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Sample records for g8 summit meeting

  1. Construction of syndromic surveillance using a web-based daily questionnaire for health and its application at the G8 Hokkaido Toyako Summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, H; Ohkusa, Y; Akahane, M; Sugahara, T; Okabe, N; Imamura, T

    2010-10-01

    We constructed a syndromic surveillance system to collect directly information on daily health conditions directly from local residents via the internet [web-based daily questionnaire for health surveillance system (WDQH SS)]. This paper considers the feasibility of the WDQH SS and its ability to detect epidemics. A verification study revealed that our system was an effective surveillance system. We then applied an improved WDQH SS as a measure against public health concerns at the G8 Hokkaido Toyako Summit meeting in 2008. While in operation at the Summit, our system reported a fever alert that was consistent with a herpangina epidemic. The highly mobile WDQH SS described in this study has three main advantages: the earlier detection of epidemics, compared to other surveillance systems; the ability to collect data even on weekends and holidays; and a rapid system set-up that can be completed within 3 days. PMID:20067657

  2. Junior G8 Summit: Speaking Out with a "Passion for Peace"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Canada, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Junior G8 competition allows groups of young people from each of the G8 countries to have their voices heard on a global stage--the annual G8 summit. An international essay competition results in the selection of teams of students who travel to the G8 summit to provide a youth perspective on global issues. The 2006 competition focused on four…

  3. 77 FR 13232 - Security Zones; G8/North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Summit, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... with a large scale, international political event. DATES: Comments and related materials must be... the international, economical, and political objectives of G8 and NATO along with the...

  4. A multi-data source surveillance system to detect a bioterrorism attack during the G8 Summit in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Meyer, N; McMenamin, J; Robertson, C; Donaghy, M; Allardice, G; Cooper, D

    2008-07-01

    In 18 weeks, Health Protection Scotland (HPS) deployed a syndromic surveillance system to early-detect natural or intentional disease outbreaks during the G8 Summit 2005 at Gleneagles, Scotland. The system integrated clinical and non-clinical datasets. Clinical datasets included Accident & Emergency (A&E) syndromes, and General Practice (GPs) codes grouped into syndromes. Non-clinical data included telephone calls to a nurse helpline, laboratory test orders, and hotel staff absenteeism. A cumulative sum-based detection algorithm and a log-linear regression model identified signals in the data. The system had a fax-based track for real-time identification of unusual presentations. Ninety-five signals were triggered by the detection algorithms and four forms were faxed to HPS. Thirteen signals were investigated. The system successfully complemented a traditional surveillance system in identifying a small cluster of gastroenteritis among the police force and triggered interventions to prevent further cases. PMID:17678556

  5. 76 FR 550 - Second National Bed Bug Summit; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... AGENCY Second National Bed Bug Summit; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA is planning the second National Bed Bug Summit to be held February 1 and 2, 2011, on the topic of the bed bug resurgence in the United States. The goal of this...

  6. Meeting Report: Outcomes from the Undergraduate Research Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    This article reports the outcomes from the undergraduate research summit held on August 2003 at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. This summit brought together an array of stakeholders from the chemistry community, ranging from those with a long history of success in undergraduate research to junior faculty members who have started on a trajectory…

  7. Industry and Government Officials Meet for Space Weather Summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    2008-10-01

    Commercial airlines, electric power grids, cell phones, handheld Global Positioning Systems: Although the Sun is less active due to solar minimum, the number and types of situations and technologies that can benefit from up-to-date space weather information are growing. To address this, the second annual summit of the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group (CSWIG) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) was held on 1 May 2008 during Space Weather Workshop (SWW), in Boulder, Colo.

  8. The Physical Therapy and Society Summit (PASS) Meeting: observations and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kigin, Colleen M; Rodgers, Mary M; Wolf, Steven L

    2010-11-01

    The construct of delivering high-quality and cost-effective health care is in flux, and the profession must strategically plan how to meet the needs of society. In 2006, the House of Delegates of the American Physical Therapy Association passed a motion to convene a summit on "how physical therapists can meet current, evolving, and future societal health care needs." The Physical Therapy and Society Summit (PASS) meeting on February 27-28, 2009, in Leesburg, Virginia, sent a clear message that for physical therapists to be effective and thrive in the health care environment of the future, a paradigm shift is required. During the PASS meeting, participants reframed our traditional focus on the physical therapist and the patient/client (consumer) to one in which physical therapists are an integral part of a collaborative, multidisciplinary health care team with the health care consumer as its focus. The PASS Steering Committee recognized that some of the opportunities that surfaced during the PASS meeting may be disruptive or may not be within the profession's present strategic or tactical plans. Thus, adopting a framework that helps to establish the need for change that is provocative and potentially disruptive to our present care delivery, yet prioritizes opportunities, is a critical and essential step. Each of us in the physical therapy profession must take on post-PASS roles and responsibilities to accomplish the systemic change that is so intimately intertwined with our destiny. This article offers a perspective of the dynamic dialogue and suggestions that emerged from the PASS event, providing further opportunities for discussion and action within our profession. PMID:20829448

  9. Identifying practical solutions to meet America's fiber needs: proceedings from the Food & Fiber Summit.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Amy R; Jones, Julie Miller; Rodriguez, Judith; Slavin, Joanne; Zelman, Kathleen M

    2014-07-01

    Fiber continues to be singled out as a nutrient of public health concern. Adequate intakes of fiber are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, certain gastrointestinal disorders and obesity. Despite ongoing efforts to promote adequate fiber through increased vegetable, fruit and whole-grain intakes, average fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half of the recommended daily amounts. Research indicates that consumers report increasingly attempting to add fiber-containing foods, but there is confusion around fiber in whole grains. The persistent and alarmingly low intakes of fiber prompted the "Food & Fiber Summit," which assembled nutrition researchers, educators and communicators to explore fiber's role in public health, current fiber consumption trends and consumer awareness data with the objective of generating opportunities and solutions to help close the fiber gap. The summit outcomes highlight the need to address consumer confusion and improve the understanding of sources of fiber, to recognize the benefits of various types of fibers and to influence future dietary guidance to provide prominence and clarity around meeting daily fiber recommendations through a variety of foods and fiber types. Potential opportunities to increase fiber intake were identified, with emphasis on meal occasions and food categories that offer practical solutions for closing the fiber gap. PMID:25006857

  10. Identifying Practical Solutions to Meet America’s Fiber Needs: Proceedings from the Food & Fiber Summit

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Amy R.; Jones, Julie Miller; Rodriguez, Judith; Slavin, Joanne; Zelman, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Fiber continues to be singled out as a nutrient of public health concern. Adequate intakes of fiber are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, certain gastrointestinal disorders and obesity. Despite ongoing efforts to promote adequate fiber through increased vegetable, fruit and whole-grain intakes, average fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half of the recommended daily amounts. Research indicates that consumers report increasingly attempting to add fiber-containing foods, but there is confusion around fiber in whole grains. The persistent and alarmingly low intakes of fiber prompted the “Food & Fiber Summit,” which assembled nutrition researchers, educators and communicators to explore fiber’s role in public health, current fiber consumption trends and consumer awareness data with the objective of generating opportunities and solutions to help close the fiber gap. The summit outcomes highlight the need to address consumer confusion and improve the understanding of sources of fiber, to recognize the benefits of various types of fibers and to influence future dietary guidance to provide prominence and clarity around meeting daily fiber recommendations through a variety of foods and fiber types. Potential opportunities to increase fiber intake were identified, with emphasis on meal occasions and food categories that offer practical solutions for closing the fiber gap. PMID:25006857

  11. The G8 and global health: What now? What next?

    PubMed

    Labonte, Ronald; Schrecker, Ted

    2006-01-01

    The policies of the G8 countries (the G7 industrialized countries plus Russia) matter for population health and the determinants of health worldwide. In the years before the 2005 Summit, relevant G7 commitments were more often broken than kept, representing an inadequate response to the scale of health crises in countries outside the industrialized world. The commitments made in 2005 by some G7 countries to increase development assistance to the longstanding target of 0.7% of Gross National Income, and by the G7 as a whole to additional debt cancellation for some developing countries, were welcome and overdue. However, Canada and the United States did not state timetables for reaching the development assistance target, and new conditionalities attached to debt relief may undermine the benefits for population health. Lack of adequate funding for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, even after the September 2005 replenishment meeting, is unconscionable; yet even if those funds were provided, additional resources for developing country health systems would be needed. Similarly, widespread agreement on the need for improving market access for developing country exports was not met with any concrete policy response to the "asymmetrical" nature of recent trade liberalization; neither was the need to control the deadly trade in small arms. To respond adequately to global health needs, the G8 will need to adopt an agenda that more fundamentally alters the distribution of economic and political power, within and among nations. PMID:16512325

  12. We the Children: Meeting the Promises of the World Summit for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annan, Kofi A.

    This abridged version of the Secretary-General's report to the United Nations General Assembly's Special Session on Children details the achievements of the 1990 World Summit for Children. Nearly 150 countries provided national progress reports of their implementation of goals set forth in the Summit and the 1989 Convention on the Rights of the…

  13. The political process in global health and nutrition governance: the G8's 2010 Muskoka Initiative on Maternal, Child, and Newborn Health.

    PubMed

    Kirton, John; Kulik, Julia; Bracht, Caroline

    2014-12-01

    Why do informal, plurilateral summit institutions such as the Group of Eight (G8) major market democracies succeed in advancing costly public health priorities such as maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH), even when the formal, multilateral United Nations (UN) system fails to meet such goals, when G8 governments afflicted by recession, deficit, and debt seek to cut expenditures, and when the private sector is largely uninvolved, despite the growing popularity of public-private partnerships to meet global health and related nutrition, food, and agriculture needs? Guided by the concert-equality model of G8 governance, this case study of the G8's 2010 Muskoka Initiative on MNCH traces the process through which that initiative was planned within Canada, internationally prepared through negotiations with Canada's G8 partners, produced at Muskoka by the leaders in June, multiplied in its results by the UN summit in September, and reinforced by the new accountability mechanism put in place. It finds that the Muskoka summit succeeded in mobilizing major money and momentum for MNCH. This was due to the initiative and influence of children-focused nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), working with committed individuals and agencies within the host Canadian government, as well as supportive public opinion and the help of those in the UN responsible for realizing its Millennium Development Goals. Also relevant were the democratic like-mindedness of G8 leaders and their African partners, the deference of G8 members to the host's priority, and the need of the G8 to demonstrate its relevance through a division of labor between it and the new Group of Twenty summit. This study shows that G8 summits can succeed in advancing key global health issues without a global shock on the same subject to galvanize agreement and action. It suggests that, when committed, focused NGOs and government officials will lead and the private sector will follow, but that there will be a lag in the

  14. Building a sustainable clinical academic workforce to meet the future healthcare needs of Australia and New Zealand: report from the first summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J; Searle, J; Hanney, R; Chapman, A; Grigg, M; Choong, P; Mackay, A; Smithers, B M; Churchill, J A; Carney, S; Smith, J A; Wainer, Z; Talley, N J; Gladman, M A

    2015-09-01

    The delivery of healthcare that meets the requirements for quality, safety and cost-effectiveness relies on a well-trained medical workforce, including clinical academics whose career includes a specific commitment to research, education and/or leadership. In 2011, the Medical Deans of Australia and New Zealand published a review on the clinical academic workforce and recommended the development of an integrated training pathway for clinical academics. A bi-national Summit on Clinical Academic Training was recently convened to bring together all relevant stakeholders to determine how best to do this. An important part understood the lessons learnt from the UK experience after 10 years since the introduction of an integrated training pathway. The outcome of the summit was to endorse strongly the recommendations of the medical deans. A steering committee has been established to identify further stakeholders, solicit more information from stakeholder organisations, convene a follow-up summit meeting in late 2015, recruit pilot host institutions and engage the government and future funders. PMID:26332622

  15. The future of sleep technology: report from an American Association of Sleep Technologists summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Rita; Trimble, Melinda

    2014-05-15

    The American Association of Sleep Technologists (AAST) Board of Directors hosted a Sleep Technology Summit on September 21, 2013 with the goals of identifying changes in the delivery of diagnostic and treatment services to sleep disorders patients, predicting the impact on sleep technologists, identifying new roles for sleep technologists, and determining appropriate education to prepare technologists for the future. A carefully chosen panel of speakers focused on the business skills necessary to provide care cost effectively and the clinical skills that will be essential for the technologist of the future to help care for patients with sleep disorders. A group of selected leaders, educators, and industry professionals reviewed the current state of affairs and examined opportunities to sustain the profession and define the role of the sleep technologist of the future. Facilitated group discussions of these critical topics followed each session. There was a clear consensus that regulatory and economic pressures are changing the way sleep disorders patients are diagnosed and treated. Private insurers are requiring pre-authorization for laboratory sleep studies and are incentivizing home sleep testing for most patients suspected of obstructive sleep apnea. Reimbursement for home testing will be lower than for laboratory testing, and further reductions in overall reimbursement are anticipated. These factors will almost certainly reduce the need for technologists to perform laboratory diagnostic studies and pressure sleep centers to reduce payrolls. Remaining laboratory patients will have more complicated sleep disorders, have more comorbidity, and require a higher level of care than most of the patients currently tested in sleep centers. Testing these patients will require technologists with a higher level of training, experience, and sophistication. A second area of consensus was that the focus in medicine is changing from diagnosis to outcomes. New models of

  16. Summary of summit meeting of professional society presidents and/or executive directors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    The Board on Earth Sciences convened a meeting of presidents and executive directors of major American solid earth sciences professional organizations on February 7, 1986, to explore the commonalities of goals and to enhance the effectiveness of individuals and organizations. The following items were discussed by leaders in the earth sciences: responsibilities of the Board on Earth Sciences and the American Geological Institute; new scientific initiatives in the solid earth sciences; the 1989 International Geological Congress; the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program; the International Decade of Hazard Reduction; the deteriorating situation in the American energy and mineral resources industries; the state of geological mapping in the United States; and funding for research in the solid earth sciences. Policy statements were developed on several of the above topics. Problem areas were identified that require the continuing attention of the earth sciences community. The problem areas enumerated during the meeting are presented in summary in the text. 3 figs.

  17. 2007 Youth Policy Summit Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ellen; Fussell, Annemarie; Templin, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The NCSSSMST (National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and Technology) and Keystone Science School co-sponsored two Youth Policy Summits during the summer of 2007. Forty students represented 10 high schools from across the country at each Summit, meeting for a week in June and August at Keystone Science School…

  18. Summing up the Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The President of ALIA writes about expectations for the Public Libraries Summit, and provides an account of what took place on the day of the meeting, and what has taken place since. In funding terms, the most likely areas of productive engagement with the federal government are considered to be: children, early learning and a literate Australia;…

  19. 77 FR 22221 - Security Zones; North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Summit, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ...) Summit, Chicago, Illinois in the Federal Register (77 FR 13232). Although the G8 Summit is now planned to... the potential dangers associated with a large scale, international political event. DATES: This rule... Coast Guard security zones for this event. Rather, the NATO Summit remains a highly political event...

  20. 2007 simulation education summit.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue Ming; Pliego, Jose F; Henrichs, Bernadette; Bowyer, Mark W; Siddall, Viva J; McGaghie, William C; Raemer, Daniel B

    2008-01-01

    The Society for Simulation in Healthcare convened the second Simulation Education Summit meeting in October 2007 in Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the Summit was to bring together leaders of public, private, and government organizations, associations, and agencies involved in healthcare education for a focused discussion of standards for simulation-based applications. Sixty-eight participants representing 36 organizations discussed in structured small and large groups the criteria needed for various training and assessment applications using simulation. Although consensus was reached for many topics, there were also areas that required further thought and dialogue. This article is a summary of the results of these discussions along with a preliminary draft of a guideline for simulation-based education. PMID:19088663

  1. 16 CFR Appendix G8 to Part 305 - Boilers (Electric)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Boilers (Electric) G8 Appendix G8 to Part... LABELING RULEâ) Appendix G8 to Part 305—Boilers (Electric) Type Range of annual fuel utilization efficiencies (AFUEs) Low High Electric Boilers 100 100...

  2. 12 CFR 563g.8 - Use of the offering circular.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of the offering circular. 563g.8 Section... § 563g.8 Use of the offering circular. (a) An offering circular or amendment declared effective by the... therein is as of a date not more than 16 months prior to such use. (b) An offering circular filed...

  3. 12 CFR 563g.8 - Use of the offering circular.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of the offering circular. 563g.8 Section... § 563g.8 Use of the offering circular. (a) An offering circular or amendment declared effective by the... therein is as of a date not more than 16 months prior to such use. (b) An offering circular filed...

  4. Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit: Summit Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Walton, Marlei; Davis-Street, Janis; Smaka, Todd J.; Griffin, DeVon

    2006-01-01

    The Medical Informatics and Health Care Systems group in the Office of Space Medicine at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has been tasked by NASA with improving overall medical care on the International Space Station (ISS) and providing insights for medical care for future exploration missions. To accomplish this task, a three day Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit was held on August 23-25th, 2005 at Space Center Houston. The purpose of the summit was to review NASA#s a) current strategy for preflight health maintenance and injury screening, b) current treatment methods in-flight, and c) risk mitigation strategy for musculoskeletal injuries or syndromes that could occur or impact the mission. Additionally, summit participants provided a list of research topics NASA should consider to mitigate risks to astronaut health. Prior to the summit, participants participated in a web-based pre-summit forum to review the NASA Space Medical Conditions List (SMCL) of musculoskeletal conditions that may occur on ISS as well as the resources currently available to treat them. Data from the participants were compiled and integrated with the summit proceedings. Summit participants included experts from the extramural physician and researcher communities, and representatives from NASA Headquarters, the astronaut corps, JSC Medical Operations and Human Adaptations and Countermeasures Offices, Glenn Research Center Human Research Office, and the Astronaut Strength, Conditioning, and Reconditioning (ASCR) group. The recommendations in this document are based on a summary of summit discussions and the best possible evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal care for astronauts while on the ISS, and include recommendati ons for exploration class missions.

  5. New Visions in Action: National Assessment Summit Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbusch, Marcia Harmon, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The National Assessment Summit was designed to bring together users and producers of assessments and engage them in a discussion of unmet assessment needs and untapped assessment capacities. The meeting was truly a summit in that national foreign language organizations and associations were asked to nominate representatives to bring their…

  6. Atrial Arrhythmia Summit: Post Summit Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together nationally and internationally recognized experts in cardiology, electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space medicine in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms, risk factors, and management of atrial arrhythmias in the unique occupational cohort of the U.S. astronaut corps.

  7. Global warming at the summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    During the recent summit meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Bill Clinton, the two leaders reaffirmed their concerns about global warming and the need to continue to take actions to try to reduce the threat.In a June 4 joint statement, they stressed the need to develop flexibility mechanisms, including international emissions trading, under the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. They also noted that initiatives to reduce the risk of greenhouse warming, including specific mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol, could potentially promote economic growth.

  8. International Summit on Integrated Environmental Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the International Summit on Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM), held in Washington, DC 7th-9th December 2010. The meeting brought together 57 scientists and managers from leading US and European government and non-governmental organizations, universitie...

  9. Presidents' Summit for America's Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Volunteer Administration, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Includes "Reflections of a Delegate to the Presidents' Summit for America's Future [PSAF]" (Seita); "Personal Reactions to the PSAF" (Ellis); "The Presidents' Summit: Telling Our Stories" (Silver); "Thoughts on the Presidents' Summit" (Todd); and "An Internet Dialogue: Thoughts on Literacy, Volunteers, and the Presidents' Summit" (Clay, Cora,…

  10. g8b Experiment at JLab: Photoproduction of PHI meson

    SciTech Connect

    Salamanca, Julian; Cole, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The experiments using polarized photos, at threshold energies, have been taken as relevant experiments because the physics behind them is expected to explain a bunch of problems into the hadronic physics. The nature of parity exchange at threshold energies, strangeness content of proton, violation of Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka observation (OZI rule), are examples of them. Photoproduction of vector mesons by using polarized photons gives a very important way to study those issues. Our goal will be measure the $\\vec {\\gamma} p \\rightarrow \\phi p $ reaction, with $\\phi \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-} $, in the photon energy range of 1.7GeV to 2.1 GeV by using a Coherent Linear Polarized Photon Beam in Hall-B at Thomas Jefferson Laboratory (Newport News, VA). The experiment where data were taken was called "g8b".

  11. PACIFIC NORTHWEST CYBER SUMMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Matlock, Gordon W.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.; Smith, Karen S.

    2013-08-07

    On March 26, 2013, the Snohomish County Public Utility District (PUD) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) jointly hosted the Pacific Northwest Cyber Summit with the DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, the White House, Washington State congressional delegation, Washington State National Guard, and regional energy companies.

  12. Simulating Global Climate Summits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesperman, Dean P.; Haste, Turtle; Alrivy, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    One of the most persistent and controversial issues facing the global community is climate change. With the creation of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992 and the Kyoto Protocol (1997), the global community established some common ground on how to address this issue. However, the last several climate summits have failed…

  13. News & Information President Chen Yiyu Meets with Omi Professor Wang Jie Meets with NSF Assistant Director Vice President Sun Jiaguang Visited Japan and Germany on International Evaluation Vice President Shen Wenqing Meets JST Delegation Vice President Wang Jie Meets with Vice President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh 12th Meeting of China-Korea Joint Committee for Basic Scientific Research Held Further Implement the Scientific Outlook for Development and Open up a New Prospect for Science Funding Panel Meeting for A3 Foresight Program 2008 held in Hangzhou Department Director's Fund for Earthquake Relief Vice President Shen Wenqing Meets IRRI Officials President Chen Yiyu Visits Taiwan Province NSFC VIP Attends the NSFC-JST Workshop 1st NSFC-JST Joint Evaluation for Funded Projects Ends Successfully NSFC Delegation Visits the U.S. Top Heads Meet at China-US Computer Science Leadership Summit President Chen Yiyu Met with Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chari Sirindhorn of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    President Chen Yiyu Meets with Omi Professor Wang Jie Meets with NSF Assistant Director Vice President Sun Jiaguang Visited Japan and Germany on International Evaluation Vice President Shen Wenqing Meets JST Delegation Vice President Wang Jie Meets with Vice President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh 12th Meeting of China-Korea Joint Committee for Basic Scientific Research Held Further Implement the Scientific Outlook for Development and Open up a New Prospect for Science Funding Panel Meeting for A3 Foresight Program 2008 held in Hangzhou Department Director's Fund for Earthquake Relief Vice President Shen Wenqing Meets IRRI Officials President Chen Yiyu Visits Taiwan Province NSFC VIP Attends the NSFC-JST Workshop 1st NSFC-JST Joint Evaluation for Funded Projects Ends Successfully NSFC Delegation Visits the U.S. Top Heads Meet at China-US Computer Science Leadership Summit President Chen Yiyu Met with Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chari Sirindhorn of Thailand

  14. Ascraeus Mons Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    7 March 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a lava channel on the northeastern summit of Ascraeus Mons.

    Location near: 11.5oN, 104.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Northern Spring

  15. Summiteers--Moving Mountains with Bereaved Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, Hans-Georg

    2011-01-01

    Summiteers are people who rush to the top. There is a mountain summit and a metaphorical summit inside us which we can climb. In the area of mountain summits, Reinhold Messner is surely the best known and most successful summiteer. He climbed, among other things, the highest peak on earth without supplemental oxygen. In the language of the country…

  16. The 2015 Pregnancy Summit, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Cherynne

    2016-03-01

    Pregnancy Summit, Cineworld, The O2, London, UK, 29 September to 1 October 2015 The 2015 Pregnancy Summit was held over 3 days from 29 September to 1 October at Cineworld, The O2, London, UK. The event brings together a multidisciplinary faculty of international researchers and clinicians to discuss both scientific and clinical aspects of pregnancy-related issues in an informal setting. The goal of the meeting was to provide delegates with an update of recent advances in management of pregnancy-related conditions, to present research data and to discuss the current attitudes and practices in relevant topics. An extensive range of topics were discussed, from preeclampsia and treatment of hypertension, to the psychological impact of termination of pregnancy and feticide. This report will summarize a selection of the lectures presented. PMID:26900652

  17. Ebook Summit: Our Ebook Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Over 2000 participants made the daylong programming at the "Library Journal"/"School Library Journal" Virtual Ebook Summit, September 29, a robust conversation and not just within the summit interface but also in tweets with the #ebooksummit hashtag (and beyond) and in libraries across the country where participants logged in to take part. The…

  18. Pavonis Mons Summit Caldera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This image shows part of the summit caldera of Pavonis Mons. Pavonis the middle of three Tharsis volcanos that form a line southeast of Olympus Mons and northwest of Vallis Marineris. On Earth volcanic calderas usually form when a massive eruption has emptied out the magma chamber and the 'roof' of the chamber collapses into the resultant space. It is likely that summit calderas on Martian volcanoes form in a similar manner.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. IT Summit 2010 - Award Winners

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA CIO Linda Cureton announces this year’s IT Summit award winners. These awards recognize achievement in six key areas for contributions that have aided in NASA achieving mission goals and objec...

  20. IT Summit 2010 - Promo 2

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA CIO Linda Cureton offers a preview of the NASA IT Summit, which will feature IT experts from the public and private sectors speaking about IT collaboration, innovation, waves of the future, in...

  1. AGU hosts Leadership Summit on Climate Science Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, Ann

    2011-03-01

    Building on informal meetings among a small group of scientific societies and research institutions concerned with climate science, AGU hosted a Leadership Summit on Climate Science Communication, 7-8 March 2011, in Washington, D. C. Presidents, executive directors, and senior public policy staff from 17 science organizations engaged with experts in the social sciences regarding effective communication of climate science and with practitioners from agriculture, energy, and the military. The keynote speaker for the summit was Bob Inglis, former U.S. representative from South Carolina's 4th Congressional District.

  2. Human and bovine serotype G8 rotaviruses may be derived by reassortment.

    PubMed

    Browning, G F; Snodgrass, D R; Nakagomi, O; Kaga, E; Sarasini, A; Gerna, G

    1992-01-01

    The origin of, and relationship between human and bovine serotype G8 rotaviruses were investigated by genomic hybridisation. Radiolabelled mRNAs of human G8 rotaviruses 69M (isolated in Indonesia) and HAL1271 (isolated in Finland), and bovine rotaviruses KK3 (G10) and NCDV (G6), were used as probes. The products of liquid hybridisation between the probes and the genomic RNA of human and bovine rotaviruses, including bovine G8 rotavirus 678 (isolated in Scotland) and two other Finnish human G8 rotaviruses HAL1166 and HAL8590, were examined by separation in polyacrylamide gels. The genomes of Finnish human G8 rotaviruses were similar to those of bovine G6 and G10 rotaviruses. Neither Indonesian human G8 nor bovine G8 viruses had high levels of similarity to each other or to other bovine and human rotaviruses. Thus these three epidemiologically distinct G8 rotaviruses have different origins and may be derived by reassortment with rotaviruses of a third, as yet unknown, host species. The similarity between the Finnish isolates and the bovine isolate NCDV suggests that they have diverged recently and that these human G8 rotaviruses may be derived from a zoonotic infection, or alternatively, from the live rotavirus vaccine of bovine origin which has been used to vaccinate Finnish children. PMID:1322648

  3. Drug repositioning summit: finding new routes to success.

    PubMed

    Campas, Clara

    2009-03-01

    The Third Annual Drug Repositioning Summit 2008 was held at the Hyatt Harborside Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts, October 6-7, and focused on new strategies for drug repositioning. The meeting, organized by The Cambridge Healthtech Institute, brought together a panel of speakers from the industry and the academia, who discussed and proposed new routes for success in drug repositioning based on their own experience in the field. This meeting report summarizes the most relevant presentations and issues discussed. PMID:19330171

  4. 16 CFR Appendix G8 to Part 305 - Boilers-Electric

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Boilers-Electric G8 Appendix G8 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Boilers—Electric Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  5. 16 CFR Appendix G8 to Part 305 - Boilers-Electric

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Boilers-Electric G8 Appendix G8 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Boilers—Electric Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  6. 16 CFR Appendix G8 to Part 305 - Boilers-Electric

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Boilers-Electric G8 Appendix G8 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Boilers—Electric Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  7. 16 CFR Appendix G8 to Part 305 - Boilers-Electric

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Boilers-Electric G8 Appendix G8 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Boilers—Electric Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  8. Beyond the World Food Summit.

    PubMed

    Mulvany, P

    1997-08-01

    While most speakers at the 1996 World Food Summit expressed concern about the injustice that forces more than 800 million people worldwide to live with hunger, some sought solutions through economic and social development while others called for a more liberal marketplace. Among world leaders, only Fidel Castro raised issues and challenges that addressed some of the underlying causes of malnutrition. The Plan of Action that grew out of the Summit has only one measurable commitment, which is to halve the number of undernourished people by 2015. The other six commitments, while diluted, contain important objectives even though they give little emphasis to the underlying causes of poverty or hunger. The Summit process, however, did contribute to the fact that food-related issues are now placed higher on the world agenda because many of these issue were raised by civil service organizations (CSOs) at the Summit's parallel NGO (nongovernmental organization) forum. In fact, one of the most positive outcomes of the Summit may prove to be the increased effectiveness of the CSOs as a result of the creation of improved networks in preparation for the Summit. The CSOs contributed examples of how food security could be improved, published an active site on the World Wide Web, and challenged the statements of governments. In addition to raising trade issues, CSOs also lobbied for sustainable agriculture and agricultural biodiversity. In fact, CSOs may have to set a new action agenda for the formal sector to encourage development of new institutions and new global forums that give NGOs a place at the table. PMID:12348317

  9. Atrial Arrhythmias in Astronauts - Summary of a NASA Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael R.; Watkins, Sharmila D.; Polk, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Problem Definition: To evaluate NASA s current standards and practices related to atrial arrhythmias in astronauts, Space Medicine s Advanced Projects Section at the Johnson Space Center was tasked with organizing a summit to discuss the approach to atrial arrhythmias in the astronaut cohort. Since 1959, 11 cases of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, or supraventricular tachycardia have been recorded among active corps crewmembers. Most of the cases were paroxysmal, although a few were sustained. While most of the affected crewmembers were asymptomatic, those slated for long-duration space flight underwent radiofrequency ablation treatment to prevent further episodes of the arrhythmia. The summit was convened to solicit expert opinion on screening, diagnosis, and treatment options, to identify gaps in knowledge, and to propose relevant research initiatives. Summit Meeting Objectives: The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together a panel of six cardiologists, including nationally and internationally renowned leaders in cardiac electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space flight cardiovascular physiology. The primary objectives of the summit discussions were to evaluate cases of atrial arrhythmia in the astronaut population, to understand the factors that may predispose an individual to this condition, to understand NASA s current capabilities for screening, diagnosis, and treatment, to discuss the risks associated with treatment of crewmembers assigned to long-duration missions or extravehicular activities, and to discuss recommendations for prevention or management of future cases. Summary of Recommendations: The summit panel s recommendations were grouped into seven categories: Epidemiology, Screening, Standards and Selection, Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation Manifesting Preflight, Atrial Fibrillation during Flight, Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation, and Future Research

  10. Higher Ambitions Summit. Rapporteur Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The Sutton Trust and Pearson two-day summit on higher ambitions in apprenticeships and vocational education drew more than 120 leaders in education, training and employment, policy makers, academics, and researchers to London. Delegates heard from political leaders stressing the importance they attach to high-quality apprenticeships. Presentations…

  11. Proceedings of the 2013 CINP summit: innovative partnerships to accelerate CNS drug discovery for improved patient care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anthony George; Hongaard-Andersen, Peter; Moscicki, Richard A; Sahakian, Barbara; Quirion, Rémi; Krishnan, K Ranga Rama; Race, Tim

    2015-02-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases and, in particular, mental health disorders, are becoming recognized as the health challenge of the 21(st) century. Currently, at least 10% of the global population is affected by a mental health disorder, a figure that is set to increase year on year. Meanwhile, the rate of development of new CNS drugs has not increased for many years, despite unprecedented levels of investment. In response to this state of affairs, the Collegium Internationale Neuro-Psychopharmacologicum (CINP) convened a summit to discuss ways to reverse this disturbing trend through new partnerships to accelerate CNS drug discovery. The objectives of the Summit were to explore the issues affecting the value chain (i.e. the chain of activities or stakeholders that a company engages in/with to deliver a product to market) in brain research, thereby gaining insights from key stakeholders and developing actions to address unmet needs; to identify achievable objectives to address the issues; to develop action plans to bring about measurable improvements across the value chain and accelerate CNS drug discovery; and finally, to communicate recommendations to governments, the research and development community, and other relevant stakeholders. Summit outputs include the following action plans, aligned to the pressure points within the brain research-drug development value chain: Code of conduct dealing with conflict of interest issues, Prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment, Linking science and regulation, Patient involvement in trial design, definition of endpoints, etc., Novel trial design, Reproduction and confirmation of data, Update of intellectual property (IP) laws to facilitate repurposing and combination therapy (low priority), Large-scale, global patient registries, Editorials on nomenclature, biomarkers, and diagnostic tools, and Public awareness, with brain disease advocates to attend G8 meetings and World Economic Forum (WEF) Annual meetings in

  12. Proceedings of the 2013 CINP Summit: Innovative Partnerships to Accelerate CNS Drug Discovery for Improved Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Hongaard-Andersen, Peter; Moscicki, Richard A.; Sahakian, Barbara; Quirion, Rémi; Krishnan, K. Ranga Rama; Race, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases and, in particular, mental health disorders, are becoming recognized as the health challenge of the 21st century. Currently, at least 10% of the global population is affected by a mental health disorder, a figure that is set to increase year on year. Meanwhile, the rate of development of new CNS drugs has not increased for many years, despite unprecedented levels of investment. In response to this state of affairs, the Collegium Internationale Neuro-Psychopharmacologicum (CINP) convened a summit to discuss ways to reverse this disturbing trend through new partnerships to accelerate CNS drug discovery. The objectives of the Summit were to explore the issues affecting the value chain (i.e. the chain of activities or stakeholders that a company engages in/with to deliver a product to market) in brain research, thereby gaining insights from key stakeholders and developing actions to address unmet needs; to identify achievable objectives to address the issues; to develop action plans to bring about measurable improvements across the value chain and accelerate CNS drug discovery; and finally, to communicate recommendations to governments, the research and development community, and other relevant stakeholders. Summit outputs include the following action plans, aligned to the pressure points within the brain research-drug development value chain: Code of conduct dealing with conflict of interest issues,Prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment,Linking science and regulation,Patient involvement in trial design, definition of endpoints, etc.,Novel trial design,Reproduction and confirmation of data,Update of intellectual property (IP) laws to facilitate repurposing and combination therapy (low priority),Large-scale, global patient registries,Editorials on nomenclature, biomarkers, and diagnostic tools, andPublic awareness, with brain disease advocates to attend G8 meetings and World Economic Forum (WEF) Annual meetings in Davos

  13. 77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities, and Social Determinants of Health...). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing, will...

  14. Summit Panorama with Rover Deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Summit Panorama with Rover (QTVR)

    The panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the hundreds of images combined into this 360-degree view, the 'Husband Hill Summit' panorama. The images were acquired on Spirit's sols 583 to 586 (Aug. 24 to 27, 2005), shortly after the rover reached the crest of 'Husband Hill' inside Mars' Gusev Crater. This is the largest panorama yet acquired from either Spirit or Opportunity. The panoramic camera shot 653 separate images in 6 different filters, encompassing the rover's deck and the full 360 degrees of surface rocks and soils visible to the camera from this position. This is the first time the camera has been used to image the entire rover deck and visible surface from the same position. Stitching together of all the images took significant effort because of the large changes in resolution and parallax across the scene.

    The image is an approximately true-color rendering using the 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 480-nanometer filters for the surface, and the 600-nanometer and 480-nanometer filters for the rover deck. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

    This panorama provided the team's first view of the 'Inner Basin' region (center of the image), including the enigmatic 'Home Plate' feature seen from orbital data. After investigating the summit area, Spirit drove downhill to get to the Inner Basin region. Spirit arrived at the summit from the west, along the direction of the rover tracks seen in the middle right of the panorama. The peaks of 'McCool Hill' and 'Ramon Hill' can be seen on the horizon near the center of the panorama. The summit region itself is a broad, windswept plateau. Spirit spent more than a month exploring the summit region, measuring the chemistry and mineralogy of soils and rocky outcrops at the peak

  15. Foreign policy matters: a normative view of the G8 and population health.

    PubMed

    Labonte, Ronald; Schrecker, Ted

    2007-03-01

    The Group of Eight (G8) countries occupy a dominant position in the international economic and political order. Given what is known about influences on the social determinants of health in an interconnected world, the G8 are a logical starting point for any enquiry into the relations between foreign policy and health. We first make five arguments for adopting an explicitly normative, equity-oriented perspective on the performance of G8 policy in areas related to population health. We then examine G8 performance with respect to the crucial policy triad of development assistance, debt relief and trade, finding that neither rhetoric nor promising institutional innovation has been matched by resources commensurate with demonstrated levels of need. We conclude that it is necessary to pursue advocacy efforts based on the normative perspective we have put forward and that doing so effectively requires further investigation of why some policies are more receptive than others to policies of redistribution both within and outside their borders. PMID:17486209

  16. Functional involvement of G8 in the hairpin ribozyme cleavage mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pinard, Robert; Hampel, Ken J.; Heckman, Joyce E.; Lambert, Dominic; Chan, Philip A.; Major, Francois; Burke, John M.

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic determinants for the cleavage and ligation reactions mediated by the hairpin ribozyme are integral to the polyribonucleotide chain. We describe experiments that place G8, a critical guanosine, at the active site, and point to an essential role in catalysis. Cross-linking and modeling show that formation of a catalytic complex is accompanied by a conformational change in which N1 and O6 of G8 become closely apposed to the scissile phosphodiester. UV cross-linking, hydroxyl-radical footprinting and native gel electrophoresis indicate that G8 variants inhibit the reaction at a step following domain association, and that the tertiary structure of the inactive complex is not measurably altered. Rate–pH profiles and fluorescence spectroscopy show that protonation at the N1 position of G8 is required for catalysis, and that modification of O6 can inhibit the reaction. Kinetic solvent isotope analysis suggests that two protons are transferred during the rate-limiting step, consistent with rate-limiting cleavage chemistry involving concerted deprotonation of the attacking 2′-OH and protonation of the 5′-O leaving group. We propose mechanistic models that are consistent with these data, including some that invoke a novel keto–enol tautomerization. PMID:11707414

  17. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Supernova Remnant G8.7-0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; Caraveo, P.A.; /more authors..

    2012-09-14

    We present a detailed analysis of the GeV gamma-ray emission toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G8.7-0.1 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. An investigation of the relationship between G8.7-0.1 and the TeV unidentified source HESS J1804-216 provides us with an important clue on diffusion process of cosmic rays if particle acceleration operates in the SNR. The GeV gamma-ray emission is extended with most of the emission in positional coincidence with the SNR G8.7-0.1 and a lesser part located outside the western boundary of G8.7-0.1. The region of the gamma-ray emission overlaps spatially connected molecular clouds, implying a physical connection for the gamma-ray structure. The total gamma-ray spectrum measured with LAT from 200 MeV-100 GeV can be described by a broken power-law function with a break of 2.4 {+-} 0.6 (stat) {+-} 1.2 (sys) GeV, and photon indices of 2.10 {+-} 0.06 (stat) {+-} 0.10 (sys) below the break and 2.70 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.14 (sys) above the break. Given the spatial association among the gamma rays, the radio emission of G8.7-0.1, and the molecular clouds, the decay of p0s produced by particles accelerated in the SNR and hitting the molecular clouds naturally explains the GeV gamma-ray spectrum. We also find that the GeV morphology is not well represented by the TeV emission from HESS J1804-216 and that the spectrum in the GeV band is not consistent with the extrapolation of the TeV gamma-ray spectrum. The spectral index of the TeV emission is consistent with the particle spectral index predicted by a theory that assumes energy-dependent diffusion of particles accelerated in an SNR. We discuss the possibility that the TeV spectrum originates from the interaction of particles accelerated in G8.7-0.1 with molecular clouds, and we constrain the diffusion coefficient of the particles.

  18. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G8.7-0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; and others

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the GeV gamma-ray emission toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G8.7-0.1 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. An investigation of the relationship between G8.7-0.1 and the TeV unidentified source HESS J1804-216 provides us with an important clue on diffusion process of cosmic rays if particle acceleration operates in the SNR. The GeV gamma-ray emission is extended with most of the emission in positional coincidence with the SNR G8.7-0.1 and a lesser part located outside the western boundary of G8.7-0.1. The region of the gamma-ray emission overlaps spatially connected molecular clouds, implying a physical connection for the gamma-ray structure. The total gamma-ray spectrum measured with LAT from 200 MeV-100 GeV can be described by a broken power-law function with a break of 2.4 {+-} 0.6 (stat) {+-} 1.2 (sys) GeV, and photon indices of 2.10 {+-} 0.06 (stat) {+-} 0.10 (sys) below the break and 2.70 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.14 (sys) above the break. Given the spatial association among the gamma rays, the radio emission of G8.7-0.1, and the molecular clouds, the decay of {pi}{sup 0}s produced by particles accelerated in the SNR and hitting the molecular clouds naturally explains the GeV gamma-ray spectrum. We also find that the GeV morphology is not well represented by the TeV emission from HESS J1804-216 and that the spectrum in the GeV band is not consistent with the extrapolation of the TeV gamma-ray spectrum. The spectral index of the TeV emission is consistent with the particle spectral index predicted by a theory that assumes energy-dependent diffusion of particles accelerated in an SNR. We discuss the possibility that the TeV spectrum originates from the interaction of particles accelerated in G8.7-0.1 with molecular clouds, and we constrain the diffusion coefficient of the particles.

  19. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Supernova Remnant G8.7-0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fukui, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashi, K.; Hays, E.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kubo, H.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Lionetto, A. M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nishino, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Yasuda, H.; Ziegler, M.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the GeV gamma-ray emission toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G8.7-0.1 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. An investigation of the relationship between G8.7-0.1 and the TeV unidentified source HESS J1804-216 provides us with an important clue on diffusion process of cosmic rays if particle acceleration operates in the SNR. The GeV gamma-ray emission is extended with most of the emission in positional coincidence with the SNR G8.7-0.1 and a lesser part located outside the western boundary of G8.7-0.1. The region of the gamma-ray emission overlaps spatially connected molecular clouds, implying a physical connection for the gamma-ray structure. The total gamma-ray spectrum measured with LAT from 200 MeV-100 GeV can be described by a broken power-law function with a break of 2.4 ± 0.6 (stat) ± 1.2 (sys) GeV, and photon indices of 2.10 ± 0.06 (stat) ± 0.10 (sys) below the break and 2.70 ± 0.12 (stat) ± 0.14 (sys) above the break. Given the spatial association among the gamma rays, the radio emission of G8.7-0.1, and the molecular clouds, the decay of π0s produced by particles accelerated in the SNR and hitting the molecular clouds naturally explains the GeV gamma-ray spectrum. We also find that the GeV morphology is not well represented by the TeV emission from HESS J1804-216 and that the spectrum in the GeV band is not consistent with the extrapolation of the TeV gamma-ray spectrum. The spectral index of the TeV emission is consistent with the particle spectral index predicted by a theory that assumes energy-dependent diffusion of particles accelerated in an SNR. We discuss the possibility that the TeV spectrum originates from the interaction of particles accelerated in G8.7-0.1 with molecular clouds, and we constrain the diffusion coefficient of the particles.

  20. Genomic characterization of nontypeable rotaviruses and detection of a rare G8 strain in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sumit; Paul, Vinod K; Bhan, Maharaj K; Ray, Pratima

    2009-12-01

    In the present investigation we molecularly characterized nontypeable rotavirus strains previously identified during surveillance in New Delhi, India. The majority of strains were demonstrated to belong to genotype G1 (54.5%) or P[8] (77.8%) on the basis of nucleotide sequencing of fragments from their VP7 and VP4 genes. The other genotypes detected included G2, G8, G9, G12, and P[4]. A G8P[6] strain, strain DS108, was detected for the first time in northern India. The VP7 gene of DS108 was most homologous with the VP7 gene of a bovine G8 strain, strain A5 (98.9%), indicating its bovine parentage. In contrast, the VP4 gene had a high degree of nucleotide sequence homology (92.9% to 99.1%) with the VP4 genes of human P[6] strains. The VP6 gene and nonstructural genes (NSP1 to NSP3 and NSP5) were most homologous with the VP6 gene and nonstructural genes of human rotaviruses belonging to the DS1 genogroup. Interestingly, the NSP4 gene of DS108 clustered within genotype E6 that until now had only two representative strains, both with G12P[6] specificity (strains RV176-00 and N26-02). Together, these results indicate that G8 strain DS108 belongs to the DS1 genogroup and could be the result of the acquisition of the VP7, VP4, and NSP4 genes by a human G2P[4] strain from more than one donor, similar to the evolution of G12P[6] strain RV176-00. The present study highlights the importance of characterizing multiple genes of nontypeable rotavirus strains to detect novel strains and get a more complete picture of rotavirus evolution. PMID:19794047

  1. Dialogue on Dialog: Interview with Roger Summit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Presents interview with Roger Summit, the president of Dialog Information Services, Inc. Highlights include Summit's role as chief architect of the system, the inception of Dialog and its beginnings at Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, services provided by Dialog, a challenge for libraries, and future developments and services. (EJS)

  2. 11th Annual Legislative Summit, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Education Association, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Several papers were presented during the 11th Annual National Indian Education Association (NIEA) Legislative Summit. This volume contains the following briefing papers presented during the summit: (1) Reauthorization of No Child Left Behind Strengthen Native American Education; (2) The Johnson O'Malley Program; (3) Legislation to Address…

  3. A Launching Kit for Learning Activities Centered about the 1987 Summits in Canada = Trousse de Reference Concernant les Activites D'apprentissage Axees sur les Sommets de 1987 au Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reford-McCandless International Inst., Toronto (Ontario).

    This kit, designed for use in elementary and secondary school classrooms and community groups, presents information and interdisciplinary learning activities that focus on two 1987 Canadian summit meetings. One summit, the Commonwealth of Nations meeting in Vancouver, involved countries with a legacy as British colonial nations; and the other, La…

  4. European Heart Rhythm Association Summit report 2014.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Richard; Leclercq, Christophe; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2016-05-01

    Across Europe, the role of the welfare state is constantly being questioned and even eroded. At the same time, funding sources for post-graduate medical education and training are under attack as regulators review the working relationships between physicians and industry. Both of these issues have profound consequences for cardiologists and their patients, and were, therefore, chosen as the themes of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) 2014 Spring Summit held at Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, 25-26 March 2014. The meeting noted that some of the changes are already affecting patient care standards and that this is exacerbated by a reduction in research and education programmes. The principle conclusion was that EHRA must find better means of engagement with the authorities across Europe to ensure that its views are considered and that ethical patient care is preserved. Participants were particularly alarmed by the example from Sweden in which future healthcare planning appears to exclude the views of physicians, although this is not yet the case in other countries. The demand for greater transparency in relationships between physicians and industry was also discussed. Although intended to eliminate corruption, concern was expressed that such moves would cause long-term damage to education and research, threatening the future of congresses, whose role in these areas appears underestimated by the authorities. PMID:26467405

  5. In Brief: Climate Adaptation Summit report released

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-10-01

    “We understand from the science that we have no choice between mitigation and adaptation. We have to do both,” John Holdren, President Barack Obama's science and technology advisor, said at a 29 September meeting where he was presented with a new report about national and regional preparations for adapting to changing climate. The report is based on the National Climate Adaptation Summit, which was convened by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research in May 2010. Stating that the United States must adapt to a changing climate now and prepare for increasing impacts on urban infrastructure, food, water, human health, and ecosystems in the coming decades, the report identifies a set of priorities for near-term action. Among the priorities are developing an overarching national strategy, with research, planning, and management components to guide federal climate change adaptation programs. Other priorities include improving coordination of federal plans and programs and creating a federal climate information portal and a clearinghouse of best practices and tool kits for adaptation. The report also identifies other priorities, including the need for support for assessments in the U.S. Global Change Research Program agency budgets, for increasing funding for research on vulnerability and impacts, and for initiating a regional series of ongoing climate adaptation forums. For more information, see http://www.joss.ucar.edu/events/2010/ncas/index.html.

  6. The Summit of Olympus Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 October 2003

    Bold scarps and extensional features (grabens) record multiple stages of caldera collapse at the summit of Olympus Mons. The wrinkle ridges are contractional features, and probably formed during the cooling of an ancient lava lake, prior to the collapse events. Olympus Mons is the largest volcano in our solar system, reaching heights of over 40 km tall from base to summit, with the base covering an area as large as the state of Arizona.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 18.5, Longitude 226.6 East (133.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Summit Fuels Push to Improve High Schools: Money, Initiatives Pledged during Two-Day Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    The nation's governors adjourned their two-day summit on high schools armed with an expanded arsenal of political and financial commitments to prepare all students for success in college and the workplace. But despite the enthusiastic launch of two major initiatives at the February 26-27, 2005 meeting here, observers cautioned that improving…

  8. 77 FR 51731 - All-Terrain Vehicle Safety Summit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... COMMISSION 16 CFR Chapter II All-Terrain Vehicle Safety Summit AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission... announcing its intent to hold a Summit on all-terrain vehicle (ATV) safety. The Summit will be held at the... information at the Summit should register by September 14, 2012; all other individuals who wish to attend...

  9. Novel NSP1 genotype characterised in an African camel G8P[11] rotavirus strain.

    PubMed

    Jere, Khuzwayo C; Esona, Mathew D; Ali, Yahia H; Peenze, Ina; Roy, Sunando; Bowen, Michael D; Saeed, Intisar K; Khalafalla, Abdelmelik I; Nyaga, Martin M; Mphahlele, Jeffrey; Steele, Duncan; Seheri, Mapaseka L

    2014-01-01

    Animal-human interspecies transmission is thought to play a significant role in influencing rotavirus strain diversity in humans. Proving this concept requires a better understanding of the complete genetic constellation of rotaviruses circulating in various animal species. However, very few whole genomes of animal rotaviruses, especially in developing countries, are available. In this study, complete genetic configuration of the first African camel rotavirus strain (RVA/Camel-wt/SDN/MRC-DPRU447/2002/G8P[11]) was assigned a unique G8-P[11]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A18-N2-T6-E2-H3 genotype constellation that has not been reported in other ruminants. It contained a novel NSP1 genotype (genotype A18). The evolutionary dynamics of the genome segments of strain MRC-DPRU447 were rather complex compared to those found in other camelids. Its genome segments 1, 3, 7-10 were closely related (>93% nucleotide identity) to those of human-animal reassortant strains like RVA/Human-tc/ITA/PA169/1988/G6P[14] and RVA/Human-wt/HUN/Hun5/1997/G6P[14], segments 4, 6 and 11 shared common ancestry (>95% nucleotide identity) with bovine rotaviruses like strains RVA/Cow-wt/CHN/DQ-75/2008/G10P[11] and RVA/Cow-wt/KOR/KJ19-2/XXXX/G6P[7], whereas segment 2 was closely related (94% nucleotide identity) to guanaco rotavirus strain RVA/Guanaco-wt/ARG/Rio_Negro/1998/G8P[1]. Its genetic backbone consisted of DS-1-like, AU-1-like, artiodactyl-like and a novel A18 genotype. This suggests that strain MRC-DPRU447 potentially emerged through multiple reassortment events between several mammalian rotaviruses of at least two genogroups or simply strain MRC-DPRU447 display a unique progenitor genotypes. Close relationship between some of the genome segments of strain MRC-DPRU447 to human rotaviruses suggests previous occurrence of reassortment processes combined with interspecies transmission between humans and camels. The whole genome data for strain MRC-DPRU447 adds to the much needed animal rotavirus data from Africa

  10. Whole genomic characterization of Korean porcine G8P[7] reassortant rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Gyu; Park, Sang-Ik; Woo, Nam-Il; Kim, Deok-Song; Seo, Ja-Young; Alfajaro, Mia Madel; Kim, Ji-Yun; Soliman, Mahmoud; Baek, Yeong-Bin; Cho, Eun-Hyo; Kwon, Joseph; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kang, Mun-Il; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2016-10-01

    This study analyzed eleven genomic segments of three Korean porcine G8P[7] group A rotavirus (RVA) strains. Phylogenetically, these strains contained two bovine-like and nine porcine-like genomic segments. Eight genes (VP1, VP2, VP6 and NSP1-NSP5) of strains 156-1 and 42-1 and seven genes (VP1, VP2, VP6 and NSP2-NSP5) of strain C-1 clustered closely with porcine and porcine-like animal strains and distantly from typical human Wa-like strains. The VP3-M2 genotype of these strains clustered closely with bovine-like strains, but distantly with typical human DS-1-like strains. These data indicate that multiple reassortments involving porcine and bovine RVA strains in Korea must have occurred. PMID:27393603

  11. Comparative analysis of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine strains and G8 rotaviruses identified during vaccine trial in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Ciarlet, Max; Lawrence, Jody; Steele, Duncan; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    RotaTeqTM is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine based on a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone in vitro reassorted with human outer capsid genes. During clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine efficacy over a 2-year follow-up was lower against the genotypes contained in the vaccine than against the heterotypic G8P[6] and G8P[1] rotavirus strains of which the former is highly prevalent in Africa. Complete genome analyses of 43 complete rotavirus genomes collected during phase III clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, were conducted to gain insight into the high level of cross-protection afforded by RotaTeqTM against these G8 strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a high number of bovine rotavirus gene segments in these human G8 strains. In addition, we performed an in depth analysis on the individual amino acid level which showed that G8 rotaviruses were more similar to the RotaTeqTM vaccine than non-G8 strains. Because RotaTeqTM possesses a bovine genetic backbone, the high vaccine efficacy against G8 strains might be partially explained by the fact that all these strains contain a complete or partial bovine-like backbone. Altogether, this study supports the hypothesis that gene segments other than VP7 and VP4 play a role in vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:26440913

  12. News from the Breath Analysis Summit 2011.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2012-05-23

    This special section highlights some of the important work presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2011, which was held in Parma (Italy) from 11 to 14 September 2011. The meeting, which was jointly organized by the International Association for Breath Research and the University of Parma, was attended by more than 250 delegates from 33 countries, and offered 34 invited lectures and 64 unsolicited scientific contributions. The summit was organized to provide a forum to scientists, engineers and clinicians to present their latest findings and to meet industry executives and entrepreneurs to discuss key trends, future directions and technologies available for breath analysis. A major focus was on nitric oxide, exhaled breath condensate, electronic nose, mass spectrometry and newer sensor technologies. Medical applications ranged from asthma and other respiratory diseases to gastrointestinal disease, occupational diseases, critical care and cancer. Most people identify breath tests with breathalysers used by police to estimate ethanol concentration in blood. However, breath testing has far more sophisticated applications. Breath analysis is rapidly evolving as a new frontier in medical testing for disease states in the lung and beyond. Every individual has a breath fingerprint-or 'breathprint'-that can provide useful information about his or her state of health. This breathprint comprises the many thousands of molecules that are expelled with each breath we exhale. Breath research in the past few years has uncovered the scientific and molecular basis for such clinical observations. Relying on mass spectrometry, we have been able to identify many such unique substances in exhaled breath, including gases, such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), and a wide array of volatile organic compounds. Exhaled breath also carries aerosolized droplets that can be collected as an exhaled breath condensate that contains endogenously produced non-volatile compounds. Breath

  13. Mushrooms and Health Summit proceedings.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Dwyer, Johanna; Hasler-Lewis, Clare M; Milner, John A; Noakes, Manny; Rowe, Sylvia; Wach, Mark; Beelman, Robert B; Caldwell, Joe; Cantorna, Margherita T; Castlebury, Lisa A; Chang, Shu-Ting; Cheskin, Lawrence J; Clemens, Roger; Drescher, Greg; Fulgoni, Victor L; Haytowitz, David B; Hubbard, Van S; Law, David; Myrdal Miller, Amy; Minor, Bart; Percival, Susan S; Riscuta, Gabriela; Schneeman, Barbara; Thornsbury, Suzanne; Toner, Cheryl D; Woteki, Catherine E; Wu, Dayong

    2014-07-01

    The Mushroom Council convened the Mushrooms and Health Summit in Washington, DC, on 9-10 September 2013. The proceedings are synthesized in this article. Although mushrooms have long been regarded as health-promoting foods, research specific to their role in a healthful diet and in health promotion has advanced in the past decade. The earliest mushroom cultivation was documented in China, which remains among the top global mushroom producers, along with the United States, Italy, The Netherlands, and Poland. Although considered a vegetable in dietary advice, mushrooms are fungi, set apart by vitamin B-12 in very low quantity but in the same form found in meat, ergosterol converted with UV light to vitamin D2, and conjugated linoleic acid. Mushrooms are a rare source of ergothioneine as well as selenium, fiber, and several other vitamins and minerals. Some preclinical and clinical studies suggest impacts of mushrooms on cognition, weight management, oral health, and cancer risk. Preliminary evidence suggests that mushrooms may support healthy immune and inflammatory responses through interaction with the gut microbiota, enhancing development of adaptive immunity, and improved immune cell functionality. In addition to imparting direct nutritional and health benefits, analysis of U.S. food intake survey data reveals that mushrooms are associated with higher dietary quality. Also, early sensory research suggests that mushrooms blended with meats and lower sodium dishes are well liked and may help to reduce intakes of red meat and salt without compromising taste. As research progresses on the specific health effects of mushrooms, there is a need for effective communication efforts to leverage mushrooms to improve overall dietary quality. PMID:24812070

  14. Reproducibility Data on SUMMiT

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, Lloyd; Jakubczak, Jay; Limary, Siv; McBrayer, John; Montague, Stephen; Smith, James; Sniegowski, Jeffry; Stewart, Harold; de Boer, Maarten

    1999-07-16

    SUMMiT (Sandia Ultra-planar Multi-level MEMS Technology) at the Sandia National Laboratories' MDL (Microelectronics Development Laboratory) is a standardized MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) technology that allows designers to fabricate concept prototypes. This technology provides four polysilicon layers plus three sacrificial oxide layers (with the third oxide layer being planarized) to enable fabrication of complex mechanical systems-on-a-chip. Quantified reproducibility of the SUMMiT process is important for process engineers as well as designers. Summary statistics for critical MEMS technology parameters such as film thickness, line width, and sheet resistance will be reported for the SUMMiT process. Additionally, data from Van der Pauw test structures will be presented. Data on film thickness, film uniformity and critical dimensions of etched line widths are collected from both process and monitor wafers during manufacturing using film thickness metrology tools and SEM tools. A standardized diagnostic module is included in each SWiT run to obtain post-processing parametric data to monitor run-to-run reproducibility such as Van der Pauw structures for measuring sheet resistance. This characterization of the SUMMiT process enables design for manufacturability in the SUMMiT technology.

  15. Cosmo-geo-anthropo-logical history and political and deep future events in climate and life evolution conveyed by a physical/virtual installation at a scale of 1 mm per 100 years across Denmark during the COP15 climate summit meeting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm Jacobsen, Bo

    2010-05-01

    During the COP15 climate summit meeting a physical and virtual installation of time was performed at a linear scale of 1 mm per 100 years. The "track of time" was carefully anchored geographically so that highlights in time history coincided with landmarks of historical and cultural significance to both tourists and the local Danish population; with Big Bang at the site of early royal settlements from the Viking age (13.7 billion years ~ 137 km from now), Earth origin at Kronborg in Elsinore (4.6 bil. Years ~ 46 km), and fish go on land at The Little Mermaid (390 mil. Years ~ 3900 m). The venue of the COP15 meeting coincided with the position of severe global warming, driven by the steady solar constant increase, to be expected 600 million years into the future. Nested in this grand track of time were the Quaternary ice-ages (2.6 mil. years ~ 26 m), human origin as species (100,000 years ~ 1 m), human history (< 10,000 years ~ 100 mm), personal life and the scope of political consequences of voting action (100 years ~ 1 mm). This installation of time involved several media. Highlights in time history and future were installed as a kml-file so that the convenient user interface of Google Earth could be utilized to provide both overview of time and understanding of details and proportions events antropo-geo-cosmo-history. Each Google Earth marker-balloon gave short explanations and linked to "on location" video-narratives. A classical printed text-folder was prepared as a tour guide for those who wanted to actually walk the Phanerozoic (~5 km). Credit-card-shaped graphs of temperature, CO2 and sealevel development and scenarios were prepared to scale for the period 4000 BP to 1000 years into the future. Along the time line from "Fish on land" to the present 3900 chalk marks were placed on the street surface, one for every metre = time span of Man as a species so far. A "NowGate" marking the present was implemented physically as a door frame, where citizens could meet

  16. 75 FR 21391 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... Citation of Previous Announcement: 75 FR 19465 (April 14, 2010). Previously Announced Time and Date of... Meeting: TVA Knoxville West Tower Auditorium, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee. Changes...

  17. Galapagos III World Evolution Summit: why evolution matters

    PubMed Central

    Paz-y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina

    2016-01-01

    There is no place on Earth like the Galapagos Islands and no better destination to discuss the reality of evolution. Under the theme ‘Why Does Evolution Matter’, the University San Francisco of Quito (USFQ), Ecuador, and its Galapagos Institute for the Arts and Sciences (GAIAS), organized the III World Evolution Summit in San Cristóbal Island. The 200-attendee meeting took place on 1 to 5 June 2013; it included 12 keynote speakers, 20 oral presentations by international scholars, and 31 posters by faculty, postdocs, and graduate and undergraduate students. The Summit encompassed five sessions: evolution and society, pre-cellular evolution and the RNA world, behavior and environment, genome, and microbes and diseases. USFQ and GAIAS launched officially the Lynn Margulis Center for Evolutionary Biology and showcased the Galapagos Science Center, in San Cristóbal, an impressive research facility conceptualized in partnership with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA. USFQ and GAIAS excelled at managing the conference with exceptional vision and at highlighting the relevance of Galapagos in the history of modern evolutionary thinking; Charles Darwin’s visit to this volcanic archipelago in 1835 unfolded unprecedented scientific interest in what today is a matchless World Heritage. PMID:26925190

  18. Context view shows approach of access road to summit, communication ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Context view shows approach of access road to summit, communication towers and NW corner of lookout tower at center right. Camera is pointed SE. - Chelan Butte Lookout, Summit of Chelan Butte, Chelan, Chelan County, WA

  19. Energy - Water Nexus -- Meeting the Energy and Water Needs of the Snake/Columbia River Basin in the 21st CenturyScience and Technology SummitConference Results

    SciTech Connect

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Gerald Sehlke

    2008-02-01

    In June 2007, representatives from federal, state, and academic institutions met to discuss the role of innovative science, technology, and policy in meeting future energy and water demands in the Snake-Columbia River Basin. Conference members assessed the state-of-the-science, technology, and associated research to develop cost-effective and environmentally sound methodologies and technologies to maximize the production of energy and availability of water and to minimize the consumption of both water and energy in the Snake-Columbia River system. Information on all phases of science and technology development, theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, pilot tests, and field applications were relevant topics for discussion. An overview of current management needs was presented the first day. On the second day, five focus groups were created: ? Energy Generation and Use ? Water Allocation and Use ? Energy/Water Storage ? Environmental Considerations ? Social, Economic, Political, and Regulatory Considerations. Each group started with a list of status items and trends, and discussed the future challenges and research needed to reach four goals: ? Balance energy production and resource consumption ? Balance water availability and competing needs ? Balance water consumption/energy production and competing needs ? Balance environmental impacts and water use/energy production ? Balance costs and benefits of water use. The resulting initiatives were further broken down into three categories of importance: critical, important, and nice to do but could be delayed. Each initiative was assigned a number of dots to show a more refined ranking. The results of each focus group are given in the pages that follow. These results are intended to help local and regional researchers 1. Develop a technical strategy for developing cost-effective science and technology to predict, measure, monitor, purify, conserve, and store water and to maximize power generation, storage, and

  20. Study on adsorption properties of QCS/PS-G8-2-8 anion exchange membrane for Rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Jilin; Wang, Lulu; Feng, Ruijiang; Zhang, Fan

    2015-06-01

    A series of novel anion exchange composite membrane (QCS/PS-G8-2-8) were synthesized based on the quaternized chitosan (QCS, DQ = 89.20 (±3.50)%) blended with block polymer of polystyrene (PS) and G8-2-8 (maleic acid diethyl brace base pairs [octyl dimethyl chloride/ammonium bromide]). Then the QCS was cross-linked by glutaraldehyde (GA). The parameters including adsorption time (t), pH, and initial concentration of Rhodamine B (C0), temperature (T), the mass fraction of G8-2-8 and GA (WGA) on the adsorption were investigated to determine the optimum condition for the removal of RB. The kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the adsorption process were also discussed. The optimum adsorption condition was that the adsorption time was 100 min, pH was 4, the initial concentration of RB was 100 mg L-1, the mass fraction of G8-2-8 was 5.0 wt%, the mass fraction of GA was 2.0 wt%, the temperature was 40 °C. Thus, RB optimum adsorption capacity (q) of the composite membrane QCS/PS-G8-2-8 (5.0%) (G8-2-8 mass content (wt.%) was 5.0%) was 17.04 mg g-1. The adsorption isotherm of the RB on the composite membrane can be well fitted with the Temkin equation. The adsorption kinetics can be well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The values of ΔG, ΔH and ΔS indicated that the adsorption of RB onto QCS/PS-G8-2-8 was spontaneous and exothermic.

  1. The First National Pain Medicine Summit--final summary report.

    PubMed

    Lippe, Philipp M; Brock, Charles; David, Jose; Crossno, Ronald; Gitlow, Stuart

    2010-10-01

    and organizations dedicated to improving pain care, the first National Pain Medicine Summit. The process began with the adoption of Resolution 321 (A-08) at an AMA Annual House of Delegates meeting in June 2008. Resolution 321 (A-08) states, in part, that "...the AMA encourages relevant specialties to collaborate in studying: 1) the scope and practice and body of knowledge encompassed by the field of Pain Medicine; 2) the adequacy of undergraduate, graduate, and post graduate education in the principles and practices of the field of Pain Medicine, considering the current and anticipated medical need for the delivery of quality pain care; and 3) appropriate training and credentialing criteria for this multi-disciplinary field of medical practice." The next step was delegating the responsibility for implementing Resolution 321 (A-08) to the Pain and Palliative Medicine Specialty Section Council (PPMSSC). The PPMSSC, under the direction of its chairman, Philipp M. Lippe, MD, FACS, assumed responsibility in November 2008 for identifying a process that would achieve the goals established by Resolution 321 (A-08). The PPMSSC in turn established an Advisory Committee, charged with strategic planning, and an Implementation Committee, charged with tactical operations. The two groups began work immediately. The process included three distinct phases centered on a Pain Medicine Summit. Phase One involved a modified Delphi process identifying the five most pressing and relevant themes in pain care. Phase Two consisted of the Pain Medicine Summit itself, including a gathering of representatives from across the pain care spectrum to address the previously identified five most pressing themes. Phase Three was the preparation of this report, which describes the conclusions drawn and recommendations developed by the attendees at the Pain Medicine Summit. Based on a recommendation from the Advisory Committee, the PPMSSC decided to retain the services of a consulting firm to help the

  2. The G8-global healthcare applications project (GHAP) - recommendations for the way into the information society

    PubMed

    Dietzel

    1999-12-16

    The Global Healthcare Applications Project has sought to demonstrate the potential of telematics in the field of medicine and healthcare and to promote joint approaches to issues such as the setting of standards. This has been done through 10 sub-projects covering a range of applications and issues: 1. Towards a global public health information network - Coordinator: Germany (Ulrich Laaser, ulaaser@mail.uni-bielefeld.de; URL: http://health.ibs.uni-bielefeld. de/i-jphe/database/documents/abstract/laaser-g7.htm(C45-60_laaser-g7. pdf) 2. Improving prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. - Coordinator: France (Gerard Brugal, gerard. brugal@imag.fr; URL: http://pathconsult.imag.fr/G7/G7_index.html) 3. Improving prevention, diagnosis and treatment of major cardiovascular diseases. - Coordinator: Italy (Attilio Maseri, amaseri@rm.unicatt.it; URL: http://www.g7cardio.org) 4. International concerted action for collaboration in telemedicine. - Coordinator: Canada (Andre Lacroix, lacroixa@ere.umontreal.ca; URL: http:// www.g7sp4.org) 5. Enabling mechanisms for a global healthcare network, including Internet connectivity. - Coordinator: UK (Ray Rogers, r.rogers@mcmail.com; URL: http://www.ehto.be/sp5) 6. International harmonisation of the use of data cards in healthcare: Internet Connectivity Coordinator: USA (Elliot R. Siegel, siegel@nlm.nih.gov; URL: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/) - Smart Cards and information exchange security in health care Joint Coordinators: France, European Commission, Italy and Germany (Jacques Sauret, jacques.sauret@sante.gouv.fr and G8-HC@sesam-vitale.fr; URL: http:/www.sesam-vitale.fr/Projects/Netlink-G7-En/) 7. Evidence and effectiveness. - Coordinator: Canada (Andrew Penn, andrew. penn@ualberta.ca; URL: http://www.medlib.com/spi/web.htm) 8. Multilingual anatomical digital database. - Coordinator: USA (Michael J. Ackermann; URL: http://www.nlm.nih.gov) 9. Medical image reference centre. - Coordinator: Japan (Eturo Kashiwagi

  3. Social Summit 1995: Putting Literacy on the Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This theme issue contains 10 articles related to core issues of the World Summit for Social Development in Copenhagen in March 1995. "Social Summit, People, and Education" (Om Shrivastava) addresses the summit's focuses: elimination of poverty, reduction of unemployment, and social integration. "Education for All by the Year 2000" (T. M. Sakya)…

  4. The Cancer Moonshot Summit: Reaching New Heights

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog from acting NCI Director Dr. Doug Lowy on the Cancer Moonshot national summit hosted by Vice President Joe Biden in Washington, D.C., including a summary of the NCI-related activities stimulated by the Cancer Moonshot.

  5. Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: Building Research Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frontera, Walter R.; Fuhrer, Marcus J.; Jette, Alan M.; Chan, Leighton; Cooper, Rory A.; Duncan, Pamela W.; Kemp, John D.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Peckham, P. Hunter; Roth, Elliot J.; Tate, Denise G.

    2006-01-01

    The general objective of the "Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: Building Research Capacity" was to advance and promote research in medical rehabilitation by making recommendations to expand research capacity. The 5 elements of research capacity that guided the discussions were (a) researchers; (b) research culture, environment, and infrastructure;…

  6. Survey of Public Libraries Summit County, Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasingame, Ralph

    Library surveys are a means to an objective examination of the library and its services, helping to clarify the purposes that are being served and to assess the methods of providing these services. This survey was undertaken as a cooperative project of the seven public libraries of Summit County, Ohio. Its purpose was to develop a long-range plan…

  7. Efficient Mobility Summit: Transportation and the Future of Dynamic Mobility Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-01

    On October 27, 2015, The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) brought together local and national thought leaders to discuss the convergence of connectivity, vehicle automation, and transportation infrastructure investments at the Future Energy Efficient Mobility Workshop. The half-day workshop was held in conjunction with the Colorado Department of Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications. Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications.

  8. Current research in aging: a report from the 2015 Ageing Summit.

    PubMed

    Moyse, Emmanuel; Lahousse, Lies; Krantic, Slavica

    2015-01-01

    Ageing Summit, London, UK, 10-12 February 2015 The Ageing Summit 2015 held on 10-12 February 2015 in London (UK) provided an extensive update to our knowledge of the 'Biology of Ageing' and a forum to discuss the participants' latest research progress. The meeting was subdivided into four thematic sessions: cellular level research including the aging brain; slowing down progression, rejuvenation and self-repair; genetic and epigenetic regulation; and expression and pathology of age-related diseases. Each session included multiple key presentations, three to five short research communications and ongoing poster presentations. The meeting provided an exciting multidisciplinary overview of the aging process from cellular and molecular mechanisms to medico-social aspects of human aging. PMID:26107317

  9. The 2015 Chile-U.S. Astronomy Education Outreach Summit in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Sandra Lee; Arnett, Dinah; Hardy, Eduardo; Cabezón, Sergio; Spuck, Tim; Fields, Mary Sue; Smith, R. Chris

    2015-08-01

    The first Chile-U.S. Astronomy Education Outreach Summit occurred March 22-28, 2015. The Summit was organized and supported by the U.S. Embassy in Chile, Associated Universities Inc., Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, the Carnegie Institution for Science, the Image of Chile Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and La Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica. The Summit brought together a team of leading experts and officials from Chile and the U.S. to share best practices in astronomy education and outreach. In addition, Summit participants discussed enhancing existing partnerships, and building new collaborations between U.S. Observatories and astronomy education outreach leaders in Chile.The Summit was an exciting and intense week of work and travel. Discussions opened in Santiago on March 22 with a variety of astronomy education and public outreach work sessions, a public forum, and on March 23 the U.S. Embassy sponsored a Star Party. On Tuesday, March 24, the Summit moved to San Pedro de Atacama, where activities included work sessions, a visit to the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array telescope facilities, and a second public forum. From San Pedro, the team traveled to La Serena for additional work sessions, visits to Gemini and Cerro Tololo, a third public forum, and the closing session. At each stop, authorities and the broader community were invited to participate and provide valuable input on the current state, and the future, of astronomy education and public outreach.Following the Summit a core working committee has continued meeting to draft a “roadmap document” based on findings from the Summit. This document will help to identify potential gaps in astronomy outreach efforts, and how the U.S. facilities and Chilean institutions might work together strategically to address these needs. The first draft of this “roadmap document” will be made available for comment in both Spanish and

  10. National Summit on Innovation and Learning=Sommet National sur L'Innovation et L'Apprentissage. Summary=Sommaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conference Board of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This report provides a summary of the objectives, proceedings, and major outcomes of a summit meeting of over 500 leaders from across Canada convened to validate and prioritize strategic recommendations from an innovation and learning engagement process and to discuss key challenges to realization of Canada's vision to become one of the most…

  11. Comparative Indicators of Education in the United States and Other G-8 Countries: 2006. NCES 2007-006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David C.; Sen, Anindita; Malley, Lydia B.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes how the education system in the United States compares with education systems in the other Group of Eight (G-8) countries: Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United Kingdom. The report draws on the most current information about education from three primary sources: the Indicators of…

  12. Comparative Indicators of Education in the United States and Other G-8 Countries: 2009. NCES 2009-039

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David C.; Sen, Anindita; Malley, Lydia B.; Burns, Stephanie D.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes how the education system in the United States compares with education systems in the other Group of Eight (G-8) countries (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom) that are among the world's most economically developed countries and among the United States' largest economic partners.…

  13. Comparative Indicators of Education in the United States and Other G-8 Countries: 2011. NCES 2012-007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David C.; Warren, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    This is the 2011 edition of a biennial series of compendia describing key education outcomes and contexts of education in the Group of Eight (G-8) countries--Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The report is organized into five topical areas: population and school enrollment,…

  14. Draft Genome Assembly of Two Pseudoclavibacter helvolus Strains, G8 and W3, Isolated from Slaughterhouse Environments

    PubMed Central

    Raghupathi, Prem K.; Herschend, Jakob; Røder, Henriette L.; Sørensen, Søren J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequences of two Pseudoclavibacter helvolus strains. Strain G8 was isolated from a meat chopper and strain W3 isolated from the wall of a small slaughterhouse in Denmark. The two annotated genomes are 3.91 Mb and 4.00 Mb in size, respectively. PMID:27034481

  15. Socially Disadvantaged Students in Socially Disadvantaged Schools: Double Jeopardy in Mathematics Achievement in the G8 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dundas, Traci Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Using the G8 countries' (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, and the United States) samples from the 2003 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), this study aimed to explore the phenomenon of double jeopardy in mathematics achievement for socially disadvantaged students. Double…

  16. The effects of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on HDL-cholesterol concentrations depend on ABCA1 genetic variants in the Boston Puerto Rican health study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/G8 (ABCG5/G8) are associated with HDL-C concentrations. To assess whether the effect of ABCG5/G8 genetic variants on HDL-C concentrations is dependent on ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 (ABCA1), we studied potential interactions between ...

  17. Global Summit on Regulatory Science 2013.

    PubMed

    Howard, Paul C; Tong, Weida; Weichold, Frank; Healy, Marion; Slikker, William

    2014-12-01

    Regulatory science has been defined as the science that is used to develop regulatory decisions by government bodies. Regulatory science encompasses many scientific disciplines that oversee many studies producing a wide array of data. These may include fundamental research into the cellular interaction or response to a particular chemical or substance, hazard-assessment and dose-response studies in animal species, neurophysiological or neurobehavioral studies, best practices for the generation and analysis of genomics data, bioinformatics approaches, and mathematical modeling of risk. The Global Summit on Regulatory Science is an international conference with a mission to explore emerging and innovative technologies, and provide a platform to enhance translation of basic science into regulatory applications. The Third Global Summit on Regulatory Science which focused on nanotechnology is discussed. PMID:25128336

  18. Thermal conductivity measurements of Summit polycrystalline silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Rebecca; Kuppers, Jaron D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-11-01

    A capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials using a steady state resistance technique was developed and used to measure the thermal conductivities of SUMMiT{trademark} V layers. Thermal conductivities were measured over two temperature ranges: 100K to 350K and 293K to 575K in order to generate two data sets. The steady state resistance technique uses surface micromachined bridge structures fabricated using the standard SUMMiT fabrication process. Electrical resistance and resistivity data are reported for poly1-poly2 laminate, poly2, poly3, and poly4 polysilicon structural layers in the SUMMiT process from 83K to 575K. Thermal conductivity measurements for these polysilicon layers demonstrate for the first time that the thermal conductivity is a function of the particular SUMMiT layer. Also, the poly2 layer has a different variation in thermal conductivity as the temperature is decreased than the poly1-poly2 laminate, poly3, and poly4 layers. As the temperature increases above room temperature, the difference in thermal conductivity between the layers decreases.

  19. Mock Climate Summit: Teaching and Assessing Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, D.; Gautier, C.; Bazerman, C.

    2003-04-01

    This paper will demonstrate the effectiveness of a Mock Climate Summit as a pedagogical for teaching the science and policy aspects of global climate change. The Mock Climate Summit is a student-centered course simulating the Conference of the Parties (COP) where international environmental protocols are negotiated. Compared to traditional lecture-based methods common in the geoscience classroom, the Mock Climate Summit uses negotiations and arguments to teach the interactions between these two "spheres" and demonstrate the depth and breadth of these interactions. Through a detailed assessment of students' dialogue transcribed from video and audio tapes, we found that the nature of the student dialogue matures rapidly as they are given multiple opportunities to present, negotiate and argue a specific topic. Students' dialogue progress from hypothetical (what-if) scenarios to action-oriented scenarios and implementation plans. The progression of the students' dialogue shows increased comfort with the communities' discourse as they take ownership of the point-of-view associated with their assumed roles.

  20. Mock climate summit: teaching and assessing learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, D.; Gautier, C.; Bazerman, C.

    2003-04-01

    This paper will demonstrate the effectiveness of a Mock Climate Summit as a pedagogical approach for teaching the science and policy aspects of global climate change. The Mock Climate Summit is a student-centered course simulating the Conference of the Parties (COP) where international environmental protocols are negotiated. Compared to traditional lecture-based methods common in the geoscience classroom, the Mock Climate Summit uses negotiations and arguments to teach the interactions between these two “spheres” and demonstrate the depth and breadth of these interactions. Through a detailed assessment of students’ dialogue transcribed from video and audio tapes, we found that the nature of the student dialogue matures rapidly as they are given multiple opportunities to present, negotiate and argue a specific topic. Students’ dialogue progress from hypothetical (what-if) scenarios to action-oriented scenarios and implementation plans. The progression of the students’ dialogue shows increased comfort with the communities’ discourse as they take ownership of the point-of-view associated with their assumed roles.

  1. International concerted action on collaboration in telemedicine: recommendations of the G-8 Global Healthcare Applications Subproject-4.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, André; Lareng, Louis; Padeken, Dittmar; Nerlich, Michael; Bracale, Marcello; Ogushi, Yoich; Okada, Yoshikazu; Orlov, Oleg I; McGee, James; Sanders, Jay H; Doarn, Charles R; Prerost, Sandra; McDonald, Ian

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of the G-8 Global Healthcare Applications Subproject-4 (G-8 GHAP-SP-4) were to establish an international concerted action on collaboration in telemedicine, telehealth, and health telematics (hereafter referred in this paper as telemedicine). In order to promote and facilitate the implementation of telemedicine or health telematics networks around the world, it was considered necessary to address certain key issues. Five thematic solution-seeking forums were held between May 1998 and December 1999. Each addressed a key issue, including interoperability of telemedicine and telehealth systems, impact of telemedicine on health care management, evaluation and cost effectiveness of telemedicine, clinical and technical quality and standards, and medico-legal aspects of national and international applications. The main objectives of these forums were to establish best practices and a thorough review of the issues and discussions among experts to determine the best solutions for the facilitation of global international telemedicine networks. More than 650 invited participants from 16 countries attended the five forums, which were of 2-3 days in duration. These forums provided a foundation for the exchange of ideas resulting in the initiation of collaborative activities. Based on these deliberations, a series of 21 recommendations were prepared by the national representatives of the G-8 GHAP SP-4. These recommendations propose to political leaders and health care managers of the G-8 and other countries roadmaps to follow in order to accelerate the achievement of a Global Society of Healthcare via Telemedicine, Telehealth, and Health Telematics. The 21 recommendations are presented in this report. PMID:12079604

  2. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION AROUND MID-INFRARED BUBBLES IN THE G8.14+0.23 H II REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Chakraborti, S.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2012-09-10

    Mid-infrared shells or bubbles around expanding H II regions have received much attention due to their ability to initiate a new generation of star formation. We present multi-wavelength observations around two bubbles associated with a southern massive star-forming region G8.14+0.23, to investigate the triggered star formation signature on the edges of the bubbles by the expansion of the H II region. We have found observational signatures of the collected molecular and cold dust material along the bubbles and the {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) velocity map reveals that the molecular gas in the bubbles is physically associated around the G8.14+0.23 region. We have detected 244 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the region and about 37% of these YSOs occur in clusters. Interestingly, these YSO clusters are associated with the collected material on the edges of the bubbles. We have found good agreement between the dynamical age of the H II region and the kinematical timescale of bubbles (from the {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) line data) with the fragmentation time of the accumulated molecular materials to explain possible 'collect and collapse' process around the G8.14+0.23 region. However, one cannot entirely rule out the possibility of triggered star formation by compression of the pre-existing dense clumps by the shock wave. We have also found two massive embedded YSOs (about 10 and 22 M{sub Sun }) which are associated with the dense fragmented clump at the interface of the bubbles. We conclude that the expansion of the H II region is also leading to the formation of these two young massive embedded YSOs in the G8.14+0.23 region.

  3. 77 FR 68117 - Blue Summit Wind, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Blue Summit Wind, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice... (Commission) Rules of Practice and Procedure 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2), Blue Summit Wind, LLC (Blue Summit) filed a...) interconnection facilities that deliver power from the Blue Summit's wind energy generator (Blue Summit...

  4. 77 FR 48583 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Meeting No. 12-03; August 16, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Meeting No. 12-03; August 16, 2012 The TVA Board of Directors will hold a public meeting on August 16, 2012, in the TVA West Tower Auditorium, 400 West Summit Hill...

  5. SR proteins SRp20 and 9G8 contribute to efficient export of herpes simplex virus 1 mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero-Paunetto, Laurimar; Li Ling; Hernandez, Felicia P.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.

    2010-06-05

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) mRNAs are exported to the cytoplasm through the export receptor TAP/NFX1. HSV-1 multifunctional protein ICP27 interacts with TAP/NXF1, binds viral RNAs, and is required for efficient viral RNA export. In ICP27 mutant infections, viral RNA export is reduced but not ablated, indicating that other export adaptors can aid in viral RNA export. Export adaptor protein Aly/REF is recruited to viral replication compartments, however, Aly/REF knockdown has little effect on viral RNA export. SR proteins SRp20 and 9G8 interact with TAP/NXF1 and mediate export of some cellular RNAs. We report that siRNA knockdown of SRp20 or 9G8 resulted in about a 10 fold decrease in virus yields and in nuclear accumulation of poly(A+) RNA. In infected cells depleted of SRp20, newly transcribed Bromouridine-labeled RNA also accumulated in the nucleus. We conclude that SRp20 and 9G8 contribute to HSV-1 RNA export.

  6. 78 FR 20166 - Meeting of the Regional Resource Stewardship Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY Meeting of the Regional Resource Stewardship Council AGENCY: Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). ACTION... Regional Resource Stewardship Council, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT-11...

  7. Summit geomorphology of western Pacific guyots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Waasbergen, Robert J.; Winterer, Edward L.

    Bathymetric and seismic reflection data for 21 guyots in the Japanese, Wake and Mid Pacific Mountains seamount groups show that many guyots bear thick shallow-water limestone deposits that represent nearly undeformed Cretaceous rudist-reef-bounded carbonate platforms. Three types of guyot summits are distinguished: those with more than 200 m of shallow-water limestone, sufficient to bury the underlying volcanic relief, follow the same basic morphologic patterns as their coral/algal-dominated modern counterparts. Surface morphology is controlled by the original reef/platform configuration, modified by subaerial erosion and by long-term deformation of the sedimentary deposits and the underlying volcanic edifice. These seamounts range in age from Barremian to Aptian, with Barremian or Aptian to late Albian limestone deposits. Guyots with thin limestone deposits represent reef-bearing volcanic islands at various stages of fringing-reef and barrier-reef development. These edifices and their overlying limestone deposits are of Albian age. Reef growth on these was suddenly halted when regional emergence led to cessation of shallow-water-limestone accumulation on all guyots in the western Pacific, probably during the latest Albian. The karstic surfaces were resubmerged by middle Turonian time and, in latitudes south of about 20°N, blanketed by pelagic ooze. Guyots without reef deposits appear to be products of post-Albian volcanism and erosion at sea level. Among the three types of summit-configurations a range of stages of development of Cretaceous carbonate-platforms can be observed. The exposure of the guyot summits indicated by the occurence of karstic relief of 100-200 m on many of the limestone caps suggests that the sea floor of the western Pacific was raised several hundred meters. The age and platform thickness-relationships among the different types of guyots suggests that this uplift occurred at late Albian time.

  8. Identification of Novel Ghanaian G8P[6] Human-Bovine Reassortant Rotavirus Strain by Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Francis E.; Fujii, Yoshiki; Haga, Kei; Damanka, Susan; Lartey, Belinda; Agbemabiese, Chantal A.; Ohta, Nobuo; Armah, George E.; Katayama, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in children <5 years of age worldwide. The monovalent rotavirus vaccine Rotarix was introduced into the national Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) in Ghana in May 2012. However, there is a paucity of genetic and phylogenetic data on the complete genomes of human RVAs in circulation pre-vaccine introduction. The common bovine rotavirus VP7 genotype G8 has been sporadically detected in Ghanaian children, usually in combination with the VP4 genotype P[6]. To investigate the genomic constellations and phylogeny of RVA strains in circulation prior to vaccine introduction, the full genomes of two unusual G8P[6] strains, GH018-08 and GH019-08, detected during burden of disease surveillance, were characterized by Illumina MiSeq sequencing. The Ghanaian isolates, GH018-08 and GH019-08, exhibited the unusual, previously unreported genotype constellation G8-P[6]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H3. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that 10 out of the 11 genes of GH018-08 and GH019-08 were identical/nearly identical, with significant variation detected only in their VP1 genes, and clearly established the occurrence of multiple independent interspecies transmission and reassortment events between co-circulating bovine/ovine/caprine rotaviruses and human DS-1-like RVA strains. These findings highlight the contribution of reassortment and interspecies transmission events to the high rotavirus diversity in this region of Africa, and justify the need for simultaneous monitoring of animal and human rotavirus strains. PMID:24971993

  9. UNESCO and the World Summit on the Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abid, Abdelaziz

    The World Summit on the Information Society will be held in two phases: Geneva, December 10-12, 2003 and Tunis in 2005. The Summit began as an initiative of the 1998 ITU Plenipotentiary Conference when it was recognized that the gap between information "haves" and "have nots" was increasing while at the same time telecommunications were playing an…

  10. Wild Food Summit: Anishinaabe Relearning Traditional Gathering Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Barbara Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Wild Food Summits is a program initiated by Steve Dahlberg, the White Earth Tribal & Community College Extension director. Dahlberg began Wild Food Summits to teach people about identifying and gathering wild greens, mushrooms, and other edible plant life. The whole community comes together to cook and eat the foods. The tribal college has…

  11. Some Points To Make When You Talk About the Summit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    In September, 1989, the President and the nation's governors held what they called an "Education Summit" in Charlottesville, Virginia. They declared that they would establish national goals for education. Following the summit, a communique was issued listing goals in seven areas: (1) the readiness of children to start school; (2) performance of…

  12. Cotton and Sustainability: Impacting Student Learning through Sustainable Cotton Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha-Brookshire, Jung; Norum, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of intensive extra-curricular learning opportunities on students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding cotton and sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: A three-phase extra-curricular learning opportunity was designed to include a Sustainable Cotton Summit; pre-summit and…

  13. The social summit: a gender perspective.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    This editorial introduction to an issue of INSTRAW News notes that the UN has undertaken a year long series of important international conferences, starting with the September 1994 Conference on Population and Development. The second major conference is the World Summit for Social Development, and the third is the Fourth World Conference on Women. At these conferences, the international community is coming together to rescue the people whose lives have been threatened by the legacy of the Cold War: ethnic, religious, and cultural violence and exacerbation of the gap between rich and poor. Women are an integral part of the developing social agenda because women are a magnifying glass, rather than simply a mirror, of the problems of society. This issue of INSTRAW News provides a broad overview of how gender issues have evolved and the changes which occurred as a result. Specific gender issues are analyzed as they impact the three core items of the Social Summit agenda: attacking poverty, creating jobs, and building social solidarity. PMID:12157783

  14. 75 FR 19465 - Sunshine Act; Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY Sunshine Act; Meeting Notice April 16, 2010. The TVA Board of Directors will hold a public meeting on April 16, 2010, at the TVA West Tower Auditorium, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee, to consider the matters listed below. The...

  15. 75 FR 11565 - Sunshine Act Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... DISABILITY Sunshine Act Meetings Type: Quarterly Meeting. Dates and Times: April 19, 2010, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m... Sessions; Emergency Management; Developmental Disabilities and Bill of Rights Act, International Development, National Summit on Disability Policy 2010, United States Marine Corps Research...

  16. "we cannot Wait to ACT!" Simulating Global Climate Summits with Gifted and Talented Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haste, T.; Vesperman, D.; Alrivy, S.

    2012-12-01

    Students simulated the 2011 Durban Climate Summit in order to experience two roles: global diplomats attempting to solve a significant global problem and scientists as contributors of knowledge. Together, they worked to develop a framework to provide global solutions as world leaders. This project demonstrated [highlighted?] student work from the climate summit, describing how students promoted dialogue and provided climate science information to their diplomatic peers, who then used this information in diplomatic negotiations. By focusing on increasing student climate literacy, students engaged in both climate science and global diplomacy through meaningful simulations to understand the global and political issues surrounding Climate Change mitigation. Three classes of international middle school students attending Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth summer programs enacted the 2011 Durban Model United Nations meeting. One class developed a deep understanding of climate and climate science by working with computer models and data to represent members of the IPCC. Members of this class collaborated with climate scientists, conducted experiments, and developed a well-rounded understanding of paleoclimate, current climatic trends, carbon cycling, and modeling future outcomes. Two additional classes took on the roles of UN diplomats, researched their respective nations, engaged in practice UN simulations, and developed a working understanding of the diplomatic process. Students representing the IPCC assisted their diplomatic peers in developing and proposing possible UN resolutions. All three classes worked together to enact the Durban Climate Summit with the underlying focus of developing diplomatic Climate Change mitigation strategies and ultimately resolutions for member nations.

  17. The Education Summit; A Different Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1996-05-01

    The last National Education Summit held by the Governors occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia in 1989. That Summit, chaired by then Governor Clinton, produced the national goals for education announced by President Bush. These top-down goals are unfulfilled and are, for all practical purposes, dead. The 1996 Education Summit seems different, although its recommendations may suffer the same fate of those of the 1989 Summit. The 1996 Education Summit was held at IBM's Executive Conference Center in Palisades, New York. The Governors invited 44 executives of major businesses from virtually every state. CEO's from IBM, AT&T, Bell South, Eastman Kodak, Procter & Gamble, and Boeing were a part of the planning committee. Absent, for the most part, were professional educators and their organizations. The constitution of the 1996 Education Summit sent a clear signal, viz., that the "professional educators," whatever their individual talents, as a group have failed the nation's public schools and now its time for someone else to try. The "someone else" is the group of individuals that are the ultimate consumers of the output of the American education system. The collective point of view of the attending CEO's is that companies have undergone radical changes to become globally competitive, now it's time to keep the work force equally competitive. And this can only come through radical changes in the educational system. The CEO's point out that the companies they represent live or die by the (international) standards they establish, some of which are expressed in the principles of Total Quality Management (TQM), which represents a systemic approach to the changes American industry had to undergo to stay competitive. The executives clearly have run out of patience with the current system of public education. Many feel that they are running out of talented people to fill the important jobs that this society will need to fill to keep it moving forward. That talent is not being

  18. Tackling tuberculosis: Insights from an international TB Summit in London

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Arundhati; Danquah, Cynthia A; Scotti, Francesca; Howard, Tracey K; Kamil, Tengku K; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) poses a grave predicament to the world as it is not merely a scientific challenge but a socio-economic burden as well. A prime cause of mortality in human due to an infectious disease; the malady and its cause, Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained an enigma with many questions that remain unanswered. The ability of the pathogen to survive and switch between varied physiological states necessitates a protracted therapeutic regimen that exerts an excessive strain on low-resource countries. To complicate things further, there has been a significant rise of antimicrobial resistance. Existing control measures, including treatment regimens have remained fairly uniform globally for at least half a century and require reinvention. Overcoming the societal and scientific challenges requires an increase in dialog to identify key regions that need attention and effective partners with whom successful collaborations can be fostered. In this report, we explore the discussions held at the International TB Summit 2015 hosted by EuroSciCon, which served as an excellent platform for researchers to share their recent findings. Ground-breaking results require outreach to affect policy design, governance and control of the disease. Hence, we feel it is important that meetings such as these reach a wider, global audience. PMID:26151309

  19. Managing Haemophilia for Life: 5th Haemophilia Global Summit.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Cedric; Dolan, Gerry; Jennings, Ian; Windyga, Jerzy; Lobet, Sébastien; Rodríguez-Merchán, E Carlos; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; O'Mahony, Brian

    2015-10-01

    The 5th Haemophilia Global Summit was held in Barcelona, Spain, in September 2014. The programme was designed by an independent Scientific Steering Committee of haemophilia experts and explored issues relevant to the practical management of haemophilia, as well as key opportunities and challenges for care in the future. The topics outlined in this supplement were selected by the Scientific Steering Committee for their relevance to improving haemophilia care globally. In this supplement from the meeting, Gerry Dolan explores pharmacokinetics and dynamics in haemophilia, and Gerry Dolan and Ian Jennings jointly address the role of the laboratory in haemophilia care. The potential benefits of low-dose prophylaxis regimens for people with haemophilia in the developing world are reviewed by Jerzy Windyga, and the question of whether 'Future haemophilia research should be undertaken in the developing world' is debated by Jerzy Windyga and Cedric Hermans. Management strategies for ankle arthropathy are discussed by Sébastien Lobet and E. Carlos Rodríguez-Merchán, and the use of ultrasound for the early detection of haemophilic arthropathy is addressed by Matteo Nicola Dario Di Minno and Víctor Jiménez-Yuste. Finally, the role of patients in the future of haemophilia care is reviewed by Brian O'Mahony. PMID:26350039

  20. Managing haemophilia for life: 4th Haemophilia Global Summit.

    PubMed

    Astermark, J; Dolan, G; Hilberg, T; Jiménez-Yuste, V; Laffan, M; Lassila, R; Lobet, S; Martinoli, C; Perno, C-F

    2014-07-01

    The 4th Haemophilia Global Summit was held in Potsdam, Germany, in September 2013 and brought together an international faculty of haemophilia experts and delegates from multidisciplinary backgrounds. The programme was designed by an independent Scientific Steering Committee of haemophilia experts and explored global perspectives in haemophilia care, discussing practical approaches to the optimal management of haemophilia now and in the future. The topics outlined in this supplement were selected by the Scientific Steering Committee for their relevance and potential to influence haemophilia care globally. In this supplement from the meeting, Jan Astermark reviews current understanding of risk factors for the development of inhibitory antibodies and discusses whether this risk can be modulated and minimized. Factors key to the improvement of joint health in people with haemophilia are explored, with Carlo Martinoli and Víctor Jiménez-Yuste discussing the utility of ultrasound for the early detection of haemophilic arthropathy. Other aspects of care necessary for the prevention and management of joint disease in people with haemophilia are outlined by Thomas Hilberg and Sébastian Lobet, who highlight the therapeutic benefits of physiotherapy and sports therapy. Riitta Lassila and Carlo-Federico Perno describe current knowledge surrounding the risk of transmission of infectious agents via clotting factor concentrates. Finally, different types of extended half-life technology are evaluated by Mike Laffan, with a focus on the practicalities and challenges associated with these products. PMID:24924596

  1. Tackling tuberculosis: Insights from an international TB Summit in London.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Arundhati; Danquah, Cynthia A; Scotti, Francesca; Howard, Tracey K; Kamil, Tengku K; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) poses a grave predicament to the world as it is not merely a scientific challenge but a socio-economic burden as well. A prime cause of mortality in human due to an infectious disease; the malady and its cause, Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained an enigma with many questions that remain unanswered. The ability of the pathogen to survive and switch between varied physiological states necessitates a protracted therapeutic regimen that exerts an excessive strain on low-resource countries. To complicate things further, there has been a significant rise of antimicrobial resistance. Existing control measures, including treatment regimens have remained fairly uniform globally for at least half a century and require reinvention. Overcoming the societal and scientific challenges requires an increase in dialog to identify key regions that need attention and effective partners with whom successful collaborations can be fostered. In this report, we explore the discussions held at the International TB Summit 2015 hosted by EuroSciCon, which served as an excellent platform for researchers to share their recent findings. Ground-breaking results require outreach to affect policy design, governance and control of the disease. Hence, we feel it is important that meetings such as these reach a wider, global audience. PMID:26151309

  2. [VI Ibero-American Summit of heads of state and government: Declaration of Viña del Mar].

    PubMed

    1997-09-01

    The leaders of 21 Ibero-American countries came to Viña del Mar (Chile) for the sixth meeting of the now-traditional Ibero-American Summits. The Declaration that resulted from the Summit reiterated the commitment of these nations to the principles of democracy, the rule of law, and political pluralism. The development of efficient and participatory systems of democratic government was one of the most important of the topics dealt with at the meeting and served as the framework for the discussion and the search for solutions to common problems, such as poverty, arms trafficking, unequal opportunity for men and women, and inappropriate government practices. The leaders also supported a series of initiatives and international programs in the technological and cultural arenas that will strengthen the ties and unite the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries. PMID:9445767

  3. The effect of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on plasma HDL cholesterol levels depends on the ABCA1 gene variation in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/G8 have shown an association with HDL-C. One of the most likely mechanisms to explain those associations is through ABCA1. Objective: To assess whether the effect of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on HDL-C is dependent on ABCA1, we studied potential interacti...

  4. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Arun Majumdar)

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Arun

    2012-02-28

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Director of ARPA-E, Arun Majumdar, gave the final keynote address for Tuesday, February 28th. He discussed APRA-E's role in meeting 21st century energy needs with American innovation.

  5. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Arun Majumdar)

    ScienceCinema

    Majumdar, Arun (ARPA-E Director)

    2012-03-21

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Director of ARPA-E, Arun Majumdar, gave the final keynote address for Tuesday, February 28th. He discussed APRA-E's role in meeting 21st century energy needs with American innovation.

  6. Genetic Variations at ABCG5/G8 Genes Modulate Plasma Lipids Concentrations in Patients with Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rios, A; Perez-Martinez, P; Fuentes, F; Mata, P; Lopez-Miranda, J; Alonso, R; Rodriguez, F; Garcia-Olid, A; Ruano, J; Ordovas, JM; Perez-Jimenez, F

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of four common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at ABCG5 (i7892A>G, i18429C>T, Gln604GluC>G, i11836G>A) and five at ABCG8 (5U145T>G, Tyr54CysA>G, Asp19HisG>C, i14222T>C, and Thr400LysG>T) with plasma lipids concentrations and to explore the interaction between those SNPs and smoking in patients with FH. Methods and Results ABCG5/G8 SNPs were genotyped in 500 subjects with genetic diagnosis of FH. Carriers of the minor A allele at the ABCG5_i11836G>A SNP displayed significantly higher HDL-C concentrations (P=0.023) than G/G subjects. In addition, carriers of the minor G allele at the ABCG5_Gln604GluC>G SNP had significantly lower VLDL-C (P=0.011) and lower TG (P=0.017) concentrations than homozygous C/C. Interestingly, a significant gene-smoking interaction was found, in which carriers of the minor alleles at ABCG5 (i7892A>G, i18429C>T, i11836G>A) SNPs displayed significantly lower HDL-C, higher TC and higher TG respectively, only in smokers. On the other hand, non-smokers carriers of the minor alleles at ABCG5 (i18429C>T and Gln604GluC>G) SNPs had significantly lower TG concentrations (P=0.012 and P=0.035) compared with homozygous for the major allele. Conclusions Our data support the notion that ABCG5/G8 genetic variants modulate plasma lipids concentrations in patients with FH and confirm that this effect could be influenced by smoking. Therefore, these results suggest that gene-environmental interactions can affect the clinical phenotype of FH. PMID:20172523

  7. Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill' (QTVR)

    In late November 2005 while descending 'Husband Hill,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the most detailed panorama so far of the 'Inner Basin,' the rover's next target destination. Spirit acquired the 405 individual images that make up this 360-degree view of the surrounding terrain using five different filters on the panoramic camera. The rover took the images on Martian days, or sols, 672 to 677 (Nov. 23 to 28, 2005 -- the Thanksgiving holiday weekend).

    This image is an approximately true-color rendering using camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters. Seams between individual frames have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

    'Home Plate,' a bright, semi-circular feature scientists hope to investigate, is harder to discern in this image than in earlier views taken from higher up the hill. Spirit acquired this more oblique view, known as the 'Seminole panorama,' from about halfway down the south flank of Husband Hill, 50 meters (164 feet) or so below the summit. Near the center of the panorama, on the horizon, are 'McCool Hill' and 'Ramon Hill,' named, like Husband Hill, in honor of the fallen astronauts of the space shuttle Columbia. Husband Hill is visible behind the rover, on the right and left sides of the panorama. An arc of rover tracks made while avoiding obstacles and getting into position to examine rock outcrops can be traced over a long distance by zooming in to explore the panorama in greater detail.

    Spirit is now significantly farther downhill toward the center of this panorama, en route to Home Plate and other enigmatic soils and outcrop rocks in the quest to uncover the history of Gusev Crater and the 'Columbia Hills.'

  8. The Education Summit; A Different Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1996-05-01

    The last National Education Summit held by the Governors occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia in 1989. That Summit, chaired by then Governor Clinton, produced the national goals for education announced by President Bush. These top-down goals are unfulfilled and are, for all practical purposes, dead. The 1996 Education Summit seems different, although its recommendations may suffer the same fate of those of the 1989 Summit. The 1996 Education Summit was held at IBM's Executive Conference Center in Palisades, New York. The Governors invited 44 executives of major businesses from virtually every state. CEO's from IBM, AT&T, Bell South, Eastman Kodak, Procter & Gamble, and Boeing were a part of the planning committee. Absent, for the most part, were professional educators and their organizations. The constitution of the 1996 Education Summit sent a clear signal, viz., that the "professional educators," whatever their individual talents, as a group have failed the nation's public schools and now its time for someone else to try. The "someone else" is the group of individuals that are the ultimate consumers of the output of the American education system. The collective point of view of the attending CEO's is that companies have undergone radical changes to become globally competitive, now it's time to keep the work force equally competitive. And this can only come through radical changes in the educational system. The CEO's point out that the companies they represent live or die by the (international) standards they establish, some of which are expressed in the principles of Total Quality Management (TQM), which represents a systemic approach to the changes American industry had to undergo to stay competitive. The executives clearly have run out of patience with the current system of public education. Many feel that they are running out of talented people to fill the important jobs that this society will need to fill to keep it moving forward. That talent is not being

  9. Characterization and cloning of the human splicing factor 9G8: a novel 35 kDa factor of the serine/arginine protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Cavaloc, Y; Popielarz, M; Fuchs, J P; Gattoni, R; Stévenin, J

    1994-01-01

    By adopting a monoclonal antibody approach, we have identified a novel splicing factor of 35 kDa which we have termed 9G8. The isolation and characterization of cDNA clones indicate that 9G8 is a novel member of the serine/arginine (SR) splicing factor family because it includes an N-terminal RNA binding domain (RBD) and a C-terminal SR domain. The RNA binding domain of 9G8 is highly homologous to those of the SRp20 and RBP1 factors (79-71% identity), but the homology is less pronounced in the cases of SF2/ASF and SC35/PR264 (45-37% identity). Compared with the other SR splicing factors, 9G8 presents some specific sequence features because it contains an RRSRSXSX consensus sequence repeated six times in the SR domain, and a CCHC motif in its median region, similar to the zinc knuckle found in the SLU7 splicing factor in yeast. Complete immunodepletion of 9G8 from a nuclear extract, which is accompanied by a substantial depletion of other SR factors, results in a loss of splicing activity. We show that a recombinant 9G8 protein, expressed using a baculovirus vector and excluding other SR factors, rescues the splicing activity of a 9G8-depleted nuclear extract and an S100 cytoplasmic fraction. This indicates that 9G8 plays a crucial role in splicing, similar to that of the other SR splicing factors. This similarity was confirmed by the fact that purified human SC35 also rescues the 9G8-depleted extract. The identification of the 9G8 factor enlarges the essential family of SR splicing factors, whose members have also been proposed to play key roles in alternative splicing. Images PMID:8013463

  10. Summit Lake landslide and geomorphic history of Summit Lake basin, northwestern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curry, B. Brandon; Melhorn, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    The Summit Lake landslide, northwestern Nevada, composed of Early Miocene pyroclastic debris, Ashdown Tuff, and basalt and rhyolite of the Black Rock Range, blocked the upper Soldier Creek-Snow Creek drainage and impounded Summit Lake sometimes prior to 7840 yr B.P. The slide covers 8.2 km2 and has geomorphic features characteristic of long run-out landslides, such as lobate form, longitudinal and transverse ridges, low surface gradient (7.1 ??), and preservation of original stratigraphic position of transported blocks. However, estimated debris volume is the smallest reported (2.5 ?? 105 m3) for a landslide of this type. The outflow channel of the Summit Lake basin was a northward-flowing stream valley entrenched by Mahogany Creek. Subsequent negative tectonic adjustment of the basin by about 35 m, accompanied by concommitant progradation of a prominent alluvial fan deposited by Mahogany Creek, argues for a probable diversion of drainage from the Alvord basin southward into the Lahontan basin. The landslide occurred while the creek flowed southward, transferring about 147 km2 of watershed from the Lahontan basin back to the Alvord basin. Overflow northward occurred during high stands of Pluvial Lake Parman in the basin; otherwise, under drier climates, the Summit Lake basin has been closed. Within large depressions on the slide surface, the ca. 6800 yr old Mazama Bed and other sediments have buried a weakly developed soil. Disseminated humus in the soil yields an age of 7840 ?? 310 yr B.P. Absence of older tephra (such as St. Helens M) brackets the slide age between 7840 and 19,000 yr B.P. Projectile points found on the highest strandlines of Pluvial Lake Parman suggest a ca 8700 yr B.P. age by correlation with cultural artifacts and radiocarbon ages from nearby Last Supper Cave, Nevada. Organic matter accumulation in landslide soils suggests ages ranging from 9100 to 16,250 yr B.P. Estimation of the age of the slide from morphologic data for the isolated Summit

  11. Winter Camp: A Blog from the Greenland Summit, Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Lora

    2009-01-01

    An earlier issue presents the first half of the author's experience living and working at the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Greenland Summit Camp. The author is a remote-sensing glaciologist at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center. She took measurements that will be used to validate data collected by NASA s Aqua, Terra, and Ice, Clouds, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) satellites with ground-truth measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet she made at Summit Camp from November 2008-February 2009. This article presents excerpts from the second half of her stay and work at the Greenland Summit.

  12. Proceedings Report from the Sustainability Education Summit, September 20-21, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The first-ever U. S. Department of Education summit on sustainability, "Sustainability Education Summit: Citizenship and Pathways for a Green Economy," was held on Sept. 20-21, 2010, in Washington, D.C. The Sustainability Education Summit (the Summit) brought together leaders from higher education, business and industry, labor, government, and…

  13. View of the highway, lower west summit switchbacks between Frozen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the highway, lower west summit switchbacks between Frozen Lake and Bar Drift, looking northwest, showing retained alignment - Beartooth Highway, Red Lodge, Montana to Cooke City, Montana, Cody, Park County, WY

  14. President Barack Obama at UN Climate Change Summit

    ScienceCinema

    Obama, Barack

    2013-05-29

    In his first address to the United Nations as Commander-in- Chief, President Obama addresses the pressing issue of climate change. The one-day UN summit brought together delegations from 90 nations. September 22, 2009 (Public Domain)

  15. 29. ROAD TO SUMMIT SHOWING VISITOR OVERLOOK AND SCIENCE CITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. ROAD TO SUMMIT SHOWING VISITOR OVERLOOK AND SCIENCE CITY, FROM ATOP WHITE HILL. NOTE THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS OF WHAT APPEARS TO BE A CIRCULAR SHELTER AT LOWER RIGHT. - Haleakala National Park Roads, Pukalani, Maui County, HI

  16. 3. ROAD TO SUMMIT SHOWING VISITOR OVERLOOK AND SCIENCE CITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ROAD TO SUMMIT SHOWING VISITOR OVERLOOK AND SCIENCE CITY, FROM ATOP WHITE HILL. NOTE THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS OF WHAT APPEARS TO BE A CIRCULAR SHELTER AT LOWER RIGHT. - Haleakala National Park Roads, Pukalani, Maui County, HI

  17. President Barack Obama at UN Climate Change Summit

    SciTech Connect

    Obama, Barack

    2009-01-01

    In his first address to the United Nations as Commander-in- Chief, President Obama addresses the pressing issue of climate change. The one-day UN summit brought together delegations from 90 nations. September 22, 2009 (Public Domain)

  18. Agenda 21: The Earth summit strategy to save our planet

    SciTech Connect

    Sitarz, D.

    1993-01-01

    This summit was held on June 13, 1992 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil to provide a forum for developing a plan of action to confront and overcome the most pressing environmental, health, and social problem issues facing the planet. AGENDA 21 is the agreement adopted by all participating nations at this summit. The adoption of this document by virtually every nation on Earth has created an unprecedented global partnership to reverse the environmental degradation of the planet.

  19. Synthesis of water suitable as the MEPC.174(58) G8 influent water for testing ballast water management systems.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Fabio; Del Core, Marianna; Cappello, Simone; Mazzola, Salvatore; Sprovieri, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Here, we describe the methodologies adopted to ensure that natural seawater, used as "influent water" for the land test, complies with the requirement that should be fulfilled to show the efficacy of the new ballast water treatment system (BWTS). The new BWTS was located on the coast of SW Sicily (Italy), and the sampled seawater showed that bacteria and plankton were two orders of magnitude lower than requested. Integrated approaches for preparation of massive cultures of bacteria (Alcanivorax borkumensis and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus), algae (Tetraselmis suecica), rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis), and crustaceans (Artemia salina) suitable to ensure that 200 m(3) of water fulfilled the international guidelines of MEPC.174(58)G8 are here described. These methodologies allowed us to prepare the "influent water" in good agreement with guidelines and without specific problems arising from natural conditions (seasons, weather, etc.) which significantly affect the concentrations of organisms at sea. This approach also offered the chance to reliably run land tests once every two weeks. PMID:26403705

  20. Full genomic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a zoonotic human G8P[14] rotavirus strain detected in a sample from Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rashi; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Roy, Sunando; Esona, Mathew D; Lopez, Beatriz; Mencos, Yolanda; Rey-Benito, Gloria; Bowen, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    We report the genomic characterization of a rare human G8P[14] rotavirus strain, identified in a stool sample from Guatemala (GTM) during routine rotavirus surveillance. This strain was designated as RVA/Human-wt/GTM/2009726790/2009/G8P[14], with a genomic constellation of G8-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A13-N2-T6-E2-H3. The VP4 gene occupied lineage VII within the P[14] genotype. Phylogenetic analysis of each genome segment revealed close relatedness to several zoonotic simian, guanaco and bovine strains. Our findings suggest that strain RVA/Human-wt/GTM/2009726790/2009/G8P[14] is an example of a direct zoonotic transmission event. The results of this study reinforce the potential role of interspecies transmission and reassortment in generating novel and rare rotavirus strains which infect humans. PMID:25952569

  1. ACAT2 and ABCG5/G8 are both required for efficient cholesterol absorption in mice: evidence from thoracic lymph duct cannulation[S

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tam M.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Davis, Matthew A.; Kent, Carol R.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic fate of newly absorbed cholesterol and phytosterol is orchestrated through adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G5 and G8 heterodimer (G5G8), and acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2). We hypothesized that intestinal G5G8 limits sterol absorption by reducing substrate availability for ACAT2 esterification and have attempted to define the roles of these two factors using gene deletion studies in mice. Male ACAT2−/−, G5G8−/−, ACAT2−/−G5G8−/− (DKO), and wild-type (WT) control mice were fed a diet with 20% of energy as palm oil and 0.2% (w/w) cholesterol. Sterol absorption efficiency was directly measured by monitoring the appearance of [3H]sitosterol and [14C]cholesterol tracers in lymph after thoracic lymph duct cannulation. The average percentage (± SEM) absorption of [14C]cholesterol after 8 h of lymph collection was 40.55 ± 0.76%, 19.41 ± 1.52%, 32.13 ± 1.60%, and 21.27 ± 1.35% for WT, ACAT2−/−, G5G8−/−, and DKO mice, respectively. [3H]sitosterol absorption was <2% in WT and ACAT2−/− mice, whereas it was up to 6.8% in G5G8−/− and DKO mice. G5G8−/− mice also produced chylomicrons with ∼70% less cholesterol ester mass than WT mice. In contrast to expectations, the data demonstrated that the absence of G5G8 led to decreased intestinal cholesterol esterification and reduced cholesterol transport efficiency. Intestinal G5G8 appeared to limit the absorption of phytosterols; ACAT2 more efficiently esterified cholesterol than phytosterols. The data indicate that handling of sterols by the intestine involves both G5G8 and ACAT2 but that an additional factor (possibly Niemann-Pick C1-like 1) may be key in determining absorption efficiency. PMID:22669916

  2. The combination of ezetimibe and ursodiol promotes fecal sterol excretion and reveals a G5G8-independent pathway for cholesterol elimination[S

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhuan; Liu, Xiaoxi; Pijut, Sonja S.; Li, Jianing; Horn, Jamie; Bradford, Emily M.; Leggas, Markos; Barrett, Terrence A.; Graf, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggest an interdependent relationship between liver and intestine for cholesterol elimination from the body. We hypothesized that a combination of ursodiol (Urso) and ezetimibe (EZ) could increase biliary secretion and reduce cholesterol reabsorption, respectively, to promote cholesterol excretion. Treatment with Urso increased hepatic ABCG5 ABCG8 (G5G8) protein and both biliary and fecal sterols in a dose-dependent manner. To determine whether the drug combination (Urso-EZ) further increased cholesterol excretion, mice were treated with Urso alone or in combination with two doses of EZ. EZ produced an additive and dose-dependent increase in fecal neutral sterol (FNS) elimination in the presence of Urso. Finally, we sequentially treated wide-type and G5G8-deficient mice with Urso and Urso-EZ to determine the extent to which these effects were G5G8 dependent. Although biliary and FNS were invariably lower in G5G8 KO mice, the relative increase in FNS following treatment with Urso alone or the Urso-EZ combination was not affected by genotype. In conclusion, Urso increases G5G8, biliary cholesterol secretion, and FNS and acts additively with EZ to promote fecal sterol excretion. However, the stimulatory effect of these agents was not G5G8 dependent. PMID:25635125

  3. The combination of ezetimibe and ursodiol promotes fecal sterol excretion and reveals a G5G8-independent pathway for cholesterol elimination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhuan; Liu, Xiaoxi; Pijut, Sonja S; Li, Jianing; Horn, Jamie; Bradford, Emily M; Leggas, Markos; Barrett, Terrence A; Graf, Gregory A

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies suggest an interdependent relationship between liver and intestine for cholesterol elimination from the body. We hypothesized that a combination of ursodiol (Urso) and ezetimibe (EZ) could increase biliary secretion and reduce cholesterol reabsorption, respectively, to promote cholesterol excretion. Treatment with Urso increased hepatic ABCG5 ABCG8 (G5G8) protein and both biliary and fecal sterols in a dose-dependent manner. To determine whether the drug combination (Urso-EZ) further increased cholesterol excretion, mice were treated with Urso alone or in combination with two doses of EZ. EZ produced an additive and dose-dependent increase in fecal neutral sterol (FNS) elimination in the presence of Urso. Finally, we sequentially treated wide-type and G5G8-deficient mice with Urso and Urso-EZ to determine the extent to which these effects were G5G8 dependent. Although biliary and FNS were invariably lower in G5G8 KO mice, the relative increase in FNS following treatment with Urso alone or the Urso-EZ combination was not affected by genotype. In conclusion, Urso increases G5G8, biliary cholesterol secretion, and FNS and acts additively with EZ to promote fecal sterol excretion. However, the stimulatory effect of these agents was not G5G8 dependent. PMID:25635125

  4. Whole genomic analysis of human and bovine G8P[1] rotavirus strains isolated in Nigeria provides evidence for direct bovine-to-human interspecies transmission.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi; Adah, Mohammed Ignatius; Ide, Tomihiko; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-09-01

    Bovine group A rotavirus (RVA) G8P[1] strains have been rarely detected in humans. Two Nigerian G8P[1] strains, HMG035 (RVA/Human-tc/NGA/HMG035/1999/G8P[1]) and NGRBg8 (RVA/Cow-tc/NGA/NGRBg8/1998/G8P[1]), were previously suggested to have the VP7, VP4, and NSP1 genes of bovine origin. In order to obtain precise information on the origin and evolution of these G8P[1] strains, the complete nucleotide sequences of the whole genomes of strains HMG035 and NGRBg8 were determined and analyzed in the present study. On whole genomic analysis, strains HMG035 and NGRBg8 were found to be very closely related to each other in all the 11 segments, and were found to have a bovine RVA-like genotype constellation (G8-P[1]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A11-N2-T6-E2-H3). Furthermore, on phylogenetic analysis, each of the 11 genes of strains HMG035 and NGRBg8 appeared to be of bovine origin. Thus, strains HMG035 and NGRBg8 were suggested to be derived from a common origin, and strain NGRBg8 was assumed to represent an example of bovine RVA strains that were transmitted to humans. Our findings provide clear evidence for direct bovine-to-human interspecies transmission of RVA strains. PMID:27302094

  5. The 1992 Earth Summit: background and prospects.

    PubMed

    Strong, M F

    1992-03-01

    In 1989, the UN General Assembly agreed to sponsor a conference on environment and development and that the Heads of State would attend this 1st ever Earth Summit in June 1992. The planned agenda included making concrete changes to the basis of our economic life, relations between and among nations, and the outlook for the future. This would result in restructuring world priorities. Despite the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the human Environment acknowledging the basic link between environment and development, the environment has deteriorated even further, especially ozone depletion. Yet some governments did set up environmental agencies or ministries, like the US Environmental Protection Agency, but they were not allowed to influence economic policy or the policies and/or practices of major sectoral agencies. These environmental organizations relied too heavily on regulation. The 1992 conference needs to result in a political commitment to place reduction of poverty worldwide as the 1st priority since poverty and underdevelopment are strongly related to destruction of the environment. It is particularly important that developing countries improve their strengths by developing their human resources and institutional capacities (science, technology, management and professional skills) and reduce their vulnerabilities, such as dependence on foreign experts. This can best be achieved if they have access to technology. Moreover they must reduce population growth and reach population stability quickly. The 1992 conference in Brazil should also result in a global partnership based on common interest, mutual need, and shared responsibility. The world ecoindustrial revolution has already begun in some countries, such as Japan which has reduced energy use 40% since 1975. In fact, Japan has proven that environmental improvement can be accomplished with high rates of economic growth. PMID:12284962

  6. Olympus: The Ultimate Summit for Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Darrell; Holt, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High above the world-class observatories that dot Hawaii's dormant Mauna Kea volcano, floating farther yet over the hostile and nearly inaccessible peaks of Mt. Everest, lies a summit waiting to be conquered. Here above the clouds and city lights and over 99.7% of the atmosphere is a platform on the edge of space, home to a broad range of astronomy and physics experiments. Today, balloons are lifting experiments longer, higher and more inexpensively than ever before, and returning them safely to Earth for reuse. Week-long flights at altitudes of approximately 35 kilometers carrying payloads in excess of several tons are the norm. NASA now plans to extend this platform and create a new generation of balloons capable of staying afloat with such cargo for 100 days and ultimately 1,000 days. What do some scientists hope to accomplish with 100 or even 1,000 days at the edge of space? To name but a few proposals on the table: Jupiter-size planet searches, large-aperture solar astronomy, large-aperture infrared astronomy, cosmic-ray investigations, long-duration Earth science missions, and hard x-ray imaging experiments. Olympus defines a new era in scientific ballooning. Advances in material science and trajectory control are enabling revolutionary capabilities. Very large scientific payloads can now be reliably launched and retrieved for reflight at a range of altitudes. Balloon flight still remains a fraction of the cost of a rocket launch. The ultra long duration balloon, with its 100-day maiden flight planned for 2001, provides a long-term facility in a near-space environment for many types of science. This is a stratospheric mountaintop well worth the climb.

  7. Mushrooms and Health Summit Proceedings123

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Mary Jo; Dwyer, Johanna; Hasler-Lewis, Clare M.; Milner, John A.; Noakes, Manny; Rowe, Sylvia; Wach, Mark; Beelman, Robert B.; Caldwell, Joe; Cantorna, Margherita T.; Castlebury, Lisa A.; Chang, Shu-Ting; Cheskin, Lawrence J.; Clemens, Roger; Drescher, Greg; Fulgoni, Victor L.; Haytowitz, David B.; Hubbard, Van S.; Law, David; Myrdal Miller, Amy; Minor, Bart; Percival, Susan S.; Riscuta, Gabriela; Schneeman, Barbara; Thornsbury, Suzanne; Toner, Cheryl D.; Woteki, Catherine E.; Wu, Dayong

    2014-01-01

    The Mushroom Council convened the Mushrooms and Health Summit in Washington, DC, on 9–10 September 2013. The proceedings are synthesized in this article. Although mushrooms have long been regarded as health-promoting foods, research specific to their role in a healthful diet and in health promotion has advanced in the past decade. The earliest mushroom cultivation was documented in China, which remains among the top global mushroom producers, along with the United States, Italy, The Netherlands, and Poland. Although considered a vegetable in dietary advice, mushrooms are fungi, set apart by vitamin B-12 in very low quantity but in the same form found in meat, ergosterol converted with UV light to vitamin D2, and conjugated linoleic acid. Mushrooms are a rare source of ergothioneine as well as selenium, fiber, and several other vitamins and minerals. Some preclinical and clinical studies suggest impacts of mushrooms on cognition, weight management, oral health, and cancer risk. Preliminary evidence suggests that mushrooms may support healthy immune and inflammatory responses through interaction with the gut microbiota, enhancing development of adaptive immunity, and improved immune cell functionality. In addition to imparting direct nutritional and health benefits, analysis of U.S. food intake survey data reveals that mushrooms are associated with higher dietary quality. Also, early sensory research suggests that mushrooms blended with meats and lower sodium dishes are well liked and may help to reduce intakes of red meat and salt without compromising taste. As research progresses on the specific health effects of mushrooms, there is a need for effective communication efforts to leverage mushrooms to improve overall dietary quality. PMID:24812070

  8. IS PROTOSTELLAR HEATING SUFFICIENT TO HALT FRAGMENTATION? A CASE STUDY OF THE MASSIVE PROTOCLUSTER G8.68-0.37

    SciTech Connect

    Longmore, S. N.; Pillai, T.; Keto, E.; Zhang, Q.; Qiu, K.

    2011-01-10

    If star formation proceeds by thermal fragmentation and the subsequent gravitational collapse of the individual fragments, how is it possible to form fragments massive enough for O and B stars in a typical star-forming molecular cloud where the Jeans mass is about 1 M{sub sun} at the typical densities (10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}) and temperatures (10 K)? We test the hypothesis that a first generation of low-mass stars may heat the gas enough that subsequent thermal fragmentation results in fragments {>=}10 M{sub sun}, sufficient to form B stars. We combine ATCA and Submillimeter Array observations of the massive star-forming region G8.68-0.37 with radiative transfer modeling to derive the present-day conditions in the region and use this to infer the conditions in the past, at the time of core formation. Assuming that the current mass/separation of the observed cores equals the fragmentation Jeans mass/length and the region's average density has not changed requires the gas temperature to have been 100 K at the time of fragmentation. The postulated first generation of low-mass stars would still be around today, but the number required to heat the cloud exceeds the limits imposed by the observations. Several lines of evidence suggest the observed cores in the region should eventually form O stars yet none have sufficient raw material. Even if feedback may have suppressed fragmentation, it was not sufficient to halt it to this extent. To develop into O stars, the cores must obtain additional mass from outside their observationally defined boundaries. The observations suggest that they are currently fed via infall from the very massive reservoir ({approx}1500 M{sub sun}) of gas in the larger parsec scale cloud around the star-forming cores. This suggests that massive stars do not form in the collapse of individual massive fragments, but rather in smaller fragments that themselves continue to gain mass by accretion from larger scales.

  9. Association of ATP binding cassette transporter G8 rs4148217 SNP and serum lipid levels in Mulao and Han nationalities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The association of ATP binding cassette transporter G8 gene (ABCG8) rs4148217 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and serum lipid profiles is still controversial in diverse racial/ethnic groups. Mulao nationality is an isolated minority in China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Mulao and Han populations. Methods A total of 634 subjects of Mulao nationality and 717 participants of Han nationality were randomly selected from our previous samples. Genotyping of the ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The genotypic and allelic frequencies of ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP were different between the two nationalities (P < 0.01 for each), the frequency of A allele was higher in Mulao than in Han. The A allele carriers in Han had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 levels than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05 for each), whereas the A allele carriers in Mulao had lower ApoA1 levels than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05). Subgroup analyses showed that the A allele carriers in Han had lower HDL-C and higher triglyceride (TG) levels in females but not in males than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05 for each), and the A allele carriers in Mulao had lower ApoA1 levels in females but not in males than the A allele noncarriers (P < 0.05). The levels of TG and HDL-C in Han, and ApoA1 in Mulao were associated with genotypes in females but not in males (P < 0.05-0.01). Serum lipid parameters were also correlated with several environmental factors (P < 0.05-0.001). Conclusions The ABCG8 rs4148217 SNP is associated with serum TG, HDL-C and ApoA1 levels in our study populations, but this association is different between the Mulao and Han

  10. The first national adult immunization summit 2012: implementing change through action.

    PubMed

    Shen, Angela K; Bridges, Carolyn B; Tan, Litjen

    2013-01-01

    To address lagging vaccine coverage among adults in the United States, over 150 organizations representing a wide range of immunization partners convened in Atlanta, GA from May 15-16, 2012 for the inaugural National Adult Immunization Summit. The meeting called for solution-oriented discussion toward improving current immunization levels, implementing the 2011 National Vaccine Advisory Committee adult immunization recommendations, and capitalizing on new opportunities to improve coverage. Provisions in the federal health reform law that increase access to preventive services, including immunizations, and the increasing numbers of complementary vaccine providers such as pharmacists, create new opportunities to increase access for immunization services and improve coverage for adults. The Summit organized around five focal areas: empowering providers, quality and performance measures, increasing access and collaboration, educating patients, and informing decision-makers. These focal areas formed the basis of working groups, charged to coordinate efforts by the participating organizations to address gaps in the current immunization system. Summit participants identified priority themes to address as tasks during the coming year, including better communicating the value of immunizations to increase demand for immunizations, creating a central repository of resources for providers, patients, and others interested in improving adult immunization levels, examining performance and quality measures and evaluating means to use such measures to motivate vaccine providers, increasing engagement with employer and employee groups to increase awareness and demand for vaccinations, improving the use of immunization information systems and electronic health reports, decreasing barriers to all vaccine providers including pharmacists and community vaccinators, decreasing the complexity of the adult vaccine schedule where possible, engaging adult immunization champions and leaders in

  11. Best practice contact lens care: a review of the Asia Pacific Contact Lens Care Summit.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Deborah; Holden, Brien; Evans, Kylie; Ng, Venice; Cho, Pauline

    2009-03-01

    Contact lens hygiene has long been recognised as key to the prevention of contact-lens associated infection and inflammation. Microbial keratitis (MK) is the only serious and potentially sight-threatening contact lens adverse event. International studies including recent research in Asia Pacific show that MK is rare but, as the consequences can be severe, it is important to minimise the risk factors. Studies continue to show that one of the key risk factors is lens and lens case hygiene. Therefore, it is also useful to review the behaviour of our patients, to see how closely they follow the recommended hygiene practices. Recent studies in various regions have shown that patients' lens care habits do not meet a required standard. Patients can become complacent and thus non-compliant with lens care instructions. Furthermore, they do not understand the high risk of some behaviour and they are not hearing the practitioner when instructions and reminders are given. Further education is important to improve patient compliance and safety. The Asia Pacific Contact Lens Care Summit held in Singapore urged the industry and practitioners to restore the emphasis of proper lens care, including the 'rub and rinse' technique, and developed a new set of guidelines to help eye-care professionals educate their patients on the importance of proper contact lens care to avoid eye infections. The summit also presented the latest research on how to avoid corneal staining, another important element of contact lens care. This review provides a summary of the summit presentations and the science behind these guidelines. PMID:19278458

  12. 75 FR 39974 - Sunshine Act Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL COUNCIL ON DISABILITY Sunshine Act Meetings DATE AND TIMES: July 28, 2010, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. PLACE: Renaissance Washington... CONSIDERED: (1) National Summit on Disability Policy 2010 Evaluation; (2) Council Strategic Planning....

  13. 75 FR 26807 - Sunshine Act Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL COUNCIL ON DISABILITY Sunshine Act Meetings Dates and Times: May 13, 2010, 9 a.m.-4:45 p.m. May 14, 2010, 8:30 a.m.-10... Considered: National Summit on Disability Policy 2010. Portions Open to the Public: Thursday, May 13, 2010,...

  14. Report from the 1st Cardiovascular Outcome Trial (CVOT) Summit of the Diabetes & Cardiovascular Disease (D&CVD) EASD Study Group.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Oliver; Standl, Eberhard; Catrinoiu, Doina; Genovese, Stefano; Lalic, Nebojsa; Skra, Jan; Valensi, Paul; Ceriello, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The 1st Cardiovascular Outcome Trial (CVOT) Summit of the Diabetes & Cardiovascular Disease (D&CVD) EASD Study Group was held during the annual meeting on 30 October 2015 in Munich. This summit was organized in light of recently published and numerous ongoing CVOTs on diabetes, which have emerged in response to the FDA and the EMA Guidelines. The CVOT Summit stands as a novel conference setup, with the aim of serving as a reference meeting for all topics related to CVOTs in diabetes. Members of the steering committee of the D&CVD EASD Study Group constitute the backbone of the summit. It included presentations of key results on DPP-4 inhibitors, GLP-1-Analogues, SGLT-2 inhibitors, acarbose and insulins. Diabetologists' and cardiologists' perspective on the potential need of new study designs were also highlighted. Furthermore, panel discussions on the design of CVOTs on diabetes were included in the program. The D&CVD EASD Study Group will continue its activity. In-depth discussions and presentations of new CVOTs like LEADER, will be resumed at the 2nd CVOT on diabetes of the D&CVD EASD Study Group, which will be held from 20-22 October 2016 in Munich ( http://www.dcvd.org). PMID:26892706

  15. RadarSAT And Snow Characteristics At Greenland Summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Terhikki; Lahtinen, Panu; Anttila, Kati; Riihela, Aku

    2013-12-01

    The RASCALS (Radiation, Snow Characteristics and Albedo at Summit) campaign [1] was carried out at the Greenland Summit camp research station during June - July 2010. The collection of surface roughness, dielectric constant and density profiles of snow were carried out concurrently with snow albedo and bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) measurements. Polarimetric interferometry of Radarsat-2 quad pol fine beam images is used to study the snow surface anisotropy at Summit, Greenland. Various methods of determining the polarimetric coherence are tested and the results are compared with the in situ surface roughness results, which show a clear anisotropy varying with time. In addition, surface backscattering modelling is used to check the fraction of the surface backscattering.

  16. Elongate summit calderas as Neogene paleostress indicators in Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulsen, T.S.; Wilson, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    The orientations and ages of elongate summit calderas on major polygenetic volcanoes were compiled to document Miocene to Pleistocene Sh (minimum horizontal stress) directions on the western and northern flanks of the West Antarctic rift system. Miocene to Pleistocene summit calderas along the western Ross Sea show relatively consistent ENE long axis trends, which are at a high angle to the Transantarctic Mountain Front and parallel to the N77ºE Sh direction at Cape Roberts. The elongation directions of many Miocene to Pleistocene summit calderas in Marie Byrd Land parallel the alignment of polygenetic volcanoes in which they occur, except several Pleistocene calderas with consistent NNE to NE trends. The overall pattern of elongate calderas in Marie Byrd Land is probably due to a combination of structurally controlled orientations and regional stress fields in which Sh is oriented NNE to NE at a moderate to high angle to the trace of the West Antarctic rift system.

  17. The World Summit for Social Development.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The three goals of the UN World Summit for Social Development are to attack poverty, build solidarity, and create jobs. Unprecedented population growth has led to recognition of the need for a new, people-centered vision of development to counter the mutually reinforcing threats posed to world stability by poverty, unemployment, and social disintegration. This population growth may result in an inability of humanity to adapt and create unrelenting pressure on the world's natural resources. It has become increasingly recognized that improvements in the status of women will be vital to ensuring the future of humanity. Giving women the ability to decide their family size will eliminate hundreds of thousands of maternal deaths each year and will slow population growth while it increases women's productivity and control over resources. As the industrialized nations engage in unsustainable patterns of production and consumption, the lowest-income countries are caught in a "poverty-population-environment spiral." Although population growth is gradually slowing, the population of the world could double by 2050, with 95% of the growth occurring in developing countries. Concern is also mounting over the increasing urbanization of the world as well as the fact that while the populations of poor countries are becoming larger and younger, the population of industrialized countries are becoming older and smaller. The new vision of sustainable development involves generating economic growth, distributing benefits equitably, and allowing the regeneration of the environment. Without such security, the world can not achieve peace. The symptoms of social discrimination include social exclusion, which affects 90% of the world's population; sex and racial discrimination, which lowers the quality of life and increases life-threatening risks for women, indigenous people, and Blacks; violence and abuse, reflected in fact that the US has the highest incidence of murder in the world, in the

  18. People, poverty and the Earth Summit.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, J

    1992-01-01

    UNCED is about human beings managing their affairs so that all can achieve a reasonably good life without destroying the life-supporting environment. Currently human activities are approaching an upset of environmental balance through production of greenhouse gases, depletion of the ozone layer, and reduction of natural resources. Equity is the right to a decent life for the current human population of 5.5 billion and the future 10 billion expected within the next 50 years. A minimum use of environmental space/person is required. The Earth Summit will be a broad statement of environmental policy. Agenda 21 includes 115 action programs within 40 chapters. Separate conventions will be held on climate and biodiversity. The secretariat of UNCED has been working primarily with Agenda 21. Population issues are emphasized in Chapter 5 ("Demographic Dynamics and Sustainability") of the first section in Agenda 21 on Social and Economic Dimensions. The program areas include 1) research on the links between population, the environment, and development; 2) formulation by governments of integrated national policies on environment and development, which account for demographic trends, and promotion of population literacy; and 3) implementation of local level programs to ensure access to education and information and services in order to plan families freely and responsibly. Increases in funding for the population program are anticipated to be US $9 billion by the year 2000 and about US $7 billion/year until then. The year 2000 will bring with it a doubling of urban population in developing countries. There are challenges and opportunities to expand private sector job creation, education, clean water, and family health services. In addition to managing human settlements, there is also management of fragile ecosystems, which means relieving the pressure on these lands through urban migration or relocation to richer agricultural areas. The goal for agriculture is to triple food

  19. Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2003-01-01

    This report consists of a large map sheet and a pamphlet. The map shows the geology, some photographs, description of map units, and correlation of map units. The pamphlet gives the full text about the geologic map. The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water; the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones.

  20. World Antibody-Drug Conjugate Summit, October 15–16, 2013, San Francisco, CA

    PubMed Central

    Klinguer-Hamour, Christine; Strop, Pavel; Shah, Dhaval K; Ducry, Laurent; Xu, April; Beck, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The World Antibody-Drug Conjugate (WADC) Summits organized by Hanson Wade are currently the largest meetings fully dedicated to ADCs. The first global ADC Summit was organized in Boston in October 2010. Since 2011, two WADC are held every year in Frankfurt and San Francisco, respectively. The 2013 WADC San Francisco event was structured around plenary sessions with keynote speakers from AbbVie, Agensys, ImmunoGen, Immunomedics, Genentech, Pfizer and Seattle Genetics. Parallel tracks were also organized addressing ADC discovery, development and optimization of chemistry, manufacturing and control (CMC) issues. Discovery and process scientists, regulatory experts (US Food and Drug Administration), academics and clinicians were present, including representatives from biotechnology firms (Concortis, CytomX Therapeutics, Glykos, Evonik, Igenica, Innate Pharma, Mersana Therapeutics, Polytherics, Quanta Biodesign, Redwood Bioscience, Sutro Biopharma, SynAffix), pharmaceutical companies (Amgen, Genmab, Johnson and Johnson, MedImmune, Novartis, Progenics, Takeda) and contract research or manufacturing organizations (Baxter, Bayer, BSP Pharmaceuticals, Fujifilm/Diosynth, Lonza, Pierre Fabre Contract Manufacturing, Piramal, SAFC, SafeBridge). PMID:24423618

  1. World Antibody-Drug Conjugate Summit, October 15-16, 2013, San Francisco, CA.

    PubMed

    Klinguer-Hamour, Christine; Strop, Pavel; Shah, Dhaval K; Ducry, Laurent; Xu, April; Beck, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The World Antibody-Drug Conjugate (WADC) Summits organized by Hanson Wade are currently the largest meetings fully dedicated to ADCs. The first global ADC Summit was organized in Boston in October 2010. Since 2011, two WADC are held every year in Frankfurt and San Francisco, respectively. The 2013 WADC San Francisco event was structured around plenary sessions with keynote speakers from AbbVie, Agensys, ImmunoGen, Immunomedics, Genentech, Pfizer and Seattle Genetics. Parallel tracks were also organized addressing ADC discovery, development and optimization of chemistry, manufacturing and control (CMC) issues. Discovery and process scientists, regulatory experts (US Food and Drug Administration), academics and clinicians were present, including representatives from biotechnology firms (Concortis, CytomX Therapeutics, Glykos, Evonik, Igenica, Innate Pharma, Mersana Therapeutics, Polytherics, Quanta Biodesign, Redwood Bioscience, Sutro Biopharma, SynAffix), pharmaceutical companies (Amgen, Genmab, Johnson and Johnson, MedImmune, Novartis, Progenics, Takeda) and contract research or manufacturing organizations (Baxter, Bayer, BSP Pharmaceuticals, Fujifilm/Diosynth, Lonza, Pierre Fabre Contract Manufacturing, Piramal, SAFC, SafeBridge). PMID:24423618

  2. The World Summit of Harmonization on Traditional, Alternative and Complementary Medicine (TACM) in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, José; Villar, Martha

    2010-01-01

    The World Summit of Harmonization on Traditional, Alternative and Complementary Medicine (TACM) was held in Lima, Peru, November 7–11, 2007, with almost 600 worldwide participants. This meeting was organized by Peruvian Medical College, the institution that affiliates and authorizes all physicians to practice medicine in Peru. The meeting included seven sections starting with an overview on the current status of the TACM. The second section included experiences from different countries on regulations and quality control in products and services used in the TACM. The worldwide experience of education and training in TACM was a very important part of the meeting in which speakers from Spain, Germany, Argentina, Italy, Brazil, Cuba and Peru shared their experience. The meeting included topics on homeopathy, acupuncture, mind–body medicine, neural therapy, chiropraxis, among others. Two final sessions were related to the ways of linking Traditional medicine to the national Health Systems in the Latin America countries and also the association between bio-commerce and TACM including intellectual properties and bio-piracy. PMID:18955348

  3. The World Summit of Harmonization on Traditional, Alternative and Complementary Medicine (TACM) in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Aguilar, José; Villar, Martha

    2010-06-01

    The World Summit of Harmonization on Traditional, Alternative and Complementary Medicine (TACM) was held in Lima, Peru, November 7-11, 2007, with almost 600 worldwide participants. This meeting was organized by Peruvian Medical College, the institution that affiliates and authorizes all physicians to practice medicine in Peru. The meeting included seven sections starting with an overview on the current status of the TACM. The second section included experiences from different countries on regulations and quality control in products and services used in the TACM. The worldwide experience of education and training in TACM was a very important part of the meeting in which speakers from Spain, Germany, Argentina, Italy, Brazil, Cuba and Peru shared their experience. The meeting included topics on homeopathy, acupuncture, mind-body medicine, neural therapy, chiropraxis, among others. Two final sessions were related to the ways of linking Traditional medicine to the national Health Systems in the Latin America countries and also the association between bio-commerce and TACM including intellectual properties and bio-piracy. PMID:18955348

  4. Abrupt emergence and predominance in Vietnam of rotavirus A strains possessing a bovine-like G8 on a DS-1-like background.

    PubMed

    Hoa-Tran, T N; Nakagomi, T; Vu, H M; Do, L P; Gauchan, P; Agbemabiese, C A; Nguyen, T T T; Nakagomi, O; Thanh, N T H

    2016-02-01

    An apparently single rotavirus A strain possessing a genotype constellation of G8-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 abruptly emerged, caused diarrhoea in children requiring hospitalisation, and increased to reach 27 % of strains detected during the first half of 2015 in Vietnam. PMID:26586330

  5. Compliant membranes for the development of MEMS dual-backplate capacitive microphone using the SUMMiT V fabrication process.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, David

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this project is the investigation of compliant membranes for the development of a MicroElectrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS) microphone using the Sandia Ultraplanar, Multilevel MEMS Technology (SUMMiT V) fabrication process. The microphone is a dual-backplate capacitive microphone utilizing electrostatic force feedback. The microphone consists of a diaphragm and two porous backplates, one on either side of the diaphragm. This forms a capacitor between the diaphragm and each backplate. As the incident pressure deflects the diaphragm, the value of each capacitor will change, thus resulting in an electrical output. Feedback may be used in this device by applying a voltage between the diaphragm and the backplates to balance the incident pressure keeping the diaphragm stationary. The SUMMiT V fabrication process is unique in that it can meet the fabrication requirements of this project. All five layers of polysilicon are used in the fabrication of this device. The SUMMiT V process has been optimized to provide low-stress mechanical layers that are ideal for the construction of the microphone's diaphragm. The use of chemical mechanical polishing in the SUMMiT V process results in extremely flat structural layers and uniform spacing between the layers, both of which are critical to the successful fabrication of the MEMS microphone. The MEMS capacitive microphone was fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories and post-processed, packaged, and tested at the University of Florida. The microphone demonstrates a flat frequency response, a linear response up to the designed limit, and a sensitivity that is close to the designed value. Future work will focus on characterization of additional devices, extending the frequency response measurements, and investigating the use of other types of interface circuitry.

  6. 76 FR 45650 - Motorcoach Safety Summit and Regional Roundtables

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... January 17, 2008 (73 FR 3316) at http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2008/pdf/E8-785.pdf . FOR FURTHER... hold four regional roundtable discussions. Seating is limited for all events. Individuals with diverse... Summit. Based on limited seating and to accommodate the strong interest outside the Washington area,...

  7. Structural map of the summit area of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The map shows the faults, sets of fissures, eruptive vent lines and collapse features in the summit area of the volcano. It covers most of the USGS Kilauea Crater 7-1/2 minute quadrangle, together with parts of Volcano, Makaopuhi Crater, and Kau Desert 7-1/2 minute quadrangles. (ACR)

  8. International Summit on Prevention of Mental Retardation from Biomedical Causes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Jean, Ed.

    Proceedings from the International Summit on Prevention of Mental Retardation from Biomedical Causes are provided. After a list of participants and summary of the highlights of the conference, the keynote address by H. Moser is presented. The following 13 papers are provided along with workshop recommendations and a list of main points elicited…

  9. Climbing Mount Everest: on our way to the summit.

    PubMed

    Shamian, Judith

    2003-01-01

    The key to climbing Mount Everest is not one individual striving for the peak. Teamwork, leadership, and meticulous planning are what take climbers to the summit. They are key, as well, to solving the problems of human resources in the healthcare system. PMID:12846148

  10. 78 FR 36683 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, Mississippi

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, Mississippi AGENCY: Federal Communications... U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal...--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 0 1. The authority citation for part 73 continues to read as follows:...

  11. 77 FR 23203 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, MS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Summit, MS AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez... Communications Commission proposes to amend 47 CFR Part 73 as follows: PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 1....

  12. The High School Leadership Summit. Issue Papers, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education 2004 National High School Summit took place December 2-3, 2004, in Washington, D.C. Nearly 1000 individuals participated-educators, policymakers, business leaders, and government officials. The event built on the work the Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE) had done with states over the prior year and…

  13. Progress since the World Summit for Children: A Statistical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    One of the strengths of the 1990 World Summit for Children was its emphasis on goals to drive development and shape actions, and on the need to monitor progress, thereby transforming the way the world collected and processed data on children and women and creating a vital base and baseline for progress. In 2000, an exhaustive end-decade review of…

  14. What Makes a Great Teacher? PDK Summit Offers Many Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Erin

    2009-01-01

    Creating change school requires courage. Great teachers can't be satisfied with managing change; they must be prepared to lead change, argues Thomas Guskey, keynote speaker at the 2008 Phi Delta Kappa Summit on High-Performing Educators and a professor of education at Georgetown College in Georgetown, Kentucky.

  15. Students Protest Lack of Representation at Spellings Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    Student lobbyists have sent Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings a letter scolding her for what they see as a minimizing of student representation at the higher-education summit held last week. The Department of Education responded by saying that students had indeed been invited to participate. The letter, which was signed by Jennifer S. Pae,…

  16. Recommendations from NASA's Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Johnson-Throop, K. A.; Scheuring, R. A.; Walton, M. E.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Smaka, T.; McCulley, P. A.; Jones, J. A.; Stokes, C. R.; Parker, K. K.; Wear, M.; Johnson-Throop, K. A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Continuously evolving medical standards of care, limited crew training time, and the inherent constraints of space flight necessitate regular revisions of the mission medical support infrastructure and methodology. A three-day Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit was held to review NASA s current strategy for preflight health maintenance and injury screening, risk mitigation for musculoskeletal injuries or syndromes, treatment methods during flight, and research topics to mitigate risks to astronaut health. The Summit also undertook consideration of the best evidence-based terrestrial musculoskeletal practices to recommend their adaptation for use in space. Methods: The types and frequencies of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by short- and long-duration astronauts were obtained from the Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health. The Summit panel was comprised of experts from the clinical and research communities, as well as representatives from NASA Headquarters, the Astronaut corps, and the offices of JSC Medical Operations, JSC Human Adaptation and Countermeasures, Glenn Research Center Human Research, and Astronaut Strength Conditioning and Rehabilitation. Before the summit, panelists participated in a Web-based review of NASA s Space Medical Conditions List (SMCL). Results: The Summit generated seventy-five operational and research recommendations to the NASA Office of Space Medicine, including changes to the SMCL and to the musculoskeletal section of the ISS debrief questionnaire. From these recommendations, seven were assigned highest value and priority, and could be immediately adopted for the exploration architecture. Discussion: Optimized exercise and conditioning to improve performance and forestall musculoskeletal damage on orbit were the primary area of focus. Special attention was paid to exercise timing and muscle group specificity. The panel s recommendations are currently in various stages of consideration or integration

  17. Fourth World Antibody-Drug Conjugate Summit: February 29-March 1, 2012, Frankfurt, Germany.

    PubMed

    Beck, Alain; Lambert, John; Sun, Michael; Lin, Kedan

    2012-01-01

    The 4th World Antibody Drug Conjugate (WADC) Summit, organized by Hanson Wade was held on February 29‑March 1, 2012 in Frankfurt, Germany, which was also the location for the Antibody Drug Conjugate Summit Europe held in February 2011. During the one year between these meetings, antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) have confirmed their technological maturity and their clinical efficacy in oncology. Brentuximab vedotin (ADCETRIS (TM) ) gained approval by the US Food and Drug Administration in August 2011 and trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) confirmed impressive clinical efficacy responses in a large cohort of breast cancer patients. During the 4th WADC meeting, antibody-maytansinoid conjugates were showcased by representatives of ImmunoGen (T-DM1, SAR3419, lorvotuzumab mertansine/IMGN801, IMGN529 and IMG853) and Biotest (BT-062). Data on antibody-auristatin conjugates were presented by scientists and clinicians from Seattle Genetics and Takeda (brentuximab vedotin), Pfizer (5T4-MMAF), Agensys/Astella (AGS-16M8F), Progenics (PSMA-ADC) and Genmab (anti-TF ADCs). Alternative payloads such as calicheamicins and duocarmycin used for preparation of ADCs were discussed by Pfizer and Synthon representatives, respectively. In addition, emerging technologies, including site-directed conjugation (Ambrx), a protein toxin as payload (Viventia), hapten-binding bispecific antibodies (Roche), and use of light activated drugs (Photobiotics), were also presented. Last but not least, progresses in solving Chemistry Manufacturing and Control, and pharmacokinetic issues were addressed by scientists from Genentech, Pfizer, Novartis and Pierre Fabre. PMID:22909934

  18. Monitoring of stage and velocity, for computation of discharge in the Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois, 2010-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Kevin K.; Goodwin, Greg E.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Michigan diversion accounting is the process used by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers to quantify the amount of water that is diverted from the Lake Michigan watershed into the Illinois and Mississippi River Basins. A network of streamgages within the Chicago area waterway system monitor tributary river flows and the major river flow on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal near Lemont as one of the instrumental tools used for Lake Michigan diversion accounting. The mean annual discharges recorded by these streamgages are used as additions or deductions to the mean annual discharge recorded by the main stream gaging station currently used in the Lake Michigan diversion accounting process, which is the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal near Lemont, Illinois (station number 05536890). A new stream gaging station, Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois (station number 414757087490401), was installed on September 23, 2010, for the purpose of monitoring stage, velocity, and discharge through the Summit Conduit for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in accordance with Lake Michigan diversion accounting. Summit Conduit conveys flow from a small part of the lower Des Plaines River watershed underneath the Des Plaines River directly into the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. Because the Summit Conduit discharges into the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal upstream from the stream gaging station at Lemont, Illinois, but does not contain flow diverted from the Lake Michigan watershed, it is considered a flow deduction to the discharge measured by the Lemont stream gaging station in the Lake Michigan diversion accounting process. This report offers a technical summary of the techniques and methods used for the collection and computation of the stage, velocity, and discharge data at the Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois stream gaging station for the 2011 and 2012 Water Years. The stream gaging station Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois (station number 414757087490401) is an

  19. Communication strategies to help reduce the prevalence of non-communicable diseases: Proceedings from the inaugural IFIC Foundation Global Diet and Physical Activity Communications Summit

    PubMed Central

    Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Reed, Kimberly A; Rahavi, Elizabeth B; Dooher, Carrie C

    2012-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), which include cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes, all of which are associated with the common risk factors of poor diet and insufficient physical activity, caused 63% of all deaths globally in 2008. The increasing discussion of global NCDs, including at the 2011 United Nations General Assembly High-level Meeting on the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable Diseases, and a request for multi-stakeholder engagement, prompted the International Food Information Council Foundation to sponsor the Global Diet and Physical Activity Communications Summit: “Insights to Motivate Healthful, Active Lifestyles” on September 19, 2011, in New York City. The Summit brought together a diverse group of stakeholders, representing 34 nations from governments; communication, health, nutrition, and fitness professions; civil society; nonprofits; academia; and the private sector. The Summit provided expert insights and best practices for the use of science-based, behavior-focused communications to motivate individuals to achieve healthful, active lifestyles, with the goal of reducing the prevalence of NCDs. Presented here are some of the highlights and key findings from the Summit. PMID:22537216

  20. Extensive Molecular Dynamics Simulations Show That Canonical G8 and Protonated A38H+ Forms Are Most Consistent with Crystal Structures of Hairpin Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Mlýnský, Vojtěch; Banáš, Pavel; Hollas, Daniel; Réblová, Kamila; Walter, Nils G.; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The hairpin ribozyme is a prominent member of the group of small catalytic RNAs (RNA enzymes or ribozymes) because it does not require metal ions to achieve catalysis. Biochemical and structural data have implicated guanine 8 (G8) and adenine 38 (A38) as catalytic participants in cleavage and ligation catalyzed by the hairpin ribozyme, yet their exact role in catalysis remains disputed. To gain insight into dynamics in the active site of a minimal self-cleaving hairpin ribozyme, we have performed extensive classical, explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on timescales of 50-150 ns. Starting from the available X-ray crystal structures, we investigated the structural impact of the protonation states of G8 and A38, and the inactivating A−1(2′-methoxy) substitution employed in crystallography. Our simulations reveal that a canonical G8 agrees well with the crystal structures while a deprotonated G8 profoundly distorts the active site. Thus MD simulations do not support a straightforward participation of the deprotonated G8 in catalysis. By comparison, the G8 enol tautomer is structurally well tolerated, causing only local rearrangements in the active site. Furthermore, a protonated A38H+ is more consistent with the crystallography data than a canonical A38. The simulations thus support the notion that A38H+ is the dominant form in the crystals, grown at pH 6. In most simulations, the canonical A38 departs from the scissile phosphate and substantially perturbs the structures of active site and S-turn. Yet, we occasionally also observe formation of a stable A−1(2′-OH)…A38(N1) hydrogen bond, which documents the ability of the ribozyme to form this hydrogen bond, consistent with a potential role of A38 as general base catalyst. The presence of this hydrogen bond is, however, incompatible with the expected in-line attack angle necessary for self-cleavage, requiring a rapid transition of the deprotonated 2′-oxyanion to a position more favorable for

  1. Internal tidal currents over the summit of cross seamount

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, M.; Mullineaux, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 46 days of record from a current meter deployed above the summit of Cross Seamount (approximately 300 km west of the Hawaiian Islands) indicates that the strongest current fluctuations were driven by the semidiurnal tide. The tides accounted for 28% of the variance in the current spectrum, were mainly baroclinic in character, and were propagated towards the west-northwest. The amplitude of the S2 current flowing parallel to the major axis of the current ellipse ranged between 4 and 9 cm-1 s. The S2 current was 1.5 times larger than the M2 current. This ratio is 4 times larger than is expected for this region of the Pacific and is not a general characteristics of flows over seamounts. Instantaneous current speeds over the seamount often exceeded 20 cm s-1 and were probably responsible for the small ripples observed on the sediment-covered regions of the summit. ?? 1990.

  2. Cheryl Martin, Keynote - 2013 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Cheryl )

    2014-03-06

    The fourth annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2013. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Cheryl Martin is the Deputy Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency--Energy (ARPA-E), gave the keynote address.

  3. Cheryl Martin, Keynote - 2013 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Cheryl (Deputy Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E))

    2014-04-11

    The fourth annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2013. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Cheryl Martin is the Deputy Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency--Energy (ARPA-E), gave the keynote address.

  4. [The Washington summit: orange light for genome editing?].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-02-01

    The summit organised in early December 2015 considered in depth the various issues (technical, scientific, societal and ethical) raised by the prospect of genome editing using the extremely effective CRISPR system. Germline editing (for therapeutic or "enhancement" purposes) was stated to be irresponsible under current conditions, but the possibility that this could be considered in the future was not excluded; a mechanism for monitoring progress and possibly revising recommendations was proposed. PMID:26936181

  5. A Review of a Historical Summit on Integrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The US Institute of Medical sponsors a “Summit on Integrative Medicine and the Health of the Public” on February 25–27, 2009. A prestigious body of speakers and attendees created a dynamic conference in which the content and discussions provided vital information for transforming the US health care system. Topics included: patient-centered care, the scientific basis of integrative medicine, health care financing reform and value-driven care, and mind-body relationships and health. PMID:19720689

  6. Secondary prevention of HAPE in a Mount Everest summiteer.

    PubMed

    Dunin-Bell, Ola; Boyle, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Climbers who have suffered a previous episode of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) are at significantly increased risk of developing it again on return to high altitude. In spite of the high mortality associated with HAPE, some climbers are willing to take this risk in order to summit the tallest mountains in the world. This is a case report of a climber who suffered an episode of HAPE partway up Mount Everest. He was determined to complete his summit attempt that same climbing season, which would involve a return to extreme altitude less than 3 weeks following recovery. Based on experimental evidence suggesting that sildenafil, salmeterol, and acetazolamide may have therapeutic value for both the prevention and treatment of HAPE, he used these medications for secondary prevention. He was able to successfully reach the summit of Mount Everest and return to base camp without any evidence of recurrence of pulmonary edema. This provides clinical evidence that medication can be used to increase the safety margin for HAPE-susceptible individuals traveling to extremely high altitudes. PMID:19775220

  7. Late-stage summit activity of Martian shield volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The preservation of morphologically fresh lava flows which pre-date the most recent episodes of caldera collapse at the summits of Ascraeus, Arsia and Olympus Montes indicates that explosive eruptions were not associated with this stage of Tharsis shield volcanism. The existence of resurfaced floor segments, complex wrinkle ridges, and lava terraces within the summit craters suggests that lava lakes comprised the dominant form of the intra-caldera activity. Multiple collapse episodes on Ascraeus and Olympus Montes are indicated by the nested summit craters. The most plausible cause of caldera collapse appears to be large-scale sub-terminal effusive activity, which is corroborated by the previously recognized existence of large lava flows on the flanks of these volcanoes. Due to the implied sequence of large-scale explosive (silicic) volcanism followed by effusive (basaltic) activity, it appears highly unlikely that ignimbrites or other forms of pyroclastic flows (previously proposed as possible deposits within the Olympus Mons aureole material) were ever erupted from the Tharsis Montes.

  8. Climate Monitoring Network on Maunakea - Master Station at Summit and Lower Elevation Satellite Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, M. M.; Klasner, F.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Businger, S.

    2014-12-01

    Maunakea, a dormant shield volcano on the Big Island of Hawai'i, rises 13,796 feet above sea level, making it the highest point in the Pacific Basin. From sea floor to summit, it's the tallest mountain in the world. The high elevation, low air and light pollution, as well as dry weather year round make it the best location in the world for astronomy observations. The summit is home to 13 ground based telescope facilities. Like all alpine regions, it is an extremely fragile and unique ecosystem because of the harsh conditions and short growing seasons located at high altitudes. The summit is home to several federal and/or state protected species. It supports 11 species of arthropods found nowhere else on Earth. Most noted of these is the Wēkiu bug, whose habitat has been altered by the infrastructural development on the mountain. Arthropod habitat model development has highlighted gaps in climate information, for example, lack of climate precipitation data, snow data and reliable temperature data. Furthermore, in tropical regions, precipitation is the most variable climate component due to topography and local winds. The telescopes collect weather data for the purpose of knowing when it is dry and clear for astronomical observation. Although existing weather stations associated with the telescopes meet some weather and climate monitoring needs, it cannot address the full range of issues needed due to technological limitation and site design. Precipitation does not occur often and is likely to be in the form of snow or ice. Snow cover data has not been directly recorded despite astronomical recording of other meteorological data that began in the1960s. Therefore, the need to monitor the weather and climate in a long-term and well-calibrated way is critical for management of the ecosystems on the slopes of Maunakea. Long-term weather and climate monitoring stations are the primary building blocks for research partnerships, which encourage collaboration and ultimately

  9. Nitrate chemistry in the snow and atmosphere at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fibiger, D. L.; Hastings, M. G.; Dibb, J. E.; Nenes, A.; Chen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrate deposition to snow surfaces results from reactions of NOx (NO + NO2) with oxidants to produce HNO3. There has been enormous interest in using the isotopic composition of nitrate in ice cores to trace past NOx chemistry and sources. With the rapid cycling of NO and NO2, the oxygen isotopic signal reflects the oxidants that NOx reacts with to form nitrate, while the nitrogen isotopes could contain information about the NOx sources. In two spring/summer field seasons at Summit, Greenland (May-June 2010 and 2011), surface snow was collected at high time resolution and was measured for the complete N and O isotopic composition of nitrate. The oxygen isotopes (δ18O and Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52*δ18O) display the same very strong linear relationship (Δ17O = 0.46 * δ18O - 6.9, R2 = 0.9) in both seasons. This relationship indicates that there is very little photolysis of the nitrate at Summit and an unaltered nitrate signal is preserved in the snowpack. In addition, a suite of atmospheric measurements was made at Summit and none of the constituents measured show any correlation with concentration or isotopes of nitrate in the snow. This indicates that local chemistry is not contributing significantly to the nitrate in the snow. The combination of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes provides a richer picture of the data. There are three nitrate signatures that contribute to total nitrate deposition to Summit in both seasons. These sources can be described by the following isotopic compositions: δ15N, Δ17O, δ18O (per mil vs. air N2 or VSMOW): (1) -8, 27, 74 (2) 6, 40, 100 and (3) 16, 0, 23. While the same three nitrate sources are contributing in the two years, there is a very different balance of importance in 2010 compared to 2011. With limited source δ15N data it is difficult to assign each point to a specific NOx source, however the complete isotopic composition, atmospheric measurements and differences between the two seasons allow for tentative source

  10. International Leaders Summit: using dialogue to Center the Conversation on the Education of Deaf Children and Youth in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John L

    2011-01-01

    Om July 18, 2010, the eve of the 21st International Congress on the Education of the Deaf (ICED 2010), the International Leaders Summit was held at the Center for Dialogue at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada. A total of 120 world leaders from 32 countries participated. Presenters, including students, led the conversation on current perspectives, teacher preparation, worldwide resources, and major issues affecting the education of d/Deaf and hard of hearing infants, children, and youth. Summit participants recognized that advances in detection, early intervention, and technology present challenges in meeting the needs of a student population more diverse than at any other stage in history. While it was acknowledged that needs differ in various parts of the world, there was a consensus that change is required to prepare students to handle challenges in the 21st century. PMID:21949967

  11. 75 FR 34487 - Sunshine Act Meetings (by Conference Call)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL COUNCIL ON DISABILITY Sunshine Act Meetings (by Conference Call) DATE AND TIMES: June 25, 2010, 1 p.m.-3 p.m. PLACE: NCD... CONSIDERED: National Summit on Disability Policy 2010. CONTACT PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Mark...

  12. Climate Change Student Summits: A Model that Works (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    The C2S2: Climate Change Student Summit project has completed four years of activities plus a year-long longitudinal evaluation with demonstrated positive impacts beyond the life of the project on both students and teachers. This presentation will share the lessons learned about implementing this climate change science education program and suggest that it is a successful model that can be used to scale up from its Midwestern roots to achieve measurable national impact. A NOAA Environmental Literacy grant allowed ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing) to grow a 2008 pilot program involving 2 Midwestern sites, to a program 4 years later involving 10 sites. The excellent geographical coverage included 9 of the U.S. National Climate Assessment regions defined by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Through the delivery of two professional development (PD) workshops, a unique opportunity was provided for both formal and informal educators to engage their classrooms/audiences in understanding the complexities of climate change. For maximum contact hours, the PD experience was extended throughout the school year through the use of an online grouphub. Student teams were involved in a creative investigative science research and presentation experience culminating in a Climate Change Student Summit, an on-site capstone event including a videoconference connecting all sites. The success of this program was based on combining multiple aspects, such as encouraging the active involvement of scientists and early career researchers both in the professional development workshops and in the Student Summit. Another key factor was the close working relationships between informal and formal science entities, including involvement of informal science learning facilities and informal science education leaders. The program also created cutting-edge curriculum materials titled the ELF, (Environmental Literacy Framework with a focus on climate change), providing an earth systems

  13. UN food summit tries to focus world attention on hunger.

    PubMed

    Scommegna, P

    1996-11-01

    This article discusses the November 1996 World Food Summit in Rome, women's role as food producers, overconsumption, and justification for a world conference focus. The Summit was planned by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization and is to focus on how to provide people with food security and how to keep pace with growing needs without causing environmental damage. The Summit takes place during a time when 841 million of the world population are chronically undernourished, of which 200 million are children. Millions more suffer from contaminated food and water, micronutrient deficiencies, and blindness due to lack of vitamin A. Agricultural production in 88 countries is deficient. These countries cannot produce enough food to feed their populations an adequate diet and cannot afford to import needed food. These countries include China, India, and most of sub-Saharan Africa. World grain stocks have dropped to low levels, export prices for cereals have risen, and the world fish harvest has leveled off. Over the next 50 years the world must raise food for about 4 billion more people with a limited supply of land and uneven water resources. African countries must increase food production by 300%, Latin America by 80%, Asia by 69%, and North America by 30%. The former strategy of increasing yields with fertilizers is no longer effective and there is no other alternative. In developing countries women are the main producers of food for the family. Future policies must recognize women's role in food production. Poverty would decrease and food supplies increase if poor women were given access to credit and technical advice, education and health care, and a place in the center of the world agenda for increasing food productivity. The global food system is inequitably concentrated among few, and the food trade is increasingly controlled by multinationals. Overconsumption is as serious a problem as overpopulation. PMID:12291741

  14. A look behind the arms control agenda at the US-Russian and Sino-US summits

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    When President Bill Clinton met in New York with Russian President Boris Yeltsin on October 23 and Chinese President Jiang Zemin the following day, the leaders discussed a broad spectrum of arms control issues-including START II ratification, limits on Russian conventional weapons in the Caucasus, the nuclear test ban treaty, nuclear exports to Iran and NATO expansion. The crisis in Bosnia, however, dominated the administration`s pre- and post-summit briefings as well as the media`s coverage of the meetings. On October 20, the Arms Control Association (ACA) held a news conference to highlight the key arms control issues involved in the two sets of talks. Because these vital national security issues were virtually ignored by the press, the ACA press briefing remains the most comprehensive coverage of the full range of issues that were, in fact, addressed at the mini-summits. Panel speakers included Spurgeon M. Keeny, Jr., ACA president and executive director and former deputy director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency; Jack Mendelsohn, ACA deputy director and a former member of the US SALT II and START I delegations; Stanley Resor, ACA board chairman and former chief US delegate to the Mutual and Balanced Force Reduction talks, former defense undersecretary for policy and former secretary of the Army; and William Dircks, director of the Atlantic Council`s Program on Nuclear Policy and former deputy director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Extended excerpts from their remarks follow.

  15. Whole grains and health: from theory to practice--highlights of The Grains for Health Foundation's Whole Grains Summit 2012.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Nicola M; Jacques, Paul F; Seal, Chris J; de Vries, Jan; Jonnalagadda, Satya S; Clemens, Roger; Webb, Densie; Murphy, Lee Anne; van Klinken, Jan-Willem; Topping, David; Murray, Robyn; Degeneffe, Dennis; Marquart, Leonard F

    2013-05-01

    The Grains for Health Foundation's Whole Grains Summit, held May 19-22, 2012 in Minneapolis, was the first meeting of its kind to convene >300 scientists, educators, food technologists, grain breeders, food manufacturers, marketers, health professionals, and regulators from around the world. Its goals were to identify potential avenues for collaborative efforts and formulate new approaches to whole-grains research and health communications that support global public health and business. This paper summarizes some of the challenges and opportunities that researchers and nutrition educators face in expanding the knowledge base on whole grains and health and in translating and disseminating that knowledge to consumers. The consensus of the summit was that effective, long-term, public-private partnerships are needed to reach across the globe and galvanize the whole-grains community to collaborate effectively in translating whole-grains science into strategies that increase the availability and affordability of more healthful, grain-based food products. A prerequisite of that is the need to build trust among diverse multidisciplinary professionals involved in the growing, producing, marketing, and regulating of whole-grain products and between the grain and public health communities. PMID:23514771

  16. Test Equity for Individuals Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. PEPNet Test Equity Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEPNet-West, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the highlights of the 2008 Test Equity Summit held in Bloomfield, Colorado last August 6-8, 2008. The 2008 Test Equity Summit convened by the Postsecondary Education Programs Network (PEPNet) identified and examined problems, challenges, and issues that academic and psychoeducational tests pose for individuals who are deaf or…

  17. Tech Prep Leadership Summit: A Conference Report (Chicago, Illinois, June 22-23, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Research in Vocational Education, Berkeley, CA.

    This report presents outcomes of deliberations at the Tech Prep Leadership Summit on a "national vision" for tech prep. Following an introduction, Section 2 represents the consensus reached at the summit. Discussion of the purpose of tech prep focuses on the mission statement and goals of the Tech Prep Act. The discussion of program outcomes…

  18. Community Colleges in the Evolving STEM Education Landscape: Summary of a Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Steve; Labov, Jay B.

    2012-01-01

    The National Research Council (NRC) and National Academy of Engineering (NAE) have released a new report, "Community Colleges in the Evolving STEM Education Landscape: Summary of a Summit." Based on a national summit that was supported by the National Science Foundation and organized by the NRC and the NAE, the report highlights the importance of…

  19. It's Not a Matter of Time: Highlights from the 2011 Competency-Based Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgis, Chris; Patrick, Susan; Pittenger, Linda

    2011-01-01

    From Anchorage, Alaska, to Orlando, Florida, and from Gray, Maine, to Yuma, Arizona, one hundred competency-based innovators gathered at the Competency-Based Learning Summit in March 2011. Sponsored by the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL), the Summit was developed in…

  20. A Global Imperative: The Report of the 21st Century Literacy Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Media Consortium, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This monograph, the report of the 21st Century Literacy Summit held in April 2005, presents a working definition for this emerging field, and details strategic priorities and recommendations that were the summit's major outcomes. The five strategic priorities--(1) Develop a Strategic Research Agenda; (2) Raise Awareness and Visibility of the…

  1. Primative components, crustal assimilation, and magmatic degassing of the 2008 Kilauea summit eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, Michael C.; Thornber, Carl R.; Orr, Tim R.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous summit and rift zone eruptions at Kīlauea starting in 2008 reflect a shallow eruptive plumbing system inundated by a bourgeoning supply of new magma from depth. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions, host glass, and bulk lava compositions of magma erupted at both the summit and east rift zone demonstrate chemical continuity at both ends of a well-worn summit-to-rift pipeline. Analysis of glass within dense-cored lapilli erupted from the summit in March – August 2008 show these are not samplings of compositionally distinct magmas stored in the shallow summit magma reservoir, but instead result from remelting and assimilation of fragments from conduit wall and vent blocks. Summit pyroclasts show the predominant and most primitive component erupted to be a homogenous, relatively trace-element-depleted melt that is a compositionally indistinguishable from east rift lava. Based on a “top-down” model for the geochemical variation in east rift zone lava over the past 30 years, we suggest that the apparent absence of a 1982 enriched component in melt inclusions, as well as the proposed summit-rift zone connectivity based on sulfur and mineral chemistry, indicate that the last of the pre-1983 magma has been flushed out of the summit reservoir during the surge of mantle-derived magma from 2003-2007.

  2. National Summit on Economic & Financial Literacy (Washington, DC, March 3, 2005). Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Economic Education (NJ3), 2005

    2005-01-01

    On March 3, 2005, a gathering of policy-shapers, thought-leaders and decision-makers met for The National Summit on Economic and Financial Literacy to promote the benefits of economic and financial literacy to individuals, families, businesses and communities. The ultimate goal of the Summit was to ensure that everyone has the real-life skills…

  3. Discovery and synthesis of new UV-induced intrastrand C(4-8)G and G(8-4)C photolesions.

    PubMed

    Münzel, Martin; Szeibert, Claudia; Glas, Andreas F; Globisch, Daniel; Carell, Thomas

    2011-04-13

    UV irradiation of cellular DNA leads to the formation of a number of defined mutagenic DNA lesions. Here we report the discovery of new intrastrand C(4-8)G and G(8-4)C cross-link lesions in which the C(4) amino group of the cytosine base is covalently linked to the C(8) position of an adjacent dG base. The structure of the novel lesions was clarified by HPLC-MS/MS data for UV-irradiated DNA in combination with chemical synthesis and direct comparison of the synthetic material with irradiated DNA. We also report the ability to generate the lesions directly in DNA with the help of a photoactive precursor that was site-specifically incorporated into DNA. This should enable detailed chemical and biochemical investigations of these lesions. PMID:21425860

  4. Implications of the Earth Summit for ocean and coastal governance

    SciTech Connect

    Cicin-Sain, B.; Knecht, R.W.

    1993-10-01

    The Earth Summit (United Nations Conference on Environmental and Development (UNCED)), held in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992, was unique in the history of international conferences. Never before had so many heads of state participated in such an international negotiation. UNCED was also unique in both the breadth of environmental and development issues addressed and in the nature of the cross-cutting dimensions that were examined (for example, from poverty, population growth, and the role of indigenous peoples to unsustainable patterns of consumption (in the North), the role of women, and technology transfer). The chapter devoted to oceans and coasts was the longest and, in some ways, the most comprehensive, of the 40 chapters making up the action plan (Agenda 21) that was approved at Rio. This article provides an overview of the events leading up the Earth Summit, describes the principal outputs of the conference and their potential effects on ocean and coastal governance, discusses the main tension seen at UNCED and some of the negotiating processes, and, finally, considers current efforts at implementation of its recommendations. 43 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Remarks from Congressional Leaders: Congressman Daniel Lipinski (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Lipinski, Daniel (Congressman, Illinois)

    2012-03-14

    Congressman Daniel Lipinski (D-Illinois) spoke during the opening session of the EFRC Summit. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  6. Innovating a Sustainable Energy Future (2011 EFRC Summit)

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Mark

    2011-05-25

    The second speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research" was Mark Little, Senior Vice President and Director of GE Global Research. He discussed the role that industry and in particular GE is playing as a partner in innovative energy research. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  7. Innovating a Sustainable Energy Future (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Little, Mark (GE Global Research)

    2012-03-14

    The second speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research" was Mark Little, Senior Vice President and Director of GE Global Research. He discussed the role that industry and in particular GE is playing as a partner in innovative energy research. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  8. Remarks from Congressional Leaders: Senator Jeff Bingaman (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Bingaman, Jeff (Senator, New Mexico)

    2012-03-14

    During the opening session of the EFRC Summit, Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) explained how the EFRCs play an important role in the U.S. energy innovation ecosystem. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  9. Prior altitude experience of climbers attempting to summit Aconcagua.

    PubMed

    Borm, Nicholas; Van Roo, Jon D; Pesce, Carlos; Courtney, D Mark; Malik, Sanjeev; Lazio, Matthew P

    2011-01-01

    Aconcagua (6962 m) is one of the seven summits and the highest mountain outside of Asia. Climbers of varying experience are drawn to its nontechnical route. Our objective was to detail the prior altitude experience of climbers attempting to summit Aconcagua. We asked all climbers on the normal route of Aconcagua to complete questionnaires with demographics and prior high altitude experience while acclimatizing at Plaza de Mulas base camp during 9 nonconsecutive days in January 2009. 127 volunteers from 22 countries were enrolled. Mean age was 39.8 years and 88.2% were male. Median altitude at place of residence was 200 m (IQR: 30, 700). Median previous maximum altitude reached was 5895 m (IQR: 5365, 6150). 7.1% of climbers had never been above 4000 m. Median previous maximum sleeping altitude was 4800 m (IQR: 4300, 5486). 12.6% of climbers had never slept above 4000 m. Climbers who performed acclimatization treks spent a mean of 3.6 (2.5, 4.7) days at>3000 m in the previous 2 months. However, 50.4% of climbers performed no acclimatization treks. Although the majority of mountaineers who attempt Aconcagua have prior high altitude experience, a substantial minority has never been above 4000 m. PMID:22206564

  10. Remarks from Congressional Leaders: Senator Jeff Bingaman (2011 EFRC Summit)

    SciTech Connect

    Bingaman, Jeff

    2011-05-25

    During the opening session of the EFRC Summit, Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) explained how the EFRCs play an important role in the U.S. energy innovation ecosystem. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  11. Remarks from Congressional Leaders: Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Lofgren, Zoe (Congresswoman, California)

    2012-03-14

    Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren (D-California) spoke during the opening session of the EFRC Summit. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  12. [The Saint-Petersburg summit of Group of Eight: the problems of infectious diseases and the ways of their solution].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, being the presiding country at the Group of Eight Summit for the first time, Russia proposed the issue of counteraction with infectious diseases as one of the priority issues. In addition to the realization of the priority National Health Project, which is to a large degree dedicated to the immunoprophylaxis of infectious diseases as well as the prevention and treatment of HIV-infection/AIDS and hepatites B and C, a meeting of the Presidium of Russian Federation State Council presided by President V. V. Putin, dedicated to the problem of HIV-infection epidemic spread, was held on April 21; the meeting resulted in the formation of Governmental Commission on the problems of HIV-infection/AIDS. On July 16, the leaders of Group of Eight during their meeting in Saint-Petersburg, discussed and validated the Declaration on counteraction with infectious diseases, reflecting the position of the leaders on the entire complex of problems connected with the spread of infectious diseases, and determining the main principles of the global strategy of counteraction with epidemics under the threats associated with the appearance of new infections, such as avian influenza, HIV-infection/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. While preparing for the Summit, Russia made a range of suggestion aimed mostly on the reinforcement of possibilities to control infectious diseases in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Practically all Russia's initiatives were supported by the partners, which was also reflected in the conclusive document of the Summit. Following Russian initiatives, Group of Eight intends to increase the effectiveness of international affords on the prevention and elimination of the consequences of natural disasters, including the use of fast response teams. To provide Russia's contribution to this initiative, modernized specialized antiepidemic teams will be used. Taking into consideration the present-day financial participation of Russian Federation in the realization of

  13. Impact of IgA constant domain on HIV-1 neutralizing function of monoclonal antibody F425A1g8.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaocong; Duval, Mark; Lewis, Christopher; Gawron, Melissa A; Wang, Rijian; Posner, Marshall R; Cavacini, Lisa A

    2013-01-01

    With the majority of HIV infections resulting from mucosal transmission, induction of an effective mucosal immune response is thought to be pivotal in preventing transmission. HIV-specific IgA, but not IgG, has been detected in the genital tract, seminal fluid, urethral swabs, urine, and vaginal wash samples of HIV-negative sex workers and HIV-status discordant couples. Purified mucosal and plasma IgA from some individuals with highly exposed, persistently seronegative status can neutralize infection and present cross-clade neutralization activity, though present at low levels. We generated a CD4-induced human mAb, F425A1g8, and characterized the impact of its isotype variants on HIV neutralizing activity. The result showed that, in contrast to little neutralization by the F425A1g8 IgG1 in the absence of sCD4, the IgA1 variant of the Ab displayed significant independent neutralization activity against a range of HIV clade B isolates in the absence of sCD4. Studies of the neutralizing function of IgA isotypes, and the functional relationship between different antigenic epitopes and IgA Abs, may also suggest strategies for the intervention of virus transmission and spread within the mucosa of the host, as well as serve to inform the design of vaccine strategies that may be more effective at preventing mucosal transmission. This research clearly suggests that IgA isotype, because of its unique molecular structure, may play an important role in HIV neutralization. PMID:23183895

  14. Are dinucleoside monophosphates relevant models for the study of DNA intrastrand cross-link lesions? The example of g[8-5m]T.

    PubMed

    Garrec, Julian; Dumont, Elise

    2014-07-21

    Oxidatively generated tandem lesions such as G[8-5m]T pose a potent threat to genome integrity. Direct experimental studies of the kinetics and thermodynamics of a specific lesion within DNA are very challenging, mostly due to the variety of products that can be formed in oxidative conditions. Dinucleoside monophosphates (DM) involving only the reactive nucleobases in water represent appealing alternative models on which most physical chemistry and structural techniques can be applied. However, it is not yet clear how relevant these models are. Here, we present QM/MM MD simulations of the cyclization step involved in the formation of G[8-5m]T from the guanine-thymine (GpT) DM in water, with the aim of comparing our results to our previous investigation of the same reaction in DNA ( Garrec , J. , Patel , C. , Rothlisberger , U. , and Dumont , E. ( 2012 ) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134 , 2111 - 2119 ). We show that, despite the different levels of preorganization of the two systems, the corresponding reactions share many energetic and structural characteristics. The main difference lies in the angle between the G and T bases, which is slightly higher in the transition state (TS) and product of the reaction in water than in the reaction in DNA. This effect is due to the Watson-Crick H-bonds, which are absent in the {GpT+water} system and restrain the relative positioning of the reactive nucleobases in DNA. However, since the lesion is accommodated easily in the DNA macromolecule, the induced energetic penalty is relatively small. The high similarity between the two reactions strongly supports the use of GpT in water as a model of the corresponding reaction in DNA. PMID:24911289

  15. The annual cycle of snowfall at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Benjamin Brian

    The mass balance of interior Greenland is much less understood than the oft-studied melting coastal regions due to a dearth of observations. The ICECAPS project, which launched in the summer of 2010 at Summit, Greenland, offers a unique, ground-based opportunity to study precipitation in central Greenland where the mass balance is marginally positive. Combing the perspectives from a Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System (POSS), a Millimeter- wavelength Cloud Radar (MMCR), and an accumulation field, the annual cycle of precipitation at Summit is examined. The annual average snowfall measured by the POSS (MMCR) is 83.3 mm (88.8 mm) of liquid equivalent, with the seasonal cycle defined by a large peak in summer and a smaller one in late winter. Accumulation showed a similar seasonal pattern, though with damped variability and a one or two month time lag. Daily snowfall increases by a factor of 3 from June through October compared to the rest of the year, while accumulation only increases 18% during the same timeframe. This reduced variability is explained by the seasonally-varying nature of latent heat flux, compaction, and wind contributions. The ICECAPS remote sensors and the accumulation field measurements do not completely agree as far as total annual liquid equivalent. The deposition of snow by wind, among other factors, is suggested as a possible contributor to the discrepancy. To further examine the seasonal cycle, snowfall measurements by the POSS were linked to other local meteorological parameters, including wind direction, liquid water path (LWP), 2-m temperature, and precipitable water vapor (PWV). Snowfall rarely occurs and is typically very light if the wind does not have a southerly component, except in the summertime, for which moderate snowfall often coincides with all wind directions. Snowfall rate and occurrence are higher when PWV exceeds the current month's mean PWV. The wind direction and moisture dependence are consistent with snowfall being

  16. Explosively Erupted Gabbro From Kilauea Volcano's Summit Magmatic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, T. R.; Fiske, R. S.; Swanson, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    Gabbro clasts up to 13cm in diameter were blasted to the surface of Kilauea volcano by a powerful pyroclastic eruption 1500-1000 years b.p. They occur in the Kulanaokuaiki 3 tephra and as sparsely distributed lag lithics over 70 square km of the volcano's south flank where the tephra has been eroded away. These holocrystalline and glass-bearing gabbros make up about 12 per cent of the 1100 lithic clasts studied. Some are enclosed in cored bombs, but most occur as monolithologic clasts. Lag-lithic isopleths from an array of 110 south-flank sites suggest that this eruption emanated from the volcano's summit. The gabbros are remarkably fresh and consist chiefly of plagioclase + clinopyroxene + opaque oxides with varying percentages of olivine and rare orthopyroxene. Plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals range up to 5 mm in length in the coarsest examples. Interstitial glass comprises as much as 25 modal per cent of the rock. In some samples this glass is moderately vesicular, reflecting an abrupt pressure drop accompanying eruption. The interstital glass contains 2.0 to 0.5 wt. per cent MgO and some has locally abundant apatite needles. Major element compositional trends of interstitial glass and glass melt inclusions in olivine suggest that the gabbros formed by crystallization along multiple liquid lines of descent. Whole-rock XRF compositions of 11 samples suggest that the gabbros are of two distinct types. Nine have 11 to 15 wt. per cent MgO and are samples of magma bodies that were crystallizing or had crystallized at depth. Two gabbros contain 6 wt. per cent MgO; these probably originated as segregation veins in as yet unknown parent bodies. All of the gabbros texturally resemble segregation veins from Kilauea Iki and other Kilauean lava lake deposits, but only the two low-MgO samples likely had such an origin. Most of the gabbros are fragments torn from partially to entirely crystallized bodies adjacent to the Kulanaokuaiki 3 parent magma body. We infer that

  17. Patient and Family Engagement Summit: Needed Changes in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Swartwout, Ellen; Drenkard, Karen; McGuinn, Kathy; Grant, Susan; El-Zein, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    Patient and family engagement is a strategy to enhance healthcare outcomes through strong clinician-patient partnerships. A new care delivery process, in which the patient is the driver of the healthcare team, is required to achieve optimal health. A summit partially funded by a seed grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow Alumni Foundation was held with interprofessional colleagues and patient representatives to identify needed clinical competencies and future practice changes. Recommended shifts in the care delivery process included a focus on patient strengths, including the patient as a valued team member, doing care "with me" and not "to me," and considering all entities or providers including the patient, as equal partners. PMID:26906687

  18. Third Space Weather Summit Held for Industry and Government Agencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    2009-12-01

    The potential for space weather effects has been increasing significantly in recent years. For instance, in 2008 airlines flew about 8000 transpolar flights, which experience greater exposure to space weather than nontranspolar flights. This is up from 368 transpolar flights in 2000, and the number of such flights is expected to continue to grow. Transpolar flights are just one example of the diverse technologies susceptible to space weather effects identified by the National Research Council's Severe Space Weather Events—Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts: A Workshop Report (2008). To discuss issues related to the increasing need for reliable space weather information, experts from industry and government agencies met at the third summit of the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group (CSWIG) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), held 30 April 2009 during Space Weather Week (SWW), in Boulder, Colo.

  19. Ice Hockey Summit II: zero tolerance for head hits and fighting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Stuart, Michael J; Dodick, David W; Roberts, William O; Alford, Patrick W; Ashare, Alan B; Aubrey, Mark; Benson, Brian W; Burke, Chip J; Dick, Randall; Eickhoff, Chad; Emery, Carolyn A; Flashman, Laura A; Gaz, Daniel V; Giza, Chris C; Greenwald, Richard M; Herring, Stanley A; Hoshizaki, T Blaine; Hudziak, James J; Huston, John; Krause, David; LaVoi, Nicole; Leaf, Matt; Leddy, John J; MacPherson, Alison; McKee, Ann C; Mihalik, Jason P; Moessner, Anne M; Montelpare, William J; Putukian, Margot; Schneider, Kathryn J; Szalkowski, Ron; Tabrum, Mark; Whitehead, James R; Wiese-Bjornstal, Diane M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to present currently known basic science and on-ice influences of sport-related concussion (SRC) in hockey, building upon the Ice Hockey Summit I action plan (2011) to reduce SRC. The prior summit proceedings included an action plan intended to reduce SRC. As such, the proceedings from Summit I served as a point of departure for the science and discussion held during Summit II (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, October 2013). Summit II focused on (1) Basic Science of Concussions in Ice Hockey: Taking Science Forward, (2) Acute and Chronic Concussion Care: Making a Difference, (3) Preventing Concussions via Behavior, Rules, Education, and Measuring Effectiveness, (4) Updates in Equipment: Their Relationship to Industry Standards, and (5) Policies and Plans at State, National, and Federal Levels To Reduce SRC. Action strategies derived from the presentations and discussion described in these sectors were voted on subsequently for purposes of prioritization. The following proceedings include the knowledge and research shared by invited faculty, many of whom are health care providers and clinical investigators. The Summit II evidence-based action plan emphasizes the rapidly evolving scientific content of hockey SRC. It includes the most highly prioritized strategies voted on for implementation to decrease concussion. The highest-priority action items identified from the Summit include the following: (1) eliminate head hits from all levels of ice hockey, (2) change body checking policies, and (3) eliminate fighting in all amateur and professional hockey. PMID:25757010

  20. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Sheetak: Low Cost - Solid State Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2012-02-29

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video are David Marcus, Founder of General Compression, and Eric Ingersoll, CEO of General Compression. Himanshu Pokharna, Vice President of Sheetak Uttam Ghoshal, President and CEO of Sheetak.

  1. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Sheetak: Low Cost - Solid State Cooling

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2012-03-21

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video are David Marcus, Founder of General Compression, and Eric Ingersoll, CEO of General Compression. Himanshu Pokharna, Vice President of Sheetak Uttam Ghoshal, President and CEO of Sheetak.

  2. Diversity Summit 2008: challenges in the recruitment and retention of ethnic minorities in neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Desiree; Razani, Jill; Suarez, Paola; Lafosse, Jose M; Manly, Jennifer; Attix, Deborah K

    2010-11-01

    The 2008 Diversity Summit recognized the many advantages of increasing the number of neuropsychologists from ethnically diverse backgrounds. The Summit addressed the aspiration of creating a more ethnically diverse body of neuropsychologists by increasing the recruitment of ethnic minority students to neuropsychology training programs. Challenges to successful recruitment and retention of ethnic minority students were discussion points at the Summit. This paper summarizes and expands these points and also suggests solutions to these challenges with the aim of stimulating innovative approaches to increasing the representation of ethnic minorities in neuropsychology. PMID:21108149

  3. Proceedings of the cardiac PET summit meeting 12 may 2014: Cardiac PET and SPECT instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2015-06-01

    Advances in PET and SPECT and imaging hardware and software are vastly improving the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial perfusion and function. PET perfusion imaging has benefitted from the introduction of novel detectors that now allow true 3D imaging, and precise attenuation correction (AC). These developments have also resulted in perfusion images with higher spatial and contrast resolution that may be acquired in shorter protocols and/or with less patient radiation exposure than traditional PET or SPECT studies. Hybrid PET/CT cameras utilize transmission computed tomographic (CT) scans for AC, and offer the additional clinical advantages of evaluating coronary calcium and myocardial anatomy but at a higher cost than PET scanners that use (68)Ge radioactive line sources. As cardiac PET systems continue to improve, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems are also undergoing a profound change in their design. The scintillation camera general purpose design is being replaced with systems with multiple detectors focused on the heart yielding 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of conventional SPECT. As a result, shorter acquisition times and/or lower tracer doses produce higher quality SPECT images than were possible before. This article reviews these concepts and compares the attributes of PET and SPECT instrumentation. PMID:25824018

  4. CDC Zika Summit Details Plans to Fight Mosquito-Borne Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158094.html CDC Zika Summit Details Plans to Fight Mosquito-Borne Illness ... the continental United States braces itself for the Zika virus, federal, state and local health officials gathered ...

  5. Deep magma body beneath the summit and rift zones of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.; Fiske, R.S.; Miklius, Asta; Okamura, A.T.; Sako, M.K.

    1990-01-01

    A magnitude 7.2 earthquake in 1975 caused the south flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, to move seaward in response to slippage along a deep fault. Since then, a large part of the volcano's edifice has been adjusting to this perturbation. The summit of Kilauea extended at a rate of 0.26 meter per year until 1983, the south flank uplifted more than 0.5 meter, and the axes of both the volcano's rift zones extended and subsided; the summit continues to subside. These ground-surface motions have been remarkably steady and much more widespread than those caused by either recurrent inflation and deflation of the summit magma chamber or the episodic propagation of dikes into the rift zones. Kilauea's magmatic system is, therefore, probably deeper and more extensive than previously thought; the summit and both rift zones may be underlain by a thick, near vertical dike-like magma system at a depth of 3 to 9 kilometers.

  6. Proceedings of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 2015 Research Summit.

    PubMed

    Cillo, Joseph E; Basi, David; Peacock, Zachary; Aghaloo, Tara; Bouloux, Gary; Dodson, Thomas; Edwards, Sean P; Kademani, Deepak

    2016-03-01

    The Fifth Biennial Research Summit of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and its Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment was held in Rosemont, Illinois on May 6 and 7, 2015. The goal of the symposium is to provide a forum for the most recent clinical and scientific advances to be brought to the specialty. The proceedings of the events of that summit are presented in this report. PMID:26707430

  7. Proceedings from the 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Research Summit.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Zachary S; Aghaloo, Tara; Bouloux, Gary F; Cillo, Joseph E; Hale, Robert G; Le, Anh D; Lee, Janice S; Kademani, Deepak

    2014-02-01

    The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation, and the International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons sponsored the fifth research summit, which convened on May 2 and 3 in Rosemont, Illinois. The Research Summits are convened biennially to facilitate the discussion and collaboration of oral and maxillofacial surgeons with clinical and basic science researchers in fields affecting the specialty. The goal is to advance the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery through exposure and education in topics that ultimately benefit the oral and maxillofacial surgical patient. This edition of the research summit included the topics of robotic surgery and antiresorptive-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (ARONJ). Most importantly, this research summit saw the development of research interest groups (RIGs) in the fields of anesthesia, maxillofacial oncology and reconstructive surgery, obstructive sleep apnea and orthognathic surgery, temporomandibular joint surgery, and trauma. These RIGs developed specific research goals with a plan to continue working on potential projects at the AAOMS Clinical Trials Course on May 7 to 9, 2013 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The summit program was developed by the AAOMS Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment. The charge of the committee is to encourage and promote research within the specialty and to encourage interdisciplinary collaboration. The research summit serves as a platform for oral and maxillofacial surgeons to lead the goal of advancement of research relevant to the specialty. This article provides an overview of the presentations that were made in the sessions on robotic surgery and ARONJ. The research summit keynote address and two additional presentations on patient registries are summarized and updates from the RIGs that were formed at the 2013 research summit are highlighted. PMID:24438595

  8. Catalog of Tephra Samples from Kilauea's Summit Eruption, March-December 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wooten, Kelly M.; Thornber, Carl R.; Orr, Tim R.; Ellis, Jennifer F.; Trusdell, Frank A.

    2009-01-01

    The opening of a new vent within Halema'uma'u Crater in March 2008 ended a 26-year period of no eruptive activity at the summit of Kilauea Volcano. It also heralded the first explosive activity at Kilauea's summit since 1924 and the first of eight discrete explosive events in 2008. At the onset of the eruption, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) initiated a rigorous program of sample collection to provide a temporally constrained suite of tephra samples for petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic studies. Petrologic studies help us understand conditions of magma generation at depth; processes related to transport, storage, and mixing of magma within the shallow summit region; and specific circumstances leading to explosive eruptions. This report provides a catalog of tephra samples erupted at Kilauea's summit from March 19, 2008, through the end of 2008. The Kilauea 2008 Summit Sample Catalog is tabulated in the accompanying Microsoft Excel file, of2009-1134.xls (four file types linked on right). The worksheet in this file provides sampling information and sample descriptions. Contextual information for this catalog is provided below and includes (1) a narrative of 2008 summit eruptive activity, (2) a description of sample collection methods, (3) a scheme for characterizing a diverse range in tephra lithology, and (4) an explanation of each category of sample information (column headers) in the Microsoft Excel worksheet.

  9. Developments since the Summit. The right to food.

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    In 1997, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and relevant nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) worked to actualize Objective 7.4 of the World Food Summit Plan of Action that asks governments "to clarify the content of the right to adequate food and the fundamental right of everyone to be free from hunger, as stated in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and other relevant international and regional instruments." The Objective also calls for a better definition of the rights related to food security. On May 29, 1997, the FAO Director-General and the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (UNHCHR) signed a Memorandum of Understanding that created a framework of cooperation on issues related to the right to food. NGOs have crafted a 15-article draft International Code of Conduct on the Human Right to Adequate Food that includes a precise definition of the content of the right to food and indicates the obligations of states and other organizations. The FAO and the office of the UNHCHR plan to mark the 50th anniversary of the UN Declaration of Human Rights with a public event recording their joint progress in clarifying and implementing the right to food. PMID:12321563

  10. Sand-Strewn Summit of 'Husband Hill' on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Undulating bands of dark and light sand, sloping dunes, and scattered cobbles form an apron around a ridge of light-colored rock that stands in bold relief against distant plains, as viewed by NASA's 'Spirit' rover from the top of 'Husband Hill' on Mars. 'The view of the summit is spectacular where we are right now,' said geologist Larry Crumpler, with the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque.

    From here, Spirit is looking north-northeast en route to examining more of the local geology of the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater. A few days after taking this picture, Spirit investigated the small, sinuous drifts on the left, located north-northeast of the rover's position in this image. The last previous time Spirit examined a drift was on the rim of 'Bonneville Crater' almost 500 martian days, or sols, ago, in March 2004.

    The largest light-colored rock in the foreground is nicknamed 'Whittaker.' The cliff beyond it and slightly to the left is nicknamed 'Tenzing.' The highest rock on the ridge ahead has been dubbed 'Hillary.' Science team members selected the nicknames in honor of the earliest climbers to scale Mount Everest on Earth. This view covers approximately 50 degrees of the compass from left to right. It is a mosaic assembled from frames Spirit took with the panoramic camera on sol 603 (Sept. 13, 2005). It was taken through a blue (430-nanometer) filter and is presented as a cylindrical projection.

  11. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Bruce A; Caldwell, Kathleen; Congdon, Clare Bates; Disney, Jane; Donahue, Maria; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Flemings, Elsie; Golden, Meredith; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Highman, Jay; James, Karen; Kim, Carol; Lantz, R Clark; Marvinney, Robert G; Mayer, Greg; Miller, David; Navas-Acien, Ana; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Postema, Sonia; Rardin, Laurie; Rosen, Barry; SenGupta, Arup; Shaw, Joseph; Stanton, Elizabeth; Susca, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting "Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic" held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13-15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food, and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 μg/L in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry, and educators at the local, state, national, and international levels to (1) establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry, and others; (3) develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods; and (5) develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies. PMID:26231509

  12. Assessment and monitoring of recreation impacts and resource conditions on mountain summits: examples from the Northern Forest, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monz, Christopher A.; Marion, Jeffrey L.; Goonan, Kelly A.; Manning, Robert E.; Wimpey, Jeremy; Carr, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Mountain summits present a unique challenge to manage sustainably: they are ecologically important and, in many circumstances, under high demand for recreation and tourism activities. This article presents recent advances in the assessment of resource conditions and visitor disturbance in mountain summit environments, by drawing on examples from a multiyear, interdisciplinary study of summits in the northeastern United States. Primary impact issues as a consequence of visitor use, such as informal trail formation, vegetation disturbance, and soil loss, were addressed via the adaption of protocols from recreation ecology studies to summit environments. In addition, new methodologies were developed that provide measurement sensitivity to change previously unavailable through standard recreation monitoring protocols. Although currently limited in application to the northeastern US summit environments, the methods presented show promise for widespread application wherever summits are in demand for visitor activities.

  13. Summit on the National Effort To Prevent Mental Retardation and Related Disabilities. Summit Proceedings (Washington, D.C., February 6-7, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Committee on Mental Retardation, Washington, DC.

    This document reports the proceedings of a summit to assess the adequacy of the U.S. effort to prevent mental retardation and related disabilities and to chart the course for future strategies to reduce the incidence and ameliorate the effects of these disabilities, particularly when caused by socioeconomic conditions. The document contains…

  14. The meta-leadership summit for preparedness initiative: an innovative model to advance public health preparedness and response.

    PubMed

    Sobelson, Robyn K; Young, Andrea C; Marcus, Leonard J; Dorn, Barry C; Neslund, Verla S; McNulty, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    This article reports on the design, evaluation framework, and results from the Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness was a 5-year initiative based on the premise that national preparedness and emergency response is not solely the responsibility of government. From 2006 to 2011, 36 Meta-Leadership Summits were delivered in communities across the country. Summits were customized, 10-hour leadership development, networking, and community action planning events. They included participation from targeted federal, state, local, nonprofit/philanthropic, and private sector leaders who are directly involved in decision making during a major community or state-wide emergency. A total of 4,971 government, nonprofit, and business leaders attended Meta-Leadership Summits; distribution of attendees by sector was balanced. Ninety-three percent of respondents reported the summit was a valuable use of time, 91% reported the overall quality as "good" or "outstanding," and 91% would recommend the summit to their colleagues. In addition, approximately 6 months after attending a summit, 80% of respondents reported that they had used meta-leadership concepts or principles. Of these, 93% reported that using meta-leadership concepts or principles had made a positive difference for them and their organizations. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative was a value-added opportunity for communities, providing the venue for learning the concepts and practice of meta-leadership, multisector collaboration, and resource sharing with the intent of substantively improving preparedness, response, and recovery efforts. PMID:24251597

  15. Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill' (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In late November 2005 while descending 'Husband Hill,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the most detailed panorama so far of the 'Inner Basin,' the rover's next target destination. Spirit acquired the 405 individual images that make up this 360-degree view of the surrounding terrain using five different filters on the panoramic camera. The rover took the images on Martian days, or sols, 672 to 677 (Nov. 23 to 28, 2005 -- the Thanksgiving holiday weekend).

    This image is a false-color rendering using camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters, emphasizing some colors more than others to enhance striking but subtle color differences among rocks, soils, hills, and plains.

    'Home Plate,' a bright, semi-circular feature scientists hope to investigate, is harder to discern in this image than in earlier views taken from higher up the hill. Spirit acquired this more oblique view, known as the 'Seminole panorama,' from about halfway down the south flank of Husband Hill, 50 meters (164 feet) or so below the summit. Near the center of the panorama, on the horizon, are 'McCool Hill' and 'Ramon Hill,' named, like Husband Hill, in honor of the fallen astronauts of the space shuttle Columbia. Husband Hill is visible behind the rover, on the right and left sides of the panorama. An arc of rover tracks made while avoiding obstacles and getting into position to examine rock outcrops can be traced over a long distance by zooming in to explore the panorama in greater detail.

    Spirit is now significantly farther downhill toward the center of this panorama, en route to Home Plate and other enigmatic soils and outcrop rocks in the quest to uncover the history of Gusev Crater and the 'Columbia Hills.'

  16. [Population policy and the "Earth Summit": the passages of history].

    PubMed

    Camp, S; Conly, S

    1992-12-01

    At the UN Conference on the Environment and Development, commonly referred to as the Earth Summit, questions of population and family planning tended to become politicized and controversial. The Catholic Church succeeded in eliminating all specific references to family planning and contraception in the official documents. The UN General Assembly Resolution calling for convocation of the conference and the early planning documents made no reference to the impact of demographic growth on the environment. But in the months preceding the conference, the UN Population Fund and other interest groups succeeded in calling greater attention to population questions. The Vatican exercised its influence to change the wording concerning population, aided by disagreement between the developed and developing countries on the weight that should be given to overconsumption in the developed world and population growth in the developing countries. The wealthier countries, the poor countries, the Vatican, feminist groups opposing coercive population control, and ecological and demographic interest groups supporting family planning were the main contenders in the battle to influence the eventual statement. The words "family planning" were replaced in the text by "responsible planning of family size, in a spirit of liberty and dignity and in accordance with personal values, taking into account moral and cultural considerations". Although it was impossible to change the timid wording during the Conference, concern about rapid growth was expressed in numerous Conference statements. The final document lacked vigor in calling for rapid stabilizing of population growth and universal access to family planning. But the significant result of the Conference as a whole was that the intrinsic links between population dynamics, the environment, and economic development were acknowledged. PMID:12319664

  17. Development and evaluation of a regional, large-scale interprofessional collaborative care summit.

    PubMed

    Foote, Edward F; Clarke, Virginia; Szarek, John L; Waters, Sharon K; Walline, Vera; Shea, Diane; Goss, Sheryl; Farrell, Marian; Easton, Diana; Dunleavy, Erin; Arscott, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The Northeastern/Central Pennsylvania Interprofessional Education Coalition (NECPA IPEC) is a coalition of faculty from multiple smaller academic institutions with a mission to promote interprofessional education. An interprofessional learning program was organized, which involved 676 learners from 10 different institutions representing 16 unique professions, and took place at seven different institutions simultaneously. The program was a 3-hour long summit which focused on the management of a patient with ischemic stroke. A questionnaire consisting of the Interprofessional Education Perception Scale (IEPS) questionnaire (pre-post summit), Likert-type questions, and open comment questions explored the learners' perceptions of the session and their attitudes toward interprofessional learning. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests for difference and qualitative thematic coding. The attitude of learners toward interprofessional education (as measured by the IEPS) was quite high even prior to the summit, so there were no significant changes after the summit. However, a high percentage of learners and facilitators agreed that the summit met its objective and was effective. In addition, the thematic analysis of the open-ended questions confirmed that students learned from the experience with a sense of the core competencies of interprofessional education and practice. A collaborative approach to delivering interprofessional learning is time and work intensive but beneficial to learners. PMID:26046124

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains PA4C2 and PA3G8 and Pseudomonas putida PA14H7, Three Biocontrol Bacteria against Dickeya Phytopathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cigna, Jérémy; Raoul des Essarts, Yannick; Mondy, Samuel; Hélias, Valérie; Beury-Cirou, Amélie

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains PA4C2 and PA3G8 and Pseudomonas putida strain PA14H7 were isolated from potato rhizosphere and show an ability to inhibit the growth of Dickeya phytopathogens. Here, we report their draft genome sequences, which provide a basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in antibiosis against Dickeya. PMID:25635023

  19. First observations of surface ozone concentration from the summit region of Mount Everest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semple, John L.; Moore, G. W. K.

    2008-10-01

    The extreme height of Mount Everest is such that its summit region may periodically be in the lower stratosphere. In this regard it provides a unique location for observing the exchange of ozone between the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Here we report the first surface ozone measurements from the summit region of Mount Everest. Simultaneous measurements were recorded at different elevations on the north side from base camp (5676 m) to the summit (8848 m) during May 2005. The concentrations measured were as high as 70 ppb. Meteorological diagnostics suggest that the stratosphere as well as the long range transport of polluted tropospheric air masses from South East Asia are sources of the observed ozone. There is evidence that the source region for ozone in the vicinity of Mount Everest may vary with the onset of the summer monsoon.

  20. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling General Compression: A River of Wind

    ScienceCinema

    Marcus, David; Ingersoll, Eric

    2012-03-21

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video are David Marcus, Founder of General Compression, and Eric Ingersoll, CEO of General Compression. General Compression, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has created an advanced air compression process which can store and release more than a weeks worth of the energy generated by wind turbines.

  1. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling General Compression: A River of Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, David; Ingersoll, Eric

    2012-02-29

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video are David Marcus, Founder of General Compression, and Eric Ingersoll, CEO of General Compression. General Compression, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has created an advanced air compression process which can store and release more than a weeks worth of the energy generated by wind turbines.

  2. Database for the Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, Dillon R.; Ramsey, David W.; Bruggman, Peggy E.; Felger, Tracey J.; Lougee, Ellen; Margriter, Sandy; Showalter, Patrick; Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water: the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas, the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones. This digital release contains all the information used to produce the geologic map published as USGS Geologic Investigations Series I-2759 (Neal and Lockwood, 2003). The main component of this digital release is a geologic map database prepared using ArcInfo GIS. This release also contains printable files for the geologic map and accompanying descriptive pamphlet from I-2759.

  3. Kilauea summit overflows: Their ages and distribution in the Puna District, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Hagstrum, J.T.; Beeson, M.H.; Champion, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    The tube-fed pahoehoe lava flows covering much of the northeast flank of Kilauea Volcano are named the 'Aila'au flows. Their eruption age, based on published and six new radiocarbon dates, is approximately AD 1445. The flows have distinctive paleomagnetic directions with steep inclinations (40??-50??) and easterly declinations (0??-10??E). The lava was transported ~40 km from the vent to the coast in long, large-diameter lava tubes; the longest tube (Kazumura Cave) reaches from near the summit to within several kilometers of the coast near Kaloli Point. The estimated volume of the 'Aila'au flow field is 5.2 ?? 0.8 km3, and the eruption that formed it probably lasted for approximately 50 years. Summit overflows from Kilauea may have been nearly continuous between approximately AD 1290 and 1470, during which time a series of shields formed at and around the summit. The 'Aila'au shield was either the youngest or the next to youngest in this series of shields. Site-mean paleomagnetic directions for lava flows underlying the 'Aila'au flows form only six groups. These older pahoehoe flows range in age from 2750 to 2200 years. Lava flows from most of these summit eruptions also reached the coast, but none appears as extensive as the 'Aila'au flow field. The chemistry of the melts erupted during each of these summit overflow events is remarkably similar, averaging approximately 6.3 wt.% MgO near the coast and 6.8 wt.% MgO near the summit. The present-day caldera probably formed more recently than the eruption that formed the 'Aila'au flows (estimated termination ca. AD 1470). The earliest explosive eruptions that formed the Keanakako'i Ash, which is stratigraphically above the 'Aila'au flows, cannot be older than this age.

  4. America's Promise Alliance Dropout Prevention Summits: Mobilizing Action to Address the High School Dropout Crisis Across the Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Beth; Evans, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    In this final evaluation of the America's Promise Dropout Prevention Summits, the evaluation reveals that the Summits not only served as the catalyst for the creation of new programs and collaborative efforts around ending the high school dropout crisis, but strengthened existing work, political and public awareness, and funding at the state,…

  5. Restoring the Trust in Native Education. Annual NIEA Legislative Summit (14th, February 7-9, 2011). Briefing Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Education Association, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Several briefing papers were presented during the 14th Annual National Indian Education Association (NIEA) Legislative Summit. This briefing book contains the following papers presented during the summit: (1) Restoring the Trust in Native Education; (2) NIEA Legislative Priorities for 2011: "Talking Points"; (3) Reauthorization of the Elementary…

  6. The Superintendents' and Deans' Summit on Transformation and Collaboration for Student Success (April 22-23, 1997). Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Atlantic Lab. for Student Success, Philadelphia, PA.

    This publication provides an overview of the proceedings of the Superintendents' and Deans' Summit on Transformation and Collaboration for Student Success. The overarching goal of the Summit was to develop a formal mechanism for forging the professional expertise of field-based practitioners and college level professional education programs.…

  7. Preliminary investigation of gold mineralization in the Pedro Dome-Cleary Summit area, Fairbanks district, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilkington, H.D.; Forbes, R.B.; Hawkins, D.B.; Chapman, R.M.; Swainbank, R.C.

    1969-01-01

    Anomalous gold values in mineralized veins and hydrothermally altered quartz-mica schist in the Pedro Dome-Cleary Summit area of the Fairbanks district suggest the presence of numerous small low- to high-grade lodes. Anomalous concentrations of gold were found to exist in the wall rocks adjacent to mineralized veins. In general, the gold concentration gradients in these wall rocks are much too steep to increase appreciably the mineable width of the veins. Anomalous gold values were also detected in bedrock samples taken by means of a power auger on the Murphy Dome Road along the southwest extension of the Pedro Dome-Cleary Summit mineralized belt.

  8. Carbon dioxide emission rate of Kīlauea Volcano: Implications for primary magma and the summit reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerlach, T.M.; McGee, K.A.; Elias, T.; Sutton, A.J.; Doukas, M.P.

    2002-01-01

     We report a CO2 emission rate of 8500 metric tons per day (t d−1) for the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, several times larger than previous estimates. It is based on three sets of measurements over 4 years of synchronous SO2 emission rates and volcanic CO2/SO2concentration ratios for the summit correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) traverse. Volcanic CO2/SO2 for the traverse is representative of the global ratio for summit emissions. The summit CO2 emission rate is nearly constant, despite large temporal variations in summit CO2/SO2 and SO2 emission rates. Summit CO2 emissions comprise most of Kīlauea's total CO2 output (∼9000 t d−1). The bulk CO2 content of primary magma determined from CO2emission and magma supply rate data is ∼0.70 wt %. Most of the CO2 is present as exsolved vapor at summit reservoir depths, making the primary magma strongly buoyant. Turbulent mixing with resident reservoir magma, however, prevents frequent eruptions of buoyant primary magma in the summit region. CO2 emissions confirm that the magma supply enters the edifice through the summit reservoir. A persistent several hundred parts per million CO2 anomaly arises from the entry of magma into the summit reservoir beneath a square kilometer area east of Halemaumau pit crater. Since most of the CO2 in primary magma is degassed in the summit, the summit CO2 emission rate is an effective proxy for the magma supply rate. Both scrubbing of SO2 and solubility controls on CO2and S in basaltic melt cause high CO2/SO2 in summit emissions and spatially uncorrelated distributions of CO2 and SO2 in the summit plume.

  9. Conducting Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Tribes Educational Technical Center, Bismarck, ND.

    Written for anyone interested in what makes a meeting run smoothly (and what doesn't), the guide for conducting meetings is divided into the following sections: the chairperson (his/her responsibilities, preparing an agenda, organizing discussions); the meeting (quorums, discussions, points of order, and clarification); the motion (making the…

  10. 77 FR 25892 - Security Zones; North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Summit, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... proposed rule (77 FR 13232) that would establish four separate security zones in the Chicago Harbor and Chicago River during the NATO Summit. This statement is incorrect. The Coast Guard received one comment... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; North Atlantic Treaty Organization...

  11. Re-Envisioning Business Programs in Liberal Arts Worlds: 2006 Summit Proceeding & Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neville, Mary Grace, Comp.; Godwin, Lindsey, Comp.; Senchack, A.J., Comp.; Parks, Don, Comp.

    2007-01-01

    This report compiles primary and secondary research about the role of business education in undergraduate liberal arts institutions. Grounded in history, literature and the ongoing dialogue about the role of business education in society, the report also serves as proceedings from a multi-university summit held in November 2006 at Southwestern…

  12. Educating Urban Indians: A Summit for the Future (Milwaukee, Wisconsin, March 10, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Community School of Milwaukee, Inc., WI.

    A March 2000 education summit brought together educators, parents, and community leaders to discuss key issues in the education of American Indian and Alaska Native students who attend school in urban areas. This summary report provides an overview of the main points discussed in a keynote address and four panel discussions. The keynote address by…

  13. 78 FR 18611 - Summit on Color in Medical Imaging; Cosponsored Public Workshop; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Summit on Color in Medical Imaging; Cosponsored Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of cosponsored public workshop; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and...

  14. Berkeley's 'Best-Kept' Secret: National Summit Seeks to Involve Youth in How Communities Are Redeveloped

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdman, Pamela

    2004-01-01

    Bringing together youth and adults from 15 Hope VI projects around the country, the Youth Leadership for Change is the third national summit of its kind. HUD used to fund the program, but now support comes from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the San Francisco Foundation. At least some participants say the…

  15. Discovering Africa through Internet-Based Geographic Information Systems: A Pan-African Summit Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milson, Andrew J.; Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Earle, Brian D.

    2007-01-01

    In the United States, people get very little news about Africa, and what news they do get is about war or famine, with little historical information or context. In this article, the authors describe how they developed and implemented a Pan-African Summit simulation project in order to give their approximately 100, 9th-grade students (in five World…

  16. The 13th Annual Legislative Summit (Washington, DC, 2010). Briefing Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Education Association, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This volume contains briefing papers presented at the 13th Annual National Indian Education Association (NIEA) Legislative Summit held in Washington, DC. The following papers are included: (1) NIEA Appropriations Priorities for FY11; (2) The President's Budget Request for Fiscal Year 2011 for Native Education; (3) BIE Race to the Top; (4)…

  17. Case Study: Lee's Summit West High School--Empowering Students to Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board's (SREB's) case study series highlights best practices High Schools That Work (HSTW) network schools and districts are implementing to better prepare students for further studies and careers. Lee's Summit West (LSW) High School near Kansas City, Missouri, boasts of a 99 percent graduation rate; 93 percent of…

  18. Mars Summit Explores Options for Human Missions to the Red Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-05-01

    The United States "needs to begin the homesteading and settlement of Mars," Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin told participants at the Humans to Mars Summit on 8 May in Washington, D. C. "It is within reach technically and budgetarily. Even in a period of fiscal challenges, the United States needs to consider this program with long-term planning."

  19. Adding a Community University Educational Summit (CUES) to Enhance Service Learning in Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Catherine; Schriehans, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    For this study, one hundred and twenty student reflection papers (undergraduate and graduate) from a service learning extracurricular event titled, "Community University Educational Summit" (CUES) was analyzed. Over a two-year period, this event was held on one Saturday during the month of October at California State University San…

  20. 77 FR 6534 - Malheur National Forest; Oregon; Summit Logan Grazing Authorization Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... Prairie allotments. These allotments are within the Upper Malheur River and Upper North Fork Malheur River watersheds. The Summit Logan Grazing Authorization Project area is located south and west of Prairie City... Prairie City Ranger District, Malheur National Forest. DATES: Comments concerning the scope of...

  1. Using Film Clips to Teach Teen Pregnancy Prevention: "The Gloucester 18" at a Teen Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrman, Judith W.; Moore, Christopher C.; Anthony, Becky

    2012-01-01

    Teaching pregnancy prevention to large groups offers many challenges. This article describes the use of film clips, with guided discussion, to teach pregnancy prevention. In order to analyze the costs associated with teen pregnancy, a film clip discussion session based with the film "The Gloucester 18" was the keynote of a youth summit. The lesson…

  2. Ancient tepui summits harbor young rather than old lineages of endemic frogs.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Patricia E; Ron, Santiago R; Señaris, J Celsa; Rojas-Runjaic, Fernando J M; Noonan, Brice P; Cannatella, David C

    2012-10-01

    The flattop mountains (tepuis) of South America are ancient remnants of the Precambrian Guiana Shield plateau. The tepui summits, isolated by their surrounding cliffs that can be up to 1000 m tall, are thought of as "islands in the sky," harboring relict flora and fauna that underwent vicariant speciation due to plateau fragmentation. High endemicity atop tepui summits support the idea of an ancient "Lost World" biota. However, recent work suggests that dispersal between lowlands and summits has occurred long after tepui formation indicating that tepui summits may not be as isolated from the lowlands as researchers have long suggested. Neither view of the origin of the tepui biota (i.e., ancient vicariance vs. recent dispersal) has strong empirical support owing to a lack of studies. We test diversification hypotheses of the Guiana Shield highlands by estimating divergence times of an endemic group of treefrogs, Tepuihyla. We find that diversification of this group does not support an ancient origin for this taxon; instead, divergence times among the highland species are 2-5 Ma. Our data indicate that most highland speciation occurred during the Pliocene. Thus, this unparalleled landscape known as "The Lost World" is inhabited, in part, not by Early Tertiary relicts but neoendemics. PMID:23025594

  3. A new paradigm for Summit: enhanced traverse capabilities and satellite camps.`

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, R. L.; Burkhart, J. F.; Courville, Z.; Dibb, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Summit Station began its life at the summit of the Greenland Ice Sheet (72°N, 38°W, 3200 m.a.s.l.), as the drilling camp for the GISP2 ice core in 1989. Since then, the station has hosted both summer campaign science, and since 1997, year-round observations of atmospheric and cryospheric processes, both chemical and physical. After "experimental" winter seasons in 1997-98 and 2000-2002, the station has been continuously occupied since 2003. While most of the science activities at the station are supported by the US NSF Polar Division, the station also hosts many interagency and international investigations in physical glaciology, atmospheric chemistry, and other disciplines. Projects requiring access to the only high elevation observatory North of the Arctic circle providing clean air or snow for chemistry experiments will find Summit a unique and suitable location. In addition to investigator-driven projects, Summit hosts a cooperative NOAA-NSF Long Term Observatory (LTO) program committed to maintaining year-round measurements of key baseline variables of climate change at the site., The facility is operated by CH2M HILL Polar Services (CPS) with guidance from the Science Coordination Office (SCO), and the cooperation of the Government of Greenland. Facility support is primarily from NSF ARSL. Summit has historically served as a logistical hub for wider-ranging field studies in central Greenland and also stationary projects seeking a convenient location in the dry-snow zone. These functions conflict with the goal of reducing emissions at Summit in support of clean science. In recent years and into the future, projects without a need for the unique clean-snow / air characteristics will be increasingly directed to alternate locations in the dry-snow zone. These locations include a new logistical-hub to the north that will serve as the base of operations for projects not requiring a direct connection to the historical climate records of Summit , or locations

  4. Report of the first Asia-Pacific influenza summit, Asia-Pacific Alliance for the Control of Influenza (APACI), Bangkok, 12-13 June 2012.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Lance C; Smith, David W; Chan, Paul K S

    2013-11-01

    On June 12-13, 2012, the Asia-Pacific Alliance for the Control of Influenza (APACI) convened jointly with the Influenza Foundation of Thailand and the Thailand Department of Disease Control, the First Asia-Pacific Influenza Summit. The objectives of the meeting were to review the current state of official influenza control policies in Asia-Pacific countries; identify, summarize and communicate influenza control strategies that have successfully increased vaccine uptake in the region; develop policy and advocacy approaches to improve influenza vaccine uptake in high-risk groups and healthcare workers in the region; and establish collaborative relationships to promote best practices for the control of influenza. In moving forward, the challenge for the region will be establishing collaborations able to effectively communicate risk and key messages about influenza vaccination. PMID:23809609

  5. PARC - Scientific Exchange Program (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Blankenship, Robert E. (Director, Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center); PARC Staff

    2011-11-03

    'PARC - Scientific Exchange Program' was submitted by the Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center (PARC) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. PARC, an EFRC directed by Robert E. Blankenship at Washington University in St. Louis, is a partnership of scientists from ten institutions. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  6. PARC - Scientific Exchange Program (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, Robert E.; PARC Staff

    2011-05-01

    'PARC - Scientific Exchange Program' was submitted by the Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center (PARC) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. PARC, an EFRC directed by Robert E. Blankenship at Washington University in St. Louis, is a partnership of scientists from ten institutions. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  7. Electricity: The Energy of Tomorrow (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Abruna, Hector D. (Director, Energy Materials Center at Cornell); emc2 Staff

    2011-11-03

    'Electricity: the Energy of Tomorrow' was submitted by the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. emc2, an EFRC directed by Hector D. Abruna at Cornell University (lead) is a partnership between Cornell and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  8. Mapping Lithologic Units Exposed on the Summit of Mauna Kea Using AVIRIS Hyperspectral Reflectance Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinness, E. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    The Mauna Kea summit region is largely comprised of cinder cones and lava flows that form the cap of the Mauna Kea Volcano. The cones and flows at the summit are part of the Laupahoehoe Volcanic series. The Laupa hoehoe volcanism occurred both during and after the late Pleistocene Makanaka glacial episode at the summit. In addition, a few Laupahoehoe cones have been glacially eroded as evidenced by oversteepened slopes, which suggests that they predate the Makanaka glacial period. Two notable examples of possible preglacial cones are Puu Waiau and Puu Poliahu. These two cones are also significantly altered, most likely by hydrothermal activity that has weakly cemented the materials on the cones. Well-crystalline sulfates (alunite and jarosite), phyllosilicates, and zeolites, have been found in samples collected from altered cones at the summit. In addition, palagonitic tephra, which have nanophase ferric oxide, allophane, and other poorly crystalline forms of weakly altered basaltic glass (i.e., no phyllosilicates), have been described at several locations on Mauna Kea. While several studies have discussed the occurrence of alteration products on Mauna Kea, the distribution of these materials exposed at the summit has not been extensively mapped. Hyperspectral imaging can provide information for identifying and mapping lithologic units containing alteration minerals, such as are found on Mauna Kea. The Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is a hyperspectral imaging instrument that covers the wavelength range from about 0.4 to 2.5 micron in 224 bands, with a band spacing of 10 nm and average band width of 10 nm

  9. Identification of Water-Quality Trends Using Sediment Cores from Dillon Reservoir, Summit County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greve, Adrienne I.; Spahr, Norman E.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2001-01-01

    Since the construction of Dillon Reservoir, in Summit County, Colorado, in 1963, its drainage area has been the site of rapid urban development and the continued influence of historical mining. In an effort to assess changes in water quality within the drainage area, sediment cores were collected from Dillon Reservoir in 1997. The sediment cores were analyzed for pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and trace elements. Pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs were used to determine the effects of urban development, and trace elements were used to identify mining contributions. Water-quality and streambed-sediment samples, collected at the mouth of three streams that drain into Dillon Reservoir, were analyzed for trace elements. Of the 14 pesticides and 3 PCBs for which the sediment samples were analyzed, only 2 pesticides were detected. Low amounts of dichloro-diphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and dichloro-diphenyldichloroethane (DDD), metabolites of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), were found at core depths of 5 centimeters and below 15 centimeters in a core collected near the dam. The longest core, which was collected near the dam, spanned the entire sedimentation history of the reservoir. Concentrations of total combustion PAH and the ratio of fluoranthene to pyrene in the core sample decreased with core depth and increased over time. This relation is likely due to growth in residential and tourist populations in the region. Comparisons between core samples gathered in each arm of the reservoir showed the highest PAH concentrations were found in the Tenmile Creek arm, the only arm that has an urban area on its shores, the town of Frisco. All PAH concentrations, except the pyrene concentration in one segment in the core near the dam and acenaphthylene concentrations in the tops of three cores taken in the reservoir arms, were below Canadian interim freshwater sediment-quality guidelines. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium

  10. Lawmakers: population and social development inseparable. Social development summit.

    PubMed

    1995-05-01

    Parliamentarians from around the world endorsed action to promote social development by approving the Copenhagen Statement on Population and Social Development during the International Meeting of Parliamentarians on Population and Social Development held at the National Parliament in Copenhagen, Denmark, March 4-5, 1995. The International Conference of Parliamentarians on Population and Development is a similar meeting held ahead of the International Conference on Population and Development during September 1994 in Cairo, Egypt. Among the key points of the Copenhagen Statement is the recognition of the importance of slowing rapid population growth, eradicating poverty, protecting the environment, creating jobs, and promoting social integration so that people can participate equally and fully in all spheres of social, cultural, economic, and political life. The document also acknowledges the need to promote universal access to education and health care, affirms the 20/20 principle as an useful concept against poverty and in development cooperation, and notes South-South cooperation as a means to promote national and international cooperation. Shin Sakurai, chairman of the Asian Forum of Parliamentarians on Population and Development, presided over the event and led the Japanese delegation of four legislators. The first such national suprapartisan body of lawmakers concerned with population and development, the Japan Parliamentarians Federation for Population was established in 1974. The federation has since been a pioneer in Asia and worldwide in fostering political commitment on population and development, playing an important role in gaining and maintaining support in Japan for multilateral and bilateral assistance in the field. Sakurai stressed in his March 4 address that population problems cannot be resolved without social development. PMID:12289009

  11. A National Sleep Foundation's conference summary: the National Summit to Prevent Drowsy Driving and a new call to action.

    PubMed

    Drobnich, Darrel

    2005-01-01

    On November 20-21, 2002, the National Sleep Foundation (NSF), a U.S.-based non-profit organization, and a coalition of other organizations, federal agencies and corporations convened a National Summit to Prevent Drowsy Driving at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC. The Summit brought together experts in the fields of transportation, safety and health, sleep research, and communications as well as advocates to assist in the creation of a comprehensive national agenda to increase awareness about the dangers of drowsy driving. Recommendations from the Summit formed the basis of post-summit activities, including the development of a new Web site (www.drowsydriving.org) dedicated to the prevention of driver fatigue and a report, the National Action Plan to Prevent Drowsy Driving, which describes a series of action items for national, state and local initiatives in the areas of research, public policy, and educational programs. PMID:15732323

  12. G8P[6] rotaviruses isolated from Amerindian children in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, during 2009: close relationship of the G and P genes with those of bovine and bat strains.

    PubMed

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2014-03-01

    During the 2009 national group A rotavirus (RVA) surveillance, five unusual strains of the human G8P[6] genotype were detected in Brazilian indian children with acute gastroenteritis. The aim of this study was to carry out sequence analysis of the two outer capsid proteins (VP4 and VP7) and the inner capsid protein (VP6) of the G8P[6] strains detected in order to provide further information on the genetic relationship between human and animal RVA. A total of 68 stool samples, collected in Mato Grosso do Sul during 2009, were tested for RVA using ELISA, following by reverse transcriptase-PCR and sequencing. RVA infection was detected in 7.3% of samples (5/68). The IAL-RN376 G8 sequence shares a clade with bovine and human strains, displaying highest nucleotide identity to African human strains DRC86 and DRC88, followed by African bovine strain NGRBg8. IAL-RN376 and IAL-RN377 P[6] sequences showed highest identity to human strain R330 from Ireland, and a close genetic relationship to African fruit bat RVA strain KE4852/07. Strains IAL-RN376 and IAL-RN377 display genogroup I VP6 specificity and the I2 genotype, and share high nucleotide identities with human strains B1711, 272-BF and 06-242, and moderate identities with bovine (RUBV81, 86 and KJ9-1) and porcine (HP140) strains. This study suggested that a reassortment between bovine and bat RVA strains could have occurred in animal host(s) preceding the transmission to humans. In the indigenous population, zoonotic transmission is probably fairly frequent as the inhabitants live in close contact with animals under conditions of poor hygiene. PMID:24259191

  13. Structure of the Paleozoic rocks in the Tonkin Summit Quadrangle, Eureka County, Nevda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arney, Eric

    Paleozoic rocks in the northern Simpson Park Range, Tonkin Summit Quadrangle, are comprised of the syn-orogenic Roberts Mountains allochthon, the postorogenic Permian Garden Valley Formation, and autochthonous Devonian carbonates. Complex deformation includes the Late Devonian-Early Mississippian, Antler Orogeny, post-Antler thrusting, and Cenozoic Basin and Range extension. The Roberts Mountains thrust caused eastward advancement of deep marine, mainly siliciclastic strata on top of the shelfal, mainly carbonate platform during the Antler Orogeny. This study shows that an east-vergent, post-Antler thrust, emplace the topographically higher carbonate outliers of the autochthon on top of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. These carbonate masses sit on top of the Henderson thrust in the Tonkin Summit Quadrangle and timing of this thrust is constrained to be post-Permian.

  14. Introduction to the Summit Session, "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research", from the Director of the DOE Office of Science, Bill Brinkman (2011 EFRC Summit)

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Bill

    2011-05-25

    In this video Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science, introduces the session, "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research," at the 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum. During the introduction of the senior representatives from both the public and private sector, Dr. Brinkman explained the motivation for creating the Energy Frontiers Research Centers program. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  15. Introduction to the Summit Session, "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research", from the Director of the DOE Office of Science, Bill Brinkman (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Brinkman, Bill (Director, DOE Office of Science)

    2012-03-14

    In this video Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science, introduces the session, "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research," at the 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum. During the introduction of the senior representatives from both the public and private sector, Dr. Brinkman explained the motivation for creating the Energy Frontiers Research Centers program. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  16. Dr. Hans Rosling, Keynote - 2013 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit

    SciTech Connect

    Rosling, Hans

    2014-03-06

    The fourth annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2013. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Hans Rosling (Professor, International Health, Karolinska Institute; Edutainer, Gapminder.org), gave this keynote address.

  17. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Ursula Burns, Xerox Corporation)

    ScienceCinema

    Burns, Ursula (Xerox Corporation, Chairman and CEO)

    2014-04-11

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Ursula Burns, Chairman and CEO of the Xerox Corporation, gave the second keynote address of the third day's sessions on February 29.

  18. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Susan Hockfield, MIT)

    ScienceCinema

    Hockfield, Susan (President, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    2014-04-10

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - reseachers, entrepeneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Susan Hockfield, President of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, gave the first keynote address of the third day's sessions on February 29.

  19. Dr. Hans Rosling, Keynote - 2013 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit

    ScienceCinema

    Rosling, Hans (Professor, International Health, Karolinska Institute; Edutainer, Gapminder.org)

    2014-04-11

    The fourth annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2013. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Hans Rosling (Professor, International Health, Karolinska Institute; Edutainer, Gapminder.org), gave this keynote address.

  20. The First Physical Therapy Summit on Global Health: implications and recommendations for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Dean, Elizabeth; Al-Obaidi, Saud; De Andrade, Armele Dornelas; Gosselink, Rik; Umerah, Gloria; Al-Abdelwahab, Sami; Anthony, Joseph; Bhise, Anjali R; Bruno, Selma; Butcher, Scotty; Fagevik-Olsén, Monika; Frownfelter, Donna; Gappmaier, Eduard; Gylfadóttir, Sif; Habibi, Mehrdad; Hanekom, Susan; Hasson, Scott; Jones, Alice; LaPier, Tanya; Lomi, Constantina; Mackay, Liz; Mathur, Sunita; O'Donoghue, Grainne; Playford, Kristen; Ravindra, Savita; Sangroula, Kanchan; Scherer, Susan; Skinner, Margot; Wong, Wai Pong

    2011-11-01

    The First Physical Therapy Summit on Global Health was convened at the 2007 World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT) Congress to vision practice in the 21st century and, in turn, entry-level education and research, as informed by epidemiological indicators, and consistent with evidence-based noninvasive interventions, the hallmark of physical therapy. The Summit and its findings were informed by WHO data and validated through national databases of the countries of the five WCPT regions. The health priorities based on mortality were examined in relation to proportions of physical therapists practicing in the areas of regional priorities and of the curricula in entry-level programs. As a validation check and to contextualize the findings, input from members of the 800 Summit participants was integrated and international consultants refined the recommendations. Lifestyle-related conditions (ischemic heart disease, smoking-related conditions, hypertension, stroke, cancer, and diabetes) were leading causes of premature death across regions. Contemporary definitions of physical therapy support that the profession has a leading role in preventing, reversing, as well as managing lifestyle-related conditions. The proportions of practitioners practicing primarily in these priority areas and of the entry-level curricula based on these priorities were low. The proportions of practitioners in priority areas and entry-level curricula devoted to lifestyle-related conditions warrant being better aligned with the prevalence of these conditions across regions in the 21st century. A focus on clinical competencies associated with effective health education and health behavior change formulates the basis for The Second Physical Therapy Summit on Global Health. PMID:21612551

  1. The Toxicology Education Summit: Building the Future of Toxicology Through Education

    PubMed Central

    Barchowsky, Aaron; Buckley, Lorrene A.; Carlson, Gary P.; Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Ford, Sue M.; Genter, Mary Beth; Germolec, Dori R.; Leavens, Teresa L.; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Safe, Stephen H.; Sulentic, Courtney E. W.; Eidemiller, Betty J.

    2012-01-01

    Toxicology and careers in toxicology, as well as many other scientific disciplines, are undergoing rapid and dramatic changes as new discoveries, technologies, and hazards advance at a blinding rate. There are new and ever increasing demands on toxicologists to keep pace with expanding global economies, highly fluid policy debates, and increasingly complex global threats to public health. These demands must be met with new paradigms for multidisciplinary, technologically complex, and collaborative approaches that require advanced and continuing education in toxicology and associated disciplines. This requires paradigm shifts in educational programs that support recruitment, development, and training of the modern toxicologist, as well as continued education and retraining of the midcareer professional to keep pace and sustain careers in industry, government, and academia. The Society of Toxicology convened the Toxicology Educational Summit to discuss the state of toxicology education and to strategically address educational needs and the sustained advancement of toxicology as a profession. The Summit focused on core issues of: building for the future of toxicology through educational programs; defining education and training needs; developing the “Total Toxicologist”; continued training and retraining toxicologists to sustain their careers; and, finally, supporting toxicology education and professional development. This report summarizes the outcomes of the Summit, presents examples of successful programs that advance toxicology education, and concludes with strategies that will insure the future of toxicology through advanced educational initiatives. PMID:22461448

  2. Blueprint for Action: Visioning Summit on the Future of the Workforce in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Sectish, Theodore C; Hay, William W; Mahan, John D; Mendoza, Fernando S; Spector, Nancy D; Stanton, Bonita; Szilagyi, Peter G; Turner, Teri L; Walker, Leslie R; Slaw, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    The Federation of Pediatric Organizations engaged members of the pediatric community in an 18-month process to envision the future of the workforce in pediatrics, culminating in a Visioning Summit on the Future of the Workforce in Pediatrics. This article documents the planning process and methods used. Four working groups were based on the 4 domains that are likely to affect the future workforce: Child Health Research and Training, Diversity and Inclusion, Gender and Generations, and Pediatric Training Along the Continuum. These groups identified the issues and trends and prioritized their recommendations. Before the summit, 5 key megatrends cutting across all domains were identified:1. Aligning Education to the Emerging Health Needs of Children and Families 2. Promoting Future Support for Research Training and for Child Health Research 3. Striving Toward Mastery Within the Profession 4. Aligning and Optimizing Pediatric Practice in a Changing Health Care Delivery System 5. Taking Advantage of the Changing Demographics and Expertise of the Pediatric Workforce At the Visioning Summit, we assembled members of each of the working groups, the Federation of Pediatric Organizations Board of Directors, and several invited guests to discuss the 5 megatrends and develop the vision, solutions, and actions for each megatrend. Based on this discussion, we offer 10 recommendations for the field of pediatrics and its leading organizations to consider taking action. PMID:26034250

  3. Methane anomalies in seawater above the Loihi submarine summit area, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Gamo, Toshitaka; Ishibashi, Junichiro; Sakai, Hitoshi ); Tilbrook, B. )

    1987-10-01

    Hydrothermal activity above Loihi submarine volcano was characterized by water column distributions of methane, pH and helium-3. It was found that the southern Loihi summit is almost covered with hydrothermal plumes, which have anomalously high concentrations of methane (maximum: 569 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3} kg{sup {minus}}1) accompanied by high concentrations of helium-3 and low pH values (minimum: 7.18). The plumes consist of two layers: a shallow plume (about 200 m above the summit) and a deep plume (about 100 m above the summit), probably derived from different hydrothermal vents. The shallow and deep plumes showed different CH{sub 4}/{sup 3}He and CH{sub 4}/pH ratios with the same {sup 3}He/pH ratio, which implies that methane concentrations differ between the hydrothermal end members for the two plumes. The variation of methane between the end members is suggested to result from inter-vent inhomogeneity of bacterial activities that consume or produce methane within the vents. Comparison of the CH{sub 4}/{sup 3}He ratios of the two plumes with the previous data for Loihi and other submarine hydrothermal areas confirms that the Loihi hotspot has one to two orders of magnitude smaller CH{sub 4}/{sup 3}He value than those of the East Pacific Rise and the Galapagos spreading centers.

  4. The Study to Understand Mortality and Morbidity in COPD (SUMMIT) study protocol.

    PubMed

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Anderson, Julie; Brook, Robert D; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome R; Crim, Courtney; Haumann, Brett; Martinez, Fernando J; Yates, Julie; Newby, David E

    2013-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often coexists with other chronic diseases and comorbidities that can markedly influence patients' health status and prognosis. This is particularly true for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, there have been no trials assessing the effect of COPD medications on CVD in patients with both diseases. The "Study to Understand Mortality and Morbidity in COPD" (SUMMIT) aims at determining the impact of fluticasone furoate/vilanterol combination and the individual components on the survival of patients with moderate COPD and either a history of CVD or at increased risk for CVD. SUMMIT is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of 16 000 patients with moderate COPD randomly assigned to once daily treatment with fluticasone furoate/vilanterol (100/25 μg), fluticasone furoate (100 μg), vilanterol (25 μg) or matched placebo; mortality is the primary end-point. The study is an event-driven trial powered by the comparison of furoate/vilanterol versus placebo. Secondary end-points are decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s and effect on a composite cardiovascular end-point. This article describes the design of the SUMMIT study. PMID:23018908

  5. From the Margins to the Mainstream: An Action Agenda for Literacy. Guide for a Two- or Three-Hour Group Discussion and Planning Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Andy; Smith, Cristine

    This guide provides step-by-step activities for facilitators to run a discussion and planning meeting with a group of people interested in learning about and taking action related to the Adult Literacy Summit Action Agenda. It is intended for groups such as literacy coalitions, program staff, state-level staff, or other governmental and nonprofit…

  6. Proceedings of the August 2011 Traceability Research Summit.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Tejas; Buckley, Greg; McEntire, Jennifer C

    2013-12-01

    of data required to be maintained at value chain end points, and data privacy concerns. The third approach requires individual nodes within the value chain to maintain electronic records for its own data and make them available for querying during a traceback for outbreak investigation. The major advantage of this approach is the protection of confidential information and the potential for quicker access during a trace. However, the primary disadvantage of this approach is the need for greater computational power and a more complex mechanism to linking the value chain through the data. As next steps, a subgroup will work on clarifying the approach to meeting the goals of traceability, better defining critical tracking events, and articulating the strategy and return on investment from a regulatory and industry perspective. This will result in improved alignment of on-going traceability pilots and initiatives as well as a more actionable guidance document for public review. PMID:23216103

  7. High-precision Pb Isotopes Reveal Two Small Magma Bodies Beneath the Summit of Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietruszka, A. J.; Heaton, D. E.; Marske, J. P.; Garcia, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    The summit magma storage reservoir of Kilauea Volcano is one of the most important components of the volcano's magmatic plumbing system, but its geometry is poorly known. High-precision Pb isotopic analyses of Kilauea summit lavas (1959-1982) define the minimum number of magma bodies within the summit reservoir and their volumes. The 206Pb/204Pb ratios of these lavas display a temporal decrease due to changes in the composition of the parental magma delivered to the volcano. Analyses of multiple lavas from some individual eruptions reveal small but significant differences in 206Pb/204Pb. The extra-caldera lavas from Aug. 1971 and Jul. 1974 display lower Pb isotope ratios and higher MgO contents (10 wt. %) than the intra-caldera lavas (MgO ~7-8 wt. %) from each eruption. From 1971 to 1982, the 206Pb/204Pb ratios of the lavas define two separate decreasing temporal trends. The intra-caldera lavas from 1971, 1974, 1975, Apr. 1982 and the lower MgO lavas from Sep. 1982 have higher 206Pb/204Pb ratios at a given time (compared to the extra-caldera lavas and the higher MgO lavas from Sep. 1982). These trends require that the intra- and extra-caldera lavas (and the Sep. 1982 lavas) were supplied from two separate, partially isolated magma bodies. Numerous studies (Fiske and Kinoshita, 1969; Klein et al., 1987) have long identified the locus of Kilauea's summit reservoir ~2 km southeast of Halemaumau (HMM) at a depth of ~2-7 km, but more recent investigations have discovered a second magma body located <1 km below the east rim of HMM (Battaglia et al., 2003; Johnson et al., 2010). The association between the vent locations of the extra-caldera lavas near the southeast rim of the caldera and their higher MgO contents suggests that these lavas tapped the deeper magma body. In contrast, the lower MgO intra-caldera lavas were likely derived from the shallow magma body beneath HMM. Residence time modeling based on the Pb isotope ratios of the lavas suggests that the magma volume

  8. A Structural and Paleomagnetic Analysis of the Basalts of Summit Creek, central Cascades, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetrow, A. C.; Valentine, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    This study is a detailed analysis of the structural geology and paleomagnetism of the Basalts of Summit Creek. Located southeast of Mount Rainier, this section of layered basaltic flows formed during the Eocene Epoch (55 to 45 Ma). During the Eocene, this region underwent a time of unique volcanism that has shaped the modern landscape of the Pacific Northwest. Over the course of the available field season, five excursions were taken into the field to conduct structural mapping and paleomagnetic core drilling. Although exposure is limited by vegetation, nineteen sites were mapped and ten of those were drilled for cores. Cores were analyzed using alternating field demagnetization and thermal demagnetization. Mapping data was integrated into a preliminary structural map of the section. This study attempts to provide a greater understanding of the emplacement and deformation of the Basalts of the Summit Creek and any possible relationship with the Crescent Basalts located in the Olympic Peninsula of Washington state. Once paleomagnetic directions were corrected for core orientation and bedding tilt, none of the flows yielded orientations consistent enough to provide reliable magnetic directions for the section. This scatter is believed to be due, in part, to hydrothermal alteration that has subsequently influenced the Basalts of the Summit Creek. The scattered magnetic orientations are quite similar to those observed in the Crescent Basalts. This is does not demonstrate a definite connection between the two chemically similar Eocene volcanic sequences, but it does provide another similarity on the growing list. The lava flows along the north, middle, and south of the area and, with a few exceptions, have a northeast strike and a northwest dip. Along the middle transect of the section, nearest to Pony Creek and Carleton Ridge, bedding orientation has greater variability and suggests that there may still be unidentified structures that are influencing the area. Reflected

  9. Frequency of group A rotavirus with mixed G and P genotypes in bovines: predominance of G3 genotype and its emergence in combination with G8/G10 types.

    PubMed

    Malik, Yashpal S; Sharma, Kuldeep; Vaid, Nirupama; Chakravarti, Somendu; Chandrashekar, K M; Basera, Sanjay S; Singh, Rashmi; Minakshi; Prasad, Gaya; Gulati, Baldev R; Bhilegaonkar, Kiren N; Pandey, Awadh B

    2012-09-01

    The present study describes the genotypic distribution of rotaviruses (RVs) in an Indian bovine population with unexpectedly higher proportions of G3 alone or in combination of G8/G10. PCR-genotyping confirmed that 39.4% (13/33) of the prevalent RVs were the G3 type while 60.6% (20/33) were dual G3G10 or G3G8 types. P typing revealed that 93.9% (31/33) of the samples were P[11] while 6.1% (2/33) possessed a dual P[1]P[11] type. Sequence analysis of the VP7 gene from G3 strains viz. B-46, 0970, and BR-133 showed that these strains had sequence identities of 90.5% to 100% with other bovine G3 strains. The highest identity (98.9% to 100%) was observed with RUBV3 bovine G3 strains from eastern India. The G3 strains (B-46, 0970, and BR-133) showed 97.5% to 98.8% sequence homologies with the Indian equine RV strain Erv-80. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that G3 strains clustered with bovine RUBV3 and J-63, and equine Erv-80 G3. Overall, these results confirmed that the incidence of infection by RVs with the G3 genotype and mixed genotypes in the bovine population was higher than previously predicted. This finding reinforces the importance of constantly monitoring circulating viral strains with the G3 genotype in future surveillance studies. PMID:23006956

  10. A Meeting of Minds around Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Designing an International PCK Summit for Professional, Community, and Field Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Jenifer; Stokes, Laura

    2013-01-01

    A "conference" is a familiar mode of work for academics. Conferences provide opportunities to bring professionals working in a field together to share and build knowledge. As common as conferences are, however, they are quite challenging to design in ways that truly succeed in galvanizing the attention of an academic community on a…

  11. The preservation of long-range transported nitrate in snow at Summit, Greenland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrate is one of the major anions found in polar and alpine snow, both today and in the past. Deposition of nitrate to snow surfaces results from reactions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) with oxidants in the atmosphere, resulting in the production of HNO3 that is incorporated into precipitation or reacts on the surface of particles. Several factors motivate studying nitrate concentration in ice cores including reconstructing past levels of NOx, tropospheric oxidant concentrations and natural variability in NOx sources. The link between the atmospheric concentration of NOx and nitrate concentration in ice core records is problematic because post-depositional processing, such as photolysis and evaporation, can impact the concentration of nitrate in snow. Recent work has shown that the isotopic ratios of nitrate (15N/14N, 18O/16O, 17O/16O) can be a powerful tool for tracing post-depositional loss of nitrate from surface snow. The isotopic composition of nitrate has been shown to contain information about the source of the nitrate (i.e, NOx sources) and the oxidation processes that convert NOx to nitrate in the atmosphere prior to deposition. Results from a number of studies at Summit, Greenland reveal limited loss of nitrate from surface snow during highly photoactive periods, and the oxygen isotopic signatures in snow nitrate appear to be representative of atmospheric deposition of nitrate from outside of Summit. Higher than expected oxygen isotope ratios (18O/16O, 17O/16O) found in Summit summertime nitrate were expected to be dependent upon local photochemistry in which nitrate in the snow is photolyzed to NOx that is then oxidized above the snow by BrO to reform nitrate (i.e., BrONO2). However, the oxygen isotopic composition of nitrate collected at high time resolution in surface snow does not show any link to local gas phase concentrations of a number of species, including BrO. Furthermore, the combination of nitrogen and oxygen isotope data reveals interesting

  12. A strategy for determining arterial blood gases on the summit of Mt. Everest

    PubMed Central

    Catron, Thomas F; Powell, Frank L; West, John B

    2006-01-01

    Background Climbers on the summit of Mt. Everest are exposed to extreme hypoxia, and the physiological implications are of great interest. Inferences have been made from alveolar gas samples collected on the summit, but arterial blood samples would give critical information. We propose a plan to insert an arterial catheter at an altitude of 8000 m, take blood samples above this using an automatic sampler, store the samples in glass syringes in an ice-water slurry, and analyze them lower on the mountain 4 to 6 hours later. Results A preliminary design of the automatic sampler was successfully tested at the White Mountain Research Station (altitude 3800 m – 4300 m). To determine how much the blood gases changed over a long period, rabbit blood was tonometered to give a gas composition close to that expected on the summit (PO2 4.0 kPa (30 mmHg), PCO2 1.3 kPa (10 mmHg), pH 7.7) and the blood gases were measured every 2 hours for 8 hours both at sea level and 3800 m. The mean changes were PO2 +0.3 to +0.4 kPa (+2 to +3 mmHg), PCO2 0 to +0.13 kPa (+1 mmHg), pH -0.02 to -0.04, base excess -0.7 to -1.2 mM. In practice the delay before analysis should not exceed 4 to 6 hours. The small paradoxical rise in PO2 is presumably caused mainly by contamination of the blood with air. Conclusion We conclude that automatic arterial blood sampling at high altitude is technically feasible and that the changes in the blood gases over a period of several hours are acceptably small. PMID:16524477

  13. Analysis of nitrate in the snow and atmosphere at Summit, Greenland: Chemistry and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fibiger, Dorothy L.; Dibb, Jack E.; Chen, Dexian; Thomas, Jennie L.; Burkhart, John F.; Huey, L. Gregory; Hastings, Meredith G.

    2016-05-01

    As a major sink of atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2), nitrate (NO3-) in polar snow can reflect the long-range transport of NOx and related species (e.g., peroxyacetyl nitrate). On the other hand, because NO3- in snow can be photolyzed, potentially producing gas phase NOx locally, NO3- in snow (and thus, ice) may reflect local processes. Here we investigate the relationship between local atmospheric composition at Summit, Greenland (72°35'N, 38°25'W) and the isotopic composition of NO3- to determine the degree to which local processes influence atmospheric and snow NO3-. Based on snow and atmospheric observations during May-June 2010 and 2011, we find no connection between the local atmospheric concentrations of a suite of gases (BrO, NO, NOy, HNO3, and nitrite (NO2-)) and the NO3- isotopic composition or concentration in snow. This suggests that (1) the snow NO3- at Summit is primarily derived from long-range transport and (2) this NO3- is largely preserved in the snow. Additionally, three isotopically distinct NO3- sources were found to be contributing to the NO3- in the snow at Summit during both 2010 and 2011. Through the complete isotopic composition of NO3-, we suggest that these sources are local anthropogenic particulate NO3- from station activities (δ15N = 16‰, Δ17O = 4‰, and δ18O = 23‰), NO3- formed from midlatitude NOx (δ15N = -10‰, Δ17O = 29‰, δ18O = 78‰) and a NO3- source that is possibly influenced by or derived from stratospheric ozone NO3- (δ15N = 5‰, Δ17O = 39‰, δ18O = 100‰).

  14. Evaluating the Impact of the Summit Station, Greenland Radiosonde Program on Data Modelers and Forecast Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, C. J.; Starkweather, S.; Cox, C. J.; Solomon, A.; Shupe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Radiosondes are balloon-borne meteorological sensors used to acquire profiles of temperature and humidity. Radiosonde data are essential inputs for numerical weather prediction models and are used for climate research, particularly in the creation of reanalysis products. However, radiosonde programs are costly to maintain, in particular in the remote regions of the Arctic (e.g., $440,000/yr at Summit, Greenland), where only 40 of approximately 1000 routine global launches are made. The climate of this data-sparse region is poorly understood and forecast data assimilation procedures are designed for global applications. Thus, observations may be rejected from the data assimilation because they are too far from the model expectations. For the most cost-efficient deployment of resources and to improve forecasting methods, analyses of the effectiveness of individual radiosonde programs are necessary. Here, we evaluate how radiosondes launched twice daily (0 and 12 UTC) from Summit Station, Greenland, (72.58⁰N, 38.48⁰W, 3210 masl) influence the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) operational forecasts from June 2013 through May of 2015. A statistical analysis is conducted to determine the impact of the observations on the forecast model and the meteorological regimes that the model fails to reproduce are identified. Assimilation rates in the inversion layer are lower than any other part of the troposphere. Above the inversion, assimilation rates range from 85%-100%, 60%-98%, and > 99% for temperature, humidity, and wind, respectively. The lowest assimilation rates are found near the surface, possibly associated with biases in the representation of the temperature inversion by the ECMWF model at Summit. Consequently, assimilation rates are lower near the surface during winter when strong temperature inversions are frequently observed. Our findings benefit the scientific community who uses this information for climatological analysis of the

  15. Arms control and the Helsinki Summit: Issues and obstacles in the second Clinton term

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Prior to the summit, there was general concern that the proposed expansion of NATO would prevent a successful summit and prevent agreement on any measures leading to the ratification of START II. The Duma has held up START II ratification for a number of reasons, but basically the Russians felt that START II was an inequitable agreement that would force them into a major, expensive buildup that they could not afford. There were also serious concerns in the Duma about US intentions in the area of ballistic missile defenses, which would affect their willingness to enter into substantial reductions. There are some very serious questions that remain, and it`s not even clear in some instances what was and wasn`t agreed to at the summit. With regard to NATO expansion, it was formally stated that the two sides disagreed on the desirability and acceptability of expansion. Yeltsin, however, accepted that he, in any case, could not stop the expansion process. He sought to get some amelioration for the problems that it would cause in Russian eyes. He did not get a formal charter between Russia and NATO outlining the limits of expansion and Russian rights, but rather a commitment to a document that was intended to minimize the potential consequences of disagreement. This document would seek, to some extent, to compensate Russian concerns. However, it was specifically indicated that it would not be a formal treaty but rather a heads-of-government document constituting a political commitment. This document does not exist, and it may not be that easy to formalize it between Russia and NATO. The Duma will be very disappointed in this outcome with regard to NATO expansion.

  16. Rime Mushrooms - Extreme Rime Ice Buildup on Mountain Summits of Southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteman, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Patagonian Andes are known among mountain climbers for a meteorological phenomenon that occurs there but is unknown in many other mountain areas. The phenomenon is the buildup of rime ice in large bulbous or mushroom-shaped accretions on the windward side of projecting mountain summits, ridges and exposed near-vertical rock faces. These "ice mushrooms" have never been investigated scientifically. This talk will introduce the audience to ice mushrooms, describe where they are found, consider the meteorological factors leading to their formation, and illustrate how they are negotiated by mountain climbers using photographs and descriptions from Southern Patagonia.

  17. Three-dimensional p-velocity structure of the summit caldera of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Stauber, D.A.; Iyer, N.M.; Mooney, W.D.; Dawson, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional high-resolution seismic study of the summit caldera of Newberry Volcano, Oregon, was conducted by the US Geological Survey using an adaptation of the method applied by Mercessian et al. (1984). Preliminary interpretation of the traveltime residuals reveals a ring of high P-velocity material coinciding with the inner ring fault system of the caldera in the upper 2 km. A zone of lower P velocities extends deeper than 2 km in the center of the caldera. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Avoiding the zero sum game in global cancer policy: beyond 2011 UN high level summit.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, R; Purushotham, A D

    2011-11-01

    In September 2011 a unique high level summit on non-communicable diseases will be held in New York. For cancer as for many of the other chronic diseases this marks their first high level recognition. However, the reality of cancer control in middle and low income countries is and will be very different from the trajectory experienced by developed countries. This perspective seeks to critically examine the approach being taken, mapping pitfalls and presenting alternative solutions for an international cancer control policy. PMID:22018537

  19. Global Alzheimer Research Summit: basic and clinical research: present and future Alzheimer research.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Danielle; Jovanovic, Katarina; Da Costa Dias, Bianca; Weiss, Stefan F T

    2012-01-01

    We report here on the proceedings of the Global Alzheimer Summit that took place September 22-23, 2011 in Madrid, Spain. As Alzheimer disease (AD) is the leading cause of neurodegeneration in elderly individuals and as yet has no effective therapeutic option, it continues to stimulate global research interests. At the conference, leaders in the field of AD research provided insights into current developments in various areas of research, namely molecular mechanisms, genetics, novel aspects of AD research and translational research. Emphasis was also placed on the importance of biomarkers in the diagnosis of AD and development of current therapeutic strategies. PMID:22453170

  20. Year-round research gets boost at summit of Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bales, Roger C.; Dibb, Jack E.

    A successful pilot project has added support for locating a year-round interdisciplinary environmental observatory at the 3200-m summit of the Greenland ice sheet (Figure 1). Such a facility will enable numbers of European and U.S. scientists to make continuous measurements at a unique, high elevation, Northern Hemisphere location (Figure 2). From August 1997 through April 1998 a pilot winter-over program of atmospheric and snow measurements was carried out, in part to test the feasibility of a longer-term year-round facility Year-round measurements are expected to resume in the summer of 2000.

  1. Validation of MODIS Terra and Aqua Ice Surface Temperatures at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D. K.; Shuman, C. A.; Xiong, X.; Wenny, B. N.; DiGirolamo, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    Ice-surface temperature (IST) is used in many studies, for example for validation of model output and for detection of leads and thin ice in sea ice. The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on the Terra and Aqua satellites are useful for mapping IST of sea ice and the Greenland ice sheet (Hall et al., 2012), and validation of the ISTs derived from MODIS has been an ongoing effort (e.g., Koenig & Hall, 2010; Shuman et al., 2014). Recent results call into question the calibration of the MODIS-derived ISTs at very cold temperatures that are characteristic of the Greenland ice sheet high interior during winter (Shuman et al., 2014). In the present work, we investigate the calibration of MODIS IR bands 31 (10.780 - 11.280 µm) and 32 (11.770 - 12.270 µm) under very cold conditions. MODIS IR bands are calibrated using a quadratic algorithm. In Collection 6 (C6), the offset and nonlinear calibration coefficients are computed from data collected during the blackbody cool-down vs the warm-up data used in Collection 5 (C5). To improve the calibration accuracy for low-temperature scenes, the offset terms are set to 0. In general, Aqua MODIS bands 31 and 32 perform better than Terra MODIS bands 31 and 32. One of the reasons is that the Aqua bands have a lower saturation temperature (~340 K) than the Terra (~380 K) bands, and lower saturation or smaller dynamic range means better resolution. As compared to ~2-m NOAA air temperatures (TA) at Summit, Greenland, Shuman et al. (2014) show a small (~0.5°C) offset in Terra MODIS-derived IST vs TA near 0°C, and an increasingly larger offset (up to ~5°C) as TA drops to -60°C. To investigate this further, we compare Terra and Aqua C5 and C6 ISTs with TA data from Summit. This work will document the calibration of bands 31 and 32 at very low temperatures in C5 and C6. Hall, D.K., et al., 2012: Satellite-Derived Climate-Quality Data Record of the Clear-Sky Surface Temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet

  2. Meeting Demand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneman, Kathy

    1998-01-01

    Addresses how a school district can use temporary classroom space to meet increasing student enrollment while additional space is being built. Provides examples of using portable facilities to supplement educational sites, including how to protect students who are in portable classrooms when tornadoes appear. (GR)

  3. 225GHz opacity measurements at Summit camp, Greenland, for the GreenLand Telescope (GLT) site testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Cocher, Pierre L.; Asada, Keiichi; Matsushita, Satoki; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, Paul T. P.; Chen, Chien-Ping

    2014-07-01

    We report three winter seasons and two full summer from August 2011 to April 2014 of atmospheric opacity measurements with a 225GHz tipping radiometer at Summit camp in Greenland (Latitude 72°.57 N, Longitude 38°.46 W, Elevation 3250 masl). The summit of the ice cap in Greenland is expected to be the location for the GreenLand Telescope (GLT), a 12 meters aperture millimeter / sub-millimeter telescope with VLBI and single- dish capability. The winter regime (November to April) is of particular interest for sub-millimeter observations since the opacities lower quartile in these months can get as low as 0.042, with occasional opacities as low as 0.025. We then compare Summit zenith opacities to other submillimeter sites.

  4. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Foro Energy: High Power Lasers - Long Distances (Performer Video)

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2012-03-21

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video from Foro Energy are Joel Moxley, Founder and CEO, Mark Zediker, Founder and CTO, and Paul Deutch, President and COO. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy, also appears briefly in this video to praise the accomplishment of a high powered laser that can transmit that power long distances for faster and more powerful drilling of geothermal, oil, and gas wells.

  5. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Foro Energy: High Power Lasers - Long Distances (Performer Video)

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2012-02-28

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video from Foro Energy are Joel Moxley, Founder and CEO, Mark Zediker, Founder and CTO, and Paul Deutch, President and COO. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy, also appears briefly in this video to praise the accomplishment of a high powered laser that can transmit that power long distances for faster and more powerful drilling of geothermal, oil, and gas wells.

  6. Financing the Future for California's Children: The California Child Care Economic Summit Conference Report (Rancho Santa Fe, California, October 3-5, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill-Scott, Karen; And Others

    This report describes a conference convened by eight child care advocates to create a plan for funding child care services for California's families. Part one describes the participants of the summit, their role, and the assumptions of the summit. Part two details the following three models that were proposed for financing child care: (1) create a…

  7. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Bill Clinton, 42nd President of the United States)

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, William J.

    2012-02-29

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Former President Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States, gave the final keynote address of the 2012 Summit on February 29. He addressed the importance of government investment in research that will help move the world toward a cleaner and more secure energy future.

  8. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Bill Clinton, 42nd President of the United States)

    ScienceCinema

    Clinton, William J. (Bill) (42nd President of the United States)

    2012-03-21

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Former President Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States, gave the final keynote address of the 2012 Summit on February 29. He addressed the importance of government investment in research that will help move the world toward a cleaner and more secure energy future.

  9. Two magma bodies beneath the summit of Kīlauea Volcano unveiled by isotopically distinct melt deliveries from the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietruszka, Aaron J.; Heaton, Daniel E.; Marske, Jared P.; Garcia, Michael O.

    2015-03-01

    The summit magma storage reservoir of Kīlauea Volcano is one of the most important components of the magmatic plumbing system of this frequently active basaltic shield-building volcano. Here we use new high-precision Pb isotopic analyses of Kīlauea summit lavas-from 1959 to the active Halema'uma'u lava lake-to infer the number, size, and interconnectedness of magma bodies within the volcano's summit reservoir. From 1971 to 1982, the 206Pb/204Pb ratios of the lavas define two separate magma mixing trends that correlate with differences in vent location and/or pre-eruptive magma temperature. These relationships, which contrast with a single magma mixing trend for lavas from 1959 to 1968, indicate that Kīlauea summit eruptions since at least 1971 were supplied from two distinct magma bodies. The locations of these magma bodies are inferred to coincide with two major deformation centers identified by geodetic monitoring of the volcano's summit region: (1) the main locus of the summit reservoir ∼2-4 km below the southern rim of Kīlauea Caldera and (2) a shallower magma body <2 km below the eastern rim of Halema'uma'u pit crater. Residence time modeling suggests that the total volume of magma within Kīlauea's summit reservoir during the late 20th century (1959-1982) was exceedingly small (∼0.1-0.5 km3). Voluminous Kīlauea eruptions, such as the ongoing, 32-yr old Pu'u 'Ō'ō rift eruption (>4 km3 of lava erupted), must therefore be sustained by a nearly continuous supply of new melt from the mantle. The model results show that a minimum of four compositionally distinct, mantle-derived magma batches were delivered to the volcano (at least three directly to the summit reservoir) since 1959. These melt inputs correlate with the initiation of energetic (1959 Kīlauea Iki) and/or sustained (1969-1974 Mauna Ulu, 1983-present Pu'u 'Ō'ō and 2008-present Halema'uma'u) eruptions. Thus, Kīlauea's eruptive behavior is partly tied to the delivery of new magma batches

  10. Seismic detection of increased degassing before Kīlauea's 2008 summit explosion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Jessica H.; Poland, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    The 2008 explosion that started a new eruption at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, was not preceded by a dramatic increase in earthquakes nor inflation, but was associated with increases in SO2 emissions and seismic tremor. Here we perform shear wave splitting analysis on local earthquakes spanning the onset of the eruption. Shear wave splitting measures seismic anisotropy and is traditionally used to infer changes in crustal stress over time. We show that shear wave splitting may also vary due to changes in volcanic degassing. The orientation of fast shear waves at Kīlauea is usually controlled by structure, but in 2008 showed changes with increased SO2 emissions preceding the start of the summit eruption. This interpretation for changing anisotropy is supported by corresponding decreases in Vp/Vs ratio. Our result demonstrates a novel method for detecting changes in gas flux using seismic observations and provides a new tool for monitoring under-instrumented volcanoes.

  11. Perspectives in Energy Research: How Can We Change the Game? (2011 Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Isaacs, Eric (Director, Argonne National Laboratory)

    2012-03-14

    Eric Issacs, Director of DOE's Argonne National Laboratory, discussed the role of the EFRC Program and National Laboratories in developing game-changing energy technologies in the EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research." The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  12. Concentrations and snow-atmosphere fluxes of reactive nitrogen at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, J. W.; Jacob, D. J.; Fan, S.-M.; Colman, A. S.; Dibb, J. E.

    1999-06-01

    Concentrations and fluxes of NOy (total reactive nitrogen), ozone concentrations and fluxes of sensible heat, water vapor, and momentum were measured from May 1 to July 20, 1995 at Summit, Greenland. Median NOy concentrations declined from 947 ppt in May to 444 ppt by July. NOy fluxes were observed into and out of the snow, but the magnitudes were usually below 1 μmol m-2 h-1 because of the low HNO3 concentration and weak turbulence over the snow surface. Some of the highest observed fluxes may be due to temporary storage by equilibrium sorption of peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN) or other organic nitrogen species on ice surfaces in the upper snowpack. Sublimation of snow at the surface or during blowing snow events is associated with efflux of NOy from the snowpack. Because the NOy fluxes during summer at Summit are bidirectional and small in magnitude, the net result of turbulent NOy exchange is insignificant compared to the 2 μmol m-2 d-1 mean input from fresh snow during the summer months. If the arctic NOy reservoir is predominantly PAN (or compounds with similar properties), thermal dissociation of this NOy is sufficient to support the observed flux of nitrate in fresh snow. Very low HNO3 concentrations in the surface layer (1% of total NOy) reflect the poor ventilation of the surface layer over the snowpack combined with the relatively rapid uptake of HNO3 by fog, falling snow, and direct deposition to the snowpack.

  13. An Autonomous Polarized Raman Lidar System Designed for Summit Camp, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, Robert A.; Neely, Ryan R.; Pilewskie, Peter; O'Neill, Michael; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Hayman, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    A dearth of high-spatial and temporal resolution measurements of atmospheric state variables in the Arctic directly inhibits scientific understanding of radiative and precipitation impacts on the changing surface environment. More reliable and frequent measurements are needed to better understand Arctic weather processes and constrain model predictions. To partially address the lack of Artic observations, a new autonomous Raman lidar system, which will measure water vapor mixing ratio, temperature, extinction, and cloud phase profiles through the troposphere, is designed for deployment to Summit Camp, Greenland (72° 36' N, 38° 25' W, 3250 [m]). This high-altitude Arctic field site has co-located ancillary equipment such as a Doppler millimeter cloud radar, microwave radiometers, depolarization lidars, ceiliometer, an infrared interferometer and twice-daily radiosondes. The current suite of instruments allows for a near comprehensive picture of the atmospheric state above Summit but increased spatial and temporal resolution of water vapor and temperature will reveal detailed microphysical information. A system description will be provided with an emphasis on the Monte Carlo safety analysis done to ensure eye safety in all relevant weather conditions.

  14. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP): DOE's Solar Fuels Energy Innovation Hub (2011 EFRC Summit)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nate

    2011-05-25

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub focused on fuels from sunlight. JCAP's Director, Nate Lewis, spoke at the 2011 EFRC Summit about what JCAP is and how it is partnering with the EFRC community to accelerate the progress towards new solar fuels. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  15. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP): DOE's Solar Fuels Energy Innovation Hub (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Lewis, Nate (Director, Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis and Professor at Caltech)

    2012-03-14

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub focused on fuels from sunlight. JCAP's Director, Nate Lewis, spoke at the 2011 EFRC Summit about what JCAP is and how it is partnering with the EFRC community to accelerate the progress towards new solar fuels. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  16. Welcome Remarks and Introduction from the DOE Under Secretary for Science, Steve Koonin (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Koonin, Steve

    2012-03-14

    In this video the DOE Under Secretary for Science, Steve Koonin, opened the 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum with welcoming remarks and an introduction of the keynote address. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  17. The Grand Challenges of Organ Banking: Proceedings from the first global summit on complex tissue cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jedediah K; Bischof, John C; Braslavsky, Ido; Brockbank, Kelvin G M; Fahy, Gregory M; Fuller, Barry J; Rabin, Yoed; Tocchio, Alessandro; Woods, Erik J; Wowk, Brian G; Acker, Jason P; Giwa, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The first Organ Banking Summit was convened from Feb. 27 - March 1, 2015 in Palo Alto, CA, with events at Stanford University, NASA Research Park, and Lawrence Berkeley National Labs. Experts at the summit outlined the potential public health impact of organ banking, discussed the major remaining scientific challenges that need to be overcome in order to bank organs, and identified key opportunities to accelerate progress toward this goal. Many areas of public health could be revolutionized by the banking of organs and other complex tissues, including transplantation, oncofertility, tissue engineering, trauma medicine and emergency preparedness, basic biomedical research and drug discovery - and even space travel. Key remaining scientific sub-challenges were discussed including ice nucleation and growth, cryoprotectant and osmotic toxicities, chilling injury, thermo-mechanical stress, the need for rapid and uniform rewarming, and ischemia/reperfusion injury. A variety of opportunities to overcome these challenge areas were discussed, i.e. preconditioning for enhanced stress tolerance, nanoparticle rewarming, cyroprotectant screening strategies, and the use of cryoprotectant cocktails including ice binding agents. PMID:26687388

  18. Micro-tilt changes preceding summit explosions at Semeru volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, K.; Hendrasto, M.; Mulyana, I.; Rosadi, U.; Purbawinata, M. A.

    2007-03-01

    A two-axis tiltmeter installed at the summit of Semeru volcano, Indonesia, reveals two different modes of deformation, short-term and longer-term. The short-term variations are inflations precursory to the occurrence of summit explosions. The time intervals between the explosions range from several minutes to several tens of minutes, and the maximum precursory tilt change observed is about 0.1-0.2 μrad. This change in tilt is interpreted to reflect a shallow pressurization source, just beneath the active crater. The longer-term tilt changes are displayed over a period of several days to weeks, and a steady inflation during a period of nearly 2 weeks preceded the occurrence of pyroclastic flows on December 22, 2005. Both short-term and longer-term changes are confined to the radial tilt component, pointing toward the active crater and conduit. To explain both of these tilt changes we propose relatively shallow conduit pressurization, although at somewhat deeper levels in the case of longer-term deformation. The causative mechanisms involve gas exsolution, microlite crystallization, and rheological stiffening, which results in greater flow resistance and dynamic pressure in the upper conduit, thus causing the edifice tilts observed. The gas pore pressure in the magma builds until the threshold required to trigger explosive fragmentation is reached.

  19. Emerging hemodynamic signatures of the right heart (Third International Right Heart Failure Summit, part 2).

    PubMed

    Maron, Bradley A

    2014-12-01

    Despite the importance of preserved right ventricular structure and function with respect to outcome across the spectrum of lung, cardiac, and pulmonary vascular diseases, only recently have organized efforts developed to consider the pulmonary vascular-right ventricular apparatus as a specific unit within the larger context of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology. The Third International Right Heart Failure Summit (Boston, MA) was a multidisciplinary event dedicated to promoting a dialogue about the scientific and clinical basis of right heart disease. The current review provides a synopsis of key discussions presented during the section of the summit titled "Emerging Hemodynamic Signatures of the Right Heart." Specifically, topics emphasized in this element of the symposium included (1) the effects of pulmonary vascular dysfunction at rest or provoked by exercise on the right ventricular pressure-volume relationship, (2) the role of pressure-volume loop analysis as a method to characterize right ventricular inefficiency and predict right heart failure, and (3) the importance of a systems biology approach to identifying novel factors that contribute to pathophenotypes associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension and/or right ventricular dysfunction. Collectively, these concepts frame a forward-thinking paradigm shift in the approach to right heart disease by emphasizing factors that regulate the transition from adaptive to maladaptive right ventricular-pulmonary vascular (patho)physiology. PMID:25610606

  20. Warm Events At Summit, Greenland During 2012 Relative To An Evolving Climate Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, C. A.; Schnaubelt, M. J.; Mefford, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    An evolving temperature record from the Greenland Summit Station, at approximately 3216 m in elevation, has documented unusual periods of near and above freezing air temperatures in July 2012. Since August 2005, data has been collected from well-calibrated and actively-ventilated temperature sensors at a NOAA-ESRL climate observatory. Comparison of these data from a nominal 2 m height above the ice sheet surface over the past seven summers reveals several periods of unusual warmth at the highest elevations of the ice sheet in 2012. Detailed analysis of the available data indicates that temperatures rose to or above freezing for almost 6.5 hours on July 11 at Summit Station. A maximum air temperature of 1 degree C was recorded repeatedly in the 1-minute averages during this period. NOAA's data also indicated brief periods at or above zero on July 12th and 29th as well. These anomalously warm air-temperature periods can now be compared and contrasted with equivalent-quality data from earlier records (automatic weather stations began operating in May 1987 during the GISP2 project) and used to calibrate indications of warm surface temperatures derived from multi-decadal satellite passive microwave and infrared sensors.

  1. Perspectives in Energy Research: How Can We Change the Game? (2011 Summit)

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, Eric

    2011-05-25

    Eric Issacs, Director of DOE's Argonne National Laboratory, discussed the role of the EFRC Program and National Laboratories in developing game-changing energy technologies in the EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research." The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  2. Seismic detection of increased degassing before Kīlauea's 2008 summit explosion.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jessica H; Poland, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    The 2008 explosion that started a new eruption at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, was not preceded by a dramatic increase in earthquakes nor inflation, but was associated with increases in SO2 emissions and seismic tremor. Here we perform shear wave splitting analysis on local earthquakes spanning the onset of the eruption. Shear wave splitting measures seismic anisotropy and is traditionally used to infer changes in crustal stress over time. We show that shear wave splitting may also vary due to changes in volcanic degassing. The orientation of fast shear waves at Kīlauea is usually controlled by structure, but in 2008 showed changes with increased SO2 emissions preceding the start of the summit eruption. This interpretation for changing anisotropy is supported by corresponding decreases in Vp/Vs ratio. Our result demonstrates a novel method for detecting changes in gas flux using seismic observations and provides a new tool for monitoring under-instrumented volcanoes. PMID:23575672

  3. Staff meeting

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN?s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  4. Reading the World: Redefining Literature and History Curriculum. A Report from the Multicultural Education Summit Convened by the San Francisco Unified School District. Proceedings (San Francisco, California, March 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Susan; Maxton, Ashindi

    This report documents a 1998 summit that brought together academics and practitioners to discuss the challenges of multicultural education. Part 1, "Summit Proceedings," examines definitions, major topics, voices of the summit, recommendations, and the future. Part 2, "Selected Articles," includes three sections that offer articles from the…

  5. A Vision for a Summit: CELT Recently Brought Together School Districts, Vendors and Professional Organizations for a National Summit on "Leadership, Learning and Technology for the 21st Century"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsay, Priscilla; Milton, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    A lunch-time discussion among CELT (Center for Education Leadership and Technology) Corporation staff about how to positively impact the 2004 presidential campaign quickly evolved into a vision for bringing together top executive-level practitioners in education for a national summit on "Leadership, Learning and Technology for the 21st Century."…

  6. Liquid Sunshine to Fuel Your Car (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, Daniel; CLSF Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Liquid Sunshine to Fuel Your Car' was submitted by the Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation (CLSF) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CLSF is directed by Daniel Cosgrove at Pennsylvania State University and is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: Penn State (lead), North Caroline State University, and Virginia Tech University. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation is 'to dramatically increase our fundamental knowledge of the formation and physical interactions of bio-polymer networks in plant cell walls to provide a basis for improved methods for converting biomass into fuels.' Research topics are: biofuels (biomass), membrane, interfacial characterization, matter by design, and self-assembly.

  7. UNC EFRC: Fuels from Sunlight (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Meyer, Thomas J. (Director, UNC EFRC: Solar Fuels and Next Generation Photovoltaics); UNC EFRC Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Fuels from Sunlight' was submitted by the University of North Carolina (UNC) EFRC: Solar Fuels and Next Generation Photovoltaics to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. The UNC EFRC directed by Thomas J. Meyer is a partnership of scientists from six institutions: UNC (lead), Duke University, University of Florida, North Caroline Central University, North Carolina State University, and the Research Triangle Institute. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Solar Fuels and Next Generation Photovoltaics is 'to combine the best features of academic and translational research to study light/matter interactions and chemical processes for the efficient collection, transfer, and conversion of solar energy into chemical fuels and electricity.' Research topics are: catalysis (CO{sub 2}, hydrocarbons, water), electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis, solar photovoltaic, solar fuels, photonic, solar electrodes, photosynthesis, fuel cells, CO{sub 2} (convert), greenhosue gas, hydrogen (fuel), interfacial characterization, novel materials synthesis, charge transport, and self-assembly.

  8. Liquid Sunshine to Fuel Your Car (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Cosgrove, Daniel (Director, Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation); CLSF Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Liquid Sunshine to Fuel Your Car' was submitted by the Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation (CLSF) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CLSF is directed by Daniel Cosgrove at Pennsylvania State University and is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: Penn State (lead), North Caroline State University, and Virginia Tech University. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation is 'to dramatically increase our fundamental knowledge of the formation and physical interactions of bio-polymer networks in plant cell walls to provide a basis for improved methods for converting biomass into fuels.' Research topics are: biofuels (biomass), membrane, interfacial characterization, matter by design, and self-assembly.

  9. Battle against Phonons (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum

    ScienceCinema

    Chen, Gang (Director, Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center); S3TEC Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Battle against Phonons' was submitted by the Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion (S3TEC) EFRC to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for the special award, 'Best with Popcorn'. S3TEC, an EFRC directed by Gang Chen at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a partnership of scientists from four research institutions: MIT (lead), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Boston College, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Solid-State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion Center is 'to create novel, solid-state materials for the conversion of sunlight into electricity using thermal and photovoltaic processes.' Research topics are: solar photovoltaic, photonic, metamaterial, optics, solar thermal, thermoelectric, phonons, thermal conductivity, defects, ultrafast physics, interfacial characterization, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, charge transport, defect tolerant materials, and scalable processing.

  10. UNC EFRC: Fuels from Sunlight (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Thomas J.; UNC EFRC Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Fuels from Sunlight' was submitted by the University of North Carolina (UNC) EFRC: Solar Fuels and Next Generation Photovoltaics to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. The UNC EFRC directed by Thomas J. Meyer is a partnership of scientists from six institutions: UNC (lead), Duke University, University of Florida, North Caroline Central University, North Carolina State University, and the Research Triangle Institute. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Solar Fuels and Next Generation Photovoltaics is 'to combine the best features of academic and translational research to study light/matter interactions and chemical processes for the efficient collection, transfer, and conversion of solar energy into chemical fuels and electricity.' Research topics are: catalysis (CO{sub 2}, hydrocarbons, water), electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis, solar photovoltaic, solar fuels, photonic, solar electrodes, photosynthesis, fuel cells, CO{sub 2} (convert), greenhosue gas, hydrogen (fuel), interfacial characterization, novel materials synthesis, charge transport, and self-assembly.

  11. CABS: Green Energy for Our Nation's Future (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect

    Jan Jaworski; Sayre, Richard T.; CABS Staff

    2011-05-01

    'CABS: Green Energy for our Nation's Future' was submitted by the Center for Advanced Biofuel Systems (CABS) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CABS, an EFRC directed by Jan Jaworski at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center is a partnership of scientists from five institutions: Donald Danforth Plant Science Center (lead), Michigan State University, the University of Nebraska, New Mexico Consortium/LANL, and Washington State University. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  12. Excited About Excitons (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, Marc; Center for Excitonics Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Excited about Excitons' was submitted by the Center for Excitonics to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for its 'outstanding portrayal of young scientists'. The Center for Excitonics, an EFRC directed by Marc Baldo at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: MIT (lead), Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Harvard University. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Excitonics is 'to understand the transport of charge carriers in synthetic disordered systems, which hold promise as new materials for conversion of solar energy to electricity and electrical energy storage.' Research topics are: solar photovoltaic, photonic, solid state lighting, photosynthesis, novel materials synthesis, charge transport, defect tolerant materials, scalable processing, and self-assembly.

  13. Search for the ANSER (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, Michael R.; ANSER Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Search for the ANSER' was submitted by the Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center (ANSER) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. ANSER, an EFRC directed by Michael Wasielewski at Argonne National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from five institutions: Argonne National Laboratory, Northwestern University, University of Chicago, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Yale. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. At ANSER, the mission is 'to revolutionize our understanding of molecules, materials and methods necessary to create dramatically more efficient technologies for solar fuels and electricity production.' Research topics are: catalysis (water), electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis, solar photovoltaic, solar fuels, solar electrodes, photosynthesis, transportation fuels, bio-inspired, spin dynamics, hydrogen (fuel), ultrafast physics, interfacial characterization, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, charge transport, and self-assembly.

  14. Enabling Energy Efficiency (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Coltrin, Mike (Acting Director, EFRC for Solid State Lighting Science); Simmons, Jerry; SSLS Staff

    2011-11-03

    'Enabling Energy Efficiency' was submitted by the EFRC for Solid-State Lighting Science (SSLS) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. SSLS is directed by Mike Coltrin (Acting) and Jerry Simmons at Sandia National Laboratories, and is a partnership of scientists from eight institutions: Sandia National Laboratories (lead); California Institute of Technology; Los Alamos National Laboratory; University of Massachusetts, Lowell; University of New Mexico; Northwestern University; Philips Lumileds Lighting; and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  15. Saving the Sun for a Rainy Day (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Bullock, R. Morris (Director, Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis); CME Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Saving the Sun for a Rainy Day' was submitted by the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis (CME) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CME, an EFRC directed by R. Morris Bullock at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from four institutions: PNNL (lead), Pensylvania State University, University of Washington, and the University of Wyoming. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis is 'to understand, design and develop molecular electrocatalysts for solar fuel production and use.' Research topics are: catalysis (water), electrocatalysis, bio-inspired, electrical energy storage, fuel cells, hydrogen (fuel), matter by design, novel materials synthesis, and charge transport.

  16. Union for International Cancer Control International Session: healthcare economics: the significance of the UN Summit non-communicable diseases political declaration in Asia.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Kawahara, Norie; Masui, Tohru; Takeyama, Kunihiko; Nogimori, Masafumi; Roh, Jae Kyung

    2013-06-01

    The Japan National Committee for the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) and UICC-Asia Regional Office (ARO) organized an international session as part of the official program of the 71st Annual Meeting of the Japanese Cancer Association to discuss the topic "Healthcare Economics: The Significance of the UN Summit non-communicable diseases (NCDs) Political Declaration in Asia." The presenters and participants discussed the growing cost of cancer in the Asian region and the challenges that are faced by the countries of Asia, all of which face budgetary and other systemic constraints in tackling and controlling cancer in the region. The session benefited from the participation of various stakeholders, including cancer researchers and representatives of the pharmaceutical industry. They discussed the significance of the UN Political Declaration on the prevention and control of NCDs (2011) as a means of boosting awareness of cancer in the Asian region and also addressed the ways in which stakeholders can cooperate to improve cancer control and treatment. Other issues that were covered included challenges relating to pharmaceutical trials in Asia and how to link knowledge and research outcomes. The session concluded with the recognition that with the onset of a super-aged society in most countries in Asia and an increasing focus on quality of life rather than quantity of life, it is more important than ever for all stakeholders to continue to share information and promote policy dialogue on cancer control and treatment. PMID:23701361

  17. Partnering to change the world for people with haemophilia: 6(th) Haemophilia Global Summit, Prague, Czech Republic, 24-26(th) September 2015.

    PubMed

    Astermark, Jan; Hart, Dan; Lobet, Sébastien; Blatný, Jan; d'Oiron, Roseline; Kenet, Gili; Dolan, Gerry; Libotte, Valérie; Hermans, Cedric

    2016-07-01

    The 6(th) Haemophilia Global Summit was held in Prague, Czech Republic, in September 2015. The programme was designed by an independent Scientific Steering Committee of haemophilia experts and aimed to share optimal management strategies for haemophilia at all life stages, explore recent potential advances in the management of haemophilia A and B and discuss challenges in haemophilia care. In this supplement from the meeting, Dan Hart reviews the lessons that can be learnt from cost-constrained environments with regard to improving care for people with haemophilia globally. Sébastien Lobet discusses the importance of physical activity for optimising care and Roseline d'Oiron and Jan Blatný consider the role of real-world data in understanding the effect of treatment in a clinical setting over the long term and the true impact of treatment on the day-to-day life of the patient. Gili Kenet addresses the current challenges relating to the optimal management of prophylaxis, and Gerry Dolan and Cedric Hermans discuss the value of pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters in informing treatment decisions. Cedric Hermans and Valérie Libotte explore the importance of considering social and occupational development factors as an integral part of haemophilia care, and Jan Astermark reviews key strategies to predict and prevent inhibitor development. PMID:27292051

  18. Search for the ANSER (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum

    ScienceCinema

    Wasielewski, Michael R. (Director, Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center); ANSER Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Search for the ANSER' was submitted by the Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center (ANSER) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. ANSER, an EFRC directed by Michael Wasielewski at Argonne National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from five institutions: Argonne National Laboratory, Northwestern University, University of Chicago, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Yale. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. At ANSER, the mission is 'to revolutionize our understanding of molecules, materials and methods necessary to create dramatically more efficient technologies for solar fuels and electricity production.' Research topics are: catalysis (water), electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis, solar photovoltaic, solar fuels, solar electrodes, photosynthesis, transportation fuels, bio-inspired, spin dynamics, hydrogen (fuel), ultrafast physics, interfacial characterization, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, charge transport, and self-assembly.

  19. Food and nutrition security public initiatives from a human and socioeconomic development perspective: mapping experiences within the 1996 World Food Summit signatories.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Marie Agnès; Chaves-Dos-Santos, Sandra Maria

    2014-03-01

    Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life. In a global scenario where hunger and obesity affect millions of people, public actions have been developed towards Food and Nutrition Security (FNS). In 1996 during the World Food Summit, 186 countries signed the Rome Declaration, committing themselves to assess and address Food and Nutrition Insecurity. In this exploratory study, we compile secondary internet data using keywords in four languages to map the global distribution, among signatories, of FNS public initiatives and assess their association with key national-level socioeconomic indicators. As a result, we found FNS public policies in 123 countries, reports on the state of FNS in 139 countries, and the presence of both in 114 countries (61%). The proportion of countries with any type of, as well as with specific, FNS policy or diagnostic was higher in least developed countries. There was a statistically significant association between these proportions and selected national-level socioeconomic variables. The results are discussed along with population vulnerability, international cooperation mechanisms and political discourse and how these factors impact the existence of FNS public actions. PMID:24581064

  20. Battle against Phonons (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gang; S3TEC Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Battle against Phonons' was submitted by the Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion (S3TEC) EFRC to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for the special award, 'Best with Popcorn'. S3TEC, an EFRC directed by Gang Chen at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a partnership of scientists from four research institutions: MIT (lead), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Boston College, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Solid-State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion Center is 'to create novel, solid-state materials for the conversion of sunlight into electricity using thermal and photovoltaic processes.' Research topics are: solar photovoltaic, photonic, metamaterial, optics, solar thermal, thermoelectric, phonons, thermal conductivity, defects, ultrafast physics, interfacial characterization, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, charge transport, defect tolerant materials, and scalable processing.

  1. Heart of the Solution - Energy Frontiers (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Green, Peter F. (Director, Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion, University of Michigan); CSTEC Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Heart of the Solution - Energy Frontiers' was submitted by the Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion (CSTEC) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was both the People's Choice Award winner and selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for its 'exemplary explanation of the role of an Energy Frontier Research Center'. The Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion is directed by Peter F. Green at the University of Michigan. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion is 'to study complex material structures on the nanoscale to identify key features for their potential use as materials to convert solar energy and heat to electricity.' Research topics are: solar photovoltaic, photonic, optics, solar thermal, thermoelectric, phonons, thermal conductivity, solar electrodes, defects, ultrafast physics, interfacial characterization, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, charge transport, and self-assembly.

  2. Inverse Design: Playing "Jeopardy" in Materials Science (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Alex Zunger (former Director, Center for Inverse Design); Tumas, Bill (Director, Center for Inverse Design); CID Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Inverse Design: Playing 'Jeopardy' in Materials Science' was submitted by the Center for Inverse Design (CID) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CID, an EFRC directed by Bill Tumas at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from five institutions: NREL (lead), Northwestern University, University of Colorado, Stanford University, and Oregon State University. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Inverse Design is 'to replace trial-and-error methods used in the development of materials for solar energy conversion with an inverse design approach powered by theory and computation.' Research topics are: solar photovoltaic, photonic, metamaterial, defects, spin dynamics, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, and defect tolerant materials.

  3. Chemistry of surface water at a volcanic summit area, Norikura, central Japan: multivariate statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Anazaw, K; Ohmori, L H

    2001-11-01

    Many hydrochemical studies on chemical formation of shallow ground water have been reported as results of water-rock interaction, and contamination of paleo-brine or human activities, whereas the preliminary formation of precipitation source in the recharged region has not been established yet. The purpose of this research work is to clarify the geochemical process of water formation from a water source unpolluted by seawater or human activity. Norikura volcano, located in western part of central Japan provided a suitable source for this research purpose, and hence chemical compositions of water samples from the summit and the mountainside area of Norikura volcano were determined. Most samples in the summit area showed very low electrical conductivity, and lower than 12 microS/cm. On the basis of the chemical compositions, principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA), such as kinds of multivariate statistical techniques were used to extract geochemical factors affecting hydrochemical process. As a result, three factors were extracted. The first factor showed high loading on K+, Ca2+, SO2 and SiO2, and this factor was interpreted due to influence of the chemical interaction between acidic precipitated water and rocks. The second factor showed high loading on Na+ and Cl-, and it was assumed to be an influence of seawater salt. The third factor showed loading on NO3-, and it was interpreted to be caused by biochemical effect of vegetation. The proportionate contributions of these factors to the evolution of water chemical composition were found to be 45%, 20%, and 10% for factors 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The same exploration at the mountainside of Norikura volcano revealed that the chemical variances of the non-geothermal water samples were highly influenced by water-rock interactions. The silicate dissolution showed 45% contribution for all chemical variances, while the adsorption of Ca2+ and Mg2+ by precipitation or ion exchange showed 20

  4. Observation of new particle formation at the summit of Mt. Fuji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, N.; Miura, K.; Ueda, S.; Kato, S.; Uno, I.

    2013-12-01

    New particle formation (NPF) from gaseous precursors is largely recognized as an important worldwide mechanism increasing the number of atmospheric particles. However, there are a few reports from high-altitude in eastern Asia about this. Mt. Fuji (35.36N, 138.73E, 3776m ASL) is the highest mountain in Japan. The summit of Mt. Fuji is almost located in the free troposphere and is affected very little by local pollution. Therefore, measurements taken here can be assumed to be a representation of measured background atmospheric conditions and long-range transport of pollutants from Continent of China. In order to observe NPF, measurements of aerosol size distribution were conducted at the summit of Mt. Fuji from July 30 to Aug. 23, 2011, and from July 19 to Aug. 23, 2012. Aerosol size distributions from 4.4 to 5000 nm in diameter were measured with a scanning mobility particle size (SMPS, TSI 3936N25 or 3936L22) and an optical particle counter (OPC, RION KR12). Small positive ions were measured with a Gerdien type meter (COM-3400). The critical mobility was set at 5.0 and 0.7 cm2 / V-sec. The 59 days of data were analyzed and classified into NPF events and non-events. There were 21 events, the 15 events of which were nighttime events during the period of measurements. We calculated a NPF event frequency for each air mass origin: Continent of China, Maritime, Japan, and Sea to land. It appears that air mass from the continent of China have the highest probability to lead to a NPF event, while the lower probabilities of NPF events are found in the air masses from maritime. New particle formation with ion induced nucleation was observed only once at night at the summit of Mt. Fuji. Then, the ratio of O3 to CO was high and the mixing ratio was low. This is possibly due to a descending stratospheric air mass. The low condensation sink at this time may have caused the ion induced nucleation.

  5. 76 FR 49764 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy ICT Transmission Planning Summit and Entegry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy ICT Transmission Planning... Commission's ongoing outreach efforts. Entergy ICT Transmission Planning Summit August 23, 2011 (8 a.m.-5...

  6. "Don't Take Our Voices Away": A Role Play on the Indigenous Peoples' Global Summit on Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Julie Treick; Swinehart, Tim

    2010-01-01

    The Indigenous Peoples' Climate Summit role play grew out of the Portland Area Rethinking Schools Earth in Crisis Curriculum Workgroup and the Oregon Writing Project. It was designed to introduce students to the broad injustice of the climate crisis and to familiarize them with some of the specific issues faced by different indigenous groups…

  7. Affordability, Accessibility and Accountability in Higher Education: Proceedings of the Community College Virtual Summit, June 28, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The main intention of the Community College Virtual Summit, as stated by Troy Justesen, assistant secretary for vocational and adult education, was to explore four critical issues facing community colleges: (1) Two- to four-year transitions; (2) Adult and nontraditional students; (3) Accountability; and (4) Leadership. These were selected as the…

  8. Proceedings of the World Summit on Television for Children. Final Report. (2nd, London, England, March 9-13, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Genevieve, Ed.

    This report summarizes the presentations and events of the Second World Summit on Television for Children, to which over 180 speakers from 50 countries contributed, with additional delegates speaking in conference sessions and social events. The report includes the following sections: (1) production, including presentations on the child audience,…

  9. Evidence Acquisition and Evaluation for a U.S. Government Evidence Summit on Protecting Children outside Family Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Elizabeth S.; Zlidar, Vera M.; Balster, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing the need for evidence to inform policies, strategies, and programs to care for vulnerable children, the U.S. Government convened an Evidence Summit on Protecting Children Outside of Family Care on December 12-13, 2011, in Washington, DC, USA. This paper summarizes the background and methods for the acquisition and evaluation of the…

  10. Teaching Excellence through Professional Learning and Policy Reform: Lessons from around the World. International Summit on the Teaching Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleicher, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    If the quality of an education system can never exceed the quality of its teachers, then countries need to do all they can to build a high-quality teaching force. "Teaching Excellence through Professional Learning and Policy Reform: Lessons from around the World," the background report to the sixth International Summit on the Teaching…

  11. Learning Disabilities: A National Responsibility. Summit on Learning Disabilities (Washington, D.C., September 20-21, 1994). [Videotapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Learning Disabilities, Inc., New York, NY.

    Four videocassettes provide the presentations and discussion of four panels from a 1994 summit on the nation's responsibility in relation to individuals with learning disabilities. Each panel examined issues of research, public policy and legislation, good practices, and consumer interest within its area of concentration. The first panel was on…

  12. The Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Pope, Gary A. (Director, Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security); CFSES Staff

    2011-11-03

    'The Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security (CFSES)' was submitted to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CFSES is directed by Gary A. Pope at the University of Texas at Austin and partners with Sandia National Laboratories. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  13. Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Burns, Peter (Director, Materials Science of Actinides); MSA Staff

    2011-11-03

    'Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides' was submitted by the EFRC for Materials Science of Actinides (MSA) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. MSA is directed by Peter Burns at the University of Notre Dame, and is a partnership of scientists from ten institutions.The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  14. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Fireside Chat with Steven Chu and Bill Gates

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven; Gates, Bill; Podesta, John

    2012-02-28

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. This video captures a session called 'Fireside Chat' that featured Steven Chu, the Secretary of Energy, and Bill Gates, Chairman of Microsoft Corporation. The session is moderated by John Podesta, Chair of the Center for American Progress. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Microsoft Founder and Chairman Bill Gates exchanged ideas about how small businesses and innovators can overcome the challenges that face many startups.

  15. Mineralogy of three slightly palagonitized basaltic tephra samples from the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Yang, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    The paper characterizes the mineralogy and spectral properties of three slightly palagonitized basaltic tephra samples collected near the summit of Mauna Kea in order to contribute to the basis for inferring mineralogy and processes for Martian surface materials. The mineralogy of size fractions of these samples is examined by diffuse reflectance and FIR spectroscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, magnetic analysis, EMPA, TEM, and SEM. For the 20-1000 micron size fraction, sample HWMK11 (red) is essentially completely oxidized and has a hematite (Ti-hematite) pigment dispersed throughout the silicate matrix. Sample HWMK12 (black) has the lowest proportion of ferric-bearing phases and is thus least weathered. For HWMK11, the amount of hematite is essentially constant, and mica is present only in the coarse clay-sized fraction; smectites are low in structural Fe.

  16. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Secretary of Energy Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Department of Energy Secretary)

    2012-03-21

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Steven Chu, Energy Secretary, gave the first keynote presentation of the day. He discusses how President Obama's 'all-of-the-above' approach to energy will help the Unites States solve 21st century global energy challenges and maintain its leadership as an exporter of energy technology. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu highlighted our vulnerability to price fluctuations in the fuel markets, most recently to oil and gasoline, as well as our inability to drill our way out of the problem. Secretary Chu made the case for leveraging energy innovation in order to reduce our exposure to oil price fluctuations and improve the U.S.'s economic competitiveness.

  17. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Fireside Chat with Steven Chu and Bill Gates

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Department of Energy Secretary); Gates, Bill (Microsoft, Chairman); Podesta, John (Center for American Progress, Chair and Counselor)

    2012-03-21

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. This video captures a session called 'Fireside Chat' that featured Steven Chu, the Secretary of Energy, and Bill Gates, Chairman of Microsoft Corporation. The session is moderated by John Podesta, Chair of the Center for American Progress. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Microsoft Founder and Chairman Bill Gates exchanged ideas about how small businesses and innovators can overcome the challenges that face many startups.

  18. Diffuse CO2 and H2S degassing from the summit crater of Pico do Fogo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionis, Samara; Melián, Gladys; Padrón, Eleazar; Bandomo, Zuleyka; Fernandes, Paulo; Silva, Sónia; Barrancos, Jose; Rodríguez, Fátima; Padilla, Germán; Nolasco, Dácil; Calvo, David; Hernández, Pedro A.; Pérez, Nemesio; Semedo, Helio; Gonzalves, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Pico do Fogo volcano is the youngest and most active volcano of the Cape Verde archipelago and rises over 2,800 m above sea level. It is located to the east of the Bordiera semicircular escarpment at Fogo Island and is capped by a 500-m-wide, 150-m-deep summit crater. Soil gas geochemical surveys in volcanic areas are useful tool to identify changes in volcanic activity related to magmatic processes. Among these studies, to monitor spatial and secular variations of soil CO2 and H2S effluxes pattern can provide important information about the state of activity of the volcanic system. CO2 has been one of the most studied gases in volcanic environments. Many studies have shown that significant amounts of CO2 are released to the atmosphere by quiescent volcanoes and geothermal systems through soil diffuse degassing. Since the emission rate of diffuse CO2 can increase dramatically prior to an eruption (e.g., Hernández et al. 2001a; Carapezza et al. 2004), efforts have to be made to obtain a CO2 flux baseline for a given volcanic system. However, and mainly due to analytical limitations, very few works on diffuse H2S emission have been carried out at volcanic-hydrothermal areas. With the aim of improving the geochemical surveillance program of Pico do Fogo, periodic soil degassing surveys have been performed at the summit crater of this volcano, focusing on the diffuse CO2 and H2S emissions. Temporal and spatial variations of CO2 and H2S efflux have been used to improve the knowledge about the degassing processed and their relationships with the volcanic activity. Each diffuse CO2 and H2S survey has been carried out following the accumulation chamber method at 40-65 sites homogeneously distributed at Pico do Fogo summit crater covering an area of about 0.142 km2. Soil CO2 and H2S efflux distribution maps were constructed following a Sequential Gaussian Simulation (sGs) in order to distinguish areas with anomalous CO2 and H2S emission rates and to compute the total gas

  19. High-altitude pulmonary edema among visitors to Summit County, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Sophocles, A M; Bachman, J

    1983-12-01

    Twenty-nine cases of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) affecting visitors to Summit County, Colorado, were analyzed. The mean age of the group was 37.8 years, and all the patients were male. These results differ from previous studies and suggest that there are two varieties of HAPE. The first type (type 1, or nonresident-ascent HAPE) affects visitors to altitudes above 8,000 ft (2,439 m). At altitudes up to 11,000 ft (3,354 m), it is a disease that affects primarily adult men. The second variety (type 2, or resident-reascent HAPE) affects residents of high altitudes when they descend to an elevation below 8,000 ft (2,430 m) and then return to high altitude. This type of HAPE affects male and female residents almost equally and is a disease of childhood and adolescence. PMID:6644250

  20. Measurements of near surface ozone at Summit, Greenland, using an automated moving inlet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, B. A.; Helmig, D.; Honrath, R. E.; Hueber, J.; Seok, B.; Kramer, L. J.; Toro, C.; Ganzeveld, L.

    2009-12-01

    A fast-response chemiluminescence ozone analyzer was used to measure ozone as a function of both height and time in the near surface atmosphere at Summit Camp, Greenland during the summer 2009 season. The sampling line inlet for this ozone analyzer was mounted on a unique motorized moving platform which continuously sampled vertical ozone profiles between approximately 0.02 to 2 meters above the snowpack. Measurement periods lasted between one and 24 hours. Ozone concentrations showed significant temporal and vertical variability. Various meteorological data as well as turbulence parameters derived from measurements by three sonic anemometers located on a nearby 10-m flux tower are utilized to show the dependence of ozone behavior on atmospheric stability regimes and exchanges at the snowpack surface.

  1. Summit-Watertown transmission line project, South Dakota. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) needs to rebuild the existing Summit-Watertown 115-kV transmission line, located in northeastern South Dakota, and western Minnesota. Nearly 60 percent of the existing facility was replaced in 1965 after severe ice-loading broke structures and wires. Because of the extensive loss of the line, surplus poles had to be used to replace the damaged H-frame structures. These were of varying sizes, causing improper structure loading. Additionally, the conductors and overhead shield wires have been spliced in numerous places. This provides additional space on these wires for icing and wind resistance, which in turn create problems for reliability. Finally, a progressive fungal condition has weakened the poles and, along with the improper loading, has created an unsafe condition for maintenance personnel and the general public.

  2. Disturbance of the Boundary Layer at Summit Station, Greenland by an Atmospheric River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, William; Shupe, Mathew; Ralph, Marty

    2014-05-01

    On 11 July 2012, a rare melt episode occurred at Summit Station Greenland. As described by Neff et al. 2014 (Submitted JGR), a major factor in this melt event was an Atmospheric River (AR), a narrow corridor of high water-vapor content. This AR transited the western Atlantic and theen moved up the west coast of Greenland and thence over Greenland. Back trajectories also indicated significant warm air advection from mid-North America during a major heat wave. We present here the boundary layer changes during this event using sodar to distinguish well-mixed from stable periods and relate these to changes in synoptic forcing and resulting changes in radiative forcing by low-level, shallow, warm clouds. A second near-melt episode also occurred on 29 July which provides an opportunity to compare and contrast boundary layer responses in the two cases.

  3. Mineralogy of three slightly palagonitized basaltic tephra samples from the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V.; Yang, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The paper characterizes the mineralogy and spectral properties of three slightly palagonitized basaltic tephra samples collected near the summit of Mauna Kea in order to contribute to the basis for inferring mineralogy and processes for Martian surface materials. The mineralogy of size fractions of these samples is examined by diffuse reflectance and FIR spectroscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, magnetic analysis, EMPA, TEM, and SEM. For the 20-1000 micron size fraction, sample HWMK11 (red) is essentially completely oxidized and has a hematite (Ti-hematite) pigment dispersed throughout the silicate matrix. Sample HWMK12 (black) has the lowest proportion of ferric-bearing phases and is thus least weathered. For HWMK11, the amount of hematite is essentially constant, and mica is present only in the coarse clay-sized fraction; smectites are low in structural Fe.

  4. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Secretary of Energy Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2012-02-28

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Dr. Steven Chu, Energy Secretary, gave the first keynote presentation of the day. He discusses how President Obama's 'all-of-the-above' approach to energy will help the Unites States solve 21st century global energy challenges and maintain its leadership as an exporter of energy technology. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu highlighted our vulnerability to price fluctuations in the fuel markets, most recently to oil and gasoline, as well as our inability to drill our way out of the problem. Secretary Chu made the case for leveraging energy innovation in order to reduce our exposure to oil price fluctuations and improve the U.S.'s economic competitiveness.

  5. Meeting Abstracts - Annual Meeting 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The AMCP Abstracts program provides a forum through which authors can share their insights and outcomes of advanced managed care practice through publication in AMCP's Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy (JMCP). Most of the reviewed and unreviewed abstracts are presented as posters so that interested AMCP meeting attendees can review findings and query authors. The Student/Resident/ Fellow poster presentation (unreviewed) is Wednesday, April 20, 2016, and the Professional poster presentation (reviewed) is Thursday, April 21. The Professional posters will also be displayed on Friday, April 22. The reviewed abstracts are published in the JMCP Meeting Abstracts supplement. The AMCP Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy Annual Meeting 2016 in San Francisco, California, is expected to attract more than 3,500 managed care pharmacists and other health care professionals who manage and evaluate drug therapies, develop and manage networks, and work with medical managers and information specialists to improve the care of all individuals enrolled in managed care programs. Abstracts were submitted in the following categories: Research Report: describe completed original research on managed care pharmacy services or health care interventions. Examples include (but are not limited to) observational studies using administrative claims, reports of the impact of unique benefit design strategies, and analyses of the effects of innovative administrative or clinical programs. Economic Model: describe models that predict the effect of various benefit design or clinical decisions on a population. For example, an economic model could be used to predict the budget impact of a new pharmaceutical product on a health care system. Solving Problems in Managed Care: describe the specific steps taken to introduce a needed change, develop and implement a new system or program, plan and organize an administrative function, or solve other types of problems in managed care settings. These

  6. Charlemagne's Summit Canal: An Early Medieval Hydro-Engineering Project for Passing the Central European Watershed

    PubMed Central

    Zielhofer, Christoph; Leitholdt, Eva; Werther, Lukas; Stele, Andreas; Bussmann, Jens; Linzen, Sven; Schneider, Michael; Meyer, Cornelius; Berg-Hobohm, Stefanie; Ettel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Central European Watershed divides the Rhine-Main catchment and the Danube catchment. In the Early Medieval period, when ships were important means of transportation, Charlemagne decided to link both catchments by the construction of a canal connecting the Schwabian Rezat and the Altmühl rivers. The artificial waterway would provide a continuous inland navigation route from the North Sea to the Black Sea. The shortcut is known as Fossa Carolina and represents one of the most important Early Medieval engineering achievements in Europe. Despite the important geostrategic relevance of the construction it is not clarified whether the canal was actually used as a navigation waterway. We present new geophysical data and in situ findings from the trench fills that prove for the first time a total length of the constructed Carolingian canal of at least 2300 metres. We have evidence for a conceptual width of the artificial water course between 5 and 6 metres and a water depth of at least 60 to 80 cm. This allows a crossing way passage of Carolingian cargo scows with a payload of several tons. There is strong evidence for clayey to silty layers in the trench fills which reveal suspension load limited stillwater deposition and, therefore, the evidence of former Carolingian and post-Carolingian ponds. These findings are strongly supported by numerous sapropel layers within the trench fills. Our results presented in this study indicate an extraordinarily advanced construction level of the known course of the canal. Here, the excavated levels of Carolingian trench bottoms were generally sufficient for the efficient construction of stepped ponds and prove a final concept for a summit canal. We have evidence for the artificial Carolingian dislocation of the watershed and assume a sophisticated Early Medieval hydrological engineering concept for supplying the summit of the canal with adequate water. PMID:25251589

  7. Science for Energy Technology: The Industry Perspective (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, Jeffrey; Carlson, David E.; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Hunt, Catherine T.

    2011-05-25

    A distinguished panel of industry leaders discussed how basic science impacts energy technology at the 2011 EFRC Summit. Panel members are Jeffrey Wadworth, President and CEO of Battelle Memorial Institute; David E. Carlson, the Chief Scientist for BP Solar; Yet-Ming Chiang, Professor at MIT and the founder of A123 Systems; and Catherine T. Hunt, the R&D Director of Innovation Sourcing and Sustainable Technologies at the Dow Chemical Company. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss 'Science for our Nation's Energy Future.' In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  8. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, C.; Bennartz, R.; Kulie, M. S.; Merrelli, A. J.; Shupe, M. D.; Turner, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive datasets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliments past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland from 2010-2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m-2 or less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. This measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the four years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.

  9. Science for Energy Technology: The Industry Perspective (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    ScienceCinema

    Wadsworth, Jeffrey (Battelle Memorial Institute); Carlson, David E. (BP Solar); Chiang, Yet-Ming (MIT and A123 Systems); Hunt, Catherine T. (Dow Chemical)

    2012-03-20

    A distinguished panel of industry leaders discussed how basic science impacts energy technology at the 2011 EFRC Summit. Panel members are Jeffrey Wadworth, President and CEO of Battelle Memorial Institute; David E. Carlson, the Chief Scientist for BP Solar; Yet-Ming Chiang, Professor at MIT and the founder of A123 Systems; and Catherine T. Hunt, the R&D Director of Innovation Sourcing and Sustainable Technologies at the Dow Chemical Company. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss 'Science for our Nation's Energy Future.' In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  10. The Thermal Circulation on Kilimanjaro, Tanzania and its Relevance to Summit Ice-Field Mass Balance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, N. C.; Duane, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    It is well known that mountains create their own climates. On Kilimanjaro, which is the tallest free standing mountain in Africa, the intense tropical sunlight generates a strong diurnal mountain circulation which transports moisture up the mountain during the day and back downslope at night. This process has strong consequences for development of cloud cover, precipitation, and hence ice-field mass balance on the summit crater. We compare surface climate (temperature, moisture and wind) measured at ten elevations on Kilimanjaro, with equivalent observations in the free atmosphere from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data for September 2004 to July 2008. There are no simple temporal trends over this period in either surface of free- air data. Correlations between daily surface and free air temperatures are greatest below 2500 metres, meaning that synoptic (inter-diurnal) variability is the major control here. In contrast, temperatures and moisture on the higher slopes above treeline (about 3000 m) are strongly decoupled from the free atmosphere, showing intense heating/cooling by day/night (more than 5°C). The sparsely vegetated upper slopes are the focus for the most intense heating and upslope winds develop by mid-morning. The forest on the lower slopes acts as a moisture source, with large vapour pressure excesses reported (5 mb) which move upslope reaching the crater in the afternoon before subsiding downslope at night. The montane thermal circulation is more effective at upslope moisture transport during January as compared with July. Fluctuations in upper air flow strength and direction (at 500 mb) surprisingly have limited influence on the strength of surface heating and upslope moisture advection. This finding suggests that local changes in surface characteristics such as deforestation could have a strong influence on the mountain climate and the summit ice fields on Kilimanjaro, and make mass-balance somewhat divorced from larger-scale advective changes associated

  11. Energy Frontier Research Centers: A View from Senior EFRC Representatives (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    SciTech Connect

    Drell, Persis; Armstrong, Neal; Carter, Emily; DePaolo, Don; Gunnoe, Brent

    2011-05-25

    A distinguished panel of scientists from the EFRC community provide their perspective on the importance of EFRCs for addressing critical energy needs at the 2011 EFRC Summit. Persis Drell, Director at SLAC, served as moderator. Panel members are Neal Armstrong (Director of the Center for Interface Science: Solar Electric Materials, led by the University of Arizona), Emily Carter (Co-Director of the Combustion EFRC, led by Princeton University. She is also Team Leader of the Heterogeneous Functional Materials Center, led by the University of South Caroline), Don DePaolo (Director of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2, led by LBNL), and Brent Gunnoe (Director of the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization, led by the University of Virginia). The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to

  12. Charlemagne's summit canal: an early medieval hydro-engineering project for passing the Central European Watershed.

    PubMed

    Zielhofer, Christoph; Leitholdt, Eva; Werther, Lukas; Stele, Andreas; Bussmann, Jens; Linzen, Sven; Schneider, Michael; Meyer, Cornelius; Berg-Hobohm, Stefanie; Ettel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Central European Watershed divides the Rhine-Main catchment and the Danube catchment. In the Early Medieval period, when ships were important means of transportation, Charlemagne decided to link both catchments by the construction of a canal connecting the Schwabian Rezat and the Altmühl rivers. The artificial waterway would provide a continuous inland navigation route from the North Sea to the Black Sea. The shortcut is known as Fossa Carolina and represents one of the most important Early Medieval engineering achievements in Europe. Despite the important geostrategic relevance of the construction it is not clarified whether the canal was actually used as a navigation waterway. We present new geophysical data and in situ findings from the trench fills that prove for the first time a total length of the constructed Carolingian canal of at least 2300 metres. We have evidence for a conceptual width of the artificial water course between 5 and 6 metres and a water depth of at least 60 to 80 cm. This allows a crossing way passage of Carolingian cargo scows with a payload of several tons. There is strong evidence for clayey to silty layers in the trench fills which reveal suspension load limited stillwater deposition and, therefore, the evidence of former Carolingian and post-Carolingian ponds. These findings are strongly supported by numerous sapropel layers within the trench fills. Our results presented in this study indicate an extraordinarily advanced construction level of the known course of the canal. Here, the excavated levels of Carolingian trench bottoms were generally sufficient for the efficient construction of stepped ponds and prove a final concept for a summit canal. We have evidence for the artificial Carolingian dislocation of the watershed and assume a sophisticated Early Medieval hydrological engineering concept for supplying the summit of the canal with adequate water. PMID:25251589

  13. Report of the Indo-US Health Care Summit 2009 - Mental Health Section

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangi, Anand K.; Desai, Nimesh G.

    2009-01-01

    The 2nd Indo-US Health Care Summit held in January 2009 was a forum to discuss collaboration between physicians in the US and India on medical education, health care services and research. Six specialties were represented including Mental Health (MH). Using Depression as the paradigmatic disorder, the following objectives were developed. Objective I – Leadership and Public Education: Linkage with like-minded agencies and organizations. The core message should be simple. Major Depression is a brain disorder. Depression is treatable. Timely treatment prevents disability and suicide. Objective II – Medical Education: To improve psychiatric education, it was proposed that (1) relations between US/UK and Indian mid-level institutions be established, (2) teaching methods such as tele-psychiatry and online courses be pursued, (3) use models of teaching excellence to arouse student interest, and (4) develop core curricula for other branches of medicine, and CME. Objective III - Reduce Complications of Depression (Suicide, Alcoholism): Goals include (1) decriminalizing attempted suicide, (2) improving reporting systems, and including depression, psychosis, alcoholism, and suicide in the national registry, (3) pilot studies in vulnerable groups on risk and interventions, and (4) education of colleagues on alcoholism as a link between psychiatric and medical disorders. Objective IV - Integrating MH Treatment & Primary Health Care: The focus should be on training of general practitioners in psychiatry. Available training modules including long distance learning modules to be suitably modified for India. Collaborations and specific project designs are to be developed, implemented and monitored by each specialty group and reviewed in future summits. PMID:20048457

  14. Energy Frontier Research Centers: A View from Senior EFRC Representatives (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    ScienceCinema

    Drell, Persis (SLAC); Armstrong, Neal (University of Arizona); Carter, Emily (Princeton University); DePaolo, Don (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory); Gunnoe, Brent (University of Virginia)

    2012-03-16

    A distinguished panel of scientists from the EFRC community provide their perspective on the importance of EFRCs for addressing critical energy needs at the 2011 EFRC Summit. Persis Drell, Director at SLAC, served as moderator. Panel members are Neal Armstrong (Director of the Center for Interface Science: Solar Electric Materials, led by the University of Arizona), Emily Carter (Co-Director of the Combustion EFRC, led by Princeton University. She is also Team Leader of the Heterogeneous Functional Materials Center, led by the University of South Caroline), Don DePaolo (Director of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2, led by LBNL), and Brent Gunnoe (Director of the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization, led by the University of Virginia). The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate

  15. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pettersen, Claire; Bennartz, Ralf; Kulie, Mark S.; Merrelli, Aronne J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.

    2016-04-15

    Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive data sets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliment past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high-frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland, from 2010 to 2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 gm–2 or less, themore » cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high-frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. As a result, this measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single-scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the 4 years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.« less

  16. Geologic history of the summit of Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, David A.; Dreyer, Brian M.; Paduan, Jennifer B.; Martin, Julie F.; Chadwick, William W.; Caress, David W.; Portner, Ryan A.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary L.; Thomas, Hans; Butterfield, David A.; Embley, Robert W.

    2013-10-01

    Multibeam (1 m resolution) and side scan data collected from an autonomous underwater vehicle, and lava samples, radiocarbon-dated sediment cores, and observations of flow contacts collected by remotely operated vehicle were combined to reconstruct the geologic history and flow emplacement processes on Axial Seamount's summit and upper rift zones. The maps show 52 post-410 CE lava flows and 20 precaldera lava flows as old as 31.2 kyr, the inferred age of the caldera. Clastic deposits 1-2 m thick accumulated on the rims postcaldera. Between 31 ka and 410 CE, there are no known lava flows near the summit. The oldest postcaldera lava (410 CE) is a pillow cone SE of the caldera. Two flows erupted on the W rim between ˜800 and 1000 CE. From 1220 to 1300 CE, generally small eruptions of plagioclase phyric, depleted, mafic lava occurred in the central caldera and on the east rim. Larger post-1400 CE eruptions produced inflated lobate flows of aphyric, less-depleted, and less mafic lava on the upper rift zones and in the N and S caldera. All caldera floor lava flows, and most uppermost rift zone flows, postdate 1220 CE. Activity shifted from the central caldera to the upper S rift outside the caldera, to the N rift and caldera floor, and then to the S caldera and uppermost S rift, where two historical eruptions occurred in 1998 and 2011. The average recurrence interval deduced from the flows erupted over the last 800 years is statistically identical to the 13 year interval between historical eruptions.

  17. Geologic history of the summit of Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, David A.; Dreyer, Brian M; Paduan, Jennifer B; Martin, Julie F; Chadwick, William W Jr; Caress, David W; Portner, Ryan A; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary; Thomas, Hans; Butterfield, David A; Embley, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam (1 m resolution) and side scan data collected from an autonomous underwater vehicle, and lava samples, radiocarbon-dated sediment cores, and observations of flow contacts collected by remotely operated vehicle were combined to reconstruct the geologic history and flow emplacement processes on Axial Seamount's summit and upper rift zones. The maps show 52 post-410 CE lava flows and 20 precaldera lava flows as old as 31.2 kyr, the inferred age of the caldera. Clastic deposits 1–2 m thick accumulated on the rims postcaldera. Between 31 ka and 410 CE, there are no known lava flows near the summit. The oldest postcaldera lava (410 CE) is a pillow cone SE of the caldera. Two flows erupted on the W rim between ∼800 and 1000 CE. From 1220 to 1300 CE, generally small eruptions of plagioclase phyric, depleted, mafic lava occurred in the central caldera and on the east rim. Larger post-1400 CE eruptions produced inflated lobate flows of aphyric, less-depleted, and less mafic lava on the upper rift zones and in the N and S caldera. All caldera floor lava flows, and most uppermost rift zone flows, postdate 1220 CE. Activity shifted from the central caldera to the upper S rift outside the caldera, to the N rift and caldera floor, and then to the S caldera and uppermost S rift, where two historical eruptions occurred in 1998 and 2011. The average recurrence interval deduced from the flows erupted over the last 800 years is statistically identical to the 13 year interval between historical eruptions.

  18. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of waters from fumaroles at Kilauea summit, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkley, T.K.; Quick, J.E.; Gregory, R.T.; Gerlach, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    Condensate samples were collected in 1992 from a high-temperature (300?? C) fumarole on the floor of the Halemaumau Pit Crater at Kilauea. The emergence about two years earlier of such a hot fumarole was unprecedented at such a central location at Kilauea. The condensates have hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions which indicate that the waters emitted by the fumarole are composed largely of meteoric water, that any magmatic water component must be minor, and that the precipitation that was the original source to the fumarole fell on a recharge area on the slopes of Mauna Loa Volcano to the west. However, the fumarole has no tritium, indicating that it taps a source of water that has been isolated from atmospheric water for at least 40 years. It is noteworthy, considering the unstable tectonic environment and abundant local rainfall of the Kilauea and Mauna Loa regions, that waters which are sources to the hot fumarole remain uncontaminated from atmospheric sources over such long times and long transport distances. As for the common, boiling point fumaroles of the Kilauea summit region, their 18O, D and tritium concentrations indicate that they are dominated by recycling of present day meteoric water. Though the waters of both hot and boiling point fumaroles have dominantly meteoric sources, they seem to be from separate hydrological regimes. Large concentrations of halogens and sulfur species in the condensates, together with the location at the center of the Kilauea summit region and the high temperature, initially suggested that much of the total mass of the emissions of the hot fumarole, including the H2O, might have come directly from a magma body. The results of the present study indicate that it is unreliable to infer a magmatic origin of volcanic waters based solely on halogen or sulfur contents, or other aspects of chemical composition of total condensates. ?? 1995 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Claire; Bennartz, Ralf; Kulie, Mark S.; Merrelli, Aronne J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.

    2016-04-01

    Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive data sets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliment past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high-frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland, from 2010 to 2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m-2 or less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high-frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. This measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single-scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the 4 years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.

  20. Isotopes of HNO3 in Air and Snow at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, J. C.; Hastings, M. G.; Steig, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    The ice core record of nitric acid (HNO3, or nitrate, NO3-), a final sink for atmospheric NO and NO2, potentially contains valuable information about past changes in our atmosphere. Through reactions with OH and ozone, NOx (NO and NO2) is closely linked to the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. However, the interpretation of nitrate ice core records is complicated by post-depositional processing of nitrate, whereby photolysis and volatilization can result in nitrate losses from the snow surface. Quantitatively understanding the air-to-snow transfer of nitric acid is a necessary step in unraveling ice core records of nitrate. We present isotopic measurements (15N/14N and 18O/16O) of HNO3 in air and snow from Summit, Greenland. Preliminary results show that the δ15N of HNO3 is similar in surface snow and in air sampled 1.5 meters above the snow surface. The δ18O of HNO3 is significantly higher in the surface snow versus the air samples. Previous studies of nitrate in precipitation have suggested that the δ15N of nitrate is influenced by sources of precursor NOx while the δ18O of nitrate is influenced by the chemical pathways of nitrate production. We discuss the possibility that the difference in δ18O between the air and snow samples may be an indication that the air samples contain nitrate that was photolyzed and recycled from the snow surface. The similarity between δ15N in air and snow samples suggests that, despite the possibility of nitrate recycling, there is no net loss of nitrate from the snow surface. The utility of comparisons between variations in the δ15N of nitrate and changes in the source regions of air masses reaching Summit will also be discussed.

  1. Meeting Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Aspaas, Per Pippin

    2013-06-01

    On 2-3 June 2012, the University of Tromsoe hosted a conference about the cultural and scientific history of the transits of Venus. The conference took place in Tromsoe for two very specific reasons. First and foremost, the last transit of Venus of this century lent itself to be observed on the disc of the Midnight Sun in this part of Europe during the night of 5 to 6 June 2012. Second, several Venus transit expeditions in this region were central in the global enterprise of measuring the scale of the solar system in the eighteenth century. The site of the conference was the Nordnorsk Vitensenter (Science Centre of Northern Norway), which is located at the campus of the University of Tromsoe. After the conference, participants were invited to either stay in Tromsoe until the midnight of 5-6 June, or take part in a Venus transit voyage in Finnmark, during which the historical sites Vardoe, Hammerfest, and the North Cape were to be visited. The post-conference program culminated with the participants observing the transit of Venus in or near Tromsoe, Vardoe and even from a plane near Alta. These Proceedings contain a selection of the lectures delivered on 2-3 June 2012, and also a narrative description of the transit viewing from Tromsoe, Vardoe and Alta. The title of the book, Meeting Venus, refers the title of a play by the Hungarian film director, screenwriter and opera director Istvan Szabo (1938-). The autobiographical movie Meeting Venus (1991) directed by him is based on his experience directing Tannhauser at the Paris Opera in 1984. The movie brings the story of an imaginary international opera company that encounters a never ending series of difficulties and pitfalls that symbolise the challenges of any multicultural and international endeavour. As is evident from the many papers presented in this book, Meeting Venus not only contains the epic tales of the transits of the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it also covers the conference

  2. SummitView 1.0: a code to automatically generate 3D solid models of surface micro-machining based MEMS designs.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Yarberry, Victor R.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes the SummitView 1.0 computer code developed at Sandia National Laboratories. SummitView is designed to generate a 3D solid model, amenable to visualization and meshing, that represents the end state of a microsystem fabrication process such as the SUMMiT (Sandia Ultra-Planar Multilevel MEMS Technology) V process. Functionally, SummitView performs essentially the same computational task as an earlier code called the 3D Geometry modeler [1]. However, because SummitView is based on 2D instead of 3D data structures and operations, it has significant speed and robustness advantages. As input it requires a definition of both the process itself and the collection of individual 2D masks created by the designer and associated with each of the process steps. The definition of the process is contained in a special process definition file [2] and the 2D masks are contained in MEM format files [3]. The code is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes represent the geometric data and the SUMMiT V process steps. Classes are provided for the following process steps: Planar Deposition, Planar Etch, Conformal Deposition, Dry Etch, Wet Etch and Release Etch. SummitView is built upon the 2D Boolean library GBL-2D [4], and thus contains all of that library's functionality.

  3. Hot Meetings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Mary

    2002-01-01

    A colleague walked by my office one time as I was conducting a meeting. There were about five or six members of my team present. The colleague, a man who had been with our institution (The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, a.k.a. APL) for many years, could not help eavesdropping. He said later it sounded like we we re having a raucous argument, and he wondered whether he should stand by the door in case things got out of hand and someone threw a punch. Our Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) team was a hot group, to invoke the language that is fashionable today, although we never thought of ourselves in those terms. It was just our modus operandi. The tenor of the discussion got loud and volatile at times, but I prefer to think of it as animated, robust, or just plain collaborative. Mary Chiu and her "hot" team from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory built the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft for NASA. Instruments on the spacecraft continue to collect data that inform us about what's happening on our most important star, the Sun.

  4. The National Football League: cerebral concussion, peer-review, and the oath of Hippocrates: keynote address--NFL concussion summit, Chicago 2007.

    PubMed

    Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2008-01-01

    The following comments convey the assembled keynote points made at a summit called by Commissioner Roger Goodell involving all leading medical personnel in the National Football League, outside experts and players union representatives. PMID:18300908

  5. Summit CO2 emission rates by the CO2/SO2 ratio method at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, during a period of sustained inflation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hager, S.A.; Gerlach, T.M.; Wallace, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    The emission rate of carbon dioxide escaping from the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, proved highly variable, averaging 4900 ± 2000 metric tons per day (t/d) in June–July 2003 during a period of summit inflation. These results were obtained by combining over 90 measurements of COSPEC-derived SO2emission rates with synchronous CO2/SO2 ratios of the volcanic gas plume along the summit COSPEC traverse. The results are lower than the CO2 emission rate of 8500 ± 300 t/d measured by the same method in 1995–1999 during a period of long-term summit deflation [Gerlach, T.M., McGee, K.A., Elias, T., Sutton, A.J. and Doukas, M.P., 2002. Carbon dioxide emission rate of Kīlauea Volcano: Implications for primary magma and the summit reservoir. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, 107(B9): art. no.-2189.]. Analysis of the data indicates that the emission rates of the present study likely reflect changes in the magma supply rate and residence time in the summit reservoir. It is also likely that emission rates during the inflation period were heavily influenced by SO2 pulses emitted adjacent to the COSPEC traverse, which biased CO2/SO2 ratios towards low values that may be unrepresentative of the global summit gas plume. We conclude that the SO2 pulses are consequences of summit re-inflation under way since 2003 and that CO2 emission rates remain comparable to, but more variable than, those measured prior to re-inflation.

  6. Seasonal Aerosol Distributions at Summit, Greenland: EC, OC, 14C and Individual Particle Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klouda, G. A.; Conny, J. M.; McNichol, A. P.; Dibb, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol is known to affect the Earth's atmosphere and surface albedo thus having an influence on climate. In the case of carbonaceous aerosol, organic carbon (OC) tends to scatter sunlight while elemental (soot) carbon (EC) aerosol absorbs light. Considering the importance of these aerosols on snow and ice albedo (Hansen and Nazarenko, 2004), PM2.5, PM2.5-10 and snow-melt filters were collected weekly at Summit, Greenland from August 2000 to August 2002 to measure particulate EC, OC, and 14C of total carbon; the latter to quantify natural and anthropogenic source contributions. The pattern of PM2.5 shows a spring-summer maxima in EC (~10 ng m-3) and OC (~ 100 ng m-3); with levels consistent with summer 2006 measurements reported by Hagler et al. (2007). For a subset of filters over the two year period, the average biogenic contribution to PM2.5 OC was estimated to be 20 ng m-3 considering an average percent modern carbon of 46 % (SD=18 %; n=21) and an average total carbon concentration of 50 ng m-3. A summer maximum was observed in PM2.5-10 OC (~ 1000 ng m-3), while for the most part EC concentrations were below detection (< 300 ng m-3; limited primarily by the volume of air sampled). To provide insight into scattering and absorption properties of aerosols at Summit, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate the size, shape, and chemistry of particle populations as well as individual particles from selected filters. Particles were migrated from the filters to polished silicon or germanium wafers using an electrostatically-assisted centrifugation technique. Particle populations were studied by employing secondary electron imaging and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) with automated SEM and associated particle analysis software. The size, shape, and composition of individual particles were studied with field-emission SEM employing secondary and backscatter electron imaging, bright-field and dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy

  7. First Measurements of Osmium Concentration and Isotopic Composition in a Summit, Greenland Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterberg, E. C.; Sharma, M.; Hawley, R. L.; Courville, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Osmium (Os) is one of the rarer elements in the environment and therefore one of the most difficult to accurately measure, but its isotopically distinctive crustal, mantle-derived, and extra-terrestrial sources make it a valuable geochemical tracer. Recent state-of-the-art analyses of precipitation, river water, and ocean water samples from around the world have revealed elevated concentrations of Os with a characteristically low (unradiogenic) Os isotopic signature (187Os/188Os). This unusual low Os isotopic signal has been interpreted as evidence for widespread Os pollution due to the smelting of Platinum Group Element (PGE) sulfide ores for use in automobile catalytic converters. However, an environmental time series of Os concentrations and isotopic composition spanning the pre-industrial to modern era has not previously been developed to evaluate changes in atmospheric Os sources through time. Here we present the first measurements of Os concentration and isotopic composition (to our knowledge) in a 100 m-long ice core collected from Summit, Greenland, spanning from ca. 1700 to 2010 AD. Due to the extremely low Os concentrations in snow (10-15 g/g), these analyses have only recently become possible with advances in Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) and ultra-clean analytical procedures. Initial results indicate that the 187Os/188Os of Greenland snow was unradiogenic (187Os/188Os = 0.13-0.15) for at least several periods over the past 300 years, including both pre-anthropogenic and modern times. Os concentrations in the Summit ice core are relatively high (11-52 pg/kg) compared to previously measured precipitation in North America, Europe, Asia and Antarctic sea ice (0.35-23 pg/kg). The low (unradiogenic) isotopic composition are consistent with extraterrestrial (cosmic dust and meteorites; 187Os/188Os = 0.13) and possibly volcanic (187Os/188Os = 0.15-0.6) Os sources, although the Os isotopic composition of volcanic emissions is poorly constrained

  8. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the eruptive history of Mount Erebus, Antarctica: Summit flows, tephra, and caldera collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harpel, C.J.; Kyle, P.R.; Esser, R.P.; McIntosh, W.C.; Caldwell, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Eruptive activity has occurred in the summit region of Mount Erebus over the last 95 ky, and has included numerous lava flows and small explosive eruptions, at least one plinian eruption, and at least one and probably two caldera-forming events. Furnace and laser step-heating 40Ar/39Ar ages have been determined for 16 summit lava flows and three englacial tephra layers erupted from Mount Erebus. The summit region is composed of at least one or possibly two superimposed calderas that have been filled by post-caldera lava flows ranging in age from 17 ?? 8 to 1 ?? 5 ka. Dated pre-caldera summit flows display two age populations at 95 ?? 9 to 76 ?? 4 ka and 27 ?? 3 to 21 ??4 ka of samples with tephriphonolite and phonolite compositions, respectively. A caldera-collapse event occurred between 25 and 11 ka. An older caldera-collapse event is likely to have occurred between 80 and 24 ka. Two englacial tephra layers from the flanks of Mount Erebus have been dated at 71 ?? 5 and 15 ?? 4 ka. These layers stratigraphically bracket 14 undated tephra layers, and predate 19 undated tephra layers, indicating that small-scale explosive activity has occurred throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene eruptive history of Mount Erebus. A distal, englacial plinian-fall tephra sample has an age of 39 ?? 6 ka and may have been associated with the older of the two caldera-collapse events. A shift in magma composition from tephriphonolite to phonolite occurred at around 36 ka. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  9. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the eruptive history of Mount Erebus, Antarctica: summit flows, tephra, and caldera collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpel, Christopher J.; Kyle, Philip R.; Esser, Richard P.; McIntosh, William C.; Caldwell, David A.

    2004-12-01

    Eruptive activity has occurred in the summit region of Mount Erebus over the last 95 ky, and has included numerous lava flows and small explosive eruptions, at least one plinian eruption, and at least one and probably two caldera-forming events. Furnace and laser step-heating 40Ar/39Ar ages have been determined for 16 summit lava flows and three englacial tephra layers erupted from Mount Erebus. The summit region is composed of at least one or possibly two superimposed calderas that have been filled by post-caldera lava flows ranging in age from 17 ± 8 to 1 ± 5 ka. Dated pre-caldera summit flows display two age populations at 95 ± 9 to 76 ± 4 ka and 27 ± 3 to 21 ± 4 ka of samples with tephriphonolite and phonolite compositions, respectively. A caldera-collapse event occurred between 25 and 11 ka. An older caldera-collapse event is likely to have occurred between 80 and 24 ka. Two englacial tephra layers from the flanks of Mount Erebus have been dated at 71 ± 5 and 15 ± 4 ka. These layers stratigraphically bracket 14 undated tephra layers, and predate 19 undated tephra layers, indicating that small-scale explosive activity has occurred throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene eruptive history of Mount Erebus. A distal, englacial plinian-fall tephra sample has an age of 39 ± 6 ka and may have been associated with the older of the two caldera-collapse events. A shift in magma composition from tephriphonolite to phonolite occurred at around 36 ka.

  10. Anomalous occurrence of uranium in alpine peats, Summit County, Colorado, and results of a simple sample fractionation procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leventhal, Joel S.; Jennings, Joan K.; Lemke, Alan J.

    1978-01-01

    Samples from Summit County, Colo., were fractionated for analyses of organic content and uranium. The uranium is related to organic content but not to type of organic matter. In one area uranium values are around 100 ppm in bulk samples and as much as 200 ppm in certain separated fractions of the samples; this is much higher than the 1-10 ppm normal uranium values for peat.

  11. 75 FR 22100 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... the Federal Register on April 13, 2010 (75 FR 18781). At the Board meeting scheduled on the afternoon... meetings and public hearing. Persons attending Board meetings are requested to refrain from using...

  12. 75 FR 80455 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ...; ] ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings...

  13. Formation of left-lateral fractures within the Summit Ridge shear zone, 1989 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.; Fleming, R.W. |

    1993-12-01

    The 1989 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake is characterized by the lack of major, throughgoing, coseismic, right-lateral faulting along strands of the San Andreas fault zone in the epicentral area. Instead, throughout the Summit Ridge area there are zones of tension cracks and left-lateral fracture zones oriented about N45 deg W, that is, roughly parallel to the San Andreas fault in this area. The left-lateral fractures zones are enigmatic because their left-lateral slip is opposite to the right-lateral sense of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. We suggest that the enigmatic fractures can be understood if we assume that coesiesmic deformation was by right-lateral shear across a broad zone, about 0.5 km wide and 4 km long, beneath Summit Ridge. Contrary to most previous reports on the Loma Prieta earthquake, which assert that coseismic, right-lateral ground rupture was restricted to considerable (greater than 4 km) depths in the epicentral area, we find that nearly all the right-lateral offset is represented at the ground surface by the Summit Ridge shear zone.

  14. The National LGBT Cancer Action Plan: A White Paper of the 2014 National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities

    PubMed Central

    Margolies, Liz; Sigurdsson, Hrafn Oli; Walland, Jonathan; Radix, Asa; Rice, David; Buchting, Francisco O.; Sanchez, Nelson F.; Bare, Michael G.; Boehmer, Ulrike; Cahill, Sean; Griebling, Tomas L.; Bruessow, Diane; Maingi, Shail

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite growing social acceptance of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender (LGBT) persons and the extension of marriage rights for same-sex couples, LGBT persons experience stigma and discrimination, including within the healthcare system. Each population within the LGBT umbrella term is likely at elevated risk for cancer due to prevalent, significant cancer risk factors, such as tobacco use and human immunodeficiency virus infection; however, cancer incidence and mortality data among LGBT persons are lacking. This absence of cancer incidence data impedes research and policy development, LGBT communities' awareness and activation, and interventions to address cancer disparities. In this context, in 2014, a 2-day National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities was convened by a planning committee for the purpose of accelerating progress in identifying and addressing the LGBT communities' concerns and needs in the spheres of cancer research, clinical cancer care, healthcare policy, and advocacy for cancer survivorship and LGBT health equity. Summit participants were 56 invited persons from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada, representatives of diverse identities, experiences, and knowledge about LGBT communities and cancer. Participants shared lessons learned and identified gaps and remedies regarding LGBT cancer concerns across the cancer care continuum from prevention to survivorship. This white paper presents background on each of the Summit themes and 16 recommendations covering the following: sexual orientation and gender identity data collection in national and state health surveys and research on LGBT communities and cancer, the clinical care of LGBT persons, and the education and training of healthcare providers.

  15. Transplantation in end-stage pulmonary hypertension (Third International Right Heart Failure Summit, part 3).

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha

    2014-12-01

    The Third International Right Heart Summit was organized for the purpose of bringing an interdisciplinary group of expert physician-scientists together to promote dialogue involving emerging concepts in the unique pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, and therapies of pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and right heart failure (RHF). This review summarizes key ideas addressed in the section of the seminar entitled "Transplantation in End-Stage Pulmonary Hypertension." The first segment focused on paradigms of recovery for the failing right ventricle (RV) within the context of lung-alone versus dual-organ heart-lung transplantation. The subsequent 2-part section was devoted to emerging concepts in RV salvage therapy. A presentation of evolving cell-based therapy for the reparation of diseased tissue was followed by a contemporary perspective on the role of mechanical circulatory support in the setting of RV failure. The final talk highlighted cutting-edge research models utilizing stem cell biology to repair diseased tissue in end-stage lung disease-a conceptual framework within which new therapies for PVD have potential to evolve. Together, these provocative talks provided a novel outlook on how the treatment of PVD and RHF can be approached. PMID:25610607

  16. Transplantation in end-stage pulmonary hypertension (Third International Right Heart Failure Summit, part 3)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Third International Right Heart Summit was organized for the purpose of bringing an interdisciplinary group of expert physician-scientists together to promote dialogue involving emerging concepts in the unique pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, and therapies of pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and right heart failure (RHF). This review summarizes key ideas addressed in the section of the seminar entitled “Transplantation in End-Stage Pulmonary Hypertension.” The first segment focused on paradigms of recovery for the failing right ventricle (RV) within the context of lung-alone versus dual-organ heart-lung transplantation. The subsequent 2-part section was devoted to emerging concepts in RV salvage therapy. A presentation of evolving cell-based therapy for the reparation of diseased tissue was followed by a contemporary perspective on the role of mechanical circulatory support in the setting of RV failure. The final talk highlighted cutting-edge research models utilizing stem cell biology to repair diseased tissue in end-stage lung disease—a conceptual framework within which new therapies for PVD have potential to evolve. Together, these provocative talks provided a novel outlook on how the treatment of PVD and RHF can be approached. PMID:25610607

  17. Nuclear Energy And The Implications Of The UN World Summit On Sustainable Development

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, Eric Paul; Schutz, Donald

    2003-03-01

    The 2002 United Nations World Summit On Sustainable Development (WSSD) at Johannesburg, South Africa wrought in significant turn-around on attitudes toward energy as the delegates came to recognize that energy is at the heart of sustainable development. As history demonstrates, developing countries will not suppress their need to convert environmental resources into energy to generate economic growth. Nations require the capability to generate local and regional incomes, not “transfer wealth” if they are to develop. And the WSSD also brought acknowledgement that developing countries cannot be expected to invest in expensive efforts to curb their production of greenhouse gasses. When the need for energy gained WSSD recognition, the European Union intensified their demand for renewable energy targets. Such targets quickly became a stumbling block for energy negotiations as the developed countries recognized that most of the challenge would fall upon them. The U.S. target, for instance, would require that 12% of all U.S. energy be generated by renewables by the year 2012.

  18. Proceedings of the Summit on Environmental Challenges to Reproductive Health and Fertility: Executive Summary

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Tracey J.; Carlson, Alison; Schwartz, Jackie M.; Giudice, Linda C.

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 Summit on “Environmental Challenges to Reproductive Health and Fertility” convened scientists, health care professionals, community groups, political representatives and the media to hear presentations on the impact of environmental contaminants on reproductive health and fertility and to discuss opportunities to improve health through research, education, communication and policy. Environmental reproductive health focuses on exposures to environmental contaminants, particularly during critical periods of development, and their potential effects on future reproductive health, including conception, fertility, pregnancy, adolescent development and adult health. Approximately 87,000 chemical substances are registered for use in commerce in the US, with ubiquitous human exposures to environmental contaminants in air, water, food and consumer products. Exposures during critical windows of susceptibility may result in adverse effects with lifelong and even intergenerational health impacts. Effects can include impaired development and function of the reproductive tract and permanently altered gene expression, leading to metabolic and hormonal disorders, reduced fertility and fecundity and illnesses such as testicular, prostate, uterine and cervical cancers later in life. This executive summary reviews effects of pre- and post-natal exposures on male and female reproductive health and provides a series of recommendations for advancing the field in the areas of research, policy, health care and community action. PMID:18275883

  19. Core Competencies for Pain Management: Results of an Interprofessional Consensus Summit

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Scott M; Young, Heather M; Lucas Arwood, Ellyn; Chou, Roger; Herr, Keela; Murinson, Beth B; Watt-Watson, Judy; Carr, Daniel B; Gordon, Debra B; Stevens, Bonnie J; Bakerjian, Debra; Ballantyne, Jane C; Courtenay, Molly; Djukic, Maja; Koebner, Ian J; Mongoven, Jennifer M; Paice, Judith A; Prasad, Ravi; Singh, Naileshni; Sluka, Kathleen A; St Marie, Barbara; Strassels, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this project was to develop core competencies in pain assessment and management for prelicensure health professional education. Such core pain competencies common to all prelicensure health professionals have not been previously reported. Methods An interprofessional executive committee led a consensus-building process to develop the core competencies. An in-depth literature review was conducted followed by engagement of an interprofessional Competency Advisory Committee to critique competencies through an iterative process. A 2-day summit was held so that consensus could be reached. Results The consensus-derived competencies were categorized within four domains: multidimensional nature of pain, pain assessment and measurement, management of pain, and context of pain management. These domains address the fundamental concepts and complexity of pain; how pain is observed and assessed; collaborative approaches to treatment options; and application of competencies across the life span in the context of various settings, populations, and care team models. A set of values and guiding principles are embedded within each domain. Conclusions These competencies can serve as a foundation for developing, defining, and revising curricula and as a resource for the creation of learning activities across health professions designed to advance care that effectively responds to pain. PMID:23577878

  20. Molybdenum and Uranium from Remote Continental Origin at Pico Summit, Pico Island, Azores, Portugal

    SciTech Connect

    Carmo Freitas, Maria do; Pacheco, Adriano M. G.; Tuncel, Guerdal

    2008-08-07

    The present study looks into aerosols collected by a land-based, seven-wavelength Aethalometer, from the lower-free troposphere close to the summit of the Pico mountain (top height: 2351 m; sampling height: 2225 m), in Pico island, Azores, Portugal. Following suitable handling and preparation procedures, all samples were put through instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA; k{sub 0}-variant) for elemental assessment. Archival data have been used as an input to the HYSPLIT model (courtesy of NOAA ARL READY Website) for computing isentropic, backward trajectories of air masses reaching the Pico atmosphere. The results point to significant enrichments of molybdenum and uranium in high-altitude aerosols, especially in the summer samples. A local origin for either element is most unlikely though: Pico is a rural island, and there are no comparable records from low-altitude stations in the Azores at large. On the contrary, long-range transport from remote sources in continental areas--Europe and North-Central America--is rather compatible with the synoptic, elemental pathways converging over the Pico observatory for the period under study.

  1. Chemical sensors for breath gas analysis: the latest developments at the Breath Analysis Summit 2013.

    PubMed

    Tisch, Ulrike; Haick, Hossam

    2014-06-01

    Profiling the body chemistry by means of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the breath opens exciting new avenues in medical diagnostics. Gas sensors could provide ideal platforms for realizing portable, hand-held breath testing devices in the near future. This review summarizes the latest developments and applications in the field of chemical sensors for diagnostic breath testing that were presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2013 in Wallerfangen, Germany. Considerable progress has been made towards clinically applicable breath testing devices, especially by utilizing chemo-sensitive nanomaterials. Examples of several specialized breath testing applications are presented that are either based on stand-alone nanomaterial-based sensors being highly sensitive and specific to individual breath compounds over others, or on combinations of several highly specific sensors, or on experimental nanomaterial-based sensors arrays. Other interesting approaches include the adaption of a commercially available MOx-based sensor array to indirect breath testing applications, using a sample pre-concentration method, and the development of compact integrated GC-sensor systems. The recent trend towards device integration has led to the development of fully integrated prototypes of point-of-care devices. We describe and compare the performance of several prototypes that are based on different sensing technologies and evaluate their potential as low-cost and readily available next-generation medical devices. PMID:24682160

  2. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-232-1948, Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Blade, L.M.; Savery, H.

    1989-02-01

    A study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania. The request concerned potential exposure of dock workers to exhaust emissions from diesel-powered forklift trucks brought about by the health complaints of several of the workers there. Twenty-one workers were identified as symptomatic of exposure to diesel exhaust fumes. This included at least half of the midnight shift. Upper respiratory tract irritation was mentioned by all of these workers. Some reported eye irritation, cough productive of black-tinged sputum, and sore throat. These symptoms lessened during periods away from work. Airborne concentrations of all components measured at the site were well below the applicable exposure limits. A potential health hazard associated with exposure to diesel engine exhaust existed. The authors recommend that whenever a forklift truck is to be left unattended for more than the shortest of periods, the motor should be turned off. The newer forklifts should be used on a shift before the older, less emission controlled, lifts. Roof exhaust fans ordered are to be installed at the facility and their effectiveness evaluated.

  3. Identifying Ice Hydrometeor Signatures Above Summit, Greenland Using a Multi-Instrument Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, C.; Bennartz, R.; Kulie, M.; Merrelli, A. J.; Shupe, M.; Turner, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers are commonly used to retrieve precipitable water vapor and liquid water path. These retrievals, however, may be adversely affected by ice hydrometeors, especially during ice precipitation events, which can be observed in mixed phase clouds. We establish that ice hydrometeors produce enhanced brightness temperatures in high frequency ground-based passive microwave observations. This effect is evident in several years of summer season microwave radiometer data collected at Summit Station, Greenland. Using a multi-instrument suite and coupling measurements with well-established gas and liquid absorption models, we can quantify the ice hydrometeor signature. Better knowledge of these ice effects on the passive microwave observations aids in improvement of retrieved properties, such as liquid water path, when ice is present in the column. Additionally, the use of the active cloud radar guides what regimes exhibit predominately ice precipitation. By clearly identifying the ice signature in the high frequency microwave, we establish a unique platform that can be used to assess ice habit models and particle size distributions for Arctic environments.

  4. Solar irradiance observed at Summit, Greenland: Possible links to magnetic activity on short timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, John E.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of ground-level visible sunlight (400-600 nm) from Summit, Greenland over the period August 2004 through October 2014 define the attenuation provided by cloudiness, including its dependence on solar elevation and season. The long-term mean cloud-attenuation increases with increasing solar zenith angle, consistent with radiative transfer calculations which treat a cloud as a plane parallel layer with a strong bias toward forward scattering and an albedo for diffuse radiation near 0.1. The ratio of measured irradiance to clear-sky irradiance for solar zenith angles greater than 66° has a small, but statistically significant, positive correlation with the previous day's magnetic activity as measured by the daily Ap index, but no clear relationship exists between the irradiance ratio and daily changes in the ground-level neutron flux measured at Thule over the time frame considered. A high value of Ap on one day tends to be followed by a day whose ground-level solar irradiance is slightly greater than would occur otherwise. In an average sense, the visible irradiance following a day with Ap>16 exceeds that following a day with Ap≤16 by 1.2-1.3% with a 95% confidence range of approximately ±1.0%. The results are broadly compatible with small changes in atmospheric scattering following magnetic disturbances.

  5. Molybdenum and Uranium from Remote Continental Origin at Pico Summit, Pico Island, Azores, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Maria do Carmo; Pacheco, Adriano M. G.; Tuncel, Gürdal

    2008-08-01

    The present study looks into aerosols collected by a land-based, seven-wavelength Aethalometer, from the lower-free troposphere close to the summit of the Pico mountain (top height: 2351 m; sampling height: 2225 m), in Pico island, Azores, Portugal. Following suitable handling and preparation procedures, all samples were put through instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA; k0-variant) for elemental assessment. Archival data have been used as an input to the HYSPLIT model (courtesy of NOAA ARL READY Website) for computing isentropic, backward trajectories of air masses reaching the Pico atmosphere. The results point to significant enrichments of molybdenum and uranium in high-altitude aerosols, especially in the summer samples. A local origin for either element is most unlikely though: Pico is a rural island, and there are no comparable records from low-altitude stations in the Azores at large. On the contrary, long-range transport from remote sources in continental areas—Europe and North-Central America—is rather compatible with the synoptic, elemental pathways converging over the Pico observatory for the period under study.

  6. Gold gradients and anomalies in the Pedro Dome-Cleary Summit area, Fairbanks district, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forbes, Robert B.; Pilkington, H.D.; Hawkins, D.B.

    1968-01-01

    Anomalous gold values have been discovered in hydrothermally altered quartz diorite, quartz monzonite, and quartz mica schist at the head of Fox Creek; and in similarly altered quartz diorite in the Granite Creek area. Channel samples across some of these altered zones have produced anomalous gold values over widths which merit further investigation as potential large tonnage low-grade gold deposits. Trace gold gradients have also been detected in the wall rocks adjacent to mineralized veins and in hydrothermal alteration zones in the Pedro Dome-Cleary Summit area. Although most of the gradients may not materially increase the mineable width of the deposit under current economic conditions, such gradients can be used to locate auriferous quartz veins and altered zones by geochemical methods. Gold enrichment is accompanied by anomalous concentrations of arsenic and antimony, and gold bearing quartz veins and altered zones are frequently signaled by peripheral haloes of these metals before trace gold is detectable. Hydrothermally altered and/or sheared zones in both granitic and metamorphic rocks should be carefully prospected, along the trend of the Cleary Antiform.

  7. Nitrate Deposition to Surface Snow at Summit, Greenland, Following the 9 November 2000 Solar Proton Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duderstadt, Katharine A.; Dibb, Jack E.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Spence, Harlan E.; Jackman, Charles Herbert; Randall, Cora E.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Mills, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This study considers whether spurious peaks in nitrate ions in snow sampled at Summit, Greenland from August 2000 to August 2002 are related to solar proton events. After identifying tropospheric sources of nitrate on the basis of correlations with sulfate, ammonium, sodium, and calcium, we use the three-dimensional global Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to examine unaccounted for nitrate spikes. Model calculations confirm that solar proton events significantly impact HOx, NOx, and O3 levels in the mesosphere and stratosphere during the weeks and months following the major 9 November 2000 solar proton event. However, SPE-enhanced NOy calculated within the atmospheric column is too small to account for the observed nitrate ion peaks in surface snow. Instead, our WACCM results suggest that nitrate spikes not readily accounted for by measurement correlations are likely of anthropogenic origin. These results, consistent with other recent studies, imply that nitrate spikes in ice cores are not suitable proxies for individual SPEs and motivate the need to identify alternative proxies.

  8. Subsurface structure of the north Summit gas field, Chestnut Ridge anticline of the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, G.; Shumaker, R.C.; Staub, W.K.

    1996-09-01

    The Chestnut Ridge anticline is the westernmost of the High Plateau folds in southwestern Pennsylvania and north-central West Virginia that are detached primarily in the Marcellus Shale, and the Martinsburg, Salina, and Rome Formations. The primary, basal detachment at the Summit field occurs in the Salina salt. Production from fracture porosity in the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone commenced in 1936. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, 14 wells were drilled preparatory to conversion of the reservoir to gas storage. Schlumberger`s Formation MicroScanner (FMS) logs were run in each of these wells to provide information on the structural configuration and fracture patterns of the reservoir. These data indicate that two inward-facing, tight folds at the Oriskany level form the upper flanks and core of the anticline at the northern end of the field, whereas the main part of the field to the south is a comparatively simple, broad closure at the Oriskany level. The structure is a broad, slightly asymmetric open fold in the Mississippian Greenbrier Formation at the surface. Fracture patterns mapped using FMS logs indicate a complex fracture system which varies slightly along the trend of the fold and among the units analyzed, including the Helderberg Formation, Huntersville Chert, Oriskany Sandstone, and Onondaga Formation. An orthogonal joint system strikes toward the northwest and northeast slightly askew to the trend of the fold`s crestal trace. A similar, but more complex fracture pattern is found in an oriented core of these units.

  9. Cosmogenic 3He in terrestrial rocks: The summit lavas of Maui

    PubMed Central

    Craig, H.; Poreda, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    We have identified terrestrial cosmic rayproduced 3He in three lava flows on the crest of Haleakala Volcano on Maui, 3 km above sea level, and ≈0.5 million years old. Although these lavas, like all oceanic basalts, contain primordial 3He from the mantle, the “cosmogenic” component (3HeC) can be identified unambiguously because it is extractable only by high-temperature vacuum fusion. In contrast, a large fraction of the mantle helium resides in fluid inclusions and can be extracted by vacuum crushing, leaving a residual component with 3He/4He ratios as high as 75× those in the atmosphere, which can be liberated by melting the crushed grains. Cosmogenic 3He is present in both olivines and clinopyroxenes at 0.8-1.2 × 10-12 ml(STP)/g and constitutes 75% ± 5% of the total 3He present. The observed 3HeC levels require a cosmic ray exposure age of only some 64,000 years, much less than the actual age of the lavas, if there is no erosion. Using a model that includes effects of uplift or submergence as well as erosion, we calculate an apparent “erosion rate” of the order of 8.5 m/106 years for the western rim of the summit crater, as an example of the application of measurements of cosmogenic rare gases to terrestrial geological problems. PMID:16593671

  10. Occurrence, transport, and fate of trace elements, Blue River Basin, Summit County, Colorado: an integrated approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.; Driver, N.E.; Bails, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Mining activities in the Blue River Basin, Summit County, Colorado, have affected the trace-element chemistry and biota along French Gulch and the Blue River. Elevated concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn were present in the bed and suspended sediments. Bed sediment trace-element concentrations were high in the streams in and near mining activities in the basin and remained high as water flowed into Dillon Reservoir about 3.5 km downstream. Bed-sediment (< 63 μm) data were useful in assessing the distribution of trace elements in the basin. Suspended-sediment measurements provided information as to the transport of the trace elements. Filtered (< 0.45 μm) water-column trace-element concentrations were orders of magnitude less than the sediment concentrations. Concentrations of Cd and Zn in the water column at some sites exceeded stream water-quality standards. Elevated trace-element concentrations in the sediment and water column are a source of contamination and must be considered in water-quality management of the Blue River Basin.

  11. SERI results from the PEP 1987 Summit Round Robin and a comparison of photovoltaic calibration methods

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.A.; Waddington, D.; Rummel, S.; Myers, D.R.; Stoffel, T.L.; Osterwald, C.R.

    1989-03-01

    The SERI results for the Photovoltaic Solar Energy Project (PEP) 1987 summit round robin are presented and the proposed International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) technical committee TC82 global calibration method is evaluated in this report. The global calibration method has a +-4% uncertainty in the short-circuit current (I/sub sc/) including random and nonrandom error sources. This uncertainty can be reduced +-3% if the global normal method is used and the direct component of the total irradiance is measured with a primary absolute cavity radiometer. Nearly half of the uncertainty for various primary and secondary PV calibration methods is nonrandom. If a +-4% uncertainty in I/sub sc/ under standard reporting conditions is acceptable, then the global calibration method with spectral corrections is suitable for cells or modules. If a primary reference device with an uncertainty less than +-3% is required, then the global method is unsuitable. The SERI primary direct normal calibration method has a +-1% uncertainty in I/sub sc/ as verified by comparison with primary AMO cells. If a +-1% primary reference cell is used for secondary calibrations, then a +-2% uncertainty could be achieved for reference cells or modules. 37 refs., 29 figs., 42 tabs.

  12. Geothermal Disruption of Summit Glaciers at Mount Spurr Volcano, 2004-6: An Unusual Manifestation of Volcanic Unrest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, Michelle L.; Neal, Christina A.; Wessels, Rick L.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    Mount Spurr, a 3,374-m-high stratovolcano in the Cook Inlet region of Alaska, showed signs of volcanic unrest beginning in 2004 and lasting through 2006. These signs included increases in heat flow, seismicity, and gas flux, which we interpret as the results of a magmatic intrusion in mid-2004. In response, debris-laden meltwater beneath the glacier in Mount Spurr's geothermally active summit basin accumulated as the overlying snow and ice melted. As heat output increased, the icecap subsided into a growing cavity over a meltwater lake, similar to that observed during subglacial volcanic activity in Iceland. An ice plug collapsed into the lake sometime between June 20 and July 8, 2004, forming an ice cauldron that continued to grow in diameter during 2004 and 2005. A freefall of ice and snow into the lake likely caused a mixture of water and debris to be displaced rapidly upward and outward along preexisting englacial and, possibly, subglacial pathways leading away and downslope from the summit basin. Where these pathways intersected crevasses or other weak points in the sloping icefield, the mixture debouched onto the surface, producing dark, fluid debris flows. In summer 2004, the occurrence of two sets of debris flows separated in time by as long as a week suggests two pulses of summit ice collapse, each producing a surge of water and debris from the lake. A single debris flow was also emplaced on May 2, 2005. This event, which was captured by a Web camera, occurred simultaneously with a lake-level drop of ~15 m. To the east of the ice cauldron, a spillway that fed the debris flows has apparently maintained a relatively constant lake level for months at a time. Aerial photographs show that the spillway is in the direction of a breach in the summit crater. Melting of snow and ice at the summit has continued through 2006, with a total meltwater volume of ~5.4 million m3 as of March 2006.

  13. What Triggered the Recent Melt Event at Summit, Greenland? Insights from an Integrated Suite of Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, N.; Pettersen, C.; Walden, V. P.; Turner, D. D.; Shupe, M.; Bennartz, R.; Neff, W. D.; Cox, C.; Kulie, M.; Castellani, B.

    2012-12-01

    The melt extent of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) has been increasing in recent decades. According to a NASA press release, satellite observations show that the GIS melt extent was an anomalously high 97% in mid-July 2012, including rare melting at high altitude locations such as Summit, Greenland. This event was also captured by ground-based observations at Summit, collected by the ICECAPS (Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric State, and Precipitation at Summit) project. The observational data also recorded increased variability in the atmospheric state for July 2012 compared to the July 2010 and 2011. One of the outliers on 11 July 2012 produced ice melt temperatures at Summit, Greenland for the first time since observational records began. The origin of the warm airmass that affected Summit on 11 July 2012 was traced to the central United States on 1 July 2012. Instead of flowing around the southern tip of Greenland, the airmass was forced over central Greenland and thus lifted to over 3200m by the thickness of the GIS. Temperature retrievals from a microwave radiometer (MWR) observed a warm front arriving on 10 July 2012, which included RH values close to saturation as recorded by a NOAA met tower. Elevated precipitable water vapor levels suggest ripe conditions for liquid water clouds. A low level liquid cloud was observed by a micropulse lidar (MPL) and a millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) from 10-11 July 2012 with elevated liquid water content retrieved from the MWRs. Observations from an infrared spectrometer (PAERI) instrument indicate increased downwelling longwave fluxes during this time. The liquid water cloud effectively traps the heat thus limiting the surface's ability to cool radiatively. Surface-based inversions are common during clear sky scenes but liquid bearing clouds often weaken these inversions. In combination with solar heating, this can create surface temperatures warmer than the air aloft. A conceptual surface energy

  14. Carbon in Underland (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum

    ScienceCinema

    DePaolo, Donald J. (Director, Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2); NCGC Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Carbon in Underland' was submitted by the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (NCGC) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for its 'entertaining animation and engaging explanations of carbon sequestration'. NCGC, an EFRC directed by Donald J. DePaolo at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from seven institutions: LBNL (lead) Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis, Ohio State University, and Washington University in St. Louis. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO{sub 2} is 'to use new investigative tools, combined with experiments and computer simulations, to build a fundamental understanding of molecular-to-pore-scale processes in fluid-rock systems, and to demonstrate the ability to control critical aspects of flow, transport, and mineralization in porous rock media as applied to geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Research topics are: bio-inspired, CO{sub 2} (store), greenhouse gas, and interfacial characterization.

  15. Light Matters (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Atwater, Harry (Director, Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion (LMI), California Institute of Technology); LMI Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Light Matters' was submitted by the Center for Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion (LMI) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for its 'striking photography and visual impact'. LMI, an EFRC directed by Harry Atwater at the California Institute of Technology is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: CalTech (lead), University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion is 'to tailor the morphology, complex dielectric structure, and electronic properties of matter to sculpt the flow of sunlight, enabling light conversion to electrical and chemical energy with unprecedented efficiency.' Research topics are: catalysis (imines hydrocarbons), solar photovoltaic, solar fuels, photonic, solid state lighting, metamaterial, optics, phonons, thermal conductivity, solar electrodes, photsynthesis, CO{sub 2} (convert), greenhouse gas, and matter by design.

  16. Explosive activity of the summit cone of Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion island): A historical and geological review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michon, Laurent; Di Muro, Andrea; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Saint-Marc, Cécile; Fadda, Pierluigi; Manta, Fabio

    2013-08-01

    Summit explosive activity and collapses that form pit craters and calderas represent major volcanic hazards on a dominantly effusive, frequently active volcano like Piton de la Fournaise. Only three summit collapse events (1986, 2002, 2007) have been recorded since the foundation of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano observatory (OVPF) in 1979, and two of them (1986 and 2007) were associated with weak phreatic activity. At Piton de la Fournaise, the normal explosive activity consists of short-lived and mild (< 20 m-high) lava fountains, which quickly evolve into strombolian activity during the eruptions. Based on comprehensive literature review and high-resolution image analysis of surface outcrops and summit caldera walls, we reconstructed the time distribution of recent explosive events (phreatomagmatic; phreatic) and their link with summit collapses and lateral (flank) effusive eruptions. In historical time (post-1640 CE), we recognise two main clusters of explosive events. Frequent and violent phreatomagmatic to phreatic explosions occurred during the oldest cluster (1708-1878) and alternated with long-lasting periods (years to decades) of summit effusive activity. In contrast, scarce, and on average, weak explosions occurred during the youngest cluster (1897-2012), when discrete and short-lived (< 6 months) effusive eruptions represent the main eruptive dynamics. Historical summit collapses (pit craters and caldera), all localised at the top of the summit cone, were related to voluminous lateral eruptions and were followed by a significant decrease in eruptive rate. However, magma draining during lateral eruptions was not systematically associated with summit collapses or explosions. The long-lasting occurrence of magma at very shallow depth below the volcano summit, followed by a rapid lateral drainage, apparently represents a critical condition favouring magma-groundwater interaction to produce explosive activity. The prehistoric growth of the Piton de la

  17. Chemical characterization of aerosols at the summit of Mountain Tai in Central East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C.; Zhuang, G.; Huang, K.; Li, J.; Zhang, R.; Wang, Q.; Liu, T.; Sun, Y.; Guo, Z.; Fu, J. S.; Wang, Z.

    2011-07-01

    PM2.5 and TSP samples were collected at the summit of Mountain Tai (MT) (1534 m a.s.l.) in spring 2006/2007 and summer 2006 to investigate the characteristics of aerosols over central eastern China. For comparison, aerosol samples were also collected at Tazhong, Urumqi, and Tianchi in Xinjiang in northwestern China, Duolun and Yulin in northern China, and two urban sites in the megacities, Beijing and Shanghai, in 2007. Daily mass concentrations of TSP and PM2.5 ranged from 39.6-287.6 μg m-3 and 17.2-235.7 μg m-3 respectively at the summit of MT. Averaged concentrations of PM2.5 showed a pronounced seasonal variation with higher concentration in summer than spring. 17 water-soluble ions (SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, F-, PO43-, NO2-, CH3COO-, CH2C2O42-, C2H4C2O42-, HCOO-, MSA, C2O42-, NH4+, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+, Na+), and 19 elements of all samples were measured. SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ were the major water-soluble species in PM2.5, accounting for 61.50 % and 72.65 % of the total measured ions in spring and summer, respectively. The average ratio of PM2.5/TSP was 0.37(2006) and 0.49(2007) in spring, while up to 0.91 in summer, suggesting that aerosol particles were primarily comprised of fine particles in summer and of considerable coarse particles in spring. Crustal elements (e.g., Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, etc.) showed higher concentration in spring than summer, while most of the pollution species (SO42-, NO3-, K+, NO2-, NH4+, Cl-, organic acids, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cr) from local/regional anthropogenic emissions or secondary formation presented higher concentration in summer. The ratio of Ca/Al suggested the impact of Asian dust from the western deserts on the air quality in this region. The high concentration of K+ in PM2.5 (4.41 μg m-3) and its good correlation with black carbon (r = 0.90) and oxalic acid (r = 0.87) suggested the severe pollution from biomass burning, which was proved to be a main source of fine particles over central eastern China in summer. The contribution of biomass

  18. Constraints on the δ2H diffusion rate in firn from field measurements at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Harro A. J.; (L. G.) van der Wel, Gerko; Been, Henk A.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.; (C. J. P. P) Smeets, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Diffusion smears out, and can eventually wash away, spatial gradients (such as seasonal cycles) in the stable isotope signals in snow and firn after deposition. The diffusion process is governed by the continuous evaporation and condensation of ice particles into and from the air channels. As this diffusion process influences the isotope signals that are eventually conserved in ice cores, quantitative knowledge of the process is necessary. We performed detailed 2H isotope diffusion measurements in the upper 3 meters of firn at Summit, Greenland. Using a small snow gun, a thin snow layer was formed from 2H-enriched water over a 6 x 6 m2 area. We followed the diffusion process, quantified as the increase of the δ2H diffusion length, over a four years period, by retrieving the layer once per year. Each year we drilled 2-3 firn cores, sliced them into 1 cm layers and measured the δ2H-signal of these layers. Our experimental findings show the gradual increase of the diffusion length to close to 4 cm after four years. This is much smaller than the result based on the commonly used model by Johnsen at al (2000), which yields more than 6 cm. We have studied the possible causes for this discrepancy, and conclude that the poor constraint of the tortuosity partly explains the discrepancy. But more important, it is likely that isotopic inhomogeneity exists within the ice grains in the firn, which slows down the diffusion process. This effect has not been considered in the model. Reference: S. Johnsen, K. Clausen, K. Cuffey, K. Hoffmann, J. Schwander, T. Creyts. Diffusion of stable isotopes in polar firn and ice: The isotope effect in firn diffusion. Physics of ice core Records (T. Hondoh, editor) Hokkaido University Press 2000.

  19. Mechanistic drivers of flexibility in summit metabolic rates of small birds.

    PubMed

    Swanson, David; Zhang, Yufeng; King, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    Flexible metabolic phenotypes allow animals to adjust physiology to better fit ecological or environmental demands, thereby influencing fitness. Summit metabolic rate (Msum = maximal thermogenic capacity) is one such flexible trait. Skeletal muscle and heart masses and myocyte metabolic intensity are potential drivers of Msum flexibility in birds. We examined correlations of skeletal muscle and heart masses and pectoralis muscle citrate synthase (CS) activity (an indicator of cellular metabolic intensity) with Msum in house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) to determine whether these traits are associated with Msum variation. Pectoralis mass was positively correlated with Msum for both species, but no significant correlation remained for either species after accounting for body mass (Mb) variation. Combined flight and leg muscle masses were also not significantly correlated with Msum for either species. In contrast, heart mass was significantly positively correlated with Msum for juncos and nearly so (P = 0.054) for sparrows. Mass-specific and total pectoralis CS activities were significantly positively correlated with Msum for sparrows, but not for juncos. Thus, myocyte metabolic intensity influences Msum variation in house sparrows, although the stronger correlation of total (r = 0.495) than mass-specific (r = 0.378) CS activity with Msum suggests that both pectoralis mass and metabolic intensity impact Msum. In contrast, neither skeletal muscle masses nor pectoralis metabolic intensity varied with Msum in juncos. However, heart mass was associated with Msum variation in both species. These data suggest that drivers of metabolic flexibility are not uniform among bird species. PMID:24992186

  20. Mechanistic Drivers of Flexibility in Summit Metabolic Rates of Small Birds

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, David; Zhang, Yufeng; King, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    Flexible metabolic phenotypes allow animals to adjust physiology to better fit ecological or environmental demands, thereby influencing fitness. Summit metabolic rate (Msum = maximal thermogenic capacity) is one such flexible trait. Skeletal muscle and heart masses and myocyte metabolic intensity are potential drivers of Msum flexibility in birds. We examined correlations of skeletal muscle and heart masses and pectoralis muscle citrate synthase (CS) activity (an indicator of cellular metabolic intensity) with Msum in house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) to determine whether these traits are associated with Msum variation. Pectoralis mass was positively correlated with Msum for both species, but no significant correlation remained for either species after accounting for body mass (Mb) variation. Combined flight and leg muscle masses were also not significantly correlated with Msum for either species. In contrast, heart mass was significantly positively correlated with Msum for juncos and nearly so (P = 0.054) for sparrows. Mass-specific and total pectoralis CS activities were significantly positively correlated with Msum for sparrows, but not for juncos. Thus, myocyte metabolic intensity influences Msum variation in house sparrows, although the stronger correlation of total (r = 0.495) than mass-specific (r = 0.378) CS activity with Msum suggests that both pectoralis mass and metabolic intensity impact Msum. In contrast, neither skeletal muscle masses nor pectoralis metabolic intensity varied with Msum in juncos. However, heart mass was associated with Msum variation in both species. These data suggest that drivers of metabolic flexibility are not uniform among bird species. PMID:24992186

  1. Revised Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the Summit/Westward Project

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-10-21

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to amend its July 25, 2003, Record of Decision (ROD) regarding the proposed Summit/Westward Project (Project) to offer contract terms for an optional interconnection of this Project into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). Under this optional interconnection plan, BPA would integrate electric power from the Project into the FCRTS at a point adjacent to Clatskanie People's Utility District (CPUD) existing Wauna Substation. In order to deliver power to this location, CPUD would develop a new substation (Bradbury Substation) at a site near the Project and a new 230-kV transmission line from there to CPUD's Wauna Substation, which is already connected to the FCRTS. As part of this revised decision, BPA will facilitate CPUD development of the Bradbury-Wauna transmission line by allowing joint use of BPA right-of-way. This will involve reconstructing a section of BPA's 115-kV Allston-Astoria No. 1 transmission line from single-circuit H-frame wood-pole design to double-circuit single metal pole design. Terms of BPA participation in CPUD's development of the Bradbury-Wauna transmission line will be documented in a Construction Agreement. This optional interconnection plan is in addition to BPA's previous offer for interconnection of the Project at BPA's Allston Substation, as documented in the July 25, 2003, ROD. As with the initial interconnection plan, the decision to offer terms to interconnect the Project through the optional interconnection plan is consistent with BPA's Business Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (BP EIS) (DOE/EIS-0183, June 1995), and the Business Plan Record of Decision (BP ROD, August 1995). This decision thus is similarly tiered to the Business Plan ROD.

  2. World Bispecific Antibody Summit, September 27-28, 2011, Boston, MA.

    PubMed

    Dhimolea, Eugen; Reichert, Janice M

    2012-01-01

    With more than 30 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) approved and annual global sales of the products at ~$50 billion in 2010, these products have proven to be successful in many ways. Nevertheless, there is room for improvement in performance, and substantial unmet medical needs remain. As a consequence, numerous organizations are devoting resources to engineering novel mAbs such as bispecific antibodies that have increased functionality compared with unmodified IgG molecules. The World Bispecific Antibody Summit, organized by Hanson Wade, drew over 100 participants to Boston to discuss engineering novel bispecific antibodies, generating lead candidates and clinical study and commercialization of the molecules. Approaches such as the trifunctional antibody (TRION), dual variable domain-Ig (Abbott), two-in-one (Genentech), dual affinity retargeting (MacroGenics), kappa-lambda body (NovImmune), bispecific T-cell engager (Micromet) and chemical generation (CovX/Pfizer) were discussed in detail. In addition, posters describing bispecific Affibody® molecules for targeting of EGFR and HER2 (Affibody), T-cell receptor based bi-specifics that target HLA-peptides (Immunocore), a novel mAb-Fv bispecific antibody format utilizing Fc region (Xencore), generation of a tetravalent bispecific antibody against IL4 and IL13 for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (Sanofi), Combining Affibody® molecules and the Albumod™ technology to create long acting multispecific protein therapeutics (Royal Institute of Technology, Affibody) and COVA301 as a highly potent bispecific inhibitor of IL-17A and TNF-α (Covagen) were presented. PMID:22327426

  3. Atmospheric bulk deposition measurements of organochlorine pesticides at three alpine summits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobi, Gert; Kirchner, Manfred; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Körner, Wolfgang; Offenthaler, Ivo; Moche, Wolfgang; Weiss, Peter; Schaub, Marcus; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Bulk deposition samples were collected at three elevated summits in different parts of the Alps from 2005 to 2010. Deposition samples were analyzed for a wide range of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). HCHs, DDT, DDD, DDE, chlordanes, cis-heptachlor, HCB, dieldrin and endrin were found in all samples, only aldrin was found less frequently. Differences in the mean deposition rates between the three sites reflect the different amounts of precipitation at these sites. At the northern edge of the Alps with the highest annual total precipitations, mean annual deposition rates were at least twice those at the Swiss site for most of the investigated OCP. Average annual deposition of α-HCH amounted to 602, 461 and 216 ng m-2 year-1, the sum of DDT, DDD and DDE to 579, 210 and 144 ng m-2 year-1 and the sum of trans- and cis-chlordane to 35, 47, 16 ng m-2 year-1 at Zugspitze, Sonnblick, and Weissfluhjoch, respectively. A quite distinct seasonal pattern of OPC deposition was observed at all three locations. For most of the HCH isomers, higher deposition rates were observed in summer than in winter at all three sites, which may be caused by enhanced re-volatilization due to higher summer temperatures and the ongoing application of HCH-containing products in some regions as well. For the other investigated OCPs, higher summer deposition rates were found only at Weissfluhjoch. This site is more often affected by air masses crossing the river Po basin than the other two sites, an area exhibiting higher summer temperatures compared to other regions adjacent to the Alps.

  4. NSF-Sponsored Summit on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, S.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-sponsored Summit on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education made major progress toward developing a collective community vision for the geosciences. A broad spectrum of the geoscience education community, ~200 educators from research universities/four and two year colleges, focused on preparation of undergraduates for graduate school and future geoscience careers, pedagogy, use of technology, broadening participation/retention of underrepresented groups, and preparation of K-12 science teachers. Participants agreed that key concepts, competencies and skills learned throughout the curriculum were more important than specific courses. Concepts included understanding Earth as complex, dynamic system, deep time, evolution of life, natural resources, energy, hazards, hydrogeology, surface processes, Earth materials and structure, and climate change. Skills/competencies included ability to think spatially and temporally, reason inductively and deductively, make and use indirect observations, engage in complex open, coupled systems thinking, and work with uncertainty, non-uniqueness, and incompleteness, as well as critical thinking, problem solving, communication, and ability to think like a scientist and continue to learn. Successful ways of developing these include collaborative, integrative projects involving teams, interdisciplinary projects, fieldwork and research experiences, as well as flipped classrooms and integration and interactive use of technology, including visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis of real data. Wider adoption of proven, effective best practices is our communities' main pedagogical challenge, and we focused on identifying implementation barriers. Preparation of future teachers in introductory and general geoscience courses by incorporating Next Generation Science Standards and using other sciences/math to solve real world geoscience problems should help increase diversity and number of future geoscientists and

  5. Aerosol Transport to the Greenland Summit Site, June, 2003 to August 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, T. A.; Cliff, S. S.; Jimenez-Cruz, M. P.; Portnoff, L.; Perry, K.; McConnell, J.; Burkhart, J.; Bales, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    With the resumption of year-round staffing of the Summit Greenland Environmental Observatory (GEOSummit) in 2003, we were able to sample aerosols year round by size (8 size modes), time (3 hr to 24 hr), and composition (mass, optical attenuation, and elements H, Na to Mo, plus lead) for association with particulate layers in snow, firn and ice. Sampling was accomplished using a 10 L/min slotted 8-stage rotating drum impactor (DELTA 8 DRUM, http://delta.ucdavis.edu)in the clean sector 0.5 km upwind from the main camp pollution sources. The air intake was approximately 2m above the snow surface. The rotation rate of the DRUM was slowed to 0.5 mm/day, allowing continuous sampling for 48 weeks with 12-hr time resolution on a single set of lightly greased 480 ?g/cm2 Mylar substrates. Early results show transport of relatively coarse (12 to 5 ?m aerodynamic diameter) soil aerosols to the site in spring, 2003, in well -defined plumes of 1- to 2-day duration. Trajectory analysis shows potential Asian sources. Sulfur-containing aerosols, also seen in plumes of short duration, occur in two size modes, a typical accumulation mode aerosol (0.75?0.34 ?m) and a very fine aerosol mode ( 0.34?0.09 ?m), the latter likely stratospheric in origin. We wish to acknowledge the excellent on-site support of the GEOSummit staff, including M. Lewis, R. Abbott, B. Torrison, and K. Hess, and T. Wood.

  6. The Bubble's Wake: Localized Rebound of Kīlauea's Summit Lava Lake Following Minor Bubble Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, T. R.; Houghton, B. F.; Taddeucci, J.; Del Bello, E.; Scarlato, P.; Patrick, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    One persistent mode of outgassing from Kīlauea's summit lava lake, which has been active since 2008, is characterized by dome-shaped upwellings of incandescent lava several meters across on the lake surface. These phenomena usually occur a few times per minute during the lava lake's typical north-to-south circulation regime, dampen and disappear within seconds, and produce few pyroclasts. Up until now, it has not been possible to determine if these upwellings were caused by the bursting of discrete bubbles or by rafts of smaller bubbles, though their slow speed and relative lack of pyroclasts suggested the latter. However, observations of these phenomena during 2013-14 using high-speed (200-500 Hz) cameras found a surprising result. Each dome-shaped upwelling was, instead, the aftermath of the bursting of a discrete bubble, which broke through the surface crust a few tenths of a second before the related upwelling and was roughly one-quarter to one-half its size. Thus, these upwellings appear to be the rebound of the lava lake surface into the void created by relatively minor, meter-scale bubble bursts. In some instances, the rebound even develops into a liquid jet. Rebound of the lava lake surface following wall rock collapses has been shown to be important for triggering transient explosive activity at Kīlauea since 2008. The dome-shaped upwellings described here are another example of lake-rebound dynamics at Kīlauea, though on a smaller scale. In light of the prevalence of these phenomena at Kīlauea, rebound of the magma column following disturbances at the magma free-surface could play a role in other volcanic systems as well.

  7. Microbial communities established on Mont Blanc summit with Saharan dust deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvochina, M.; Alekhina, I.; Normand, P.; Petit, J. R.; Bulat, S.

    2009-04-01

    Dust originating from the Sahara desert can be uplifted during storms, transported across the Mediterranean towards the Alpine region and deposited during snowfalls. The microbes associated with dust particles can be involved in establishing microbiota in icy environments as well as affect ecosystem and human health. Our objective was to use a culture-free DNA-based approach to assess bacterial content and diversity and furthermore, to identify ‘icy' microbes which could be brought on the Mont Blanc (MtBl) summit with Saharan dust and became living in the snow. Saharan dust fallout on MtBl summit from one event (MB5, event June 2006) vs. control libraries and that from another event (May 2008) were collected in Grenoble (SD, 200 m a.s.l.) and at Col du Dome (MB-SD, 4250 m a.s.l.). Soil from Ksar Ghilane (SS, Saharan desert, Tunisia, March 2008) was taken for overall comparison as a possible source population. Fresh snow falling in Grenoble (85) was collected as example of diversity in this area. To assess the microbial diversity 16S rRNA gene libraries (v3-v5 region) were constructed for corresponding dust-snow samples (MB5, SS, SD, 85 and MB-SD) along with clear snow samples and several controls. For both MB5 and MB-SD samples full-gene technique was evoked in attempt to differentiate reproduced bacteria from damaged DNA. Before sequencing the clones were rybotyped. All clone libraries were distinct in community composition except for some single phylotypes (or closely related groups) overlap. Thus, clone libraries from two different events that were collected at Col du Dome area within 2 year interval (MB5 and MB-SD) were different in community composition except one of the abundant phylotype from MB-SD library (Geodermatophilus sp.) which was shared (98% sequence similarity) with single representative from MB-5 library. These bacteria are pigmented and radiation-resistant, so it could be an indicator of desert origin for our sequences. For MB5 library two

  8. Application of Microbeam Techniques to Identifying and Assessing Comagmatic Mixing Between Summit and Rift Eruptions at Kilauea Volcano (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornber, C. R.; Rowe, M. C.; Adams, D. T.; Orr, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    Near-continuous eruption of Kilauea Volcano since 1983 has yielded an extensive record of glass, phenocryst and melt-inclusion chemistry from well-quenched lava that can be correlated with geophysical and geological monitoring data. Eruption temperatures are determined using glass thermometry. Microbeam evaluation of phenocryst mineralogy, morphology, texture, zoning and melt inclusions helps to constrain magma storage and transport within the edifice and to track the evolution of shallow magmatic plumbing during this prolonged eruptive era. For most of this eruption up to April 2001, east rift lava was olivine-phyric and olivine-liquid relations indicated equilibrium crystallization during summit-to-rift magma transport. From 2001 to present, most lava erupted from vents near Pu`u O`o has been a relatively low-temperature “hybrid”, characterized by a disequilibrium low-pressure phenocryst assemblage. Olivine (Fo81.5-80.5) coexists with phenocrysts of lower temperature clinopyroxene (±plagioclase, ±Fe-rich olivine). Mixing between hotter and cooler magma is texturally documented by complex pyroxene zoning and resorption and olivine overgrowths on resorbed pyroxene. The co-magmatic mixing is not apparent in bulk lava analyses, since both components are fractionates of parent magmas with indistinguishable trace-element signatures. Post-2001 rift-zone lava indicates perpetual flushing of stored magma by hotter recharge magma rising from the mantle source. Geophysical and gas monitoring data confirm an increase in magma supply to Kilauea Volcano between 2001 and 2008, which we have interpreted as increasing the efficiency of the flushing process. Since March 2008, the petrology of the new summit lava lake and contemporaneously erupted rift zone lava provides new perspective on complexities of magma degassing, crystallization and mixing prior to rift eruption. Bulk lava chemistry, SIMS and LA-ICPMS analyses of matrix glasses and olivine melt-inclusions in both

  9. Taking evidence-based plastic surgery to the next level: report of the second Summit on Evidence-based Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Felmont F; Rohrich, Rod J; Sykes, Jonathan M

    2013-07-01

    Applying the principles of evidence-based medicine has the potential to drastically improve quality of care and patient outcomes. For this reason, evidence-based medicine has been held as one of the 15 most important developments in medicine within the past 100 years. In August of 2010, a broad coalition of leaders from numerous organizations representing societies, boards, journals, foundations, and academic institutions met in Colorado Springs, Colorado, for the first Evidence-Based Plastic Surgery Summit. The summit signaled a sea change in the approach of organized plastic surgery to the promotion of evidence-based medicine within the specialty. It was determined that a strategic, coordinated, and sustained effort to drive an evidence-based medicine culture would accelerate adoption and advance quality of care and patient safety. Over the past 2 years, many of the goals of the initial summit have been met. In order to take our evidence-based medicine efforts to the next level, a second summit was recently held to redefine goals, focus efforts, address barriers, and launch new initiatives with broad consensus. This article documents the outcomes of the second Evidence-Based Plastic Surgery Summit. PMID:23813399

  10. Taking evidence-based plastic surgery to the next level: report of the second summit on evidence-based plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Felmont F; Rohrich, Rod J; Sykes, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Applying the principles of evidence-based medicine has the potential to drastically improve quality of care and patient outcomes. For this reason, evidence-based medicine has been held as one of the 15 most important developments in medicine within the past 100 years. In August of 2010, a broad coalition of leaders from numerous organizations representing societies, boards, journals, foundations, and academic institutions met in Colorado Springs, Colorado, for the first Evidence-Based Plastic Surgery Summit. The summit signaled a sea change in the approach of organized plastic surgery to the promotion of evidence-based medicine within the specialty. It was determined that a strategic, coordinated, and sustained effort to drive an evidence-based medicine culture would accelerate adoption and advance quality of care and patient safety. Over the past 2 years, many of the goals of the initial summit have been met. In order to take our evidence-based medicine efforts to the next level, a second summit was recently held to redefine goals, focus efforts, address barriers, and launch new initiatives with broad consensus. This article documents the outcomes of the second Evidence-Based Plastic Surgery Summit. PMID:23868347

  11. Gravity changes and deformation at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, associated with summit eruptive activity, 2009-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagnardi, Marco; Poland, Michael P.; Carbone, Daniele; Baker, Scott; Battaglia, Maurizio; Amelung, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of microgravity and surface displacement data collected at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii (USA), between December 2009 and November 2012 suggests a net mass accumulation at ~1.5 km depth beneath the northeast margin of Halema‘uma‘u Crater, within Kīlauea Caldera. Although residual gravity increases and decreases are accompanied by periods of uplift and subsidence of the surface, respectively, the volume change inferred from the modeling of interferometric synthetic aperture radar deformation data can account for only a small portion (as low as 8%) of the mass addition responsible for the gravity increase. We propose that since the opening of a new eruptive vent at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008, magma rising to the surface of the lava lake outgasses, becomes denser, and sinks to deeper levels, replacing less dense gas-rich magma stored in the Halema‘uma‘u magma reservoir. In fact, a relatively small density increase (<200 kg m−3) of a portion of the reservoir can produce the positive residual gravity change measured during the period with the largest mass increase, between March 2011 and November 2012. Other mechanisms may also play a role in the gravity increase without producing significant uplift of the surface, including compressibility of magma, formation of olivine cumulates, and filling of void space by magma. The rate of gravity increase, higher than during previous decades, varies through time and seems to be directly correlated with the volcanic activity occurring at both the summit and the east rift zone of the volcano.

  12. Gravity changes and deformation at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, associated with summit eruptive activity, 2009-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco; Poland, Michael P.; Carbone, Daniele; Baker, Scott; Battaglia, Maurizio; Amelung, Falk

    2014-09-01

    Analysis of microgravity and surface displacement data collected at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii (USA), between December 2009 and November 2012 suggests a net mass accumulation at ~1.5 km depth beneath the northeast margin of Halema`uma`u Crater, within Kīlauea Caldera. Although residual gravity increases and decreases are accompanied by periods of uplift and subsidence of the surface, respectively, the volume change inferred from the modeling of interferometric synthetic aperture radar deformation data can account for only a small portion (as low as 8%) of the mass addition responsible for the gravity increase. We propose that since the opening of a new eruptive vent at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008, magma rising to the surface of the lava lake outgasses, becomes denser, and sinks to deeper levels, replacing less dense gas-rich magma stored in the Halema`uma`u magma reservoir. In fact, a relatively small density increase (<200 kg m-3) of a portion of the reservoir can produce the positive residual gravity change measured during the period with the largest mass increase, between March 2011 and November 2012. Other mechanisms may also play a role in the gravity increase without producing significant uplift of the surface, including compressibility of magma, formation of olivine cumulates, and filling of void space by magma. The rate of gravity increase, higher than during previous decades, varies through time and seems to be directly correlated with the volcanic activity occurring at both the summit and the east rift zone of the volcano.

  13. Spatial and temporal functional changes in alpine summit vegetation are driven by increases in shrubs and graminoids

    PubMed Central

    Venn, Susanna; Pickering, Catherine; Green, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Classical approaches to investigating temporal and spatial changes in community composition offer only partial insight into the ecology that drives species distribution, community patterns and processes, whereas a functional approach can help to determine many of the underlying mechanisms that drive such patterns. Here, we aim to bring these two approaches together to understand such drivers, using an elevation gradient of sites, a repeat species survey and species functional traits. We used data from a repeat vegetation survey on five alpine summits and measured plant height, leaf area, leaf dry matter content and specific leaf area (SLA) for every species recorded in the surveys. We combined species abundances with trait values to produce a community trait-weighted mean (CTWM) for each trait, and then combined survey results with the CTWMs. Across the gradient of summits, more favourable conditions for plant growth (warmer, longer growing season) occurred at the lower elevations. Vegetation composition changes between 2004 and 2011 (according to non-metric multi-dimensional scaling ordination) were strongly affected by the high and increasing abundance of species with high SLA at high elevations. Species life-form categories strongly affected compositional changes and functional composition, with increasing dominance of tall shrubs and graminoids at the lower-elevation summits, and an overall increase in graminoids across the gradient. The CTWM for plant height and leaf dry matter content significantly decreased with elevation, whereas for leaf area and SLA it significantly increased. The significant relationships between CTWM and elevation may suggest specific ecological processes, namely plant competition and local productivity, influencing vegetation preferentially across the elevation gradient, with the dominance of shrubs and graminoids driving the patterns in the CTWMs. PMID:24790129

  14. A model for climate change education in formal and informal settings--C2S2 Climate Change Student Summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, L. T.; Lynds, S. E.; Rack, F. R.

    2012-12-01

    Through a NOAA Environmental Literacy grant, ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing) created a unique opportunity for both formal and informal educators to engage their classrooms/audiences in understanding the complexities of climate change. The program, entitled C2S2: Climate Change Student Summits, included excellent geographical coverage through an exceptional two-workshop professional development series for teachers in each of nine different regions representing the U.S. National Climate Assessment regions defined by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. The program also included a creative, investigative science research and presentation experience for teams of students in each region, culminating in the Climate Change Student Summit, an on-site capstone event including a videoconference connecting all sites. The success of this program is based on combining multiple aspects, such as providing professional development for educators and encouraging the active involvement of research scientists, both in the professional development workshops and in the Student Summit. Another key factor is the close working relationships between informal and formal education entities, including the involvement of informal science learning facilities and informal science education leaders. The program includes the creation and use of cutting-edge curriculum materials available in the ELF, (Environmental Literacy Framework with a focus on climate change) and hands-on resources for teachers and students that provide an earth systems approach to climate change education, which have been successfully used in grades 5-12 as well as at numerous science museums. The C2S2 project has completed four years of activities with demonstrated positive impacts on both students and teachers. This presentation will share the lessons learned about implementing this climate change science education program and suggest that it is a successful model that can be used to scale up this project from

  15. Digital Elevation Model Creation Using SfM on High-Altitude Snow-Covered Surfaces at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millstein, J. D.; Hawley, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Structure from Motion (SfM) provides a means through which a digital elevation model (DEM) can be constructed with data acquired at a relatively low cost when compared to other current alternatives. Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), a large area can be efficiently covered at high spatial resolution to quantify regional topography. Structure from Motion applied to photogrammetric techniques from a UAV has proven to be a successful tool, but challenges to UAV-based SfM include high-altitude locations with few distinctive surface features and minor textural differences. In June 2015, we piloted a small UAV (Quest) in order to conduct a topographical survey of Summit Camp, Greenland using SfM. Summit Camp sits at a surface elevation of 3200 meters above sea level, and occupies a snow-covered surface. The flat, very uniform terrain proved to be a challenge when flying the UAV and processing imagery using SfM techniques. In this presentation we discuss the issues both with operating a UAV instrument platform at high-altitude in the polar regions and interpreting the resulting DEM from a snow-covered region. The final DEM of Summit Camp covers a large portion of the surface area directly impacted by camp activities. In particular, volume calculations of drifting snow gauge an estimate of the equipment hours that will be required to clear and unearth structures. Investigation of surface roughness at multiple length scales can similarly provide insight on the accuracy of the DEM when observing texturally uniform surfaces.

  16. Advancing Alzheimer's disease diagnosis, treatment, and care: recommendations from the Ware Invitational Summit.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Mary D; Karlawish, Jason H; Arnold, Steven E; Khachaturian, Ara S; Khachaturian, Zaven S; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Baumgart, Matthew; Banerjee, Sube; Beck, Cornelia; Blennow, Kaj; Brookmeyer, Ron; Brunden, Kurt R; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Comer, Meryl; Covinsky, Kenneth; Feinberg, Lynn Friss; Frisoni, Giovanni; Green, Colin; Guimaraes, Renato Maia; Gwyther, Lisa P; Hefti, Franz F; Hutton, Michael; Kawas, Claudia; Kent, David M; Kuller, Lewis; Langa, Kenneth M; Mahley, Robert W; Maslow, Katie; Masters, Colin L; Meier, Diane E; Neumann, Peter J; Paul, Steven M; Petersen, Ronald C; Sager, Mark A; Sano, Mary; Schenk, Dale; Soares, Holly; Sperling, Reisa A; Stahl, Sidney M; van Deerlin, Vivianna; Stern, Yaakov; Weir, David; Wolk, David A; Trojanowski, John Q

    2012-09-01

    To address the pending public health crisis due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative disorders, the Marian S. Ware Alzheimer Program at the University of Pennsylvania held a meeting entitled "State of the Science Conference on the Advancement of Alzheimer's Diagnosis, Treatment and Care," on June 21-22, 2012. The meeting comprised four workgroups focusing on Biomarkers; Clinical Care and Health Services Research; Drug Development; and Health Economics, Policy, and Ethics. The workgroups shared, discussed, and compiled an integrated set of priorities, recommendations, and action plans, which are presented in this article. PMID:22959699

  17. Diurnal variation of atmospheric electric field at the summit of Mount Fuji, Japan, distinctly different from the Carnegie curve in the summertime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamogawa, Masashi; Suzuki, Yuko; Sakai, Rikuma; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Torii, Tatsuo; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Yasuyuki; Sato, Ryoe; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Okochi, Hiroshi; Miura, Kazuhiko; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Orihara, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Tomoyuki

    2015-04-01

    In fair weather, a clear diurnal variation of atmospheric electric field (AEF), which is distinctly different from the global diurnal variation, i.e., Carnegie curve, was observed during the summer time (July and August) of the year 2010 and 2011 at the summit of Mount Fuji, Japan (3776 m in altitude). The variation of the AEF at the summit showed a local time dependent feature, which means that the AEF increased at sunrise and decreased at sunset. This local diurnal variation is known as a mountain variation. The intensity of AEF in the daytime reached 1.5-3 times larger than that in the nighttime. From the multipoint observations of cloud images and AEF, the mountain variation was found to be attributable to the AEF generated by the positively charged top of a horizontally extensive sea of clouds below the summit. Since the sea of clouds grows with the temperature rise, the AEF variation follows local time.

  18. Leading through meetings.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Michael R

    2014-02-01

    Whether formal or informal, meetings reflect relational opportunities that are critical to effective leadership. Professional development educators can influence the quality, cost, and impact of meetings by emphasizing their structure, conduct, and behavioral dynamics. PMID:24494659

  19. RAS Ordinary Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    Here are summarized talks from the February and March RAS Ordinary Meetings. The February meeting also enjoyed the Eddington Lecture from Prof. Lisa Kewley (Australian National University) on galaxy evolution in 3D.

  20. 77 FR 36479 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  1. 76 FR 37062 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  2. 75 FR 13075 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  3. 76 FR 10557 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  4. 77 FR 74827 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  5. 78 FR 52499 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  6. 76 FR 68127 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  7. 75 FR 66061 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  8. 75 FR 39205 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  9. 78 FR 12715 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  10. 77 FR 7126 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  11. 76 FR 21702 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  12. 77 FR 51513 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  13. 76 FR 78611 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  14. 2016 ACPA MEETING ABSTRACTS.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The peer-reviewed abstracts presented at the 73rd Annual Meeting of the ACPA are published as submitted by the authors. For financial conflict of interest disclosure, please visit http://meeting.acpa-cpf.org/disclosures.html. PMID:27447885

  15. Recent Deposition of Trace Metals to Central (Summit) Greenland as Recorded in 3-Meter Snow Pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overdier, J.; Shafer, M.; Schauer, J.; von Schneidemesser, E.; Hagler, G.; Bergin, M.

    2007-12-01

    During the summer 2005 and 2006 field seasons at Summit (3270 m) Greenland we collected snow core samples for comprehensive geochemical characterization. This sampling effort was one facet of our larger program with the overall objective of improving our understanding of the sourcing and post depositional diagenesis of organic carbon depositing on the Greenland ice sheet. From snow pits of 3-meter depth, representing ~4 years of recent accumulation, detailed profiles of a suite of chemical variables were obtained, including: total and water soluble organic carbon, particulate organic and elemental carbon, inorganic ions, and comprehensive elemental and isotopic analysis. The elemental characterization supports our source reconciliation efforts in providing sub-seasonal data on aerosol particulate matter chemistry from which sourcing vectors can be inferred. Elemental and isotopic analyses on the melted snow cores were carried-out using high-resolution (sector-field) ICP-MS (Finnegan Element 2). A large suite of elements were quantified, including: the major/crustal elements (Al, Ca, K, Fe. Na, Mg, Si), minor crustal elements (Ba, Cs, Li, Rb, Sc, Sr, Ti) light transition metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn), heavy transition metals (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, W), oxyanion metals (As, Mo, U, V), platinum group metals (Rh, Pd, Pt), rare earths (Ce, Er, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Y, Yb), as well as, Be, Sb, Sn, sulfur and phosphorus. Very large (>30x) temporal variation in snow core concentrations were measured for Al, Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, P, Rb, Sr, Ti, U, Zn and all the rare earths, while low variation (~5x) is observed for the elements As, Cd, Hg, Mo, S and Sn. The later group is representative of the more mobile, anthropogenically dominated/sourced trace metals. Principal crustal elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na) and sulfate (S) present similar profiles, with significant burial peaks in spring. Major burial peaks are relatively uniformly spaced (~70 cm apart), indicating some consistency

  16. Detection of quasi-static displacement components of LP seismic sources near the volcanic summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thun, Johannes; Bean, Christopher J.; Lokmer, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Seismic long-period (LP) events are still not completely understood, but widely accepted source models involve fluids and fluid-driven resonance processes. Due to the difficulties related to installing seismometers in summit regions of volcanoes, the observations of volcanic seismicity are usually performed at distances not closer than 1-2 km from the hypocentre of a seismic event. Observations from high-density network experiments on different volcanoes lead to a new model proposed by Bean et al. (Nature Geoscience, January 2014). Therein LP events are explained as a consequence of a brittle-ductile failure occurring under the low-stress conditions in the shallow volcanic edifice, rather than fluid-driven resonance. One consequence of this model is a static displacement associated with these LP events. Unfortunately, the expected amplitude of the static shift is only several micrometres, i.e. not detectable by typical deformation measurements. Therefore, we try to develop methods for using seismometers as static shift detecting sensors. Our current inability to recover the full spectrum of recorded displacement results in a band-limited representation of the true process derived from moment-tensor inversions. If the actual source process is of a broadband character, our narrow-band results can be quite misleading. In this study we are focusing on quasi-static displacements we observed on seismometer data from Turrialba Volcano (Costa Rica) and Mt Etna (Italy). These appear as ramp-like signals on displacement traces of LP events, most commonly on all three seismometer components, and have a magnitude of a few micrometres. Laboratory tests confirm that the seismometers used in our field experiments can indeed measure step-like signals, but they also show that long period noise can be a problem when trying to interpret these. Normal high pass filters suitable to remove this noise cannot be applied without losing the signal we are interested in. Therefore special

  17. Tracing anthropogenic impacts on nitrate deposition at Summit, Greenland from 1760 to 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chellman, N.; Hastings, M. G.; McConnell, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate (NO3-) can be used to examine changes in nitrogen sources over time, as NO3- is the primary sink of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from the atmosphere. This study presents a high-resolution, seasonal analysis of δ15N and δ18O of NO3- from an ice core collected at Summit, Greenland in 2010. The relationship between the δ15N record and major sources of NOx (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, and soil emission) was investigated using emissions data as well as isotopic, elemental, and molecular tracers, including tracers for oil and coal combustion (lead, sulfur, thallium, and cadmium) and biomass burning (black carbon and ammonium). The results show a marked negative trend in δ15N-NO3-, dropping 10‰ (vs. air N2) since pre-Industrial times from an average of 12.9‰ (1760-1810) to 2.9‰ (1952-2002), with the most rapid change occurring between 1960 and 1980. This overall trend can be attributed to significant changes in NOx sources since the Industrial Revolution. The relationships between the δ15N-NO3- signal and the tracers suggest that fossil fuel and soil NOx emissions have negative δ15N signatures, while biomass burning has a positive δ15N signature. The δ18O of NO3-, on the other hand, is not representative of source signals, but of the oxidation pathways in the atmosphere. The δ18O-NO3- ice core record displayed little change between pre- and post-Industrial eras, with only a slight increase of 2.6‰ from a pre-Industrial average of 73.2‰ (vs. VSMOW) to a post-Industrial average of 75.8‰. Importantly, the seasonality of the δ18O-NO3- signal, with higher values found in wintertime snow and lower values in summer, did not change throughout the record. The lack of any trend in the δ18O-NO3- signal is expected because seasonal photochemistry, the driving force of the seasonal δ18O signal, has not changed markedly during the past 250 years. In summary, the data from this study show that investigation

  18. Making Meetings Matter!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanden, Joy A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of meetings to create favorable impressions of an individual's credibility, effectiveness, and power, and offers suggestions for managing a successful meeting. Highlights include justifying the need; inviting the proper stakeholders; selecting the venue; timing; written agendas; refreshments; and meeting protocol. (LRW)

  19. 75 FR 58350 - Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... RESEARCH COMMISSION Meeting Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Arctic Research Commission will hold its...) Approval of the minutes from the 93rd meeting. (3) Commissioners and staff reports. (4) Discussion and presentations concerning Arctic research activities. The focus of the meeting will be reports and updates...

  20. 76 FR 54536 - Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office UNITED STATES INSTITUTE OF PEACE Meeting AGENCY: United States Institute of Peace. Date/Time: Thursday, September 22, 2011 (9 a.m...: September 22, 2011 Board Meeting; Approval of Minutes of the One Hundred Fortieth Meeting (June 23-24,...

  1. Making Meetings Work Better.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standke, Linda

    1978-01-01

    Focusing on the increased use by trainers of off-site facilities for employee training meetings, this article looks at some improvements and the expanding market in the meeting site industry. It also highlights emerging trends in the industry and covers the growth of meeting planning into a profession. (EM)

  2. 78 FR 10167 - Pollinator Summit: Status of Ongoing Collaborative Efforts To Protect Pollinators; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ...The Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention, in conjunction with the United States Department of Agriculture, will facilitate a public meeting with parties engaged in activities to reduce potential acute exposure of honey bees and pollinators to pesticides. Invited presenters will provide briefings on current activities in three key areas related to improving seed treatment......

  3. 75 FR 16749 - Federal Geospatial Summit To Provide Information on Upcoming Improvements To the National Spatial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ...: National Geodetic Survey (NGS), National Ocean Service (NOS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Public meeting. SUMMARY: The National Geodetic Survey (NGS) will host a... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Abstract In January 2008, NGS adopted a 10-year plan identifying the need to...

  4. The Challenges of Living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Summary of a Summit on Patient and Healthcare Provider Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Judith; Fernandes, Aida; Nguyen, Geoffrey C.; Otley, Anthony R.; Heatherington, Joan; Stretton, Jennifer; Bollegala, Natasha; Benchimol, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    Canada has one of the highest rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the disease represents a significant health, social, and economic burden. There is currently no cure for IBD, although earlier diagnosis and new therapies have improved the overall health outcomes and quality of life for patients. Crohn's and Colitis Canada is Canada's only national, volunteer-based charity dedicated to finding cures for IBD and improving the lives of those affected, through research, education, patient programs, advocacy, and increased awareness. On April 30, 2015, Crohn's and Colitis Canada hosted the “Patient and Healthcare Professional Summit on the Burden of Disease in IBD” to obtain a deeper understanding of the unmet needs of IBD patients and their caregivers. Through personal vignettes, patients articulated a pressing need to increase understanding of the challenges faced by people suffering from IBD among both health care professionals and the general public, develop best practices for navigating life transitions and addressing the unique challenges faced by children with IBD, and provide equitable access to appropriate, effective, and affordable treatments. The recommendations that emerged from the summit will inform about efforts to increase public awareness, inform about advocacy strategies, and contribute to the development of research priorities. PMID:27446878

  5. Energy Frontier Research Centers: Helping Win the Energy Innovation Race (2011 EFRC Summit Keynote Address, Secretary of Energy Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (DOE Secretary of Energy)

    2012-03-14

    Secretary of Energy Steven Chu gave the keynote address at the 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum. In his talk, Secretary Chu highlighted the need to "unleash America's science and research community" to achieve energy breakthroughs. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  6. The Challenges of Living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Summary of a Summit on Patient and Healthcare Provider Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bray, Judith; Fernandes, Aida; Nguyen, Geoffrey C; Otley, Anthony R; Heatherington, Joan; Stretton, Jennifer; Bollegala, Natasha; Benchimol, Eric I

    2016-01-01

    Canada has one of the highest rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the disease represents a significant health, social, and economic burden. There is currently no cure for IBD, although earlier diagnosis and new therapies have improved the overall health outcomes and quality of life for patients. Crohn's and Colitis Canada is Canada's only national, volunteer-based charity dedicated to finding cures for IBD and improving the lives of those affected, through research, education, patient programs, advocacy, and increased awareness. On April 30, 2015, Crohn's and Colitis Canada hosted the "Patient and Healthcare Professional Summit on the Burden of Disease in IBD" to obtain a deeper understanding of the unmet needs of IBD patients and their caregivers. Through personal vignettes, patients articulated a pressing need to increase understanding of the challenges faced by people suffering from IBD among both health care professionals and the general public, develop best practices for navigating life transitions and addressing the unique challenges faced by children with IBD, and provide equitable access to appropriate, effective, and affordable treatments. The recommendations that emerged from the summit will inform about efforts to increase public awareness, inform about advocacy strategies, and contribute to the development of research priorities. PMID:27446878

  7. Energy Frontier Research Centers: Helping Win the Energy Innovation Race (2011 EFRC Summit Keynote Address, Secretary of Energy Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2011-05-25

    Secretary of Energy Steven Chu gave the keynote address at the 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum. In his talk, Secretary Chu highlighted the need to "unleash America's science and research community" to achieve energy breakthroughs. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  8. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Summit National Site, Deerfield, OH. June 1988. First Remedial Action. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The 11.5-acre Summit National site is a former coal strip mine approximately 45 miles southeast of Cleveland. Summit National Liquid Services operated a solvent-recycling and waste-disposal facility on the site from 1973 to 1978. Solvents, paint sludges, phenols, cyanide, arsenic, and other liquid wastes were stored, incinerated, and buried or dumped during site operations. All onsite media are contaminated with a variety of organic and inorganic compounds, and investigations indicate that offsite areas also are affected. The primary contaminants of concern affecting soil, sediments, ground water, and surface water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, TCE and xylenes, other organics including phenols, PAHs and PCBs, and metals including arsenic and chromium. The selected remedial action for the site includes: excavation and onsite incineration of contaminated soil and sediments and the contents of approximately 1,600 buried drums and 4 tanks, with disposal of incinerator residuals in an onsite RCRA landfill; ground-water pump and treatment and onsite surface-water treatment and discharge of treated water to downgradient surface water; dismantling and onsite disposal of all onsite structures; ground-water and surface water monitoring; and residence relocation.

  9. Brownish discoloration of the summit crater lake of Mt. Shinmoe-dake, Kirishima Volcano, Japan: volcanic-microbial coupled origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, Shinji; Sugimori, Kenji; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Koeda, Tomoyuki; Inaba, Hiroaki; Kataoka, Yoshihisa; Kagiyama, Tsuneomi

    2014-05-01

    A drastic change in lake water color from blue-green to brown was observed in the summit crater lake of Mt. Shinmoe-dake, Kirishima Volcano about 8 months after its 2008 eruption. The color change lasted for about 2 months (April-June 2009). The discoloration was attributed to a brownish color suspension that had formed in the lake water. X-ray fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared analyses of a sample of the suspension identified schwertmannite (Fe8O8(OH)6(SO4)). A cultivation test of iron-oxidizing bacteria for the sampled lake water with lakebed sediment revealed that the crater lake hosts iron-oxidizing bacteria, which likely participated in schwertmannite formation. We suggest that pyrite (FeS2) provided an energy source for the iron-oxidizing bacteria since the mineral was identified in hydrothermally altered tephra ejected by the August 2008 eruption. From consideration of these and other factors, the brownish discoloration of the summit crater lake of Mt. Shinmoe-dake was inferred to have resulted from a combined volcanic-microbial process.

  10. 39 CFR 6.1 - Regular meetings, annual meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regular meetings, annual meeting. 6.1 Section 6.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE MEETINGS (ARTICLE VI) § 6.1 Regular meetings, annual meeting. The Board shall meet regularly on a...

  11. 78 FR 2961 - Sunshine Act Meeting-Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting--Closed Meeting The following notice of a closed meeting is published... HOLDING THE MEETING: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. TIME AND DATE: January 14, 2013 at 10:00 a.m... meeting changes, an announcement of the change, along with the new time and place of the meeting will...

  12. 78 FR 6306 - Sunshine Act Meeting-Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting--Closed Meeting The following notice of a closed meeting is published... HOLDING THE MEETING: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. TIME AND DATE: February 4, 2013 at 12:00 p.m... meeting changes, an announcement of the change, along with the new time and place of the meeting will...

  13. The Inter-Organizational Summit on Education and Training (ISET) 2010 survey on the influence of the Houston conference training guidelines.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Jerry J; Perry, William; Ruff, Ronald M; Shear, Paula K; Breting, Leslie M Guidotti

    2012-11-01

    A conference specific to the education and training of clinical neuropsychology was held in 1997, which led to a report published in the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology (Hannay, J., Bieliauskas, L., Crosson, B., Hammeke, T., Hamsher, K., & Koffler, S. (1998). Proceedings of the Houston Conference on Specialty Education and Training in Clinical Neuropsychology. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 13, 157-250.). The guidelines produced by this conference have been referred to as the Houston Conference (HC) guidelines. Since that time, there has been considerable discussion, and some disagreement, about whether the HC guidelines produced a positive outcome in the training of neuropsychologists. To explore this question and determine how widely the HC guidelines were implemented, a meeting was held in 2006. Present and past leaders of the American Psychological Association Division 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology), the National Academy of Neuropsychology, and the Association of Postdoctoral Programs in Clinical Neuropsychology met to discuss the possible need for an Inter-Organizational Summit on Education and Training (ISET). A decision was reached to have the ISET Steering Committee conduct a survey of clinical neuropsychologists that could address the extent to which HC guidelines were present in the specialty and whether the influence of the HC guidelines was positive. An online survey was constructed, with data gathered in 2010. The current paper presents and discusses the ISET survey results. Specific findings need to be viewed cautiously due to the relatively low response rate. However, with some direct parallels to a larger recent survey of clinical neuropsychologists, the following general conclusions appear well founded: (a) the demographics of respondents in the ISET survey are comparable with a recent larger professional practice survey and thus may reasonably represent the specialty; (b) the HC guidelines appear to have been widely adopted by training

  14. Snow Core Records of Recent Deposition of Trace Metals to Central (Summit) Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Bergin, M.

    2009-12-01

    During the summer 2005 and 2006 field seasons at Summit (3270 m) Greenland we collected snow core samples for comprehensive geochemical characterization. From snow pits of 3-meter depth, dug in the clean-air sector, representing ~4 years of recent accumulation, detailed profiles (10 cm intervals) of: total and water soluble organic carbon, particulate organic and elemental carbon, inorganic ions, organic acids (LMWA), and comprehensive elemental and isotopic species were obtained. The elemental characterization supports our source reconciliation efforts in providing sub-seasonal data on aerosol particulate matter chemistry from which sourcing vectors can be inferred. Elemental analysis on the snow core sections was carried-out using magnetic-sector ICP-MS. A large suite of elements was quantified, including: the major/crustal elements (Al, Ca, K, Fe, Na, Mg, Si); minor crustal elements (Ba, Be, Cs, Li, Rb, Sc, Sr, Ti); light transition metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn); heavy transition metals (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, W); oxyanion metals (As, Mo, U, V); platinum group metals (Rh, Pd, Pt); rare earths (Ce, Er, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Y, Yb); as well as semi- and non-metals Sb, Sn, S, and P. Signal-noise was adequate to quantify all but 4 of the 52 elements studied. Chemical profiles from separate cores collected in 2005 and 2006 exhibited excellent coherence (when offset by the 45 cm of annual snow deposition) between years, indicating that the deposition archive is relatively uniform and that the sampling and analytical methods applied were robust. Clearly resolved intra- and inter-annual burial patterns were apparent for most elements, with strong covariance between many; indicating that relatively few deposition modalities are represented. Large (>30x) temporal variation in snow core concentrations were measured for Al, Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, P, Rb, Sr, Ti, U, Zn and all the rare earths, while low variation (~5x) was observed for the elements As, Cd, Hg, Mo, Pt, S and Sn. The

  15. Grainstones and cementstone mounds: The Trogkofel summit section (Lower Permian, Carnic Alps, Austria).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffhauser, M.; Sanders, D.; Krainer, K.

    2009-04-01

    In the Carnic Alps, Austria, an Artinskian succession 400 m thick of shallow-water bioclastic limestones and of mounds composed of ?Archaeolithophyllum, Archaeolithoporella and abundant fibrous cementstone (after former aragonite) records deposition along a "grainstone-dominated" platform margin. The section was taken along the route through the east-facing cliff of Trogkofel. The Trogkofel Limestone (Artinskian pro parte) is excellently exposed and preserved the most complete along this route, but no section has hitherto been logged. The total thickness of the Trogkofel Limestone probably is about 550 meters; the summit section comprises its upper 400 meters. The section consists mainly of shallow-water bioclastic limestones (grainstones, packstones, rudstones) intercalated with cementstone mounds. Both the bioclastic limestones and the mounds typically are thick-bedded to, more commonly, unbedded. Throughout the section, intervals a few tens of meters in thickness dominated by bioclastic limestones change vertically with intervals dominated by cementstone mounds. Up-section, no clear-cut trend with respect to prevalent facies, mean depositional water depth, and energy index is obvious. Furthermore, no lime-muddy, meter-scale peritidal cycles, and no teepee structures and no pisolite levels were identified; thin intervals of fenestral lime mudstones and/or of cryptmicrobially-laminated limestones are very rare. The bioclastic limestones commonly weather out unstratified, or show subhorizontal stratification or, more rarely, low-angle cross-stratification. In the upper 100 meters of section, grainstones to fine-grained rudstones rich in keystone vugs are prevalent. The cementstone mounds comprise intervals up to a few meters in thickness; the biogenic component is characterized by foliose crusts pertaining to ?Archaeolithophyllum hidensis and Archaeolithoporella, overgrown by Tubiphytes and fenestrate bryozoans. The ?Archaeolithophyllum-Archaeolithoporella crusts

  16. Seasonal Atmospheric Chemistry at Summit, Greenland Based on N and O Isotopes of Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, M. G.; Steig, E. J.; Sigman, D. M.; Jarvis, J.

    2003-12-01

    Nitric acid (HNO3), or nitrate (NO3-) is the major sink for reactive nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the atmosphere. Ice core records of NO3- could provide information about past reactive nitrogen chemistry and oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. However, processes that take place in the surface snow (e.g., evaporation, photolysis) can affect the final NO3- concentrations that are archived in the ice cores, making it difficult to interpret past changes in atmospheric chemistry or climate. The isotopic composition of NO3- in surface snow provides an additional constraint on the effect of post-depositional processing in the upper meter of snowpack on the NO3- content measured in glacial ice cores. Furthermore, the isotopes of NO3- in ice cores have the potential to allow for reconstruction of sources of NOx and aspects of atmospheric chemistry in the past. Snow pit samples (sampled every 3 cm to 1 m) collected at Summit, Greenland during August 2001 show seasonal variation in N and O isotopes of NO3-. δ 15N of NO3- in the upper meter of snow ranges from -15 to +16 per mil (vs. atmospheric N2), with higher values found in summertime snow. The δ 15N of snowpack NO3- falls in the range reported for NO3- in precipitation from other parts of the world. δ 18O of NO3- in the snowpack ranges from 65 to 80 per mil (vs. VSMOW), similar to high values observed for rainwater and aerosol NO3-. In contrast to the δ 15N, the δ 18O of NO3- is lower in summertime snow than in wintertime. Preliminary analyses also show diurnal variation in the isotopes of NO3- during summer, with depletion of 15N and 18O at "night" followed by enrichment during the "day." The similar behavior of the N and O isotopes is suggestive of a simple physical mechanism for the diurnal change, such as photolysis or evaporation. The seasonal δ 15N and δ 18O, however, vary in opposite directions suggesting that these processes are not the dominant mechanism determining the seasonal signals. Our hypothesis is

  17. How to Run a Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, Antony

    1976-01-01

    Offers guidelines on how to correct things that go wrong in meetings. Discusses functions of a meeting, distinctions in size and type of meetings, the chairman's role, defining meeting objectives, making preparations, and conducting a meeting that will meet its objectives. (Author/JG)

  18. Moving from Petroleum to Plants to Energize our World (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, Maureen; C3Bio Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Moving from Petroleum to Plants to Energize our World' was submitted by the Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. C3Bio, an EFRC directed by Maureen McCann at Purdue University is a partnership between five institutions: Purdue (lead), Argonne National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Northeastern University, and the University of Tennessee. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  19. Moving from Petroleum to Plants to Energize our World (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    McCann, Maureen (Director, Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels); C3Bio Staff

    2011-11-03

    'Moving from Petroleum to Plants to Energize our World' was submitted by the Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. C3Bio, an EFRC directed by Maureen McCann at Purdue University is a partnership between five institutions: Purdue (lead), Argonne National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Northeastern University, and the University of Tennessee. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  20. Undergraduate Research at the Center for Energy Efficient Materials (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum

    ScienceCinema

    Bowers, John (Director, Center for Energy Efficient Materials ); CEEM Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Undergraduate Research at the Center for Energy Efficient Materials (CEEM)' was submitted by CEEM to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CEEM, an EFRC directed by John Bowers at the University of California, Santa Barbara is a partnership of scientists from four institutions: UC, Santa Barbara (lead), UC, Santa Cruz, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Energy Efficient Materials is 'to discover and develop materials that control the interactions between light, electricity, and heat at the nanoscale for improved solar energy conversion, solid-state lighting, and conversion of heat into electricity.' Research topics are: solar photovoltaic, photonic, solid state lighting, optics, thermoelectric, bio-inspired, electrical energy storage, batteries, battery electrodes, novel materials synthesis, and scalable processing.

  1. The Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuel (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Allen, Todd (Director, Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuel); CMSNF Staff

    2011-11-02

    'The Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuel (CMSNF)' was submitted by the CMSNF to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CMSNF, an EFRC directed by Todd Allen at the Idaho National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from six institutions: INL (lead), Colorado School of Mines, University of Florida, Florida State University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the University of Wisconsin at Madison. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels is 'to achieve a first-principles based understanding of the effect of irradiation-induced defects and microstructures on thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels.' Research topics are: phonons, thermal conductivity, nuclear, extreme environment, radiation effects, defects, and matter by design.

  2. Solar Cells from Plastics? Mission Possible at the PHaSE Energy Research Center, UMass Amherst (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Russell, Thomas P; Lahti, Paul M. (PHaSE - Polymer-Based Materials for Harvesting Solar Energy); PHaSE Staff

    2011-11-03

    'Solar Cells from Plastics? Mission Possible at the PHaSE Energy Research Center, UMass Amherst' was submitted by the Polymer-Based Materials for Harvesting Solar Energy (PHaSE) EFRC to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. PHaSE, an EFRC co-directed by Thomas P. Russell and Paul M. Lahti at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, is a partnership of scientists from six institutions: UMass (lead), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pennyslvania State University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and the University of Pittsburgh. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  3. EFRC:CST at the University of Texas at Austin - A DOE Energy Frontier Research Center (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Zhu, Xiaoyang (Director, Understanding Charge Separation and Transfer at Interfaces in Energy Materials); CST Staff

    2011-11-03

    'EFRC:CST at the University of Texas at Austin - A DOE Energy Frontier Research Center' was submitted by the EFRC for Understanding Charge Separation and Transfer at Interfaces in Energy Materials (EFRC:CST) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. EFRC:CST is directed by Xiaoyang Zhu at the University of Texas at Austin in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  4. The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Mao, Ho-kwang (Director, Center for Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments); EFree Staff

    2011-11-02

    'The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales ' was submitted by the Center for Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments (EFree) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. EFree is directed by Ho-kwang Mao at the Carnegie Institute of Washington and is a partnership of scientists from thirteen institutions.The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments is 'to accelerate the discovery and creation of energy-relevant materials using extreme pressures and temperatures.' Research topics are: catalysis (CO{sub 2}, water), photocatalysis, solid state lighting, optics, thermelectric, phonons, thermal conductivity, solar electrodes, fuel cells, superconductivity, extreme environment, radiation effects, defects, spin dynamics, CO{sub 2} (capture, convert, store), greenhouse gas, hydrogen (fuel, storage), ultrafast physics, novel materials synthesis, and defect tolerant materials.

  5. Autonomic Materials for Smarter, Safer, Longer-Lasting Batteries (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Thackeray, Michael (Director, Center for Electrical Energy Storage); CEES Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Autonomic Materials for Smarter, Safer, Longer-Lasting Batteries' was submitted by the Center for Electrical Energy Storage (CEES) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CEES, an EFRC directed by Michael Thackery at Argonne National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: ANL (lead), Northwestern University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Electrical Energy Storage is 'to acquire a fundamental understanding of interfacial phenomena controlling electrochemical processes that will enable dramatic improvements in the properties and performance of energy storage devices, notable Li ion batteries.' Research topics are: electrical energy storage, batteries, battery electrodes, electrolytes, adaptive materials, interfacial characterization, matter by design; novel materials synthesis, charge transport, and defect tolerant materials.

  6. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes at LANL (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Nastasi (Director, Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes); CMIME Staff

    2011-11-03

    'Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes (CMIME) at LANL' was submitted by CMIME to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CMIME, an EFRC directed by Michael Nastasi at Los Alamos National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from four institutions: LANL (lead), Carnegia Mellon University, the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  7. Nine thousand years of upper montane soil/vegetation dynamics from the summit of Caratuva Peak, Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Maurício B.; Pereira, Nuno Veríssimo; Behling, Hermann; Curcio, Gustavo R.; Roderjan, Carlos V.

    2014-12-01

    Biodiversity loss, climate change, and increased freshwater consumption are some of the main environmental problems on Earth. Mountain ecosystems can reduce these threats by providing several positive influences, such as the maintenance of biodiversity, water regulation, and carbon storage, amongst others. The knowledge of the history of these environments and their response to climate change is very important for management, conservation, and environmental monitoring programs. The genesis of the soil organic matter of the current upper montane vegetation remains unclear and seems to be quite variable depending on location. Some upper montane sites in the very extensive coastal Sea Mountain Range present considerable organic matter from the late Pleistocene and other from only the Holocene. Our study was carried out on three soil profiles (two cores in grassland and one in forest) on the Caratuva Peak of the Serra do Ibitiraquire (a sub-range of Sea Mountain Range - Serra do Mar) in Southern Brazil. The δ13C isotopic analyses of organic matter in soil horizons were conducted to detect whether C3 or C4 plants dominated the past communities. Complementarily, we performed a pollen analysis and 14C dating of the humin fraction to obtain the age of the studied horizons. Except for a short and probably drier period (between 6000 and 4500 cal yr BP), C3 plants, including ombrophilous grasses and trees, have dominated the highlands of the Caratuva Peak (Pico Caratuva), as well as the other uppermost summits of the Serra do Ibitiraquire, since around 9000 cal yr BP. The Caratuva region represents a landscape of high altitude grasslands (campos de altitude altomontanos or campos altomontanos) and upper montane rain/cloud forests with soils that most likely contain some organic matter from the late Pleistocene, as has been reported in Southern and Southeastern Brazil for other sites. However, our results indicate that the studied deposits (near the summit) are from the early

  8. Reactivation of Stromboli's summit craters at the end of the 2007 effusive eruption detected by thermal surveys and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotta, E.; Calvari, S.; Cristaldi, A.; D'Auria, L.; Di Vito, M. A.; Moretti, R.; Peluso, R.; Spampinato, L.; Boschi, E.

    2015-11-01

    This work arises from the field observations made during the civil protection emergency period connected to the 2007 Stromboli eruption. We observed changes in the shallow feeding system of the volcano to which we give a volcanological interpretation and the relative implications. Here we describe the processes that occurred in the upper feeding system from the end of the 2007 effusive eruption on 3 April to the renewal of the strombolian explosive activity at the summit craters (30 June), interpreted using multidisciplinary data. We used thermal camera data collected both from helicopter and from a fixed station at 400 m to retrieve the evolving summit crater activity. These data, compared with seismic signals and published geochemical records, allowed us to detail the shifting of the degassing activity within the crater terrace from NE to SW, occurred between 15 and 25 April 2007 prior to the resumption of the strombolian activity. In particular, from mid-April, a gradual SW displacement in the maximum apparent temperatures was recorded at the vents within the summit craters, together with a change in the very long period location and confirmed by variations in geochemical indicators (CO2/SO2 plume ratios and CO2 fluxes) from literature. The shallow feeding system experienced a major readjustment after the end of the effusive activity, determining variations in the pressure leakage of the source, slowly deepening and shifting toward SW. All these data, together with the framework supplied by previous structural surveys, allowed us to propose that the compaction of debris accumulated in the uppermost conduit by inward crater collapses, occurred in early March, produced the observed anomalies. At Stromboli, major morphology changes, taking place in the following years, were anticipated by these small and apparently minor processes occurred in the upper feeding system. Other studies are relating similar changes to modifications of the eruptive activity also at other

  9. Diffuse volcanic degassing and thermal energy release 2015 surveys from the summit cone of Teide volcano, Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melián, Gladys; Asensio-Ramos, María; Padilla, Germán; Alonso, Mar; Halliwell, Simon; Sharp, Emerson; Butters, Damaris; Ingman, Dylan; Alexander, Scott; Cook, Jenny; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    The summit cone of Teide volcano (Spain) is characterized by the presence of a weak fumarolic system, steamy ground, and high rates of diffuse CO2 degassing all around this area. The temperature of the fumaroles (83° C) corresponds to the boiling point of water at discharge conditions. Water is the major component of these fumarolic emissions, followed by CO2, N2, H2, H2S, HCl, Ar, CH4, He and CO, a composition typical of hydrothermal fluids. Previous diffuse CO2 surveys have shown to be an important tool to detect early warnings of possible impending volcanic unrests at Tenerife Island (Melián et al., 2012; Pérez et al., 2013). In July 2015, a soil and fumarole gas survey was undertaken in order to estimate the diffuse volcanic degassing and thermal energy release from the summit cone of Teide volcano. A diffuse CO2 emission survey was performed selecting 170 observation sites according to the accumulation chamber method. Soil CO2 efflux values range from non-detectable (˜0.5 g m‑2d‑1) up to 10,672 g m‑2d‑1, with an average value of 601 g m‑2d‑1. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. Measurement of soil CO2 efflux allowed an estimation of 162 ± 14 t d‑1 of deep seated derived CO2. To calculate the steam discharge associated with this volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 output, we used the average H2O/CO2 mass ratio equal to 1.19 (range, 0.44-3.42) as a representative value of the H2O/CO2 mass ratios for Teide fumaroles. The resulting estimate of the steam flow associated with the gas flux is equal to 193 t d‑1. The condensation of this steam results in a thermal energy release of 5.0×1011J d‑1 for Teide volcano or a total heat flow of 6 MWt. The diffuse gas emissions and thermal energy released from the summit of Teide volcano are comparable to those observed at other volcanoes. Sustained surveillance using these methods will be valuable for monitoring the activity of Teide volcano.

  10. A Time for Questions: The Future of Integration and Tech Prep. A Report of a Three-Day Summit (Washington, D.C., June 27-29, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol; Flaxman, Erwin

    A 3-day summit of researchers, policymakers, administrators, practitioners, and other concerned individuals examined the organizational, instructional, and political problems in implementing integration and tech prep (I/TP) programs. The following propositions emerged from the discussions: (1) I/TP face numerous structural and professional…

  11. AIDS Prevention and Control: Invited Presentations and Papers from the World Summit of Ministers of Health on Programmes for AIDS Prevention (London, England, January 26-28, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    Papers from the World Summit of Ministers of Health on Programmes for AIDS Prevention in this book include: (1) "Global AIDS: Epidemiology, Impact, Projections, Global Strategy," (Jonathan Mann); (2) "Modes of Transmission: The Basis for Prevention Strategies," (Donald Acheson); (3) "National AIDS Information Programme in France," (Alain…

  12. School Desegregation--The Unfinished Agenda. Proceedings from the Daisy Bates Educational Summit (Little Rock, Arkansas, May 9-11, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, New York, NY.

    This publication presents the proceedings of an educational summit held in May 1991 to honor D. Bates and to examine the unfinished agenda of the desegregation movement. Bates was President of the Arkansas State Conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) when the Little Rock (Arkansas) School Board voted…

  13. 78 FR 76101 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... regarding the meetings, please contact David Capozzi, Executive Director, (202) 272- 0010 (voice); (202) 272... with disabilities. An assistive listening system, Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART),...

  14. Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erskine, W. D.; Saynor, M. J.; Turner, K.; Whiteside, T.; Boyden, J.; Evans, K. G.

    2015-03-01

    Soil erosion rates on plots of waste rock at Ranger uranium mine and basin sediment yields have been measured for over 30 years in Magela Creek in northern Australia. Soil erosion rates on chlorite schist waste rock are higher than for mica schist and weathering is also much faster. Sediment yields are low but are further reduced by sediment trapping effects of flood plains, floodouts, billabongs and extensive wetlands. Suspended sediment yields exceed bedload yields in this deeply weathered, tropical landscape, but the amount of sand transported greatly exceeds that of silt and clay. Nevertheless, sand is totally stored above the topographic base level. Longitudinal continuity of sediment transport is not maintained. As a result, suspended sediment and bedload do not move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek and lower Magela Creek wetlands trap about 90.5% of the total sediment load input.

  15. Comparison of Near-Surface Air Temperatures and MODIS Ice-Surface Temperatures at Summit, Greenland (2008-2013)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuman, Christopher A.; Hall, Dorothy K.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Mefford, Thomas K.; Schnaubelt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the stability of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared-derived ice surface temperature (IST) data from Terra for use as a climate quality data record. The availability of climate quality air temperature data (TA) from a NOAA Global Monitoring Division observatory at Greenlands Summit station has enabled this high temporal resolution study of MODIS ISTs. During a 5 year period (July 2008 to August 2013), more than 2500 IST values were compared with 3-minute average TA values derived from the 1-minute data from NOAAs primary 2 m air temperature sensor. These data enabled an expected small offset between air and surface temperatures at this the ice sheet location to be investigated over multiple annual cycles.

  16. Proceedings of the First International Summit on Intestinal Anastomotic Leak, Chicago, Illinois, October 4–5, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Shogan, Benjamin D.; An, Gary C.; Schardey, Hans M.; Matthews, Jeffrey B.; Umanskiy, Konstantin; Fleshman, James W.; Hoeppner, Jens; Fry, Donald E.; Garcia-Granereo, Eduardo; Jeekel, Hans; van Goor, Harry; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Konda, Vani; Gilbert, Jack A.; Auner, Gregory W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The first international summit on anastomotic leak was held in Chicago in October, 2012 to assess current knowledge in the field and develop novel lines of inquiry. The following report is a summary of the proceedings with commentaries and future prospects for clinical trials and laboratory investigations. Background: Anastomotic leakage remains a devastating problem for the patient, and a continuing challenge to the surgeon operating on high-risk areas of the gastrointestinal tract such as the esophagus and rectum. Despite the traditional wisdom that anastomotic leak is because of technique, evidence to support this is weak-to-non-existent. Outcome data continue to demonstrate that expert high-volume surgeons working in high-volume centers continue to experience anastomotic leaks and that surgeons cannot predict reliably which patients will leak. Methods: A one and one-half day summit was held and a small working group assembled to review current practices, opinions, scientific evidence, and potential paths forward to understand and decrease the incidence of anastomotic leak. Results: Results of a survey of the opinions of the group demonstrated that the majority of participants believe that anastomotic leak is a complicated biologic problem whose pathogenesis remains ill-defined. The group opined that anastomotic leak is underreported clinically, it is not because of technique except when there is gross inattention to it, and that results from animal models are mostly irrelevant to the human condition. Conclusions: A fresh and unbiased examination of the causes and strategies for prevention of anastomotic leak needs to be addressed by a continuous working group of surgeons, basic scientists, and clinical trialists to realize a real and significant reduction in its incidence and morbidity. Such a path forward is discussed. PMID:25215465

  17. Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs): A Response to Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, Paul; Crabtree, George; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Ratner, Mark

    2011-05-25

    A distinguished panel of speakers at the 2011 EFRC Summit looks at the EFRC Program and how it serves as a response to "Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination”, the culminating report that arose from a series of Basic Research Needs workshops. The panel members are Paul Alivisatos, the Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, George Crabtree, Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory, Mildred Dresselhause, Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Mark Ratner, Professor at Northwestern University. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  18. Determination of Mercury Content in a Shallow Firn Core from Summit, Greenland by Isotope Dilution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Jacqueline L.; Long, Stephen E.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Kelly, W. Robert

    2003-01-01

    The total mercury Hg content was determined in 6 cm sections of a near-surface 7 m firn core and in surrounding surface snow from Summit, Greenland (elevation: 3238 m, 72.58 N, 38.53 W) in May 2001 by isotope dilution cold-vapor inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-CV-ICP-MS). The focus of this research was to evaluate the capability of the ID-CV-ICPMS technique for measuring trace levels of Hg typical of polar snow and firn. Highly enriched Hg-201 isotopic spike is added to approximately 10 ml melted core and thoroughly mixed. The Hg(+2) in the sample is reduced on line with tin (II) chloride (SnCl2) and the elemental Hg (Hg(0)) vapor pre-concentrated on to gold gauze using a commercial amalgam system. The Hg is then thermally desorbed and introduced into a quadrupole ICP-MS. The blank corrected Hg concentrations determined for all samples ranged from 0.25 ng/L to 1.74 ng/L (ppt) (average 0.59 ng/L plus or minus 0.28 ng/L) and fall within the range of those previously determined by Boutron et al., 1998 (less than or equal to 0.05 ng/L to 2.0 ng/L) for the Summit site. The average blank value was 0.19 ng/L plus or minus 0.045 ng/L (n=6). The Hg values specifically for the firn core range from 0.25 ng/L to 0.87 ng/L (average 0.51 ng/L plus or minus 0.13 ng/L) and show both values declining with time and larger variability in concentration in the top 1.8 m.

  19. Monitoring of vegetation impact due to trampling on Cadillac Mountain summit using high spatial resolution remote sensing data sets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Kook; Daigle, John J

    2012-11-01

    Cadillac Mountain--the highest peak along the eastern seaboard of the United States--is a major tourist destination in Acadia National Park, Maine. Managing vegetation impact due to trampling on the Cadillac Mountain summit is extremely challenging because of the large number of visitors and the general open nature of landscape in this fragile subalpine environmental setting. Since 2000, more intensive management strategies--based on placing physical barriers and educational messages for visitors--have been employed to protect threatened vegetation, decrease vegetation impact, and enhance vegetation recovery in the vicinity of the summit loop trail. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the management strategies employed. For this purpose, vegetation cover changes between 2001 and 2007 were detected using multispectral high spatial resolution remote sensing data sets. A normalized difference vegetation index was employed to identify the rates of increase and decrease in the vegetation areas. Three buffering distances (30, 60, and 90 m) from the edges of the trail were used to define multiple spatial extents of the site, and the same spatial extents were employed at a nearby control site that had no visitors. No significant differences were detected between the mean rates of vegetation increase and decrease at the experimental site compared with a nearby control site in the case of a small spatial scale (≤30 m) comparison (in all cases P > 0.05). However, in the medium (≤60 m) and large (≤90 m) spatial scales, the rates of increased vegetation were significantly greater and rates of decreased vegetation significantly lower at the experimental site compared with the control site (in all cases P < 0.001). Research implications are explored that relate to the spatial extent of the radial patterns of impact of trampling on vegetation at the site level. Management implications are explored in terms of the spatial strategies used to

  20. Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs): A Response to Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    ScienceCinema

    Alivisatos, Paul (Director, LBNL); Crabtree, George (ANL); Dresselhaus, Mildred (MIT); Ratner, Mark (Northwestern University)

    2012-03-14

    A distinguished panel of speakers at the 2011 EFRC Summit looks at the EFRC Program and how it serves as a response to "Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination?, the culminating report that arose from a series of Basic Research Needs workshops. The panel members are Paul Alivisatos, the Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, George Crabtree, Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory, Mildred Dresselhause, Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Mark Ratner, Professor at Northwestern University. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.