.8 g/dL for G6PD partial deficient and 10.8 g/dL for G6PD full defect women).The prevalence of G6PD full defect was 2.3% and 17.0% for G6PD partial defect. There was no difference in the proportions with fractional Hb drop ≥ 20% as compared to their baseline value post SP-IPTp among the 3 groups on days 3, 7, 14. The G6PD full defect group had the highest median fractional drop at day 7. There was a weak negative correlation between G6PD activity and fractional Hb drop. There was no statistical difference between the three groups in the proportions of those who started the study with Hb ≥ 8g/dl whose Hb level subsequently fell below 8g/dl post-SP IPTp. No study participant required transfusion or hospitalization for severe anaemia. Conclusions There was no significant difference between G6PD normal and deficient women in proportions with significant acute haemoglobin drop post SP-IPTp and lower G6PD enzyme activity was not strongly associated with significant acute drug-induced haemoglobin

  11. Review of key knowledge gaps in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency detection with regard to the safe clinical deployment of 8-aminoquinoline treatment regimens: a workshop report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a crucial aspect in the current phases of malaria control and elimination, which will require the wider use of 8-aminoquinolines for both reducing Plasmodium falciparum transmission and achieving the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax. 8-aminoquinolines, such as primaquine, can induce severe haemolysis in G6PD-deficient individuals, potentially creating significant morbidity and undermining confidence in 8-aminoquinoline prescription. On the other hand, erring on the side of safety and excluding large numbers of people with unconfirmed G6PD deficiency from treatment with 8-aminoquinolines will diminish the impact of these drugs. Estimating the remaining G6PD enzyme activity is the most direct, accessible, and reliable assessment of the phenotype and remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of patients who could be harmed by the administration of primaquine. Genotyping seems an unambiguous technique, but its use is limited by cost and the large range of recognized G6PD genotypes. A number of enzyme activity assays diagnose G6PD deficiency, but they require a cold chain, specialized equipment, and laboratory skills. These assays are impractical for care delivery where most patients with malaria live. Improvements to the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency are required for the broader and safer use of 8-aminoquinolines to kill hypnozoites, while lower doses of primaquine may be safely used to kill gametocytes without testing. The discussions and conclusions of a workshop conducted in Incheon, Korea in May 2012 to review key knowledge gaps in G6PD deficiency are reported here. PMID:23537118

  12. A C {r_arrow} T transition at nucleotide 592 accounts for the most frequent mutation of G6PD gene in Taiwanese aboriginal Ami tribe: detection by mutagenically separated PCR (MS-PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.P.; Sun, W.; Chang, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the commonest known enzymopathy in Taiwan. It is estimated to affect 3% of our population, and its molecular defects have been characterized recently. There are 9 point mutations identified with a C {r_arrow} T substitution at nucleotide (nt) 592 in exon VI, the least frequently seen (0.8%) of all mutations. To characterize mutations of the G6PD gene in the Ami people, the most populous of Taiwanese minorities, we studied 21 G6PD-deficient Ami infants and their family members. Natural and amplification-created restriction sites were generated by PCR technique with 10 pairs of primers applied for the screening. By studying the first 7 cases, we found an identical C {r_arrow} T transition at nt 592. MS-PCR was then designed to rapidly detect the nt 592 mutation. As a result, 17 infants are disclosed as having the C {r_arrow} T transition at nt 592, and 2 have a G {r_arrow} T substitution at nt 1376, which were finally verified to be derived from a Chinese Min-Nan ancestor. The genetic defect of the remaining 2 infants remains unidentified. This study has shown that MS-PCR is a feasible and highly sensitive technique for screening mutation carriers in pooled DNA samples. The homogeneity of the nt 592 mutation in the Ami people has proved to be a good indicator for anthropological research.

  13. Overexpression of G6PD and HSP90 Beta in Mice with Benzene Exposure Revealed by Serum Peptidome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Tan, Kehong; Meng, Xing; Yang, Wenwen; Wei, Haiyan; Sun, Rongli; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-01-01

    The small peptides representation of the original proteins are a valuable source of information that can be used as biomarkers involved in toxicity mechanism for chemical exposure. The aim of this study is to investigate serum peptide biomarkers of benzene exposure. C57BL/6 mice were enrolled into control group and benzene groups of 150 and 300 mg/kg/d Serum peptides were identified by mass spectrometry using an assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry (MS). Differential peptide spectra were obtained by tandem mass spectrometry and analyzed by searching the International Protein Index using the Sequest program. Forty-one peptide peaks were found in the range of 1000–10,000 Da molecular weight. Among them, seven peaks showed significantly different expression between exposure groups and control group. Two peptide peaks (1231.2 and 1241.8), which showed a two-fold increase in expression, were sequenced and confirmed as glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and heat shock protein 90 Beta (HSP90 Beta), respectively. Furthermore, the expression of the two proteins in liver cells showed the same trend as in serum. In conclusion, G6PD and HSP90 beta might be the candidate serum biomarkers of benzene exposure. It also provided possible clues for the molecular mechanism of benzene-induced oxidative stress. PMID:26378550

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and the risk of malaria and other diseases in children in Kenya: a case-control and a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Uyoga, Sophie; Ndila, Carolyne M; Macharia, Alex W; Nyutu, Gideon; Shah, Shivang; Peshu, Norbert; Clarke, Geraldine M; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Rockett, Kirk A; Williams, Thomas N

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The global prevalence of X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is thought to be a result of selection by malaria, but epidemiological studies have yielded confusing results. We investigated the relationships between G6PD deficiency and both malaria and non-malarial illnesses among children in Kenya. Methods We did this study in Kilifi County, Kenya, where the G6PD c.202T allele is the only significant cause of G6PD deficiency. We tested the associations between G6PD deficiency and severe and complicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria through a case-control study of 2220 case and 3940 control children. Cases were children aged younger than 14 years, who visited the high dependency ward of Kilifi County Hospital with severe malaria between March 1, 1998, and Feb 28, 2010. Controls were children aged between 3–12 months who were born within the same study area between August 2006, and September 2010. We assessed the association between G6PD deficiency and both uncomplicated malaria and other common diseases of childhood in a cohort study of 752 children aged younger than 10 years. Participants of this study were recruited from a representative sample of households within the Ngerenya and Chonyi areas of Kilifi County between Aug 1, 1998, and July 31, 2001. The primary outcome measure for the case-control study was the odds ratio for hospital admission with severe malaria (computed by logistic regression) while for the cohort study it was the incidence rate ratio for uncomplicated malaria and non-malaria illnesses (computed by Poisson regression), by G6PD deficiency category. Findings 2863 (73%) children in the control group versus 1643 (74%) in the case group had the G6PD normal genotype, 639 (16%) versus 306 (14%) were girls heterozygous for G6PD c.202T, and 438 (11%) versus 271 (12%) children were either homozygous girls or hemizygous boys. Compared with boys and girls without G6PD deficiency, we found significant

  15. Humanized mouse model of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency for in vivo assessment of hemolytic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rochford, Rosemary; Ohrt, Colin; Baresel, Paul C.; Campo, Brice; Sampath, Aruna; Magill, Alan J.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are at risk for the development of hemolytic anemia when given 8-aminoquinolines (8-AQs), an important class of antimalarial/antiinfective therapeutics. However, there is no suitable animal model that can predict the clinical hemolytic potential of drugs. We developed and validated a human (hu)RBC-SCID mouse model by giving nonobese diabetic/SCID mice daily transfusions of huRBCs from G6PD-deficient donors. Treatment of SCID mice engrafted with G6PD-deficient huRBCs with primaquine, an 8-AQ, resulted in a dose-dependent selective loss of huRBCs. To validate the specificity of this model, we tested known nonhemolytic antimalarial drugs: mefloquine, chloroquine, doxycycline, and pyrimethamine. No significant loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs was observed. Treatment with drugs known to cause hemolytic toxicity (pamaquine, sitamaquine, tafenoquine, and dapsone) resulted in loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs comparable to primaquine. This mouse model provides an important tool to test drugs for their potential to cause hemolytic toxicity in G6PD-deficient populations. PMID:24101478

  16. Protective Effect of Quercetin on Oxidative Stress in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Deficient Erythrocytes in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Rezaeian Mehrabadi, Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient subjects are vulnerable to oxidative stress. Quercetin, a flavonoids, has been employed as a potent oxygen-free radical scavenger in order to assess the protective effects of quercetin against H2O2-induced oxidative damage in G6PD-deficient and normal human erythrocytes. Erythrocytes of G6PD-deficient (n = 10) and normal (n = 10) subjects were incubated with different concentrations of quercetin. The produced thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and glutathione (GSH) level of erythrocytes were then subsequently measured. Different concentrations of quercetin showed no significant hemolysis, compared with the phosphate buffer solution. Upon challenge with H2O2, there was a significant (p < 0.005) decrease in GSH and an increase in TBARS level in G6PD-deficient erythrocytes. With quercetin, it managed to preserve concentrations of 15 to 75 mM preserved GSH and TBARS levels of normal and G6PD-deficient erythrocytes against H2O2-induced oxidative damage. In addition to its well-established antioxidant effects, quercetin was also found to have cytoprotective properties. PMID:24363724

  17. EFFECT OF METHYL OLEATE OZONIDE, A POSSIBLE OZONE INTERMEDIATE, ON NORMAL AND G-6-PD DEFICIENT ERYTHROCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    While ozone (O3) has long been recognized as a respiratory tract irritant (STOKINGER 1957, 1965; YOUNG & SHAW 1964; MENZEL 1976), it has also been unequivocally established that it causes a wide variety of systemic effects including chromosomal aberrations in circulating lymphocy...

  18. Detailed functional analysis of two clinical glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) variants, G6PDViangchan and G6PDViangchan+Mahidol: Decreased stability and catalytic efficiency contribute to the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Boonyuen, Usa; Chamchoy, Kamonwan; Swangsri, Thitiluck; Saralamba, Naowarat; Day, Nicholas P J; Imwong, Mallika

    2016-06-01

    Deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an X-linked hereditary genetic defect that is the most common polymorphism and enzymopathy in humans. To investigate functional properties of two clinical variants, G6PDViangchan and G6PDViangchan+Mahidol, these two mutants were created by overlap-extension PCR, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. We describe an overexpression and purification method to obtain substantial amounts of functionally active protein. The KM for G6P of the two variants was comparable to the KM of the native enzyme, whereas the KM for NADP(+) was increased 5-fold for G6PDViangchan and 8-fold for G6PDViangchan+Mahidol when compared with the native enzyme. Additionally, kcat of the mutant enzymes was markedly reduced, resulting in a 10- and 18-fold reduction in catalytic efficiency for NADP(+) catalysis for G6PDViangchan and G6PDViangchan+Mahidol, respectively. Furthermore, the two variants demonstrated significant reduction in thermostability, but similar susceptibility to trypsin digestion, when compared with the wild-type enzyme. The presence of NADP(+) is shown to improve the stability of G6PD enzymes. This is the first report indicating that protein instability and reduced catalytic efficiency are responsible for the reduced catalytic activity of G6PDViangchan and G6PDViangchan+Mahidol and, as a consequence, contribute to the clinical phenotypes of these two clinical variants. PMID:27053284

  19. EVALUATION OF THE DORSET SHEEP AS A PREDICTIVE ANIMAL MODEL FOR THE RESPONSE OF GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-DEFICIENT HUMAN ERYTHOCYTES TO A PROPOSED SYSTEMIC TOXIC OZONE INTERMEDIATE, METHYL OLEATE OZONIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Erythrocytes of both glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD)-deficient humans and Dorest sheep, an animal model with an erythrocyte G-6-PD deficiency, responded in a dose-dependent manner to the oxidant stress of methyl oleate ozonide (MOO) as measured by decreases in G-6-PD a...

  20. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency among Male Blood Donors in Sana’a City, Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nood, Hafiz A.; Bazara, Fakiha A.; Al-Absi, Rashad; Habori, Molham AL

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency among Yemeni people from different regions of the country living in the capital city, Sana’a, giving an indication of its overall prevalence in Yemen. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among Yemeni male blood donors attending the Department of Blood Bank at the National Centre of the Public Health Laboratories in the capital city, Sana’a, Yemen. Fluorescent spot method was used for screening, spectrophotometeric estimation of G-6-PD activity and separation by electrophoresis was done to determine the G-6-PD phenotype. Results Of the total 508 male blood donors recruited into the study, 36 were G-6-PD deficient, giving a likely G-6-PD deficiency prevalence of 7.1%. None of these deficient donors had history of anemia or jaundice. Thirty-five of these deficient cases (97.2%) showed severe G-6-PD deficiency class II (<10% of normal activity), and their phenotyping presumptively revealed a G-6-PD-Mediterranean variant. Conclusion The results showed a significant presence of G-6-PD deficiency with predominance of a severe G-6-PD deficiency type in these blood donors in Sana’a City, which could represent an important health problem through occurrence of hemolytic anemia under oxidative stress. A larger sample size is needed to determine the overall prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency, and should be extended to include DNA analysis to identify its variants in Yemen. PMID:22359725

  1. Integrative Gene Expression Profiling Reveals G6PD-Mediated Resistance to RNA-Directed Nucleoside Analogues in B-Cell Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    McBrayer, Samuel K.; Yarrington, Michael; Qian, Jun; Feng, Gang; Shanmugam, Mala; Gandhi, Varsha; Krett, Nancy L.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleoside analogues 8-amino-adenosine and 8-chloro-adenosine have been investigated in the context of B-lineage lymphoid malignancies by our laboratories due to the selective cytotoxicity they exhibit toward multiple myeloma (MM), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cell lines and primary cells. Encouraging pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 8-chloro-adenosine being documented in an ongoing Phase I trial in CLL provide additional impetus for the study of these promising drugs. In order to foster a deeper understanding of the commonalities between their mechanisms of action and gain insight into specific patient cohorts positioned to achieve maximal benefit from treatment, we devised a novel two-tiered chemoinformatic screen to identify molecular determinants of responsiveness to these compounds. This screen entailed: 1) the elucidation of gene expression patterns highly associated with the anti-tumor activity of 8-chloro-adenosine in the NCI-60 cell line panel, 2) characterization of altered transcript abundances between paired MM and MCL cell lines exhibiting differential susceptibility to 8-amino-adenosine, and 3) integration of the resulting datasets. This approach generated a signature of seven unique genes including G6PD which encodes the rate-determining enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Bioinformatic analysis of primary cell gene expression data demonstrated that G6PD is frequently overexpressed in MM and CLL, highlighting the potential clinical implications of this finding. Utilizing the paired sensitive and resistant MM and MCL cell lines as a model system, we go on to demonstrate through loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies that elevated G6PD expression is necessary to maintain resistance to 8-amino- and 8-chloro-adenosine but insufficient to induce de novo resistance in sensitive cells. Taken together, these results indicate that G6PD activity

  2. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue. PMID:27040960

  3. Effects of iron chloride/zeolıte on G6PD of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)'s liver tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alak, Gonca; Uçar, Arzu; Parlak, Veysel; Kocaman, Esat Mahmut; Atamanalp, Muhammed

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic ecosystems have been negatively affected by the contamination of ground and surface waters as a result of various activities. Due to the ferrous chloride (FeCl2), which is used as the reducing agent for the organic synthesis reactions in the contamination of water column and sediment, iron salts may be very toxic for some aquatic organisms. In order to minimize these effects, natural products such as zeolite have been widely used in recently years. For this reason, rainbow trout were exposed to FeCl2 and/or zeolite ((FeCl2 (0.002 mg/l)(A), FeCl2+zeolite (0.002 mg/l+1 gr/l) (B), zeolite (1 gr/l) (C) and control (without FeCl2 and/or zeolite (D)). for 28 days and their oxidative stress responses were investigated. At the end of the treatment period, Glucose-6- phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity was determined in the samples taken from livers. G6PD values for liver tissues were found statistically important in the control and treatment groups (p<0.01).

  4. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Deficiency in Transfusion Medicine: The Unknown Risks

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Richard O.; Jhang, Jeffrey S.; Pham, Huy P.; Hod, Eldad A.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is red blood cell (RBC) destruction in response to oxidative stress. Patients requiring RBC transfusions may simultaneously receive oxidative medications or have concurrent infections, both of which can induce hemolysis in G6PD-deficient RBCs. Although it is not routine practice to screen healthy blood donors for G6PD deficiency, case reports identified transfusion of G6PD-deficient RBCs as causing hemolysis and other adverse events. In addition, some patient populations may be more at risk for complications associated with transfusions of G6PD-deficient RBCs because they receive RBCs from donors who are more likely to have G6PD deficiency. This review discusses G6PD deficiency, its importance in transfusion medicine, changes in the RBC antioxidant system (of which G6PD is essential) during refrigerated storage, and mechanisms of hemolysis. In addition, as yet unanswered questions that could be addressed by translational and clinical studies are identified and discussed. PMID:23815264

  5. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Nigerian children.

    PubMed

    Williams, Olatundun; Gbadero, Daniel; Edowhorhu, Grace; Brearley, Ann; Slusher, Tina; Lund, Troy C

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (561 males and 561 females) aged 1 month to 15 years. The mean age was 7.4 ± 3.2 years. Children of Yoruba ethnicity made up the largest group (77.5%) followed by those Igbo descent (10.6%) and those of Igede (10.2%) and Tiv (1.8%) ethnicity. G6PD status was determined using the fluorescent spot method. We found that the overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency was 15.3% (24.1% in males, 6.6% in females). Yoruba children had a higher prevalence (16.9%) than Igede (10.5%), Igbo (10.1%) and Tiv (5.0%) children. The odds of G6PD deficiency were 0.38 times as high in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children (p=0.0500). The odds for Igede and Tiv children were not significantly different from Yoruba children (p=0.7528 and 0.9789 respectively). Mean oxygen saturation, heart rate and hematocrit were not significantly different in G6PD deficient and G6PD sufficient children. The odds of being G6PD deficient were 2.1 times higher in children with scleral icterus than those without (p=0.0351). In conclusion, we determined the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Nigerian sub-populations. The odds of G6PD deficiency were decreased in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children. There was no association between vital parameters or hematocrit and G6PD deficiency. We found that a history of scleral icterus may increase the odds of G6PD deficiency, but we did not exclude other common causes of icterus such as sickle cell disease or malarial infection. PMID:23874768

  6. Molecular characterization of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient variants in Baghdad city - Iraq

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although G6PD deficiency is the most common genetically determined blood disorder among Iraqis, its molecular basis has only recently been studied among the Kurds in North Iraq, while studies focusing on Arabs in other parts of Iraq are still absent. Methods A total of 1810 apparently healthy adult male blood donors were randomly recruited from the national blood transfusion center in Baghdad. They were classified into G6PD deficient and non-deficient individuals based on the results of methemoglobin reduction test (MHRT), with confirmation of deficiency by subsequent enzyme assays. DNA from deficient individuals was studied using a polymerase chain reaction-Restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for four deficient molecular variants, namely G6PD Mediterranean (563 C→T), Chatham (1003 G→A), A- (202 G→A) and Aures (143 T→C). A subset of those with the Mediterranean variant, were further investigated for the 1311 (C→T) silent mutation. Results G6PD deficiency was detected in 109 of the 1810 screened male individuals (6.0%). Among 101 G6PD deficient males molecularly studied, the Mediterranean mutation was detected in 75 cases (74.3%), G6PD Chatham in 5 cases (5.0%), G6PD A- in two cases (2.0%), and G6PD Aures in none. The 1311 silent mutation was detected in 48 out of the 51 G6PD deficient males with the Mediterranean variant studied (94.1%). Conclusions Three polymorphic variants namely: the Mediterranean, Chatham and A-, constituted more than 80% of G6PD deficient variants among males in Baghdad. Iraq. This observation is to some extent comparable to other Asian Arab countries, neighboring Turkey and Iran. PMID:22452742

  7. Clinical complications of G6PD deficiency in Latin American and Caribbean populations: systematic review and implications for malaria elimination programmes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although G6PDd individuals are generally asymptomatic throughout their life, the clinical burden of this genetic condition includes a range of haematological conditions, including acute haemolytic anaemia (AHA), neonatal jaundice (NNJ) and chronic non-sphaerocytic anaemia (CNSA). In Latin America (LA), the huge knowledge gap regarding G6PDd is related to the scarce understanding of the burden of clinical manifestation underlying G6PDd carriage. The aim of this work was to study the clinical significance of G6PDd in LA and the Caribbean region through a systematic review. Methods A systematic search of the published literature was undertaken in August 2013. Bibliographies of manuscripts were also searched and additional references were identified. Only original research was included. All study designs were included, as long as any clinical information was present. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported clinical information from populations living in LA or Caribbean countries or about migrants from these countries living in countries outside this continent. Results The Medline search generated 487 papers, and the LILACS search identified 140 papers. After applying the inclusion criteria, 100 original papers with any clinical information on G6PDd in LA were retrieved. Additionally, 16 articles were included after reading the references from these papers. These 116 articles reported data from 18 LA and Caribbean countries. The major clinical manifestations reported from LA countries were those related to AHA, namely drug-induced haemolysis. Most of the published works regarding drug-induced haemolysis in LA referred to haemolytic crises in P. vivax malaria patients during the course of the treatment with primaquine (PQ). Favism, infection-induced haemolysis, NNJ and CNSA appear to play only a minor public health role in this continent. Conclusion Haemolysis in patients using PQ seems to be the major clinical manifestation of G6PDd in LA and contributes to the morbidity of P. vivax infection in this continent, although the low number of reported cases, which could be linked to under-reporting of complications. These results support the need for better strategies to diagnose and manage G6PDd in malaria field conditions. Additionally, Malaria Control Programmes in LA should not overlook this condition in their national guidelines. PMID:24568147

  8. Unsuspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presenting as symptomatic methemoglobinemia with severe hemolysis after fava bean ingestion in a 6-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, Marie-Hélène; Danékova, Névéna; Mesples, Bettina; Chemouny, Myriam; Couque, Nathalie; Parez, Nathalie; Ducrocq, Rolande; Elion, Jacques

    2011-05-01

    We report the occurrence of symptomatic methemoglobinemia in a previously healthy boy, who presented with severe acute hemolysis after fava bean ingestion. The methemoglobinemia revealed a previously unrecognized glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We discuss the pathophysiology of severe methemoglobinemia when associated with acute hemolysis, favism, and the common African G6PD A-variant [G6PD, VAL68MET, ASN126ASP]. In conclusion, screening for G6PD deficiency must be considered in symptomatic methemoglobinemia, especially in young boys, when associated with intravascular hemolysis. PMID:21479984

  9. Cryopreservation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity inside red blood cells: developing a specimen repository in support of development and evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common human enzyme deficiency. It is characterized by abnormally low levels of G6PD activity. Individuals with G6PD deficiency are at risk of undergoing acute haemolysis when exposed to 8‒aminoquinoline-based drugs, such as primaquine. For this reason it is imperative to identify individuals with G6PD deficiency prior to administering these anti-malarial drugs. There is a need for the development and evaluation of point-of-care G6PD deficiency screening tests suitable for areas of the developing world where malarial treatments are frequently administered. The development and evaluation of new G6PD tests will be greatly assisted with the availability of specimen repositories. Methods Cryopreservation of erythrocytes was evaluated as a means to preserve G6PD activity. Blood specimens from 31 patients including ten specimens with normal G6PD activity, three with intermediate activity, and 18 with deficient activity were cryopreserved for up to six months. Results Good correlation in G6PD activity between fresh and cryopreserved specimens (R2 = 0.95). The cryopreserved specimens show an overall small drop in mean G6PD activity of 0.23 U/g Hb (P=0.23). Cytochemical staining showed that intracellular G6PD activity distribution within the red blood cell populations is preserved during cryopreservation. Furthermore, the mosaic composition of red blood cells in heterozygous women is also preserved for six months or more. The fluorescent spot and the BinaxNOW qualitative tests for G6PD deficiency also showed high concordance in G6PD status determination between cryopreserved specimens and fresh specimens. Conclusions A methodology for establishing a specimen panel for evaluation of G6PD tests is described. The approach is similar to that used in several malaria research facilities for the cryopreservation of parasites in clinical specimens and axenic cultures. Specimens stored in this manner will aid

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among children attending the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, IZ; Mainasara, AS; Erhabor, Osaro; Omojuyigbe, ST; Dallatu, MK; Bilbis, LS; Adias, TC

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human enzyme deficiencies in the world. It is particularly common in populations living in malaria-endemic areas, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. This present study was conducted with the aim of determining the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children visiting the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital for pediatric-related care. The study included 118 children, made up of 77 (65.3%) males and 41 (34.7%) females aged ≤5 years with mean age of 3.26 ± 1.90 years. Randox G6PD quantitative in vitro test screening was used for the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency. Of the 118 children tested, 17 (14.4%) were G6PD-deficient. Prevalence of G6PD deficiency was concentrated predominantly among male children (22.1%). Male sex was significantly correlated with G6PD deficiency among the children studied (r = 7.85, P = 0.01). The highest prevalence occurred among children in the 2- to 5-year age-group. Of the 17 G6PD-deficient children, twelve (70.2%) were moderately deficient, while five (29.4%) were severely deficient. Blood film from G6PD-deficient children indicated the following morphological changes; Heinz bodies, schistocytes, target cells, nucleated red cells, spherocytes, and polychromasia. This present study has shown a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children residing in Sokoto in the northwestern geopolitical zone of Nigeria. The study indicated a male sex bias in the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among the children studied. There is a need for the routine screening of children for G6PD deficiency in our environment, to allow for evidence-based management of these children and to ensure the avoidance of food, drugs, and infective agents that can potentially predispose these children to oxidative stress as well as diseases that deplete micronutrients that protect against oxidative stress. There is need to build capacity in our

  11. Molecular Characterization of Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Families from the Republic of Macedonia and Genotype-phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Cherepnalkovski, Anet Papazovska; Zemunik, Tatijana; Glamocanin, Sofijanka; Piperkova, Katica; Gunjaca, Ivana; Kocheva, Svetlana; Jovanova, Biljana Coneska; Krzelj, Vjekoslav

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Glucose-6-phospahte dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) is one of the most common inherited disorders affecting around 400 million people worldwide. Molecular analysis of the G6PD gene identified more than 140 distinct mutations, the majority being single base missense mutations. G6PD Mediterranean is the most common variant found in populations of the Mediterranean area. Aim: The aim of our study was to perform molecular characterization of G6PD deficiency in families from the Republic of Macedonia and correlate the findings to disease phenotype. Patients and methods: Six patients and seven other family members were selected for genetic characterization, the selection procedure involved clinical evaluation and G6PD quantitative testing. All patients were first screened for the Mediterranean mutation, and subsequently for the Seattle mutation. Mutations were detected using PCR amplification and appropriate restriction endonuclease cleavage. Results: Four hemizygote and 3 heterozygous carriers for G6PD Mediterranean were detected. All G6PD deficient patients from this group showed clinical picture of hemolysis, and in 66.6% neonatal jaundice was confirmed based on history data. To our knowledge, this is the first study concerned with molecular aspects of the G6PD deficiency in R. Macedonia. Conclusion: This study represents a step towards a more comprehensive genetic evaluation in our population and better understanding of the health issues involved. PMID:26622077

  12. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency enhances human coronavirus 229E infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Ho, Hung-Yao; Shih, Shin-Ru; Chiu, Daniel Tsun-Yee

    2008-03-15

    The host cellular environment is a key determinant of pathogen infectivity. Viral gene expression and viral particle production of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient and G6PD-knockdown cells were much higher than their counterparts when human coronavirus (HCoV) 229E was applied at 0.1 multiplicity of infection. These phenomena were correlated with increased oxidant production. Accordingly, ectopic expression of G6PD in G6PD-deficient cells or addition of antioxidant (such as alpha-lipoic acid) to G6PD-knockdown cells attenuated the increased susceptibility to HCoV 229E infection. All experimental data indicated that oxidative stress in host cells is an important factor in HCoV 229E infectivity. PMID:18269318

  13. Frostbite: A Novel Presentation of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency?

    PubMed

    Bowles, Justin M; Joas, Chris; Head, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Acute hemolytic anemia (AHA) due to glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has rarely been recognized as a contributor to the development of frostbite. We discuss a case of frostbite in a 32-year-old male Marine with G6PD deficiency during military training on Mount McKinley in Alaska, which eventually led to a permanent disability. In this report, the pathophysiology of G6PD deficiency, the effects of hemolytic anemia, and factors that contribute to frostbite will be discussed, as well as the clinical findings, treatment course, and the outcome of this case. The patient was evacuated and admitted to Alaska Regional Hospital. He was treated for fourth-degree frostbite, ultimately resulting in the complete or partial amputation of all toes. Although it cannot be proved that AHA occurred in this patient, this case potentially adds frostbite to the list of rare but possible clinical presentations of G6PD deficiency. PMID:26360347

  14. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Improves Insulin Resistance With Reduced Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Ham, Mira; Choe, Sung Sik; Shin, Kyung Cheul; Choi, Goun; Kim, Ji-Won; Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Ryu, Je-Won; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), a rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, plays important roles in redox regulation and de novo lipogenesis. It was recently demonstrated that aberrant upregulation of G6PD in obese adipose tissue mediates insulin resistance as a result of imbalanced energy metabolism and oxidative stress. It remains elusive, however, whether inhibition of G6PD in vivo may relieve obesity-induced insulin resistance. In this study we showed that a hematopoietic G6PD defect alleviates insulin resistance in obesity, accompanied by reduced adipose tissue inflammation. Compared with wild-type littermates, G6PD-deficient mutant (G6PD(mut)) mice were glucose tolerant upon high-fat-diet (HFD) feeding. Intriguingly, the expression of NADPH oxidase genes to produce reactive oxygen species was alleviated, whereas that of antioxidant genes was enhanced in the adipose tissue of HFD-fed G6PD(mut) mice. In diet-induced obesity (DIO), the adipose tissue of G6PD(mut) mice decreased the expression of inflammatory cytokines, accompanied by downregulated proinflammatory macrophages. Accordingly, macrophages from G6PD(mut) mice greatly suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory signaling cascades, leading to enhanced insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and hepatocytes. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of G6PD(mut) bone marrow to wild-type mice attenuated adipose tissue inflammation and improved glucose tolerance in DIO. Collectively, these data suggest that inhibition of macrophage G6PD would ameliorate insulin resistance in obesity through suppression of proinflammatory responses. PMID:27284106

  15. Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency at the China-Myanmar Border

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Luo, Lan; Yang, Yuling; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Huaie; Zhang, Wen; Fan, Zhixiang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Cui, Liwang; He, Yongshu

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked hereditary disease that predisposes red blood cells to oxidative damage. G6PD deficiency is particularly prevalent in historically malaria-endemic areas. Use of primaquine for malaria treatment may result in severe hemolysis in G6PD deficient patients. In this study, we systematically evaluated the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the Kachin (Jingpo) ethnic group along the China-Myanmar border and determined the underlying G6PD genotypes. We surveyed G6PD deficiency in 1770 adult individuals (671 males and 1099 females) of the Kachin ethnicity using a G6PD fluorescent spot test. The overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the study population was 29.6% (523/1770), among which 27.9% and 30.6% were males and females, respectively. From these G6PD deficient samples, 198 unrelated individuals (147 females and 51 males) were selected for genotyping at 11 known G6PD single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Southeast Asia (ten in exons and one in intron 11) using a multiplex SNaPshot assay. Mutations with known association to a deficient phenotype were detected in 43.9% (87/198) of cases, intronic and synonymous mutations were detected alone in 34.8% (69/198) cases and no mutation were found in 21.2% (42/198) cases. Five non-synonymous mutations, Mahidol 487G>A, Kaiping 1388G>A, Canton 1376G>T, Chinese 4 392G>T, and Viangchan 871G>A were detected. Of the 87 cases with known deficient mutations, the Mahidol variant was the most common (89.7%; 78/87), followed by the Kaiping (8.0%; 7/87) and the Viangchan (2.2%; 2/87) variants. The Canton and Chinese 4 variants were found in 1.1% of these 87 cases. Among them, two females carried the Mahidol/Viangchan and Mahidol/Kaiping double mutations, respectively. Interestingly, the silent SNPs 1311C>T and IVS11nt93T>C both occurred in the same 95 subjects with frequencies at 56.4% and 23.5% in tested females and males, respectively (P<0.05). It is noteworthy that 24

  16. The Preterm Infant: A High-Risk Situation for Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia Due to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Michael; Hammerman, Cathy; Bhutani, Vinod K

    2016-06-01

    Prematurity and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are risk factors for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The 2 conditions may interact additively or synergistically, contributing to extreme hyperbilirubinemia, with the potential for bilirubin neurotoxicity. This hyperbilirubinemia is the result of sudden, unpredictable, and acute episodes of hemolysis in combination with immaturity of bilirubin elimination, primarily of conjugation. Avoidance of contact with known triggers of hemolysis in G6PD-deficient individuals will prevent some, but not all, episodes of hemolysis. All preterm infants with G6PD deficiency should be vigilantly observed for the development of jaundice both in hospital and after discharge home. PMID:27235211

  17. OZONE INDUCED HEMATOLOGICAL CHANGES IN MOUSE STRAINS WITH DIFFERENTIAL LEVELS OF ERYTHROCYTE G-6-PD ACTIVITY AND VITAMIN E STATUS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single short term in vivo exposure (6 hr) to O3 (i.e., 0.3, 0.9, 1.5 ppm) markedly affected several hematological parameters in males of two mouse strains (C57L/J and A/J) reared on either a vitamin E normal or deficient diet. Of particular significance is that at the lowest co...

  18. Is glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency more prevalent in Carrion's disease endemic areas in Latin America?

    PubMed

    Mazulis, Fernando; Weilg, Claudia; Alva-Urcia, Carlos; Pons, Maria J; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana

    2015-12-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a cytoplasmic enzyme with an important function in cell oxidative damage prevention. Erythrocytes have a predisposition towards oxidized environments due to their lack of mitochondria, giving G6PD a major role in its stability. G6PD deficiency (G6PDd) is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans; it affects approximately 400 million individuals worldwide. The overall G6PDd allele frequency across malaria endemic countries is estimated to be 8%, corresponding to approximately 220 million males and 133 million females. However, there are no reports on the prevalence of G6PDd in Andean communities where bartonellosis is prevalent. PMID:26706684

  19. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and the Need for a Novel Treatment to Prevent Kernicterus.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Anna D; Hwang, Sunhee; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-06-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia occurs frequently in newborns, and in severe cases can progress to kernicterus and permanent developmental disorders. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, one of the most common human enzymopathies, is a major risk factor for hyperbilirubinemia and greatly increases the risk of kernicterus even in the developed world. Therefore, a novel treatment for kernicterus is needed, especially for G6PD-deficient newborns. Oxidative stress is a hallmark of bilirubin toxicity in the brain. We propose that the activation of G6PD via a small molecule chaperone is a potential strategy to increase endogenous defense against bilirubin-induced oxidative stress and prevent kernicterus. PMID:27235212

  20. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in an Endemic Area for Malaria in Manaus: A Cross-Sectional Survey in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Marli Stela; de Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Barbosa, Maria das Graças Vale; Alecrim, Wilson Duarte; Alecrim, Maria das Graças Costa

    2009-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of information regarding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in endemic areas for malaria in Latin America. Methodology/Principal Findings This study determined the prevalence of the G6PD deficiency in 200 male non-consanguineous individuals residing in the Ismail Aziz Community, on the outskirts of Manaus (Brazilian Amazon). Six individuals (3%) were deficient using the qualitative Brewer's test. Gel electrophoresis showed that five of these patients were G6PD A−. The deficiency was not associated with the ethnic origin (P = 0.571). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, G6PD deficiency protected against three or more episodes of malaria (P = 0.049), independently of the age, and was associated with a history of jaundice (P = 0.020) and need of blood transfusion (P = 0.045) during previous treatment for malarial infection, independently of the age and the previous malarial exposure. Conclusions/Significance The frequency of G6PD deficiency was similar to other studies performed in Brazil and the finding of a predominant G6PD A− variant will help the clinical management of patients with drug-induced haemolysis. The history of jaundice and blood transfusion during previous malarial infection may trigger the screening of patients for G6PD deficiency. The apparent protection against multiple malarial infections in an area primarily endemic for Plasmodium vivax needs further investigation. PMID:19370159

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase deficiency and its correlation with other risk factors in jaundiced newborns in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Gutiérrez; Castro, Simone Martins; Santin, Ana Paula; Zaleski, Carina; Carvalho, Felipe Gutiérrez; Giugliani, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the correlation between glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and neonatal jaundice. Methods Prospective, observational case-control study was conducted on 490 newborns admitted to Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre for phototherapy, who all experienced 35 or more weeks of gestation, from March to December 2007. Enzymatic screening of G6PD activity was performed, followed by PCR. Results There was prevalence of 4.6% and a boy-girl ratio of 3:1 in jaundiced newborns. No jaundiced neonate with ABO incompatibility presented G6PD deficiency, and no Mediterranean mutation was found. A higher proportion of deficiency was observed in Afro-descendants. There was no association with UGT1A1 variants. Conclusions G6PD deficiency is not related to severe hyperbilirubinemia and considering the high miscegenation in this area of Brazil, other gene interactions should be investigated. PMID:23569738

  2. Somatic-cell selection is a major determinant of the blood-cell phenotype in heterozygotes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations causing severe enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Filosa, S.; Giacometti, N.; Wangwei, C.; De Mattia, D.; Pagnini, D.; Alfinito, F.; Schettini, F.; Luzzatto, L.; Martini, G.

    1996-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation in mammals is regarded as an essentially random process, but the resulting somatic-cell mosaicism creates the opportunity for cell selection. In most people with red-blood-cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the enzyme-deficient phenotype is only moderately expressed in nucleated cells. However, in a small subset of hemizygous males who suffer from chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the underlying mutations (designated class I) cause more-severe G6PD deficiency, and this might provide an opportunity for selection in heterozygous females during development. In order to test this possibility we have analyzed four heterozygotes for class I G6PD mutations: two with G6PD Portici (1178G-->A) and two with G6PD Bari (1187C-->T). We found that in fractionated blood cell types (including erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages) there was a significant excess of G6PD-normal cells. The significant concordance that we have observed in the degree of imbalance in the different blood-cell lineages indicates that a selective mechanism is likely to operate at the level of pluripotent blood stem cells. Thus, it appears that severe G6PD deficiency affects adversely the proliferation or the survival of nucleated blood cells and that this phenotypic characteristic is critical during hematopoiesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8808605

  3. Somatic-cell selection is a major determinant of the blood-cell phenotype in heterozygotes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations causing severe enzyme deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Filosa, S.; Giacometti, N.; Wangwei, C.; Martini, G.

    1996-10-01

    X-chromosome inactivation in mammals is regarded as an essentially random process, but the resulting somatic-cell mosaicism creates the opportunity for cell selection. In most people with red-blood-cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the enzyme-deficient phenotype is only moderately expressed in nucleated cells. However, in a small subset of hemizygous males who suffer from chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the underlying mutations (designated class I) cause more-severe G6PD deficiency, and this might provide an opportunity for selection in heterozygous females during development. In order to test this possibility we have analyzed four heterozygotes for class I G6PD mutations: two with G6PD Portici (1178G{r_arrow}A) and two with G6PD Bari (1187C{r_arrow}T). We found that in fractionated blood cell types (including erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages) there was a significant excess of G6PD-normal cells. The significant concordance that we have observed in the degree of imbalance in the different blood-cell lineages indicates that a selective mechanism is likely to operate at the level of pluripotent blood stem cells. Thus, it appears that severe G6PD deficiency affects adversely the proliferation or the survival of nucleated blood cells and that this phenotypic characteristic is critical during hematopoiesis. 65 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient subjects may be better "storers" than donors of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Kriebardis, Anastasios G; Georgatzakou, Hara T; Foudoulaki-Paparizos, Leontini E; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wither, Matthew J; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Papassideri, Issidora S; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Antonelou, Marianna H

    2016-07-01

    Storage of packed red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with progressive accumulation of lesions, mostly triggered by energy and oxidative stresses, which potentially compromise the effectiveness of the transfusion therapy. Concerns arise as to whether glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient subjects (G6PD(-)), ~5% of the population in the Mediterranean area, should be accepted as routine donors in the light of the increased oxidative stress their RBCs suffer from. To address this question, we first performed morphology (scanning electron microscopy), physiology and omics (proteomics and metabolomics) analyses on stored RBCs from healthy or G6PD(-) donors. We then used an in vitro model of transfusion to simulate transfusion outcomes involving G6PD(-) donors or recipients, by reconstituting G6PD(-) stored or fresh blood with fresh or stored blood from healthy volunteers, respectively, at body temperature. We found that G6PD(-) cells store well in relation to energy, calcium and morphology related parameters, though at the expenses of a compromised anti-oxidant system. Additional stimuli, mimicking post-transfusion conditions (37°C, reconstitution with fresh healthy blood, incubation with oxidants) promoted hemolysis and oxidative lesions in stored G6PD(-) cells in comparison to controls. On the other hand, stored healthy RBC units showed better oxidative parameters and lower removal signaling when reconstituted with G6PD(-) fresh blood compared to control. Although the measured parameters of stored RBCs from the G6PD deficient donors appeared to be acceptable, the results from the in vitro model of transfusion suggest that G6PD(-) RBCs could be more susceptible to hemolysis and oxidative stresses post-transfusion. On the other hand, their chronic exposure to oxidative stress might make them good recipients, as they better tolerate exposure to oxidatively damaged long stored healthy RBCs. PMID:27094493

  5. Acute viral hepatitis E presenting with haemolytic anaemia and acute renal failure in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Aggarwal, Amitesh; Jain, Piyush; Rajpal, Surender; Agarwal, Mukul P

    2015-10-01

    The association of acute hepatitis E viral (HEV) infection with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency leading to extensive intravascular haemolysis is a very rare clinical entity. Here we discuss such a patient, who presented with acute HEV illness, developed severe intravascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of bilirubin, complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), and was later on found to have a deficiency of G6PD. The patient recovered completely with haemodialysis and supportive management. PMID:25500531

  6. Malaria, favism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Huheey, J E; Martin, D L

    1975-10-15

    Although glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient individuals may suffer (sometimes fatally) from favism, a high incidence of this trait occurs in many Mediterranean populations. This apparent paradox is explained on the basis of a synergistic interaction between favism and G-6-PD deficiency that provides increased protection against malaria compared to that of the G-6-PD deficiency alone. This relationship is analogous to that between various hemoglobins and malaria in that there is selection for a more severe trait if it provides more protection against malaria. PMID:1107056

  7. Evaluation of the blue formazan spot test for screening glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pujades, A; Lewis, M; Salvati, A M; Miwa, S; Fujii, H; Zarza, R; Alvarez, R; Rull, E; Corrons, J L

    1999-06-01

    Several screening tests for glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency have been reported thus far, and a standardized method of testing was proposed by the International Council for Standardization in Hematology (ICSH). The screening test used in any particular laboratory depends upon a number of factors such as cost, time required, temperature, humidity, and availability of reagents. In this study, a direct comparison between three different G6PD screening methods has been undertaken. In 71 cases (50 hematologically normal volunteers, 9 hemizygous G6PD-deficient males, and 12 heterozygous deficient females), the blue formazan spot test (BFST) was compared with the conventional methemoglobin reduction test (HiRT) and the ICSH-recommended fluorescent spot test (FST-ICSH). In all cases, the results obtained with the three screening tests were correlated with the enzyme activity assayed spectrophotometrically. In hemizygous G6PD-deficient males, all cases were equally detected with the three methods: BFST (4.7-6.64, controls: 11.1-13.4), BMRT (score +3 in all 9 cases), and FST (no fluorescence in 9 cases). In heterozygous G6PD-deficient females, two methods detected 7 out of 12 cases (BFST: 8.71-11.75, controls: 11.1-13.4; and BMRT: score +3 in 7 cases), whereas the FST-ICSH missed all 12 cases that presented a variable degree of fluorescence. Although the sensitivity for G6PD-deficient carrier detection is the same for the BMRT and the BFST, the latter has the advantage of being semiquantitative and not merely qualitative. Unfortunately, none of the three screening tests compared here allowed the detection of the 100% heterozygote carrier state of G6PD deficiency. PMID:10407579

  8. Kawasaki disease with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency, case report.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Hesham Radi; Al-Dossary, Sahar; Asseri, Abdulsalam

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of unknown etiology that occurs predominantly in infants and children younger than 5 years of age. Coronary artery abnormalities are the most serious complication. Based on the literatures infusion of Intravenous Immunoglobulin of 2 g/kg and a high dose of oral aspirin up to 100 mg/kg/day are the standard treatment for Kawasaki disease in the acute stage, and should be followed by antiplatelet dose of aspirin for thrombocytosis. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an inherited X-linked hereditary disorder, and aspirin can induce hemolysis in patients with G6PD deficiency. We report a case of a 5 year and 8 month old male with KD and G6PD deficiency. PMID:27134550

  9. Risks of Hemolysis in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficient Infants Exposed to Chlorproguanil-Dapsone, Mefloquine and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine as Part of Intermittent Presumptive Treatment of Malaria in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Poirot, Eugenie; Vittinghoff, Eric; Ishengoma, Deus; Alifrangis, Michael; Carneiro, Ilona; Hashim, Ramadhan; Baraka, Vito; Mosha, Jacklin; Gesase, Samwel; Chandramohan, Daniel; Gosling, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Background Chlorproguanil-dapsone (CD) has been linked to hemolysis in symptomatic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient (G6PDd) children. Few studies have explored the effects of G6PD status on hemolysis in children treated with Intermittent Preventive Treatment in infants (IPTi) antimalarial regimens. We sought to examine the joint effects of G6PD status and IPTi antimalarial treatment on incidence of hemolysis in asymptomatic children treated with CD, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), and mefloquine (MQ). Methods A secondary analysis of data from a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of IPTi was conducted. Hemoglobin (Hb) measurements were made at IPTi doses, regular follow-up and emergency visits. G6PD genotype was determined at 9 months looking for SNPs for the A- genotype at coding position 202. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to examine hemolysis among children with valid G6PD genotyping results. Hemolysis was defined as the absolute change in Hb or as any post-dose Hb <8 g/dL. These outcomes were assessed using either a single follow-up Hb on day 7 after an IPTi dose or Hb obtained 1 to 14 or 28 days after each IPTi dose. Findings Relative to placebo, CD reduced Hb by approximately 0.5 g/dL at day 7 and within 14 days of an IPTi dose, and by 0.2 g/dL within 28 days. Adjusted declines in the CD group were larger than in the MQ and SP groups. At day 7, homo-/hemizygous genotype was associated with higher odds of Hb <8 g/dL (adjusted odds ratio = 6.7, 95% CI 1.7 to 27.0) and greater absolute reductions in Hb (-0.6 g/dL, 95% CI -1.1 to 0.003). There was no evidence to suggest increased reductions in Hb among homo-/hemizygous children treated with CD compared to placebo, SP or MQ. Conclusions While treatment with CD demonstrated greater reductions in Hb at 7 and 14 days after an IPTi dose compared to both SP and MQ, there was no evidence that G6PD deficiency exacerbated the adverse effects of CD, despite evidence for higher

  10. A comprehensive analysis of membrane and morphology of erythrocytes from patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zishui; Jiang, Chengrui; Tang, Jia; He, Ming; Lin, Xiaoying; Chen, Xiaodan; Han, Luhao; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Feng, Yi; Guo, Yibin; Li, Hongyi; Jiang, Weiying

    2016-06-01

    Acute hemolytic anemia could be triggered by oxidative stress in the patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. However, the underlying hemolytic mechanism is unknown. To make clear the hemolytic mechanisms, a systematic study on membrane ultrastructure had been undertaken. A comprehensive method was used including atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, flow cytometer and fluorescence microscopy to analyze the membrane ultrastructure, externalized phosphatidylserine (PS), intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, morphology and the distributions of band 3 protein in G6PD deficient red blood cells (RBCs) after tert-butyl-hydroperoxide (t-BHP) oxidation. The results showed that erythrocyte shrinkage, annexin-V binding to externalized PS on the membrane of early-stage apoptotic cells, the increased membrane roughness and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, as well as the change of distributions of band 3 protein in RBCs. Compared with the control RBCs, as the concentration of t-BHP up to 0.1mM, the membrane roughness of G6PD deficient RBCs showed significant difference (p<0.05) and as the concentration of t-BHP up to 0.3mM, externalized PS showed significant difference (p<0.05). Furthermore, the population types of RBCs showed dramatic difference between control groups and G6PD deficient groups. Oxidative stress induced more serious erythrocyte apoptosis and resulted in increased roughness of erythrocyte membrane and abnormal distributed band 3 protein in G6PD deficient RBCs. Echinocytes are the predominant abnormal erythrocyte shape occurring in the peripheral blood from patients with G6PD deficiency, which may shorten the RBCs lifespan. The results in the present study will give an increased understanding for the hemolytic mechanism of G6PD deficiency. PMID:26496826

  11. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia associated with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ermertcan, Aylin Türel; Yaşar, Ali; Kayhan, Tuba Çelebı; Gülen, Hüseyin; Ertan, Pelin

    2011-09-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a syndrome characterized by hypodontia, hypotrichosis, and partial or total ecrine sweat gland deficiency. The most prevalent form of HED is inherited as an X linked pattern. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive disease, which leads to hemolytic anemia and jaundice. It is expressed in males, while heterozygous females are usually clinically normal. A 12-year-old boy with the complaints of hair and eyebrow disturbances, teeth disfigurement, decreased sweating, and xerosis presented to the outpatient clinic. Dermatological examination revealed sparse hair and eyebrows, conical-shaped teeth, xerosis, syndactylia, transverse grooves, and discoloration of nails. Laboratory findings indicated anemia. His 3-year-old sister also had sparse hair and eyebrows, xerosis, and syndactylia. We learned that the patient had a previous history of neonatal jaundice and a diagnosis of G-6-PD deficiency. Although it has been shown that loci of ectodermal dysplasia and G-6-PD deficiency genes are near to one another, we did not find any case study reporting on occurrence of these two genetic diseases together. With the aspect of this rare and interesting case, the relationship between HED and G-6-PD deficiency was defined. PMID:22028581

  12. Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia Associated with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yaşar, Ali; Kayhan, Tuba Çelebİ; Gülen, Hüseyin; Ertan, Pelin

    2011-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a syndrome characterized by hypodontia, hypotrichosis, and partial or total ecrine sweat gland deficiency. The most prevalent form of HED is inherited as an X linked pattern. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive disease, which leads to hemolytic anemia and jaundice. It is expressed in males, while heterozygous females are usually clinically normal. A 12-year-old boy with the complaints of hair and eyebrow disturbances, teeth disfigurement, decreased sweating, and xerosis presented to the outpatient clinic. Dermatological examination revealed sparse hair and eyebrows, conical-shaped teeth, xerosis, syndactylia, transverse grooves, and discoloration of nails. Laboratory findings indicated anemia. His 3-year-old sister also had sparse hair and eyebrows, xerosis, and syndactylia. We learned that the patient had a previous history of neonatal jaundice and a diagnosis of G-6-PD deficiency. Although it has been shown that loci of ectodermal dysplasia and G-6-PD deficiency genes are near to one another, we did not find any case study reporting on occurrence of these two genetic diseases together. With the aspect of this rare and interesting case, the relationship between HED and G-6-PD deficiency was defined. PMID:22028581

  13. Antimalarial NADPH-Consuming Redox-Cyclers As Superior Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Copycats

    PubMed Central

    Bielitza, Max; Belorgey, Didier; Ehrhardt, Katharina; Johann, Laure; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Gallo, Valentina; Schwarzer, Evelin; Mohring, Franziska; Jortzik, Esther; Williams, David L.; Becker, Katja; Arese, Paolo; Elhabiri, Mourad

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Early phagocytosis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient erythrocytes parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum were shown to protect G6PD-deficient populations from severe malaria. Here, we investigated the mechanism of a novel antimalarial series, namely 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones, to understand whether these NADPH-consuming redox-cyclers, which induce oxidative stress, mimic the natural protection of G6PD deficiency. Results: We demonstrated that the key benzoylmenadione metabolite of the lead compound acts as an efficient redox-cycler in NADPH-dependent methaemoglobin reduction, leading to the continuous formation of reactive oxygen species, ferrylhaemoglobin, and subsequent haemichrome precipitation. Structure–activity relationships evidenced that both drug metabolites and haemoglobin catabolites contribute to potentiate drug effects and inhibit parasite development. Disruption of redox homeostasis by the lead benzylmenadione was specifically induced in Plasmodium falciparum parasitized erythrocytes and not in non-infected cells, and was visualized via changes in the glutathione redox potential of living parasite cytosols. Furthermore, the redox-cycler shows additive and synergistic effects in combination with compounds affecting the NADPH flux in vivo. Innovation: The lead benzylmenadione 1c is the first example of a novel redox-active agent that mimics the behavior of a falciparum parasite developing inside a G6PD-deficient red blood cell (RBC) giving rise to malaria protection, and it exerts specific additive effects that are inhibitory to parasite development, without harm for non-infected G6PD-sufficient or -deficient RBCs. Conclusion: This strategy offers an innovative perspective for the development of future antimalarial drugs for G6PD-sufficient and -deficient populations. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1337–1351. PMID:25714942

  14. Resistance of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency to malaria: effects of fava bean hydroxypyrimidine glucosides on Plasmodium falciparum growth in culture and on the phagocytosis of infected cells.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, H; Atamna, H; Shalmiev, G; Kanaani, J; Krugliak, M

    1996-07-01

    The balanced polymorphism of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD-) is believed to have evolved through the selective pressure of malarial combined with consumption of fava beans. The implicated fava bean constituents are the hydroxypyrimidine glucosides vicine and convicine, which upon hydrolysis of their beta-O-glucosidic bond, became protein pro-oxidants. In this work we show that the glucosides inhibit the growth of Plasmodium falciparum, increase the hexose-monophosphate shunt activity and the phagocytosis of malaria-infected erythrocytes. These activities are exacerbated in the presence of beta-glucosidase, implicating their pro-oxidant aglycones in the toxic effect, and are more pronounced in infected G6PD- erythrocytes. These results suggest that G6PD- infected erythrocytes are more susceptible to phagocytic cells, and that fava bean pro-oxidants are more efficiently suppressing parasite propagation in G6PD- erythrocytes, either by directly affecting parasite growth, or by means of enhanced phagocytic elimination of infected cells. The present findings could account for the relative resistance of G6PD- bearers to falciparum malaria, and establish a link between dietary habits and malaria in the selection of the G6PD- genotype. PMID:8710417

  15. Diverse point mutations in the human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene cause enzyme deficiency and mild or severe hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Vulliamy, T.J.; D'Urso, M.; Battistuzzi, G.; Estrada, M.; Foulkes, N.S.; Martini, G.; Calabro, V.; Poggi, V.; Giordano, R.; Town, M.; Luzzatto, L.; Persico, M.G. )

    1988-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is a common genetic abnormality affecting an estimated 400 million people worldwide. Clinical and biochemical analyses have identified many variants exhibiting a range of phenotypes, which have been well characterized from the hematological point of view. However, until now, their precise molecular basis has remained unknown. The authors have cloned and sequenced seven mutant G6PD alleles. In the nondeficient polymorphic African variant G6PD A they have found a single point mutation. The other six mutants investigated were all associated with enzyme deficiency. The mutations observed show a striking predominance of C {yields} T transitions, with CG doublets involved in four of seven cases. Thus, diverse point mutations may account largely for the phenotypic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency.

  16. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and diagnostic challenges in 1500 immigrants in Denmark examined for haemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Warny, Marie; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Petersen, Jesper; Birgens, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    Similar to the thalassaemia syndromes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is highly prevalent in areas historically exposed to malaria. In the present study, we used quantitative and molecular methods to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in a population of 1508 immigrants in Denmark. We found the allele frequency to be between 2.4 and 2.9% in the female immigrants. Furthermore, the mutation pattern in the studied population showed a high prevalence of the G6PD A-(202A) variant in African and African-American immigrants, a high prevalence of the G6PD Mediterranean variant in Mediterranean European and Western Asian immigrants, and substantial heterogeneity in the variants found in the Eastern Asian/Pacific immigrants. Inasmuch as many of the patients included in this investigation had various thalassaemic syndromes, we were able to evaluate the effects of the interaction between a low mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) value and G6PD activity, particularly in heterozygous females. The activity level was markedly influenced by the MCH value in females with normal G6PD activity, but not in heterozygous and homozygous females. Comparison of patients with normal G6PD activity and heterozygous females indicated considerable overlap in activity levels. To help separating heterozygous females from females with wild-type genes, a DNA analysis is necessary when the female activity level is between 4.0 and 4.9 U/g hgb corresponding to 50-60% of the median activity of unaffected males. PMID:25925739

  17. Molecular Epidemiological Survey of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Thalassemia in Uygur and Kazak Ethnic Groups in Xinjiang, Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Han, Luhao; Su, Hai; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Weiying; Chen, Suqin

    2016-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and thalassemia occur frequently in tropical and subtropical regions, while the prevalence of relationship between the two diseases in Xinjiang has not been reported. We aimed to determine the prevalence of these diseases and clarify the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes of the two diseases in the Uygur and Kazak ethnic groups in Xinjiang. We measured G6PD activity by G6PD:6PGD (glucose acid-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) ratio, identified the gene variants of G6PD and α- and β-globin genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-DNA sequencing and gap-PCR and compared these variants in different ethnic groups in Xinjiang with those adjacent to it. Of the 149 subjects with molecular analysis of G6PD deficiency conducted, a higher prevalence of the combined mutations c.1311C > T/IVSXI + 93T > C and IVSXI + 93T > C, both with normal enzymatic activities, were observed in the Uygur and Kazak subjects. A case of rare mutation HBB: c.135delC [codon 44 (-C) in the heterozygous state], a heterozygous case of HBB: c.68A > G [Hb G-Taipei or β22(B4)Glu→Gly] and several common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found on the β-globin gene. In conclusion, G6PD deficiency with pathogenic mutations and three common α-thalassemia (α-thal) [- -(SEA), -α(3.7) (rightward), -α(4.2) (leftward)] deletions and point mutations of the α-globin gene were not detected in the present study. The average incidence of β-thalassemia (β-thal) in Uygurs was 1.45% (2/138) in Xinjiang. The polymorphisms of G6PD and β-globin genes might be useful genetic markers to trace the origin and migration of the Uygur and Kazak in Xinjiang. PMID:26950205

  18. Survey on haemoglobin variants, beta thalassaemia, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and haptoglobin types in Turks from western Thrace.

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, M; Kutlar, A; Kutlar, F; Dinçol, G; Erdem, S; Baştesbihçi, S

    1985-01-01

    A total of 102 apparently healthy and randomly selected Turks who either immigrated from Western Thrace or were still living there were studied for haemoglobin variants, high Hb A2 beta thalassaemia, G6PD deficiency, and haptoglobin types. The incidence of haemoglobins S and O Arab were 2.9 and 3.9% respectively. The incidence of high A2 beta thalassaemia was 10.8% and that of G6PD deficiency 5%. The gene frequencies of Hp1 and Hp2 were 0.326 and 0.674, respectively. PMID:4045955

  19. Population screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiencies in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands, using a modified enzyme assay on filter paper dried bloodspots

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency poses a significant impediment to primaquine use for the elimination of liver stage infection with Plasmodium vivax and for gametocyte clearance, because of the risk of life-threatening haemolytic anaemia that can occur in G6PD deficient patients. Although a range of methods for screening G6PD deficiency have been described, almost all require skilled personnel, expensive laboratory equipment, freshly collected blood, and are time consuming; factors that render them unsuitable for mass-screening purposes. Methods A published WST8/1-methoxy PMS method was adapted to assay G6PD activity in a 96-well format using dried blood spots, and used it to undertake population screening within a malaria survey undertaken in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands. The assay results were compared to a biochemical test and a recently marketed rapid diagnostic test. Results Comparative testing with biochemical and rapid diagnostic test indicated that results obtained by filter paper assay were accurate providing that blood spots were assayed within 5 days when stored at ambient temperature and 10 days when stored at 4 degrees. Screening of 8541 people from 41 villages in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands revealed the prevalence of G6PD deficiency as defined by enzyme activity < 30% of normal control was 20.3% and a prevalence of severe deficiency that would predispose to primaquine-induced hemolysis (WHO Class I-II) of 6.9%. Conclusions The assay enabled simple and quick semi-quantitative population screening in a malaria-endemic region. The study indicated a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Isabel Province and highlights the critical need to consider G6PD deficiency in the context of P. vivax malaria elimination strategies in Solomon Islands, particularly in light of the potential role of primaquine mass drug administration. PMID:20684792

  20. Increased basal oxidation of peroxiredoxin 2 and limited peroxiredoxin recycling in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient erythrocytes from newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Fook-Choe; Peskin, Alexander V; Wong, Fei-Liang; Ithnin, Azlin; Othman, Ainoon; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2014-07-01

    Erythrocytes require glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) to generate NADPH and protect themselves against hemolytic anemia induced by oxidative stress. Peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2) is a major antioxidant enzyme that requires NADPH to recycle its oxidized (disulfide-bonded) form. Our aims were to determine whether Prx2 is more highly oxidized in G6PD-deficient erythrocytes and whether these cells are able to recycle oxidized Prx2 after oxidant challenge. Blood was obtained from 61 Malaysian neonates with G6PD deficiency (average 33% normal activity) and 86 controls. Prx2 redox state was analyzed by Western blotting under nonreducing conditions. Prx2 in freshly isolated blood was predominantly reduced in both groups, but the median level of oxidation was significantly higher (8 vs 3%) and the range greater for the G6PD-deficient population. When treated with reagent H2O2, the G6PD-deficient erythrocytes were severely compromised in their ability to recycle oxidized Prx2, with only 27 or 4% reduction after 1 h treatment with 0.1 or 1 mM H2O2 respectively, compared with >97% reduction in control erythrocytes. The accumulation of oxidized Prx2 in oxidatively stressed erythrocytes with common G6PD variants suggests that impaired antioxidant activity of Prx2 could contribute to the hemolysis and other complications associated with the condition.-Cheah, F.-C., Peskin, A. V., Wong, F.-L., Ithnin, A., Othman, A., Winterbourn, C. C. Increased basal oxidation of peroxiredoxin 2 and limited peroxiredoxin recycling in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient erythrocytes from newborn infants. PMID:24636884

  1. Data on how several physiological parameters of stored red blood cells are similar in glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient and sufficient donors.

    PubMed

    Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Kriebardis, Anastasios G; Georgatzakou, Hara T; Foudoulaki-Paparizos, Leontini E; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wither, Matthew J; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Papassideri, Issidora S; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Antonelou, Marianna H

    2016-09-01

    This article contains data on the variation in several physiological parameters of red blood cells (RBCs) donated by eligible glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient donors during storage in standard blood bank conditions compared to control, G6PD sufficient (G6PD(+)) cells. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cell fragility and membrane exovesiculation were measured in RBCs throughout the storage period, with or without stimulation by oxidants, supplementation of N-acetylcysteine and energy depletion, following incubation of stored cells for 24 h at 37 °C. Apart from cell characteristics, the total or uric acid-dependent antioxidant capacity of the supernatant in addition to extracellular potassium concentration was determined in RBC units. Finally, procoagulant activity and protein carbonylation levels were measured in the microparticles population. Further information can be found in "Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient subjects may be better "storers" than donors of red blood cells" [1]. PMID:27437434

  2. Relation between Neonatal Icter and Gilbert Syndrome in Gloucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficient Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zahedpasha, Yadollah; Ahmadpour, Mousa; Niaki, Haleh Akhavan; Alaee, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: The pathogenesis of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia hasn’t been completely defined in Gloucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient newborns. The aim of this study was to detect the relationship between Gilbert’s syndrome and hyperbilirubinemia in Gloucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient neonates. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted in Amirkola pediatrics teaching hospital, Babol, Iran. A total number of one hundred four infants were included in the study (51 infants with neonatal jaundice and Gloucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency admitted to phototherapy or transfusion were selected as the case group and 53 infants with Gloucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency admitted for other reasons than jaundice were selected as the control group). Exclusion criteria were ABO or Rh incompatibility or other reasons that made Coombs test positive, sepsis, hepatosplenomegaly, metabolic diseases, medical treatment and phototherapy. The promoter and coding regions of Uridine diphosphate Glucuronosyl Transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) of genomic DNA were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) isolated from leukocytes. We used chi-square test and t-test to compare cases and controls. Results: Distribution of Gilbert genome was not significantly different between the two groups; among cases, 33.3% were homozygote, 35.3% heterozygote, and 31.4% normal. Among controls, 22.6% were homozygote, 34% heterozygote, and 43.4% normal (p-value=xxx). Hyperbilirubinemia family history didn’t differ significantly between these two groups. Conclusions: We showed that in Gloucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient neonates, there was no significant association between Gilbert’s syndrome (promoter polymorphism) and hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:24783083

  3. Dual Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency undergoing PCI with Drug-Eluting Stents.

    PubMed

    Biscaglia, Simone; Ferri, Alessandra; Pavasini, Rita; Campo, Gianluca; Ferrari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. In patients with G6PD deficiency, the use of aspirin is controversial, since past studies have reported a potential risk of haemolysis related to its administration, even at low doses. More recent publications have shown that low-dose aspirin administration is safe in these patients. At the same time, no authors have previously reported more than single cases regarding low-dose aspirin treatment in patients with G6PD deficiency undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and most physicians are still sceptical about aspirin administration in these patients. In this paper, we report a case series of five patients with G6PD deficiency receiving PCI with drug-eluting stents (DES) and treatment with dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) containing low-dose aspirin, without clinical complications. Moreover, we discuss our internal protocol for managing these patients and provide an overview of the available data. PMID:25843116

  4. Ribose metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis in normal and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, E F; Ruprecht, R M; Schulman, S; Vanderberg, J; Olson, J A

    1986-01-01

    The metabolism of pentose-phosphate was investigated in Plasmodium falciparum-infected normal and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient human red blood cells in vitro. 5'-Phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) content of infected normal red blood cells was increased 50-60-fold at the parasite trophozoite growth stage over that of uninfected cells. The PRPP increment in infected G6PD-deficient cells at comparable stage and parasitemia was only 40% of the value in normal infected cells. Red blood cell PRPP synthetase activity did not change during the growth cycle of the parasite and was similar in both normal and G6PD-deficient cells. Reduced glutathione (GSH) content of G6PD-deficient cells under conditions of culture fell to low or undetectable levels. These low levels of GSH were shown to inhibit the function of red blood cell PRPP synthetase, which requires GSH for full activity. Measurements of the incorporation of 1-14C or 6-14C selectively labeled glucose into parasite nucleic acids revealed that in normal infected red cells, approximately 20% of the pentose was produced via the oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate, whereas in infected G6PD-deficient cells (Mediterranean type), none of the pentose was produced via the oxidative pathway. It is concluded that the low level of reduced GSH found in G6PD deficiency and the resultant partial inhibition of PRPP synthetase together with the missing oxidative pathway for ribose phosphate production can account fully for the reduced parasite growth rate in G6PD-deficient red blood cells described previously. Of these two mechanisms, the predominant one is the impaired PRPP synthetase activity due to low GSH levels in enzyme-deficient red blood cells. The contribution to the ribose-phosphate pool by the hexose monophosphate shunt is relatively minor. A co-existing oxidative stress (which is often hypothesized to mediate the destruction of parasitized red blood cells) is not required to explain growth inhibition

  5. Red blood cell indices and prevalence of hemoglobinopathies and glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiencies in male Tanzanian residents of Dar es Salaam.

    PubMed

    Mwakasungula, Solomon; Schindler, Tobias; Jongo, Said; Moreno, Elena; Kamaka, Kasimu; Mohammed, Mgeni; Joseph, Selina; Rashid, Ramla; Athuman, Thabit; Tumbo, Anneth Mwasi; Hamad, Ali; Lweno, Omar; Tanner, Marcel; Shekalaghe, Seif; Daubenberger, Claudia A

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, disorders of hemoglobin structure and production, are one of the most common monogenic disorders in humans. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) is an inherited enzymopathy resulting in increased oxygen stress susceptibility of red blood cells. The distributions of these genetic traits in populations living in tropical and subtropical regions where malaria has been or is still present are thought to result from survival advantage against severe life threatening malaria disease. 384 male Tanzanian volunteers residing in Dar es Salaam were typed for G6PD, sickle cell disease and α-thalassemia. The most prominent red blood cell polymorphism was heterozygous α(+)-thalassemia (37.8%), followed by the G6PD(A) deficiency (16.4%), heterozygous sickle cell trait (15.9%), G6PD(A-) deficiency (13.5%) and homozygous α(+)-thalassemia (5.2%). 35%, 45%, 17% and 3% of these volunteers were carriers of wild type gene loci, one, two or three of these hemoglobinopathies, respectively. We find that using a cut off value of 28.6 pg. for mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), heterozygous α(+)-thalassemia can be predicted with a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 72% in this male population. All subjects carrying homozygous α(+)-thalassemia were identified based on their MCH value < 28.6 pg. PMID:25755846

  6. Red blood cell indices and prevalence of hemoglobinopathies and glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiencies in male Tanzanian residents of Dar es Salaam

    PubMed Central

    Mwakasungula, Solomon; Schindler, Tobias; Jongo, Said; Moreno, Elena; Kamaka, Kasimu; Mohammed, Mgeni; Joseph, Selina; Rashid, Ramla; Athuman, Thabit; Tumbo, Anneth Mwasi; Hamad, Ali; Lweno, Omar; Tanner, Marcel; Shekalaghe, Seif; Daubenberger, Claudia A

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, disorders of hemoglobin structure and production, are one of the most common monogenic disorders in humans. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) is an inherited enzymopathy resulting in increased oxygen stress susceptibility of red blood cells. The distributions of these genetic traits in populations living in tropical and subtropical regions where malaria has been or is still present are thought to result from survival advantage against severe life threatening malaria disease. 384 male Tanzanian volunteers residing in Dar es Salaam were typed for G6PD, sickle cell disease and α-thalassemia. The most prominent red blood cell polymorphism was heterozygous α+-thalassemia (37.8%), followed by the G6PD(A) deficiency (16.4%), heterozygous sickle cell trait (15.9%), G6PD(A-) deficiency (13.5%) and homozygous α+-thalassemia (5.2%). 35%, 45%, 17% and 3% of these volunteers were carriers of wild type gene loci, one, two or three of these hemoglobinopathies, respectively. We find that using a cut off value of 28.6 pg. for mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), heterozygous α+-thalassemia can be predicted with a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 72% in this male population. All subjects carrying homozygous α+-thalassemia were identified based on their MCH value < 28.6 pg. PMID:25755846

  7. Assessment of alternatives to correct inventory difference statistical treatment deficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, K.R.; Johnston, J.W.; Bennett, C.A.; Brouns, R.J.; Mullen, M.F.; Roberts, F.P.

    1983-11-01

    This document presents an analysis of alternatives to correct deficiencies in the statistical treatment of inventory differences in the NRC guidance documents and licensee practice. Pacific Northwest Laboratory's objective for this study was to assess alternatives developed by the NRC and a panel of safeguards statistical experts. Criteria were developed for the evaluation and the assessment was made considering the criteria. The results of this assessment are PNL recommendations, which are intended to provide NRC decision makers with a logical and statistically sound basis for correcting the deficiencies.

  8. Effect of vitamin K1 on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient neonatal erythrocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, M.; Waisman, D.; Mazor, D.; Hammerman, C.; Bader, D.; Abrahamov, A.; Meyerstein, N.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To determine whether vitamin K1, which is routinely administered to neonates, could act as an exogenous oxidising agent and be partly responsible for haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphat-dehydrogenase (G-6-PD).
METHODS—G-6-PD deficient (n=7) and control (n=10) umbilical cord blood red blood cells were incubated in vitro with a vitamin K1 preparation (Konakion). Two concentrations of Vitamin K1 were used, both higher than that of expected serum concentrations, following routine injection of 1 mg vitamin K1. Concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) and methaemoglobin, indicators of oxidative red blood cell damage, were determined before and after incubation, and the mean percentage change from baseline calculated.
RESULTS—Values (mean (SD)) for GSH, at baseline, and after incubation with vitamin K1 at concentrations of 44 and 444 µM, respectively, and percentage change from baseline (mean (SD)) were 1.97 + 0.31µmol/g haemoglobin, 1.89 ± 0.44 µmol/g (-4.3 ± 13.1%), and 1.69± 0.41 µmol/g (-14.5 ±9.3%) for the G-6-PD deficient red blood cells, and 2.27 ± 0.31 µmol/g haemoglobin, 2.09 ± 0.56 µmol/g (−7.2 ± 23.2%), and 2.12 ± 0.38 µmol/g (−6.0 + 14.1%) for the control cells. For methaemoglobin (percentage of total haemoglobin), the corresponding values were 2.01± 0.53%, 1.93 ± 0.37% (−0.6± 17.4%) and 2.06 ± 0.43% (5.7 ± 14.2%) for the G-6-PD deficient red blood cells, and 1.56 ± 0.74%, 1.70 ± 0.78% (12.7 ± 21.9%), and 1.78 ± 0.71% (20.6 ± 26.8%) for the control red blood cells. None of the corresponding percentage changes from baseline was significantly different when G-6-PD deficient and control red blood cells were compared.
CONCLUSIONS—These findings suggest that G-6-PD deficient red blood cells are not at increased risk of oxidative damage from vitamin K1.

 PMID:10194997

  9. Ischaemic Priapism and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A Mechanism of Increased Oxidative Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, BF; Thompson, EB; Shah, SD; Wharfe, GH

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ischaemic priapism is a devastating urological condition that has the potential to cause permanent erectile dysfunction. The disorder has been associated with numerous medical conditions and the use of pharmacotherapeutic agents. The aetiology is idiopathic in a number of cases. There are two prior case reports of the association of ischaemic priapism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We report on a third case of priapism associated with G6PD deficiency and review recently described molecular mechanisms of increased oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of ischaemic priapism. The case report of a 32-year old Afro-Caribbean male with his first episode of major ischaemic priapism is described. Screening for common causes of ischaemic priapism, including sickle cell disease was negative. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency was discovered on evaluation for priapism. Penile aspiration was performed and erectile function was good post treatment. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is a cause for ischaemic priapism and should be a part of the screening process in idiopathic causes of the disorder. Increased oxidative stress occurs in G6PD deficiency and may lead to priapism. PMID:25803385

  10. A hemolysis trigger in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency. Vicia sativa (Vetch).

    PubMed

    Bicakci, Zafer

    2009-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme, playing an important role in the redox metabolism of all aerobic cells. It was reported that certain medications, fava beans, and infections can trigger acute hemolytic anemia in patients with G6PD deficiency. An 8-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with blood in the urine, headache, dizziness, fatigue, loss of appetite, and jaundice in the eyes, 24 hours after eating large amounts of fresh, vetch grains. Laboratory investigation revealed hemolytic anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and G6PD deficiency. Approximately 0.5% of fava bean seeds have 2 pyrimidine beta-glycosides called, vicine and convicine. Vetch has 0.731% vicine, 0.081% convicine, and 0.530% beta cyanoalanine glycosides. The aim of this case report is to emphasize the importance of vetch seeds as a cause for hemolytic crisis in our country, where approximately one million tons of vetch is produced per year, especially in the agricultural regions. PMID:19198723

  11. Laboratory and Genetic Assessment of Iron Deficiency in Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Over 9 million individuals donate blood annually in the US. Between 200 to 250 mg of iron is removed with each whole blood donation, reflecting losses from the hemoglobin in red blood cells. This amount represents approximately 25% of the average iron stores in men and almost 75% of the iron stores in women. Replenishment of iron stores takes many months, leading to a high rate of iron depletion, especially in frequent blood donors (e. g., more than 2 times per year). In large epidemiologic studies, donation frequency, female gender, and younger age (reflecting menstrual status), are particularly associated with iron depletion. Currently, a minimum capillary hemoglobin of 12.5 gm/dl is the sole requirement for donor qualification in the US as far as iron levels are concerned, yet it is known that hemoglobin level is a poor surrogate for low iron. In an effort to better identify and prevent iron deficiency, blood collection centers are now considering various strategies to manage donor iron loss, including changes in acceptable hemoglobin level, donation interval, donation frequency, testing of iron status, and iron supplementation. This chapter highlights laboratory and genetic tests to assess the iron status of blood donors and their applicability as screening tests for blood donation. PMID:25676373

  12. Dental Considerations in Children with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (Favism): A Review of the Literature and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, Daniela; Butrón-Téllez Girón, Claudia; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an uncommon inherited enzyme deficiency characterized by hemolytic anemia, caused by the inability of erythrocytes to detoxify oxidizing agents such as drugs, infectious diseases, or fava bean ingestion. In this later case, the disorder is known as favism. The aim of the present report was to present a review of the literature in this disease, to describe a case report concerning an affected 9-year-old male, and to review the main implications and precautions in pediatric dental management. PMID:26435857

  13. Dental Considerations in Children with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (Favism): A Review of the Literature and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pérez, Daniela; Butrón-Téllez Girón, Claudia; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an uncommon inherited enzyme deficiency characterized by hemolytic anemia, caused by the inability of erythrocytes to detoxify oxidizing agents such as drugs, infectious diseases, or fava bean ingestion. In this later case, the disorder is known as favism. The aim of the present report was to present a review of the literature in this disease, to describe a case report concerning an affected 9-year-old male, and to review the main implications and precautions in pediatric dental management. PMID:26435857

  14. Rasch Measurement in the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adult Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Luis; Roset, Montse; Badia, Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Tested the metric properties of a Spanish version of the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA) questionnaire through Rasch analysis with a sample of 356 adult patients in Spain. Results suggest that the Spanish AGHDA could be a useful complement of the clinical evaluation of growth hormone deficiency patients at group and…

  15. 26 CFR 1.1311(b)-3 - Existence of relationship in case of adjustment by way of deficiency assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... by way of deficiency assessment. 1.1311(b)-3 Section 1.1311(b)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... of deficiency assessment. (a) Except for cases described in paragraph (b) of § 1.1312-3, no... by way of a deficiency assessment under the circumstance described in paragraph (b) of §...

  16. 26 CFR 1.1311(b)-3 - Existence of relationship in case of adjustment by way of deficiency assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... by way of deficiency assessment. 1.1311(b)-3 Section 1.1311(b)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... adjustment by way of deficiency assessment. (a) Except for cases described in paragraph (b) of § 1.1312-3, no... by way of a deficiency assessment under the circumstance described in paragraph (b) of §...

  17. Assessment of vitamin A deficiency in Republic of Malawi by impression cytology method.

    PubMed

    Escoute, A J; Chirambo, M C; Luzeau, R; Amedée-Manesme, O

    1991-01-01

    During a countrywide survey, we assessed the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency by impression cytology method with transfer in a randomized sample of 650 representative of the children's population of the Republic of Malawi. A vitamin A deficiency was indicated by the results of the ophthalmic examination (XN = 1,4%; X2 = 0,2%) and the ICT test (22% with deficient cytology). Results of ICT were related to age. Vitamin A deficiency seems to be a public health problem in the Republic of Malawi. PMID:1856038

  18. Assessment of goiter in an area of endemic iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Smyth, P P; Darke, C; Parkes, A B; Smith, D F; John, R; Hetherton, A M; Lazarus, J H

    1999-09-01

    Urinary iodone (UI) excretion and sonographically measured thyroid volume were investigated in 195 subjects living in 6 separate villages in the Casamance region of southeastern Senegal, West Africa. A comparison of goiter prevalence using thyroid palpation and volume measurement and of iodine excretion expressed as micrograms per gram (microg/g) creatinine or micrograms per deciliter (microg/dl) urine was undertaken, and possible pathogenetic factors were investigated. Ultrasound measured thyroid volumes were above the recommended upper limit of the reference range for an area replete in iodine in 83.1% or females, 52.3% of males, and 80.0% of children aged 13 years or younger. Overall sensitivity and specificity for palpation compared to sonographically demonstrated thyroid enlargement was 51.7% and 91.5%, respectively. Thyroid enlargement was not associated with ethnic origin, thiocyanate ingestion, HLA DR/DQ phenotype frequency, or thyroid growth-stimulating immunoglobulin (TGI) positivity. Median UI was 32 microg/g creatinine with 65.0% having values consistent with iodine deficiency (< 50 microg/g). When results were expressed as micrograms per deciliter, the percentage having values consistent with iodine deficiency (< 5.0 microg/dl) increased to 95.7%. The findings suggest a primary role for iodine deficiency in goitrogenesis in the study population. They demonstrate that classification of the severity of the endemia in this or other study populations in areas of iodine deficiency is dependent on the methods used to determine goiter prevalence (palpation or ultrasound measured thyroid enlargement), or dietary iodine status (iodine excretion expressed as micrograms per gram creatinine or micrograms per deciliter urine). PMID:10524568

  19. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in a negro family

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ananda S.; Tranchida, Liborio; Konno, Edward T.; Berman, Lawrence; Albert, Samuel; Sing, Charles F.; Brewer, George J.

    1968-01-01

    Detailed clinical and genetic studies have been performed in a Negro family, which segregated for sex-linked sideroblastic anemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-DP) deficiency. This is the first such pedigree reported. Males affected with sideroblastic anemia had growth retardation, hypochromic microcytic anemia, elevated serum iron, decreased unsaturated iron-binding capacity, increased 59Fe clearance, low 59Fe incorporation into erythrocytes, normal erythrocyte survival (51Cr), normal hemoglobin electrophoretic pattern, erythroblastic hyperplasia of marrow with increased iron, and marked increase in marrow sideroblasts, particularly ringed sideroblasts. Perinuclear deposition of ferric aggregates was demonstrated to be intramitochondrial by electron microscopy. Female carriers of the sideroblastic gene were normal but exhibited a dimorphic population of erythrocytes including normocytic and microcytic cells. The bone marrow studies in the female (mother) showed ringed marrow sideroblasts. Studies of G-6-PD involved the methemoglobin elution test for G-6-PD activity of individual erythrocytes, quantitative G-6-PD assay, and electrophoresis. In the pedigree, linkage information was obtained from a doubly heterozygous woman, four of her sons, and five of her daughters. Three sons were doubly affected, and one was normal. One daughter appeared to be a recombinant. The genes appeared to be linked in the coupling phase in the mother. The maximum likelihood estimate of the recombination value was 0.14. By means of Price-Jones curves, the microcytic red cells in peripheral blood were quantitated in female carriers. The sideroblast count in the bone marrow in the mother corresponded closely to the percentage of microcytic cells in peripheral blood. This is the second example in which the cellular expression of a sex-linked trait has been documented in the human red cells, the first one being G-6-PD deficiency. The coexistence of the two genes in doubly

  20. [Assessment of the level of urinary iodine deficiency in children of Senegalese central regions].

    PubMed

    Sall, N D; Sall, M G; Sarr, N G; Gaye, O; Diatta, A; Diallo, F; Mbaye, A M; Ndiaye, B; Toure, M

    2000-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) are a major public health problem in Senegal, where strategies of salt iodization were adopted in the southern and eastern regions. The aim of this study led in four districts (Koungheul, Bambey, Mekhe and Kebemer), was to estimate by a questionnaire, the women knowleges, attitudes and practices (KAP) concerning IDD, and to measure children urinary iodine excretion by the Sandell-Kolthoff method to assess a potential deficiency. Six hundred ninety eight households were selected covering 1336 women (age 15 to 49 years) and 400 children (age 6 to 12 years). Sixty three per cent of the women knew the goiter, 89% of them considered that it was a disease and only 0.6% knew the role of iodized salt in the treatment. On the other hand, 20% of the children presented a normal range of urinary iodine excretion superior to 100 microg/l, the deficiency was light (50 to 100 microg/l) in 38% of the children, moderate (25 to 50 microg/l) in 27% and severe (< 25 microg/l) in 15% of them. These results show that other Senegalese regions are concerned by iodine deficiency disorders and need information, education and iodine supplementation programmes, notably for children and young women. PMID:15779170

  1. NIH Researchers Find Vitamin D Binding Protein May Help to Assess Vitamin D Deficiency in African and White Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home NIH researchers find vitamin D binding protein may help to assess vitamin D deficiency in ... Americans November 21, 2013 Measuring vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) may be important for accurately determining vitamin ...

  2. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov to read descriptions of these studies. Organizations Organizations Listen Nonprofit support and advocacy groups bring together ... endorsement by GARD. Suggest an organization to add. Organizations Supporting this Disease The G6PD Favism Association E- ...

  3. A statistical assessment of population trends for data deficient Mexican amphibians.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Esther; Thessen, Anne E; Arias-Caballero, Paulina; Ayala-Orozco, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    Background. Mexico has the world's fifth largest population of amphibians and the second country with the highest quantity of threatened amphibian species. About 10% of Mexican amphibians lack enough data to be assigned to a risk category by the IUCN, so in this paper we want to test a statistical tool that, in the absence of specific demographic data, can assess a species' risk of extinction, population trend, and to better understand which variables increase their vulnerability. Recent studies have demonstrated that the risk of species decline depends on extrinsic and intrinsic traits, thus including both of them for assessing extinction might render more accurate assessment of threats. Methods. We harvested data from the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) and the published literature for Mexican amphibians, and used these data to assess the population trend of some of the Mexican species that have been assigned to the Data Deficient category of the IUCN using Random Forests, a Machine Learning method that gives a prediction of complex processes and identifies the most important variables that account for the predictions. Results. Our results show that most of the data deficient Mexican amphibians that we used have decreasing population trends. We found that Random Forests is a solid way to identify species with decreasing population trends when no demographic data is available. Moreover, we point to the most important variables that make species more vulnerable for extinction. This exercise is a very valuable first step in assigning conservation priorities for poorly known species. PMID:25548736

  4. A statistical assessment of population trends for data deficient Mexican amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Thessen, Anne E.; Arias-Caballero, Paulina; Ayala-Orozco, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    Background. Mexico has the world’s fifth largest population of amphibians and the second country with the highest quantity of threatened amphibian species. About 10% of Mexican amphibians lack enough data to be assigned to a risk category by the IUCN, so in this paper we want to test a statistical tool that, in the absence of specific demographic data, can assess a species’ risk of extinction, population trend, and to better understand which variables increase their vulnerability. Recent studies have demonstrated that the risk of species decline depends on extrinsic and intrinsic traits, thus including both of them for assessing extinction might render more accurate assessment of threats. Methods. We harvested data from the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) and the published literature for Mexican amphibians, and used these data to assess the population trend of some of the Mexican species that have been assigned to the Data Deficient category of the IUCN using Random Forests, a Machine Learning method that gives a prediction of complex processes and identifies the most important variables that account for the predictions. Results. Our results show that most of the data deficient Mexican amphibians that we used have decreasing population trends. We found that Random Forests is a solid way to identify species with decreasing population trends when no demographic data is available. Moreover, we point to the most important variables that make species more vulnerable for extinction. This exercise is a very valuable first step in assigning conservation priorities for poorly known species. PMID:25548736

  5. Nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Márcia Marília Gomes Dantas; de Brito, Naira Josele Neves; de Medeiros Rocha, Érika Dantas; França, Mardone Cavalcante; de Almeida, Maria das Graças; Brandão-Neto, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc is an essential nutrient that is required for numerous metabolic functions, and zinc deficiency results in growth retardation, cell-mediated immune dysfunction, and cognitive impairment. Objective This study evaluated nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children. Design We performed a randomised, controlled, triple-blind study. The children were divided into a control group (10% sorbitol, n=31) and an experimental group (10 mg Zn/day, n=31) for 3 months. Anthropometric and dietary assessments as well as bioelectrical measurements were performed in all children. Results Our study showed (1) an increased body mass index for age and an increased phase angle in the experimental group; (2) a positive correlation between nutritional assessment parameters in both groups; (3) increased soft tissue, and mainly fat-free mass, in the body composition of the experimental group, as determined using bioelectrical impedance vector analysis; (4) increased consumption of all nutrients, including zinc, in the experimental group; and (5) an increased serum zinc concentration in both groups (p<0.0001). Conclusions Given that a reference for body composition analysis does not exist for intervention studies, longitudinal studies are needed to investigate vector migration during zinc supplementation. These results reinforce the importance of employing multiple techniques to assess the nutritional status of populations. PMID:26507491

  6. The prevalence of cobalamin deficiency among vegetarians assessed by serum vitamin B12: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, R; Lester, S E; Babatunde, T

    2014-05-01

    Individuals following vegetarian diets are at risk for developing vitamin B12 deficiency owing to suboptimal intake. As vitamin B12 is essential for the synthesis of nucleic acids, erythrocytes and in the maintenance of myelin, deficiency may result in a variety of symptoms. Some of these symptoms may be severe while others may be irreversible. The objective of this review was to assess vitamin B12 deficiency, based on reported serum vitamin B12, among individuals adhering to different types of vegetarian diets. A systematic literature search was carried out using multiple search engines including PubMed, Medline, CINAHL plus, ERIC, Nursing and Allied Health Collection and Nursing/Academic Edition. The inclusion criteria consisted of original studies that assessed serum vitamin B12, studies written in English, non-case studies and studies that reported actual percentages of vitamin B12 deficiency. Forty research studies were included. The deficiency prevalence among infants reached 45%. The deficiency among the children and adolescents ranged from 0 to 33.3%. Deficiency among pregnant women ranged from 17 to 39%, dependent on the trimester. Adults and elderly individuals had a deficiency range of 0-86.5%. Higher deficiency prevalence was reported in vegans than in other vegetarians. Thus, with few exceptions, the reviewed studies documented relatively high deficiency prevalence among vegetarians. Vegans who do not ingest vitamin B12 supplements were found to be at especially high risk. Vegetarians, especially vegans, should give strong consideration to the use of vitamin B12 supplements to ensure adequate vitamin B12 intake. Vegetarians, regardless of the type of vegetarian diet they adhere to, should be screened for vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:24667752

  7. Therapeutic Assessment of Chloroquine-Primaquine Combined Regimen in Adult Cohort of Plasmodium vivax Malaria from Primary Care Centres in Southwestern India

    PubMed Central

    Saravu, Kavitha; Kumar, Rishikesh; Ashok, Herikudru; Kundapura, Premananda; Kamath, Veena; Kamath, Asha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Background Several reports of chloroquine treatment failure and resistance in Plasmodium vivax malaria from Southeast Asian countries have been published. Present study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of chloroquine-primaquine (CQ-PQ) combined regimen for the treatment of P. vivax malaria patients who were catered by the selected primary health centres (PHCs) of Udupi taluk, Udupi district, Karnataka, India. Method Five PHCs were selected within Udupi taluk based on probability proportional to size. In-vivo therapeutic efficacy assessment of CQ (1500 mg over three days) plus PQ (210 mg over 14 days) regimen was carried out in accordance with the World Health Organization’s protocol of 28 days follow-up among microscopically diagnosed monoinfection P. vivax cohort. Results In total, 161 participants were recruited in the study of which, 155 (96.3%) participants completed till day 28 follow-up, fully complied with the treatment regimen and showed adequate clinical and parasitological response. Loss to follow up was noted with 5 (3.1%) participants and non-compliance with treatment regimen occurred with one participant (0.6%). Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd, <30% of normal mean activity) was noted among 5 (3.1%) participants and one of them did develop PQ induced dark-brown urination which subsided after PQ discontinuation. G6PDd patients were treated with PQ 45 mg/week for eight weeks while PQ was discontinued in one case with G6PD 1.4 U/g Hb due to complaint of reddish-brown coloured urine by 48 hours of PQ initiation. Nested polymerase chain reaction test revealed 45 (28%) cases as mixed (vivax and falciparum) malaria. Conclusions The CQ-PQ combined regimen remains outstandingly effective to treat uncomplicated P. vivax malaria in Udupi taluk and thus it should continue as first line regimen. For all P. vivax cases, G6PD screening before PQ administration must be mandatory and made available in all PHCs. PMID:27315280

  8. Genetics Home Reference: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... as some antibiotics and medications used to treat malaria). Hemolytic anemia can also occur after eating fava ... a G6PD mutation may be partially protected against malaria, an infectious disease carried by a certain type ...

  9. A Preliminary In Vivo Assessment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament–Deficient Knee Kinematics With the KneeM Device

    PubMed Central

    Tardy, Nicolas; Marchand, Philippe; Kouyoumdjian, Pascal; Blin, Dominique; Demattei, Christophe; Asencio, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Background: Methods of objectively measuring rotational knee laxity are either experimental or difficult to use in daily practice. A new method has been developed to quantitatively assess rotatory laxity using an open MRI system and new tool, the KneeM device. Purpose/Hypothesis: To perform a preliminary evaluation of a novel knee rotation measurement device to assess knee kinematics during flexion in an MRI field, in both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)–deficient and healthy contralateral knees. The hypothesis was that the KneeM device would allow in vivo reproduction and analysis of knee kinematics during flexion in healthy and ACL-deficient knees. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten subjects (7 men and 3 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 32.3 ± 9.4 years) with ACL-deficient knees and contralateral uninjured knees participated in the study. An open MRI was performed with the KneeM device at a mean 4.9 months (range, 3.0-7 months) after ACL injury. The device exerted on the knee an anterior drawer force of 100 N, with an internal rotation of 20°, through the range of flexion (0°, 20°, 40°, and 60°). Both ACL-deficient and healthy contralateral knees were analyzed using the Iwaki method. Results: There was no statistical difference of anterior translation in the medial compartment between intact and ACL-deficient knees at all degrees of flexion. However, significant differences in the anterior translation of the lateral compartment were observed between ACL-deficient and intact contralateral knees at 0° and 20° of flexion (P = .005 and P = .002, respectively). Between 20° and 40°, the lateral plateau of ACL-deficient knees translated 7.7 mm posteriorly, whereas the medial compartment remained stable, reflecting a sudden external rotation of the lateral plateau under the femoral condyle. Conclusion: This preliminary study suggests that measurement of tibiofemoral movements in both compartments during flexion using the Knee

  10. Use of combined measures from capillary blood to assess iron deficiency in rural Kenyan children.

    PubMed

    Shell-Duncan, Bettina; McDade, Thomas

    2004-02-01

    Community-based surveys of iron deficiency (ID) require simple, accurate methods that can be used in remote areas. The objective of this study was to assess iron status in rural Kenya using "field-friendly" methods for capillary blood, including an improved dried blood spot assay for transferrin receptor (TfR). A single finger stick was used to obtain capillary blood from 275 school-age children. Whole blood was applied directly to filter paper, dried, and later analyzed for TfR, as well as C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute-phase protein that serves as a general marker of inflammation. Capillary blood was also used to measure hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and the ratio of zinc protoporphyrin to heme (ZPP:H). The Hb concentration alone provides the lowest estimate of the prevalence of ID (8.0%). Because ZPP:H is reported to be elevated in the presence of inflammation, we constructed a preliminary diagnostic model based on elevated ZPP:H and normal CRP level, estimating the prevalence of ID at 25.9%. When TfR is added to a multiple criteria model (elevated ZPP:H in the absence of elevated CRP and/or elevated TfR level) the prevalence of ID is estimated to be 31.2%. This study demonstrates the diagnostic utility of combining TfR with other indexes of iron status, enabling the detection of ID in both the presence and absence of infection. Furthermore, this study is the first field application of TfR blood-spot methods, and it demonstrates their feasibility in remote field settings. PMID:14747676

  11. Assessment of selenium bioavailability from naturally produced high-selenium soy foods in selenium-deficient rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed the bioavailability of selenium (Se) from protein isolate and tofu (bean curd) prepared from naturally produced high-Se soybeans in a Se-deficient rat model. The Se content of soybean seeds, protein isolate and tofu was 5.17 ± 0.22, 11.44 ± 0.09 and 7.37 ± 0.12 mg/kg, respectively. Male ...

  12. Molecular analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variants in the Solomon Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Hirono, A.; Ishii, A.; Hirono, K.; Miwa, S.; Kere, N.; Fujii, H.

    1995-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most prevalent genetic disorders, and >100 million people are considered to have mutant genes. G6PD deficiency is frequent in the area where plasmodium falciparum infection is endemic, probably because the G6PD-deficient subjects are resistant to the parasite. Falciparum and vivax malarias have been highly endemic in the Solomon Islands, and a high frequency of G6PD deficiency has also been expected. A recent investigation showed that the frequency of G6PD deficiency in the Solomon Islands was 8.4%-14.4%. Although >80 G6PD variants from various populations have been molecularly analyzed, little is known about those in Melanesians. G6PD Maewo, which was originally found in Vanuatu, has so far been the only Melanesian variant whose structural abnormality was determined. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  13. African Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Alleles Associated with Protection from Severe Malaria in Heterozygous Females in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Manjurano, Alphaxard; Sepulveda, Nuno; Nadjm, Behzad; Mtove, George; Wangai, Hannah; Maxwell, Caroline; Olomi, Raimos; Reyburn, Hugh; Riley, Eleanor M.; Drakeley, Christopher J.; Clark, Taane G.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) A- deficiency is prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa populations, and has been associated with protection from severe malaria. Whether females and/or males are protected by G6PD deficiency is uncertain, due in part to G6PD and malaria phenotypic complexity and misclassification. Almost all large association studies have genotyped a limited number of G6PD SNPs (e.g. G6PD202 / G6PD376), and this approach has been too blunt to capture the complete epidemiological picture. Here we have identified 68 G6PD polymorphisms and analysed 29 of these (i.e. those with a minor allele frequency greater than 1%) in 983 severe malaria cases and controls in Tanzania. We establish, across a number of SNPs including G6PD376, that only female heterozygotes are protected from severe malaria. Haplotype analysis reveals the G6PD locus to be under balancing selection, suggesting a mechanism of protection relying on alleles at modest frequency and avoiding fixation, where protection provided by G6PD deficiency against severe malaria is offset by increased risk of life-threatening complications. Our study also demonstrates that the much-needed large-scale studies of severe malaria and G6PD enzymatic function across African populations require the identification and analysis of the full repertoire of G6PD genetic markers. PMID:25671784

  14. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency: in vitro assessment of neutrophil function and leukocyte integrin expression.

    PubMed Central

    Olchowy, T W; Bochsler, P N; Neilsen, N R; Welborn, M G; Slauson, D O

    1994-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was identified in a two-month-old Holstein heifer calf using DNA-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the affected calf and other clinical parameters. Neutrophil integrin expression (CD18, CD11a, CD11c), aggregation, and transendothelial migration were studied in vitro. Neutrophils were isolated from the affected calf and from normal, healthy, age-matched control Holstein calves. Neutrophils isolated from the affected BLAD calf had decreased expression of leukocyte integrins on their cell surface, decreased ability to aggregate in response to chemotactic stimuli, and decreased ability to migrate across bovine endothelial cell monolayers in vitro. Transendothelial migration of neutrophils from normal calves was reduced to levels comparable to the BLAD neutrophils by treatment with an anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb 60.3). Peripheral-blood lymphocytes from the BLAD calf also expressed negligible levels of leukocyte integrins, similar to their neutrophil counterparts. Our experimental findings in vitro correlate well with the clinical observations of decreased leukocyte trafficking and diminished host defense in leukocyte adhesion-deficient animals. The syndrome of BLAD may be a suitable model for one of the human leukocyte adhesion deficiency disorders. Images Fig. 4. PMID:7911733

  15. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency: in vitro assessment of neutrophil function and leukocyte integrin expression.

    PubMed

    Olchowy, T W; Bochsler, P N; Neilsen, N R; Welborn, M G; Slauson, D O

    1994-04-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was identified in a two-month-old Holstein heifer calf using DNA-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the affected calf and other clinical parameters. Neutrophil integrin expression (CD18, CD11a, CD11c), aggregation, and transendothelial migration were studied in vitro. Neutrophils were isolated from the affected calf and from normal, healthy, age-matched control Holstein calves. Neutrophils isolated from the affected BLAD calf had decreased expression of leukocyte integrins on their cell surface, decreased ability to aggregate in response to chemotactic stimuli, and decreased ability to migrate across bovine endothelial cell monolayers in vitro. Transendothelial migration of neutrophils from normal calves was reduced to levels comparable to the BLAD neutrophils by treatment with an anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb 60.3). Peripheral-blood lymphocytes from the BLAD calf also expressed negligible levels of leukocyte integrins, similar to their neutrophil counterparts. Our experimental findings in vitro correlate well with the clinical observations of decreased leukocyte trafficking and diminished host defense in leukocyte adhesion-deficient animals. The syndrome of BLAD may be a suitable model for one of the human leukocyte adhesion deficiency disorders. PMID:7911733

  16. Deficiencies in culturally competent asthma care for ethnic minority children: a qualitative assessment among care providers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma outcomes are generally worse for ethnic minority children. Cultural competence training is an instrument for improving healthcare for ethnic minority patients. To develop effective training, we explored the mechanisms in paediatric asthma care for ethnic minority patients that lead to deficiencies in the care process. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews on care for ethnic minority children with asthma (aged 4-10 years) with paediatricians (n = 13) and nurses (n = 3) in three hospitals. Interviews were analysed qualitatively with a framework method, using a cultural competence model. Results Respondents mentioned patient non-adherence as the central problem in asthma care. They related non-adherence in children from ethnic minority backgrounds to social context factors, difficulties in understanding the chronic nature of asthma, and parents’ language barriers. Reactions reported by respondents to patients’ non-adherence included retrieving additional information, providing biomedical information, occasionally providing referrals for social context issues, and using informal interpreters. Conclusions This study provides keys to improve the quality of specialist paediatric asthma care to ethnic minority children, mainly related to non-adherence. Care providers do not consciously recognise all the mechanisms that lead to deficiencies in culturally competent asthma care they provide to ethnic minority children (e.g. communicating mainly from a biomedical perspective and using mostly informal interpreters). Therefore, the learning objectives of cultural competence training should reflect issues that care providers are aware of as well as issues they are unaware of. PMID:22551452

  17. Comprehensive biometric, biochemical and histopathological assessment of nutrient deficiencies in gilthead sea bream fed semi-purified diets.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Lozano, Gabriel F; Benedito-Palos, Laura; Estensoro, Itziar; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume

    2015-09-14

    Seven isoproteic and isolipidic semi-purified diets were formulated to assess specific nutrient deficiencies in sulphur amino acids (SAA), n-3 long-chain PUFA (n-3 LC-PUFA), phospholipids (PL), P, minerals (Min) and vitamins (Vit). The control diet (CTRL) contained these essential nutrients in adequate amounts. Each diet was allocated to triplicate groups of juvenile gilthead sea bream fed to satiety over an 11-week feeding trial period. Weight gain of n-3 LC-PUFA, P-Vit and PL-Min-SAA groups was 50, 60-75 and 80-85 % of the CTRL group, respectively. Fat retention was decreased by all nutrient deficiencies except by the Min diet. Strong effects on N retention were found in n-3 LC-PUFA and P fish. Combined anaemia and increased blood respiratory burst were observed in n-3 LC-PUFA fish. Hypoproteinaemia was found in SAA, n-3 LC-PUFA, PL and Vit fish. Derangements of lipid metabolism were also a common disorder, but the lipodystrophic phenotype of P fish was different from that of other groups. Changes in plasma levels of electrolytes (Ca, phosphate), metabolites (creatinine, choline) and enzyme activities (alkaline phosphatase) were related to specific nutrient deficiencies in PL, P, Min or Vit fish, whereas changes in circulating levels of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I primarily reflected the intensity of the nutritional stressor. Histopathological scoring of the liver and intestine segments showed specific nutrient-mediated changes in lipid cell vacuolisation, inflammation of intestinal submucosa, as well as the distribution and number of intestinal goblet and rodlet cells. These results contribute to define the normal range of variation for selected biometric, biochemical, haematological and histochemical markers. PMID:26220446

  18. Quantitative Computerized Assessment of the Degree of Acetabular Bone Deficiency: Total radial Acetabular Bone Loss (TrABL).

    PubMed

    Gelaude, Frederik; Clijmans, Tim; Delport, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    A novel quantitative, computerized, and, therefore, highly objective method is presented to assess the degree of total radical acetabular bone loss. The method, which is abbreviated to "TrABL", makes use of advanced 3D CT-based image processing and effective 3D anatomical reconstruction methodology. The output data consist of a ratio and a graph, which can both be used for direct comparison between specimens. A first dataset of twelve highly deficient hemipelves, mainly Paprosky types IIIB, is used as illustration. Although generalization of the findings will require further investigation on a larger population, it can be assumed that the presented method has the potential to facilitate the preoperative use of existing classifications and related decision schemes for treatment selection in complex revision cases. PMID:22013539

  19. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E. K.

    2015-05-06

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  20. Linkage disequilibrium for two X-linked genes in Sardinia and its bearing on the statistical mapping of the human X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Filippi, G; Rinaldi, A; Palmarino, R; Seravalli, E; Siniscalco, M

    1977-05-01

    The distribution of four X-linked mutants (G6PD, Deutan, Protan and Xg) among lowland and once highly malarial populations of Sardinia discloses a clear-cut example of linkage disequiligrium between two of them (G6PD and Protan). In the same populations the distribution of G6PD-deficiency versus colorblindness of the Deutan type and the Xg blood-group is not significantly different from that expected at equilibrium. These data suggest indirectly that the loci for G6PD and Protan may be nearer to one another than those for G6PD and Deutan. PMID:301840

  1. Linkage Disequilibrium for Two X-Linked Genes in Sardinia and Its Bearing on the Statistical Mapping of the Human X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, G.; Rinaldi, A.; Palmarino, R.; Seravalli, E.; Siniscalco, M.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of four X-linked mutants (G6PD, Deutan, Protan and Xg) among lowland and once highly malarial populations of Sardinia discloses a clear-cut example of linkage disequilibrium between two of them (G6PD and Protan). In the same populations the distribution of G6PD-deficiency versus colorblindness of the Deutan type and the Xg blood-group is not significantly different from that expected at equilibrium. These data suggest indirectly that the loci for G6PD and Protan may be nearer to one another than those for G6PD and Deutan. PMID:301840

  2. Quantitative airway assessment on computed tomography in patients with alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Matsuoka, Shin; Estépar, Raúl San José; Diaz, Alejandro; Newell, John D; Sandhaus, Robert A; Mergo, Patricia J; Brantly, Mark L; Murayama, Sadayuki; Reilly, John J; Hatabu, Hiroto; Silverman, Edwin K; Washko, George R

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between quantitative airway measurements on computed tomography (CT) and airflow limitation in individuals with severe alpha (1)-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is undefined. Thus, we planned to clarify the relationship between CT-based airway indices and airflow limitation in AATD. 52 patients with AATD underwent chest CT and pre-bronchodilator spirometry at three institutions. In the right upper (RUL) and lower (RLL) lobes, wall area percent (WA%) and luminal area (Ai) were measured in the third, fourth, and fifth generations of the bronchi. The severity of emphysema was also calculated in each lobe and expressed as low attenuation area percent (LAA%). Correlations between obtained measurements and FEV(1)% predicted (FEV(1)%P) were evaluated by the Spearman rank correlation test. In RUL, WA% of all generations was significantly correlated with FEV(1)%P (3rd, R = -0.33, p = 0.02; 4th, R = -0.39, p = 0.004; 5th, R = -0.57, p < 0.001; respectively). Ai also showed significant correlations (3rd, R = 0.32, p = 0.02; 4th, R = 0.34, p = 0.01; 5th, R = 0.56, p < 0.001; respectively). Measured correlation coefficients improved when the airway progressed distally from the third to fifth generations. LAA% also correlated with FEV(1)%P (R = -0.51, p < 0.001). In RLL, WA% showed weak correlations with FEV(1)%P in all generations (3rd, R = -0.34, p = 0.01; 4th, R = -0.30, p = 0.03; 5th, R = -0.31, p = 0.03; respectively). Only Ai from the fifth generation significantly correlated with FEV(1)%P in this lobe (R = 0.34, p = 0.01). LAA% strongly correlated with FEV(1)%P (R = -0.71, p < 0.001). We conclude therefore that quantitative airway measurements are significantly correlated with airflow limitation in AATD, particularly in the distal airways of RUL. Emphysema of the lower lung is the predominant component; however, airway disease also has a significant impact on airflow limitation in AATD. PMID:19938971

  3. Can selected functional movement screen assessments be used to identify movement deficiencies that could affect multidirectional speed and jump performance?

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Schultz, Adrian B; Jordan, Corrin A; Callaghan, Samuel J; Jeffriess, Matthew D; Luczo, Tawni M

    2015-01-01

    The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) includes lower-body focused tests (deep squat [DS], hurdle step, in-line lunge) that could assist in identifying movement deficiencies affecting multidirectional sprinting and jumping, which are important qualities for team sports. However, the hypothesized relationship with athletic performance lacks supportive research. This study investigated relationships between the lower-body focused screens and overall FMS performance and multidirectional speed and jumping capabilities in team sport athletes. Twenty-two healthy men were assessed in the FMS, and multidirectional speed (0- to 5-m, 0- to 10-m, 0- to 20-m sprint intervals; 505 and between-leg turn differences, modified T-test and differences between initial movement to the left or right); and bilateral and unilateral multidirectional jumping (vertical [VJ], standing long [SLJ], and lateral jump) tests. Pearson's correlations (r) were used to calculate relationships between screening scores and performance tests (p ≤ 0.05). After the determination of any screens relating to athletic performance, subjects were stratified into groups (3 = high-performing group; 2 = intermediate-performing group; 1 = low-performing group) to investigate movement compensations. A 1-way analysis of variance (p ≤ 0.05) determined any between-group differences. There were few significant correlations. The DS did moderately correlate with between-leg 505 difference (r = -0.423), and bilateral VJ (r = -0.428) and SLJ (r = -0.457). When stratified into groups according to DS score, high performers had a 13% greater SLJ when compared with intermediate performers, which was the only significant result. The FMS seems to have minimal capabilities for identifying movement deficiencies that could affect multidirectional speed and jumping in male team sport athletes. PMID:25028993

  4. The Efficacy of Instructor-Guided Supplemental Instruction as a Strategy for Helping Reading-Deficient College Students Improve Testing and Assessment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartley-Lukula, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    This research project examined whether the use of Instructor-guided Supplemental Instruction as a classroom scaffolding technique, might help improve testing and assessment reading outcomes for reading-deficient college students. The study was completed at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee over the 16-week Fall, 2012 semester…

  5. An assessment of gases in oxygen-deficient hay silos and the effects of forced ventilation.

    PubMed

    Kedan, G; Spielholz, P; Sjostrom, T; Trenary, B; Clark, R E

    2007-01-01

    Many modern tower silos used in the agricultural industry for hay and grain storage are oxygen-limiting by design. Forced-air ventilation using a forage blower is a method commonly used to decrease concentrations of toxic and asphyxiant gases and to increase the O2 content within a silo headspace prior to worker entry. This article describes the methods used to measure gas concentrations and the results obtained from a pilot study by the Washington Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) program of two oxygen-limiting forage tower silos in eastern Washington State. The silos were monitored for oxygen (O2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and carbon dioxide (CO2). Measured O2 concentrations were low in all areas of the headspaces monitored for both silos. After beginning forced-air ventilation, O2 concentrations within the silo headspace returned to ambient levels within 8 to 20 min. Nitrogen dioxide levels exceeded the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA) short-term exposure limit (STEL) in the silo that was filled six days earlier (silo 2), but not in the silo that was filled four days earlier (silo 1). The NO2 concentration in silo 2 decreased to below the WISHA STEL within 15 min of starting ventilation but began to rise shortly after ventilation was stopped. Carbon dioxide, which was only measured in silo 1, was detected at 2% within the headspace of this silo. The carbon dioxide concentration decreased to <1% within 3 min of starting ventilation. PMID:17370916

  6. Hemoglobin E and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in the Chittagong Hill Districts of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kerry L; Ahmed, Sabeena; Rahman, Hafizur; Prue, Chai S; Khyang, Jacob; Ram, Malathi; Haq, M Zahirul; Chowdhury, Ashish; Akter, Jasmin; Glass, Gregory E; Shields, Timothy; Nyunt, Myaing M; Khan, Wasif A; Sack, David A; Sullivan, David J

    2015-08-01

    Hemoglobin E is largely confined to south and southeast Asia. The association between hemoglobin E (HbE) and malaria is less clear than that of hemoglobin S and C. As part of a malaria study in the Chittagong Hill Districts of Bangladesh, an initial random sample of 202 individuals showed that 39% and 49% of Marma and Khyang ethnic groups, respectively, were positive for either heterozygous or homozygous hemoglobin E. In this group, 6.4% were also found to be severely deficient and 35% mildly deficient for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). In a separate Plasmodium falciparum malaria case-uninfected control study, the odds of having homozygous hemoglobin E (HbEE) compared with normal hemoglobin (HbAA) were higher among malaria cases detected by passive surveillance than age and location matched uninfected controls (odds ratio [OR] = 5.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07-46.93). The odds of heterozygous hemoglobin E (HbAE) compared with HbAA were similar between malaria cases and uninfected controls (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.42-1.19). No association by hemoglobin type was found in the initial parasite density or the proportion parasite negative after 2 days of artemether/lumefantrine treatment. HbEE, but not HbAE status was associated with increased passive case detection of malaria. PMID:26101273

  7. Sinkhole Hazard Assessment Using the Gravity and Magnetic Signatures of the Shallow Subsurface Mass Deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, M.; Shirman, B.

    2005-05-01

    Problems associated with sinkhole development are causing serious concerns in land-use planning in the Dead Sea area. We studied the resolving power of gravity and magnetic surveys for the assessment of sinkhole hazard. Microgravity surveying has been used worldwide to detect karst caves in the dense carbonate rocks. However, the Dead Sea sinkholes are developing very rapidly in the young, thick, low-density sediments that fill the Dead Sea graben. The gravity effect of the entire graben reaches -130mGal with a horizontal gravity gradient up to 10mGal/km. To the best of our knowledge a micromagnetic surveying has never been used to delineate subsurface cavities. Assuming that the collapse is caused by large voids in the shallow (a few tens of meters) depth, we defined our survey designs by 3-D gravity and magnetic forward modeling. A density contrast of such a target ranges from 0.9 to 2.0 gr/c3 and numerous magnetic susceptibility measurements suggested an average magnetic contrast of 3*10-4 SI. The modeling showed that high resolution detailed gravity and magnetic surveys can reliably delineate the voids located at the shallow depth. The magnetic dipole anomaly with its positive part located north of the negative part is typical of anomalies of a concealed void. We have been studying the feasibility of methods mapping the sites with sinkholes occurring in alluvial fans and mud flats along the Dead Sea shore since 1999. About 20 thousand gravity stations were measured at eleven sites and micromagnetic measurements were taken at five sites. The results suggest: - The microgravity and micromagnetic data indicate a subsurface mass deficit beneath some of the areas where open sinkholes are observed, suggesting that a mass deficit is presented and additional sinkhole development can be expected. Indeed, new sinkholes opened up at several anomalous locations. - Moreover, the absence of negative residual gravity anomalies and typical magnetic dipole anomalies at the

  8. Iodine-deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Jooste, Pieter L; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2008-10-01

    2 billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficiency disorders. Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. Assessment methods include urinary iodine concentration, goitre, newborn thyroid-stimulating hormone, and blood thyroglobulin. In nearly all countries, the best strategy to control iodine deficiency is iodisation of salt, which is one of the most cost-effective ways to contribute to economic and social development. When iodisation of salt is not possible, iodine supplements can be given to susceptible groups. Introduction of iodised salt to regions of chronic iodine-deficiency disorders might transiently increase the proportion of thyroid disorders, but overall the small risks of iodine excess are far outweighed by the substantial risks of iodine deficiency. International efforts to control iodine-deficiency disorders are slowing, and reaching the third of the worldwide population that remains deficient poses major challenges. PMID:18676011

  9. Assessment of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of Helicobacter pylori-associated iron deficiency and anemia in children with dyspeptic symptoms.

    PubMed

    El-Aziz Awad, Mohiee El-Deen; Amin, Saleh Mohamed; Abdou, Saied Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the diagnostic approaches of Helicobacter pylori (IP)-associated iron deficiency (ID) and anemia (IDA) in children with dyspeptic symptoms and evaluated the effect of simultaneous anti-H. pylori (anti-HIP) therapy and oral iron in comparison with each of anti? HP therapy and oral iron therapy alone, on iron status as assessed by serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) level. Two hundreds children with dyspeptic symptoms were subjected to clinical evaluation, stool examination, CBC, biochemical assays for serum iron parameters and measurements of serum IgG antibodies to HP and serum sTfR level by ELISA. Sixty children were found to have HP. associated ID or IDA and were randomly divided into 3 groups (20 children each). GA received 2-week anti-HP therapy plus 90-day oral iron, and GB received 2-week anti-HP therapy alone whereas group C received 90-day oral iron alone. Re-evaluation of the 3 groups was performed after 3 months of treatment initiation by repeat CBC and serum sTfR level. Children (45%) were HP-seropositive. The mean values of serum sTfR were significantly higher in HP-positive group and in HP-positive children with IDA than in HP-negative group and in HP-negative children with IDA although no significant differences were noted in hematologic variables and iron parameters between the corresponding groups and children. As regard treatment groups, there were significant improvements in the mean values of indices of IDA status (HIb, MCH, MCV, sTfR) and ID status (sTtRi) at 3 months of treatment initiation compared with their baseline values after. anti-HP triple therapy either with oral iron or without oral iron whereas the control children who were treated with oral iron alone showed insignificant changes despite oral iron administration. The improvements in these parameters were significantly greater in groups of children who received anti-HP therapy either combined with iron or alone, where compared with those who did not receive

  10. The prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Gambian school children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primaquine, the only available drug effective against Plasmodium falciparum sexual stages, induces also a dose-dependent haemolysis, especially in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient (G6PDd) individuals. Therefore, it is important to determine the prevalence of this deficiency in areas that would potentially benefit from its use. The prevalence of G6PD deficiency by genotype and enzyme activity was determined in healthy school children in The Gambia. Methods Blood samples from primary school children collected during a dry season malaria survey were screened for G6PDd and malaria infection. Genotypes for allele mutations reported in the country; 376, 202A-, 968A- and 542 were analysed while enzyme activity (phenotype) was assayed using a semi-quantitative commercial test kit. Enzyme activity values were fitted in a finite mixture model to determine the distribution and calculate a cut-off for deficiency. The association between genotype and phenotype for boys and girls as well as the association between mutant genotype and deficient phenotype was analysed. Results Samples from 1,437 children; 51% boys were analysed. The prevalence of P. falciparum malaria infection was 14%. The prevalence of the 202A-, 968 and 542 mutations was 1.8%, 2.1% and 1.0%, respectively, and higher in boys than in girls. The prevalence of G6PDd phenotype was 6.4% (92/1,437), 7.8% (57/728) in boys and 4.9% (35/709) in girls with significantly higher odds in the former (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.05, 2.53, p = 0.026). The deficient phenotype was associated with reduced odds of malaria infection (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.36, 1.62, p = 0.49). Conclusions There is a weak association between genotype and phenotype estimates of G6PDd prevalence. The phenotype expression of deficiency represents combinations of mutant alleles rather than specific mutations. Genotype studies in individuals with a deficient phenotype would help identify alleles responsible for haemolysis. PMID:24742291

  11. Aldosterone impairs vascular reactivity by decreasing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Dam, Aamir; Maron, Bradley A.; Scribner, Anne W.; Liao, Ronglih; Handy, Diane E.; Stanton, Robert C.; Pitt, Bertram; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired vascular reactivity; however, the mechanism by which aldosterone promotes endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd), the principal source of Nadph, modulates vascular function by limiting oxidant stress to preserve bioavailable nitric oxide (NO•). In these studies, we show that aldosterone (10−9-10−7 mol/l) decreases endothelial G6pd expression and activity in vitro resulting in increased oxidant stress and decreased cGMP levels similar to what is observed in G6pd-deficient cells. Aldosterone decreases G6pd expression by protein kinase A activation to increase expression of Crem, which interferes with Creb binding to the G6pd promoter. In vivo, infusion of aldosterone decreases vascular G6pd expression and impairs vascular reactivity. These effects are abrogated by spironolactone or vascular gene transfer of G6pd. These studies demonstrate that aldosterone induces a G6pd-deficient phenotype to impair endothelial function; aldosterone antagonism or gene transfer of G6pd improves vascular reactivity by restoring G6pd activity. PMID:17273168

  12. Induction of oxidative stress in brain of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient mice by acute lysine administration.

    PubMed

    Seminotti, Bianca; da Rosa, Mateus Struecker; Fernandes, Carolina Gonçalves; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Braga, Luisa Macedo; Leipnitz, Guilhian; de Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Woontner, Michael; Koeller, David M; Goodman, Stephen; Wajner, Moacir

    2012-05-01

    In the present work we evaluated a variety of indicators of oxidative stress in distinct brain regions (striatum, cerebral cortex and hippocampus), the liver, and heart of 30-day-old glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient (Gcdh(-/-)) mice. The parameters evaluated included thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), 2-7-dihydrodichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation, sulfhydryl content, and reduced glutathione (GSH) concentrations. We also measured the activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Under basal conditions glutaric (GA) and 3-OH-glutaric (3OHGA) acids were elevated in all tissues of the Gcdh(-/-) mice, but were essentially absent in WT animals. In contrast there were no differences between WT and Gcdh(-/-) mice in any of the indicators or oxidative stress under basal conditions. Following a single intra-peritoneal (IP) injection of lysine (Lys) there was a moderate increase of brain GA concentration in Gcdh(-/-) mice, but no change in WT. Lys injection had no effect on brain 3OHGA in either WT or Gcdh(-/-) mice. The levels of GA and 3OHGA were approximately 40% higher in striatum compared to cerebral cortex in Lys-treated mice. In the striatum, Lys administration provoked a marked increase of lipid peroxidation, DCFH oxidation, SOD and GR activities, as well as significant reductions of GSH levels and GPx activity, with no alteration of sulfhydryl content, CAT and G6PD activities. There was also evidence of increased lipid peroxidation and SOD activity in the cerebral cortex, along with a decrease of GSH levels, but to a lesser extent than in the striatum. In the hippocampus only mild increases of SOD activity and DCFH oxidation were observed. In contrast, Lys injection had no effect on any of the parameters of oxidative stress in the liver or heart of Gcdh(-/-) or WT animals. These results indicate that in Gcdh

  13. EFFECT OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORITE, AND NITRITE ON MICE WITH LOW AND HIGH LEVELS OF GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (G6PD) IN THEIR ERYTHROCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mice exposed to chlorine dioxide for 30 days at 100 ppm exhibited no significant differences from controls in any of the blood parameters measured. There were no additive or synergistic effects between chlorine dioxide and nitrite based on these same measurements. When A/J (high ...

  14. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 7, 0.07 Conveying

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    System information is given for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for elevators and special conveyors.

  15. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 2, 0.02 Substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    System information is given for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. System assembly/component deficiencies and inspection methods are given for slabs-on-grade, columns, and column fireproofing.

  16. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 3, 0.03 Superstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented on asset determinant factor/CAS profile codes/CAS cost process; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for beams; pre-engineered building systems; floors; roof structure; stairs; and fireproofing.

  17. Condition Assessment survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 9, 0.09 Electrical, Book 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards are presented for service & distribution; lighting; and special systems.

  18. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 8, 0.08 Mechanical, Book 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    System information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet too & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards are given for plumbing, fire protection, heating, cooling, and special (drinking water cooling systems).

  19. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world. PMID:1745900

  20. Assessment of surgical outcomes of limbal transplantation using simple limbal epithelial transplantation technique in patients with total unilateral limbal deficiency.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Ana Gabriela; Barbosa, Martina Maria Oiticica; Santos, Myrna Serapião; Barreiro, Telma Pereira; Gomes, José Álvaro Pereira

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the novel simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) technique, which reduces the risk of iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency in the donor eye. Four patients with total unilateral limbal stem cell deficiency received a limbal graft, measuring 4 mm × 2 mm, from the contralateral healthy eye in a single surgical procedure. The graft was divided into 10-20 pieces and distributed on the corneal surface. At 6-month follow-up, a completely avascular corneal epithelial surface was obtained in two patients, and there was improvement in visual acuity in one patient. The limbal grafts did not adhere to the cornea in one patient. No serious complications related to the surgery were observed in this study. PMID:27224077

  1. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 5, 0.05 Roofing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for built-up membrane; single- ply membrane; metal roofing systems; coated foam membrane; shingles; tiles; parapets; roof drainage system; roof specialties; and skylights.

  2. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 1, 0.01 Foundations and footings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are given for footings - spread/strip/grade beams; foundation walls; foundation dampproofing/waterproofing; excavation/backfill/ and piles & caissons.

  3. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 11, 0.11 Specialty systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for canopies; loading dock systems; tanks; domes (bulk storage, metal framing); louvers & vents; access floors; integrated ceilings; and mezzanine structures.

  4. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 12, 0.12 Sitework

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are given for utility distribution systems, central heating, central cooling, electrical, utility support structures, paving roadways/walkways, and tunnels.

  5. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 6, 0.06 Interior construction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for conventional and specialty partitions, toilet partitions & accessories, interior doors, paint finishes/coatings/ wall covering systems; floor finishing systems; and ceiling systems.

  6. Selenium deficiency mitigates hypothyroxinemia in iodine-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Vanderpas, J B; Contempré, B; Duale, N L; Deckx, H; Bebe, N; Longombé, A O; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Dumont, J E

    1993-02-01

    Studies were performed to assess the role of combined selenium and iodine deficiency in the etiology of endemic myxedematous cretinism in a population in Zaire. One effect of selenium deficiency may be to lower glutathione peroxidase activity in the thyroid gland, thus allowing hydrogen peroxide produced during thyroid hormone synthesis to be cytotoxic. In selenium-and-iodine-deficient humans, selenium supplementation may aggravate hypothyroidism by stimulating thyroxin metabolism by the selenoenzyme type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase. Selenium supplementation is thus not indicated without iodine or thyroid hormone supplementation in cases of combined selenium and iodine deficiencies. PMID:8427203

  7. Rasburicase-induced methemoglobinemia: case report, literature review, and proposed treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Garrett B; Paschal, Rita D; Adamski, Jill

    2016-04-01

    Rasburicase for the treatment of tumor lysis syndrome has been associated with hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia, usually in patients with G6PD deficiency. Risks and benefits should be considered prior to use of rasburicase in at-risk patients. Methylene blue will worsen the hemolytic anemia in G6PD deficiency and should be avoided. PMID:27099716

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  9. Iron-induced nickel deficiency in pecan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency can occur in horticultural and agronomic crops. This study assesses impact of excessive iron (Fe) on expression of Ni deficiency in pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. Field and greenhouse experiments found Ni deficiency to be inducible by ei...

  10. SUFFICIENT IODINE INTAKE IN SCHOOLCHILDREN FROM THE ZAGREB AREA: ASSESSMENT WITH DRIED BLOD SPOT THYROGLOBULIN AS A NEW FUNCTIONAL BIOMARKER FOR IODINE DEFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    Jukić, Tomislav; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; Granić, Roko; Prpić, Marin; Krilić, Drazena; Juresa, Vesna; Katalenić, Marijan; Kusić, Zvonko

    2015-12-01

    Current methods for assessment of iodine intake in a population comprise measurements of urinary iodine concentration (UIC), thyroid volume by ultrasound (US-Tvol), and newborn TSH. Serum or dried blood spot thyroglobulin (DBS-Tg) is a new promising functional iodine status biomarker in children. In 1996, a new act on universal salt iodination was introduced in Croatia with 25 mg of potassium iodideper kg of salt. In 2002, Croatia finally reached iodine sufficiency. However, in 2009, median UIC in 101 schoolchildren from Zagreb, the capital of Croatia, was 288 µg/L, posing to be excessive. The aim of the study was to assess iodine intake in schoolchildren from the Zagreb area and to evaluate the value of DBS-Tg in schoolchildren as a new functional biomarker of iodine deficiency (and iodine excess). The study was part of a large international study in 6- to 12-year-old children supported by UNICEF, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) and the International Council for the Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (ICCIDD). According to international study results, the median cut-off Tg < 13 µg/L and/or < 3% Tg values > 40 µg/L indicate iodine sufficiency. The study included 159 schoolchildren (median age 9.1 ± 1.4 years) from Zagreb and a nearby small town of Jastrebarsko with measurements of UIC, US-Tvol, DBS-Tg, T4, TSH and iodine content in salt from households of schoolchildren (KI/kg of salt). Overall median UIC was 205 µg/L (range 1-505 µg/L). Thyroid volumes in schoolchildren measured by US were within the normal range according to reference values. Median DBS-Tg in schoolchildren was 12.1 µg/L with 3% of Tg values > 40 µg/L. High Tg values were in the UIC range < 50 µg/L and > 300 µg/L (U-shaped curve of Tg plotted against UIC). All children were euthyroid with geometric mean TSH 0.7 ± 0.3 mU/L and arithmetic mean T4 62 ± 12.5 nmol/L. The mean KI content per kg of salt was 24.9 ± 3.1 mg/kg (range 19-36 mg/kg). Study results

  11. PGK deficiency.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) deficiency is one of the relatively uncommon causes of hereditary non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia (HNSHA). The gene encoding the erythrocyte enzyme PGK1, is X-linked. Mutations of this gene may cause chronic haemolysis with or without mental retardation and they may cause myopathies, often with episodes of myoglobinuria, or a combination of these clinical manifestations. Twenty-six families have been described and in 20 of these the mutations are known. The reason for different clinical manifestations of mutations of the same gene remains unknown. PMID:17222195

  12. Red Cell Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency—A Newly Recognized Cause of Neonatal Jaundice and Kernicterus in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Naiman, J. Lawrence; Kosoy, Martin H.

    1964-01-01

    Seven male newborns of Chinese, Greek and Italian origin presented with severe hemolytic jaundice due to red cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency. In five, the hemolysis was precipitated by inhalation of mothball vapours in the home. Kernicterus was evident upon admission in six infants and was fatal in four of these. G-6-PD deficiency should be suspected as a cause of jaundice in all full-term male infants of these ethnic groups. The diagnosis can be confirmed in any hospital by the methemoglobin reduction test. In areas similar to Toronto, Canada, where these high-risk ethnic groups prevail, the following measures are recommended: (1) detection of G-6-PD deficient newborns by screening cord bloods of all infants of these ethnic groups; (2) protection of affected infants from potentially hemolytic agents such as naphthalene, certain vitamin K preparations, and sulfonamides; and (3) observation of serum bilirubin levels to assess the need for exchange transfusion for hyperbilirubinemia. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:14226101

  13. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Three Recombinant Human Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Mutants: Zacatecas, Vanua-Lava and Viangchan

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; González-Valdez, Abigail; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Cuevas-Cruz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in humans causes severe disease, varying from mostly asymptomatic individuals to patients showing neonatal jaundice, acute hemolysis episodes or chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In order to understand the effect of the mutations in G6PD gene function and its relation with G6PD deficiency severity, we report the construction, cloning and expression as well as the detailed kinetic and stability characterization of three purified clinical variants of G6PD that present in the Mexican population: G6PD Zacatecas (Class I), Vanua-Lava (Class II) and Viangchan (Class II). For all the G6PD mutants, we obtained low purification yield and altered kinetic parameters compared with Wild Type (WT). Our results show that the mutations, regardless of the distance from the active site where they are located, affect the catalytic properties and structural parameters and that these changes could be associated with the clinical presentation of the deficiency. Specifically, the structural characterization of the G6PD Zacatecas mutant suggests that the R257L mutation have a strong effect on the global stability of G6PD favoring an unstable active site. Using computational analysis, we offer a molecular explanation of the effects of these mutations on the active site. PMID:27213370

  14. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Three Recombinant Human Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Mutants: Zacatecas, Vanua-Lava and Viangchan.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; González-Valdez, Abigail; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Cuevas-Cruz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in humans causes severe disease, varying from mostly asymptomatic individuals to patients showing neonatal jaundice, acute hemolysis episodes or chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In order to understand the effect of the mutations in G6PD gene function and its relation with G6PD deficiency severity, we report the construction, cloning and expression as well as the detailed kinetic and stability characterization of three purified clinical variants of G6PD that present in the Mexican population: G6PD Zacatecas (Class I), Vanua-Lava (Class II) and Viangchan (Class II). For all the G6PD mutants, we obtained low purification yield and altered kinetic parameters compared with Wild Type (WT). Our results show that the mutations, regardless of the distance from the active site where they are located, affect the catalytic properties and structural parameters and that these changes could be associated with the clinical presentation of the deficiency. Specifically, the structural characterization of the G6PD Zacatecas mutant suggests that the R257L mutation have a strong effect on the global stability of G6PD favoring an unstable active site. Using computational analysis, we offer a molecular explanation of the effects of these mutations on the active site. PMID:27213370

  15. Performance of phalangeal quantitative ultrasound parameters in the evaluation of reduced bone mineral density assessed by DX in patients with 21 hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ezequiel M; Sewaybricker, Leticia E; Baptista, Fatima; Silva, Analiza M; Carvalho, Wellington R G; Santos, Allan O; de Mello, Maricilda P; Lemos-Marini, Sofia H V; Guerra, Gil

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the performance of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters of proximal phalanges in the evaluation of reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21 OHD). Seventy patients with 21 OHD (41 females and 29 males), aged between 6-27 y were assessed. The QUS measurements, amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS), bone transmission time (BTT), and ultrasound bone profile index (UBPI) were obtained using the BMD Sonic device (IGEA, Carpi, Italy) on the last four proximal phalanges in the non-dominant hand. BMD was determined by dual energy X-ray (DXA) across the total body and lumbar spine (LS). Total body and LS BMD were positively correlated to UBPI, BTT and AD-SoS (correlation coefficients ranged from 0.59-0.72, p < 0.001). In contrast, when comparing patients with normal and low (Z-score < -2) BMD, no differences were found in the QUS parameters. Furthermore, UBPI, BTT and AD-SoS measurements were not effective for diagnosing patients with reduced BMD by receiver operator characteristic curve parameters. Although the AD-SoS, BTT and UBPI showed significant correlations with the data obtained by DXA, they were not effective for diagnosing reduced bone mass in patients with 21 OHD. PMID:24726797

  16. Assessment of the Zn-Co mixtures rhizotoxicity under Ca deficiency: using two conventional mixture models based on the cell membrane surface potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Min; Wang, Peng; Ni, Ling-Fei; Hao, Xiu-Zhen; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2014-10-01

    Toxicity assessment of Zn-Co mixtures involves multiple ions interactions. The negative potential (ψ0) at the cell membrane surface (CMs) concentrated cationic toxicants (denoted {M(2+)}0) and influenced the rhizotoxicity of Co(2+) or Zn(2+). The single and joint rhizotoxicity of Co(2+) and Zn(2+) to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were examined, coupled with different Ca(2+) levels. Joint effects of Zn(2+), Co(2+) and Ca(2+) were estimated by the linearly extended concentration addition (CA) and response addition (RA) models. Incorporation of Ca(2+) in single metal toxicity assessment significantly enhanced the prediction accuracy (r(2) increased from 0.948 to 0.550 for Zn(2+) and from 0.903 to 0.611 for Co(2+), respectively). ψ0 affected the multiple metals toxicity in both conventional mixture models (r(2)=0.814 for CA model and 0.820 for RA model). Concretely, {Zn(2+)}0 alleviated the toxicity of {Co(2+)}0, while {Co(2+)}0 had non-significant effect on {Zn(2+)}0 toxicity. Growth responses to {Ca(2+)}0 were substantially affected by {Zn(2+)}0 and {Co(2+)}0. Ca addition in medium decreased the {M(2+)}0 by reducing the ψ0 negativity, moreover this addition alleviated Ca deficiency at CMs induced by Zn(2+) (or Co(2+)). These consistent results from both extended CA and RA models indicated that ψ0 provided a novel sight for understanding the rhizotoxicity of multiple metals. PMID:25048911

  17. 26 CFR 1.963-6 - Deficiency distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... assessment of interest, additional amounts, and assessable penalties. (b) Requirements for deficiency... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deficiency distribution. 1.963-6 Section 1.963... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.963-6 Deficiency distribution. (a) In...

  18. Zinc deficiency in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S; Fitzgerald, J T; Hess, J W; Kaplan, J; Pelen, F; Dardenne, M

    1993-01-01

    Zinc is needed for growth and development, DNA synthesis, neurosensory functions, and cell-mediated immunity. Although zinc intake is reduced in elderly people, its deficiency and effects on cell-mediated immunity of the elderly have not been established. Subjects enrolled in "A Model Health Promotion and Intervention Program for Urban Middle Aged and Elderly Americans" were assessed for nutrition and zinc status. One hundred eighty healthy subjects were randomly selected for the study. Their mean dietary zinc intake was 9.06 mg/day, whereas the recommended dietary allowance is 15 mg/day. Plasma zinc was normal, but zinc in granulocytes and lymphocytes were decreased compared with younger control subjects. Of 118 elderly subjects in whom zinc levels in both granulocytes and lymphocytes were available, 36 had deficient levels. Plasma copper was increased, and interleukin 1 (IL-1) production was significantly decreased. Reduced response to the skin-test antigen panel and decreased taste acuity were observed. Thirteen elderly zinc-deficient subjects were supplemented with zinc, and various variables were assessed before and after zinc supplementation. Zinc supplementation corrected zinc deficiency and normalized plasma copper levels. Serum thymulin activity, IL-1 production, and lymphocyte ecto-5'-nucleotidase increased significantly after supplementation. Improvement in response to skin-test antigens and taste acuity was observed after zinc supplementation. A mild zinc deficiency appears to be a significant clinical problem in free-living elderly people. PMID:8353362

  19. The changing epidemiology of iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Eastman, Creswell J

    2012-07-01

    Globally, about 2 thousand million people are affected by iodine deficiency. Although endemic goitre is the most visible sign of iodine deficiency, its most devastating consequence is brain damage causing mental retardation in children. The relationship between iodine deficiency and brain damage was not clearly established until the 1980s when the term iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs), which encompass a spectrum of conditions caused by iodine deficiency, was introduced. This paradigm shift in the understanding of the clinical consequences of iodine deficiency led to a change in iodine deficiency assessment. The median urinary iodine excretion level has been recommended as the preferred indicator for monitoring population iodine deficiency status since 2001. The 2007 WHO urinary iodine data in schoolchildren from 130 countries revealed that iodine intake is still insufficient in 47 countries. Furthermore, about one-third of countries lack national estimates of the prevalence of iodine deficiency. The picture that has emerged from available data worldwide over the past two decades is that IDDs are not confined to remote, mountainous areas in developing countries, but are a global public health problem that affects most countries, including developed countries and island nations. The recognition of the universality of iodine deficiency highlights the need to develop and apply new strategies to establish and maintain sustainable IDD elimination and strengthen regular monitoring programmes. PMID:22473332

  20. Real-time monitoring of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity using liquid droplet arrays and its application to human plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Jung, Se-Hui; Ji, Su-Hyun; Han, Eun-Taek; Park, Won Sun; Hong, Seok-Ho; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2016-05-15

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) regulates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) levels and is related to the pathogenesis of various diseases, including G6PD deficiency, type 2 diabetes, aldosterone-induced endothelial dysfunction, and cancer. Therefore, a highly sensitive array-based assay for determining quantitative G6PD activity is required. Here, we developed an on-chip G6PD activity assay using liquid droplet fluorescence arrays. Quantitative G6PD activity was determined by calculating reduced resorufin concentrations in liquid droplets. The limit of detection (LOD) of this assay was 0.162 mU/ml (2.89 pM), which is much more sensitive than previous assays. We used our activity assay to determine kinetic parameters, including Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) and maximum rates of enzymatic reaction (Vmax) for NADP(+) and G6P, and half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50). We successfully applied this new assay to determine G6PD activity in human plasma from normal healthy individuals (n=30) and patients with inflammation (n=30). The inflammatory group showed much higher G6PD activities than did the normal group (p<0.001), with a high area under the curve value of 0.939. Therefore, this new activity assay has the potential to be used for diagnosis of G6PD-associated diseases and utilizing kinetic studies. PMID:26802575

  1. Quantitation of Gamma-Hydroxybutyric Acid in Dried Blood Spots: Feasibility Assessment for Newborn Screening of Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (SSADH) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Forni, Sabrina; Pearl, Phillip L.; Gibson, K. Michael; Yu, Yuezhou; Sweetman, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Objective SSADH deficiency, the most prevalent autosomal recessive disorder of GABA degradation, is characterized by elevated gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). Neurological outcomes may be improved with early intervention and anticipatory guidance. Morbidity has been compounded by complications, e.g. hypotonia, in undiagnosed infants with otherwise routine childhood illnesses. We report pilot methodology on the feasibility of newborn screening for SSADH deficiency. Method Dried blood spot (DBS) cards from patients affected with SSADH deficiency were compared with 2831 archival DBS cards for gamma-hydroxybutyric acid content. Following extraction with methanol, GHB in DBS was separated and analyzed using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results Methodology was validated to meet satisfactory accuracy and reproducibility criteria, including intra-day and inter-day validation. Archival refrigerated dried blood spots samples of babies, infants and children (N=2831) were screened for GHB, yielding a mean +/- S.D. of 8 ± 5 nM (99.9 %-tile 63 nM) (Min 0.0 Max 78 nM). The measured mean and median concentrations in blood spots derived from seven SSADH deficient patients were 1182 nM and 699 nM respectively (Min 124, Max 4851nM). Conclusions GHB concentration in all 2831 dried blood spot cards was well below the lowest concentration of affected children. These data provide proof-of-principle for screening methodology to detect SSADH deficiency with applicability to newborn screening and earlier diagnosis. PMID:23742746

  2. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  3. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin <12.0 g/dl and ferritin level <12 ng/ml were interviewed about their habits of eating ice or other non-food substances. Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors. PMID:24850454

  4. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  5. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  6. Mutations of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Durham, Santa-Maria and A+ Variants Are Associated with Loss Functional and Structural Stability of the Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; González-Valdez, Abigail; García-Torres, Itzhel; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzymopathy in the world. More than 160 mutations causing the disease have been identified, but only 10% of these variants have been studied at biochemical and biophysical levels. In this study we report on the functional and structural characterization of three naturally occurring variants corresponding to different classes of disease severity: Class I G6PD Durham, Class II G6PD Santa Maria, and Class III G6PD A+. The results showed that the G6PD Durham (severe deficiency), and the G6PD Santa Maria and A+ (less severe deficiency) (Class I, II and III, respectively) affect the catalytic efficiency of these enzymes, are more sensitive to temperature denaturing, and affect the stability of the overall protein when compared to the wild type WT-G6PD. In the variants, the exposure of more and buried hydrophobic pockets was induced and monitored with 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence, directly affecting the compaction of structure at different levels and probably reducing the stability of the protein. The degree of functional and structural perturbation by each variant correlates with the clinical severity reported in different patients. PMID:26633385

  7. Population study of 1311 C/T polymorphism of Glucose 6 Phosphate Dehydrogenase gene in Pakistan – an analysis of 715 X-chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Moiz, Bushra; Nasir, Amna; Moatter, Tariq; Naqvi, Zulfiqar Ali; Khurshid, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Background Nucleotide 1311 polymorphism at exon 11 of G6PD gene is widely prevalent in various populations of the world. The aim of the study was to evaluate 1311 polymorphism in subjects carrying G6PD Mediterranean gene and in general population living in Pakistan. Results Patients already known to be G6PD deficient were tested for 563C-T (G6PD Mediterranean) and 1311 C-T mutation through RFLP based PCR and gene sequencing. A control group not known to be G6PD deficient was tested for 1311C/T only. C-T transition at nt 1311 was detected in 60/234 X-chromosomes with 563 C-T mutation (gene frequency of 0.26) while in 130 of normal 402 X-chromosomes (gene frequency of 0.32). Conclusion We conclude that 1311 T is a frequent polymorphism both in general populations and in subjects with G6PD Mediterranean gene in Pakistan. The prevalence is higher compared to most of the populations of the world. The present study will help in understanding genetic basis of G6PD deficiency in Pakistani population and in developing ancestral links of its various ethnic groups. PMID:19640310

  8. Mutations of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Durham, Santa-Maria and A+ Variants Are Associated with Loss Functional and Structural Stability of the Protein.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; González-Valdez, Abigail; García-Torres, Itzhel; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzymopathy in the world. More than 160 mutations causing the disease have been identified, but only 10% of these variants have been studied at biochemical and biophysical levels. In this study we report on the functional and structural characterization of three naturally occurring variants corresponding to different classes of disease severity: Class I G6PD Durham, Class II G6PD Santa Maria, and Class III G6PD A+. The results showed that the G6PD Durham (severe deficiency), and the G6PD Santa Maria and A+ (less severe deficiency) (Class I, II and III, respectively) affect the catalytic efficiency of these enzymes, are more sensitive to temperature denaturing, and affect the stability of the overall protein when compared to the wild type WT-G6PD. In the variants, the exposure of more and buried hydrophobic pockets was induced and monitored with 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence, directly affecting the compaction of structure at different levels and probably reducing the stability of the protein. The degree of functional and structural perturbation by each variant correlates with the clinical severity reported in different patients. PMID:26633385

  9. DOCK8 Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System ​​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned ... Scientists Identify Genetic Cause of Previously Undefined Primary Immune Deficiency Disease Signs and Symptoms DOCK8 deficiency causes persistent skin ...

  10. Sulfadiazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), diabetes medications, diuretics ('water pills'), and vitamins.tell your doctor if you have or have ever had liver or kidney disease, asthma, severe allergies, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6PD) deficiency ( ...

  11. Haptoglobin blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Collection of blood (hematoma) Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia Blood disorder in a fetus or newborn called erythroblastosis fetalis Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency Idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia ...

  12. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, Anouk; Jacquemyn, Yves; Kinget, Kristof; Eyskens, François

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations. PMID:26113999

  13. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Anouk; Jacquemyn, Yves; Kinget, Kristof; Eyskens, François

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations. PMID:26113999

  14. Zinc: physiology, deficiency, and parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Callum

    2015-06-01

    The essential trace element zinc (Zn) has a large number of physiologic roles, in particular being required for growth and functioning of the immune system. Adaptive mechanisms enable the body to maintain normal total body Zn status over a wide range of intakes, but deficiency can occur because of reduced absorption or increased gastrointestinal losses. Deficiency impairs physiologic processes, leading to clinical consequences that include failure to thrive, skin rash, and impaired wound healing. Mild deficiency that is not clinically overt may still cause nonspecific consequences, such as susceptibility to infection and poor growth. The plasma Zn concentration has poor sensitivity and specificity as a test of deficiency. Consequently, diagnosis of deficiency requires a combination of clinical assessment and biochemical tests. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) are susceptible to Zn deficiency and its consequences. Nutrition support teams should have a strategy for assessing Zn status and optimizing this by appropriate supplementation. Nutrition guidelines recommend generous Zn provision from the start of PN. This review covers the physiology of Zn, the consequences of its deficiency, and the assessment of its status, before discussing its role in PN. PMID:25681484

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography Assessment Before and After Vitamin Supplementation in a Patient With Vitamin A Deficiency: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Saenz-de-Viteri, Manuel; Sádaba, Luis M

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin A is an essential fat-soluble vitamin important for the function of various body systems. In the eye, vitamin A is essential for the synthesis of visual pigments in photoreceptors. Vitamin A deficiency is a rare condition in the developed countries and might follow bariatric or intestinal bypass surgery.We present the case of a 67-year-old male that complained of visual loss and nyctalopia. Patient had bariatric surgery 15 years before for weight loss. Low serum levels of vitamin A confirmed the diagnosis and patient started vitamin A supplementation. Visual fields, macular thickness, and ganglion cell layer thickness were recorded and monitored 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after the beginning of therapy. Visual fields were significantly altered and central macular thickness and ganglion cell layer thickness were reduced, but the first 2 showed a significant recovery with vitamin supplementation therapy. By the 1st month of treatment patient referred a complete remission of visual symptoms. Further, we observed hyperreflective material accumulating beneath a partially disrupted ellipsoid band in the high definition optical coherence tomography that also improved progressively with vitamin repletion.Newer and more sophisticated imaging systems have increased our knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for retinal diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the effect of vitamin A deficiency and vitamin supplementation on macular thickness. This case also highlights the importance of considering bariatric bypass surgery as a cause of vitamin A deficiency in developed countries. PMID:26871796

  16. Electron transfer by human wild-type and A287P mutant P450 oxidoreductase assessed by transient kinetics: functional basis of P450 oxidoreductase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yi; Chen, Mo; Penning, Trevor M.; Miller, Walter L.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is a 2-flavin protein that transfers electrons from NADPH via its FAD and FMN moieties to all microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, including steroidogenic and drug-metabolizing P450s. Defects in the POR gene can cause POR deficiency (PORD), manifested clinically by disordered steroidogenesis, genital anomalies and skeletal malformations. We examined the POR mutant A287P, which is the most frequent cause of PORD in patients of European ancestry and partially disrupts most P450 activities in vitro. Flavin content analysis showed that A287P is deficient in FAD and FMN binding, although the mutation site is distant from the binding sites of both flavins. Externally added flavin partially restored the cytochrome c reductase activity of A287P, suggesting that flavin therapy may be useful for this frequent form of PORD. Transient kinetic dissection of the reaction of POR with NADPH and the reduction in cytochrome c by POR using stopped-flow techniques revealed defects in individual electron transfer steps mediated by A287P. A287P had impaired ability to accept electrons from NADPH, but was capable of a fast FMN ➔ cytochrome c electron donation reaction. Thus the reduced rates of P450 activities with A287P may be due to deficient flavin and impaired electron transfer from NADPH. PMID:25728647

  17. Creatine deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Andreas

    2003-02-01

    Since the first description of a creatine deficiency syndrome, the guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency, in 1994, the two further suspected creatine deficiency syndromes--the creatine transporter (CrT1) defect and the arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency were disclosed. GAMT and AGAT deficiency have autosomal-recessive traits, whereas the CrT1 defect is a X-linked disorder. All patients reveal developmental delay/regression, mental retardation, and severe disturbance of their expressive and cognitive speech. The common feature of all creatine deficiency syndromes is the severe depletion of creatine/phosphocreatine in the brain. Only the GAMT deficiency is in addition characterized by accumulation of guanidinoacetic acid in brain and body fluids. Guanidinoacetic acid seems to be responsible for intractable seizures and the movement disorder, both exclusively found in GAMT deficiency. Treatment with oral creatine supplementation is in part successful in GAMT and AGAT deficiency, whereas in CrT1 defect it is not able to replenish creatine in the brain. Treatment of combined arginine restriction and ornithine substitution in GAMT deficiency is capable to decrease guanidinoacetic acid permanently and improves the clinical outcome. The lack of the creatine/phosphocreatine signal in the patient's brain by means of in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is the common finding and the diagnostic clue in all three diseases. In AGAT deficiency guanidinoacetic acid is decreased, whereas creatine in blood was found to be normal. On the other hand the CrT1 defect is characterized by an increased concentration of creatine in blood and urine whereas guanidinoacetic acid concentration is normal. The increasing number of patients detected very recently suffering from a creatine deficiency syndrome and the unfavorable outcome highlights the need of further attempts in early recognition of affected individuals and in optimizing its treatment

  18. Iodine deficiency disorders in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, H K; Quazi, S; Kahn, M R; Mohiduzzaman, M; Nahar, B; Rahman, M M; Islam, M N; Khan, M A; Shahidullah, M; Hoque, T; Baquer, M; Pandav, C S

    1996-01-01

    An extensive iodine deficiency disorders survey was conducted in Bangladesh in 1993 to assess the latest iodine nutriture status of the country. The clinical variables of the survey were goitre and cretinism, and the biochemical variable was urinary iodine. The "EPI-30 cluster" sampling methodology was followed for selecting the survey sites. In each survey site, the study population consisted of boys and girls, aged 5-11 years, and men and women, aged 15-44 years, in about equal populations. The total number of survey sites was 78 and the total number of respondents was 30,072. The total number of urine samples was 4512 (15% sub-sample). The current total goitre rate (grade 1 + grade 2) in Bangladesh is 47.1% (hilly, 44.4%; flood-prone, 50.7%; and plains, 45.6%). The prevalence of cretinism in the country is 0.5% (hilly, 0.8%; flood-prone, 0.5%; and plains, 0.3%). Nearly 69% of Bangladeshi population have biochemical iodine deficiency (urinary iodine excretion [UIE] < 10 mg/dl) (hilly, 84.4; flood-prone, 67.1%; and plains 60.4%). Women and children are more affected that men, in terms of both goitre prevalence and UIE. The widespread severe iodine deficiency in all ecological zones indicates that the country as a whole is an iodine-deficient region. Important recommendations of global interest are made from the experience of the survey. PMID:10829973

  19. α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Umur; Stoller, James K

    2016-09-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an autosomal codominant condition that predisposes to emphysema and cirrhosis. The condition is common but grossly under-recognized. Identifying patients' α1-antitrypsin deficiency has important management implications (ie, smoking cessation, genetic and occupational counseling, and specific treatment with the infusion of pooled human plasma α1-antitrypsin). The weight of evidence suggests that augmentation therapy slows the progression of emphysema in individuals with severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:27514595

  20. LC/MS-based metabolomics strategy to assess the amelioration effects of ginseng total saponins on memory deficiency induced by simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Yue, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Yi-Xi; Liu, Xin-Min; Wang, Li-Sha; Cao, Fang-Rui; Wang, Qiong; Liao, Yong-Hong; Pan, Rui-le; Chang, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Microgravity-induced memory deficiency seriously affects learning and memory ability of the astronaut during spaceflight, with few effective countermeasures. Panax ginseng C. A. Mey. has been used as a nootropic herb for thousands of years in Asian countries. Saponins are recognized as its major active components. Previous studies have shown that ginseng saponins offer protection against memory deficits caused by various factors. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms of their nootropic effects are still largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the memory-improving effects of ginseng total saponins (GTS) on simulated microgravity hindlimb-unloaded rats using a metabolomics approach. After being exposed to a 7-days hindlimb unloading (HU), variations of plasmatic and hippocampal metabolic profiles of rats with and without GTS intervention were examined by a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based untargeted metabolomics method. Subsequently, 8 hippocampal neurotransmitters were determined using a LC-MS/MS method. Finally, a LC-MS/MS based targeted metabolomics was performed to validate biomarkers found in the untargeted analysis. Besides, to support the metabolomics results, passive avoidance (PA) test, Nissl staining, and plasmatic corticosterone (CORT) levels determination were performed. The results showed that HU could lead to variations of 7 neurotransmitters and significantly different plasmatic and hippocampal metabolic profiles. GTS could restore most of the imbalanced neurotransmitters, especially glutamic acid and acetylcholine, and correct the levels of various disturbed learning and memory relevant biomarkers such as asparagine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, and choline. In addition, GTS could markedly ameliorate HU-induced memory deficiency, protect hippocampal neurons from damage, and down-regulate elevated CORT levels. In conclusion, GTS exhibits memory-improving effects mainly through regulating the metabolism of amino acids

  1. Vitamin deficiencies and excesses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamins are essential nutrients that must be supplied exogenously either as part of a well balanced diet or as supplements. Deficiency states are uncommon in developed countries except, perhaps, among some food insecure families. In contrast, deficiency states are quite common in many developing ...

  2. Testosterone deficiency myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, R W; Woodrow, D F; Barrett, M C; Press, M; Dick, D J; Rowe, R C; Lane, R J

    1995-01-01

    Testosterone is recognized to have a positive effect on nitrogen balance and muscle development in hypogonadal men, but significantly myopathy secondary to testosterone deficiency has been reported only rarely. We describe a patient who presented with a myopathy associated with testosterone deficiency, and who demonstrated a significant functional and myometric response to treatment. PMID:7562829

  3. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  4. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  5. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  6. Factor X deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Factor X (ten) deficiency is a disorder caused by a lack of a protein called factor X in the blood. It leads to problems with ... or are not functioning like they should. Factor X is one such coagulation factor. Factor X deficiency ...

  7. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  8. Evaluation of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase stability in stored blood samples

    PubMed Central

    Jalil, Norunaluwar; Azma, Raja Zahratul; Mohamed, Emida; Ithnin, Azlin; Alauddin, Hafiza; Baya, Siti Noor; Othman, Ainoon

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the commonest cause of neonatal jaundice in Malaysia. Recently, OSMMR2000-D G6PD Assay Kit has been introduced to quantitate the level of G6PD activity in newborns delivered in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC). As duration of sample storage prior to analysis is one of the matters of concern, this study was conducted to identify the stability of G6PD enzyme during storage. A total of 188 cord blood samples from normal term newborns delivered at UKMMC were selected for this study. The cord bloods samples were collected in ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) tubes and refrigerated at 2-8 °C. In addition, 32 out of 188 cord blood samples were spotted on chromatography paper, air-dried and stored at room temperature. G6PD enzyme activities were measured daily for 7 days using the OSMMR2000-D G6PD Assay Kit on both the EDTA blood and dried blood samples. The mean value for G6PD activity was compared between days of analysis using Student Paired T-Test. In this study, 172 out of 188 cord blood samples showed normal enzyme levels while 16 had levels corresponding to severe enzyme deficiency. The daily mean G6PD activity for EDTA blood samples of newborns with normal G6PD activity showed a significant drop on the fourth day of storage (p < 0.005) while for samples with severely deficient G6PD activity, significant drop was seen on third day of storage (p = 0.002). Analysis of dried cord blood showed a significant reduction in enzyme activity as early as the second day of storage (p = 0.001). It was also noted that mean G6PD activity for spotted blood samples were lower compared to those in EDTA tubes for all days (p = 0.001). Thus, EDTA blood samples stored at 2-8 °C appeared to have better stability in terms of their G6PD enzyme level as compared to dried blood samples on filter paper, giving a storage time of up to 3 days. PMID:27103895

  9. Evaluation of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase stability in stored blood samples.

    PubMed

    Jalil, Norunaluwar; Azma, Raja Zahratul; Mohamed, Emida; Ithnin, Azlin; Alauddin, Hafiza; Baya, Siti Noor; Othman, Ainoon

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the commonest cause of neonatal jaundice in Malaysia. Recently, OSMMR2000-D G6PD Assay Kit has been introduced to quantitate the level of G6PD activity in newborns delivered in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC). As duration of sample storage prior to analysis is one of the matters of concern, this study was conducted to identify the stability of G6PD enzyme during storage. A total of 188 cord blood samples from normal term newborns delivered at UKMMC were selected for this study. The cord bloods samples were collected in ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) tubes and refrigerated at 2-8 °C. In addition, 32 out of 188 cord blood samples were spotted on chromatography paper, air-dried and stored at room temperature. G6PD enzyme activities were measured daily for 7 days using the OSMMR2000-D G6PD Assay Kit on both the EDTA blood and dried blood samples. The mean value for G6PD activity was compared between days of analysis using Student Paired T-Test. In this study, 172 out of 188 cord blood samples showed normal enzyme levels while 16 had levels corresponding to severe enzyme deficiency. The daily mean G6PD activity for EDTA blood samples of newborns with normal G6PD activity showed a significant drop on the fourth day of storage (p < 0.005) while for samples with severely deficient G6PD activity, significant drop was seen on third day of storage (p = 0.002). Analysis of dried cord blood showed a significant reduction in enzyme activity as early as the second day of storage (p = 0.001). It was also noted that mean G6PD activity for spotted blood samples were lower compared to those in EDTA tubes for all days (p = 0.001). Thus, EDTA blood samples stored at 2-8 °C appeared to have better stability in terms of their G6PD enzyme level as compared to dried blood samples on filter paper, giving a storage time of up to 3 days. PMID:27103895

  10. Hirsutinolide Series Inhibit Stat3 Activity, Alter GCN1, MAP1B, Hsp105, G6PD, Vimentin, TrxR1, and Importin α-2 Expression, and Induce Antitumor Effects against Human Glioma.

    PubMed

    Miklossy, Gabriella; Youn, Ui Joung; Yue, Peibin; Zhang, Mingming; Chen, Chih-Hong; Hilliard, Tyvette S; Paladino, David; Li, Yifei; Choi, Justin; Sarkaria, Jann N; Kawakami, Joel K; Wongwiwatthananukit, Supakit; Chen, Yuan; Sun, Dianqing; Chang, Leng Chee; Turkson, James

    2015-10-01

    We report that hirsutinolide series, 6, 7, 10, 11, 20, and 22, and the semisynthetic analogues, 30, 31, 33, and 36, inhibit constitutively active signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)3 and malignant glioma phenotype. A position 13 lipophilic ester group is required for activity. Molecular modeling and nuclear magnetic resonance structural analyses reveal direct hirsutinolide:Stat3 binding. One-hour treatment of cells with 6 and 22 also upregulated importin subunit α-2 levels and repressed translational activator GCN1, microtubule-associated protein (MAP)1B, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR)1 cytoplasmic isoform 3, glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase isoform a, Hsp105, vimentin, and tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein (TNAP)2 expression. Active hirsutinolides inhibited anchorage-dependent and three-dimensional spheroid growth, survival, and migration of human glioma lines and glioma patients' tumor-derived xenograft cells harboring constitutively active Stat3. Oral gavage delivery of 6 or 22 inhibited human glioma tumor growth in subcutaneous mouse xenografts. The inhibition of Stat3 signaling represents part of the hirsutinolide-mediated mechanisms to induce antitumor effects. PMID:26331426

  11. Eliminating iodine deficiency: obstacles and their removal.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Carmencita David; Fagela-Domingo, Carmelita

    2008-12-01

    Iodine deficiency remains a global concern for developing countries and some industrialised countries. Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of preventable mental retardation, posing a threat to the social and economic development of countries. Initiatives were developed and instituted to accelerate progress to achieve the goal of universal salt iodisation (USI). However, these efforts were not successful in eliminating iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) in some countries. Every year, 50 million children are born without the protection that iodine offers to the growing brain and body and about 18 million suffer some significant degree of mental impairment. The World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and non-governmental organisations assist to ensure that populations at risk have access to iodised salt. This paper will review the highlights of iodine deficiency and present the experiences in the various countries in Asia, i.e. assessments of the situation, action plans, and obstacles to implementation. PMID:19904447

  12. Betaine deficiency in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Lerma, C. ); Rich, P.J.; Ju, G.C.; Yang, Wenju; Rhodes, D. ); Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency. This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline {r arrow} betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde.

  13. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA. PMID:26728130

  14. Congenital limb deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, William R; Coulter, Colleen P; Schmitz, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Congenital limb deficiency disorders (LDDs) are birth defects characterized by the aplasia or hypoplasia of bones of the limbs. Limb deficiencies are classified as transverse, those due to intrauterine disruptions of previously normal limbs, or longitudinal, those that are isolated or associated with certain syndromes as well as chromosomal anomalies. Consultation with a medical geneticist is advisable. Long-term care should occur in a specialized limb deficiency center with expertise in orthopedics, prosthetics, and occupational and physical therapy and provide emotional support and contact with other families. With appropriate care, most children with LDDs can lead productive lives. PMID:26042905

  15. Iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of diagnostic testing and therapeutic recommendations for dogs and cats with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:22942439

  16. Thiamine deficiency and delirium.

    PubMed

    Osiezagha, Kenneth; Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C; Barker, Narviar C; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K

    2013-04-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  17. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Werder, Steven F

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1) Which patients should be tested? (2) What test should be ordered? (3) How are inferences made from such testing? (4) In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5) Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6) What is to be expected from treatment? (7) How is B12 deficiency treated? Methods On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment) and then reviewed in answering the above questions. Results The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed. Discussion Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test: 200 picograms per milliliter or less is low, and 201 to 350 picograms per milliliter is borderline low. Other tests may be indicated, including plasma

  18. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency in an adolescent white boy.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, P; Holmes, D; Ramanan, A V; Bose-Haider, B; Lewis, M J; Will, A

    2002-06-01

    Dietary deficiency of cobalamin resulting in tissue deficiency in white individuals is unusual. However, several patients with dietary deficiency who were neither vegan nor Hindu have been described. This report describes the case of a 14 year old boy who was a white non-Hindu with a very low intake of cobalamin, which was not apparent until a detailed dietary assessment was performed. The patient responded rapidly to a combination of oral and parenteral B12. This case illustrates the fact that severe dietary vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in non-Hindu white individuals. Inadequate dietary content of B12 may not be apparent until a detailed dietary assessment is performed. This patient is likely to have had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency for several years. Increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with the adolescent growth spurt may have provoked overt tissue deficiency. PMID:12037034

  19. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency in an adolescent white boy

    PubMed Central

    O'Gorman, P; Holmes, D; Ramanan, A V; Bose-Haider, B; Lewis, M J; Will, A

    2002-01-01

    Dietary deficiency of cobalamin resulting in tissue deficiency in white individuals is unusual. However, several patients with dietary deficiency who were neither vegan nor Hindu have been described. This report describes the case of a 14 year old boy who was a white non-Hindu with a very low intake of cobalamin, which was not apparent until a detailed dietary assessment was performed. The patient responded rapidly to a combination of oral and parenteral B12. This case illustrates the fact that severe dietary vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in non-Hindu white individuals. Inadequate dietary content of B12 may not be apparent until a detailed dietary assessment is performed. This patient is likely to have had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency for several years. Increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with the adolescent growth spurt may have provoked overt tissue deficiency. PMID:12037034

  20. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and white-colored blood vessels in the retinas Pancreatitis that keeps returning Yellowing of the eyes and ... discuss your diet needs with a registered dietitian. Pancreatitis that is related to lipoprotein lipase deficiency responds ...

  1. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  2. Vitamin D Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency can lead to a loss of bone density (size and strength), broken bones (fractures), muscle weakness, ... get too much calcium in their blood or urine. Careful monitoring of blood vitamin D levels will ...

  3. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... as many as 20 different proteins in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor ... You will be given fresh blood plasma or fresh frozen plasma infusions ... These treatments will correct the deficiency temporarily.

  4. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  5. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  6. Mean reticulocyte volume: a specific parameter to screen for hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuchan; Yang, Wang; Liao, Lin; Deng, Zengfu; Qiu, Yuling; Chen, Wenqiang; Lin, Faquan

    2016-02-01

    This study assessed the value of mean reticulocyte volume (MRV) for differential diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) so as to develop conventional and new specific screen indexes. Subjects in this study were divided into three groups: 53 cases in HS group, 217 cases in hemolytic anemia control group (109 cases of thalassemia (THAL), 56 cases of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase G6PD deficiency anemia, and 52 cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)), and 100 cases in healthy control group. We analyzed erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters including MRV, mean sphered corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and immature reticulocyte fraction. Results demonstrated that MRV was significantly lower in the HS group but significantly higher in the AIHA and G6PD deficiency anemia groups than that in the healthy control group (P = 0.000). MRV was not significantly different between the AIHA and G6PD deficiency anemia groups (P = 0.977) and between the healthy control and THAL groups (P = 0.168). The area under the ROC curve of MRV for diagnosis of HS was 0.942, with a standard error of 0.019, 95% confidence interval of 0.905-0.979, and optimal critical diagnosis point of 95.77 fL. When the MRV was ≤95.77 fL, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of HS were 86.80% and 91.20%, respectively. Therefore, MRV is a general and specific new index for screening HS and important for differential diagnosis of different types of hemolytic anemia. PMID:25868528

  7. Acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and marked selenium deficiency causing severe rhabdomyolysis in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Diego E.; Valberg, Stephanie J.; Magdesian, K. Gary; Hanna, Paul E.; Lofstedt, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of severe rhabdomyolysis in a pregnant mare associated with histopathologic and biochemical features of both selenium deficiency and acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) due to seasonal pasture myopathy (SPM). This case highlights the importance of assessing plasma selenium levels in horses with clinical signs of pasture myopathy as this deficiency may be a contributing or exacerbating factor. PMID:26538673

  8. VERMILION-DEFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    Bridges, C B

    1919-07-20

    In May, 1916, a culture of Drosophila melanogaster showed that a new sex-linked lethal had arisen. The linkage relations indicated that the position of the lethal was in the neighborhood of the sex-linked recessive "vermilion," whose locus in the X chromosome is at 33.0. When females heterozygous for the lethal were outcrossed to vermilion males, all the daughters that received the lethal-bearing chromosome showed vermilion eye-color, though, from the pedigree, vermilion was known to be absent from the ancestry of the mother. The lethal action and the unexpected appearance of vermilion both suggested that this was another instance of the phenomenon called "deficiency;" that is, the loss or "inactivation" of the genes of a section of the X chromosome. The lethal action would then be due to the deficient region including one or more genes necessary for the life of the individual. The appearance of vermilion in females carrying only one vermilion gene would be explainable on the ground that the deficient-bearing females are virtually haploid for the region including the vermilion locus. Linkage tests showed that the amount of crossing over in the neighborhood of the deficiency was cut down by about five units. Part of this may be attributed to the actual length of the "deficient" region, within which it is probable that no crossing over occurs, and part (probably most) to an alteration in the synaptic relations in the regions immediately adjacent. In more remote regions there was no disturbance or perhaps a slight rise in the frequency of crossing over. Both the local fall and the possible rise in more distant regions would seem to argue that a "pucker" at synapsis had been caused by an actual shortening of the deficient chromosome. That the deficient region extends to the left of the locus of vermilion was indicated by a test in which it was observed that the presence of an extra piece of chromosome including the loci for vermilion and sable ("vermilion

  9. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  10. A re-assessment of sucrose signaling involved in cluster-root formation and function in phosphate-deficient white lupin (Lupinus albus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengrui; Shen, Jianbo; Ludewig, Uwe; Neumann, Günter

    2015-07-01

    Apart from substrate functions, a signaling role of sucrose in root growth regulation is well established. This raised the question whether sucrose signals might also be involved in formation of cluster-roots (CRs) under phosphate (Pi) limitation, mediating exudation of phosphorus (P)-mobilizing root exudates, e.g. in Lupinus albus and members of the Proteaceae. Earlier studies demonstrated that CR formation in L. albus was mimicked to some extent by external application of high sucrose concentrations (25 mM) in the presence of extremely high P supply (1-10 mM), usually suppressing CR formation. In this study, we re-addressed this question using an axenic hydroponic culture system with normal P supply (0.1 mM) and a range of sucrose applications (0.25-25 mM). The 2.5 mM sucrose concentration was comparable with internal sucrose levels in the zone of CR initiation in first-order laterals of P-deficient plants (3.4 mM) and induced the same CR morphology. Similar to earlier studies, high sucrose concentrations (25 mM) resulted in root thickening and inhibition of root elongation, associated with a 10-fold increase of the internal sucrose level. The sucrose analog palatinose and a combination of glucose/fructose failed to stimulate CR formation under P-sufficient conditions, demonstrating a signal function of sucrose and excluding osmotic or carbon source effects. In contrast to earlier findings, sucrose was able to induce CR formation but had no effect on CR functioning with respect to citrate exudation, in vitro activity and expression of genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, secretory acid phosphatase and MATE transporters, mediating P-mobilizing functions of CRs. PMID:25412792

  11. Zinc deficiency in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Katz, R L; Keen, C L; Litt, I F; Hurley, L S; Kellams-Harrison, K M; Glader, L J

    1987-09-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa were evaluated for clinical and biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency. To assess whether these patients would benefit from zinc supplementation, a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The mean zinc intake of the anorexic group calculated on the basis of three-day dietary records was 7.7 +/- 5.2 mg/day, which is significantly below the recommended daily allowance of 15 mg for adolescents (p less than 0.001). The mean urinary zinc excretion in the anorexic group was 257.1 +/- 212.7 micrograms/24 hours compared to 749.9 +/- 897.8 micrograms/24 hours in the control group (p less than 0.005). This result suggests that the zinc status of anorexia nervosa patients may be compromised due to an inadequate zinc intake. Zinc supplementation (50 mg elemental zinc/day) was followed by a decrease in the level of depression and anxiety as assessed by the Zung Depression Scale (p less than 0.05) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (p less than 0.05), respectively. Our data suggest that individuals with anorexia nervosa may be at risk for zinc deficiency and may respond favorably after zinc supplementation. PMID:3312133

  12. Iodine Deficiency in School Children in Aligarh District, India.

    PubMed

    Aslami, Ahmad Nadeem; Ansari, Mohammed A; Khalique, N; Kapil, Umesh

    2016-08-01

    We carried out this study to assess iodine deficiency disorders among school children of 6-12 years age group in Aligarh district of India. The prevalence of goiter was 5.2%. Median Urinary Iodine Excretion level was 150 ug/L; 22.5% of students had biochemical iodine deficiency. 50.4% households were consuming adequately iodized salt. PMID:27567653

  13. 26 CFR 301.6211-1 - Deficiency defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Deficiency defined. 301.6211-1 Section 301.6211-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6211-1 Deficiency defined. (a) In...

  14. 26 CFR 301.6211-1 - Deficiency defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deficiency defined. 301.6211-1 Section 301.6211-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6211-1 Deficiency defined. (a) In...

  15. Addressing Perceived Skill Deficiencies in Student Affairs Graduate Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Jay; Mitchell, Donald, Jr.; Eckerle, Kayle; Martin, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    This article explores existing literature on perceived skill deficiencies among entry-level student affairs practitioners. Through a review of recent literature, seven perceived skill deficiencies were identified, including budgeting and financial management, strategic planning, research and assessment, legal knowledge and standards, supervision,…

  16. 26 CFR 301.6212-1 - Notice of deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice of deficiency. 301.6212-1 Section 301.6212-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6212-1 Notice of deficiency. (a) General rule. If a district director...

  17. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment. PMID:26314490

  18. Blood phenylalanine concentrations in patients with PAH-deficient hyperphenylalaninaemia off diet without and with three different single oral doses of tetrahydrobiopterin: assessing responsiveness in a model of statistical process control.

    PubMed

    Lindner, M; Gramer, G; Garbade, S F; Burgard, P

    2009-08-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor loading is a standard procedure to differentiate defects of BH(4) metabolism from phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) deficiency. BH(4) responsiveness also exists in PAH-deficient patients with high residual PAH activity. Unexpectedly, single cases with presumed nil residual PAH activity have been reported to be BH(4) responsive, too. BH(4) responsiveness has been defined either by a >or=30% reduction of blood Phe concentration after a single BH(4) dose or by a decline greater than the individual circadian Phe level variation. Since both methods have methodological disadvantages, we present a model of statistical process control (SPC) to assess BH(4) responsiveness. Phe levels in 17 adult PKU patients of three phenotypic groups off diet were compared without and with three different single oral dosages of BH(4) applied in a double-blind randomized cross-over design. Results are compared for >or=30% reduction and SPC. The effect of BH(4) by >or=30% reduction was significant for groups (p < 0.01) but not for dose (p = 0.064), with no interaction of group with dose (p = 0.24). SPC revealed significant effects for group (p < 0.01) and the interaction for group with dose (p < 0.05) but not for dose alone (p = 0.87). After one or more loadings, seven patients would be judged to be BH(4) responsive either by the 30% criterion or by the SPC model, but only three by both. Results for patients with identical PAH genotype were not very consistent within (for different BH(4) doses) and between the two models. We conclude that a comparison of protein loadings without and with BH(4) combined with a standardized procedure for data analysis and decision would increase the reliability of diagnostic results. PMID:19513811

  19. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left. PMID:25759629

  20. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  1. Natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer, and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of individuals who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically-defined congenital immunodeficiency of which there are over forty presently known to impair NK cells. The abnormality of NK cells, however, in certain cases represents the majority immunological defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in three different genes that can cause NK cell deficiency as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation. PMID:23993353

  2. Thiamine Deficiency and Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C.; Barker, Narviar C.; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K.

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke’s encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  3. Update on vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Langan, Robert C; Zawistoski, Kimberly J

    2011-06-15

    Vitamin B(12) (cobalamin) deficiency is a common cause of megaloblastic anemia, a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms, and elevated serum homocysteine levels, especially in older persons. There are a number of risk factors for vitamin B(12) deficiency, including prolonged use of metformin and proton pump inhibitors. No major medical organizations, including the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, have published guidelines on screening asymptomatic or low-risk adults for vitamin B(12) deficiency, but high-risk patients, such as those with malabsorptive disorders, may warrant screening. The initial laboratory assessment of a patient with suspected vitamin B(12) deficiency should include a complete blood count and a serum vitamin B(12) level. Measurements of serum vitamin B(12) may not reliably detect deficiency, and measurement of serum homocysteine and/or methylmalonic acid should be used to confirm deficiency in asymptomatic high-risk patients with low normal levels of vitamin B(12). Oral administration of high-dose vitamin B(12) (1 to 2 mg daily) is as effective as intramuscular administration in correcting the deficiency, regardless of etiology. Because crystalline formulations are better absorbed than naturally occurring vitamin B(12), patients older than 50 years and strict vegetarians should consume foods fortified with vitamin B(12) and vitamin B(12) supplements, rather than attempting to get vitamin B(12) strictly from dietary sources. Administration of vitamin B(12) to patients with elevated serum homocysteine levels has not been shown to reduce cardiovascular outcomes in high-risk patients or alter the cognitive decline of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease. PMID:21671542

  4. Color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannorren, D.

    1982-04-01

    Congenital and acquired color vision defects are described in the context of physiological data. Light sources, photometry, color systems and test methods are described. A list of medicines is also presented. The practical social consequences of color vision deficiencies are discussed.

  5. Arginase-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Baron, Garrett; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Arginase-1 (ARG1) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects the liver-based urea cycle, leading to impaired ureagenesis. This genetic disorder is caused by 40+ mutations found fairly uniformly spread throughout the ARG1 gene, resulting in partial or complete loss of enzyme function, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. ARG1-deficient patients exhibit hyperargininemia with spastic paraparesis, progressive neurological and intellectual impairment, persistent growth retardation, and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, a clinical pattern that differs strikingly from other urea cycle disorders. This review briefly highlights the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of ARG1 deficiency derived from clinical case reports and therapeutic strategies stretching over several decades and reports on several exciting new developments regarding the pathophysiology of the disorder using ARG1 global and inducible knockout mouse models. Gene transfer studies in these mice are revealing potential therapeutic options that can be exploited in the future. However, caution is advised in extrapolating results since the lethal disease phenotype in mice is much more severe than in humans indicating that the mouse models may not precisely recapitulate human disease etiology. Finally, some of the functions and implications of ARG1 in non-urea cycle activities are considered. Lingering questions and future areas to be addressed relating to the clinical manifestations of ARG1 deficiency in liver and brain are also presented. Hopefully, this review will spark invigorated research efforts that lead to treatments with better clinical outcomes. PMID:26467175

  6. Assessment of global cardiac uptake of Radiolabeled Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice: implications for imaging cardiovascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, André Luís Branco; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Mikitsh, John L.; Zaki, Ajlan Al; Salavati, Ali; Saboury, Babak; Tsourkas, Andrew; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of death in industrialized countries and is characterized by the accumulation of lipids and inflammatory cells, including macrophages, in blood vessel walls. Therefore, the ability to image macrophages could help identify plaques that are precursors of acute thrombotic events. Previous research has shown that long-circulating, nanoparticles could be used to detect macrophages within atherosclerotic plaques of the aorta. By conducting this study, we investigated whether global cardiac uptake of radiolabeled nanoparticles could allow assessment of total macrophage burden in the coronary arteries. Procedures Dextran-coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (IONPs) were labeled with iodine-125 via Bolton-Hunter (SHPP) method. IONPs were characterized by means of dynamic light scattering and transmission electronic microscopy. Biodistribution studies were performed in healthy and atherosclerotic mice. Additionally, digital autoradiography of hearts from both healthy and atherosclerotic mice was performed to assess regional and global atherosclerotic burden. Results The [125I]IONPs exhibited high radiolabel stability and long blood circulation, which eventually led to high heart uptake in apoE −/− mice when compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, digital autoradiography showed substantially enhanced emission of signals from the hearts of atherosclerotic mice, while no or minimal cardiac signals were detected in healthy mice. Conclusions This preparation showed adequate physical-chemical properties for in vivo studies, such as small size (~30 nm), good radiolabel stability, and long circulation time. There was also significant accumulation in the heart of apoE−/− mice compared with that of healthy control animals. These findings suggest that radiolabeled dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles may have potential to become a useful tool to detect macrophages in the atherosclerosis plaques of coronary arteries; however, these

  7. Genetics Home Reference: biotinidase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aydin HI, Sennaroğlu L, Belgin E, Jensen K, Wolf B. Hearing loss in biotinidase deficiency: genotype-phenotype ... corrected to Aydin, Halil Ibrahim]. Citation on PubMed Wolf B. Biotinidase deficiency: "if you have to have ...

  8. Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... takes longer than normal to clot in a test tube. Factor XII deficiency is a rare inherited disorder. Symptoms There are usually no symptoms. Exams and Tests Factor XII deficiency is most often found when ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: pseudocholinesterase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is a condition that results in increased sensitivity to certain muscle relaxant drugs used during general ... People with pseudocholinesterase deficiency may also have increased sensitivity to certain other drugs, including the local anesthetic ...

  10. A review of critical factors for assessing the dermal absorption of metal oxide nanoparticles from sunscreens applied to humans, and a research strategy to address current deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Gulson, Brian; McCall, Maxine J; Bowman, Diana M; Pinheiro, Teresa

    2015-11-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles in sunscreens provide broad-spectrum ultraviolet protection to skin. All studies to assess dermal penetration of nanoparticles have unanimously concluded that the overwhelming majority of nanoparticles remain on the outer surface of the skin. However, possibly due to many different experimental protocols in use, conclusions over the potential penetration to viable skin are mixed. Here, we review several factors that may influence experimental results for dermal penetration including the species studied (human, or animal model), size and coating of the metal oxide nanoparticles, composition of the sunscreen formulation, site of sunscreen application, dose and number of applications, duration of the study, types of biological samples analysed, methods for analysing samples, exposure to UV and skin flexing. Based on this information, we suggest an appropriate research agenda involving international collaboration that maximises the potential for dermal absorption of nanoparticles, and their detection, under normal conditions of sunscreen use by humans. If results from this research agenda indicate no absorption is observed, then concerns over adverse health effects from the dermal absorption of nanoparticles in sunscreens may be allayed. PMID:26140917

  11. Transient partial growth hormone deficiency due to zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Aihara, K; Fujie, A; Kihara, M

    1989-04-01

    We present here a 13-year-old boy with partial growth hormone deficiency due to chronic mild zinc deficiency. When zinc administration was started, his growth rate, growth hormone levels, and plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly. His poor dietary intake resulted in chronic mild zinc deficiency, which in turn could be the cause of a further loss of appetite and growth retardation. There was also a possibility of renal zinc wasting which may have contributed to zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency should be carefully ruled out in patients with growth retardation. PMID:2708733

  12. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) is a severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism first described in 1978. It is characterized by a neonatal presentation of intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, microcephaly with brain atrophy and coarse facial features. MoCD results in deficiency of the molybdenum cofactor dependent enzymes sulfite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. The resultant accumulation of sulfite, taurine, S-sulfocysteine and thiosulfate contributes to the severe neurological impairment. Recently, initial evidence has demonstrated early treatment with cyclic PMP can turn MoCD type A from a previously neonatal lethal condition with only palliative options, to near normal neurological outcomes in affected patients. We review MoCD and focus on describing the currently published evidence of this exciting new therapeutic option for MoCD type A caused by pathogenic variants in MOCD1. PMID:26653176

  13. Primaquine plus artemisinin combination therapy for reduction of malaria transmission: promise and risk.

    PubMed

    John, Chandy C

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of gametocyte transmission from humans to mosquitoes is a key component of malaria elimination. The study by Gonçalves and colleagues provides valuable new data on how the addition of low-dose primaquine to artemether-lumefantrine affects reduction of gametocytemia and transmission of gametocytes to mosquitoes in asymptomatically Plasmodium falciparum-infected children without G6PD deficiency, and on the degree to which low-dose primaquine affects hemoglobin levels in these children. The study sets the stage for future research required for consideration of an artemisinin combination therapy (ACT)-primaquine regimen in mass drug administration campaigns. Future studies will need to evaluate toxicity in adults and G6PD deficient persons, assess gametocyte transmission from adults, evaluate different ACT drugs with primaquine, and assess the implications of "rare" toxicities in large treatment populations, such as hemolysis requiring blood transfusion. The study highlights both the promise and the potential risk of ACT-primaquine treatment in malaria elimination campaigns.Please see related article: https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-016-0581-y . PMID:27039396

  14. NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional assessment is an essential component of the history and physical examination of children with gastrointestinal disorders. Protein-energy malnutrition, linear growth failure, overweight, and iron deficiency anemia frequently complicate the clinical course of common gastrointestinal proble...

  15. Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Erin K; Colman, Roberta F; Patterson, David

    2006-01-01

    Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency is a disease of purine metabolism which affects patients both biochemically and behaviorally. The symptoms are variable and include psychomotor retardation, autistic features, hypotonia, and seizures. Patients also accumulate the substrates of ADSL in body fluids. Both the presence of normal levels of ADSL enzyme activities in some patient tissues and the absence of a clear correlation between mutations, biochemistry, and behavior show that the system has unexplored biochemical and/or genetic complexity. It is unclear whether the pathological mechanisms of this disease result from a deficiency of purines, a toxicity of intermediates, or perturbation of another pathway or system. A patient with autistic features and mild psychomotor delay carries two novel mutations in this gene, E80D and D87E. The creation of a mouse model of this disease will be an important step in elucidating the in vivo mechanisms of the disease. Mice carrying mutations that cause ADSL deficiency in humans will be informative as to the effects of these mutations both during embryogenesis and on the brain, possibly leading to therapies for this disease in the future. PMID:16839792

  16. Primary antibody deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wood, P

    2009-03-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are a group of rare disorders characterized by an inability to produce clinically effective immunoglobulin responses. Some of these disorders result from genetic mutations in genes involved in B cell development, whereas others appear to be complex polygenic disorders. They most commonly present with recurrent infections due to encapsulated bacteria, although in the most common antibody deficiency, Common Variable Immunodeficiency, systemic and organ-specific autoimmunity can be a presenting feature. Diagnostic delay in this group of disorders remains a problem, and the laboratory has a vital role in the detection of abnormalities in immunoglobulin concentration and function. It is critical to distinguish this group of disorders from secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinaemia, in particular lymphoid malignancy, and appropriate laboratory investigations are of critical importance. Treatment of primary antibody deficiencies involves immunoglobulin replacement therapy, either via the intravenous or subcutaneous route. Patients remain at risk of a wide variety of complications, not all linked to diagnostic delay and inadequate therapy. In common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) in particular, patients remain at significantly increased risk of lymphoid malignancy, and regular clinical and laboratory monitoring is required. This review aims to give an overview of these conditions for the general reader, covering pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory investigation, therapy and clinical management. PMID:19151170

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  18. 13c-SUCROSE BREATH TEST TO DIFFERENTIATE CONGENITAL SUCRASE-ISOMALTASE DEFICIENCY FROM PANDISACCHARIDASE DEFICIENCY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A substrate-paired breath test using 13C-sucrose (S) and 13C-glucose (G) has been developed to assess congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency (CSID). The aim was to determine if CSID could be detected without duodenal enzyme assay. Methods: Two patients (1F:1M, aged 1 & 15 yrs) wi...

  19. The GSK3/Shaggy-Like Kinase ASKα Contributes to Pattern-Triggered Immunity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Marion

    2016-01-01

    The first layer of immunity against pathogenic microbes relies on the detection of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to activate pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). Despite the increasing knowledge of early PTI signaling mediated by PRRs and their associated proteins, many downstream signaling components remain elusive. Here, we identify the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE KINASE3 (GSK3)/Shaggy-like kinase ASKα as a positive regulator of plant immune signaling. The perception of several unrelated PAMPs rapidly induced ASKα kinase activity. Loss of ASKα attenuated, whereas its overexpression enhanced, diverse PTI responses, ultimately affecting susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the key enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, provides reducing equivalents important for defense responses and is a direct target of ASKα. ASKα phosphorylates cytosolic G6PD6 on an evolutionarily conserved threonine residue, thereby stimulating its activity. Plants deficient for or overexpressing G6PD6 showed a modified immune response, and the insensitivity of g6pd6 mutant plants to PAMP-induced growth inhibition was complemented by a phosphomimetic but not by a phosphonegative G6PD6 version. Overall, our data provide evidence that ASKα and G6PD6 constitute an immune signaling module downstream of PRRs, linking protein phosphorylation cascades to metabolic regulation. PMID:27208232

  20. The GSK3/Shaggy-Like Kinase ASKα Contributes to Pattern-Triggered Immunity.

    PubMed

    Stampfl, Hansjörg; Fritz, Marion; Dal Santo, Silvia; Jonak, Claudia

    2016-06-01

    The first layer of immunity against pathogenic microbes relies on the detection of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to activate pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). Despite the increasing knowledge of early PTI signaling mediated by PRRs and their associated proteins, many downstream signaling components remain elusive. Here, we identify the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE KINASE3 (GSK3)/Shaggy-like kinase ASKα as a positive regulator of plant immune signaling. The perception of several unrelated PAMPs rapidly induced ASKα kinase activity. Loss of ASKα attenuated, whereas its overexpression enhanced, diverse PTI responses, ultimately affecting susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the key enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, provides reducing equivalents important for defense responses and is a direct target of ASKα. ASKα phosphorylates cytosolic G6PD6 on an evolutionarily conserved threonine residue, thereby stimulating its activity. Plants deficient for or overexpressing G6PD6 showed a modified immune response, and the insensitivity of g6pd6 mutant plants to PAMP-induced growth inhibition was complemented by a phosphomimetic but not by a phosphonegative G6PD6 version. Overall, our data provide evidence that ASKα and G6PD6 constitute an immune signaling module downstream of PRRs, linking protein phosphorylation cascades to metabolic regulation. PMID:27208232

  1. Lower reference limits of quantitative cord glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase estimated from healthy term neonates according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute guidelines: a cross sectional retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported the lower reference limit (LRL) of quantitative cord glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), but they have not used approved international statistical methodology. Using common standards is expecting to yield more true findings. Therefore, we aimed to estimate LRL of quantitative G6PD detection in healthy term neonates by using statistical analyses endorsed by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) for reference interval estimation. Methods This cross sectional retrospective study was performed at King Abdulaziz Hospital, Saudi Arabia, between March 2010 and June 2012. The study monitored consecutive neonates born to mothers from one Arab Muslim tribe that was assumed to have a low prevalence of G6PD-deficiency. Neonates that satisfied the following criteria were included: full-term birth (37 weeks); no admission to the special care nursery; no phototherapy treatment; negative direct antiglobulin test; and fathers of female neonates were from the same mothers’ tribe. The G6PD activity (Units/gram Hemoglobin) was measured spectrophotometrically by an automated kit. This study used statistical analyses endorsed by IFCC and CLSI for reference interval estimation. The 2.5th percentiles and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated as LRLs, both in presence and absence of outliers. Results 207 males and 188 females term neonates who had cord blood quantitative G6PD testing met the inclusion criteria. Method of Horn detected 20 G6PD values as outliers (8 males and 12 females). Distributions of quantitative cord G6PD values exhibited a normal distribution in absence of the outliers only. The Harris-Boyd method and proportion criteria revealed that combined gender LRLs were reliable. The combined bootstrap LRL in presence of the outliers was 10.0 (95% CI: 7.5-10.7) and the combined parametric LRL in absence of the outliers was 11

  2. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  3. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  4. Hereditary anaemias in Portugal: epidemiology, public health significance, and control.

    PubMed Central

    Martins, M C; Olim, G; Melo, J; Magalhães, H A; Rodrigues, M O

    1993-01-01

    A countrywide prospective study aimed at establishing the prevalence of the haemoglobinopathy genes in the Portuguese population was carried out by screening 15,208 randomly selected blood samples from young males. This male based survey provided the opportunity of assessing simultaneously the prevalence of the red cell enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, thus giving a picture of these important hereditary anaemias in Portugal. The results showed a low average frequency of beta thalassaemia (0.45%) and haemoglobin S (0.32%) carriers as well as G6PD deficiency (0.51%). However, these disorders are unevenly distributed throughout the country with a higher prevalence in some areas, mainly in the south. The relationship of this pattern of haemoglobinopathies to the known haplotypes linked to beta thalassaemia and sickle cell disease, relevant historical events, and local selective pressure was investigated. Hb D and Hb J are the commonest other structural variants. The implemented programme for control of these hereditary anaemias is described. PMID:8474108

  5. Antithrombin deficiency in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Durai, Shivani; Tan, Lay Kok; Lim, Serene

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 39-year-old, gravida 3 para 2, Chinese female with a history of inherited type 1 Antithrombin deficiency and multiple prior episodes of venous thromboembolism. She presented at 29+4 weeks' gestation with severe pre-eclampsia complicated by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome. She subsequently underwent an emergency caesarean section for non-reassuring fetal status, which was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony, requiring a B-Lynch suture intraoperatively. PMID:27207982

  6. Nasal Tip Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cerkes, Nazim

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tip deficiency can be congenital or secondary to previous nasal surgeries. Underdeveloped medial crura usually present with underprojected tip and lack of tip definition. Weakness or malposition of lateral crura causes alar rim retraction and lateral nasal wall weakness. Structural grafting of alar cartilages strengthens the tip framework, reinforces the disrupted support mechanisms, and controls the position of the nasal tip. In secondary cases, anatomic reconstruction of the weakened or interrupted alar cartilages and reconstitution of a stable nasal tip tripod must be the goal for a predictable outcome. PMID:26616702

  7. Disialotransferrin developmental deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansson, B; Andersson, M; Tonnby, B; Hagberg, B

    1989-01-01

    Seven mentally deficient children and adolescents (three pairs of siblings and one singleton) were studied. A peculiar external appearance, a characteristic neurohepatosubcutaneous tissue impairment syndrome and, as a biological marker, an abnormal sialic acid transferrin pattern were characteristic features. All seven seemed odd from birth and prone to acute cerebral dysfunction during catabolic states. Abnormal lower neurone, cerebellar, and retinal functions dominated from later childhood. The disialotransferrin pattern found in serum and cerebrospinal fluid is thought to be the biological marker of a newly discovered inborn error of glycoprotein metabolism with autosomal recessive inheritance. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 p74-b PMID:2466439

  8. Immune deficiency: changing spectrum of pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Duraisingham, S S; Manson, A; Grigoriadou, S; Buckland, M; Tong, C Y W; Longhurst, H J

    2015-01-01

    Current UK national standards recommend routine bacteriology surveillance in severe antibody-deficient patients, but less guidance exists on virology screening and viral infections in these patients. In this retrospective audit, we assessed the proportion of positive virology or bacteriology respiratory and stool samples from patients with severe, partial or no immune deficiency during a 2-year period. Medical notes were reviewed to identify symptomatic viral infections and to describe the course of persistent viral infections. During the 2-year period, 31 of 78 (39·7%) severe immune-deficient patients tested had a positive virology result and 89 of 160 (55.6%) had a positive bacteriology result. The most commonly detected pathogens were rhinovirus (12 patients), norovirus (6), Haemophilus influenzae (24), Pseudomonas spp. (22) and Staphylococcus aureus (21). Ninety-seven per cent of positive viral detection samples were from patients who were symptomatic. Low serum immunoglobulin IgA levels were more prevalent in patients with a positive virology sample compared to the total cohort (P = 0·0078). Three patients had persistent norovirus infection with sequential positive isolates for 9, 30 and 16 months. Virology screening of symptomatic antibody-deficient patients may be useful as a guide to anti-microbial treatment. A proportion of these patients may experience persistent viral infections with significant morbidity. PMID:25677249

  9. Learning the oral and cutaneous signs of micronutrient deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Mitchell V; Drinane, James J

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process that is influenced by multiple systemic factors, including nutritional status. While nutritional support is commonly recognized as an important aspect of comprehensive wound management, the focus is typically on replacement of macronutrients, specifically calories and protein. Our experience strongly suggests that micronutrients are equally important, that micronutrient deficiencies are common, and that correction of these deficiencies frequently leads to wound healing when incorporated into a comprehensive wound management program. This article provides guidelines for assessment and management of micronutrient deficiencies. PMID:24595176

  10. Iron deficiency in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Lawrence P

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) and related anaemia (IDA) during pregnancy are highly prevalent worldwide in both developed and developing nations although the causes are often different. At conception, many women lack sufficient iron stores to meet the increased requirements of pregnancy, which are calculated at approximately 1200 mg. Appraisal of iron status in pregnant women is problematic, however the most reliable available diagnostic test is a serum ferritin < 20 µg/L. ID is often associated with other nutritional disorders, and there is frequently a secondary cause or association. A greater oral intake is usually insufficient to meet the increased demands of pregnancy, however regular oral supplements (given either daily or intermittently) can often meet maternal needs and avoid associated neonatal complications of IDA. Over-treatment with iron should be avoided, but intravenous administration is useful when deficiency is discovered late, is severe, or if the woman is intolerant of oral formulations. This paper reviews the current literature, and addresses differences in the prevalence and causes of ID betwen developed and developing nations. It examines gestational iron requirements, distinguishes between ID and IDA, and highlights difficulties in diagnostic testing. Finally, it appraises the evidence for and against different treatment regimens, ranging from food fortification to intravenous iron infusions, according to availability and to need.

  11. Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Alshishtawy, Moeness Moustafa

    2012-01-01

    Recently, scientists have generated a strong body of evidence providing new information about the preventive effect of vitamin D on a broad range of disorders. This evidence suggests that vitamin D is much more than a nutrient needed for bone health; it is an essential hormone required for regulation of a large number of physiological functions. Sufficient concentration of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is essential for optimising human health. This article reviews the present state-of-the-art knowledge about vitamin D’s status worldwide and refers to recent articles discussing some of the general background of vitamin D, including sources, benefits, deficiencies, and dietary requirements, especially in pregnancy. They offer evidence that vitamin D deficiency could be a major public health burden in many parts of the world, mostly because of sun deprivation. The article also discusses the debate about optimal concentration of circulating serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and explores different views on the amount of vitamin D supplementation required to achieve and maintain this concentration. PMID:22548132

  12. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  13. Zinc deficiency and eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Humphries, L; Vivian, B; Stuart, M; McClain, C J

    1989-12-01

    Decreased food intake, a cyclic pattern of eating, and weight loss are major manifestations of zinc deficiency. In this study, zinc status was evaluated in 62 patients with bulimia and 24 patients with anorexia nervosa. Forty percent of patients with bulimia and 54% of those with anorexia nervosa had biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency. The authors suggest that for a variety of reasons, such as lower dietary intake of zinc, impaired zinc absorption, vomiting, diarrhea, and binging on low-zinc foods, patients with eating disorders may develop zinc deficiency. This acquired zinc deficiency could then add to the chronicity of altered eating behavior in those patients. PMID:2600063

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cannell, J J; Hollis, B W; Zasloff, M; Heaney, R P

    2008-01-01

    The recent discovery--in a randomised, controlled trial--that daily ingestion of 1100 IU of colecalciferol (vitamin D) over a 4-year period dramatically reduced the incidence of non-skin cancers makes it difficult to overstate the potential medical, social and economic implications of treating vitamin D deficiency. Not only are such deficiencies common, probably the rule, vitamin D deficiency stands implicated in a host of diseases other than cancer. The metabolic product of vitamin D is a potent, pleiotropic, repair and maintenance, secosteroid hormone that targets > 200 human genes in a wide variety of tissues, meaning it has as many mechanisms of action as genes it targets. A common misconception is that government agencies designed present intake recommendations to prevent or treat vitamin D deficiency. They did not. Instead, they are guidelines to prevent particular metabolic bone diseases. Official recommendations were never designed and are not effective in preventing or treating vitamin D deficiency and in no way limit the freedom of the physician--or responsibility--to do so. At this time, assessing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D is the only way to make the diagnosis and to assure that treatment is adequate and safe. The authors believe that treatment should be sufficient to maintain levels found in humans living naturally in a sun-rich environment, that is, > 40 ng/ml, year around. Three treatment modalities exist: sunlight, artificial ultraviolet B radiation or supplementation. All treatment modalities have their potential risks and benefits. Benefits of all treatment modalities outweigh potential risks and greatly outweigh the risk of no treatment. As a prolonged 'vitamin D winter', centred on the winter solstice, occurs at many temperate latitudes, < or = 5000 IU (125 microg) of vitamin D/day may be required in obese, aged and/or dark-skinned patients to maintain adequate levels during the winter, a dose that makes many physicians uncomfortable. PMID

  15. Deficiencies in structured medical abstracts.

    PubMed

    Froom, P; Froom, J

    1993-07-01

    This study was carried out to determine if the content of structured abstracts conforms with recommendations of the Ad Hoc Working Group for the critical appraisal of the medical literature as adopted by the Annals of Internal Medicine. The study design was a survey. All articles published in Annals of Internal Medicine in 1991, excluding editorials, case-reports, literature reviews, decision analysis, studies in medical education, descriptive studies of clinical and basic phenomena, and papers lacking a structured abstract, were studied. Of a total of 150 articles, 20 were excluded. The abstract and text of each article were assessed for the presence of the following items; patient selection criteria, statements concerning extrapolation of findings, need for further study, and whether or not the information should be used now. Number of refusers, drop outs and reason(s) for drop outs were assessed for intervention and prospective cohort studies only. Deficiencies of assessed items were noted in both abstracts and texts. For abstracts, patient selection criteria, numbers of refusers, number of drop outs and reason(s) for drop outs were reported in 44.6% (58/130), 3.1% (4/130), 16.9% (14/83) and 2.4% (2/83) respectively. These items were reported more frequently in the texts 87.7% (114/130), 9.2% (12/130), 60.2% (50/83) and 37.3% (31/83) respectively (p < 0.05). Statements concerning extrapolation of findings, need for further study and use of information now were also more frequent in texts than abstracts (p < 0.0001). A large number of structured abstracts published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 1991, lack information recommended by the Ad Hoc Working Group. Our findings should not be extrapolated to other journals requiring structured abstracts. PMID:8326342

  16. Essential fatty acid deficiency in mice impairs lactose digestion.

    PubMed

    Lukovac, S; Los, E L; Stellaard, F; Rings, E H H M; Verkade, H J

    2008-09-01

    Essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency in mice induces fat malabsorption. We previously reported indications that the underlying mechanism is located at the level of the intestinal mucosa. We have investigated the effects of EFA deficiency on small intestinal morphology and function. Mice were fed an EFA-deficient or control diet for 8 wk. A 72-h fat balance, the EFA status, and small intestinal histology were determined. Carbohydrate absorptive and digestive capacities were assessed by stable isotope methodology after administration of [U-(13)C]glucose and [1-(13)C]lactose. The mRNA expression and enzyme activity of lactase, and concentrations of the EFA linoleic acid (LA) were measured in small intestinal mucosa. Mice fed the EFA-deficient diet were markedly EFA-deficient with a profound fat malabsorption. EFA deficiency did not affect the histology or proliferative capacity of the small intestine. Blood [13C6]glucose appearance and disappearance were similar in both groups, indicating unaffected monosaccharide absorption. In contrast, blood appearance of [13C]glucose, originating from [1-(13)C]lactose, was delayed in EFA-deficient mice. EFA deficiency profoundly reduced lactase activity (-58%, P<0.01) and mRNA expression (-55%, P<0.01) in mid-small intestine. Both lactase activity and its mRNA expression strongly correlated with mucosal LA concentrations (r=0.77 and 0.79, respectively, P<0.01). EFA deficiency in mice inhibits the capacity to digest lactose but does not affect small intestinal histology. These data underscore the observation that EFA deficiency functionally impairs the small intestine, which in part may be mediated by low LA levels in the enterocytes. PMID:18653724

  17. 12 CFR 204.6 - Charges for reserve deficiencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Section 19(1) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 505) as implemented in 12 CFR part 263. In addition.... Charges shall be assessed on the basis of daily average deficiencies during each maintenance period... to exercise the waiver privilege and assess all charges regardless of amount or reason for...

  18. Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.

    Research findings on college instruction and basic skills deficiencies are discussed in 12 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching. Titles and authors are as follows: "Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies" (Susanne D. Roueche, with responses by Gary B. Donart, Betty Harris, and James Nordyke); "Is Higher Education an…

  19. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  20. How prevalent is vitamin B(12) deficiency among vegetarians?

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Roman; Parrott, Scott James; Raj, Sudha; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Lucus, Debbie

    2013-02-01

    Vegetarians are at risk for vitamin B(12) (B12) deficiency due to suboptimal intake. The goal of the present literature review was to assess the rate of B12 depletion and deficiency among vegetarians and vegans. Using a PubMed search to identify relevant publications, 18 articles were found that reported B12 deficiency rates from studies that identified deficiency by measuring methylmalonic acid, holo-transcobalamin II, or both. The deficiency rates reported for specific populations were as follows: 62% among pregnant women, between 25% and almost 86% among children, 21-41% among adolescents, and 11-90% among the elderly. Higher rates of deficiency were reported among vegans compared with vegetarians and among individuals who had adhered to a vegetarian diet since birth compared with those who had adopted such a diet later in life. The main finding of this review is that vegetarians develop B12 depletion or deficiency regardless of demographic characteristics, place of residency, age, or type of vegetarian diet. Vegetarians should thus take preventive measures to ensure adequate intake of this vitamin, including regular consumption of supplements containing B12. PMID:23356638

  1. Determining Functional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandehloo, Niloofar; Vakili, Masoud; Hashemian, Zahra; Zare Zardini, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevated concentration of serum total homocysteine usually occurs in vitamin B-12 deficiency. This metabolite can be measured and used for screening functional vitamin B-12 deficiency. Objectives: We assessed functional vitamin B12 deficiency in Tehranian elderly admitted to elderly research center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences. Patients and Materials: A cross-sectional study was performed on 232 elderly admitted to elderly research center in Tehran, Iran in 2012. According to other studies, individuals were classified into two groups: high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency (< 220 pmol/L) and borderline vitamin B-12 (220–258 pmol/L) accompanied by elevated homocysteine (> 15 micmol/L). Results: Cut-off of 15.0 pmol/L for homocysteine was identified for persons with normal or elevated concentrations. Among persons aged 65–74 and ≥ 75 years, respectively, 56% and 93% were at high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Conclusions: The prevalence of B12 deficiency was higher in this study compared to other studies, so more attention and massive efficacious policy should be designed to reduce the deficiency of this vitamin. PMID:26430518

  2. Erythrocyte membrane proteins in copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.T.; Kramer, T.R.

    1987-05-01

    Increased osmotic stability and decreased survivability of erythrocytes caused by Cu deficiency suggest that low copper status may lead to modification in the organization of erythrocyte membrane proteins. Accordingly Cu deficiency was produced in rats by feeding a diet containing < 1 ppm Cu. The effects of low copper status on erythrocyte membrane proteins were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacylamide electrophoresis. A 170,000 dalton protein (170K) amounted to 2.68 +/- 0.11% of the total membrane protein in erythrocytes from copper-deficient rats (n = 25) and 1.42 +/- 0.10% in erythrocytes from rats fed adequate Cu. When erythrocyte membranes from copper-deficient rats were extracted with 0.5% (v/v) Triton X-100, 170K remained associated with the cytoskeletal proteins, spectrin and actin. Thus, copper deficiency can alter the composition of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. Furthermore, hematocrit levels in copper-deficient rats were negatively correlated to the amount of 170K suggesting that alteration of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton may be a factor that contributes to the anemia associated with copper deficiency.

  3. Interactions between copper deficiency, selenium deficiency and adriamycin toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Tackett, R.; Johnson, M.A. )

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are interactions between copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) status, and adriamycin (ADR) toxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed Cu,Se adequate; Cu deficient, Se adequate ({minus}Cu); Cu adequate, Se deficient; or Cu,Se deficient diets for 38-41 days. ADR or saline (SAL) were administered weekly for the last 4 weeks of the study. Cu deficiency was confirmed by a 3-fold decrease in liver Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and liver Cu, and a 5-fold decrease in RBC Cu,Zn-SOD. Se deficiency was confirmed by a 10-fold decrease in liver glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). ADR, Cu deficiency and Se deficiency all caused EKG abnormalities. However, Cu and Se deficiencies did not enhance ADR's influence on EKGs. ADR increased lipid peroxidation in liver by 15% and in heart by 18% (NS). Cu deficiency decreased ADR-induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissue by 25%. ADR influenced Se status by significantly increasing heart GSH-Px, and Cu status by increasing liver Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin and liver Cu, Zn-SOD. These elevations in Cu,Zn-SOD and GSH-Px may be a consequence of the increased lipid peroxidation initiated by ADR. In {minus}Cu rats, ADR caused severe hemolytic anemia characterized by a 19% decrease in hematocrit and a 17-fold increase in splenic Fe. These data suggest that there are numerous interactions between ADR toxicity and Cu and Se status.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  6. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an inherited disease. "Inherited" ... have AAT deficiency inherit two faulty AAT genes, one from each parent. These genes tell cells in ...

  7. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: protein C deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions protein C deficiency protein C deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Protein C deficiency is a disorder that increases the ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: protein S deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions protein S deficiency protein S deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Protein S deficiency is a disorder of blood clotting. People ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions factor V deficiency factor V deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Factor V deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder. The signs ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions isolated growth hormone deficiency isolated growth hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a condition caused by a severe ...

  12. Concomitant Inhibition of PI3Kβ and BRAF or MEK in PTEN-Deficient/BRAF-Mutant Melanoma Treatment: Preclinical Assessment of SAR260301 Oral PI3Kβ-Selective Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bonnevaux, Hélène; Lemaitre, Olivier; Vincent, Loic; Levit, Mikhail N; Windenberger, Fanny; Halley, Frank; Delorme, Cécile; Lengauer, Christoph; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Virone-Oddos, Angela

    2016-07-01

    Class IA PI3K pathway activation resulting from PTEN deficiency has been associated with lack of sensitivity of melanoma to BRAF kinase inhibitors. Although previous studies have shown synergistic activity when pan-PI3K inhibitors were combined with MAPK inhibitors in the treatment of melanoma exhibiting concurrent genetic abnormalities, overlapping adverse events in patients limit optimal dosing and clinical application. With the aim of specifically targeting PTEN-deficient cancers and minimizing the potential for on-target toxicity when inhibiting multiple PI3K isoforms, we developed a program to discover PI3Kβ-selective kinase inhibitors and identified SAR260301 as a potent PI3Kβ-selective, orally available compound, which is now in clinical development. Herein, we provide a detailed biological characterization of SAR260301, and show that this compound has outstanding biochemical and cellular selectivity for the PI3Kβ isoform versus the α, δ, and γ isoforms and a large panel of protein and lipid kinases. We demonstrate that SAR260301 blocks PI3K pathway signaling preferentially in PTEN-deficient human tumor models, and has synergistic antitumor activity when combined with vemurafenib (BRAF inhibitor) or selumetinib (MEK inhibitor) in PTEN-deficient/BRAF-mutated human melanoma tumor models. Combination treatments were very well tolerated, suggesting the potential for a superior safety profile at optimal dosing using selective compounds to inhibit multiple signaling pathways. Together, these experiments provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for safely combining inhibitors of PI3Kβ and BRAF or MEK kinase modulators to improve antitumor activity in PTEN-deficient/BRAF-mutant melanoma, and support the evaluation of SAR260301-based combinations in clinical studies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1460-71. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196754

  13. [Physiopathology of iodine deficiency].

    PubMed

    Pinchera, A; Rago, T; Vitti, P

    1998-01-01

    The process of goitrogenesis is likely to be the consequence of an increased TSH stimulation linked to an initial reduction of circulating thyroid hormone caused by iodine deficiency (ID). Other growth factors associated to TSH may have a role in the pathogenesis of goiter. Natural history of goiter is the evolution towards nodularity and functional autonomy. This phenomenon is due to the heterogeneity of thyroid follicular cells, some of which, with an intrinsic elevated growth rate, under the stimulation of ID progress to nodule formation and hyperfunction. In multinodular goiter TSH receptor mutations activating adenylate cyclase-cAMP pathway were found. In a recent epidemiological survey it was shown that nodular goiter increased with the age, being about 1% in schoolchildren and 23% in the adults (56-75 years). Also nodular autonomy and hyperthyroidism were more frequent in the 36-75 year age group. Severe ID is also cause of endemic cretinism. In Europe minor neuropsychological impairments and cognitive deficits were described in areas of moderate ID. The exposure to a mild ID during fetal life causes minor neuropsychological damage. In conclusion, ID is responsible of goiter and its evolution towards nodularity and functional autonomy. Severe ID is also cause of endemic cretinism, while cognitive deficits and minor neuropsychological impairments were found in mild to moderate ID. PMID:10052165

  14. Iodine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Elliott, T C

    1987-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) affects 800 million people in the world, yet iodine supplementation is one of the most cost-effective nutritional interventions known. Iodine is incorporated into thyroid hormones, necessary for regulating metabolic rate, growth, and development of the brain and nervous system. IDD may appear as goiter in adults, usually not a serious problem, or in cretinism in children, which is marked by severe mental and physical retardation, with irreversible hearing and speech defects and either deaf-mutism, squint and paralysis, or stunting and edema. Children supplemented by age 1 or 2 can sometimes be helped. Foods contain variable amounts of iodine dependent on the soil where they are grown, hence mountainous and some inland regions have high goiter and IDD incidence. There are also goitrogenic foods, typically those of the cabbage family. Diagnosis is clinical or by blood tests for thyroid hormone levels and ratios. Finger-stick methods are available. Prevention of IDD is simple with either iodized salt or flour, iodinated central water supplies, injectable or oral iodine-containing oil. All cost about $.04 per person per year, except injections, which cost about $1 per person, but have the advantage that they could be combined with immunizations. Local problems with supplements are loss of iodine in salt with storage in tropics, and local production of cheaper uniodinated salt. Emphasis should be given to pregnant women and young children. There is no harm in giving pregnant women iodine injections in 2nd or 3rd trimester. PMID:12343033

  15. α1-Antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Greene, Catherine M; Marciniak, Stefan J; Teckman, Jeffrey; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Brantly, Mark L; Lomas, David A; Stoller, James K; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is an inherited disorder caused by mutations in SERPINA1, leading to liver and lung disease. It is not a rare disorder but frequently goes underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or cryptogenic liver disease. The most frequent disease-associated mutations include the S allele and the Z allele of SERPINA1, which lead to the accumulation of misfolded α1-antitrypsin in hepatocytes, endoplasmic reticulum stress, low circulating levels of α1-antitrypsin and liver disease. Currently, there is no cure for severe liver disease and the only management option is liver transplantation when liver failure is life-threatening. A1ATD-associated lung disease predominately occurs in adults and is caused principally by inadequate protease inhibition. Treatment of A1ATD-associated lung disease includes standard therapies that are also used for the treatment of COPD, in addition to the use of augmentation therapy (that is, infusions of human plasma-derived, purified α1-antitrypsin). New therapies that target the misfolded α1-antitrypsin or attempt to correct the underlying genetic mutation are currently under development. PMID:27465791

  16. Betaine Deficiency in Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Lerma, Claudia; Rich, Patrick J.; Ju, Grace C.; Yang, Wen-Ju; Hanson, Andrew D.; Rhodes, David

    1991-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency (D Rhodes, PJ Rich [1988] Plant Physiol 88: 102-108). This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline → betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde. PMID:16668098

  17. Iron Deficiency Is Common During Remission in Children With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wikholm, Emma; Malmborg, Petter; Forssberg, Maria; Hederos, Carl-Axel; Wikström, Sverre

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to study prevalence of iron deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) during remission. In addition, there was an observational evaluation of hematological response to oral iron. A population-based retrospective study including 90 Swedish children (median 13 years) with IBD was performed. Patient records covered in median 25 months. Iron deficiency was present in 70/77 children (91%) in which iron status could be assessed. In clinical and biochemical remission, iron deficiency was found in 57/67 (85%) of children, and 23 (34%) of them had iron deficiency anemia. Thirty-six iron-deficient children were prescribed oral iron supplementation and 32 (89%) improved hemoglobin levels over 6 months. In conclusion, iron deficiency is common during clinical remission in children with IBD, even in cohorts with low prevalence of anemia. Therefore, regular biochemical screening for iron deficiency is warranted during all stages of disease, irrespective of symptoms and inflammatory blood markers. PMID:27336004

  18. "Myelodysplasia," myeloneuropathy, and copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Elliott, Michelle A; Hoyer, James D; Harper, Charles M; Ahlskog, J Eric; Phyliky, Robert L

    2005-07-01

    We describe a patient with a suspected myelodysplastic syndrome that developed in association with a neurologic disorder resembling subacute combined degeneration but without vitamin B12 deficiency. Ultimately, the hematologic manifestations and the neurologic syndrome were linked to severe copper deficiency. Prompt and complete reversal of the hematologic abnormalities occurred with copper replacement. Serum copper determination should be included in the work-up of patients with anemia and leukopenia of unclear etiology who have associated myeloneuropathy. The hematologic picture can resemble sideroblastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Hyperzincemia can be an accompanying abnormality even without exogenous zinc ingestion. The reason for the copper deficiency may not be evident. PMID:16007901

  19. Clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S

    1985-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal diseases, following uses of certain drugs such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease and diuretics in some cases, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. In pregnancy and during periods of growth the requirement of zinc is increased. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency include bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males; it is fatal if unrecognized and untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities, and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss, and hyperammonemia. Zinc is a growth factor. Its deficiency adversely affects growth in many animal species and humans. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and for cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Whether or not zinc is required for the metabolism of somatomedin needs to be investigated in the future. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level; the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus affect its functions. Zinc is required for the functions of several enzymes and whether or not it has an enzymatic role in steroidogenesis is not known at present

  20. Genetics of growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mullis, Primus E

    2007-03-01

    When a child is not following the normal, predicted growth curve, an evaluation for underlying illness and central nervous system abnormalities is required and appropriate consideration should be given to genetic defects causing growth hormone (GH) deficiency. This article focuses on the GH gene, the various gene alterations, and their possible impact on the pituitary gland. Transcription factors regulating pituitary gland development may cause multiple pituitary hormone deficiency but may present initially as GH deficiency. The role of two most important transcription factors, POU1F1 (Pit-1) and PROP 1, is discussed. PMID:17336732

  1. [Immune deficiencies in nutritional anemias].

    PubMed

    Bonnet Gajdos, M; Navarro, J; Belas, F; Traineau, R

    1982-12-16

    A transient cellular immunologic defect caused by folic acid deficiency was seen in a goat-milk-fed infant with severe enterocolitis. Data on the immunologic consequences of folic acid, protein and iron deficiencies were reviewed in the medical literature. Investigations are difficult because of the patients' poor general condition. Results are difficult to interpret as many etiologic factors are often combined and mechanisms of immunologic responses are complex. Attention is drawn to the danger of iron therapy in patients with transferrin deficiency. PMID:6297076

  2. Do all patients with acquired methemoglobinemia need treatment? A lesson learnt

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Raju; Karmacharya, Paras; Pathak, Ranjan; Poudel, Dilli Ram; Ghimire, Sushil; Alweis, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Acquired methemoglobinemia is a medical emergency, and its prompt recognition and treatment can avoid catastrophic complications including death. However, in mild asymptomatic cases without any comorbid conditions, it would be reasonable to simply observe and treat symptomatically to avoid severe treatment-related complications, especially in patients with suspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We present a case of mild methemoglobinemia in occult G6PD deficiency in which the patient developed hemolysis after treatment with intravenous methylene blue, requiring transfusion. PMID:26486118

  3. Acute hemolysis in a patient with a newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian G; Grossman, Stuart A

    2016-07-01

    We describe a 62-year-old of Egyptian origin who presented with sudden, severe and symptomatic anemia requiring hospitalization shortly after beginning concurrent radiation and temozolomide for his newly diagnosed glioblastoma. He had also recently been started on steroids, anticonvulsants and Pneumocystis jirovecii prophylaxis. He was ultimately diagnosed with G6PD deficiency with an acute hemolytic anemia precipitated by dapsone. Screening for G6PD deficiency should be considered in high-risk patient populations where P. jirovecii prophylaxis is planned. PMID:27230975

  4. The Role of 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D Deficiency in Iron Deficient Children of North India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Jain, Rahul; Dabla, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Extensive data from animal and human studies indicate a role of vitamin D in erythropoiesis. Iron and vitamin D deficiencies are implicated with adverse health effects in children even if they are asymptomatic. The potential relationship between the two remains poorly understood. A cross-sectional study was performed in the period from 1st May 2012 through 30th April 2013 and subjects were classified into vitamin D deficiency (VDD), vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) and vitamin D sufficiency (VDS) groups according to their 25(OH) D levels. A total of 263 children were included in the analysis. Anaemia was present in 66 % of 25(OH) D deficient subjects compared with 35 % in vitamin D sufficient individuals (p < 0.0001). The association of breast feeding and development of VDD was also significant (p < 0.05). Serum levels of 25(OH) D were found lower in female sex and if the analysis was performed in the winter/spring season. Physicians should therefore assess vitamin D levels in all anaemic children and ensure adequate supplementation to prevent deficiencies. PMID:26089618

  5. Genetics Home Reference: tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3. Citation on PubMed Liu TT, Chiang SH, Wu SJ, Hsiao KJ. Tetrahydrobiopterin-deficient hyperphenylalaninemia in the ... Citation on PubMed Wang L, Yu WM, He C, Chang M, Shen M, Zhou Z, Zhang Z, ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: arginase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes the amino acid arginine (a building block of proteins) and ammonia ... links) Encyclopedia: Hereditary urea cycle abnormality Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Genetic Brain Disorders Health ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: prekallikrein deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... a role in a process called the intrinsic coagulation pathway (also called the contact activation pathway). This ... functional plasma kallikrein, which likely impairs the intrinsic coagulation pathway. Researchers suggest that this lack (deficiency) of ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... An abnormally small head size ( microcephaly ) and autistic behaviors that affect communication and social interaction also occur ... deficiency MalaCards: dihydropyrimidinuria Merck Manual Professional Version: Pyrimidine ... Dihydropyrimidinuria Patient Support and Advocacy Resources ( ...

  9. Evolutionary Processes and Mental Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1973-01-01

    The author hypothesizes that central nervous system damage of deficiency associated with mental retardation affects primarily those cortical processes which developed at a late stage in man's evolutionary history. (Author)

  10. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    PubMed

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity. PMID:25765687

  11. Detecting Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stoller, James K

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a widely underrecognized condition, with evidence of persisting long diagnostic delays and patients' frequent need to see multiple physicians before initial diagnosis. Reasons for underrecognition include inadequate understanding of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency by physicians and allied health care providers; failure to implement available, guideline-based practice recommendations; and the belief that effective therapy is unavailable. Multiple studies have described both the results of screening and targeted detection of individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, with both varying strategies employed to identify at-risk individuals and varying results of testing. Also, various strategies to enhance detection of affected individuals have been examined, including use of the electronic medical record to prompt testing and empowerment of allied health providers, especially respiratory therapists, to promote testing for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Such efforts are likely to enhance detection with the expected result that the harmful effects of delayed diagnosis can be mitigated. PMID:27564667

  12. Genetics Home Reference: prothrombin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients and Caregivers: How Blood Clots Orphanet: Congenital factor II deficiency University of Iowa Health Care: Prothrombin Gene Mutation Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) Canadian Hemophilia Society National Hemophilia Foundation: Factor II ... Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Prothrombin ...

  13. Cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies in children.

    PubMed

    Goskowicz, M; Eichenfield, L F

    1993-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies may be associated with a variety of cutaneous findings in children. This review emphasizes new developments relating to cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies. Zinc deficiency, acrodermatitis enteropathica, and acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruptions are seen with a variety of conditions including cystic fibrosis, anorexia nervosa, and breastfeeding. Similar cutaneous findings not related to zinc deficiency may also occur with such metabolic disorders as methylmalonic aciduria, multiple carboxylase deficiency, essential fatty acid deficiency and other amino acid deficiencies. Vitamin K deficiency is associated with hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and coagulopathy. Vitamin A deficiency presents with a variety of systemic findings and distinctive dermatologic findings. Acute vitamin A deficiency may be seen in children infected with measles and is associated with more severe disease. The systemic and cutaneous findings of vitamin C deficiency, scurvy, are discussed. PMID:8374671

  14. Zinc and its deficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Evans, G W

    1986-01-01

    The pervasive role of zinc in the metabolic function of the body results from its function as a cofactor of a multitude of enzymes. Zinc is found in every tissue in the body, and because zinc metalloenzymes are found in every known class of enzymes, the metal has a function in every conceivable type of biochemical pathway. Symptoms resulting from zinc deficiency are as diverse as the enzymes with which the metal is associated. If chronic, severe, and untreated, zinc deficiency can be fatal. Less drastic symptoms include infections, hypogonadism, weight loss, emotional disturbance, dermatitis, alopecia, impaired taste acuity, night blindness, poor appetite, delayed wound healing, and elevated blood ammonia levels. Many symptoms of zinc deficiency result from poor diet consumption, but often the most severe symptoms result from other factors including excessive alcohol use, liver diseases, malabsorption syndromes, renal disease, enteral or parenteral alimentation, administration of sulfhydryl-containing drugs, and sickle cell disease. The most severe symptoms of zinc deficiency occur in young children affected with the autosomal-recessive trait, acrodermatitis enteropathica. This disease results in decreased synthesis of picolinic acid which causes an impaired ability to utilize zinc from common food. Because simple laboratory analyses are often not reliable in determining zinc nutriture of a patient, those symptoms caused by suspected zinc deficiency are best verified by the oral administration of zinc dipicolinate. This zinc compound is efficacious and safe and would provide an accurate means of identifying symptoms that do result from zinc deficiency. PMID:3514057

  15. Is the assessment of von Willebrand disease prevalence an achievable challenge? The example of the French Basque Country where blood group O and factor XI deficiency are highly prevalent.

    PubMed

    Bauduer, F; Ducout, L

    2004-10-01

    The diagnosis of type I von Willebrand disease (VWD) is not straightforward because of the absence of a single clear-cut biological criteria and the interference of several acquired conditions on phenotype expression. We illustrate here this challenge with the French Basque population characterised by a marked high frequency in both blood group O and factor XI deficiency. From this example one may question the validity of epidemiological studies reporting on VWD prevalence. PMID:15456482

  16. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Enhances Antiviral Response through Downregulation of NADPH Sensor HSCARG and Upregulation of NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Chiu, Daniel Tsun-Yee; Lin, Hsin-Ru; Tang, Hsiang-Yu; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Ho, Hung-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient cells are highly susceptible to viral infection. This study examined the mechanism underlying this phenomenon by measuring the expression of antiviral genes—tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and GTPase myxovirus resistance 1 (MX1)—in G6PD-knockdown cells upon human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection. Molecular analysis revealed that the promoter activities of TNF-α and MX1 were downregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells, and that the IκB degradation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB were decreased. The HSCARG protein, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) sensor and negative regulator of NF-κB, was upregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells with decreased NADPH/NADP+ ratio. Treatment of G6PD-knockdown cells with siRNA against HSCARG enhanced the DNA binding activity of NF-κB and the expression of TNF-α and MX1, but suppressed the expression of viral genes; however, the overexpression of HSCARG inhibited the antiviral response. Exogenous G6PD or IDH1 expression inhibited the expression of HSCARG, resulting in increased expression of TNF-α and MX1 and reduced viral gene expression upon virus infection. Our findings suggest that the increased susceptibility of the G6PD-knockdown cells to viral infection was due to impaired NF-κB signaling and antiviral response mediated by HSCARG. PMID:26694452

  17. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Enhances Antiviral Response through Downregulation of NADPH Sensor HSCARG and Upregulation of NF-κB Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Chiu, Daniel Tsun-Yee; Lin, Hsin-Ru; Tang, Hsiang-Yu; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Ho, Hung-Yao

    2015-12-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient cells are highly susceptible to viral infection. This study examined the mechanism underlying this phenomenon by measuring the expression of antiviral genes-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and GTPase myxovirus resistance 1 (MX1)-in G6PD-knockdown cells upon human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection. Molecular analysis revealed that the promoter activities of TNF-α and MX1 were downregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells, and that the IκB degradation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB were decreased. The HSCARG protein, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) sensor and negative regulator of NF-κB, was upregulated in G6PD-knockdown cells with decreased NADPH/NADP⁺ ratio. Treatment of G6PD-knockdown cells with siRNA against HSCARG enhanced the DNA binding activity of NF-κB and the expression of TNF-α and MX1, but suppressed the expression of viral genes; however, the overexpression of HSCARG inhibited the antiviral response. Exogenous G6PD or IDH1 expression inhibited the expression of HSCARG, resulting in increased expression of TNF-α and MX1 and reduced viral gene expression upon virus infection. Our findings suggest that the increased susceptibility of the G6PD-knockdown cells to viral infection was due to impaired NF-κB signaling and antiviral response mediated by HSCARG. PMID:26694452

  18. 33 CFR 154.1070 - Deficiencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... equipment or records maintained in connection with this subpart. (b) Deficiencies shall be corrected within... who disagrees with a deficiency issued by the COTP may appeal the deficiency to the cognizant COTP within 7 days or the time specified by the COTP to correct the deficiency, whichever is less. This...

  19. Generation of Recombination Activating Gene-1-Deficient Neonatal Piglets: A Model of T and B Cell Deficient Severe Combined Immune Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuya; Sendai, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Seki-Soma, Marie; Hirose, Kensuke; Watanabe, Motoo; Fukawa, Kazuo; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2014-01-01

    Although severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a very important research model for mice and SCID mice are widely used, there are only few reports describing the SCID pig models. Therefore, additional research in this area is needed. In this study, we describe the generation of Recombination activating gene-1 (Rag-1)-deficient neonatal piglets in Duroc breed using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with gene targeting and analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and histology. We constructed porcine Rag-1 gene targeting vectors for the Exon 2 region and obtained heterozygous/homozygous Rag-1 knockout cell colonies using SCNT. We generated two Rag-1-deficient neonatal piglets and compared them with wild-type neonatal piglets. FACS analysis showed that Rag-1 disruption causes a lack of Immunoglobulin M-positive B cells and CD3-positive T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Consistent with FACS analysis, histological analysis revealed structural defects and an absence of mature lymphocytes in the spleen, mesenteric lymph node (MLNs), and thymus in Rag-1-deficient piglets. These results confirm that Rag-1 is necessary for the generation of lymphocytes in pigs, and Rag-1-deficient piglets exhibit a T and B cell deficient SCID (T-B-SCID) phenotype similar to that of rodents and humans. The T-B-SCID pigs with Rag-1 deficiency generated in this study could be a suitably versatile model for laboratory, translational, and biomedical research, including the development of a humanized model and assessment of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25437445

  20. Deficiencies in Vadose Zone Understanding at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Thomas Ronald; Bates, Dona Louise; Bishop, Carolyn Wagoner; Heard, Robert Eugene; Hubbell, Joel Michael; Hull, Laurence Charles; Lehman, Richard Michael; Magnuson, Swen O; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Mccarthy, James Michael; Porro, Indrek; Ritter, Paul David; Roddy, Michael Scott; Singler, Robert Edward; Smith, Richard Paul

    2000-08-01

    Subsurface contamination in the vadose zone, that portion of the subsurface pathway between land surface and an underlying aquifer, poses environmental problems at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in eastern Idaho and across the U.S. Department of Energy complex. Assessing potential adverse impacts from these contaminated sites requires an understanding of the mechanisms controlling contaminant transport. Currently, vadose zone experts at the INEEL cannot with confidence predict the movement of water and contaminants in the complex, heterogeneous, fractured subsurface at the INEEL, especially within the vadose zone. In the draft version (Revision 1) of the Vadose Zone Deficiencies document, deficiencies in scientific understanding of flow and transport processes in the vadose zone at the INEEL were identified and grouped into 13 categories and recommendations were provided to address each of the deficiencies. The draft document provided the basis for an INEEL Vadose Zone Workshop that was conducted October 20 and 21, 1999, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The workshop was conducted to group and rank the previously identified deficiencies and for the subsequent development of science plans to address the deficiencies that limit reliable predictions of water and contaminant movement in the subsurface. The workshop participants, comprising INEEL and scientists and project managers and non-INEEL scientists knowledgeable about the vadose zone, developed science- and technology-based recommendations derived through a series of technical sessions at the workshop. In this document, the final version of the Vadose Zone Deficiencies document, the draft document has been incorporated, largely intact, as well as the results from the workshop. The workshop participants grouped the deficiencies in vadose zone understanding at the INEEL into seven categories. These seven categories will be the focus areas of five science plans that are being developed to

  1. Epileptogenesis after traumatic brain injury in Plau-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bolkvadze, Tamuna; Rantala, Jukka; Puhakka, Noora; Andrade, Pedro; Pitkänen, Asla

    2015-10-01

    Several components of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-interactome, including uPAR and its ligand sushi-repeat protein 2, X-linked (SRPX2), are linked to susceptibility to epileptogenesis in animal models and/or humans. Recent evidence indicates that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), a uPAR ligand with focal proteinase activity in the extracellular matrix, contributes to recovery-enhancing brain plasticity after various epileptogenic insults such as traumatic brain injury (TBI) and status epilepticus. Here, we examined whether deficiency of the uPA-encoding gene Plau augments epileptogenesis after TBI. Traumatic brain injury was induced by controlled cortical impact in the somatosensory cortex of adult male wild-type and Plau-deficient mice. Development of epilepsy and seizure susceptibility were assessed with a 3-week continuous video-electroencephalography monitoring and a pentylenetetrazol test, respectively. Traumatic brain injury-induced cortical or hippocampal pathology did not differ between genotypes. The pentylenetetrazol test revealed increased seizure susceptibility after TBI (p<0.05) in injured mice. Epileptogenesis was not exacerbated, however, in Plau-deficient mice. Taken together, Plau deficiency did not worsen controlled cortical impact-induced brain pathology or epileptogenesis caused by TBI when assessed at chronic timepoints. These data expand previous observations on Plau deficiency in models of status epilepticus and suggest that inhibition of focal extracellular proteinase activity resulting from uPA-uPAR interactions does not modify epileptogenesis after TBI. PMID:26253597

  2. HANDBOOK OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY, PSYCHOLOGICAL THEORY AND RESEARCH. MCGRAW-HILL SERIES IN PSYCHOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ELLIS, NORMAN R.

    THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF 21 AUTHORS IN THIS VOLUME ARE DEVOTED TO ASSESSING THE STATUS OF RESEARCH AND THEORY IN MENTAL DEFICIENCY, FOCUSING ATTENTION ON THE BEHAVIOR OF THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED. PART ONE IS CONCERNED WITH RESEARCH FINDINGS AND THEORIES TO EXPLAIN MENTAL DEFICIENCY. COMPREHENSIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL THEORIES REPRESENTED INCLUDE FIELD…

  3. Elimination of Mental Defect Due to Iodine Deficiency by the Year 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzel, Basil S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of iodine deficiency across the lifespan, with special reference to mental defect; discusses the magnitude of the problem; describes available iodine technology to control iodine deficiency disorders (IDD); and notes the status of national IDD control programs, to assess the likelihood of eliminating IDD by the year…

  4. Review of the magnitude of folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies worldwide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human deficiencies of folate and vitamin B12 result in adverse effects which may be of public health significance, but the magnitude of these deficiencies is unknown. Therefore, we examine the prevalence data currently available, assess global coverage of surveys, determine the frequency with which...

  5. Brain creatine depletion: guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (improving with creatine supplementation).

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, V; Bianchi, M C; Tosetti, M; Carducci, C; Cerquiglini, C A; Cioni, G; Antonozzi, I

    2000-11-14

    The authors describe an Italian child with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency, neurologic regression, movement disorders, and epilepsy during the first year of life. Brain MRI showed pallidal and periaqueductal alterations. In vivo 1H-MRS showed brain creatine depletion. The assessment of guanidinoacetic acid concentration in biologic fluids confirmed the diagnosis. Clinical, biochemical, and neuroradiologic improvement followed creatine supplementation. PMID:11087795

  6. 24 CFR 902.73 - PHAs with deficiencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false PHAs with deficiencies. 902.73 Section 902.73 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING ASSESSMENT SYSTEM...

  7. Deficient and Null Variants of SERPINA1 Are Proteotoxic in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model of α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    King, Dale E.; Silverman, Richard M.; Miedel, Mark T.; Luke, Cliff J.; Perlmutter, David H.; Silverman, Gary A.; Pak, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD) predisposes patients to both loss-of-function (emphysema) and gain-of-function (liver cirrhosis) phenotypes depending on the type of mutation. Although the Z mutation (ATZ) is the most prevalent cause of ATD, >120 mutant alleles have been identified. In general, these mutations are classified as deficient (<20% normal plasma levels) or null (<1% normal levels) alleles. The deficient alleles, like ATZ, misfold in the ER where they accumulate as toxic monomers, oligomers and aggregates. Thus, deficient alleles may predispose to both gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes. Null variants, if translated, typically yield truncated proteins that are efficiently degraded after being transiently retained in the ER. Clinically, null alleles are only associated with the loss-of-function phenotype. We recently developed a C. elegans model of ATD in order to further elucidate the mechanisms of proteotoxicity (gain-of-function phenotype) induced by the aggregation-prone deficient allele, ATZ. The goal of this study was to use this C. elegans model to determine whether different types of deficient and null alleles, which differentially affect polymerization and secretion rates, correlated to any extent with proteotoxicity. Animals expressing the deficient alleles, Mmalton, Siiyama and S (ATS), showed overall toxicity comparable to that observed in patients. Interestingly, Siiyama expressing animals had smaller intracellular inclusions than ATZ yet appeared to have a greater negative effect on animal fitness. Surprisingly, the null mutants, although efficiently degraded, showed a relatively mild gain-of-function proteotoxic phenotype. However, since null variant proteins are degraded differently and do not appear to accumulate, their mechanism of proteotoxicity is likely to be different to that of polymerizing, deficient mutants. Taken together, these studies showed that C. elegans is an inexpensive tool to assess the proteotoxicity of different AT

  8. Health consequences of iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Umesh

    2007-12-01

    Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) are one of the biggest worldwide public health problem of today. Their effect is hidden and profoundly affects the quality of human life. Iodine deficiency occurs when the soil is poor in iodine, causing a low concentration in food products and insufficient iodine intake in the population. When iodine requirements are not met, the thyroid may no longer be able to synthesize sufficient amounts of thyroid hormone. The resulting low-level of thyroid hormones in the blood is the principal factor responsible for the series of functional and developmental abnormalities, collectively referred to as IDD. Iodine deficiency is a significant cause of mental developmental problems in children, including implications on reproductive functions and lowering of IQ levels in school-aged children. The consequence of iodine deficiency during pregnancy is impaired synthesis of thyroid hormones by the mother and the foetus. An insufficient supply of thyroid hormones to the developing brain may result in mental retardation. Brain damage and irreversible mental retardation are the most important disorders induced by iodine deficiency. Daily consumption of salt fortified with iodine is a proven effective strategy for prevention of IDD. PMID:21748117

  9. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tanoi, Keitaro; Kobayashi, Natsuko I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium ions (Mg2+) are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency. PMID:27135350

  10. Gender Dependent Evaluation of Autism like Behavior in Mice Exposed to Prenatal Zinc Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Grabrucker, Stefanie; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Grabrucker, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc deficiency has recently been linked to the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) as environmental risk factor. With an estimated 17% of the world population being at risk of zinc deficiency, especially zinc deficiency during pregnancy might be a common occurrence, also in industrialized nations. On molecular level, zinc deficiency has been shown to affect a signaling pathway at glutamatergic synapses that has previously been identified through genetic mutations in ASD patients, the Neurexin-Neuroligin-Shank pathway, via altering zinc binding Shank family members. In particular, prenatal zinc deficient but not acute zinc deficient animals have been reported to display autism like behavior in some behavioral tests. However, a full behavioral analysis of a possible autism like behavior has been lacking so far. Here, we performed an extensive behavioral phenotyping of mice born from mothers with mild zinc deficiency during all trimesters of pregnancy. Prenatal zinc deficient animals were investigated as adults and gender differences were assessed. Our results show that prenatal zinc deficient mice display increased anxiety, deficits in nest building and various social interaction paradigm, as well as mild alterations in ultrasonic vocalizations. A gender specific analysis revealed only few sex specific differences. Taken together, given that similar behavioral abnormalities as reported here are frequently observed in ASD mouse models, we conclude that prenatal zinc deficient animals even without specific genetic susceptibility for ASD, already show some features of ASD like behavior. PMID:26973485

  11. Gender Dependent Evaluation of Autism like Behavior in Mice Exposed to Prenatal Zinc Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Grabrucker, Stefanie; Boeckers, Tobias M; Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2016-01-01

    Zinc deficiency has recently been linked to the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) as environmental risk factor. With an estimated 17% of the world population being at risk of zinc deficiency, especially zinc deficiency during pregnancy might be a common occurrence, also in industrialized nations. On molecular level, zinc deficiency has been shown to affect a signaling pathway at glutamatergic synapses that has previously been identified through genetic mutations in ASD patients, the Neurexin-Neuroligin-Shank pathway, via altering zinc binding Shank family members. In particular, prenatal zinc deficient but not acute zinc deficient animals have been reported to display autism like behavior in some behavioral tests. However, a full behavioral analysis of a possible autism like behavior has been lacking so far. Here, we performed an extensive behavioral phenotyping of mice born from mothers with mild zinc deficiency during all trimesters of pregnancy. Prenatal zinc deficient animals were investigated as adults and gender differences were assessed. Our results show that prenatal zinc deficient mice display increased anxiety, deficits in nest building and various social interaction paradigm, as well as mild alterations in ultrasonic vocalizations. A gender specific analysis revealed only few sex specific differences. Taken together, given that similar behavioral abnormalities as reported here are frequently observed in ASD mouse models, we conclude that prenatal zinc deficient animals even without specific genetic susceptibility for ASD, already show some features of ASD like behavior. PMID:26973485

  12. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  13. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23. PMID:26813504

  14. Implications of thiamine deficiency in Great Lakes salmonines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.B.; Fitzsimons, J.D.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Our recent experimental work and ecoepizootiological assessments provide mechanistic data supporting a plausible hypothesis for an association between a prey base comprised of a large biomass of nonnative alewives Alosa pseudoharengus and the recruitment difficulties currently experienced by Great Lakes salmonines. We hypothesize that the thiamine deficiency induced by alewives, a species harboring high thiaminase activity, represents an ongoing cause of fry and adult mortality in salmonines. Overall ramifications of the thiamine deficiency on recruitment have not been firmly established but may represent a substantial bottleneck for natural recruitment in feral salmonine populations in the Great Lakes. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  15. Prevalence and correlates of vitamin K deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jan K; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Szaflarska-Poplawska, Anna; Klincewicz, Beata; Adamczak, Daria; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Plawski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Although vitamin K deficiency has been implicated in adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), its prevalence in pediatric IBD remains unknown. We carried out a cross-sectional study in 63 children with Crohn's disease (CD) and 48 with ulcerative colitis (UC) to assess the prevalence of vitamin K deficiency and to search for potential correlation between vitamin K status and pediatric IBD activity. Vitamin K status was assessed using protein induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II; ELISA). Prevalence of vitamin K deficiency was 54.0% in CD and 43.7% in UC. Vitamin K deficiency was more common in patients with higher CD activity, in CD patients with higher mass Z-scores, and less common among children with CD treated with infliximab. Relation of vitamin K deficiency to pediatric IBD clinical course and treatment demand further research. PMID:24759680

  16. Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency among patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Donald L.; Chadha, Manpreet K.; Sunga, Annette Y.; Fakih, Marwan G.; Ashraf, Umeer; Silliman, Carrie G.; Hollis, Bruce W.; Nesline, Mary K.; Tian, Lili; Tan, Wei; Johnson, Candace S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the frequency of vitamin D deficiency among men with prostate cancer, as considerable epidemiological, in vitro, in vivo and clinical data support an association between vitamin D deficiency and prostate cancer outcome. Patients, subjects and methods The study included 120 ambulatory men with recurrent prostate cancer and 50 with clinically localized prostate cancer who were evaluated and serum samples assayed for 25-OH vitamin D levels. Then 100 controls (both sexes), matched for age and season of serum sample, were chosen from a prospective serum banking protocol. The relationship between age, body mass index, disease stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, season and previous therapy on vitamin D status were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results The mean 25-OH vitamin D level was 25.9 ng/mL in those with recurrent disease, 27.5 ng/mL in men with clinically localized prostate cancer and 24.5 ng/mL in controls. The frequency of vitamin D deficiency (< 20 ng/mL) and insufficiency (20–31 ng/mL) was 40% and 32% in men with recurrent prostate; 28% had vitamin D levels that were normal (32–100 ng/mL). Among men with localized prostate cancer, 18% were deficient, 50% were insufficient and 32% were normal. Among controls, 31% were deficient, 40% were insufficient and 29% were normal. Metastatic disease (P = 0.005) and season of blood sampling (winter/spring; P = 0.01) were associated with vitamin D deficiency in patients with prostate cancer, while age, race, performance status and body mass index were not. Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were common among men with prostate cancer and apparently normal controls in the western New York region. PMID:19426195

  17. [Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Hunter R., Ed.; Kerstiens, Gene, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    These four serial issues examine the effectiveness and appropriateness of a variety of assessment tests as well as their relationship to developmental education. Included are reviews of the following tests: (1) the Comparative Guidance and Placement Program, a self-scoring test of English and mathematics; (2) the Stanford Achievement Test, an…

  18. A Review on Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yeon; So, Tsz-Yin; Thackray, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and for maintaining bone health in the pediatric population. Vitamin D deficiency may develop from nutritional deficiencies, malabsorption, enzyme-inducing medications, and many other etiologies. It may present as hypocalcemia before bone demineralization at periods of increased growth velocity (infancy and adolescence) because the increased calcium demand of the body cannot be met. In children, inadequate concentrations of vitamin D may cause rickets and/or symptomatic hypocalcemia, such as seizures or tetany. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacology behind vitamin D supplementation, laboratory assessments of vitamin D status, current literature concerning vitamin D supplementation, and various supplementation options for the treatment of vitamin D deficiency in the pediatric population. PMID:24719588

  19. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  20. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Senard, Jean-Michel; Rouet, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH) deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS). Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance. PMID:16722595

  1. Growth hormone deficiency: an update.

    PubMed

    Audí, L; Fernández-Cancio, M; Camats, N; Carrascosa, A

    2013-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) in humans manifests differently according to the individual developmental stage (early after birth, during childhood, at puberty or in adulthood), the cause or mechanism (genetic, acquired or idiopathic), deficiency intensity and whether it is the only pituitary-affected hormone or is combined with that of other pituitary hormones or forms part of a complex syndrome. Growing knowledge of the genetic basis of GH deficiency continues to provide us with useful information to further characterise mutation types and mechanisms for previously described and new candidate genes. Despite these advances, a high proportion of GH deficiencies with no recognisable acquired basis continue to be labelled as idiopathic, although less frequently when they are congenital and/or familial. The clinical and biochemical diagnoses continue to be a conundrum despite efforts to harmonise biochemical assays for GH and IGF-1 analysis, probably because the diagnosis based on the so-called GH secretion stimulation tests will prove to be of limited usefulness for predicting therapy indications. PMID:23435439

  2. VISUAL DEFICIENCIES AND READING DISABILITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROSEN, CARL L.

    THE ROLE OF VISUAL SENSORY DEFICIENCIES IN THE CAUSATION READING DISABILITY IS DISCUSSED. PREVIOUS AND CURRENT RESEARCH STUDIES DEALING WITH SPECIFIC VISUAL PROBLEMS WHICH HAVE BEEN FOUND TO BE NEGATIVELY RELATED TO SUCCESSFUL READING ACHIEVEMENT ARE LISTED--(1) FARSIGHTEDNESS, (2) ASTIGMATISM, (3) BINOCULAR INCOORDINATIONS, AND (4) FUSIONAL…

  3. Psychological Problems in Mental Deficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarason, Seymour B.; Doris, John

    A statement of goals and the rationale for organization precede a historical discussion of mental deficiency and society. The problem of labels like IQ and brain injured and the consequences of the diagnostic process are illustrated by case histories; case studies are also used to examine the criteria used to decide who is retarded and to discuss…

  4. Iodine deficiency in vegetarians and vegans.

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Bucková, K; Klimes, I; Seboková, E

    2003-01-01

    Iodine content in food of plant origin is lower in comparison with that of animal origin due to a low iodine concentration in soil. Urinary iodine excretion was assessed in 15 vegans, 31 lacto- and lacto-ovovegetarians and 35 adults on a mixed diet. Iodine excretion was significantly lower in alternative nutrition groups - 172 microg/l in vegetarians and 78 microg/l in vegans compared to 216 microg/l in subjects on a mixed diet. One fourth of the vegetarians and 80% of the vegans suffer from iodine deficiency (iodine excretion value below 100 microg/l) compared to 9% in the persons on a mixed nutrition. The results show that under conditions of alternative nutrition, there is a higher prevalence of iodine deficiency, which might be a consequence of exclusive or prevailing consumption of food of plant origin, no intake of fish and other sea products, as well as reduced iodine intake in the form of sea salt. PMID:12748410

  5. Micronutrient deficiency in urban Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Schultink, W

    1997-06-01

    The economic situation of Indonesia is characterized by a large increase in the gross national product which has been on average 7% annually during the last ten years. This was accompanied by rapid urbanization. With the economic improvement, "First World" and "Third World" health and nutrition problems are coexisting in Indonesia. In 1992, the most common of death cause was cardiovascular disease whereas tuberculosis was the second ranking. About 40% of the preschool children are stunted. The main stable food and energy source is rice, although the urban population has a more diverse food pattern than the rural population. In Jakarta, many children receive too late colostrum feeding and mothers are not aware about the importance of correct breastfeeding practices after delivery. Three studies had shown that about one fifth of preschool children and one fourth of elderly take micronutrient supplements. Nevertheless, micronutrient deficiencies are prevalent in Jakarta. About one third of women suffer from moderate vitamin A deficiency (plasma retinol < 0.70 mmol/L) and 50% of pregnant women are anemic. More information is necessary on other micronutrient deficiencies. For example, a small study revealed that nearly two thirds of non-institutionalized elderly living in Jakarta experience thiamine deficiency. Appropriate interventions to reduce micronutrient deficiencies should sensitize the urban population to the fact that the government should restrict itself to use its resources to assist only the poorest individuals and groups, whereas it must be expected from the middle class to spend more time and money to solve their own problems. PMID:9659420

  6. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  7. Iodine-deficient vegetarians: a hypothetical perchlorate-susceptible population?

    PubMed

    Fields, Cheryl; Dourson, Michael; Borak, Jonathan

    2005-06-01

    Recent risk assessments of environmental perchlorate have been subject to much debate. A particular concern is whether appropriate susceptible sub-populations have been identified. Iodine-deficient pregnant women, especially vegetarians, have been proposed as such a potential susceptible sub-population, but there is no evidence of iodine deficiency in the US population and the adequacy of iodine nutrition has not been studied in US vegetarians. To understand the possibility that US vegetarians might be iodine deficient, we reviewed the prevalence, demography, and lifestyle characteristics of US vegetarians as well as the world literature on iodine nutrition in vegetarians. Our findings indicate that strict vegetarians and vegans, who comprise probably less than 0.1% of the US population, have higher education, higher incomes, and healthier lifestyles than the general population. Field studies indicate that vegetarian diets need not lead to iodine deficiency and vegans may suffer excess iodine intake. It is remains uncertain whether there are iodine-deficient vegans or pregnant women in the US. Of more general concern is whether the 10-fold default uncertainty factor is needed for intraspecies (i.e., within human) variability to protect such hypothetical susceptible sub-populations. PMID:15896441

  8. Recommendations for the nutrition management of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rani H.; Rohr, Fran; Frazier, Dianne; Cunningham, Amy; Mofidi, Shideh; Ogata, Beth; Splett, Patricia L.; Moseley, Kathryn; Huntington, Kathleen; Acosta, Phyllis B.; Vockley, Jerry; Van Calcar, Sandra C.

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of a phenylalanine-restricted diet to improve the outcome of individuals with phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency (OMIM no. 261600) has been recognized since the first patients were treated 60 years ago. However, the treatment regime is complex, costly, and often difficult to maintain for the long term. Improvements and refinements in the diet for phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency have been made over the years, and adjunctive therapies have proven to be successful for certain patients. Yet evidence-based guidelines for managing phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, optimizing outcomes, and addressing all available therapies are lacking. Thus, recommendations for nutrition management were developed using evidence from peer-reviewed publications, gray literature, and consensus surveys. The areas investigated included choice of appropriate medical foods, integration of adjunctive therapies, treatment during pregnancy, monitoring of nutritional and clinical markers, prevention of nutrient deficiencies, providing of access to care, and compliance strategies. This process has not only provided assessment and refinement of current nutrition management and monitoring recommendations but also charted a direction for future studies. This document serves as a companion to the concurrently published American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guideline for the medical treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency. Genet Med 16 2, 121–131. PMID:24385075

  9. Recommendations for the nutrition management of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rani H; Rohr, Fran; Frazier, Dianne; Cunningham, Amy; Mofidi, Shideh; Ogata, Beth; Splett, Patricia L; Moseley, Kathryn; Huntington, Kathleen; Acosta, Phyllis B; Vockley, Jerry; Van Calcar, Sandra C

    2014-02-01

    The effectiveness of a phenylalanine-restricted diet to improve the outcome of individuals with phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency (OMIM no. 261600) has been recognized since the first patients were treated 60 years ago. However, the treatment regime is complex, costly, and often difficult to maintain for the long term. Improvements and refinements in the diet for phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency have been made over the years, and adjunctive therapies have proven to be successful for certain patients. Yet evidence-based guidelines for managing phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, optimizing outcomes, and addressing all available therapies are lacking. Thus, recommendations for nutrition management were developed using evidence from peer-reviewed publications, gray literature, and consensus surveys. The areas investigated included choice of appropriate medical foods, integration of adjunctive therapies, treatment during pregnancy, monitoring of nutritional and clinical markers, prevention of nutrient deficiencies, providing of access to care, and compliance strategies. This process has not only provided assessment and refinement of current nutrition management and monitoring recommendations but also charted a direction for future studies. This document serves as a companion to the concurrently published American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guideline for the medical treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency. PMID:24385075

  10. Vitamin A Deficiency Induces Congenital Spinal Deformities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Wu, William Ka Kei; Wang, Xiaojuan; Liang, Jinqian; Qiu, Guixing; Liu, Jiaming

    2012-01-01

    Most cases of congenital spinal deformities were sporadic and without strong evidence of heritability. The etiology of congenital spinal deformities is still elusive and assumed to be multi-factorial. The current study seeks to elucidate the effect of maternal vitamin A deficiency and the production of congenital spinal deformities in the offsping. Thirty two female rats were randomized into two groups: control group, which was fed a normal diet; vitamin A deficient group, which were given vitamin A-deficient diet from at least 2 weeks before mating till delivery. Three random neonatal rats from each group were killed the next day of parturition. Female rats were fed an AIN-93G diet sufficient in vitamin A to feed the rest of neonates for two weeks until euthanasia. Serum levels of vitamin A were assessed in the adult and filial rats. Anteroposterior (AP) spine radiographs were obtained at week 2 after delivery to evaluate the presence of the skeletal abnormalities especially of spinal deformities. Liver and vertebral body expression of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDHs) and RARs mRNA was assessed by reverse transcription-real time PCR. VAD neonates displayed many skeletal malformations in the cervical, thoracic, the pelvic and sacral and limbs regions. The incidence of congenital scoliosis was 13.79% (8/58) in the filial rats of vitamin A deficiency group and 0% in the control group. Furthermore, vitamin A deficiency negatively regulate the liver and verterbral body mRNA levels of RALDH1, RALDH2, RALDH3, RAR-α, RAR-β and RAR-γ. Vitamin A deficiency in pregnancy may induce congenital spinal deformities in the postnatal rats. The decreases of RALDHs and RARs mRNA expression induced by vitamin A deprivation suggest that vertebral birth defects may be caused by a defect in RA signaling pathway during somitogenesis. PMID:23071590

  11. Early gestation screening of pregnant women for iodine deficiency disorders and iron deficiency in urban centre in Vadodara, Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Joshi, K; Nair, S; Khade, C; Rajan, M G R

    2014-02-01

    Pregnancy is a special condition where many metabolic changes may occur because of increased requirement of essential micronutrients such as iron and iodine. Foetal thyroid starts producing its own thyroid hormones after 12 weeks of gestation. Therefore, the first trimester is very crucial for meeting thyroid hormone requirements of the mother and foetus. Iodine deficiency and iron deficiency may affect mental and physical growth of the foetus. Hence, it is very important to establish a programme on the screening of pregnant women for thyroid dysfunction tests along with established iron status assessment. Thus, the study was aimed to screen the pregnant women for iodine deficiency disorders and iron deficiency during early gestation, situational analysis on thyroid insufficiency and iron deficiency in pregnant women (gestational age <15 weeks) in urban Vadodara, Gujarat. n = 256 healthy pregnant women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancy were selected. The thyroid hormone was estimated by RIA, UIE using simple microplate technique and haemoglobin (Hb) concentration by acid hematin method. Median thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), total thyroxine (TT4) and UIE concentrations were 1.88 μIU/ml, 0.83 ng/dl, 10.24 μg/dl and 297.14 mcg/l, respectively. There was a significant correlation between TSH, FT4 and month of gestation. Mean Hb concentration was 9.27 ± 1.09 g/dl. The prevalence of iodine insufficiency (based on UI) was 16.79% and iron deficiency was 91%. Screening programme for iodine deficiency during early gestation should be implemented along with the existing programme of haemoglobin estimation at first prenatal visit. This would help prevent damage to the developing brain and growth of the foetus and also to trace at-risk pregnant women. PMID:24847692

  12. Genetics Home Reference: complement factor I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Baracho GV, Nudelman V, Isaac L. Molecular characterization of homozygous hereditary factor I deficiency. Clin Exp ... G, Sánchez-Corral P, López-Trascasa M. Molecular characterization of Complement Factor I deficiency in two Spanish ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM3 synthase deficiency is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and problems with brain development. Within the first ... diagnosis or management of GM3 synthase deficiency: American Epilepsy Society: Find a Doctor Clinic for Special Children ( ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: familial glucocorticoid deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... familial glucocorticoid deficiency type 1 lead to defective trafficking of the receptor to the cell surface. J ... short stature, and natural killer cell deficiency in humans. J Clin Invest. 2012 Mar;122(3):814- ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is an inherited disorder that affects the adrenal glands . The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys and ... body. In people with 21-hydroxylase deficiency , the adrenal glands produce excess androgens, which are male sex hormones. ...

  16. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? ...

  17. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has no cure, but its ... of these treatments are the same as the ones used for a lung disease called COPD (chronic ...

  18. Multiple Carboxylase Deficiency (Late Onset) Due to Deficiency of Biotinidase

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Debadatta; Das, Manoj Kumar; Dhar, Sandipan; Mukhopadhyay, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Biotinidase is a ubiquitous mammalian cell enzyme occurring in liver, serum and kidney. It cleaves biotin from biocytin, which is a cofactor for biotin dependent enzymes, namely the human carboxylases. Biotinidase deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological, dermatological, immunological and ophthalmological abnormalities. This is a case of a 3-year-old boy presenting with delayed developmental milestones, tachypnea, progressively increasing ataxia, alopecia and dermatitis, all which dramatically responded to high doses of biotin. PMID:25284861

  19. Deficiency or dementia? Exploring B12 deficiency after urostomy.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Michelle; Bryan, Sandra; Dukes, Suzie

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can be misdiagnosed as a variety of other illnesses, and if left untreated can lead to irreversible damage to the brain and nervous system. This article discusses the case of a 70-year-old female with a urostomy, well known to the stoma care department, who shortly after a routine parastomal hernia repair developed severe confusion, immobility and was unable to communicate. Subsequent investigations ruled out a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and a diagnosis of rapidly progressing vascular dementia was made. An incidental finding of a low vitamin B12 level was identified and treatment commenced. She was transferred to a community hospital and her family were told to 'prepare for the worst'. It was, in fact, the vitamin B12 deficiency that was causing her symptoms of vascular dementia, and once treatment was established she underwent a 'miraculous' improvement, returning to normal life. This article discusses vitamin B12 deficiency and why patients with a urostomy are at risk of developing it; highlights the key role of the stoma care nurse and his or her knowledge of the patient; explores the importance of testing vitamin B12 levels in this group of patients; and discusses key learning and recommendations for practice. PMID:26067796

  20. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Pregnant Korean Women: The First Trimester and the Winter Season as Risk Factors for Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Rihwa; Kim, Seonwoo; Yoo, Heejin; Cho, Yoon Young; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon; Oh, Soo-young; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the vitamin D status of Korean women during pregnancy and assessed the effects of vitamin D deficiency on two pregnancy outcomes; preterm births and the births of small for gestational age. We measured the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in 220 pregnant Korean women who were recruited prospectively and compared these levels with those of 500 healthy non-pregnant women. We analyzed vitamin D status according to patient demographics, season, and obstetrical characteristics; moreover, we also assessed pregnancy outcomes. The overall prevalence of vitamin D deficiency(<20 ng/mL) in pregnant women and healthy non-pregnant women was 77.3% and 79.2%; respectively; and the prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (<10 ng/mL) was 28.6% and 7.2%; respectively (p < 0.05). Vitamin D deficiency was more prevalent in the winter (100%) than in the summer (45.5%) in pregnant Korean women. A higher risk of vitamin D deficiency was observed in the first trimester than in the third trimester (adjusted OR 4.3; p < 0.05). No significant association was observed between vitamin D deficiency and any of the pregnancy outcomes examined. Further research focusing on the long-term consequences of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy in Korean women is warranted. PMID:25970148

  1. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  2. Iodine deficiency disorders in Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Delange, F.; Bürgi, H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent data on iodine excretion in the urine of adults, adolescents and newborns and on the iodine content of breast milk indicate a high prevalence of iodine deficiency (moderate in many cases and severe in a few) in many European countries. These cases may manifest as subclinical hypothyroidism in neonates and as goitre in adolescents and adults. Lack of iodine causes not only goitre, but also mental deficiency, hearing loss and other neurological impairments, and short stature due to thyroid insufficiency during fetal development and childhood. Although iodinated salt is available theoretically in most countries where it is needed, its quality and share of the market are often unsatisfactory. In many countries where only household salt is iodinated the iodine content has been set too low owing to an overestimation of household salt consumption. Governments are therefore urged to pass legislation and provide means for efficient iodination of salt wherever this is necessary. PMID:2670299

  3. Iodine: deficiency and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Lyn

    2008-06-01

    Iodine deficiency is generally recognized as the most commonly preventable cause of mental retardation and the most common cause of endocrinopathy (goiter and primary hypothyroidism). Iodine deficiency becomes particularly critical in pregnancy due to the consequences for neurological damage during fetal development as well as during lactation. The safety of therapeutic doses of iodine above the established safe upper limit of 1 mg is evident in the lack of toxicity in the Japanese population that consumes 25 times the median intake of iodine consumption in the United States. Japan's population suffers no demonstrable increased incidence of autoimmune thyroiditis or hypothyroidism. Studies using 3.0- to 6.0-mg doses to effectively treat fibrocystic breast disease may reveal an important role for iodine in maintaining normal breast tissue architecture and function. Iodine may also have important antioxidant functions in breast tissue and other tissues that concentrate iodine via the sodium iodide symporter. PMID:18590348

  4. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity. PMID:26472066

  5. Mitochondrial deficiency in Cockayne syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by accelerated aging, cachectic dwarfism and many other features. Recent work has implicated mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of this disease. This is particularly interesting since mitochondrial deficiencies are believed to be important in the aging process. In this review, we will discuss recent findings of mitochondrial pathology in Cockayne syndrome and suggest possible mechanisms for the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23435289

  6. Multiple Peroxisomal Enzymatic Deficiency Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vamecq, Joseph; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Van Hoof, François; Misson, Jean-Paul; Evrard, Philippe; Verellen, Gaston; Eyssen, Hendrik J.; Van Eldere, Johan; Schutgens, Ruud B. H.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Roels, Frank; Goldfischer, Sidney L.

    1986-01-01

    Biologic, morphologic, and biochemical investigations performed in 2 patients demonstrate multiple peroxisomal deficiencies in the cerebrohepatorenal syndrome of Zellweger (CHRS) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD). Very long chain fatty acids, abnormal bile acids, including bile acid precursors (di- and trihydroxycoprostanoic acids), and C29-dicarboxylic acid accumulated in plasma in both patients. Generalized hyperaminoaciduria was also present. Peroxisomes could not be detected in CHRS liver and kidney; however, in the NALD patient, small and sparse cytoplasmic bodies resembling altered peroxisomes were found in hepatocytes. Hepatocellular and Kupffer cell lysosomes were engorged with ferritin and contained clefts and trilaminar structures believed to represent very long chain fatty acids. Enzymatic deficiencies reflected the peroxisomal defects. Hepatic glycolate oxidase and palmitoyl-CoA oxidase activities were deficient. No particle-bound catalase was found in cultured fibroblasts, and ether glycerolipid (plasmalogen) biosynthesis was markedly reduced. Administration of phenobarbital and clofibrate, an agent that induces peroxisomal proliferation and enzymatic activities, to the NALD patient did not bring about any changes in plasma metabolites, liver peroxisome population, or oxidizing activities. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:2879480

  7. Functional consequences of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    McClain, C J; Kasarskis, E J; Allen, J J

    1985-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element necessary for over 200 zinc metalloenzymes and required for normal nucleic acid, protein, and membrane metabolism. During the past two decades there has been a rapid expansion of knowledge concerning zinc metabolism in both normal and disease situations, including mechanisms for zinc absorption, excretion and internal redistribution of zinc after stress or trauma. Acrodermatitis enteropathica has been recognized to be a disease of impaired zinc absorption in man. A host of disease processes now are recognized to be complicated by zinc deficiency including alcoholic liver disease, sickle cell anemia, protein calorie malnutrition, and a variety of intestinal diseases including Crohn's disease, sprue, short bowel syndrome and after jejunal ileal bypass. Zinc has proved to be an extremely interesting mineral to nutritionists and physicians because of its importance in normal physiology and biochemistry and because of the diverse presenting features of zinc deficiency. This paper reviews ten functional consequences of zinc deficiency and emphasizes certain consequences in which there have been new discoveries concerning their mechanism (e.g., anorexia) or their clinical importance (e.g., immune dysfunction). PMID:3911268

  8. Vitamin D recommendations: beyond deficiency.

    PubMed

    Biesalski, Hans K

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in regular bone growth and in adequate function of the innate immune system, including barrier functions of mucous membranes. A sufficient supply during pregnancy and lactation protects the child from infectious diseases. Clinical symptoms of severe vitamin D deficiency (rickets) are well known and can be easily detected. Signs and symptoms beyond deficiency, however, remain to be elucidated. Based on clinical and observational data, the plasma level of 25(OH)D may serve as a 'marker' to detect or define a subclinical deficiency. Levels below 50 nmol/l might be insufficient to maintain the non-bone-related activities of vitamin D. Finally, it has to be considered that all of the nonbone activities of vitamin D are in concert with vitamin A (9-cis retinoic acid). Studies combining both vitamins in sufficient amounts (cod liver oil) demonstrated a beneficial effect on the prevention of respiratory tract infections. Consequently, it should be strongly recommended to increase the intake of vitamin D and to ensure a daily intake of vitamin A as counseled. PMID:22123631

  9. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance to study different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy. PMID:26846578

  10. The Meniscus-Deficient Knee

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Allison J.; Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Yanke, Adam B.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cole, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injury, and partial meniscectomies are the most common orthopaedic surgical procedure. The injured meniscus has an impaired ability to distribute load and resist tibial translation. Partial or complete loss of the meniscus promotes early development of chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. The primary goal of treatment for meniscus-deficient knees is to provide symptomatic relief, ideally to delay advanced joint space narrowing, and ultimately, joint replacement. Surgical treatments, including meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), high tibial osteotomy (HTO), and distal femoral osteotomy (DFO), are options that attempt to decrease the loads on the articular cartilage of the meniscus-deficient compartment by replacing meniscal tissue or altering joint alignment. Clinical and biomechanical studies have reported promising outcomes for MAT, HTO, and DFO in the postmeniscectomized knee. These procedures can be performed alone or in conjunction with ligament reconstruction or chondral procedures (reparative, restorative, or reconstructive) to optimize stability and longevity of the knee. Complications can include fracture, nonunion, patella baja, compartment syndrome, infection, and deep venous thrombosis. MAT, HTO, and DFO are effective options for young patients suffering from pain and functional limitations secondary to meniscal deficiency. PMID:26779547

  11. Nutritional Deficiencies and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, María S.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gomez, Nidia N.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipids are important components of the cell membranes of all living species. They contribute to the physicochemical properties of the membrane and thus influence the conformation and function of membrane-bound proteins, such as receptors, ion channels, and transporters and also influence cell function by serving as precursors for prostaglandins and other signaling molecules and modulating gene expression through the transcription activation. The components of the diet are determinant for cell functionality. In this review, the effects of macro and micronutrients deficiency on the quality, quantity and metabolism of different phospholipids and their distribution in cells of different organs is presented. Alterations in the amount of both saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins A, E and folate, and other micronutrients, such as zinc and magnesium, are discussed. In all cases we observe alterations in the pattern of phospholipids, the more affected ones being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin. The deficiency of certain nutrients, such as essential fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and some metals may contribute to a variety of diseases that can be irreversible even after replacement with normal amount of the nutrients. Usually, the sequelae are more important when the deficiency is present at an early age. PMID:21731449

  12. Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency Share | Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency This article ... should patients with immune deficiency be given the vaccine? Immune deficient patients have a decreased resistance to ...

  13. Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment Patterns in Academic Urban Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Paulette D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Williams, Michelle A.; LeBoff, Meryl S.; Bates, David W.; Hicks, LeRoi S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assess racial/ethnic and sex differences in treatment of vitamin D deficiency with high dose ergocalciferol (‘vitamin D2’) or other forms of vitamin D in a northeastern U.S. ambulatory clinic of an academic urban medical center. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional observational review of electronic medication prescribing records of patients with 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) deficiency (25OHD < 20 ng/ml) from 2004–2008. METHODS Using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for patients’ demographics, and Elixhauser comorbidity score, we examined the association of sex and race/ethnicity with prescription for at least one dose of vitamin D. RESULTS Among 2,140 patients without renal disease and tested for 25OHD deficiency (25OHD < 20 ng/ml), 66.2% received no vitamin D prescription for vitamin D deficiency. Blacks and Hispanics received vitamin D prescriptions at a higher frequency than whites, 37.8% 38.4% and 30.9%, respectively, p=0.003. The vitamin D prescription rate for women versus men was 26.3% and 7.5%, respectively, p=0.04. In a fully adjusted model, no difference in prescription likelihood for blacks and whites [OR=1.18 95% CI, 0.88–1.58; p=0.29] or Hispanics and whites was noted [OR=1.01 95% CI, 0.70–1.45;p=0.73]. Similarly, fully adjusted model showed no difference in prescription likelihood for females and males [OR=1.23 95% CI, 0.93–1.63; p=0.12]. CONCLUSIONS Among primary care patients with vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D supplementation was low and white patients were less likely to receive vitamin D treatment than blacks or Hispanics. Interventions to correct the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency should address the markedly low rate of vitamin D prescribing when 25OHD levels are measured. PMID:25328637

  14. Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) and their eradication.

    PubMed

    Hetzel, B S

    1983-11-12

    Disorders resulting from severe iodine deficiency affect more than 400 million people in Asia alone. These disorders include stillbirths, abortions, and congenital anomalies; endemic cretinism, characterised most commonly by mental deficiency, deaf mutism, and spastic diplegia and lesser degrees of neurological defect related to fetal iodine deficiency; and impaired mental function in children and adults with goitre associated with subnormal concentrations of circulating thyroxine. Use of the term iodine deficiency disorders, instead of "goitre", would help to bridge the serious gap between knowledge and its application. Iodised salt and iodised oil (by injection or by mouth) are suitable for the correction of iodine deficiency on a mass scale. A single dose of iodised oil can correct severe iodine deficiency for 3-5 years. Iodised oil offers a satisfactory immediate measure for primary care services until an iodised salt programme can be implemented. The complete eradication of iodine deficiency is therefore feasible within 5-10 years. PMID:6138653

  15. Iodine requirements and the risks and benefits of correcting iodine deficiency in populations.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B

    2008-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects on growth and development due to inadequate thyroid hormone production that are termed the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). IDD remains the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. IDD assessment methods include urinary iodine concentration, goiter, thyroglobulin and newborn thyrotropin. In nearly all iodine-deficient countries, the best strategy to control IDD is salt iodization, one of the most cost-effective ways to contribute to economic and social development. When salt iodization is not possible, iodine supplements can be targeted to vulnerable groups. Introduction of iodized salt to regions of chronic IDD may transiently increase the incidence of thyroid disorders, and programs should include monitoring for both iodine deficiency and excess. Although more data on the epidemiology of thyroid disorders caused by differences in iodine intake are needed, overall, the relatively small risks of iodine excess are far outweighed by the substantial risks of iodine deficiency. PMID:18565420

  16. Safety of the methylene blue plus chloroquine combination in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in young children of Burkina Faso [ISRCTN27290841

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Peter E; Mandi, Germain; Witte, Steffen; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Mansmann, Ulrich; Rengelshausen, Jens; Schiek, Wolfgang; Jahn, Albrecht; Sanon, Mamadou; Tapsoba, Théophile; Walter-Sack, Ingeborg; Mikus, Gerd; Burhenne, Jürgen; Riedel, Klaus-Dieter; Schirmer, Heiner; Kouyaté, Bocar; Müller, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    Background Safe, effective and affordable drug combinations against falciparum malaria are urgently needed for the poor populations in malaria endemic countries. Methylene blue (MB) combined with chloroquine (CQ) has been considered as one promising new regimen. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of CQ-MB in African children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Secondary objectives were to assess the efficacy and the acceptance of CQ-MB in a rural population of West Africa. Methods In this hospital-based randomized controlled trial, 226 children (6–59 months) with uncomplicated falciparum malaria were treated in Burkina Faso. The children were 4:1 randomized to CQ-MB (n = 181; 25 mg/kg CQ and 12 mg/kg MB over three days) or CQ (n = 45; 25 mg/kg over three days) respectively. The primary outcome was the incidence of severe haemolysis or other serious adverse events (SAEs). Efficacy outcomes were defined according to the WHO 2003 classification system. Patients were hospitalized for four days and followed up until day 14. Results No differences in the incidence of SAEs and other adverse events were observed between children treated with CQ-MB (including 24 cases of G6PD deficiency) compared to children treated with CQ. There was no case of severe haemolysis and also no significant difference in mean haemoglobin between study groups. Treatment failure rates were 53.7% (95% CI [37.4%; 69.3%]) in the CQ group compared to 44.0% (95% CI [36.3%; 51.9%]) in the CQ-MB group. Conclusion MB is safe for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria, even in G6PD deficient African children. However, the efficacy of the CQ-MB combination has not been sufficient at the MB dose used in this study. Future studies need to assess the efficacy of MB at higher doses and in combination with appropriate partner drugs. PMID:16179085

  17. The Enteropathy of Prostaglandin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David H.; Phillips, John A.; Cogan, Joy D.; Iverson, Tina M.; Stein, Jeffrey A.; Brenner, David A.; Morrow, Jason D.; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Small intestinal ulcers are frequent complications of therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We present here a genetic deficiency of eicosanoid biosynthesis that illuminates the mechanism of NSAID-induced ulcers of the small intestine. Methods Eicosanoids and metabolites were measured by isotope-dilution with mass spectrometry. cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription and sequenced following amplification with RT-PCR. Results We investigated the cause of chronic recurrent small intestinal ulcers, small bowel perforations, and gastrointestinal blood loss in a 45 year old male who was not taking any cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Prostaglandin metabolites in urine were significantly depressed. Serum thromboxane B2 (TxB2) production was 4.6% of normal controls (p<0.006) and serum 12-HETE was 1.3% of controls (p<0.005). Optical platelet aggregation with simultaneous monitoring of ATP release demonstrated absent granule secretion in response to ADP and a blunted aggregation response to ADP and collagen, but normal response to arachidonic acid (AA). LTB4 biosynthesis by ionophore activated leukocytes was only 3% of controls and urinary LTE4 was undetectable. These findings suggested deficient AA release from membrane phospholipids by cytosolic phospholipase A2-α (cPLA2-α) which regulates cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase mediated eicosanoid production by catalyzing the release of their substrate, AA. Sequencing of cPLA2-α cDNA demonstrated 2 heterozygous non-synonymous single base pair mutations: Ser111Pro (S111P) and Arg485His (R485H), as well as a known SNP: Lys651Arg (K651R). Conclusion Characterization of this cPLA2-α deficiency provides support for the importance of prostaglandins in protecting small intestinal integrity, and indicates that loss of prostaglandin biosynthesis is sufficient to produce small intestinal ulcers. PMID:19148786

  18. Thiamine deficiency in tachypnoeic Cambodian infants.

    PubMed

    Keating, Elizabeth M; Nget, Phot; Kea, Sreng; Kuong, Suy; Daly, Leng; Phearom, Seng; Enders, Felicity; Cheryk, Lynn A; Topazian, Mark; Fischer, Philip R; Kumar, Varun

    2014-10-27

    Background: Beriberi is endemic in South-east Asia. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings, but correlation of clinical features with blood thiamine concentrations is uncertain. Objectives: To investigate in tachypnoeic Cambodian infants the correlation between whole blood thiamine diphosphate (TDP) concentrations, clinical findings and blood TDP levels after therapy. Methods: Infants hospitalised with tachypnoea were enrolled from October 2011 to January 2012. Initial clinical features, diagnostic test results and final diagnoses were recorded. Blood for TDP determination was collected prior to treatment and at discharge. Matched infants from the general outpatient clinic with minor complaints were enrolled as controls. Thiamine was administered at the discretion of the treating paediatrician. Results: Of the 47 tachypnoeic and 47 control infants, median initial blood TDP concentrations were 83 and 93 nmol/L, respectively (P = 0·69), and were below the estimated limit of normal (<70 nmol/L) in 43% vs 34% (P = 0·40). Median initial TDP levels were 72 and 91 nmol/L in tachypnoeic infants who did or did not receive thiamine, respectively (P = 0·56); at hospital discharge, median TDP concentration had increased by 107 and 3·5 nmol/L in these two subgroups (P<0·001). Classical findings of beriberi such as dysphonia, tachycardia and hepatomegaly did not correlate with low initial TDP concentrations, but infant age, Tiger Balm use, absence of wheezing and low blood CRP levels were associated with low initial TDP levels. Use of infant formula was associated with higher initial TDP levels. Conclusions: Thiamine deficiency is common in tachypnoeic Cambodian infants, but routine clinical assessments do not accurately identify those with low blood TDP concentrations. Parenteral thiamine administration markedly increases TDP levels. Empirical thiamine treatment should be considered for tachypnoeic infants in regions with endemic thiamine deficiency. PMID

  19. [LCAT deficiency: a nephrological diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Boscutti, Giuliano; Calabresi, Laura; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Boer, Emanuela; Bosco, Manuela; Mattei, Piero Luigi; Martone, Massimiliano; Milutinovic, Neva; Berbecar, Dorina; Beltram, Elisabetta; Franceschini, Guido

    2011-01-01

    A genetic mendelian autosomal recessive condition of deficiency of lecithin- cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) can produce two different diseases: one highly interesting nephrologic picture of complete enzymatic deficiency (lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency; OMIM ID #245900; FLD), characterized by the association of dyslipidemia, corneal opacities, anemia and progressive nephropathy; and a partial form (fish eye disease; OMIM ID #136120; FED) with dyslipidemia and progressive corneal opacities only. The diagnosis of FLD falls first of all under the competence of nephrologists, because end-stage renal disease appears to be its most severe outcome. The diagnostic suspicion is based on clinical signs (corneal opacities, more severe anemia than expected for the degree of chronic renal failure, progressive proteinuric nephropathy) combined with histology obtained by kidney biopsy (glomerulopathy evolving toward sclerosis with distinctive lipid deposition). However, the final diagnosis, starting with a finding of extremely low levels of HDL-cholesterol, requires collaboration with lipidology Centers that can perform sophisticated investigations unavailable in common laboratories. To be heterozygous for a mutation of the LCAT gene is one of the monogenic conditions underlying primary hypoalphalipoproteinemia (OMIM ID #604091). This disease, which is characterized by levels of HDL-cholesterol below the 5th percentile of those of the examined population (<28 mg/dL for Italians), has heritability estimates between 40% and 60% and is considered to be a predisposing condition for coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, some monogenic forms, and especially those associated with LCAT deficiency, seem to break the rule, confirming once more the value of a proper diagnosis before drawing prognostic conclusions from a laboratory marker. As in many other rare illnesses, trying to discover all the existing cases will contribute to allow studies broad enough to pave the

  20. Effect of selenium and vitamin E dietary deficiencies on chick lymphoid organ development (42361)

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.A.; Combs, G.F. Jr.; Whitacre, M.E.; Dietert, R.R.

    1986-09-01

    Diets specifically deficient in selenium (Se) and/or vitamin E or adequate in both nutrients were fed to chicks from the time of hatching. Lymphoid organs (bursa, thymus, and in some instances, spleen) were collected from chicks 7-35 days of age. Growth of the chicks fed these diets was monitored over the experimental period as was lymphoid organ growth. The development of the primary lymphoid organs was further assessed by histological techniques and the organ contents of vitamin E (..cap alpha..-tocopherol) and Se were determined. Specific deficiencies of either Se or vitamin E were found to significantly impair bursal growth as did a combined deficiency. Thymic growth was impaired only by the combined deficiency diet. Severe histopathological changes in the bursa resulted from the combined deficiency and these were detectable by 10-14 days after hatching. These changes were characterized by a gradual degeneration of the epithelium and an accompanying depletion of lymphocytes. Similar changes, although slower to develop and less severe, were observed in the thymus as a result of the combined deficiency. When both serum and tissue levels of vitamin E and Se were monitored, it was observed that these were rapidly and independently depleted by the specific deficiency diets. These data suggest that the primary lymphoid organs are major targets of Se and vitamin E dietary deficiencies and provide a possible mechanism by which immune function may be impaired.

  1. [Distribution iodine deficiency diseases in coastal areas depending on geochemical conditions].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Andryukov, B G

    2014-01-01

    In the Primorsky Krai there was performed a population ecological and hygienic analysis of the relationship between the content of chemical elements in the soil and thyroid morbidity in the population of the region. The assessment of the prevalence of iodine deficiency and iodine deficiency diseases was carried out on the basis of the impact of the priority environmental toxic (strontium, nickel, cadmium, lead, arsenic, tin) and essential (nickel, iron, germanium, molybdenum, zinc, selenium) trace elements on the level of iodine deficiency diseases. The level of thyroid pathology in the territory of Primorye was established to be the highest one in areas characterized by the severe iodine deficiency (Northwest geochemical zones), where the structure of thyroid diseases is presented mainly by diffuse nontoxic goiter. Thyroid diseases associated with iodine deficiency in the population of different age groups are the result of multiple and combined imbalance of trace elements, which causes a relative (secondary) iodine deficiency. Thyroid disease in Primorye are environmentally caused diseases of technogenic origin, they are a consequence of the relative iodine deficiency, when on the background of normal iodine supply an imbalance of zinc, iron, cobalt, manganese with excess of such toxic trace elements as lead, strontium, nickel and chromium takes place. Thyroid pathology associated with iodine deficiency, along with other environmentally dependent diseases can be considered as a marker of ecological environment trouble. PMID:25831939

  2. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency among Pregnant Saudi Women

    PubMed Central

    Al-Faris, Nora A.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has emerged as a public health problem worldwide due to its important role in health and disease. The present work is intended to examine prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among pregnant Saudi women and related risk factors. A cross-sectional study was carried out at King Fahad Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 160 pregnant women during the first trimester of pregnancy. Socio-demographic, lifestyle and maternal characteristics were collected and vitamin D intake was assessed using a 24-h dietary recall. Weight and height were measured using standardized methods. Vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L) and insufficiency (25(OH)D = 50–74 nmol/L) were reported in 50% and 43.8% of the study sample, respectively. Median serum 25(OH)D concentration was 49.9 nmol/L. Adequate vitamin D intake (≥600 IU/day) was reported among only 8.1% of pregnant women. Age group, educational level, sun exposure frequency and daytime and daily practice of exercise were significantly associated with vitamin D status. Overall, vitamin D deficiency was common among pregnant Saudi women in Riyadh. Steps should be taken to address the current situation, including increased sunlight exposure, consumption of fatty fish, and vitamin D supplements. PMID:26861386

  3. HSF1-deficiency affects gait coordination and cerebellar calbindin levels.

    PubMed

    Ingenwerth, Marc; Estrada, Veronica; Stahr, Anna; Müller, Hans Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in cell homeostasis and protect against cell damage. They were previously identified as key players in different ataxia models. HSF1 is the main transcription factor for HSP activation. HSF1-deficient mice (HSF1-/-) are known to have deficiencies in motor control test. However, little is known about effects of HSF1-deficiency on locomotor, especially gait, coordination. Therefore, we compared HSF-deficient (HSF1-/-) mice and wildtype littermates using an automated gait analysis system for objective assessment of gait coordination. We found significant changes in gait parameters of HSF1-/- mice reminiscent of cerebellar ataxia. Immunohistochemical analyses of a cerebellum revealed co-localization of HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis of a potential interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Calbindin levels were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, respectively. While quantitative PCR revealed no differences in calbindin mRNA levels between HSF1+/+ and HSF1-/- mice, calbindin protein levels, however, were significantly decreased in a cerebellum of HSF1-/- mice. A pathway analysis supports the hypothesis of an interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin. In summary, the targeted deletion of HSF1 results in changes of locomotor function associated with changes in cerebellar calbindin protein levels. These findings suggest a role of HSF1 in regular Purkinje cell calcium homeostasis. PMID:27173427

  4. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency among Pregnant Saudi Women.

    PubMed

    Al-Faris, Nora A

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has emerged as a public health problem worldwide due to its important role in health and disease. The present work is intended to examine prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among pregnant Saudi women and related risk factors. A cross-sectional study was carried out at King Fahad Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 160 pregnant women during the first trimester of pregnancy. Socio-demographic, lifestyle and maternal characteristics were collected and vitamin D intake was assessed using a 24-h dietary recall. Weight and height were measured using standardized methods. Vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L) and insufficiency (25(OH)D = 50-74 nmol/L) were reported in 50% and 43.8% of the study sample, respectively. Median serum 25(OH)D concentration was 49.9 nmol/L. Adequate vitamin D intake (≥600 IU/day) was reported among only 8.1% of pregnant women. Age group, educational level, sun exposure frequency and daytime and daily practice of exercise were significantly associated with vitamin D status. Overall, vitamin D deficiency was common among pregnant Saudi women in Riyadh. Steps should be taken to address the current situation, including increased sunlight exposure, consumption of fatty fish, and vitamin D supplements. PMID:26861386

  5. Awareness of vitamin D deficiency among at-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vitamin D deficiency is a significant problem for a growing proportion of the UK population. Individuals with dark or covered skin are at particularly high risk due to ethno-cultural, environmental and genetic factors. We assessed the level of awareness of vitamin D deficiency among at-risk patients in order to identify groups most in need of education. Findings A cross-sectional survey using a piloted questionnaire was conducted among consecutive at-risk patients without a diagnosis of Vitamin D deficiency arriving at a large inner city general practice in the North West of England over a five day period. The survey was completed by 221 patients. The mean age was 35 years. 28% of them (n = 61) had never heard about vitamin D. Older patients (p = 0.003) were less likely to have heard about vitamin D. 54% of participants were unaware of the commonest symptoms of vitamin D deficiency. 34% did not expose their skin other than their face in the last one year, and 11% did not include vitamin D rich foods in their diet. Conclusion The majority of at-risk patients are aware of vitamin D; nevertheless, there is a significant lack of knowledge among older people, who have higher morbidity. A programme of targeted education of the at-risk population is recommended. PMID:22230819

  6. The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child’s health

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron deficiency is a global nutritional problem affecting up to 52% of pregnant women. Many of these women are symptomatic. Lack of proper weight gain during pregnancy is an important predictor of iron deficiency. PMID:25719576

  7. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  8. Congenital longitudinal deficiency of the tibia.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, D A; Loder, R T; Crandall, R C

    2003-01-01

    We performed a clinical and radiographic review of 15 patients (19 limbs) with longitudinal deficiency of the tibia treated between 1981 and 2001. Ten limbs with Kalamchi type I deficiencies were managed by through-knee amputation. Five type II deficiencies were treated by foot ablation and tibiofibular synostosis, either at the same time or staged, but prosthetic problems may arise from varus alignment and prominence of the proximal fibula. Patients with type III deficiencies (four cases) were treated by foot ablation. Prosthetic problems relating to proximal or distal tibiofibular instability may necessitate additional surgical intervention. PMID:12879290

  9. Changes in circulating levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 induced by short-term dietary magnesium deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Katsumata, Shinichi; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Kajita, Yasutaka

    2016-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a potent regulator of phosphorus (P) and vitamin D metabolism. Long-term dietary magnesium (Mg) deficiency increases circulating levels of FGF23, whereas the effects of short-term dietary Mg deficiency are unclear. Thus, the present study investigated whether short-term dietary Mg deficiency affects circulating levels of FGF23. We also assessed changes in renal mRNA expression of vitamin D metabolizing enzymes and type II sodium-phosphate (Na/Pi) cotransporters, since these are regulated by FGF23. Rats were fed a control diet (control group) or an Mg-deficient diet (Mg-deficient group) for 2, 4 or 7 days. Serum Mg levels were significantly lower in the Mg-deficient group than in the control group at all time points. Serum FGF23 levels were significantly higher in the Mg-deficient group than in the control group at day 7. The 25-hydroxyvitamin D-24-hydroxylase (24(OH)ase) mRNA levels were significantly higher in the Mg-deficient group than in the control group at day 7 . No significant differences in types IIa and IIc Na/Pi cotransporter mRNA levels were observed between the control and Mg-deficient groups. These results suggest that dietary Mg deficiency causes a rapid increase in circulating levels of FGF23 and renal 24(OH)ase mRNA levels. PMID:27624533

  10. Evaluation of Antimalarial Activity and Toxicity of a New Primaquine Prodrug

    PubMed Central

    Davanço, Marcelo Gomes; Aguiar, Anna Caroline Campos; dos Santos, Leandro Alves; Padilha, Elias Carvalho; Campos, Michel Leandro; de Andrade, Cleverton Roberto; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Chin, Chung Man; Krettli, Antoniana Ursine; Peccinini, Rosangela Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent of the five species causing malaria in humans. The current available treatment for P. vivax malaria is limited and unsatisfactory due to at least two drawbacks: the undesirable side effects of primaquine (PQ) and drug resistance to chloroquine. Phenylalanine-alanine-PQ (Phe-Ala-PQ) is a PQ prodrug with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile compared to PQ. The toxicity of this prodrug was evaluated in in vitro assays using a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2), a monkey kidney cell line (BGM), and human red blood cells deficient in the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD). In addition, in vivo toxicity assays were performed with rats that received multiple doses of Phe-Ala-PQ to evaluate biochemical, hematological, and histopathological parameters. The activity was assessed by the inhibition of the sporogonic cycle using a chicken malaria parasite. Phe-Ala-PQ blocked malaria transmission in Aedes mosquitoes. When compared with PQ, it was less cytotoxic to BGM and HepG2 cells and caused less hemolysis of G6PD-deficient red blood cells at similar concentrations. The prodrug caused less alteration in the biochemical parameters than did PQ. Histopathological analysis of the liver and kidney did show differences between the control and Phe-Ala-PQ-treated groups, but they were not statistically significant. Taken together, the results highlight the prodrug as a novel lead compound candidate for the treatment of P. vivax malaria and as a blocker of malaria transmission. PMID:25133630

  11. Ferric carboxymaltose: a review of its use in iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    Ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject(®), Injectafer(®)) is an intravenous iron preparation approved in numerous countries for the treatment of iron deficiency. A single high dose of ferric carboxymaltose (up to 750 mg of iron in the US and 1,000 mg of iron in the EU) can be infused in a short time frame (15 min). Consequently, fewer doses of ferric carboxymaltose may be needed to replenish iron stores compared with some other intravenous iron preparations (e.g. iron sucrose). Ferric carboxymaltose improved self-reported patient global assessment, New York Heart Association functional class and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure and iron deficiency in two randomized, placebo-controlled trials (FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF). In other randomized controlled trials, ferric carboxymaltose replenished iron stores and corrected anaemia in various populations with iron-deficiency anaemia, including patients with chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease or heavy uterine bleeding, postpartum iron-deficiency anaemia and perioperative anaemia. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose was generally well tolerated, with a low risk of hypersensitivity reactions. It was generally better tolerated than oral ferrous sulfate, mainly reflecting a lower incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects. The most common laboratory abnormality seen in ferric carboxymaltose recipients was transient, asymptomatic hypophosphataemia. The higher acquisition cost of ferric carboxymaltose appeared to be offset by lower costs for other items, with the potential for cost savings. In conclusion, ferric carboxymaltose is an important option for the treatment of iron deficiency. PMID:25428711

  12. Vitamin B12 deficiency in relation to functional disabilities.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Breanna S; Tangney, Christy C; Gustashaw, Kristin A R; Rasmussen, Heather E

    2013-11-01

    This study was designed to assess whether symptoms, functional measures, and reported disabilities were associated with vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency when defined in three ways. Participants, aged 60 or more years of age, in 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) were categorized in relation to three previously used definitions of B12 deficiency: (1) serum B12 < 148 pmol/L; (2) serum B12 < 200 pmol/L and serum homocysteine > 20 μmol/L; and (3) serum B12 < 258 pmol/L or serum methylmalonic acid > 0.21 μmol/L. Functional measures of peripheral neuropathy, balance, cognitive function, gait speed, along with self-reported disability (including activities of daily living) were examined with standardized instruments by trained NHANES interviewers and technicians. Individuals identified as B12 deficient by definition 2 were more likely to manifest peripheral neuropathy OR (odds) (95% confidence intervals), p value: 9.70 (2.24, 42.07), 0.004 and report greater total disability, 19.61 (6.22, 61.86) 0.0001 after adjustments for age, sex, race, serum creatinine, and ferritin concentrations, smoking, diabetes, and peripheral artery disease. Smaller, but significantly increased, odds of peripheral neuropathy and total disability were also observed when definition 3 was applied. Functional measures and reported disabilities were associated with B12 deficiency definitions that include B12 biomarkers (homocysteine or methylmalonic acid). Further study of these definitions is needed to alert clinicians of possible subclinical B12 deficiency because functional decline amongst older adults may be correctable if the individual is B12 replete. PMID:24225845

  13. Vitamin B6 deficiency and diseases in elderly people – a study in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin deficiency is a cause of health related problems in elderly people. The aims were to study associations between vitamin B6 (B6) and diseases (primarily functional gastrointestinal disorders) in elderly people in nursing homes, the prevalence of B6 deficiency and factors associated with B6 deficiency. Methods This cross-sectional study included residents in nursing homes. Demographics, nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, MNA® ), physical activity, activity of daily living (Katz Index), dietary habits, use of drugs, and psychiatric and somatic diseases were recorded. A blood sample was collected for haematological and biochemical screening, including B6 (p-PLP); p-PLP values < 20 nmol/l indicates B6 deficiency. The results are given as mean (SD). Results Sixty-one residents (men/women: 22/39) with an age of 85.3 (6.8) years and BMI 25.7 (4.5) kg/m2 were included. Malnutrition and risk of malnutrition were present in 11.5% and 61% respectively. Dietary intake of B6 (mg/day) in men and women were 1.60 (0.30) and 1.18 (0.31) (recommended 1.6 and 1.2 respectively), and 14 (23%) used B6 supplements. Median p-PLP was 20.7 (range <4.0-175.8), 30 subjects (49%) had B6 deficiency. B6 deficiency was associated with old age, low s-alanine aminotransferase and s-albumin, elevated s-homocysteine and inactivity (p-values 0.01-0.03). There were no clinically significant associations between B6 deficiency and somatic or psychiatric disorders, and B6 deficiency was not observed in subjects given B6 supplements. Conclusions Half of the residents had vitamin B6 deficiency. Vitamin supplement was effective prophylaxis for deficiency and should be recommended to all elderly people in nursing homes. PMID:23394203

  14. Zinc in growth and development and spectrum of human zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S

    1988-10-01

    Growth retardation is seen in experimental animals as a result of severe dietary restriction of several essential trace elements. However, in humans, the effect of zinc deficiency is most pronounced. Growth failure and hypogonadism in males, related to a deficiency of zinc, have been recognized in many developing countries. A mild deficiency of zinc, affecting growth and development in children and adolescents, has been reported from developed countries as well. Zinc deficiency in humans may manifest as severe, moderate, or mild. The manifestations of severe zinc deficiency include bullous pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections due to cell-mediated immune dysfunctions, hypogonadism in males, neurosensory disorders, and problems with healing of ulcers. This condition can be fatal. A moderate level of zinc deficiency has been reported in a variety of conditions. Clinical manifestations include growth retardation and male hypogonadism in adolescence, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, cell-mediated immune dysfunctions, and abnormal neurosensory changes. A mild level of zinc deficiency may manifest with decreased serum testosterone level and oligospermia in males, decreased lean body mass, hyper-ammonemia, neurosensory changes, anergy, decreased serum thymulin activity, and decreased IL-2 activity. Although the clinical aspects of severe and moderate levels of zinc deficiency are well known, the recognition of mild levels of zinc deficiency has been difficult. Currently plasmas zinc appears to be the most widely used parameter for assessment of human zinc status, and it is known to be decreased in cases of severe and moderate deficiency of zinc.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3053862

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency and Insufficiency in Hospitalized COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mekov, Evgeni; Slavova, Yanina; Tsakova, Adelina; Genova, Marianka; Kostadinov, Dimitar; Minchev, Delcho; Marinova, Dora; Tafradjiiska, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction 31–77% of patients with COPD have vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency, with results being highly variable between studies. Vitamin D may also correlate with disease characteristics. Aim To find out the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation and a risk factors for lower vitamin D levels among comorbidities and COPD characteristics. Methods 152 patients were studied for vitamin D serum levels (25(OH)D). All of them were also assessed for diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome (MS). Data were gathered also for smoking status and exacerbations in last year. All patients completed CAT and mMRC questionnaires and underwent spirometry. Results A total of 83,6% of patients have reduced levels of vitamin D. 42,8% (65/152) have vitamin D insufficiency (defined as 25–50 nmol/L) and 40,8% (62/152) have vitamin D deficiency (<25 nmol/L). The mean level of 25(OH)D for all patients is 31,97 nmol/L (95%CI 29,12–34,68). Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are more prevalent in females vs. males (97,7 vs 77,8%; p = 0.003). The prevalence and severity of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in this study is significantly higher when compared to an unselected Bulgarian population (prevalence 75,8%; mean level 38,75 nmol/L). Vitamin D levels correlate with quality of life (measured by the mMRC scale) and lung function (FVC, FEV1, FEV6, FEF2575, FEV3, but not with FEV1/FVC ratio and PEF), it does not correlate with the presence of arterial hypertension, DM, MS and number of moderate, severe and total exacerbations. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for longer hospital stay. Conclusions The patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation are a risk group for vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency, which is associated with worse disease characteristics. PMID:26047485

  16. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affected with the disease may present with acute metabolic decompensation during infancy or with severe cardiomyopathy in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and treatment with L-carnitine may be life-saving. In this review article, the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of PCD are discussed, with a focus on cardiac involvements. PMID:24385988

  17. Photodissociation of neutron deficient nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnabend, K.; Babilon, M.; Hasper, J.; Müller, S.; Zarza, M.; Zilges, A.

    2006-03-01

    The knowledge of the cross sections for photodissociation reactions like e.g. (γ, n) of neutron deficient nuclei is of crucial interest for network calculations predicting the abundances of the so-called p nuclei. However, only single cross sections have been measured up to now, i.e., one has to rely nearly fully on theoretical predictions. While the cross sections of stable isotopes are accessible by experiments using real photons, the bulk of the involved reactions starts from unstable nuclei. Coulomb dissociation (CD) experiments in inverse kinematics might be a key to expand the experimental database for p-process network calculations. The approach to test the accuracy of the CD method is explained.

  18. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease. Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient. PMID:27106490

  19. Perspectives on nutritional iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency (ID) is caused by an intake of dietary iron insufficient to cover physiological iron requirements. Studies on iron absorption from whole diets have examined relationships between dietary iron bioavailability/absorption, iron losses, and amounts of stored iron. New insights have been obtained into regulation of iron absorption and expected rates of changes of iron stores or hemoglobin iron deficits when bioavailability or iron content of the diet has been modified and when losses of iron occur. Negative effects of ID are probably related to age, up to about 20 years, explaining some of earlier controversies. Difficulties in establishing the prevalence of mild ID are outlined. The degree of underestimation of the prevalence of mild ID when using multiple diagnostic criteria is discussed. It is suggested that current low-energy lifestyles are a common denominator for the current high prevalence not only of ID but also of obesity, diabetes, and osteoporosis. PMID:11375427

  20. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf T.; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania; Bedair, Said; Kassem, Islam

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH) and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH) 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products), encouraging adequate exposure

  1. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania; Bedair, Said; Kassem, Islam

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH) and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH) 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products), encouraging adequate exposure

  2. Vitamin A deficiency in quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nestler, R.B.; Bailey, W.W.

    1943-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the symptoms of avitaminosis A in growing and adolescent bobwhites. Chicks from parents that have received a diet rich in vitamin A may have enough stored to carry them a week or ten days on a growing diet deficient in vitamin A before symptoms of deficiency occur. The first sign is ruffled feathering, with the wing primaries standing out from the body and drooping. Ophthalmia in one or both eyes occurs and may close the eyes completely, but this condition is not severe in all cases and may not even be noticeable. Birds show poor growth, loss of appetite, and weakness before death. Under the conditions of the experiments discussed herein, death may occur in the fourth or fifth week, and mortality is high......Postmortem examination may reveal visceral gout with thick deposits of urates on the kidneys, in the ureters, on the heart, in the proventriculus, and occasionally covering all the viscera. There may also be hemorrhage of the heart and other organs....Adolescent quail reared on a diet rich in vitamin A may be able to live through the winter on a maintenance diet low in this vitamin without showing symptoms of avitaminosis, but some individuals whose storage of vitamin A in the liver is not as great as that of others may succumb to visceral gout.....A growing mash for quail which contains sufficient vitamin A when fresh may, after a period of storage, lose enough of the vitamin to cause the characteristic symptoms of avitaminosis A to appear.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors for vitamin D deficiency in children with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Sung Woo; Yoo, Eun Gyong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The increasing prevalence of breast feeding has led to concerns about vitamin D deficiency (VDD) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in children. We evaluated the prevalence of VDD in a population of Korean children with IDA and assessed the risk factors for VDD in these children. Methods A total of 79 children who were diagnosed with IDA were prospectively surveyed from April 2010 to March 2011. Data were collected by questionnaire, medical assessment, and laboratory tests, including measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), hemoglobin, and wrist radiography. Results The median age was 22 months and 30% of the subjects were female. Over a half of subjects (58%) had subnormal vitamin D level (25OHD<30 ng/mL), and VDD (25OHD<20 ng/mL) was present in 39% of children. There was no difference in serum hemoglobin level between IDA patients with VDD and those without VDD. Most subjects (89%) were currently or had recently been breastfed and almost all subjects (97%) who had VDD received breastfeeding. Children with VDD were more likely to be younger than 2 years, to have been breastfed, and to have been tested in winter or spring. Multivariable analysis indicated seasonal variation was a significant independent risk factor for VDD in our IDA patients. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that VDD has a high prevalence in Korean children with IDA. Primary care physicians should be aware of the possibility of VDD in children with IDA and should supplement the vitamin D as well as iron. PMID:22745645

  4. The Impact of Adult Vitamin D Deficiency on Behaviour and Brain Function in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Karly M.; Eyles, Darryl W.; McGrath, John J.; Burne, Thomas H. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D deficiency is common in the adult population, and this has been linked to depression and cognitive outcomes in clinical populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adult vitamin D (AVD) deficiency on behavioural tasks of relevance to neuropsychiatric disorders in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods Ten-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a control or vitamin D deficient diet for 6 weeks prior to, and during behavioural testing. We first examined a range of behavioural domains including locomotion, exploration, anxiety, social behaviour, learned helplessness, sensorimotor gating, and nociception. We then assessed locomotor response to the psychomimetic drugs, amphetamine and MK-801. Attention and vigilance were assessed using the 5 choice serial reaction time task (5C-SRT) and the 5 choice continuous performance task (5C-CPT) and, in a separate cohort, working memory was assessed using the delay match to sample (DMTS) task. We also examined excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in prefrontal cortex and striatum. Results AVD-deficient rats were deficient in vitamin D3 (<10 nM) and had normal calcium and phosphate levels after 8–10 weeks on the diet. Overall, AVD deficiency was not associated with an altered phenotype across the range of behavioural domains tested. On the 5C-SRT AVD-deficient rats made more premature responses and more head entries during longer inter-trial intervals (ITI) than control rats. On the 5C-CPT AVD-deficient rats took longer to make false alarm (FA) responses than control rats. AVD-deficient rats had increases in baseline GABA levels and the ratio of DOPAC/HVA within the striatum. Conclusions AVD-deficient rats exhibited no major impairments in any of the behavioural domains tested. Impairments in premature responses in AVD-deficient rats may indicate that these animals have specific alterations in striatal systems governing compulsive or reward-seeking behaviour. PMID:23951200

  5. D0 Detector Collision Hall Oxygen Deficiancy Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1992-08-06

    EN-258, D0 Platform ODH Analysts. provided the oxygen deficiency hazard analysts for the D0 detector in the Assembly Hall. This note covers the same analysis. but revised for the Collision Hall. Liquid cryogens. released and warming to atmosphere conditions, expand to, on average, seven hundred times their liquid volume, and displace vital atmospheric oxygen. An oxygen deficiency hazard analysis assesses the increased risk to personnel in areas containing cryogenic systems. The D0 detector Collision Hall ODH analysis has been approached five different ways using established methods. If the low beta quad magnets are powered, and the exhaust rate is below 4220 scfm, the area is ODH class 1. In any other case, the analysis shows the area to be ODH class 0 as equipped (with ventilation fans) and requiring no special safety provisions. System designers have provided for a reduced oxygen level detection and warning system as well as emergency procedures to address fault conditions.

  6. How common is vitamin B12 deficiency?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In considering the vitamin B-12 fortification of flour, it is important to know who is at risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency and whether those individuals would benefit from flour fortification.This article reviews current knowledge of the prevalence and causes of vitamin B-12 deficiency and considers ...

  7. [Factor VII deficiency revealed by intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Sfaihi Ben Mansour, L; Thabet, A; Aloulou, H; Turki, H; Chabchoub, I; Mhiri, F; Mnif, Z; Ben Ali, H; Kammoun, T; Hachicha, M

    2009-07-01

    Constitutional factor VII deficiency is a hereditary disease with recessive autosomic transmission. Its incidence is estimated to be 1/1,000,000 in the general population. We report a case of severe factor VII deficiency in infancy revealed by an intracranial hemorrhage in a 2-month-old infant. We describe the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of this disease. PMID:19409767

  8. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  9. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  10. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  11. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  12. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  13. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  14. 36 CFR 1120.26 - Deficient descriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deficient descriptions. 1120.26 Section 1120.26 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Information Available Upon Request § 1120.26 Deficient descriptions. (a) If the description of...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: triosephosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of triosephosphate isomerase deficiency. Eur J Haematol. 2011 Mar;86(3):265-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0609.2010.01484.x. Citation on PubMed Orosz F, Oláh J, Ovádi J. Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency: facts and doubts. IUBMB Life. 2006 Dec;58(12):703-15. Review. Citation ...

  16. Academic Deficiency: Student Experiences of Institutional Labeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barouch-Gilbert, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Limited existing research examines how undergraduate students in the United States experience the process of being identified as deficient due to their academic performance. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of college students on academic probation who were labeled academically deficient. Students…

  17. An update on serine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    van der Crabben, S N; Verhoeven-Duif, N M; Brilstra, E H; Van Maldergem, L; Coskun, T; Rubio-Gozalbo, E; Berger, R; de Koning, T J

    2013-07-01

    Serine deficiency disorders are caused by a defect in one of the three synthesising enzymes of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway. Serine deficiency disorders give rise to a neurological phenotype with psychomotor retardation, microcephaly and seizures in newborns and children or progressive polyneuropathy in adult patients. There are three defects that cause serine deficiency of which 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency, the defect affecting the first step in the pathway, has been reported most frequently. The other two disorders in L-serine biosynthesis phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) deficiency and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) deficiency have been reported only in a limited number of patients. The biochemical hallmarks of all three disorders are low concentrations of serine in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma. Prompt recognition of affected patients is important, since serine deficiency disorders are treatable causes of neurometabolic disorders. The use of age-related reference values for serine in CSF and plasma can be of great help in establishing a correct diagnosis of serine deficiency, in particular in newborns and young children. PMID:23463425

  18. Selective deficiency of IgA

    MedlinePlus

    Consider genetic counseling if you have a family history of selective IgA deficiency and you plan to have children. If ... Genetic counseling may be of value to prospective parents with a family history of selective IgA deficiency.

  19. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  20. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... National (UK) Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Pyruvate kinase deficiency of red cells Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  1. Acquired Zinc Deficiency in an Adult Female

    PubMed Central

    Saritha, Mohanan; Gupta, Divya; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Thappa, Devinder M; Rajesh, Nachiappa G

    2012-01-01

    Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of zinc absorption. Acquired cases are reported occasionally in patients with eating disorders or Crohn's disease. We report a 24-year-old housewife with acquired isolated severe zinc deficiency with no other comorbidities to highlight the rare occurrence of isolated nutritional zinc deficiency in an otherwise normal patient. PMID:23248371

  2. 33 CFR 154.1070 - Deficiencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deficiencies. 154.1070 Section 154.1070 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Oil Facilities § 154.1070 Deficiencies. (a) The cognizant COTP...

  3. 24 CFR 203.369 - Deficiency judgments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... State law to obtain a deficiency judgment. (b) Mortgages insured before March 28, 1988. For mortgages... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deficiency judgments. 203.369... SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Claim Procedure § 203.369...

  4. 37 CFR 2.185 - Correcting deficiencies in renewal application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the deficiency surcharge required by section 9(a) of the Act and § 2.6. (b) If the renewal application..., deficiencies may be corrected before the expiration date of the registration without paying a deficiency... deficiency surcharge required by section 9(a) of the Act and § 2.6. (2) Correcting deficiencies in...

  5. Thiamin Deficiency in People with Obesity12

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, Jennifer C; Arundel, Cherinne; Chawla, Lakhmir S

    2015-01-01

    Although obesity has been viewed traditionally as a disease of excess nutrition, evidence suggests that it may also be a disease of malnutrition. Specifically, thiamin deficiency was found in 15.5–29% of obese patients seeking bariatric surgery. It can present with vague signs and symptoms and is often overlooked in patients without alcohol use disorders. This review explores the relatively new discovery of high rates of thiamin deficiency in certain populations of people with obesity, including the effects of thiamin deficiency and potential underlying mechanisms of deficiency in people with obesity. The 2 observational studies that examined the prevalence in preoperative bariatric surgery patients and gaps in our current knowledge (including the prevalence of thiamin deficiency in the general obese population and whether the current RDA for thiamin meets the metabolic needs of overweight or obese adults) are reviewed. Suggestions for future areas of research are included. PMID:25770253

  6. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice. PMID:25586321

  7. Molecular diagnosis of coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yubero, Delia; Montero, Raquel; Armstrong, Judith; Espinós, Carmen; Palau, Francesc; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Salviati, Leonardo; Navas, Placido; Artuch, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) deficiency syndromes comprise a growing number of neurological and extraneurological disorders. Primary-genetic but also secondary CoQ deficiencies have been reported. The biochemical determination of CoQ is a good tool for the rapid identification of CoQ deficiencies but does not allow the selection of candidate genes for molecular diagnosis. Moreover, the metabolic pathway for CoQ synthesis is an intricate and not well-understood process, where a large number of genes are implicated. Thus, only next-generation sequencing techniques (either genetic panels of whole-exome and -genome sequencing) are at present appropriate for a rapid and realistic molecular diagnosis of these syndromes. The potential treatability of CoQ deficiency strongly supports the necessity of a rapid molecular characterization of patients, since primary CoQ deficiencies may respond well to CoQ treatment. PMID:26144946

  8. The management of cochlear nerve deficiency.

    PubMed

    Freeman, S R; Stivaros, S M; Ramsden, R T; O'Driscoll, M P; Nichani, J R; Bruce, I A; Green, K M; Henderson, L A; Rutherford, S A; King, A T; Lloyd, S K

    2013-11-01

    The assessment process is critical in deciding whether a profoundly deaf child with cochlear nerve deficiency (CND) will be suitable for a cochlear or auditory brainstem implant (ABI). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using submillimetric T2 weighted gradient echo or turbo spin echo sequences is mandatory for all profoundly deaf children to diagnose CND. Evidence of audition on behavioural or electrophysiological tests following both auditory and electrical stimulation sometimes allows identification of significant auditory tissue not visible on MRI. In particular electric auditory brainstem response (EABR) testing may allow some quantification of auditory tissue and help decide whether a cochlear implant will be beneficial. Age and cognitive development are the most critical factors in determining ABI benefit. Hearing outcomes from both cochlear implants and ABIs are variable and likely to be limited in children with CND. A proportion of children will get no benefit. Usually the implants would be expected to provide recognition of environmental sounds and understanding of simple phonetics. Most children will not develop normal speech and they will often need to learn to communicate with sign language. The ABI involves a major neurosurgical procedure and at present the long term outcomes are unknown. It is therefore essential that parents who are considering this intervention have plenty of time to consider all aspects and the opportunity for in depth discussion. PMID:24533760

  9. Sex-specific attentional deficits in adult vitamin D deficient BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Groves, Natalie J; Burne, Thomas H J

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment. However, there is a paucity of preclinical data showing that vitamin D deficiency is a causal factor for impaired cognitive processing. The aim of this study was to assess two cognitive tasks, the 5 choice-serial reaction task and the 5 choice-continuous performance task in adult vitamin D (AVD) deficient BALB/c mice. Ten-week old male and female BALB/c mice were fed a control or vitamin D deficient diet for 10 weeks prior to, and during behavioural testing. We found sex-dependent impairments in attentional processing and showed that male AVD-deficient mice were less accurate, took longer to respond when making a correct choice and were more likely to make an omission, without a change in the motivation to collect reward. By contrast, female AVD-deficient mice had a reduced latency to collect reward, but no changes on any other measures compared to controls. Therefore, we have shown that in otherwise healthy adult mice, vitamin D deficiency led to mild cognitive impairment in male but not female mice and therefore this model will be useful for future investigations into unravelling the mechanism by which vitamin D affects the adult brain and cognitive function. PMID:26836278

  10. In Vivo Evaluation of Transdermal Iodide Microemulsion for Treating Iodine Deficiency Using Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Alayoubi, Alaadin; Sullivan, Ryan D; Lou, Hao; Patel, Hemlata; Mandrell, Timothy; Helms, Richard; Almoazen, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the transdermal efficiency of iodide microemulsion in treating iodine deficiency using rats as an animal model. Animals were fed either iodine-deficient diet (20 μg/kg iodide) or control diet (200 μg/kg iodide) over a 17-month period. At month 14, iodide microemulsion was applied topically in iodine-deficient group and physiological evaluations of thyroid gland functions were characterized by monitoring the thyroid hormones (T3, T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), iodide ion excretion in urine, and the overall rat body weights in both groups. Moreover, morphological evaluations of thyroid gland before and after treatment were performed by ultrasound imaging and through histological assessment. Prior to microemulsion treatment, the levels of T3, T4, and TSH in iodine-deficient group were statistically significant as compared to that in the control group. The levels of T3 and T4 increased while TSH level decreased significantly in iodine-deficient group within the first 4 weeks of treatment. After treatment, iodide concentration in urine increased significantly. There was no statistical difference in weight between the two groups. Ultrasound imaging and histological evaluations showed evidence of hyperplasia in iodine-deficient group. Topical iodide microemulsion has shown a promising potential as a novel delivery system to treat iodine deficiency. PMID:26288943

  11. Folate deficiency affects histone methylation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Benjamin A; Luka, Zigmund; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Bhanu, Natarajan V; Wagner, Conrad

    2016-03-01

    that the bound THF serves to protect the FAD class of histone demethylases from the destructive effects of formaldehyde generation by formation of 5,10-methylene-THF. We present pilot data showing that decreased folate in livers as a result of dietary folate deficiency is associated with increased levels of methylated lysine 4 of histone 3. This can be a result of decreased LSD1 activity resulting from the decreased folate available to scavenge the formaldehyde produced at the active site caused by the folate deficiency. Because LSD1 can regulate gene expression this suggests that folate may play a more important role than simply serving as a carrier of one-carbon units and be a factor in other diseases associated with low folate. PMID:26880641

  12. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  13. Prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency among patients with thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Collins, Aryn B; Pawlak, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the non-specificity of symptoms and possibly severe consequences of untreated vitamin B-12 deficiency, screening is important for at-risk patients to ensure the prompt delivery of treatment. In this review, studies assessing the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in thyroid dysfunction are evaluated to determine whether regular vitamin B-12 screening is necessary. A literature search was conducted using multiple electronic databases. Only original studies assessing the prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in thyroid dysfunction that reported their findings as percentages of the sample were eligible for inclusion. From a total of 7091 manuscripts generated, 6 were included in this review. The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in hypothyroidism was reported as 10, 18.6, and 40.5% in three separate studies. The prevalence of deficiency in autoimmune thyroid disease was reported as 6.3, 28, and 55.5% in three studies. The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disease are reflective of the nutrition status of the population. Autoimmune thyroid disease is also associated with the autoimmune disorders pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis which may lead to malabsorption of vitamin B-12. Vitamin B-12 screening is recommended upon initial diagnosis with autoimmune thyroid disease and then periodically thereafter. There is not enough evidence to recommend regular screening for patients with hypothyroidism unless the underlying cause is autoimmune thyroid disease. PMID:27222404

  14. Choline deficiency increases lymphocyte apoptosis and DNA damage in humans2,3

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Niculescu, Mihai D; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Fischer, Leslie M; Zeisel, Steven H

    2008-01-01

    Background: Whereas deficiency of the essential nutrient choline is associated with DNA damage and apoptosis in cell and rodent models, it has not been shown in humans. Objective: The objective was to ascertain whether lymphocytes from choline-deficient humans had greater DNA damage and apoptosis than did those from choline-sufficient humans. Design: Fifty-one men and women aged 18–70 y were fed a diet containing the recommended adequate intake of choline (control) for 10 d. They then were fed a choline-deficient diet for up to 42 d before repletion with 138–550 mg choline/d. Blood was collected at the end of each phase, and peripheral lymphocytes were isolated. DNA damage and apoptosis were then assessed by activation of caspase-3, terminal deoxynucleotide transferase–mediated dUTP nick end-labeling, and single-cell gel electrophoresis (COMET) assays. Results: All subjects fed the choline-deficient diet had lymphocyte DNA damage, as assessed by COMET assay, twice that found when they were fed the control diet. The subjects who developed organ dysfunction (liver or muscle) when fed the choline-deficient diet had significantly more apoptotic lymphocytes, as assessed by the activated caspase-3 assay, than when fed the control diet. Conclusions: A choline-deficient diet increased DNA damage in humans. Subjects in whom these diets induced liver or muscle dys-function also had higher rates of apoptosis in their peripheral lymphocytes than did subjects who did not develop organ dysfunction. Assessment of DNA damage and apoptosis in lymphocytes appears to be a clinically useful measure in humans (such as those receiving parenteral nutrition) in whom choline deficiency is suspected. PMID:16825685

  15. Genetics Home Reference: alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions AMACR deficiency alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) deficiency is a disorder ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...