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Sample records for gaba uptake inhibitors

  1. Design, synthesis and SAR studies of GABA uptake inhibitors derived from 2-substituted pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Steffan, Tobias; Renukappa-Gutke, Thejavathi; Höfner, Georg; Wanner, Klaus T

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, we disclose the design and synthesis of a series of 2-substituted pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid as core structures and the N-arylalkyl derivatives thereof as potential GABA transport inhibitors. The 2-position in the side chain of pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid derivatives was substituted with alkyl, hydroxy and amino groups to modulate the activity and selectivity to mGAT1 and mGAT4 proteins. SAR studies of the compounds performed for the four mouse GABA transporter proteins (mGAT1-mGAT4) implied significant potencies and subtype selectivities for 2-hydroxy-2-pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid derivatives. The racemate rac-(u)-13c exhibited the highest potency (pIC50 5.67) at and selectivity for mGAT1 in GABA uptake assays. In fact, the potency of rac-(u)-13c at hGAT-1 (pIC50 6.14) was even higher than its potency at mGAT1. These uptake results for rac-(u)-13c are in line with the binding affinities to the aforesaid proteins mGAT1 (pKi 6.99) and hGAT-1 (pKi 7.18) determined by MS Binding Assay based on NO711 as marker quantified by LC-ESI-MS-MS analysis. Interestingly, the 2-hydroxy-2-pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid rac-(u)-13d containing 2-{[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)]methoxy} ethyl group at the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring showed high potency at mGAT4 and a comparatively better selectivity for this protein (>15 against mGAT3) than the well known mGAT4 uptake inhibitor (S)-SNAP-5114. PMID:25698617

  2. Synthesis of 4-substituted nipecotic acid derivatives and their evaluation as potential GABA uptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hellenbrand, Tim; Höfner, Georg; Wein, Thomas; Wanner, Klaus T

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we disclose the design and synthesis of novel 4-susbtituted nipecotic acid derivatives as inhibitors of the GABA transporter mGAT1. Based on molecular modeling studies the compounds are assumed to adopt a binding pose similar to that of the potent mGAT1 inhibitor nipecotic acid. As substitution in 4-position should not cause an energetically unfavorable orientation of nipecotic acid as it is the case for N-substituted derivatives this is expected to lead to highly potent binders. For the synthesis of novel 4-substituted nipecotic acid derivatives a linear synthetic strategy was employed. As a key step, palladium catalyzed cross coupling reactions were used to attach the required biaryl moieties to the ω-position of the alkenyl- or alkynyl spacers of varying length in the 4-position of the nipecotic acid scaffold. The resulting amino acids were characterized with respect to their binding affinities and inhibitory potencies at mGAT1. Though the biological activities found were generally insignificant to poor, two compounds, one of which possesses a reasonable binding affinity for mGAT1, rac-57, the other a notable inhibitory potency at mGAT4, rac-84, both displaying a slight subtype selectivity for the individual transporters, could be identified. PMID:27039250

  3. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway. PMID:25851259

  4. Synthesis of new fluorinated analogs of GABA, Pregabalin bioisosteres, and their effects on [(3)H]GABA uptake by rat brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Borisova, T; Pozdnyakova, N; Shaitanova, E; Gerus, I; Dudarenko, M; Mironets, R; Haufe, G; Kukhar, V

    2015-08-01

    Fluorinated analogs of natural substances take an essential place in the design of new biologically active compounds. New fluorinated analogs of γ-aminobutyric acid, that is, β-polyfluoroalkyl-GABAs (FGABAs), were synthesized with substituents: β-CF3-β-OH (1), β-CF3 (2); β-CF2CF2H (3). FGABAs are bioisosteres of Pregabalin (Lyrica®, Pfizer's blockbuster drug, β-i-Bu-GABA), and have lipophilicity close to this medicine. The effects of synthesized FGABAs on [(3)H]GABA uptake by isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) were assessed and compared with those of Pregabalin. FGABAs 1-3 (100μM) did not influence the initial velocity of [(3)H]GABA uptake when applied acutely, whereas an increase in this parameter was found after preliminary incubation of FGABAs with synaptosomes. Pregabalin after preliminary incubation with synaptosomes caused unidirectional changes in the initial velocity of [(3)H]GABA uptake. Using specific inhibitors of GAT1 and GAT3, NO-711 and SNAP5114, respectively, the ability of FGABAs 1-3 to influence non-GAT1 and non-GAT3 uptake activity of nerve terminals was analyzed, but no specificity was found. Therefore, new synthesized FGABAs are structural but not functional analogs of GABA (because they did not inhibit synaptosomal [(3)H]GABA uptake). Moreover, FGABAs are able to increase the initial velocity of [(3)H]GABA uptake by synaptosomes, and this effect is higher than that of Pregabalin. PMID:26138193

  5. Distribution of 3H-GABA uptake sites in the nematode Ascaris

    SciTech Connect

    Guastella, J.; Stretton, A.O. )

    1991-05-22

    The distribution of uptake sites for the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the nematode Ascaris suum was examined by autoradiography of 3H-GABA uptake. Single neural processes in both the ventral and dorsal nerve cords were labeled with 3H-GABA. Serial section analysis identified the cells of origin of these processes as the RMEV-like and RMED-like neurons. These cells belong to a set of four neurons in the nerve ring, all of which are labeled by 3H-GABA. 3H-GABA labeling of at least two other sets of cephalic neurons was seen. One of these pairs consists of medium-sized lateral ganglia neurons, located at the level of the amphid commissure bundle. A second pair is located in the lateral ganglia at the level of the deirid commissure bundle. The position and size of these lateral ganglia cells suggest that they are the GABA-immunoreactive lateral ganglia cells frequently seen in whole-mount immunocytochemical preparations. Four neuronal cell bodies located in the retrovesicular ganglion were also labeled with 3H-GABA. These cells, which are probably cholinergic excitatory motor neurons, do not contain detectable GABA-like immunoreactivity. Heavy labeling of muscle cells was also observed. The ventral and dorsal nerve cord inhibitory motor neurons, which are known to contain GABA-like immunoreactivity, were not labeled above background with 3H-GABA. Together with the experiments reported previously, these results define three classes of GABA-associated neurons in Ascaris: (1) neurons that contain endogenous GABA and possess a GABA uptake system; (2) neurons that contain endogenous GABA, but that either lack a GABA uptake system or possess a GABA uptake system of low activity; (3) neurons that possess a GABA uptake system, but that lack endogenous GABA.

  6. [Pharmacological influences on the brain level and transport of GABA. II) Effect of various psychoactive drugs on brain level and uptake of GABA].

    PubMed

    Gabana, M A; Varotto, M; Saladini, M; Zanchin, G; Battistin, L

    1981-04-30

    The effects of some psychoactive drugs on the level and uptake of GABA in the mouse brain was studied using well standardized procedures, mainely the silica-gel cromatography for determining the GABA content and the brain slices for measuring GABA uptake. It was found that levomepromazine, sulpiride, haloperidol and amytryptiline were without effects on the cerebral level of GABA; it was also found that these drugs do not influence the rates of uptake of GABA by mouse brain slices. Such results do indicate that the psychoactive drugs studied are without effects on the level and uptake of GABA in the brain. PMID:7272066

  7. Development of a high-affinity GABA uptake system in embryonic amphibian spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lamborghini, J E; Iles, A

    1985-11-01

    High-affinity uptake systems for amino acid neurotransmitter precursors have been highly correlated with the use of the particular amino acid or its derivative as a transmitter. We have found interneurons in the Xenopus embryo spinal cord which accumulate GABA by a high-affinity uptake system. They originate near the end of gastrulation and their ability to accumulate GABA first appears at the early tail bud stage. By position and appearance they are comparable to some of the embryonic interneurons described by A. Roberts and J. D. W. Clarke (1982, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. B 296, 195-212). GABA-accumulating neurons also develop in dissociated cell cultures made from the presumptive spinal cord of neural plate stage Xenopus embryos. GABA accumulation in cultured neurons, as in cells in vivo, occurs via a high-affinity uptake system; GABA-accumulating cells have the same time of origin as the cells in vivo, and the ability to accumulate GABA in the population of cultured neurons appears at a time equivalent to that observed in intact sibling embryos. Thus it seems likely that the population of GABA-accumulating neurons developing in cell culture corresponds to the GABA-accumulating interneurons in vivo. The development of these neurons in dissociated cell cultures permits perturbation experiments that would be difficult to perform in vivo. We have examined the development of high-affinity GABA uptake in conditions that permit no electrical impulse activity in the cultures. The onset and extent of development of GABA accumulation in the neuronal population are normal under these conditions. PMID:3932109

  8. Pharmacology of GABA.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, B

    1982-01-01

    GABA-ergic systems are involved in all the main functions of the brain. In most brain regions impairment of this system produces epileptic activity. GABA-mediated inhibitory function can be enhanced by drugs of at least seven different types. They act on the metabolism or synaptic release of GABA, or its reuptake into neurones of glia, or on various components of the GABA receptor complex (GABA recognition site, "benzodiazepine" receptor or chloride ionophore). Among such compounds, those which act most specifically and potently on GABA receptors remain primarily research tools. Among compounds in clinical use, valproate, benzodiazepines, and anticonvulsant barbiturates al enhance GABA-mediated inhibition. In the future, new inhibitors of GABA uptake, new GABA agonists and potent inhibitors of GABA-transaminase are likely to become available. Trials of drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function have been made in a wide variety of neurological disorders. In most forms of epilepsy a therapeutic effect is evident. Real benefit from GABA therapies has not been demonstrated in the principal disorders of movement (Huntington's chorea, Parkinson's disease, dystonias), except in so far as they have a myoclonic or paroxysmal component. Among psychiatric disorders the acute symptoms of schizophrenia are exacerbated by enhanced GABA-ergic function. Abstinence syndromes (alcohol, barbiturate or narcotic withdrawal) are ameliorated by drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function, and there is some evidence for a beneficial action in anxiety states and mania. Attempts to relate the molecular neurobiology of GABA with clinical pharmacology are of very recent origin. Improved understanding of the variety of GABA receptor mechanisms will provide the key to the more selective pharmacological manipulations that are required for therapeutic success. PMID:6214305

  9. Distribution and ultrastructure of neurons in opossum piriform cortex displaying immunoreactivity to GABA and GAD and high-affinity tritiated GABA uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Haberly, L.B.; Hansen, D.J.; Feig, S.L.; Presto, S.

    1987-12-08

    GABAergic neurons have been identified in the piriform cortex of the opossum at light and electron microscopic levels by immunocytochemical localization of GABA and the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and by autoradiographic visualization of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake. Four major neuron populations have been distinguished on the basis of soma size, shape, and segregation at specific depths and locations: large horizontal cells in layer Ia of the anterior piriform cortex, small globular cells with thin dendrites concentrated in layers Ib and II of the posterior piriform cortex, and multipolar and fusiform cells concentrated in the deep part of layer III in anterior and posterior parts of the piriform cortex and the subjacent endopiriform nucleus. All four populations were well visualized with both antisera, but the large layer Ia horizontal cells displayed only very light /sup 3/H-GABA uptake, thus suggesting a lack of local axon collaterals or lack of high-affinity GABA uptake sites. The large, ultrastructurally distinctive somata of layer Ia horizontal cells receive a very small number of symmetrical synapses; the thin, axonlike dendrites of small globular cells are exclusively postsynaptic and receive large numbers of both symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses, in contrast to somata which receive a small number of both types; and the deep multipolar and fusiform cells receive a highly variable number of symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses on somata and proximal dendrites. Labeled puncta of axon terminal dimensions were found in large numbers in the neuropil surrounding pyramidal cell somata in layer II and in the endopiriform nucleus. Moderately large numbers of labeled puncta were found in layer I at the depth of pyramidal cell apical dendrites with greater numbers in layer Ia at the depth of distal apical segments than in layer Ib.

  10. Discovery of a subtype selective inhibitor of the human betaine/GABA transporter 1 (BGT-1) with a non-competitive pharmacological profile.

    PubMed

    Kragholm, Bolette; Kvist, Trine; Madsen, Karsten K; Jørgensen, Lars; Vogensen, Stine B; Schousboe, Arne; Clausen, Rasmus P; Jensen, Anders A; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-08-15

    The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters (GATs) are essential regulators of the activity in the GABAergic system through their continuous uptake of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft and extrasynaptic space. Four GAT subtypes have been identified to date, each displaying different pharmacological properties and expression patterns. The present study focus on the human betaine/GABA transporter 1 (BGT-1), which has recently emerged as a new target for treatment of epilepsy. However, the lack of selective inhibitors of this transporter has impaired the exploration of this potential considerably. With the objective of identifying novel compounds displaying selectivity for BGT-1, we performed a screening of a small compound library at cells expressing BGT-1 using a [(3)H]GABA uptake assay. The screening resulted in the identification of the compound N-(1-benzyl-4-piperidinyl)-2,4-dichlorobenzamide (BPDBA), a selective inhibitor of the human BGT-1 transporter with a non-competitive profile exhibiting no significant inhibitory activity at the other three human GAT subtypes. The selectivity profile of the compound was subsequently confirmed at cells expressing the four mouse GAT subtypes. Thus, BPDBA constitutes a potential useful pharmacological tool compound for future explorations of the function of the BGT-1 subtype. PMID:23792119

  11. Cl− uptake promoting depolarizing GABA actions in immature rat neocortical neurones is mediated by NKCC1

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Junko; Okabe, Akihito; Toyoda, Hiroki; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2004-01-01

    GABA is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature brain, but during early postnatal development the elevated [Cl−]i in immature neocortical neurones causes GABAA receptor activation to be depolarizing. The molecular mechanisms underlying this intracellular Cl− accumulation remain controversial. Therefore, the GABA reversal potential (EGABA) or [Cl−]i in early postnatal rat neocortical neurones was measured by the gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp method, and the relative expression levels of the cation−Cl− cotransporter mRNAs (in the same cells) were examined by semiquantitative single-cell multiplex RT-PCR to look for statistical correlations with [Cl−]i. The mRNA expression levels were positively (the Cl− accumulating Na+,K+−2Cl− cotransporter NKCC1) or negatively (the Cl− extruding K+−Cl− cotransporter KCC2) correlated with [Cl−]i. NKCC1 mRNA expression was high in early postnatal days, but decreased during postnatal development, whereas KCC2 mRNA expression displayed the opposite pattern. [Cl−]i and NKCC1 mRNA expression were each higher in cortical plate (CP) neurones than in the presumably older layer V/VI pyramidal neurones in a given slice. The pharmacological effects of bumetanide on EGABA were consistent with the different expression levels of NKCC1 mRNA. These data suggest that NKCC1 may play a pivotal role in the generation of GABA-mediated depolarization in immature CP cells, while KCC2 promotes the later maturation of GABAergic inhibition in the rat neocortex. PMID:15090604

  12. Effect of Uptake-one inhibitors on the uptake of norepinephrine and metaiodobenzylguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tobes, M.C.; Jaques, S. Jr.; Wieland, D.M.; Sisson, J.C.

    1985-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the uptake of the radiopharmaceutical metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and the catecholamine norepinephrine (NE) were studied using cultured bovine adrenomedullary cells as an in vitro model system. Sodium-dependent and sodium-independent uptake systems have been identified and characterized for both MIBG and NE. The sodium-dependent uptake of Ne and MIBG was inhibited by the selective Uptake-one inhibitors, desmethylimipramine (DMI) and cocaine, whereas the sodium-independent uptake for NE and MIBG was much less sensitive to inhibition by these agents. The sodium-dependent uptake system fulfills the criteria for the neuronal Uptake-one system, and the sodium-independent uptake system fulfills the criteria for a passive diffusion mechanism. Arterial concentrations proximal to the dog adrenal were very small suggesting that the sodium-dependent (Uptake-one) system is predominant in vivo. Consistent with the in vitro observations, the in vivo uptake of MIBG and NE into dog adrenal medullae was effectively blocked by pretreatment with DMI or cocaine. Therefore, iodine-131 MIBG scintigraphy of the adrenal appears to reflect uptake by way of the Uptake-one system.

  13. Synthesis and inhibition potency of novel ureido benzenesulfonamides incorporating GABA as tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase IX and XII inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ceruso, Mariangela; Antel, Sabrina; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    New ureido benzenesulfonamides incorporating a GABA moiety as a linker between the ureido and the sulfonamide functionalities were synthesized and their inhibition potency determined against both the predominant cytosolic (hCA I and II) and the transmembrane tumor-associated (hCA IX and XII) isoforms of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The majority of these compounds were medium potency inhibitors of the cytosolic isoform hCA I and effective hCA II inhibitors, whereas they showed strong inhibition of the two transmembrane tumor-associated isoforms hCA IX and XII, with KIs in nanomolar range. Only one derivative had a good selectivity for inhibition of the tumor-associated hCA IX target isoform over the cytosolic and physiologically dominant off-target hCA I and II, being thus a potential tool to develop new anticancer agents. PMID:25792500

  14. A functional role for both γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter-1 and GABA transporter-3 in the modulation of extracellular GABA and GABAergic tonic conductances in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kersanté, Flavie; Rowley, Samuel C S; Pavlov, Ivan; Gutièrrez-Mecinas, María; Semyanov, Alexey; Reul, Johannes M H M; Walker, Matthew C; Linthorst, Astrid C E

    2013-01-01

    Tonic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated signalling controls neuronal network excitability in the hippocampus. Although the extracellular concentration of GABA (e[GABA]) is critical in determining tonic conductances, knowledge on how e[GABA] is regulated by different GABA transporters (GATs) in vivo is limited. Therefore, we studied the role of GATs in the regulation of hippocampal e[GABA] using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats. Here we show that GAT-1, which is predominantly presynaptically located, is the major GABA transporter under baseline, quiescent conditions. Furthermore, a significant contribution of GAT-3 in regulating e[GABA] was revealed by administration of the GAT-3 inhibitor SNAP-5114 during simultaneous blockade of GAT-1 by NNC-711. Thus, the GABA transporting activity of GAT-3 (the expression of which is confined to astrocytes) is apparent under conditions in which GAT-1 is blocked. However, sustained neuronal activation by K+-induced depolarization caused a profound spillover of GABA into the extrasynaptic space and this increase in e[GABA] was significantly potentiated by sole blockade of GAT-3 (i.e. even when uptake of GAT-1 is intact). Furthermore, experiments using tetrodotoxin to block action potentials revealed that GAT-3 regulates extrasynaptic GABA levels from action potential-independent sources when GAT-1 is blocked. Importantly, changes in e[GABA] resulting from both GAT-1 and GAT-3 inhibition directly precipitate changes in tonic conductances in dentate granule cells as measured by whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Thus, astrocytic GAT-3 contributes to the regulation of e[GABA] in the hippocampus in vivo and may play an important role in controlling the excitability of hippocampal cells when network activity is increased. PMID:23381899

  15. New effects of GABAB receptor allosteric modulator rac-BHFF on ambient GABA, uptake/release, Em and synaptic vesicle acidification in nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Pozdnyakova, N; Dudarenko, M; Borisova, T

    2015-09-24

    Positive allosteric modulators of GABAB receptors have great therapeutic potential for medications of anxiety, depression, etc. The effects of recently discovered modulator rac-BHFF on the key characteristics of GABAergic neurotransmission were investigated in cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals of rats (synaptosomes). The ambient level of [(3)H]GABA that is a balance between release and uptake of the neurotransmitter increased significantly in the presence of rac-BHFF (at concentrations 10-30μM). The initial velocity of synaptosomal [(3)H]GABA uptake was suppressed by the modulator. In the presence of GABA transporter blocker NO-711, it was shown that rac-BHFF increased tonic release of [(3)H]GABA from synaptosomes (at concentrations 3-30μM). Rac-BHFF within the concentration range of 0.3-30μM did not enhance inhibiting effect of (±)-baclofen on depolarization-induced exocytotic release of [(3)H]GABA. Rac-BHFF (0.3-30μM) caused dose-dependent depolarization of the plasma membrane and dissipation of the proton gradient of synaptic vesicles in synaptosomes that was shown in the absence/presence of GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen using fluorescent dyes rhodamine 6G and acridine orange, respectively, and so, the above effects of rac-BHFF were not associated with the modulation of presynaptic GABAB receptors. Therefore, drug development strategy of positive allosteric modulation of GABAB receptors is to eliminate the above side effects of rac-BHFF in presynapse, and vice versa, these new properties of rac-BHFF may be exploited appropriately. PMID:26197223

  16. Centrifuge-induced hypergravity: [ 3H]GABA and L-[ 14C]glutamate uptake, exocytosis and efflux mediated by high-affinity, sodium-dependent transporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T. A.; Himmelreich, N. H.

    The effects of centrifuge-induced hypergravity on the presynaptic events have been investigated in order to provide further insight into regulation of glutamate and GABA neurotransmission and correlation between excitatory and inhibitory responses under artificial gravity conditions. Exposure of animals to hypergravity (centrifugation of rats at 10 G for 1 h) has been found to cause changes in the synaptic processes of brain, in particular neurotransmitter release and uptake in rat brain synaptosomes. Hypergravity loading resulted in more than two-fold enhancement of GABA transporter activity ( Vmax increased from 1.4 ± 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 3.3 ± 0.59 nmol/min/mg of protein for the animals exposed to hypergravity ( P ⩽ 0.05)). The maximal velocity of L-[ 14C]glutamate uptake decreased from 12.5 ± 3.2 to 5.6 ± 0.9 nmol/min/mg of protein under artificial gravity conditions. Depolarization-evoked exocytotic release of the neurotransmitters has also changed in response to hypergravity. It increased for GABA (7.2 ± 0.54% and 11.74 ± 1.2% of total accumulated label for control and hypergravity, respectively ( P ⩽ 0.05)), but reduced for glutamate (14.4 ± 0.7% and 6.2 ± 1.9%, for control and hypergravity, respectively). Thus, comparative analysis of the neurotransmitter uptake and release has demonstrated that short-term centrifuge-induced 10 G hypergravity loading intensified inhibitory and attenuated excitatory processes in nerve terminals. The activation or reduction of neurotransmitter uptake appeared to be coupled with similarly directed alterations of the neurotransmitter release.

  17. NAAG peptidase inhibitor increases dialysate NAAG and reduces glutamate, aspartate and GABA levels in the dorsal hippocampus following fluid percussion injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunlong; Zhao, Xueren; Van, Ken C; Bzdega, Tomasz; Smyth, Aoife; Zhou, Jia; Kozikowski, Alan P; Jiang, Jiyao; O'Connor, William T; Berman, Robert F; Neale, Joseph H; Lyeth, Bruce G

    2006-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces a rapid and excessive elevation in extracellular glutamate that induces excitotoxic brain cell death. The peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is reported to suppress neurotransmitter release through selective activation of presynaptic group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Therefore, strategies to elevate levels of NAAG following brain injury could reduce excessive glutamate release associated with TBI. We hypothesized that the NAAG peptidase inhibitor, ZJ-43 would elevate extracellular NAAG levels and reduce extracellular levels of amino acid neurotransmitters following TBI by a group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-mediated mechanism. Dialysate levels of NAAG, glutamate, aspartate and GABA from the dorsal hippocampus were elevated after TBI as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Dialysate levels of NAAG were higher and remained elevated in the ZJ-43 treated group (50 mg/kg, i.p.) compared with control. ZJ-43 treatment also reduced the rise of dialysate glutamate, aspartate, and GABA levels. Co-administration of the group II mGluR antagonist, LY341495 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) partially blocked the effects of ZJ-43 on dialysate glutamate and GABA, suggesting that NAAG effects are mediated through mGluR activation. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of NAAG peptidase may reduce excitotoxic events associated with TBI. PMID:16606367

  18. Measuring the serotonin uptake site using (/sup 3/H)paroxetine--a new serotonin uptake inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiter, C.H.; Nutt, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that may be involved in ethanol preference and dependence. It is possible to label the serotonin uptake site in brain using the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, but this also binds to other sites. We have used the new high-affinity uptake blocker paroxetine to define binding to this site and report it to have advantages over imipramine as a ligand.

  19. Endogenous 5-HT outflow from chicken aorta by 5-HT uptake inhibitors and amphetamine derivatives

    PubMed Central

    DELGERMURUN, Dugar; ITO, Shigeo; OHTA, Toshio; YAMAGUCHI, Soichiro; OTSUGURO, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Chemoreceptor cells aggregating in clusters in the chicken thoracic aorta contain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and have voltage-dependent ion channels and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which are characteristics typically associated with neurons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of 5-HT uptake inhibitors, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine and clomipramine (CLM), and amphetamine derivatives, p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) and methamphetamine (MET), on endogenous 5-HT outflow from the isolated chick thoracic aorta in vitro. 5-HT was measured by using a HPLC system with electrochemical detection. The amphetamine derivatives and 5-HT uptake inhibitors caused concentration-dependent increases in endogenous 5-HT outflow. PCA was about ten times more effective in eliciting 5-HT outflow than MET. The 5-HT uptake inhibitors examined had similar potency for 5-HT outflow. PCA and CLM increased 5-HT outflow in a temperature-dependent manner. The outflow of 5-HT induced by PCA or 5-HT uptake inhibitors was independent of extracellular Ca2+ concentration. The 5-HT outflow induced by CLM, but not that by PCA, was dependent on the extracellular NaCl concentration. These results suggest that the 5-HT uptake system of 5-HT-containing chemoreceptor cells in the chicken thoracic aorta has characteristics similar to those of 5-HT-containing neurons in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). PMID:26321443

  20. Endogenous 5-HT outflow from chicken aorta by 5-HT uptake inhibitors and amphetamine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Delgermurun, Dugar; Ito, Shigeo; Ohta, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Otsuguro, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Chemoreceptor cells aggregating in clusters in the chicken thoracic aorta contain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and have voltage-dependent ion channels and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which are characteristics typically associated with neurons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of 5-HT uptake inhibitors, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine and clomipramine (CLM), and amphetamine derivatives, p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) and methamphetamine (MET), on endogenous 5-HT outflow from the isolated chick thoracic aorta in vitro. 5-HT was measured by using a HPLC system with electrochemical detection. The amphetamine derivatives and 5-HT uptake inhibitors caused concentration-dependent increases in endogenous 5-HT outflow. PCA was about ten times more effective in eliciting 5-HT outflow than MET. The 5-HT uptake inhibitors examined had similar potency for 5-HT outflow. PCA and CLM increased 5-HT outflow in a temperature-dependent manner. The outflow of 5-HT induced by PCA or 5-HT uptake inhibitors was independent of extracellular Ca(2+) concentration. The 5-HT outflow induced by CLM, but not that by PCA, was dependent on the extracellular NaCl concentration. These results suggest that the 5-HT uptake system of 5-HT-containing chemoreceptor cells in the chicken thoracic aorta has characteristics similar to those of 5-HT-containing neurons in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). PMID:26321443

  1. Rho-Associated Kinase Inhibitors Promote Microglial Uptake Via the ERK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Fu, Peicai; Tang, Ronghua; Yu, Zhiyuan; Li, Caihong; Chen, Xue; Xie, Minjie; Wang, Wei; Luo, Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Microglia are immunocompetent cells in the central nervous system that take up tissue debris and pathogens. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) has been identified as an important regulator of uptake, proliferation, secretion, and differentiation in a number of cell types. Although ROCK plays critical roles in the microglial secretion of inflammatory factors, migration, and morphology, its effects on microglial uptake activity have not been well characterized. In the present study, we found that treatment of BV2 microglia and primary microglia with the ROCK inhibitors Y27632 and fasudil increased uptake activity and was associated with morphological changes. Furthermore, western blots showed that this increase in uptake activity was mediated through the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade, indicating the importance of ROCK in regulating microglial uptake activity. PMID:26779919

  2. Low and high affinity dopamine transporter inhibitors block dopamine uptake within 5 sec of intravenous injection

    PubMed Central

    Yorgason, Jordan T.; Jones, Sara R.; España, Rodrigo A.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive evidence suggests that the reinforcing effects of cocaine involve inhibition of dopamine transporters (DAT) and subsequent increases in dopamine (DA) levels in the striatum. We have previously reported that cocaine inhibits the DAT within 4–5 sec of intravenous injection, matching the temporal profile of the behavioral and subjective effects of cocaine. Intravenous injection of GBR-12909, a high affinity, long-acting DAT inhibitor, also inhibits DA uptake within 5 sec. Given that high affinity, long-acting drugs are considered to have relatively low abuse potential, we found it intriguing that GBR-12909 had an onset profile similar to that of cocaine. To further explore the onset kinetics of both low and high affinity DAT inhibitors, we examined the effects of intravenous cocaine (1.5 mg/kg), methylphenidate (1.5 mg/kg), nomifensine (1.5 mg/kg), GBR-12909 (1.5 mg/kg), PTT (0.5 mg/kg), and WF23 (0.5 mg/kg) on electrically-evoked DA release and uptake in the nucleus accumbens core. Results indicate that all of the DAT inhibitors significantly inhibited DA uptake within 5 sec of injection. However, the timing of peak uptake inhibition varied greatly between the low and high affinity uptake inhibitors. Uptake inhibition following cocaine, methylphenidate, and nomifensine peaked 30 sec following injection. In contrast, peak effects for GBR-12909, PTT, and WF23 occurred between 20 and 60 min following injection. These observations suggest that the initial onset for intravenous DAT inhibitors is extremely rapid and does not appear to be dictated by a drug’s affinity. PMID:21402130

  3. Iodine Status in Turkish Populations and Exposure to Iodide Uptake Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ozpinar, Aysel; Kelestimur, Fahrettin; Songur, Yildiran; Can, Ozge; Valentin, Liza; Caldwell, Kathleen; Arikan, Ender; Unsal, Ibrahim; Serteser, Mustafa; Inal, Tamer; Erdemgil, Yigit; Coskun, Abdurrahman; Bakirci, Nadi; Sezgin, Ozlem; Blount, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate, nitrate, and thiocyanate are competitive inhibitors of the sodium iodide symporter of the thyroid membrane. These inhibitors can decrease iodine uptake by the symporter into the thyroid gland and may disrupt thyroid function. This study assesses iodine status and exposure to iodide uptake inhibitors of non-pregnant and non-lactating adult women living in three different cities in Turkey (Istanbul, Isparta and Kayseri). We measured iodine and iodide uptake inhibitors in 24-hr urines collected from study participants (N = 255). All three study populations were mildly iodine deficient, with median urinary iodine (UI) levels of 77.5 µg/L in Istanbul, 58.8 µg/L in Isparta, and 69.8 µg/L in Kayseri. Perchlorate doses were higher in the study population (median 0.13 µg/kg/day), compared with a reference population (median 0.059 µg/kg/day), but lower than the U.S. EPA reference dose (0.7 µg/kg/day). Urinary thiocyanate levels increased with increasing exposure to tobacco smoke, with non-smokers (268 µg/L) significantly lower than light smokers (1110 µg/L), who were significantly lower than heavy smokers (2410 µg/L). This pilot study provides novel data indicating that study participants were moderately iodine deficient and had higher intakes of the iodide uptake inhibitor perchlorate compared with a reference population. Further investigation is needed to characterize the thyroid impact resulting from iodine deficiency coupled with exposure to iodide uptake inhibitors such as perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate. PMID:24505430

  4. Influence of ornithine decarboxylase antizymes and antizyme inhibitors on agmatine uptake by mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Molina, Bruno; López-Contreras, Andrés J; Lambertos, Ana; Dardonville, Christophe; Cremades, Asunción; Peñafiel, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Agmatine (4-aminobutylguanidine), a dicationic molecule at physiological pH, exerts relevant modulatory actions at many different molecular target sites in mammalian cells, having been suggested that the administration of this compound may have therapeutic interest. Several plasma membrane transporters have been implicated in agmatine uptake by mammalian cells. Here we report that in kidney-derived COS-7 cell line, at physiological agmatine levels, the general polyamine transporter participates in the plasma membrane translocation of agmatine, with an apparent Km of 44 ± 7 µM and Vmax of 17.3 ± 3.3 nmol h(-1) mg(-1) protein, but that at elevated concentrations, agmatine can be also taken up by other transport systems. In the first case, the physiological polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), several diguanidines and bis(2-aminoimidazolines) and the polyamine transport inhibitor AMXT-1501 markedly decreased agmatine uptake. In cells transfected with any of the three ornithine decarboxylase antizymes (AZ1, AZ2 and AZ3), agmatine uptake was dramatically reduced. On the contrary, transfection with antizyme inhibitors (AZIN1 and AZIN2) markedly increased the transport of agmatine. Furthermore, whereas putrescine uptake was significantly decreased in cells transfected with ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the accumulation of agmatine was stimulated, suggesting a trans-activating effect of intracellular putrescine on agmatine uptake. All these results indicate that ODC and its regulatory proteins (antizymes and antizyme inhibitors) may influence agmatine homeostasis in mammalian tissues. PMID:25655388

  5. Triple monoamine uptake inhibitors demonstrate a pharmacologic association between excessive drinking and impulsivity in high-alcohol-preferring (HAP) mice.

    PubMed

    O'Tousa, David S; Warnock, Kaitlin T; Matson, Liana M; Namjoshi, Ojas A; Linn, Michael Van; Tiruveedhula, Veera Venkata; Halcomb, Meredith E; Cook, James; Grahame, Nicholas J; June, Harry L

    2015-03-01

    Approximately 30% of current drinkers in the United States drink excessively, and are referred to as problem/hazardous drinkers. These individuals, who may not meet criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence, comprise binge, heavy drinkers, or both. Given their high prevalence, interventions that reduce the risk of binge and heavy drinking have important public health implications. Impulsivity has been repeatedly associated with excessive drinking in the clinical literature. As impulsivity is correlated with, and may play a critical role in, the initiation and maintenance of excessive drinking, this behavior may be an important target for therapeutic intervention. Hence, a better understanding of pharmacological treatments capable of attenuating excessive drinking and impulsivity may markedly improve clinical outcomes. The high-alcohol-preferring (HAP) mice represent a strong rodent model to study the relationship between impulsivity and excessive alcohol drinking, as recent evidence indicates they consume high levels of alcohol throughout their active cycle and are innately impulsive. Using this model, the present study demonstrates that the triple monoamine uptake inhibitors (TUIs) amitifadine and DOV 102, 677 effectively attenuate binge drinking, heavy drinking assessed via a 24-hour free-choice assay, and impulsivity measured by the delay discounting procedure. In contrast, 3-PBC, a GABA-A α1 preferring ligand with mixed agonist-antagonist properties, attenuates excessive drinking without affecting impulsivity. These findings suggest that in HAP mice, monoamine pathways may predominate as a common mechanism underlying impulsivity and excessive drinking, while the GABAergic system may be more salient in regulating excessive drinking. We further propose that TUIs such as amitifadine and DOV 102, 677 may be used to treat the co-occurrence of impulsivity and excessive drinking. PMID:24118509

  6. Correlating FAAH and anandamide cellular uptake inhibition using N-alkylcarbamate inhibitors: from ultrapotent to hyperpotent.

    PubMed

    Nicolussi, Simon; Chicca, Andrea; Rau, Mark; Rihs, Sabine; Soeberdt, Michael; Abels, Christoph; Gertsch, Jürg

    2014-12-15

    Besides the suggested role of a putative endocannabinoid membrane transporter mediating the cellular uptake of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA), this process is intrinsically coupled to AEA degradation by the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Differential blockage of each mechanism is possible using specific small-molecule inhibitors. Starting from the natural product-derived 2E,4E-dodecadiene scaffold previously shown to interact with the endocannabinoid system (ECS), a series of diverse N-alkylcarbamates were prepared with the aim of generating novel ECS modulators. While being inactive at cannabinoid receptors and monoacylglycerol lipase, these N-alkylcarbamates showed potent to ultrapotent picomolar FAAH inhibition in U937 cells. Overall, a highly significant correlation (Spearman's rho=0.91) was found between the inhibition of FAAH and AEA cellular uptake among 54 compounds. Accordingly, in HMC-1 cells lacking FAAH expression the effect on AEA cellular uptake was dramatically reduced. Unexpectedly, 3-(4,5-dihydrothiazol-2-yl)phenyl carbamates and the 3-(1,2,3-thiadiazol-4-yl)phenyl carbamates WOBE490, WOBE491 and WOBE492 showed a potentiation of cellular AEA uptake inhibition in U937 cells, resulting in unprecedented femtomolar (hyperpotent) IC50 values. Potential methodological issues and the role of cellular accumulation of selected probes were investigated. It is shown that albumin impacts the potency of specific N-alkylcarbamates and, more importantly, that accumulation of FAAH inhibitors can significantly increase their effect on cellular AEA uptake. Taken together, this series of N-alkylcarbamates shows a FAAH-dependent inhibition of cellular AEA uptake, which can be strongly potentiated using specific head group modifications. These findings provide a rational basis for the development of hyperpotent AEA uptake inhibitors mediated by ultrapotent FAAH inhibition. PMID:25283614

  7. The Design, Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship of Mixed Serotonin, Norepinephrine and Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengming; Yang, Ji; Skolnick, Phil

    The evolution of antidepressants over the past four decades has involved the replacement of drugs with a multiplicity of effects (e.g., TCAs) by those with selective actions (i.e., SSRIs). This strategy was employed to reduce the adverse effects of TCAs, largely by eliminating interactions with certain neurotransmitters or receptors. Although these more selective compounds may be better tolerated by patients, selective drugs, specifically SSRIs, are not superior to older drugs in treating depressed patients as measured by response and remission rates. It may be an advantage to increase synaptic levels of both serotonin and norepinephrine, as in the case of dual uptake inhibitors like duloxetine and venlafaxine. An important recent development has been the emergence of the triple-uptake inhibitors (TUIs/SNDRIs), which inhibit the uptake of the three neurotransmitters most closely linked to depression: serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. Preclinical studies and clinical trials indicate that a drug inhibiting the reuptake of all three of these neurotransmitters could produce more rapid onset of action and greater efficacy than traditional antidepressants. This review will detail the medicinal chemistry involved in the design, synthesis and discovery of mixed serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine transporter uptake inhibitors.

  8. Anorectic activities of serotonin uptake inhibitors: correlation with their potencies at inhibiting serotonin uptake in vivo and /sup 3/H-mazindol binding in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, I.; Taranger, M.A.; Claustre, Y.; Scatton, B.; Langer, S.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism of anorectic action of several serotonin uptake inhibitors was investigated by comparing their anorectic potencies with several biochemical and pharmacological properties and in reference to the novel compound SL 81.0385. The anorectic effect of the potent serotonin uptake inhibitor SL 81.0385 was potentiated by pretreatment with 5-hydroxytryptophan and blocked by the serotonin receptor antagonist metergoline. A good correlation was obtained between the ED/sub 50/ values of anorectic action and the ED/sub 50/ values of serotonin uptake inhibition in vivo (but not in vitro) for several specific serotonin uptake inhibitors. Most of the drugs tested displaced (/sup 3/H)-mazindol from its binding to the anorectic recognition site in the hypothalamus, except the pro-drug zimelidine which was inactive. Excluding zimelidine, a good correlation was obtained between the affinities of these drugs for (/sup 3/H)-mazindol binding and their anorectic action indicating that their anorectic activity may be associated with an effect mediated through this site. Taken together these results suggest that the anorectic action of serotonin uptake inhibitors is directly associated to their ability to inhibit serotonin uptake and thus increasing the synaptic levels of serotonin. The interactions of these drugs with the anorectic recognition site labelled with (/sup 3/H)-mazindol is discussed in connection with the serotonergic regulation of carbohydrate intake.

  9. The glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle: function, regional differences in glutamate and GABA production and effects of interference with GABA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2015-02-01

    The operation of a glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle in the brain consisting of the transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons and neurotransmitter glutamate or GABA from neurons to astrocytes is a well-known concept. In neurons, glutamine is not only used for energy production and protein synthesis, as in other cells, but is also an essential precursor for biosynthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. An excellent tool for the study of glutamine transfer from astrocytes to neurons is [(14)C]acetate or [(13)C]acetate and the glial specific enzyme inhibitors, i.e. the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase) inhibitors fluoro-acetate and -citrate. Acetate is metabolized exclusively by glial cells, and [(13)C]acetate is thus capable when used in combination with magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry, to provide information about glutamine transfer. The present review will give information about glutamine trafficking and the tools used to map it as exemplified by discussions of published work employing brain cell cultures as well as intact animals. It will be documented that considerably more glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to glutamatergic than to GABAergic neurons. However, glutamine does have an important role in GABAergic neurons despite their capability of re-utilizing their neurotransmitter by re-uptake. PMID:25380696

  10. Nitrite Uptake into Intact Pea Chloroplasts : II. Influence of Electron Transport Regulators, Uncouplers, ATPase and Anion Uptake Inhibitors and Protein Binding Reagents.

    PubMed

    Brunswick, P; Cresswell, C F

    1988-02-01

    The relationship between net nitrite uptake and its reduction in intact pea chloroplasts was investigated employing electron transport regulators, uncouplers, and photophosphorylation inhibitors. Observations confirmed the dependence of nitrite uptake on stromal pH and nitrite reduction but also suggested a partial dependance upon PSI phosphorylation. It was also suggested that ammonia stimulates nitrogen assimilation in the dark by association with stromal protons. Inhibition of nitrite uptake by N-ethylmaleimide and dinitrofluorobenzene could not be completely attributed to their inhibition of carbon dioxide fixation. Other protein binding reagents which inhibited photosynthesis showed no effect on nitrite uptake, except for p-chlormercuribenzoate which stimulated nitrite uptake. The results with N-ethylmaleimide and dinitrofluorobenzene tended to support the proposed presence of a protein permeation channel for nitrite uptake in addition to HNO(2) penetration. On the basis of a lack of effect by known anion uptake inhibitors, it was concluded that the nitrite uptake mechanism was distinct from that of phosphate and chloride/sulfate transport. PMID:16665917

  11. Use of inhibitors for coastal bacteria and phytoplankton: Application to nitrogen uptake measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trottet, Aurore; Fouilland, Eric; Leboulanger, Christophe; Lanouguère, Elodie; Bouvy, Marc

    2011-06-01

    For several decades, prokaryotic and eukaryotic inhibitors have been used to exclude bacteria from microalgal cultures and for investigating prey-predator relationships. Recently there has been considerable interest in using specific inhibitors for studying the interactions between bacteria and phytoplankton, by selective repression of either organism's activity. The effectiveness of chemical inhibitors must be tested before applying them to natural communities to partition metabolic activities between functional groups. Six different antibiotics selected from the most commonly reported in the literature were tested, at concentrations varying from 12.5 to 100 mg L -1, for their effect on bacterial growth and functional diversity of natural communities from Mediterranean coastal waters. Penicillin and streptomycin each at a final concentration of 100 mg L -1 significantly reduced bacterial growth within 2 h. There was a greater impact on bacterial functional diversity when both antibiotics were mixed together. This mixture did not have any significant effect on the growth of selected cultured phytoplankton strains, whereas the eukaryote inhibitor cycloheximide at 100 mg L -1 reduced growth within 2 h of incubation. The penicillin-streptomycin mixture and cycloheximide alone successfully partitioned NH 4+ and NO 3- uptake between bacteria and phytoplankton bi-weekly sampled in a coastal lagoon in Autumn, where bacterial contribution to total NH 4+ and NO 3- uptake averaged 46 and 41%, respectively. The use of specific inhibitors may be a valuable method for studying interactions, such as competition and mutualism, or lack of interaction between the different components of microbial communities and could be used to study their relative importance in biogeochemical fluxes.

  12. Pharmacological Modulation of Cytotoxicity and Cellular Uptake of Anti-cancer Drugs by PDE5 Inhibitors in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, QING; SHU, YAN

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous research has led to the recognition of a cGMP signaling pathway governing drug transport. This study is to investigate whether inhibitors of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), which increase intracellular cGMP levels, modulate the cytotoxicity and uptake of anti-cancer drugs in cancer cells. Methods The experiments were conducted with and without PDE5 inhibitors: dipyridamole, vardenafil, and/or sildenafil. The cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, cisplatin and oxaliplatin was determined in multiple cancer cell lines derived from different tissues. The cellular uptake of structurally diverse compounds was further examined in lung cancer cells with and without various endocytotic inhibitors. The tumor accumulation and the anti-tumor effect of trastuzumab were examined in a lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Results Dipyridamole could modulate the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin in cancer cells. Particularly, PDE5 inhibitors increased cellular uptake of structurally diverse compounds into lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. The effect of vardenafil on drug uptake could be blocked by endocytotic inhibitors. The growth of lung cancer xenograft in nude mice was significantly suppressed by addition of vardenafil to trastuzumab treatment. Conclusion PDE5 inhibitors may increase the efficacy of anti-cancer drugs by increasing endocytosis-mediated cellular drug uptake, and thus serve as adjuvant therapy for certain cancers such as lung cancer. PMID:23884568

  13. Effects of a phospholipase A/sub 2/ inhibitor on uptake and toxicity of liposomes containing plant phosphatidylinositol

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, M.; Alving, C.R.

    1986-05-01

    Plant phosphatidylinositol (PI) has been shown by us to have a direct cytotoxic effect on cultured tumor cells but not on normal cells. Synthetic PI containing /sup 14/C-linoleic acid in the sn-2 position, also showed the same pattern of selective cytotoxicity. When the metabolic fate of synthetic PI was examined with tumor cells, the radioactivity which no longer occurred as PI, was found as either products of phospholipase A/sub 2/ (93%, free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholine) or phospholipase C (7%, diglycerides). Uptake of liposomal PI was directly correlated with cytotoxicity. They tested a variety of inhibitors to see the effect on uptake and/or cytotoxicity of plant PI. General metabolic inhibitors such as metrizamide or sodium azide did not alter cellular uptake of the plant PI liposomes. Inhibitors of lipoxygenase formation, such as indomethacin, also did not alter the uptake or cytotoxicity induced by plant PI. Quinacrine, an inhibitor of phospholipase A/sub 2/, decreased the uptake of the PI containing liposomes to 50% of that seen in the presence or absence of any other inhibitor. Although quinacrine is itself toxic to cells, at low concentrations of quinacrine, plant PI did not show the same degree of cytotoxicity as in the absence of quinacrine. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that plant PI exerts cytotoxicity by serving as a substrate for phospholipase A/sub 2/.

  14. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID

  15. Synaptic GABA release prevents GABA transporter type-1 reversal during excessive network activity

    PubMed Central

    Savtchenko, Leonid; Megalogeni, Maria; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Walker, Matthew C.; Pavlov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    GABA transporters control extracellular GABA, which regulates the key aspects of neuronal and network behaviour. A prevailing view is that modest neuronal depolarization results in GABA transporter type-1 (GAT-1) reversal causing non-vesicular GABA release into the extracellular space during intense network activity. This has important implications for GABA uptake-targeting therapies. Here we combined a realistic kinetic model of GAT-1 with experimental measurements of tonic GABAA receptor currents in ex vivo hippocampal slices to examine GAT-1 operation under varying network conditions. Our simulations predict that synaptic GABA release during network activity robustly prevents GAT-1 reversal. We test this in the 0 Mg2+ model of epileptiform discharges using slices from healthy and chronically epileptic rats and find that epileptiform activity is associated with increased synaptic GABA release and is not accompanied by GAT-1 reversal. We conclude that sustained efflux of GABA through GAT-1 is unlikely to occur during physiological or pathological network activity. PMID:25798861

  16. Small-Molecule Screening Identifies the Selanazal Drug Ebselen as a Potent Inhibitor of DMT1-Mediated Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Wetli, Herbert A.; Buckett, Peter D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Summary HEK293T cells overexpressing divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) were established to screen for small-molecule inhibitors of iron uptake. Using a fluorescence-based assay, we tested 2000 known bioactive compounds to find 3 small molecules that potently block ferrous iron uptake. One of the inhibitors, ebselen, is a seleno compound used in clinical trials as a protective agent against ischemic stroke. Ebselen inhibited Fe(II) uptake (IC50 of ~0.22 μM), but did not influence Fe(III) transport or DMT1-mediated manganese uptake. An unrelated antioxidant, pyrrolidine dithiobarbamate (PDTC), also inhibited DMT1 activity (IC50 of ~1.54 μM). Both ebselen and PDTC increased cellular levels of reduced glutathione. These observations indicate that Fe(II) transport by DMT1 can be modulated by cellular redox status and suggest that ebselen may act therapeutically to limit iron-catalyzed damage due to transport inhibition. PMID:16984886

  17. Effects of calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors on Ca uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum of saponin skinned caudal artery

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.A.; Silver, P.J.

    1986-03-05

    Calmodulin (CaM) stimulates plasma membrane transport in many cell types, however, its role in Ca regulation by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in smooth muscle has not been established. /sup 45/Ca uptake was studied in saponin skinned strips of rat caudal artery as a function of CaM and the CaM inhibitors, W-7, calmidazolium (CaMZ), and trifluoperazine (TFP). Although caudal artery strips lose approximately 30% of total tissue CaM during skinning, 0.3 - 2 ..mu..M CaM did not increase /sup 45/Ca uptake over a wide range of free Ca concentrations (10/sup -8/ - 10/sup -6/M). Neither W-7 nor CaMZ at concentration of 10/sup -4/ - 2 x 10/sup -4/M inhibited the MgATP-dependent Ca uptake. Ca uptake was not affected by 50 ..mu..M TFP but a significant inhibition was produced by 500 ..mu..M. Studies of the effects of TFP on /sup 45/Ca efflux indicated that TFP concentrations which inhibited Ca uptake also significantly increased the rate of Ca release. The results suggest that total Ca uptake in caudal artery depends mainly upon MgATP and is not modulated by exogenous CaM or affected by these CaM inhibitors. They cannot preclude that CaM may affect initial velocities or that the CaM inhibitors failed to reach active sites.

  18. Atypical Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors that Provide Clues About Cocaine's Mechanism at the Dopamine Transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck Newman, Amy; Katz, Jonathan L.

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) has been a primary target for cocaine abuse/addiction medication discovery. However predicted addiction liability and limited clinical evaluation has provided a formidable challenge for development of these agents for human use. The unique and atypical pharmacological profile of the benztropine (BZT) class of dopamine uptake inhibitors, in preclinical models of cocaine effects and abuse, has encouraged further development of these agents. Moreover, in vivo studies have challenged the original DAT hypothesis and demonstrated that DAT occupancy and subsequent increases in dopamine produced by BZT analogues are significantly delayed and long lasting, as compared to cocaine. These important and distinctive elements are critical to the lack of abuse liability among BZT analogues, and improve their potential for development as treatments for cocaine abuse and possibly other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  19. Uptake of L-tri-iodothyronine by isolated rat liver cells. A process partially inhibited by metabolic inhibitors; attempts to distinguish between uptake and binding to intracellular proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Eckel, J; Rao, G S; Rao, M L; Breuer, H

    1979-01-01

    1. Rat liver cells obtained by dispersion with collagenase were used to investigate the mode of entry of L-tri-iodothyronine into the cell. 2. The hormone was taken up very rapidly at 23 degrees C; the linear phase of uptake lasted for up to approx. 20 s. 3. A plot of the initial rates of uptake against different concentrations of L-tri-iodothyronine yielded a sigmoidal curve. The Eadie--Hofstee plot (v/[S]2 versus v) yielded two straight lines. The uptake component with an apparent Kt value of 86 +/- 15 pM was designated as system I, and the second uptake component with an apparent Kt of 726 +/- 11 pM as system II. The Hill plot for system I was not linear; the apparent Hill coefficient for system II was calculated to be 2.1.4. Uptake of L-tri-iodothyronine by system I was higher at pH 6.4 than at pH 7.4; system II was relatively insensitive to changes in the pH of the external medium. 5. Both systems exhibited a transition temperature at about 16 degrees C in the Arrhenius plot. The activation energies of the two systems below and above 16 degrees C were 72.8 and 47.7 and 54.4 and 33.1 J/mol respectively. 6. Inhibitors of cellular energy reduced the uptake by system I to a larger extent than that by system II. 7. Replacement of Na+ in the external medium by either K+ or choline led to uptake that followed normal Michaelis--Menten kinetics. 8. Thiol-group-blocking agents reduced the uptake of the hormone by both systems. 9. Treatment of liver cells with beta-glucosidase, Pronase and neuraminidase led to a decrease in the uptake of L-tri-iodothyronine by system I, whereas uptake by system II was decreased after treatment with phospholipase A2, beta-galactosidase. Pronase and neuraminidase. 10. The stereoisomer D-tri-iodothyronine (100--3000 pM) did not affect system I, but uptake by system II decreased with increasing concentration of D-tri-iodothyronine. Reverse L-tri-iodothyronine (2--100 pM) and L-thyroxine (100--3000 pM) did not influence uptake by either

  20. Localization of glycine, GABA and neuropeptide containing neurons in tiger salamander retina

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Putative glycinergic and GABAergic neurons in the salamander retina were localized by a parallel analysis of high affinity {sup 3}H-glycine uptake and glycine-like immunoreactivity (Gly-IR) and a comparative analysis of high affinity {sup 3}H-GABA uptake, GABA, like immunoreactivity (GABA-IR), and glutamate decarboxylase immunoreactivity (GAD-IR) at the light microscopic level. Good correspondence of labeling of {sup 3}H-glycine uptake and Gly-IR as well as that of {sup 3}H-GABA uptake and GABA-IR were observed. In addition, GAD immunoreactive neurons contained GABA-IR as well. Extensive colocalization of {sup 3}H-glycine uptake and Gly-IR and that of {sup 3}H-GABA uptake, GABA-IR and perhaps GAD-IR were indicated by the similarities in the distribution, morphology and labeling frequency of neurons and lamination in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). However, the Gly-IR and the GABA-IR probes appeared to be more sensitive and can thus be a reliable marker for glycine and GABA containing neurons respectively.

  1. Enhancement of cellular uptake, transport and oral absorption of protease inhibitor saquinavir by nanocrystal formulation

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Xia, Deng-ning; Li, Qiu-xia; Tao, Jin-song; Gan, Yong; Wang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Saquinavir (SQV) is the first protease inhibitor for the treatment of HIV infection, but with poor solubility. The aim of this study was to prepare a colloidal nanocrystal suspension for improving the oral absorption of SQV. Methods: SQV nanocrystals were prepared using anti-solvent precipitation–high pressure homogenization method. The nanocrystals were characterized by a Zetasizer and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their dissolution, cellular uptake and transport across the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2) monolayer were investigated. Bioimaging of ex vivo intestinal sections of rats was conducted with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in rats administered nanocrystal SQV suspension (50 mg/kg, ig), and the plasma SQV concentrations were measured with HPLC. Results: The SQV nanocrystals were approximately 200 nm in diameter, with a uniform size distribution. The nanocrystals had a rod-like shape under TEM. The dissolution, cellular uptake, and transport across a Caco-2 monolayer of the nanocrystal formulation were significantly improved compared to those of the coarse crystals. The ex vivo intestinal section study revealed that the fluorescently labeled nanocrystals were located in the lamina propria and the epithelium of the duodenum and jejunum. Pharmacokinetic study showed that the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) was 2.16-fold of that for coarse crystalline SQV suspension, whereas the area under the curve (AUC) of nanocrystal SQV suspension was 1.95-fold of that for coarse crystalline SQV suspension. Conclusion: The nanocrystal drug delivery system significantly improves the oral absorption of saquinavir. PMID:26256404

  2. Uptake of antimonite and antimonate by arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata: Effects of chemical analogs and transporter inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tisarum, Rujira; Chen, Yanshan; Dong, Xiaoling; Lessl, Jason T; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-11-01

    Antimonite (SbIII) is transported into plants via aquaglyceroporin channels but it is unknown in As-hyperaccumulator Ptreis vittata (PV). We tested the effects of SbIII analogs (arsenite-AsIII, glycerol, silicic acid-Si, and, glucose), antimonate (SbV) analog (phosphate-P), and aquaglyceroporin transporter inhibitor (silver, Ag) on the uptake of SbIII or SbV by PV gametophytes. PV gametophytes were grown in 20% Hoagland solution containing 65 μM SbIII or SbV and increasing concentrations of analogs at 65-6500 μM for 2 h or 4 h under sterile condition. After exposing to 65 μM Sb for 2 h, PV accumulated 767 mg/kg Sb in SbIII treatment and 419 mg/kg in SbV treatment. SbIII uptake by PV gametophytes was not impacted by glycerol or AsIII nor aquaglyceroporin inhibitor Ag during 2 h exposure. While Si increased SbIII uptake and glucose decreased SbIII uptake by PV gametophytes, the impact disappeared during 4 h exposure. Under P-sufficient condition, P increased SbIII uptake and decreased SbV uptake during 2 h exposure, but the effect again disappeared after 4 h. After being P-starved for 2 weeks, P decreased SbIII with no effect on SbV uptake during 2 h exposure. Our results indicated that: 1) PV gametophytes could serve as an efficient model to study Sb uptake, and 2) unique SbIII uptake by PV may be related to its trait of As hyperaccumulation. PMID:26142750

  3. Pharmacokinetics and brain uptake of HIV-1 replication inhibitor DB213 in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianwen; Zhang, Yufeng; Qian, Shuai; Peng, Shaohong; Zhang, Qian; Wong, Chun-Ho; Chan, H Y Edwin; Zuo, Zhong

    2016-06-01

    The current study aims to investigate the pharmacokinetics and brain uptake of HIV-1 replication inhibitor DB213 via a developed LC/MS/MS analytical method. A sensitive, selective, accurate and reliable LC/MS/MS method for determination and quantification of DB213 in rat plasma and brain was developed and validated. A triple quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization (ESI) source was applied for the detection of DB213 and benzamidine (Internal Standard). The analytes were quantified by using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode with m/z 333.4→86.1 and m/z 121.2→104 for DB213 and benzamidine respectively. Chromatographic separation of DB213 and benzamidine was achieved on a SunFire C8 (4.6×250mm, i.d. 5μm) analytical column with gradient elution of a mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and 20mM ammonium formate buffer (containing 0.5% formic acid). The method achieved good linearity from 1.95∼1000ng/ml (r(2)=0.999) in plasma and 0.98∼125ng/ml (r(2)=0.999) in brain. The validated method was successfully applied to plasma pharmacokinetics (PK) and brain uptake of intravenous administration of DB213 water solution (1mg/kg) to Sprague-Dawley rats. It was found that the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 360min (AUC0→360min) was 184422.1±42450.8ngmin/ml and the elimination half-life of DB213 after intravenous administration was 70.9±16.1min. In addition, DB213 has demonstrated a potential to cross the blood-brain barrier via intravenous administration with a brain tissue concentration of 11.3±3.6ng/g peaked at 30min post-dosing. PMID:26999321

  4. AKT Inhibitors Promote Cell Death in Cervical Cancer through Disruption of mTOR Signaling and Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Rashmi, Ramachandran; DeSelm, Carl; Helms, Cynthia; Bowcock, Anne; Rogers, Buck E.; Rader, Janet; Grigsby, Perry W.; Schwarz, Julie K.

    2014-01-01

    Background PI3K/AKT pathway alterations are associated with incomplete response to chemoradiation in human cervical cancer. This study was performed to test for mutations in the PI3K pathway and to evaluate the effects of AKT inhibitors on glucose uptake and cell viability. Experimental Design Mutational analysis of DNA from 140 pretreatment tumor biopsies and 8 human cervical cancer cell lines was performed. C33A cells (PIK3CAR88Q and PTENR233*) were treated with increasing concentrations of two allosteric AKT inhibitors (SC-66 and MK-2206) with or without the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). Cell viability and activation status of the AKT/mTOR pathway were determined in response to the treatment. Glucose uptake was evaluated by incubation with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Cell migration was assessed by scratch assay. Results Activating PIK3CA (E545K, E542K) and inactivating PTEN (R233*) mutations were identified in human cervical cancer. SC-66 effectively inhibited AKT, mTOR and mTOR substrates in C33A cells. SC-66 inhibited glucose uptake via reduced delivery of Glut1 and Glut4 to the cell membrane. SC-66 (1 µg/ml-56%) and MK-2206 (30 µM-49%) treatment decreased cell viability through a non-apoptotic mechanism. Decreases in cell viability were enhanced when AKT inhibitors were combined with 2-DG. The scratch assay showed a substantial reduction in cell migration upon SC-66 treatment. Conclusions The mutational spectrum of the PI3K/AKT pathway in cervical cancer is complex. AKT inhibitors effectively block mTORC1/2, decrease glucose uptake, glycolysis, and decrease cell viability in vitro. These results suggest that AKT inhibitors may improve response to chemoradiation in cervical cancer. PMID:24705275

  5. Glial GABA, synthesized by monoamine oxidase B, mediates tonic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Bo-Eun; Woo, Junsung; Chun, Ye-Eun; Chun, Heejung; Jo, Seonmi; Bae, Jin Young; An, Heeyoung; Min, Joo Ok; Oh, Soo-Jin; Han, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Taekeun; Kim, Young Soo; Bae, Yong Chul; Lee, C Justin

    2014-11-15

    GABA is the major inhibitory transmitter in the brain and is released not only from a subset of neurons but also from glia. Although neuronal GABA is well known to be synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the source of glial GABA is unknown. After estimating the concentration of GABA in Bergmann glia to be around 5-10 mM by immunogold electron microscopy, we demonstrate that GABA production in glia requires MAOB, a key enzyme in the putrescine degradation pathway. In cultured cerebellar glia, both Ca(2+)-induced and tonic GABA release are significantly reduced by both gene silencing of MAOB and the MAOB inhibitor selegiline. In the cerebellum and striatum of adult mice, general gene silencing, knock out of MAOB or selegiline treatment resulted in elimination of tonic GABA currents recorded from granule neurons and medium spiny neurons. Glial-specific rescue of MAOB resulted in complete rescue of tonic GABA currents. Our results identify MAOB as a key synthesizing enzyme of glial GABA, which is released via bestrophin 1 (Best1) channel to mediate tonic inhibition in the brain. PMID:25239459

  6. First photoswitchable neurotransmitter transporter inhibitor: light-induced control of γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 (GAT1) activity in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Gabriele; Höfner, Georg; Pabel, Jörg; Dine, Julien; Eder, Matthias; Wanner, Klaus T

    2014-08-14

    Inhibition of mGAT1, the most abundant GABA transporter in the brain, enhances GABA signaling and alleviates symptoms of CNS disorders such as epilepsy assumed to be associated with low GABA levels. We have now developed a potent and subtype selective photoswitchable inhibitor of this transporter, which for the first time extends the photoswitch concept for the light-induced control of ligand affinity to active membrane transporters. The new inhibitor exhibited reduced activity upon irradiation with light, as demonstrated in GABA uptake assays and electrophysiological experiments with brain slices, and might be used as a tool compound for deepening the understanding of mGAT1 function in brain. PMID:25025595

  7. Manganese exposure inhibits the clearance of extracellular GABA and influences taurine homeostasis in the striatum of developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Fordahl, Steve C.; Anderson, Joel G.; Cooney, Paula T.; Weaver, Tara L.; Colyer, Christa L.; Erikson, Keith M.

    2010-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) accumulation in the brain has been shown to alter the neurochemistry of the basal ganglia. Mn-induced alterations in dopamine biology are fairly well understood, but recently more evidence has emerged characterizing the role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in this dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine if the previously observed Mn-induced increase in extracellular GABA (GABAEC) was due to altered GABA transporter (GAT) function, and whether Mn perturbs other amino acid neurotransmitters, namely taurine and glycine (known modulators of GABA). Extracellular GABA, taurine, and glycine concentrations were collected from the striatum of control (CN) or Mn-exposed Sprague-Dawley rats using in vivo microdialysis, and the GAT inhibitor nipecotic acid (NA) was used to probe GAT function. Tissue and extracellular Mn levels were significantly increased, and the Fe:Mn ratio was decreased 36-fold in the extracellular space due to Mn exposure. NA led to a 2-fold increase in GABAEC of CNs, a response that was attenuated by Mn. Taurine responded inversely to GABA, and a novel 10-fold increase in taurine was observed after the removal of NA in CNs. Mn blunted this response and nearly abolished extracellular taurine throughout collection. Striatal taurine transporter (Slc6a6) mRNA levels were significantly increased with Mn exposure, and Mn significantly increased 3H-Taurine uptake after 3-minute exposure in primary rat astrocytes. These data suggest that Mn increases GABAEC by inhibiting the function of GAT, and that perturbed taurine homeostasis potentially impacts neural function by jeopardizing the osmoregulatory and neuromodulatory functions of taurine in the brain. PMID:20832424

  8. Co-Localization of GABA Shunt Enzymes for the Efficient Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid via GABA Shunt Pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-28

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid, which is an important inhibitor of neurotransmission in the human brain. GABA is also used as the precursor of biopolymer Nylon-4 production. In this study, the carbon flux from the tricarboxylic acid cycle was directed to the GABA shunt pathway for the production of GABA from glucose. The GABA shunt enzymes succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD) and GABA aminotransferase (GabT) were co-localized along with the GABA transporter (GadC) by using a synthetic scaffold complex. The co-localized enzyme scaffold complex produced 0.71 g/l of GABA from 10 g/l of glucose. Inactivation of competing metabolic pathways in mutant E. coli strains XBM1 and XBM6 increased GABA production 13% to reach 0.80 g/l GABA by the enzymes co-localized and expressed in the mutant strains. The recombinant E. coli system developed in this study demonstrated the possibility of the pathway of the GABA shunt as a novel GABA production pathway. PMID:26838342

  9. Hazards and uptake of chitin synthesis inhibitors in bumblebees Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Mommaerts, Veerle; Sterk, Guido; Smagghe, Guy

    2006-08-01

    This research project examined the potential hazards of a major class of insect growth regulators (IGRs) to survival, reproduction and larval growth in bumblebees Bombus terrestris L. Eight chitin synthesis inhibitors (CSIs) were tested: buprofezin, cyromazine, diflubenzuron, flucycloxuron, flufenoxuron, lufenuron, novaluron and teflubenzuron. These different IGRs, which are important in the control of pest insects in greenhouses, were applied via three different routes of exposure under laboratory conditions: dermal contact, and orally via the drinking of sugar/water and via pollen. The compounds were tested at their respective maximum field recommended concentrations (MFRC) and also in dose-response assays to calculate LC(50) values. In general, none of the CSIs showed acute worker toxicity. However, there was a dramatic reduction in brood production, especially after oral treatment with pollen and sugar/water. Conspicuously, egg fertility was reduced in all treatments with diflubenzuron and teflubenzuron. In addition to egg mortality, the worker bumblebees removed larvae from the treated nest, and in most cases these individuals were dead first-second instars. Under a binocular microscope, such larvae showed an abnormally formed cuticle leading to mechanical weakness and death. In another series of experiments using (14)C-diflubenzuron and (14)C-flufenoxuron, cuticular penetration in workers was studied for a better understanding of the differences in toxicity. With (14)C-diflubenzuron, transovarial transport and accumulation in the deposited eggs supported the strong reproductive effects. Overall, the present results suggest that CSIs should be applied with caution in combination with bumblebees. The compatibility of each compound to be used in combination with B. terrestris is discussed in relation to calculated LC(50) values, routes of uptake and effects. PMID:16786494

  10. Differing effects of transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by nerve terminals before and after exposure of rats to artificial gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Subsequent to its release from glutamatergic neurons and activation of receptors, it is removed from extracellular space by high affinity Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters, which utilize the Na^+/K^+ electrochemical gradient as a driving force and located in nerve terminals and astrocytes. The glutamate transporters may modify the time course of synaptic events. Like glutamate itself, glutamate transporters are somehow involved in almost all aspects of normal and abnormal brain activity (e.g. cerebral ischemia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and schizophrenia). The present study assessed transporter inhibitor for the ability to inhibit glutamate uptake by synaptosomes at the normal and hypergravity conditions (rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period). DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA) is a newly developed competitive inhibitor of the high-affinity, Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters. As a potent, non- transported inhibitor of glutamate transporters, DL-TBOA promises to be a valuable new compound for the study of glutamatergic mechanisms. We demonstrated that DL-TBOA inhibited glutamate uptake ( 100 μM glutamate, 30 sec incubation period) in dose-dependent manner as in control as in hypergravity. The effect of this transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by control synaptosomes and synaptosomes prepared of animals exposed to hypergravity was different. IC50 values calculated on the basis of curves of non-linear regression kinetic analysis was 18±2 μM and 11±2 μM ((P≤0,05) before and after exposure to artificial gravity, respectively. Inhibition caused by 10 μM DL-TBOA was significantly increased from 38,0±3,8 % in control group to 51,0±4,1 % in animals, exposed to hypergravity (P≤0,05). Thus, DL-TBOA had complex effect on glutamate uptake process and perhaps, became more potent under

  11. Characterization of Transporters in the Hepatic Uptake of TAK-475 M-I, a Squalene Synthase Inhibitor, in Rats and Humans.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, T; Takeuchi, T; Moriya, Y; Tagawa, Y; Kondo, T; Moriwaki, T; Asahi, S

    2016-06-01

    TAK-475 (lapaquistat acetate) is a squalene synthase inhibitor and M-I is a pharmacologically active metabolite of TAK-475. Preclinical pharmacokinetic studies have demonstrated that most of the dosed TAK-475 was hydrolyzed to M-I during the absorption process and the concentrations of M-I in the liver, the main organ of cholesterol biosynthesis, were much higher than those in the plasma after oral administration to rats. In the present study, the mechanism of the hepatic uptake of M-I was investigated.The uptake studies of (14)C-labeled M-I into rat and human hepatocytes indicated that the uptakes of M-I were concentrative, temperature-dependent and saturable in both species with Km values of 4.7 and 2.8 μmol/L, respectively. M-I uptake was also inhibited by cyclosporin A, an inhibitor for hepatic uptake transporters including organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP). In the human hepatocytes, M-I uptake was hardly inhibited by estrone 3-sulfate as an inhibitor for OATP1B1, and most of the M-I uptake was Na(+)-independent. Uptake studies using human transporter-expressing cells revealed the saturable uptake of M-I for OATP1B3 with a Km of 2.13 μmol/L. No obvious uptake of M-I was observed in the OATP1B1-expressing cells.These results indicated that M-I was taken up into hepatocytes via transporters in both rats and humans. OATP1B3 would be mainly involved in the hepatic uptake of M-I in humans. These findings suggested that hepatic uptake transporters might contribute to the liver-selective inhibition of cholesterol synthesis by TAK-475. This is the first to clarify a carrier-mediated hepatic uptake mechanism for squalene synthase inhibitors. PMID:27011383

  12. Pharmacodynamic effects and possible therapeutic uses of THIP, a specific GABA-agonist.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A V; Svendsen, O; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1982-10-22

    THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) is a potent and specific GABA receptor agonist which does not influence the GABA uptake system or GABA metabolizing enzymes. The specificity for the GABA receptor is also demonstrated by lack of action on monoaminergic, cholinergic, histaminergic or opiate receptors. Since in recent years GABA receptor stimulants-among others THIP--have become available many have speculated as to what clinical indication GABA-ergic stimulation might be an important element. The first suggestion was that GABA-ergic drugs by an inhibitory effect on the dopamine neurons would improve the antischizophrenic effect of neuroleptics and improve tardive dyskinesia. Furthermore, studies on brains of deceased Parkinson and Huntington's chorea patients have demonstrated a low level of GABA and its synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in the basal ganglia. Also in epilepsy and diseases with dementia a deficit in the GABA system has been proposed. Therefore a therapeutic strategy for these diseases may be supplementary treatment with drugs which increase GABA receptor activity. Furthermore, recent results in humans have shown that GABA agonists perhaps also could be of benefit in mania and depressions. When considering the neurophysiological elements of nociception and muscle tone it is also reasonable to suggest that GABA-ergic stimulation may reduce pain perception and muscle tone. PMID:6292818

  13. Different transporter systems regulate extracellular GABA from vesicular and non-vesicular sources

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inseon; Volynski, Kirill; Brenner, Tanja; Ushkaryov, Yuri; Walker, Matthew; Semyanov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Tonic GABA type A (GABAA) conductance is a key factor regulating neuronal excitability and computation in neuronal networks. The magnitude of the tonic GABAA conductance depends on the concentration of ambient GABA originating from vesicular and non-vesicular sources and is tightly regulated by GABA uptake. Here we show that the transport system regulating ambient GABA responsible for tonic GABAA conductances in hippocampal CA1 interneurons depends on its source. In mice, GABA from vesicular sources is regulated by mouse GABA transporter 1 (mGAT1), while that from non-vesicular sources by mouse GABA transporters 3/4 (mGAT3/4). This finding suggests that the two transporter systems do not just provide backup for each other, but regulate distinct signaling pathways. This allows individual tuning of the two signaling systems and indicates that drugs designed to act at specific transporters will have distinct therapeutic actions. PMID:23494150

  14. GABA as a rising gliotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Bo-Eun; Lee, C. Justin

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter that is known to be synthesized and released from GABAergic neurons in the brain. However, recent studies have shown that not only neurons but also astrocytes contain a considerable amount of GABA that can be released and activate GABA receptors in neighboring neurons. These exciting new findings for glial GABA raise further interesting questions about the source of GABA, its mechanism of release and regulation and the functional role of glial GABA. In this review, we highlight recent studies that identify the presence and release of GABA in glial cells, we show several proposed potential pathways for accumulation and modulation of glial intracellular and extracellular GABA content, and finally we discuss functional roles for glial GABA in the brain. PMID:25565970

  15. Relationship between rate of drug uptake in brain and behavioral pharmacology of monoamine transporter inhibitors in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Heather L; Negus, S Stevens; Wilcox, Kristin M; Ewing, Sarah B; Stehouwer, Jeffrey; Goodman, Mark M; Votaw, John R; Mello, Nancy K; Carroll, F Ivy; Howell, Leonard L

    2008-09-01

    Although inhibition of dopamine transporters (DAT) and the subsequent increase in dopamine clearly play a role in the effects of psychomotor stimulants, the reinforcing effectiveness of DAT inhibitors varies. Previous studies suggest that pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of these drugs account for this variability. The present studies compared the time course and behavioral effects of five phenyltropane analogs of cocaine with high affinity for DAT and varying time courses of action in rhesus monkeys. The rate of drug uptake in putamen was measured using positron emission tomography neuroimaging. The rank order of the time to peak drug uptake was cocaineuptake corresponded closely with the time to peak discriminative stimulus effects, and there was a trend for the time of peak drug uptake to correspond negatively with the peak number of drug infusions. Collectively, these results indicate that the rate of drug entry in brain can play an important role in the behavioral pharmacology of psychomotor stimulants. PMID:18468667

  16. Effects of the monoamine uptake inhibitors RTI-112 and RTI-113 on cocaine- and food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Negus, S S; Mello, N K; Kimmel, H L; Howell, L L; Carroll, F I

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine blocks uptake of the monoamines dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine, and monoamine uptake inhibitors constitute one class of drugs under consideration as candidate "agonist" medications for the treatment of cocaine abuse and dependence. The pharmacological selectivity of monoamine uptake inhibitors to block uptake of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine is one factor that may influence the efficacy and/or safety of these compounds as drug abuse treatment medications. To address this issue, the present study compared the effects of 7-day treatment with a non-selective monoamine uptake inhibitor (RTI-112) and a dopamine-selective uptake inhibitor (RTI-113) on cocaine- and food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys. Monkeys (N=3) were trained to respond for cocaine injections (0.01 mg/kg/inj) and food pellets under a second-order schedule [FR2(VR16:S)] during alternating daily components of cocaine and food availability. Both RTI-112 (0.0032-0.01 mg/kg/hr) and RTI-113 (0.01-0.056 mg/kg/h) produced dose-dependent, sustained and nearly complete elimination of cocaine self-administration. However, for both drugs, the potency to reduce cocaine self-administration was similar to the potency to reduce food-maintained responding. These findings do not support the hypothesis that pharmacological selectivity to block dopamine uptake is associated with behavioral selectivity to decrease cocaine- vs. food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys. PMID:18755212

  17. Pretreatment with delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol and psychoactive drugs: effects on uptake of biogenic amines and on behavior.

    PubMed

    Hershkowitz, M; Szechtman, H

    1979-11-16

    Injection of delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) into mice increased the uptake into brain synaptosomes of radioactive DA, NE, 5-HT and GABA, with the effect on GABA being the greatest; uptake of leucine was not stimulated, indicating that THC does not facilitate the transport of amino acids in general. The effect of THC was stereospecific because pretreatment with the non-psychoactive isomer, (+) delta 6-THC had no effect on uptake of DA into cortical synaptosomes. The effect on DA uptake was correlated with psychoactive potency. THC enhanced uptake more than did SP-111 (a water soluble ester of THC but less potent than THC) and much more than cannabidiol (a non-psychoactive ingredient of marijuana). THC increased the uptake of DA into striatal synaptosomes but much less than into cortical synaptosomes. The enhancing effect of THC on uptake in cortex showed tolerance after chronic (1 week) treatment with THC. Catecholaminergic receptor antagonists (chlorpromazine, propranolol), like THC, stimulated the uptake of DA or NE into cortical synaptosomer. In contrast, pretreatment with MAO (pargyline) or uptake (tricyclic antidepressants) inhibitors, or with amphetamine, decreased uptake. Thus THC does not inhibit MAO uptake, or stimulate the release of catecholamines but may interact with a receptor. The notion of a THC--receptor interaction is supported by behavioral experiments. PMID:230975

  18. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA by an amacrine cell: Evidence for independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    O'Mally, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the cholinergic cells was measured by illuminating the retina with moving gratings composed of light and dark bars. Retinas that were labelled with {sup 3}H-choline released acetylcholine in response to moving gratings composed of bars as small as 50 {mu}m; 300 to 800 {mu}m wide bars yielded maximal responses. Responses were obtained to gratings moving at speeds from 50 to 6000 {mu}m/sec. Three groups recently reported that the cholinergic cells also contain GABA. To confirm these findings, retinas were double-labeled with {sup 3}H-GABA and DAPI, and processed for autoradiography. The cells that accumulate DAPI were heavily labelled with silver grains due to uptake of {sup 3}H-GABA. Incubation of retinas in the presence of elevated concentrations of K{sup +} caused them to release both acetylcholine and GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA from the cholinergic amacrine cells. Retinas were double-labeled with {sup 14}C-GABA and {sup 3}H-acetylcholine, allowing simultaneous measurement of their release. The release of {sup 14}C-GABA was independent of extracellular Ca{sup ++}. Radioactive GABA synthesized endogenously from {sup 14}C-glutamate behave the same as radioactive GABA accumulated from the medium. In the same experiments, the simultaneously measured release of {sup 3}H-acetylcholine was strongly Ca{sup ++}-dependent, indicating that acetylcholine and GABA are released by different mechanisms.

  19. Selective enhancement of the uptake and bioactivity of a TAT-conjugated peptide inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3.

    PubMed

    Manceur, Aziza P; Driscoll, Brandon D; Sun, Wei; Audet, Julie

    2009-03-01

    The use of cell-penetrating peptides as transduction vectors is a promising approach to deliver peptides and proteins into cells. However, the uptake and bioavailability of trans-activating transcriptor (TAT)-conjugated molecules vary depending on the cell type and the cargo. This study aimed to determine whether a low-voltage electrical pulse can enhance the TAT-mediated delivery of peptide cargoes in different cell types. In TF-1 and mouse embryonic stem cells, the uptake of a novel detachable TAT-conjugated glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) peptide inhibitor was enhanced by an order of magnitude without affecting the cell viability. A similar increase in uptake was achieved in primary mouse bone marrow cells while maintaining >80% of their viability. Interestingly, under these low-voltage conditions, the uptake of a control peptide not conjugated to TAT was not significantly increased. A T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) luciferase reporter assay was also used to assess the bioactivity of the TAT construct. The results indicated that cells loaded with a low-voltage electrical pulse had a twofold increase in TCF/LEF activity, which was equivalent to a level of GSK-3 inhibition similar to that of cells treated with 20 mmol/l lithium or 500 nmol/l (2'Z,3'E)-6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime. These results demonstrate the usefulness of low-voltage electrical pulses to enhance the uptake and bioactivity of TAT-conjugated molecules in different cell types. PMID:19107119

  20. The effect of selective 5-hydroxytryptamine uptake inhibitors on 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine-induced ejaculation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rényi, L.

    1986-01-01

    The ejaculatory response and the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) behavioural syndrome induced by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT) (3 mg kg-1 i.p.) were studied following acute and repeated treatment of rats with the selective uptake inhibitors of 5-HT, fluoxetine, zimeldine, alaproclate, and citalopram. The oral doses used were based on the respective ED50 values for uptake inhibition. Acute doses of fluoxetine and zimeldine significantly reduced the ejaculatory response when given 48 h before 5-MeODMT. This blockade was prevented by treatment of the rats with the postsynaptic 5-HT receptor antagonist methergoline. An acute dose of fluoxetine given 7 and 14 days before 5-MeODMT significantly enhanced the ejaculatory response. On day 24, the response returned to the control level. Repeated treatment every second day (5 times over 9 days and 10 times over 19 days) with fluoxetine caused a longer blockade of the ejaculatory response and the sensitization of the response came later than after an acute dose. Parallel with the ejaculatory response three other components of the 5-HT behavioural syndrome also decreased significantly. Acute doses of alaproclate and citalopram significantly blocked the ejaculatory response at 1 h, but they failed to affect the response at any other time point after either acute or repeated treatment. Neither did these drugs attentuate the 5-HT syndrome. It is concluded that acute and repeated treatment of rats with different selective 5-HT uptake inhibitors does not produce a common alteration in 5-HT2-receptor functions. PMID:2939912

  1. The effect of selective 5-hydroxytryptamine uptake inhibitors on 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine-induced ejaculation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rényi, L

    1986-04-01

    The ejaculatory response and the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) behavioural syndrome induced by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT) (3 mg kg-1 i.p.) were studied following acute and repeated treatment of rats with the selective uptake inhibitors of 5-HT, fluoxetine, zimeldine, alaproclate, and citalopram. The oral doses used were based on the respective ED50 values for uptake inhibition. Acute doses of fluoxetine and zimeldine significantly reduced the ejaculatory response when given 48 h before 5-MeODMT. This blockade was prevented by treatment of the rats with the postsynaptic 5-HT receptor antagonist methergoline. An acute dose of fluoxetine given 7 and 14 days before 5-MeODMT significantly enhanced the ejaculatory response. On day 24, the response returned to the control level. Repeated treatment every second day (5 times over 9 days and 10 times over 19 days) with fluoxetine caused a longer blockade of the ejaculatory response and the sensitization of the response came later than after an acute dose. Parallel with the ejaculatory response three other components of the 5-HT behavioural syndrome also decreased significantly. Acute doses of alaproclate and citalopram significantly blocked the ejaculatory response at 1 h, but they failed to affect the response at any other time point after either acute or repeated treatment. Neither did these drugs attentuate the 5-HT syndrome. It is concluded that acute and repeated treatment of rats with different selective 5-HT uptake inhibitors does not produce a common alteration in 5-HT2-receptor functions. PMID:2939912

  2. The Urease Inhibitor NBPT Negatively Affects DUR3-mediated Uptake and Assimilation of Urea in Maize Roots

    PubMed Central

    Zanin, Laura; Tomasi, Nicola; Zamboni, Anita; Varanini, Zeno; Pinton, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of urease inhibitors in agriculture, little information is available on their effect on nitrogen (N) uptake and assimilation. Aim of this work was to study, at physiological and transcriptional level, the effects of N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) on urea nutrition in hydroponically grown maize plants. Presence of NBPT in the nutrient solution limited the capacity of plants to utilize urea as a N-source; this was shown by a decrease in urea uptake rate and 15N accumulation. Noteworthy, these negative effects were evident only when plants were fed with urea, as NBPT did not alter 15N accumulation in nitrate-fed plants. NBPT also impaired the growth of Arabidopsis plants when urea was used as N-source, while having no effect on plants grown with nitrate or ammonium. This response was related, at least in part, to a direct effect of NBPT on the high affinity urea transport system. Impact of NBPT on urea uptake was further evaluated using lines of Arabidopsis overexpressing ZmDUR3 and dur3-knockout; results suggest that not only transport but also urea assimilation could be compromised by the inhibitor. This hypothesis was reinforced by an over-accumulation of urea and a decrease in ammonium concentration in NBPT-treated plants. Furthermore, transcriptional analyses showed that in maize roots NBPT treatment severely impaired the expression of genes involved in the cytosolic pathway of ureic-N assimilation and ammonium transport. NBPT also limited the expression of a gene coding for a transcription factor highly induced by urea and possibly playing a crucial role in the regulation of its acquisition. This work provides evidence that NBPT can heavily interfere with urea nutrition in maize plants, limiting influx as well as the following assimilation pathway. PMID:26635834

  3. Decreased alanine aminotransferase activity in serum of man during gamma-acetylenic-GABA treatment.

    PubMed

    Olsen, R; Hørder, M

    1980-06-01

    Decreasing concentrations of alanine aminotransferase were observed in nine patients receiving gamma-acetylenic-GABA, an inhibitor of GABA aminotransferase. In vitro studies showed that preincubation at 37 degrees C of serum with gamma-acetylenic-GABA and with urine from a patient receiving the drug led to inhibition of alanine aminotransferase. This inhibition of alanine aminotransferase by gamma-acetylenic-GABA was neutralized by 1-analine, the natural substrate for the enzyme. The mechanism of inhibition may be a competition between the drug and 1-alanine for the substrate binding site of the enzyme. PMID:7414257

  4. A defect in sodium-dependent amino acid uptake in diabetic rabbit peripheral nerve. Correction by an aldose reductase inhibitor or myo-inositol administration.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, D A; Lattimer, S A; Carroll, P B; Fernstrom, J D; Finegold, D N

    1990-01-01

    A myo-inositol-related defect in nerve sodium-potassium ATPase activity in experimental diabetes has been suggested as a possible pathogenetic factor in diabetic neuropathy. Because the sodium-potassium ATPase is essential for other sodium-cotransport systems, and because myo-inositol-derived phosphoinositide metabolites regulate multiple membrane transport processes, sodium gradient-dependent amino acid uptake was examined in vitro in endoneurial preparations derived from nondiabetic and 14-d alloxan diabetic rabbits. Untreated alloxan diabetes reduced endoneurial sodium-gradient dependent uptake of the nonmetabolized amino acid 2-aminoisobutyric acid by greater than 50%. Administration of an aldose reductase inhibitor prevented reductions in both nerve myo-inositol content and endoneurial sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. Myo-inositol supplementation that produced a transient pharmacological elevation in plasma myo-inositol concentration, but did not raise nerve myo-inositol content, reproduced the effect of the aldose reductase inhibitor on endoneurial sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. Phorbol myristate acetate, which acutely normalizes sodium-potassium ATPase activity in diabetic nerve, did not acutely correct 2-aminoisobutyric uptake when added in vitro. These data suggest that depletion of a small myo-inositol pool may be implicated in the pathogenesis of defects in amino acid uptake in diabetic nerve and that rapid correction of sodium-potassium ATPase activity with protein kinase C agonists in vitro does not acutely normalize sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. PMID:2185278

  5. Discriminative stimulus effects of magnesium chloride: substitution studies with monoamine uptake inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kantak, K M; Edwards, M A; Wilcox, K M; Kitchel, E

    1997-10-01

    Previous studies suggest that magnesium chloride may have discriminative stimulus effects that partially overlap with those of noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists as well as certain monoamine uptake inhibitors. In our study, rats were trained to discriminate 100 mg/kg magnesium chloride from saline and its discriminative stimulus effects were characterized with respect to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and monoamine transporter functions in substitution tests. The discriminative stimulus effects of magnesium chloride were acquired within a moderate number of training sessions and showed dose-related substitution after either subcutaneous (3-300 mg/kg) or intracerebroventricular (0.3-300 microg) administration. The intracerebroventricular administration of magnesium chloride was over 4000 times more potent than its s.c. administration. The monoamine uptake inhibitors cocaine, GBR 12909, talsupram and citalopram fully substituted (> or =90% magnesium-appropriate responses) for magnesium chloride in the majority of subjects tested and the group averages reached a maximum of 72 to 82% responses on the magnesium-appropriate lever. Based on relative potency analysis, the rank order of potency of these four drugs for producing magnesium-appropriate responses was talsupram = cocaine > citalopram = GBR 12909. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists dizocilpine, phencyclidine and NPC 17742 engendered maximum group averages of 49 to 65% responses on the magnesium-appropriate lever. The results suggest that the centrally mediated discriminative stimulus effects of magnesium chloride may be more directly related to interactions with monoamine neurotransmitter functions than to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockade. PMID:9336325

  6. Bile enhances glucose uptake, reduces permeability, and modulates effects of lectins, trypsin inhibitors and saponins on intestinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Bakke, Anne Marie; Chikwati, Elvis M; Venold, Fredrik F; Sahlmann, Christian; Holm, Halvor; Penn, Michael H; Oropeza-Moe, Marianne; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2014-02-01

    Antinutritional factors (ANFs) can disrupt digestive and other intestinal functions. ANFs in soybean meal (SBM) are implicated in proliferative and inflammatory responses in the intestine of various (functionally) monogastric animals, including Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). The goal of the current study was to investigate the effect of ex vivo exposure of mid and distal intestinal tissue of salmon to soybean saponins (SAP), lectin (LEC) and Kunitz' trypsin inhibitor (KTI), singly and in combination, on epithelial function, as assessed by measuring in vitro glucose uptake pathways along a glucose concentration gradient. As solubilization of SAP in the calcium-containing Ringer's solution was problematic but resolved with the addition of a physiological concentration of bile collected from the gall bladder of salmon, an evaluation of bile effects became an added element. Results indicated that bile increased baseline glucose absorption and possibly transport, and also had a protective effect on the epithelial barrier, at least partially due to taurocholate. Compared to controls, tissues exposed to LEC+bile, KTI+bile and LEC+KTI+bile exhibited increased glucose uptake at the higher glucose concentrations, apparently due to markedly increased tissue permeability. Addition of SAP, however, attenuated the response, possibly by binding bile components. SAP+bile, also in combination with LEC and/or KTI, as well as LEC, KTI and LEC+KTI without bile often reduced transcellular glucose uptake pathways, while maintaining low tissue permeability. SAP+LEC+KTI+bile, LEC and KTI caused the most marked reductions. The distal intestine was more affected, reflecting the restriction of in vivo SBM-induced inflammatory changes to this region. PMID:24291392

  7. Firefly luciferase inhibitor-conjugated peptide quenches bioluminescence: a versatile tool for real time monitoring cellular uptake of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, Pekka K; Rönkkö, Teemu; Hinkkanen, Ari E; Palvimo, Jorma J; Närvänen, Ale; Turhanen, Petri; Laatikainen, Reino; Weisell, Janne; Pulkkinen, Juha T

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, novel firefly luciferase-specific inhibitor compounds (FLICs) are evaluated as potential tools for cellular trafficking of transporter conjugates. As a proof-of-concept, we designed FLICs that were suitable for solid phase peptide synthesis and could be covalently conjugated to peptides via an amide bond. The spacer between inhibitor and peptide was optimized to gain efficient inhibition of recombinant firefly luciferase (FLuc) without compromising the activity of the model peptides. The hypothesis of using FLICs as tools for cellular trafficking studies was ensured with U87Fluc glioblastoma cells expressing firefly luciferase. Results show that cell penetrating peptide (penetratin) FLIC conjugate 9 inhibited FLuc penetrated cells efficiently (IC50 = 1.6 μM) and inhibited bioluminescence, without affecting the viability of the cells. Based on these results, peptide-FLIC conjugates can be used for the analysis of cellular uptake of biomolecules in a new way that can at the same time overcome some downsides seen with other methods. Thus, FLICs can be considered as versatile tools that broaden the plethora of methods that take advantage of the bioluminescence phenomena. PMID:24341748

  8. Multikinase Inhibitors Induce Cutaneous Toxicity through OAT6-Mediated Uptake and MAP3K7-Driven Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Eric I; Gibson, Alice A; Hu, Shuiying; Vasilyeva, Aksana; Orwick, Shelley J; Du, Guoqing; Mascara, Gerard P; Ong, Su Sien; Chen, Taosheng; Vogel, Peter; Inaba, Hiroto; Maitland, Michael L; Sparreboom, Alex; Baker, Sharyn D

    2016-01-01

    The use of multikinase inhibitors (MKI) in oncology, such as sorafenib, is associated with a cutaneous adverse event called hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR), in which sites of pressure or friction become inflamed and painful, thus significantly impacting quality of life. The pathogenesis of MKI-induced HFSR is unknown, and the only available treatment options involve dose reduction or discontinuation of therapy, which have negative effects on primary disease management. To investigate the underlying mechanisms by which sorafenib promotes keratinocyte cytotoxicity and subsequent HFSR induction, we performed a transporter-directed RNAi screen in human epidermal keratinocytes and identified SLC22A20 (OAT6) as an uptake carrier of sorafenib. Further investigations into the intracellular mechanism of sorafenib activity through in situ kinome profiling identified the mitogen-activated protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) as a target of sorafenib that induces cell death. Finally, we demonstrate that sorafenib induced keratinocyte injury in vivo and that this effect could be reversed by cotreatment with the OAT6 inhibitor probenecid. Collectively, our findings reveal a novel pathway that regulates the entry of some MKIs into keratinocytes and explains the basis underlying sorafenib-induced skin toxicity, with important implications for the therapeutic management of HFSR. PMID:26677977

  9. Selective CNS Uptake of the GCP-II Inhibitor 2-PMPA following Intranasal Administration.

    PubMed

    Rais, Rana; Wozniak, Krystyna; Wu, Ying; Niwa, Minae; Stathis, Marigo; Alt, Jesse; Giroux, Marc; Sawa, Akira; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP-II) is a brain metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes the abundant neuropeptide N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) to NAA and glutamate. Small molecule GCP-II inhibitors increase brain NAAG, which activates mGluR3, decreases glutamate, and provide therapeutic utility in a variety of preclinical models of neurodegenerative diseases wherein excess glutamate is presumed pathogenic. Unfortunately no GCP-II inhibitor has advanced clinically, largely due to their highly polar nature resulting in insufficient oral bioavailability and limited brain penetration. Herein we report a non-invasive route for delivery of GCP-II inhibitors to the brain via intranasal (i.n.) administration. Three structurally distinct classes of GCP-II inhibitors were evaluated including DCMC (urea-based), 2-MPPA (thiol-based) and 2-PMPA (phosphonate-based). While all showed some brain penetration following i.n. administration, 2-PMPA exhibited the highest levels and was chosen for further evaluation. Compared to intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration, equivalent doses of i.n. administered 2-PMPA resulted in similar plasma exposures (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 1.0) but dramatically enhanced brain exposures in the olfactory bulb (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 67), cortex (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 46) and cerebellum (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 6.3). Following i.n. administration, the brain tissue to plasma ratio based on AUC0-t in the olfactory bulb, cortex, and cerebellum were 1.49, 0.71 and 0.10, respectively, compared to an i.p. brain tissue to plasma ratio of less than 0.02 in all areas. Furthermore, i.n. administration of 2-PMPA resulted in complete inhibition of brain GCP-II enzymatic activity ex-vivo confirming target engagement. Lastly, because the rodent nasal system is not similar to humans, we evaluated i.n. 2-PMPA also in a non-human primate. We report that i.n. 2-PMPA provides selective brain delivery with micromolar concentrations. These studies support

  10. Selective CNS Uptake of the GCP-II Inhibitor 2-PMPA following Intranasal Administration

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Wozniak, Krystyna; Wu, Ying; Niwa, Minae; Stathis, Marigo; Alt, Jesse; Giroux, Marc; Sawa, Akira; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP-II) is a brain metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes the abundant neuropeptide N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) to NAA and glutamate. Small molecule GCP-II inhibitors increase brain NAAG, which activates mGluR3, decreases glutamate, and provide therapeutic utility in a variety of preclinical models of neurodegenerative diseases wherein excess glutamate is presumed pathogenic. Unfortunately no GCP-II inhibitor has advanced clinically, largely due to their highly polar nature resulting in insufficient oral bioavailability and limited brain penetration. Herein we report a non-invasive route for delivery of GCP-II inhibitors to the brain via intranasal (i.n.) administration. Three structurally distinct classes of GCP-II inhibitors were evaluated including DCMC (urea-based), 2-MPPA (thiol-based) and 2-PMPA (phosphonate-based). While all showed some brain penetration following i.n. administration, 2-PMPA exhibited the highest levels and was chosen for further evaluation. Compared to intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration, equivalent doses of i.n. administered 2-PMPA resulted in similar plasma exposures (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 1.0) but dramatically enhanced brain exposures in the olfactory bulb (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 67), cortex (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 46) and cerebellum (AUC0-t, i.n./AUC0-t, i.p. = 6.3). Following i.n. administration, the brain tissue to plasma ratio based on AUC0-t in the olfactory bulb, cortex, and cerebellum were 1.49, 0.71 and 0.10, respectively, compared to an i.p. brain tissue to plasma ratio of less than 0.02 in all areas. Furthermore, i.n. administration of 2-PMPA resulted in complete inhibition of brain GCP-II enzymatic activity ex-vivo confirming target engagement. Lastly, because the rodent nasal system is not similar to humans, we evaluated i.n. 2-PMPA also in a non-human primate. We report that i.n. 2-PMPA provides selective brain delivery with micromolar concentrations. These studies support

  11. Inhibition of recombinant N-type and native high voltage-gated neuronal Ca{sup 2+} channels by AdGABA: Mechanism of action studies

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Sandoval, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Zoidis, Grigoris; Felix, Ricardo

    2011-02-01

    High-voltage activated Ca{sup 2+} (Ca{sub V}) channels play a key role in the regulation of numerous physiological events by causing transient changes in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. These channels consist of a pore-forming Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 1} protein and three auxiliary subunits (Ca{sub V}{beta}, Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} and Ca{sub V}{gamma}). Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} is an important component of Ca{sub V} channels in many tissues and of great interest as a drug target. It is well known that anticonvulsant agent gabapentin (GBP) binds to Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} and reduces Ca{sup 2+} currents by modulating the expression and/or function of the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 1} subunit. Recently, we showed that an adamantane derivative of GABA, AdGABA, has also inhibitory effects on Ca{sub V} channels. However, the importance of the interaction of AdGABA with the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} subunit has not been conclusively demonstrated and the mechanism of action of the drug has yet to be elucidated. Here, we describe studies on the mechanism of action of AdGABA. Using a combined approach of patch-clamp recordings and molecular biology we show that AdGABA inhibits Ca{sup 2+} currents acting on Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} only when applied chronically, both in a heterologous expression system and in dorsal root-ganglion neurons. AdGABA seems to require uptake and be acting intracellularly given that its effects are prevented by an inhibitor of the L-amino acid transport system. Interestingly, a mutation in the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} that abolishes GBP binding did not affect AdGABA actions, revealing that its mechanism of action is similar but not identical to that of GBP. These results indicate that AdGABA is an important Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} ligand that regulates Ca{sub V} channels.

  12. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter 2 Mediates the Hepatic Uptake of Guanidinoacetate, the Creatine Biosynthetic Precursor, in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tachikawa, Masanori; Ikeda, Saori; Fujinawa, Jun; Hirose, Shirou; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is the biosynthetic precursor of creatine which is involved in storage and transmission of phosphate-bound energy. Hepatocytes readily convert GAA to creatine, raising the possibility that the active uptake of GAA by hepatocytes is a regulatory factor. The purpose of this study is to investigate and identify the transporter responsible for GAA uptake by hepatocytes. The characteristics of [14C]GAA uptake by hepatocytes were elucidated using the in vivo liver uptake method, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes, an expression system of Xenopus laevis oocytes, gene knockdown, and an immunohistochemical technique. In vivo injection of [14C]GAA into the rat femoral vein and portal vein results in the rapid uptake of [14C]GAA by the liver. The uptake was markedly inhibited by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and nipecotinic acid, an inhibitor of GABA transporters (GATs). The characteristics of Na+- and Cl−-dependent [14C]GAA uptake by freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were consistent with those of GAT2. The Km value of the GAA uptake (134 µM) was close to that of GAT2-mediated GAA transport (78.9 µM). GABA caused a marked inhibition with an IC50 value of 8.81 µM. The [14C]GAA uptake exhibited a significant reduction corresponding to the reduction in GAT2 protein expression. GAT2 was localized on the sinusoidal membrane of the hepatocytes predominantly in the periportal region. This distribution pattern was consistent with that of the creatine biosynthetic enzyme, S-adenosylmethionine∶guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase. GAT2 makes a major contribution to the sinusoidal GAA uptake by periportal hepatocytes, thus regulating creatine biosynthesis in the liver. PMID:22384273

  13. γ-Aminobutyric acid transporter 2 mediates the hepatic uptake of guanidinoacetate, the creatine biosynthetic precursor, in rats.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Masanori; Ikeda, Saori; Fujinawa, Jun; Hirose, Shirou; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is the biosynthetic precursor of creatine which is involved in storage and transmission of phosphate-bound energy. Hepatocytes readily convert GAA to creatine, raising the possibility that the active uptake of GAA by hepatocytes is a regulatory factor. The purpose of this study is to investigate and identify the transporter responsible for GAA uptake by hepatocytes. The characteristics of [(14)C]GAA uptake by hepatocytes were elucidated using the in vivo liver uptake method, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes, an expression system of Xenopus laevis oocytes, gene knockdown, and an immunohistochemical technique. In vivo injection of [(14)C]GAA into the rat femoral vein and portal vein results in the rapid uptake of [(14)C]GAA by the liver. The uptake was markedly inhibited by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and nipecotinic acid, an inhibitor of GABA transporters (GATs). The characteristics of Na(+)- and Cl(-)-dependent [(14)C]GAA uptake by freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were consistent with those of GAT2. The Km value of the GAA uptake (134 µM) was close to that of GAT2-mediated GAA transport (78.9 µM). GABA caused a marked inhibition with an IC(50) value of 8.81 µM. The [(14)C]GAA uptake exhibited a significant reduction corresponding to the reduction in GAT2 protein expression. GAT2 was localized on the sinusoidal membrane of the hepatocytes predominantly in the periportal region. This distribution pattern was consistent with that of the creatine biosynthetic enzyme, S-adenosylmethionine:guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase. GAT2 makes a major contribution to the sinusoidal GAA uptake by periportal hepatocytes, thus regulating creatine biosynthesis in the liver. PMID:22384273

  14. The plant GABA signaling downregulates horizontal transfer of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence plasmid.

    PubMed

    Lang, Julien; Gonzalez-Mula, Almudena; Taconnat, Ludivine; Clement, Gilles; Faure, Denis

    2016-05-01

    In the tumor-inducing (Ti) Agrobacterium tumefaciens, quorum sensing activates the horizontal transfer of the virulent Ti plasmid. In pure culture, this process can be impaired by the A. tumefaciens BlcC lactonase, whose expression is induced by gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA). It was therefore hypothesized that host GABA content might modulate quorum sensing and virulence gene dissemination during A. tumefaciens infection. We examined GABA metabolism and transport in Arabidopsis thaliana tumors combining transcriptomic, metabolomic and histological approaches. In addition, using genetically modified plants and bacteria, we evaluated the impact of plant host GABA content on Ti plasmid dissemination. The results showed that GABA and free proline, which acts as an antagonist of GABA uptake in A. tumefaciens, accumulated in wild-type tumors relative to uninfected plant tissues. Moreover, comparisons of tumors induced on Col-0 and her1 plants showed that the increase in the plant GABA : proline ratio was associated with both the upregulated expression of the blcC gene and the decreased dissemination of Ti plasmid in tumor-colonizing A. tumefaciens populations. This work demonstrates experimentally that the variation in the GABA content in plant tumors can interfere with the dissemination of A. tumefaciens Ti plasmids, and therefore highlights plant GABA content as an important trait in the struggle against pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26714842

  15. Crucial interactions between selective serotonin uptake inhibitors and sigma-1 receptor in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Md Shenuarin; Tagashira, Hideaki; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    Depression is associated with a substantial increase in the risk of developing heart failure and is independently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Inversely, cardiovascular disease can lead to severe depression. Thus, therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is strongly recommended to reduce cardiovascular disease-induced morbidity and mortality. However, molecular mechanisms to support evidence-based SSRI treatment of cardiovascular disease have not been elucidated. We recently found very high expression of the sigma-1 receptor, an orphan receptor, in rat heart tissue and defined the cardiac sigma-1 receptor as a direct SSRI target in eliciting cardioprotection in both pressure overload (PO)induced and transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-induced myocardial hypertrophy models in rodents. Our findings suggest that SSRIs such as fluvoxamine protect against PO- and TAC-induced cardiac dysfunction by upregulating sigma-1 receptor expression and stimulating sigma-1 receptor-mediated Akt-eNOS signaling. Here, we discuss the association of depression and cardiovascular diseases, the protective mechanism of SSRIs in heart failure patients, and the pathophysiological relevance of sigma-1 receptors to progression of heart failure. These findings should promote development of clinical therapeutics targeting the sigma-1 receptor in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23428811

  16. Disorders of GABA metabolism: SSADH and GABA-transaminase deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Parviz, Mahsa; Vogel, Kara; Gibson, K. Michael; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical disorders known to affect inherited gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism are autosomal recessively inherited succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and GABA-transaminase deficiency. The clinical presentation of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency includes intellectual disability, ataxia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and epilepsy with a nonprogressive course in typical cases, although a progressive form in early childhood as well as deterioration in adulthood with worsening epilepsy are reported. GABA-transaminase deficiency is associated with a severe neonatal-infantile epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:25485164

  17. Neocortical GABA release at high intracellular sodium and low extracellular calcium: an anti-seizure mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rassner, Michael P; Moser, Andreas; Follo, Marie; Joseph, Kevin; van Velthoven-Wurster, Vera; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    In epilepsy, the GABA and glutamate balance may be disrupted and a transient decrease in extracellular calcium occurs before and during a seizure. Flow Cytometry based fluorescence activated particle sorting experiments quantified synaptosomes from human neocortical tissue, from both epileptic and non-epileptic patients (27.7% vs. 36.9% GABAergic synaptosomes, respectively). Transporter-mediated release of GABA in human and rat neocortical synaptosomes was measured using the superfusion technique for the measurement of endogenous GABA. GABA release was evoked by either a sodium channel activator or a sodium/potassium-ATPase inhibitor when exocytosis was possible or prevented, and when the sodium/calcium exchanger was active or inhibited. The transporter-mediated release of GABA is because of elevated intracellular sodium. A reduction in the extracellular calcium increased this release (in both non-epileptic and epileptic, except Rasmussen encephalitis, synaptosomes). The inverse was seen during calcium doubling. In humans, GABA release was not affected by exocytosis inhibition, that is, it was solely transporter-mediated. However, in rat synaptosomes, an increase in GABA release at zero calcium was only exhibited when the exocytosis was prevented. The absence of calcium amplified the sodium/calcium exchanger activity, leading to elevated intracellular sodium, which, together with the stimulation-evoked intracellular sodium increment, enhanced GABA transporter reversal. Sodium/calcium exchange inhibitors diminished GABA release. Thus, an important seizure-induced extracellular calcium reduction might trigger a transporter- and sodium/calcium exchanger-related anti-seizure mechanism by augmenting transporter-mediated GABA release, a mechanism absent in rats. Uniquely, the additional increase in GABA release because of calcium-withdrawal dwindled during the course of illness in Rasmussen encephalitis. Seizures cause high Na(+) influx through action potentials. A

  18. Actions of insecticides on the insect GABA receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, I.; Hawkins, C.A.; Taylor, A.M.; Beadle, D.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The actions of insecticides on the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor were investigated using (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (( 35S)TBPS) binding and voltage-clamp techniques. Specific binding of (35S)TBPS to a membrane homogenate derived from the brain of Locusta migratoria locusts is characterised by a Kd value of 79.3 {plus minus} 2.9 nM and a Bmax value of 1770 {plus minus} 40 fmol/mg protein. (35S)TBPS binding is inhibited by mM concentrations of barbiturates and benzodiazepines. In contrast dieldrin, ivermectin, lindane, picrotoxin and TBPS are inhibitors of (35S)TBPS binding at the nanomolar range. Bicuculline, baclofen and pyrethroid insecticides have no effect on (35S)TBPS binding. These results are similar to those obtained in electrophysiological studies of the current elicited by GABA in both Locusta and Periplaneta americana central neurones. Noise analysis of the effects of lindane, TBPS, dieldrin and picrotoxin on the cockroach GABA responses reveals that these compounds decrease the variance of the GABA-induced current but have no effect on its mean open time. All these compounds, with the exception of dieldrin, significantly decrease the conductance of GABA-evoked single current.

  19. An arylaminopyridazine derivative of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a selective and competitive antagonist at the GABAA receptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Chambon, J P; Feltz, P; Heaulme, M; Restle, S; Schlichter, R; Biziere, K; Wermuth, C G

    1985-01-01

    In view of finding a new gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor ligand we synthesized an arylaminopyridazine derivative of GABA, SR 95103 [2-(carboxy-3'-propyl)-3-amino-4-methyl-6-phenylpyridazinium chloride]. SR 95103 displaced [3H]GABA from rat brain membranes with an apparent Ki of 2.2 microM and a Hill number near 1.0. SR 95103 (1-100 microM) antagonized the GABA-mediated enhancement of [3H]diazepam binding in a concentration-dependent manner without affecting [3H]diazepam binding per se. SR 95103 competitively antagonized GABA-induced membrane depolarization in rat spinal ganglia. In all these experiments, the potency of SR 95103 was close to that of bicuculline. SR 95103 (100 microM) did not interact with a variety of central receptors--in particular the GABAB, the strychnine, and the glutamate receptors--did not inhibit Na+-dependent synaptosomal GABA uptake, and did not affect GABA-transaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase activities. Intraperitoneally administered SR 95103 elicited clonicotonic seizures in mice (ED50 = 180 mg/kg). On the basis of these results it is postulated that St 95103 is a competitive antagonist of GABA at the GABAA receptor site. In addition to being an interesting lead structure for the search of GABA ligands, SR 95103 could also be a useful tool to investigate GABA receptor subtypes because it is freely soluble in water and chemically stable. Images PMID:2984669

  20. Acute and chronic treatment with selective serotonin uptake inhibitors in mice: effects on nociceptive sensitivity and response to 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine.

    PubMed

    Eide, P K; Hole, K

    1988-03-01

    The tail-flick and increasing temperature hot-plate tests were employed to study the effects of acute or chronic treatment with zimelidine, alaproclate or chlorimipramine on nociception and response to 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT) in mice. A single dose of the serotonin (5-HT) uptake inhibitors produced antinociception in the hot-plate test but not in the tail-flick test. After chronic administration, reduced tail-flick latencies were demonstrated 24, 48, 72 and 144 h after withdrawal of zimelidine treatment, 48 h after withdrawal of alaproclate and 48 and 96 h after withdrawal of chlorimipramine treatment. The hot-plate response temperatures were slightly lowered after chronic zimelidine treatment but not after treatment with alaproclate or chlorimipramine. The response to 5-MeODMT was not altered by a single dose of the 5-HT uptake inhibitors, however, after withdrawal of chronic treatment this response was increased in the tail-flick test but not in the hot-plate test. It was concluded that acute and chronic treatment with 5-HT uptake inhibitors modulate nociception differently, and that chronic treatment induces supersensitivity of spinal postsynaptic 5-HT receptors. Different modulation of different 5-HT receptor subpopulations by these compounds may possibly contribute to the test-dependent results. PMID:2966334

  1. Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Induced Weight Changes: A Dose and Duration Dependent Study on Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jethani, S.L.; Rohatgi, R.K.; Kalra, Juhi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most significant and safe drugs among the antidepressants. Fluoxetine is the prototype drug of SSRIs. Various clinical studies showed that SSRI causes change in body weight in patients. This study was conducted to know the extent of weight change with different doses for different durations. Aim The aim of this study was to find out whether fluoxetine causes weight gain or weight loss, and to deduce the comparative weight change after intraperitoneal injection of fluoxetine for different duration and doses. Materials and Methods Present study was conducted on 72 adult (36 males and 36 females) albino rats, in 3 phases of 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 12 weeks duration. Each phase consisted of 24 (12 males and 12 females) albino rats. These 24 rats were further randomly subdivided into 4 Groups of 6 albino rats each (3 males & 3 females). Group 1(Control) received normal saline (vehicle). Rest 18 rats of each phase were experimental rats, of Group 2, Group 3 and Group 4 (6 rats each). Group 2, group 3 and group 4 experimental rats received 10mg/kg, 20 mg/kg and 40mg/kg of intraperitoneal injection of fluoxetine respectively. All rats were weighed on each day for growth monitoring. Data was subjected to statistical analysis (Mean, standard deviation and Student’s t-Test). Results All experimental group rats which received fluoxetine showed decrease of body weight. Rats which received high doses of fluoxetine could not tolerate the drug for more than two weeks and died due to excessive body weight loss, loose stools and muscle twitching. Conclusion Present study conclude that SSRIs can cause weight change in the form of decrease of body weight. This property of SSRIs can be used clinically by prescribing these drugs to obese psychiatric patient without any fear of withdrawal of drug. PMID:27134853

  2. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  3. Evidence That GABA Mediates Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Pathways Associated with Locomotor Activity in Juvenile Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, S.; Schreck, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the control of locomotor activity in juvenile salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by manipulating 3 neurotransmitter systems-gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (GABA), dopamine, and serotonin-as well as the neuropeptide corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of CRH and the GABAAagonist muscimol stimulated locomotor activity. The effect of muscimol was attenuated by administration of a dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol. Conversely, the administration of a dopamine uptake inhibitor (4???,4??? -difluoro-3-alpha-[diphenylmethoxy] tropane hydrochloride [DUI]) potentiated the effect of muscimol. They found no evidence that CRH-induced hyperactivity is mediated by dopaminergic systems following concurrent injections of haloperidol or DUI with CRH. Administration of muscimol either had no effect or attenuated the locomotor response to concurrent injections of CRH and fluoxetine, whereas the GABAA antagonist bicuculline methiodide potentiated the effect of CRH and fluoxetine.

  4. Environmental risk assessment for the serotonin re-uptake inhibitor fluoxetine: Case study using the European risk assessment framework.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Ken D; Coors, Anja; Escher, Beate I; Fenner, Kathrin; Garric, Jeanne; Gust, Marion; Knacker, Thomas; Küster, Anette; Kussatz, Carola; Metcalfe, Chris D; Monteiro, Sara; Moon, Thomas W; Mennigen, Jan A; Parrott, Joanne; Péry, Alexandre R R; Ramil, Maria; Roennefahrt, Ines; Tarazona, José V; Sánchez-Argüello, Paloma; Ternes, Thomas A; Trudeau, Vance L; Boucard, Tatiana; Van Der Kraak, Glen J; Servos, Mark R

    2010-07-01

    The serotonin re-uptake inhibitor fluoxetine was selected for an environmental risk assessment, using the most recent European guideline (EMEA 2006) within the European Union (EU)-funded Environmental Risk Assessment of Pharmaceuticals (ERAPharm) project due to its environmental persistence, acute toxicity to nontarget organisms, and unique pharmacokinetics associated with a readily ionizable compound. As a widely prescribed psychotropic drug, fluoxetine is frequently detected in surface waters adjacent to urban areas because municipal wastewater effluents are the primary route of entry to aquatic environments. In Phase I of the assessment, the initial predicted environmental concentration of fluoxetine in surface water (initial PEC(SW)) reached or exceeded the action limit of 10 ng/L, when using both a default market penetration factor and prescription data for Sweden, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Consequently, a Phase II risk assessment was conducted in which green algae were identified as the most sensitive species with a NOEC of <0.6 microg/L. From this value, a predicted no effect concentration for surface waters (PNEC(SW)) of 0.012 microg/L was derived. The PEC/PNEC ratio was above the trigger value of 1 in worst-case exposure scenarios indicating a potential risk to the aquatic compartment. Similarly, risks of fluoxetine for sediment-dwelling organisms could not be excluded. No risk assessment was conducted for the terrestrial compartment due to a lack of data on effects of fluoxetine on soil organisms. The need for a separate risk assessment for the main metabolite of fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, was not conducted because of a lack of fate and effect studies. Based on published data, fluoxetine and norfluoxetine appeared to have a low to moderate bioaccumulation potential, which should be confirmed in formal studies according to OECD guidelines. Exposure assessments for fluoxetine according to the current framework rely heavily on K(OC) and K(OW) values

  5. Differential effects of GABA in modulating nociceptive vs. non-nociceptive synapses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Summers, T; Peterson, W; Miiller, E; Burrell, B D

    2015-07-01

    GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) -mediated signaling is normally associated with synaptic inhibition due to ionotropic GABA receptors that gate an inward Cl(-) current, hyperpolarizing the membrane potential. However, there are also situations where ionotropic GABA receptors trigger a Cl(-) efflux that results in depolarization. The well-characterized central nervous system of the medicinal leech was used to study the functional significance of opposing effects of GABA at the synaptic circuit level. Specifically, we focused on synapses made by the nociceptive N cell and the non-nociceptive P (pressure) cell that converge onto a common postsynaptic target. It is already known that GABA hyperpolarizes the P cell, but depolarizes the N cell and that inhibition of ionotropic GABA receptors by bicuculline (BIC) has opposing effects on the synapses made by these two inputs; enhancing P cell synaptic transmission, but depressing N cell synapses. The goal of the present study was to determine whether the opposing effects of GABA were due to differences in Cl(-) homeostasis between the two presynaptic neurons. VU 0240551 (VU), an inhibitor of the Cl(-) exporter K-Cl co-transporter isoform 2 (KCC2), attenuated GABA-mediated hyperpolarization of the non-nociceptive afferent while bumetanide (BUM), an inhibitor of the Cl(-) importer Na-K-Cl co-transporter isoform 1 (NKCC1), reduced GABA-mediated depolarization of the nociceptive neuron. VU treatment also enhanced P cell synaptic signaling, similar to the previously observed effects of BIC and consistent with the idea that GABA inhibits synaptic signaling at the presynaptic level. BUM treatment depressed N cell synapses, again similar to what is observed following BIC treatment and suggests that GABA has an excitatory effect on these synapses. The opposing effects of GABA could also be observed at the behavioral level with BIC and VU increasing responsiveness to non-nociceptive stimulation while BIC and BUM decreased responsiveness

  6. A study on the involvement of GABA-transaminase in MCT induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lingeshwar, Poorella; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Neetu; Singh, Seema; Mishra, Akanksha; Shukla, Shubha; Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Laxman, Tulsankar Sachin; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar; Siddiqui, Hefazat H; Hanif, Kashif

    2016-02-01

    Increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is associated with cardiovascular diseases but its role has not been completely explored in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Increased SNS activity is distinguished by elevated level of norepinephrine (NE) and activity of γ-Amino butyric acid Transminase (GABA-T) which degrades GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter within the central and peripheral nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that GABA-T may contribute in pathophysiology of PH by modulating level of GABA and NE. The effect of daily oral administration of GABA-T inhibitor, Vigabatrin (GVG, 50 and 75 mg/kg/day, 35 days) was studied following a single subcutaneous administration of monocrotaline (MCT, 60 mg/kg) in male SD rats. The pressure and hypertrophy of right ventricle (RV), oxidative stress, inflammation, pulmonary vascular remodelling were assessed after 35 days in MCT treated rats. The expression of GABA-T and HIF-1α was studied in lung tissue. The levels of plasma NE (by High performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detector; HPLC-ECD) and lung GABA (by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) were also estimated. GVG at both doses significantly attenuated increased in pressure (35.82 ± 4.80 mm Hg, p < 0.001; 28.37 ± 3.32 mm Hg, p < 0.001 respectively) and hypertrophy of RV, pulmonary vascular remodelling, oxidative stress and inflammation in lungs of MCT exposed rats. GVG also reduced the expression of GABA-T and HIF-1α in MCT treated rats. Increased NE level and decreased GABA level was also reversed by GVG in MCT exposed rats. GABA-T plays an important role in PH by modulating SNS activity and may be considered as a therapeutic target in PH. PMID:26608704

  7. Inherited disorders of GABA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L; Hartka, Thomas R; Cabalza, Jessica L; Taylor, Jacob; Gibson, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    The inherited disorders of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism require an increased index of clinical suspicion. The known genetic disorders are GABA-transaminase deficiency, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency and homocarnosinosis. A recent link has also been made between impaired GABA synthesis and nonsyndromic cleft lip, with or without cleft palate. SSADH deficiency is the most commonly occurring of the inherited disorders of neurotransmitters. The disorder has a nonspecific phenotype with myriad neurological and psychiatric manifestations, and usually has a nonprogressive temporal course. Diagnosis is made by the detection of γ-hydroxybutyrate excretion on urine organic acid testing. The most consistent magnetic resonance imaging abnormality is an increased signal in the globus pallidus. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has demonstrated the first example of increased endogenous GABA in human brain parenchyma in this disorder. GABA-transaminase deficiency and homocarnosinosis appear to be very rare, but require cerebrospinal fluid for detection, thus allowing for the possibility that these entities, as in the other inherited neurotransmitter disorders, are under-recognized. PMID:23842532

  8. GABA release by hippocampal astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Karim; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Grandes, Pedro; Audinat, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes can directly influence neuronal activity through the release of various transmitters acting on membrane receptors expressed by neurons. However, in contrast to glutamate and ATP for instance, the release of GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) by astrocytes is still poorly documented. Here, we used whole-cell recordings in rat acute brain slices and electron microscopy to test whether hippocampal astrocytes release the inhibitory transmitter GABA. We observed that slow transient inhibitory currents due to the activation of GABAA receptors occur spontaneously in principal neurons of the three main hippocampal fields (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus). These currents share characteristics with the slow NMDA receptor-mediated currents previously shown to result from astrocytic glutamate release: they occur in the absence of synaptic transmission and have variable kinetics and amplitudes as well as low frequencies. Osmotic pressure reduction, known to enhance transmitter release from astrocytes, similarly increased the frequency of non-synaptic GABA and glutamate currents. Simultaneous occurrence of slow inhibitory and excitatory currents was extremely rare. Yet, electron microscopy examination of immunostained hippocampal sections shows that about 80% of hippocampal astrocytes [positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] were immunostained for GABA. Our results provide quantitative characteristics of the astrocyte-to-neuron GABAergic signaling. They also suggest that all principal neurons of the hippocampal network are under a dual, excitatory and inhibitory, influence of astrocytes. The relevance of the astrocytic release of GABA, and glutamate, on the physiopathology of the hippocampus remains to be established. PMID:22912614

  9. GAD67-mediated GABA Synthesis and Signaling Regulate Inhibitory Synaptic Innervation in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Di Cristo, Graziella; Wu, Cai Zhi; Knott, Graham; Kuhlman, Sandra; Fu, Yu; Palmiter, Richard D.; Huang, Z. Josh

    2007-01-01

    The development of GABAergic inhibitory circuits is shaped by neural activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. we demonstrate a novel function of GABA in regulating GABAergic innervation in the adolescent brain, when GABA is mainly known as an inhibitory transmitter. Conditional knockdown of the rate-limiting synthetic enzyme GAD67 in basket interneurons in adolescent visual cortex resulted in cell autonomous deficits in axon branching, perisomatic synapse formation around pyramidal neurons, and complexity of the innervation fields; the same manipulation had little influence on the subsequent maintenance of perisomatic synapses. These effects of GABA deficiency were rescued by suppressing GABA re-uptake and by GABA receptor agonists. Germ-line knockdown of GAD67 but not GAD65 showed similar deficits, suggesting a specific role of GAD67 in the maturation of perisomatic innervation. Since intracellular GABA levels are modulated by neuronal activity, our results implicate GAD67-mediated GABA synthesis in activity-dependent regulation of inhibitory innervation patterns. PMID:17582330

  10. Regulation of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors following neurotoxin-induced striatal and medial forebrain bundle lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, H.S.I.

    1985-01-01

    GABA, a major inhibitory transmitter, is used by many projection neurons of the striatum. To investigate the role of GABA in striatal function, the GABA receptor complex was studied after lesions of the striatum or the nigrostriatal neurons. Quantitative receptor autoradiography using thaw-mounted tissue slices was developed for the study of GABA and benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors. With the technique established, binding to GABA and BDZ receptors after unilateral striatal kainate lesions was examined. Subsequently, changes in GABA and BDZ receptors were studied following the destruction of dopaminergic nigrostriatal cells by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the medial forebrain bundle. In summary, quantitative receptor autoradiography allowed the detection of GABA and BDZ receptor changes in multiple small areas in each lesioned brain. This technique made it feasible to carry out kinetic saturation, and competition studies using less than 1 mg of tissue. The data suggest that dopamine is functionally inhibitory on striatopallidal neurons but is functionally excitatory on striatoentopeduncular and striatonigral cells which in turn inhibit the thalamus. This quantitative autoradiographic technique can be generalized to study other transmitter receptors and can be combined with 2-deoxyglucose uptake studies.

  11. Evaluation of monoclonal immune complexes and microaggregated albumin as inhibitors of uptake and labeled monoclonal antibody by hepatic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Blend, M.; Mermall, H.; Pinsky, S.; Frinke, J.; David, G.; Carlo, D.

    1985-05-01

    Hepatic uptake of labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) remains a persistent problem. Human hepatoma tumors were transplanted into adult rats and successfully imaged following the injection of In-111-antiferritin MoAb. Biodistribution studies revealed that the livers in both tumor and non-tumor bearing rats accumulate and retain labeled MoAb. Two biodegradable agents thought capable of inhibiting the uptake of MoAb by blocking the liver RES were studied. Immune complexes of human spleen ferritin and antiferritin-MoAb were prepared in vitro and tested as liver RES blocking agent to the same labeled/MoAb and labeled MoAb-ferritin complex. A preparation of microaggregated albumin with an average sphere diameter of 0.4 microns (range 0.1-5.0) was tested. These compounds were injected 30 minutes prior to the injection of labeled MoAb or MoAb:Ag complex; 2-4 rats per treatment group. All agents failed to inhibit or alter the uptake of labeled MoAb and MoAb:Ag complex at concentrations of 500 ..mu..g/rat of cold complex and 250 and 500 ..mu..g/rat of microaggregated albumin. Rats with no pretreatment showed a 38% uptake. Pretreatment with complex showed 45% uptake Microlite 43% uptake, and cold complex 46% uptake. Pretreatment with 12 mg of microaggregated albumin also failed to inhibit hepatic uptake of /sup 99m/Tc-Microlite and /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid. These data indicate that hepatic uptake of labeled MoAB is not the result of macrophage activity in the hepatic sinusoids.

  12. Gestational changes of GABA levels and GABA binding in the human uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Erdoe, S.L.; Villanyi, P.; Laszlo, A.

    1989-01-01

    The concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the activities of L-glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase, and the nature of the sodium-independent binding of GABA were examined in uterine tissue pieces obtained surgically from pregnant and non-pregnant women. GABA concentrations were reduced, while the activity of GABA-transaminase and the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)GABA significantly increased in specimens from pregnant subjects. These findings suggest some gestation-related functional role for the GABA system in the human uterus.

  13. Increased probability of GABA release during withdrawal from morphine.

    PubMed

    Bonci, A; Williams, J T

    1997-01-15

    Opioid receptors located on interneurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) inhibit GABA(A)-mediated synaptic transmission to dopamine projection neurons. The resulting disinhibition of dopamine cells in the VTA is thought to play a pivotal role in drug abuse; however, little is known about how this GABAA synapse is affected after chronic morphine treatment. The regulation of GABA release during acute withdrawal from morphine was studied in slices from animals treated for 6-7 d with morphine. Slices containing the VTA were prepared and maintained in morphine-free solutions, and GABAA IPSCs were recorded from dopamine cells. The amplitude of evoked IPSCs and the frequency of spontaneous miniature IPSCs measured in slices from morphine-treated guinea pigs were greater than placebo-treated controls. In addition, activation of adenylyl cyclase, with forskolin, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase, with Sp-cAMPS, caused a larger increase in IPSCs in slices from morphine-treated animals. Conversely, the kinase inhibitors staurosporine and Rp-CPT-cAMPS decreased GABA IPSCs to a greater extent after drug treatment. The results indicate that the probability of GABA release was increased during withdrawal from chronic morphine treatment and that this effect resulted from an upregulation of the cAMP-dependent cascade. Increased transmitter release from opioid-sensitive synapses during acute withdrawal may be one adaptive mechanism that results from prolonged morphine treatment. PMID:8987801

  14. Zolpidem increases GABA in depressed volunteers maintained on SSRIs.

    PubMed

    Licata, Stephanie C; Jensen, J Eric; Conn, Nina A; Winer, Jeffrey P; Lukas, Scott E

    2014-10-30

    Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) often use hypnotics like zolpidem (Ambien(®)) to improve sleep in addition to their selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) regimen. SSRIs act in part to restore disrupted GABAergic activity, but benzodiazepines and related drugs have been shown to lower GABA in a way that may be counter to these therapeutic effects. The present within-subject, single-blind, placebo-controlled study measured changes in GABA in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and thalamus of volunteers maintained on SSRIs for the treatment of MDD (n=14) following zolpidem (10mg) administration. In addition to neurochemical measurements obtained using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 4 T, a series of questionnaires were administered to assess subjective effects associated with acute zolpidem exposure. Zolpidem elevated GABA levels in both voxels of interest (P<0.05) in the depressed participants, which could imply normalization, given the lower baseline levels associated with depression. The subjective drug experience in the depressed cohort was similar to that reported previously by healthy volunteers, and no relationships existed between GABA increases and the observed behavioral effects. Aside from treating insomnia, using zolpidem in the presence of SSRIs may have some unidentified therapeutic effects for depressed individuals. PMID:25082715

  15. Modulation of GABA-augmented norepinephrine release in female rat brain slices by opioids and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Fiber, J M; Etgen, A M

    2001-07-01

    GABAA receptor activation augments electrically-stimulated release of norepinephrine (NE) from rat brain slices. Because this effect is not observed in synaptoneurosomes, GABA probably acts on inhibitory interneurons to disinhibit NE release. To determine whether opioids or adenosine influence GABA-augmented NE release, hypothalamic and cortical slices from female rats were superfused with GABA or vehicle in the presence and absence of 10 microM morphine or 100 microM adenosine. GABA augments [3H]NE release in the cortex and hypothalamus. Morphine alone has no effect on [3H]NE release, but attenuates GABA augmentation of [3H]NE release in both brain regions. Adenosine alone modestly inhibits [3H]NE release in the cortex, but not in the hypothalamus. Adenosine inhibits GABA-augmented [3H]NE release in both brain regions. The general protein kinase inhibitor H-7, augments [3H]NE release in both brain regions and may have additive effects with GABA in cortical slices. These results implicate opioid and adenosine interneurons and possibly protein kinases in regulating GABAergic influences on NE transmission. PMID:11565619

  16. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Shimeng; Yang, Liukun; Shi, Qixin; Li, Yujiao; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Le; Zhao, Minggao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT) cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T) expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB), a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment. PMID:27517961

  17. Mutations in the GABA Transporter SLC6A1 Cause Epilepsy with Myoclonic-Atonic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Carvill, Gemma L.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Schneider, Amy; Zemel, Matthew; Myers, Candace T.; Saykally, Julia; Nguyen, John; Robbiano, Angela; Zara, Federico; Specchio, Nicola; Mecarelli, Oriano; Smith, Robert L.; Leventer, Richard J.; Møller, Rikke S.; Nikanorova, Marina; Dimova, Petia; Jordanova, Albena; Petrou, Steven; Helbig, Ingo; Striano, Pasquale; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Mefford, Heather C.

    2015-01-01

    GAT-1, encoded by SLC6A1, is one of the major gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters in the brain and is responsible for re-uptake of GABA from the synapse. In this study, targeted resequencing of 644 individuals with epileptic encephalopathies led to the identification of six SLC6A1 mutations in seven individuals, all of whom have epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures (MAE). We describe two truncations and four missense alterations, all of which most likely lead to loss of function of GAT-1 and thus reduced GABA re-uptake from the synapse. These individuals share many of the electrophysiological properties of Gat1-deficient mice, including spontaneous spike-wave discharges. Overall, pathogenic mutations occurred in 6/160 individuals with MAE, accounting for ∼4% of unsolved MAE cases. PMID:25865495

  18. Identification of the sites for CaMK-II-dependent phosphorylation of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Houston, Catriona M; Lee, Henry H C; Hosie, Alastair M; Moss, Stephen J; Smart, Trevor G

    2007-06-15

    Phosphorylation can affect both the function and trafficking of GABA(A) receptors with significant consequences for neuronal excitability. Serine/threonine kinases can phosphorylate the intracellular loops between M3-4 of GABA(A) receptor beta and gamma subunits thereby modulating receptor function in heterologous expression systems and in neurons (1, 2). Specifically, CaMK-II has been demonstrated to phosphorylate the M3-4 loop of GABA(A) receptor subunits expressed as GST fusion proteins (3, 4). It also increases the amplitude of GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents in a number of neuronal cell types (5-7). To identify which substrate sites CaMK-II might phosphorylate and the consequent functional effects, we expressed recombinant GABA(A) receptors in NG108-15 cells, which have previously been shown to support CaMK-II modulation of GABA(A) receptors containing the beta3 subunit (8). We now demonstrate that CaMK-II mediates its effects on alpha1beta3 receptors via phosphorylation of Ser(383) within the M3-4 domain of the beta subunit. Ablation of beta3 subunit phosphorylation sites for CaMK-II revealed that for alphabetagamma receptors, CaMK-II has a residual effect on GABA currents that is not mediated by previously identified sites of CaMK-II phosphorylation. This residual effect is abolished by mutation of tyrosine phosphorylation sites, Tyr(365) and Tyr(367), on the gamma2S subunit, and by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. These results suggested that CaMK-II is capable of directly phosphorylating GABA(A) receptors and activating endogenous tyrosine kinases to phosphorylate the gamma2 subunit in NG108-15 cells. These findings were confirmed in a neuronal environment by expressing recombinant GABA(A) receptors in cerebellar granule neurons. PMID:17442679

  19. Striatal cholinergic interneurons drive GABA release from dopamine terminals

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alexandra B.; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F.; Shah, Nirao M.; Seal, Rebecca P.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically-driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons, but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons. PMID:24613418

  20. An inhibitor of DNA binding and uptake events dictates the proficiency of genetic transformation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: mechanism of action and links to Type IV pilus expression.

    PubMed

    Aas, Finn Erik; Løvold, Cecilia; Koomey, Michael

    2002-12-01

    Although natural genetic transformation is a widely disseminated form of genetic exchange in prokaryotic species, the proficiencies with which DNA recognition, uptake and processing occur in nature vary greatly. However, the molecular factors and interactions underlying intra- and interspecies diversity in levels of competence for natural genetic transformation are poorly understood. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the Gram-negative aetiologic agent of gonorrhoea, DNA binding and uptake involve components required for Type IV pilus (Tfp) biogenesis as well as those which are structurally related to Tfp biogenesis components but dispensable for organelle expression. We demonstrate here that the gonococcal PilV protein, structurally related to Tfp pilin subunits, is an intrinsic inhibitor of natural genetic transformation which acts ultimately by reducing the levels of sequence-specific DNA uptake into the cell. Specifically, we show that DNA uptake is enhanced in strains bearing pilV mutations and reduced in strains overexpressing PilV. Furthermore, we show that PilV exerts its effect by acting as an antagonist of ComP, a positive effector of sequence-specific DNA binding. As it prevents the accumulation of ComP at a site where it can be purified by shear extraction of intact cells, the data are most consistent with PilV either obstructing ComP trafficking or altering ComP stability. In addition, we report that ComP and PilV play overlapping and partially redundant roles in Tfp biogenesis and document other genetic interactions between comP and pilV together with the pilE and pilT genes required for the expression of retractile Tfp. Together, the results reveal a novel mechanism by which the levels of competence are governed in prokaryotic species and suggest unique ways by which competence might be modulated. PMID:12453228

  1. Ornithine aminotransferase vs. GABA aminotransferase. Implications for the design of new anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunbeom; Juncosa, Jose I.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) and γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT) are classified under the same evolutionary subgroup and share a large portion of structural, functional, and mechanistic features. Therefore, it is not surprising that many molecules that bind to GABA-AT also bind well to OAT. Unlike GABA-AT, OAT had not been viewed as a potential therapeutic target until recently; consequently, the number of therapeutically viable molecules that target OAT is very limited. In this review the two enzymes are compared with respect to their active site structures, catalytic and inactivation mechanisms, and selective inhibitors. Insight is offered that could aid in the design and development of new selective inhibitors of OAT for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25145640

  2. MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, enhances LDL uptake in HepG2 cells in vitro by regulating LDLR and PCSK9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong; Ma, Yan-ling; Gui, Yu-zhou; Wang, Shu-mei; Wang, Xin-bo; Gao, Fei; Wang, Yi-ping

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Expression of liver low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), a determinant regulator in cholesterol homeostasis, is tightly controlled at multiple levels. The aim of this study was to examine whether proteasome inhibition could affect LDLR expression and LDL uptake in liver cells in vitro. Methods: HepG2 cells were examined. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis were used to determine the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. DiI-LDL uptake assay was used to quantify the LDLR function. Luciferase assay system was used to detect the activity of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9, a major protein mediating LDLR degradation) promoter. Specific siRNAs were used to verify the involvement of PCSK9. Results: Treatment of HepG2 cells with the specific proteasome inhibitor MG132 (0.03–3 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased LDLR mRNA and protein levels, as well as LDL uptake. Short-term treatment with MG132 (0.3 μmol/L, up to 8 h) significantly increased both LDLR mRNA and protein levels in HepG2 cells, which was blocked by the specific PKC inhibitors GF 109203X, Gö 6983 or staurosporine. In contrast, a longer treatment with MG132 (0.3 μmol/L, 24 h) did not change LDLR mRNA, but markedly increased LDLR protein by reducing PCSK9-mediated lysosome LDLR degradation. Furthermore, MG132 time-dependently suppressed PCSK9 expression in the HepG2 cells through a SREBP-1c related pathway. Combined treatment with MG132 (0.3 μmol/L) and pravastatin (5 μmol/L) strongly promoted LDLR expression and LDL uptake in HepG2 cells, and blocked the upregulation of PCSK9 caused by pravastatin alone. Conclusion: Inhibition of proteasome by MG132 in HepG2 cells plays dual roles in LDLR and PCSK9 expression, and exerts a beneficial effect on cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:25042549

  3. Selaginellin and biflavonoids as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from Selaginella tamariscina and their glucose uptake stimulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Ji, Da-Jung; Han, Yu-Ran; Choi, Jae-Sue; Rhyu, Dong-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hee

    2015-07-01

    As part of an ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, the methanol extract of the aerial parts of Selaginella tamariscina was found to possess stimulatory effect on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Thus, bioassay-guided isolation of this active extract yielded two new compounds (1 and 2) along with five known biflavonoids (3-7). Their structures were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic and physicochemical data. The absolute configuration of compound 2 was determined by specific rotation and CD data analysis. All isolates exhibited potent inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 4.5±0.1 to 13.2±0.8μM. Furthermore, the isolates (1-7) showed significant stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Of these, compounds (1, 6, and 7) which exhibited mixed-competitive inhibition modes against PTP1B, showed potent stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake. This result indicated the potential of these biflavonoids as lead molecules for development of antidiabetic agents and the beneficial use of S. tamariscina against hyperglycemia. PMID:25907369

  4. Correlation between the enhancement of flunitrazepam binding by GABA and seizure susceptibility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, R.J.; Wehner, J.M.

    1987-06-08

    Various populations of mice exhibit differential sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents. The relationship of seizure susceptibility to alterations in the GABA receptor complex was investigated in six different populations of mice consisting of four inbred strains (C57BL, DBA, C3H, and BALB) and two selected lines (long sleep and short sleep). Seizure activity was induced by intraperitoneal administration of the GAD inhibitor, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and latencies to seizure onset and tonus were measured. In naive mice of the same populations, GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding was measured in extensively washed whole brain membranes at several GABA concentrations. Both differential seizure sensitivity to 3-mercaptopropionic acid and differential enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding by GABA were observed in these six populations of mice. Correlational analyses indicated a positive correlation between the degree of GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding and resistance to the seizure-inducing properties of 3-mercaptopropionic acid. These data suggest that genetic differences in sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents that disrupt the GABAergic system may be related to differences in coupling between the various receptors associated with the GABA receptor complex.

  5. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) homeostasis regulates pollen germination and polarized growth in Picea wilsonii.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yu; Chen, Tong; Jing, Yanping; Fan, Lusheng; Wan, Yinglang; Lin, Jinxing

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a four-carbon non-protein amino acid found in a wide range of organisms. Recently, GABA accumulation has been shown to play a role in the stress response and cell growth in angiosperms. However, the effect of GABA deficiency on pollen tube development remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that specific concentrations of exogenous GABA stimulated pollen tube growth in Picea wilsonii, while an overdose suppressed pollen tube elongation. The germination percentage of pollen grains and morphological variations in pollen tubes responded in a dose-dependent manner to treatment with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MP), a glutamate decarboxylase inhibitor, while the inhibitory effects could be recovered in calcium-containing medium supplemented with GABA. Using immunofluorescence labeling, we found that the actin cables were disorganized in 3-MP treated cells, followed by the transition of endo/exocytosis activating sites from the apex to the whole tube shank. In addition, variations in the deposition of cell wall components were detected upon labeling with JIM5, JIM7, and aniline blue. Our results demonstrated that calcium-dependent GABA signaling regulates pollen germination and polarized tube growth in P. wilsonii by affecting actin filament patterns, vesicle trafficking, and the configuration and distribution of cell wall components. PMID:23900837

  6. Defects in GABA metabolism affect selective autophagy pathways and are alleviated by mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Ronak; Vogel, Kara R; Till, Andreas; Liu, Jingjing; Burnett, Sarah F; Gibson, K Michael; Subramani, Suresh

    2014-04-01

    In addition to key roles in embryonic neurogenesis and myelinogenesis, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) serves as the primary inhibitory mammalian neurotransmitter. In yeast, we have identified a new role for GABA that augments activity of the pivotal kinase, Tor1. GABA inhibits the selective autophagy pathways, mitophagy and pexophagy, through Sch9, the homolog of the mammalian kinase, S6K1, leading to oxidative stress, all of which can be mitigated by the Tor1 inhibitor, rapamycin. To confirm these processes in mammals, we examined the succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH)-deficient mouse model that accumulates supraphysiological GABA in the central nervous system and other tissues. Mutant mice displayed increased mitochondrial numbers in the brain and liver, expected with a defect in mitophagy, and morphologically abnormal mitochondria. Administration of rapamycin to these mice reduced mTOR activity, reduced the elevated mitochondrial numbers, and normalized aberrant antioxidant levels. These results confirm a novel role for GABA in cell signaling and highlight potential pathomechanisms and treatments in various human pathologies, including SSADH deficiency, as well as other diseases characterized by elevated levels of GABA. PMID:24578415

  7. Defects in GABA metabolism affect selective autophagy pathways and are alleviated by mTOR inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Lakhani, Ronak; Vogel, Kara R; Till, Andreas; Liu, Jingjing; Burnett, Sarah F; Gibson, K Michael; Subramani, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    In addition to key roles in embryonic neurogenesis and myelinogenesis, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) serves as the primary inhibitory mammalian neurotransmitter. In yeast, we have identified a new role for GABA that augments activity of the pivotal kinase, Tor1. GABA inhibits the selective autophagy pathways, mitophagy and pexophagy, through Sch9, the homolog of the mammalian kinase, S6K1, leading to oxidative stress, all of which can be mitigated by the Tor1 inhibitor, rapamycin. To confirm these processes in mammals, we examined the succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH)-deficient mouse model that accumulates supraphysiological GABA in the central nervous system and other tissues. Mutant mice displayed increased mitochondrial numbers in the brain and liver, expected with a defect in mitophagy, and morphologically abnormal mitochondria. Administration of rapamycin to these mice reduced mTOR activity, reduced the elevated mitochondrial numbers, and normalized aberrant antioxidant levels. These results confirm a novel role for GABA in cell signaling and highlight potential pathomechanisms and treatments in various human pathologies, including SSADH deficiency, as well as other diseases characterized by elevated levels of GABA. PMID:24578415

  8. Sodium-dependent GABA-induced currents in GAT1-transfected HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Risso, S; DeFelice, L J; Blakely, R D

    1996-01-01

    1. HeLa cells were infected with recombinant vaccinia virus containing the T7 RNA polymerase gene and transfected with the cDNA for a rat GABA transporter, GAT1, cloned downstream of a T7 RNA polymerase promoter. Six to sixteen hours after transfection, whole-cell recording with a voltage ramp in the range -90 to 50 mV revealed GABA-induced currents (approximately -100 pA at -60 mV in 100 microM GABA, 16 h after transfection at room temperature). No GABA-induced currents were observed in parental HeLa cells or in mock-transfected cells. 2. GABA-induced currents were suppressed by extracellular perfusion with GABA-free solutions or addition of GAT1 inhibitors SKF89976-A or SKF100330-A. At fixed voltage the GABA dependence of the inward current fitted the Michaelis-Menten equation with a Hill coefficient, n, near unity and an equilibrium constant, K(m), near 3 microM. The Na+ dependence of the inward currents fitted the Michaelis-Menten equation with n approximately equal to 2 and K(m) approximately equal to 10 mM. The constants n and K(m) for GABA and Na+ were independent of voltage in the range -90 to -30 mV. 3. GABA-induced currents reverse direction in the range 5-10 mV. The implication of this result is that GAT1 can mediate electrogenic (electrophoretic) influx or efflux of GABA depending on the membrane voltage. The presence of an outward current in our experiments is consistent with radioactive-labelled flux data from resealed vesicle studies. However, it is inconsistent with frog oocyte expression experiments using the sample clone. In oocytes, GAT1 generates no outward current in a similar voltage range. Smaller intracellular volume or higher turnover rates in the mammalian expression system may explain the outward currents. 4. External GABA induces inward current, and internal GABA induces outward current. However, in cells initially devoid of internal GABA, external GABA can also facilitate an outward current. This GAT1-mediated outward current occurs

  9. GABA(B) receptors and synaptic modulation.

    PubMed

    Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2006-11-01

    GABA(B) receptors modulate transmitter release and postsynaptic membrane potential at various types of central synapses. They function as heterodimers of two related seven-transmembrane domain receptor subunits. Trafficking, activation and signalling of GABA(B) receptors are regulated both by allosteric interactions between the subunits and by the binding of additional proteins. Recent studies have shed light on the roles of GABA(B) receptors in plasticity processes at excitatory synapses. This review summarizes our knowledge of the localization, structure and function of GABA(B) receptors in the central nervous system and their use as drug targets for neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:16932937

  10. GABA interaction with lipids in organic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Beltramo, D.; Kivatinitz, S.; Lassaga, E.; Arce, A.

    1987-08-10

    The interaction of TH-GABA and UC-glutamate with lipids in an aqueous organic partition system was studied. With this partition system TH-GABA and UC-glutamate were able to interact with sphingomyelin, sulfatide, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid but not with cholesterol or ceramide. In an homogeneous aqueous medium the authors could not demonstrate any interaction between TH-GABA-lipids. The apparent dissociation constants (K/sub d/) for TH-GABA-lipids or UC-glutamate-lipids interactions inorganic medium were in the millimolar range and maximal charge between 3 and 7 moles of GABA or glutamate by mole of lipid. Amino acids such as glutamic acid, US -alanine and glycine displaced TH-GABA with the same potency as GABA itself; thus these results show that the interaction lacks pharmacological specificity. To detect this interaction lipid concentrations higher than 2 M were required and in the partition system TH-GABA and lipid phosphorus were both concentrated at the interface. Therefore, lipids tested with a biphasic partition system do not fulfill the classical criteria for a neurotransmitter receptor at least not for GABA and glutamate. 15 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  11. Enhanced cellular uptake of a TAT-conjugated peptide inhibitor targeting the polo-box domain of polo-like kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Min; Chae, Min Kyung; Lee, Chulhyun; Yim, Min Su; Bang, Jeong Kyu; Ryu, Eun Kyoung

    2014-11-01

    In the last decade, drug delivery systems using biologically active molecules for cellular uptake of therapeutic targets have been studied for application and testing in clinical trials. For instance, the transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide, or cell-penetrating peptide, was shown to deliver a variety of cargoes, including proteins, peptides, and nucleic acids. Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) plays key roles in the regulation of cell cycle events (e.g., mitotic progression). Plk1 was also shown to be activated and highly expressed in proliferating cells such as tumor cells. Amongst these phosphopeptides, Pro-Leu-His-Ser-p-Thr (PLHSpT), which is the minimal sequence for polo-box domain (PBD) binding, was shown to have an inhibitory effect and to induce apoptotic cell death. However, the phosphopeptide showed low cell membrane penetration. Thus, in our study, we synthesized Plk1 inhibitor TAT-PLHSpT to improve agent internalization into cells. TAT-PLHSpT was shown to internalize into the nucleus. The conjugation of TAT with PLHSpT inhibited cancer cell growth and survival. Moreover, it showed an increase in cellular uptake and inhibition of Plk1 kinase activity. Further studies are needed for biological evaluation of the new peptide in tumor-bearing animal models (in vivo). Our results prove that TAT-PLHSpT is a good candidate for specific PBD binding of Plk1 as a therapeutic agent for humans. PMID:25151148

  12. The GABA transaminase, ABAT, is essential for mitochondrial nucleoside metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Besse, Arnaud; Wu, Ping; Bruni, Francesco; Donti, Taraka; Graham, Brett H.; Craigen, William J.; McFarland, Robert; Moretti, Paolo; Lalani, Seema; Scott, Kenneth L.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bonnen, Penelope E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary ABAT is a key enzyme responsible for catabolism of principal inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We report an essential role for ABAT in a seemingly unrelated pathway, mitochondrial nucleoside salvage, and demonstrate that mutations in this enzyme cause an autosomal recessive neurometabolic disorder and mtDNA depletion syndrome (MDS). We describe a family with encephalomyopathic MDS caused by a homozygous missense mutation in ABAT that results in elevated GABA in subjects’ brains as well as decreased mtDNA levels in subjects’ fibroblasts. Nucleoside rescue and co-IP experiments pinpoint that ABAT functions in the mitochondrial nucleoside salvage pathway to facilitate conversion of dNDPs to dNTPs. Pharmacological inhibition of ABAT through the irreversible inhibitor Vigabatrin caused depletion of mtDNA in photoreceptor cells that was prevented through addition of dNTPs in cell culture media. This work reveals ABAT as a connection between GABA metabolism and nucleoside metabolism and defines a neurometabolic disorder that includes MDS. PMID:25738457

  13. GABA accumulating neurons are relatively resistant to chronic hypoxia in vitro: An autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, P.K.; Hu, S. )

    1990-11-01

    Whether there is preferential loss of certain types of nerve cells or specific cellular functions after hypoxic or ischemic insults remains unclear. To evaluate this phenomenon in vitro, the vulnerability of GABAergic neurons to hypoxia was investigated both quantitatively and with autoradiography. Immature neuronal cortical cultures obtained from fetal mice were subjected to chronic hypoxia (5% O2) for 24 h or 48 h and then returned to the normoxic condition for 48 h. The shorter hypoxic exposure resulted in significantly reduced numbers of neurons in comparison to the longer exposure and also to controls (29% and 26%, respectively; p less than 0.001). LDH efflux, a reliable indicator of cell damage, also was higher after the shorter exposure insult. Nevertheless, in these same 24 h hypoxic cultures there was prominent sparing of those neurons which accumulate GABA: by 48 h of recovery GABAergic neurons constituted 29.3 +/- 2.0% of the remaining neuronal population in comparison to 11.6 +/- 0.6 and 14.4 +/- 0.8% for controls and 48 h hypoxia, respectively; (p less than 0.001). Although total GABA uptake per neuron was significantly decreased after both types of insult, there was a concomitant increase in glial GABA uptake (i.e., that which could be displaced by beta-alanine). These observations suggest that certain GABAergic cortical neurons are relatively more resistant to chronic hypoxia than the general neuronal population and that depression of overall neuronal GABA uptake may be associated with enhanced glial GABA uptake.

  14. Elimination of extracellular dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex of conscious mice analysed using selective enzyme and uptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tammimaki, A; Aonurm-Helm, A; Kaenmaki, M; Mannisto, P T

    2016-04-01

    We have shown in a previous study that in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of Comt knockout animals, uptake1 followed by oxidation accounts for approximately 50% and uptake2 followed by O-methylation for the remaining 50% of dopamine clearance. However, compensatory mechanisms in genetically modified animals may have affected the result. Therefore, in the present study, we gave a high dose (30 mg/kg) of tolcapone in combination with pargyline and reboxetine to C57BL/6J mice to see whether the earlier findings could be confirmed. The three drugs were also given together. We used intracerebral microdialysis to determine the levels of extracellular dopamine and its metabolites in the mPFC. In addition, we analyzed dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) contents in cortical and striatal synaptosomes to estimate the amount of releasable dopamine and dopamine turnover. In the prefrontal cortex of male C57BL/6J mice, the combination of two drugs (pargyline + tolcapone or reboxetine + tolcapone) generally elevated extracellular dopamine levels more than any single drug. Similar responses, although much weaker, were observed in female mice. Unexpectedly, triple treatment with pargyline, reboxetine and tolcapone did not increase dopamine outflow in the mPFC in either sex, and the treatment actually diminished dopamine outflow in the dorsal striatum. This seems to indicate that such an extensive treatment induces a fast and effective shut-down of dopamine release both in the mPFC and striatum to protect the brain from excess dopaminergic stimulation. The observed decrease in extracellular dopamine levels was not due to the depletion of releasable dopamine because abundant amounts of dopamine were present in synaptosomes. These results imply that the relative proportion of COMT-induced dopamine clearance may be somewhat lower than earlier estimated. PMID:27226189

  15. Closing the loop on the GABA shunt in plants: are GABA metabolism and signaling entwined?

    PubMed Central

    Michaeli, Simon; Fromm, Hillel

    2015-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that is found in uni- and multi-cellular organisms and is involved in many aspects of plant life cycle. GABA metabolism occurs by the action of evolutionary conserved enzymes that constitute the GABA shunt, bypassing two steps of the TCA cycle. The central position of GABA in the interface between plant carbon and nitrogen metabolism is well established. In parallel, there is evidence to support a role for GABA as a signaling molecule in plants. Here we cover some of the recent findings on GABA metabolism and signaling in plants and further suggest that the metabolic and signaling aspects of GABA may actually be inseparable. PMID:26106401

  16. Altered GABA Signaling in Early Life Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Stephen W.; Galanopoulou, Aristea S.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of seizures is particularly high in the early ages of life. The immaturity of inhibitory systems, such as GABA, during normal brain development and its further dysregulation under pathological conditions that predispose to seizures have been speculated to play a major role in facilitating seizures. Seizures can further impair or disrupt GABAA signaling by reshuffling the subunit composition of its receptors or causing aberrant reappearance of depolarizing or hyperpolarizing GABAA receptor currents. Such effects may not result in epileptogenesis as frequently as they do in adults. Given the central role of GABAA signaling in brain function and development, perturbation of its physiological role may interfere with neuronal morphology, differentiation, and connectivity, manifesting as cognitive or neurodevelopmental deficits. The current GABAergic antiepileptic drugs, while often effective for adults, are not always capable of stopping seizures and preventing their sequelae in neonates. Recent studies have explored the therapeutic potential of chloride cotransporter inhibitors, such as bumetanide, as adjunctive therapies of neonatal seizures. However, more needs to be known so as to develop therapies capable of stopping seizures while preserving the age- and sex-appropriate development of the brain. PMID:21826277

  17. PKCβ Inhibitors Attenuate Amphetamine-Stimulated Dopamine Efflux.

    PubMed

    Zestos, Alexander G; Mikelman, Sarah R; Kennedy, Robert T; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2016-06-15

    Amphetamine abuse afflicts over 13 million people, and there is currently no universally accepted treatment for amphetamine addiction. Amphetamine serves as a substrate for the dopamine transporter and reverses the transporter to cause an increase in extracellular dopamine. Activation of the beta subunit of protein kinase C (PKCβ) enhances extracellular dopamine in the presence of amphetamine by facilitating the reverse transport of dopamine and internalizing the D2 autoreceptor. We previously demonstrated that PKCβ inhibitors block amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux in synaptosomes from rat striatum in vitro. In this study, we utilized in vivo microdialysis in live, behaving rats to assess the effect of the PKCβ inhibitors, enzastaurin and ruboxistaurin, on amphetamine-stimulated locomotion and increases in monoamines and their metabolites. A 30 min perfusion of the nucleus accumbens core with 1 μM enzastaurin or 1 μM ruboxistaurin reduced efflux of dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine induced by amphetamine by approximately 50%. The inhibitors also significantly reduced amphetamine-stimulated extracellular levels of norepinephrine. The stimulation of locomotor behavior by amphetamine, measured simultaneously with the analytes, was comparably reduced by the PKCβ inhibitors. Using a stable isotope label retrodialysis procedure, we determined that ruboxistaurin had no effect on basal levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, or GABA. In addition, normal uptake function through the dopamine transporter was unaltered by the PKCβ inhibitors, as measured in rat synaptosomes. Our results support the utility of using PKCβ inhibitors to reduce the effects of amphetamine. PMID:26996926

  18. GABA induces functionally active low-affinity GABA receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Meier, E; Drejer, J; Schousboe, A

    1984-12-01

    The effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its agonists muscimol and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5-4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) on the development of GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was studied by cultivation of the cells in media containing these substances. It was found that the presence of 50 microM GABA in the culture media led to the induction of low-affinity GABA receptors (KD 546 +/- 117 nM) in addition to the high-affinity receptors (KD 7 +/- 0.5 nM) which were present regardless of the presence of GABA in the culture media. The functional activity of the GABA receptors was tested by investigating the ability of GABA to modulate evoked glutamate release from the cells. It was found that GABA could inhibit evoked glutamate release (ED50 10 +/- 3 microM) only when the cells had been cultured in the presence of 50 microM GABA, 50 microM muscimol, or 150 microM THIP, i.e., under conditions where low-affinity GABA receptors were present on the cells. This inhibitory effect of GABA could be blocked by 120 microM bicuculline and mimicked by 50 microM muscimol or 150 microM THIP whereas 150 microM (-)-baclofen had no effect. It is concluded that GABA acting extracellularly induces formation of low-affinity receptors on cerebellar granule cells and that these receptors are necessary for mediating an inhibitory effect of GABA on evoked glutamate release. The pharmacological properties of these GABA receptors indicate that they belong to the so-called GABAA receptors. PMID:6149269

  19. A tolerance study of single and multiple dosing of the selective dopamine uptake inhibitor GBR 12909 in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Søgaard, U; Michalow, J; Butler, B; Lund Laursen, A; Ingersen, S H; Skrumsager, B K; Rafaelsen, O J

    1990-10-01

    GBR 12909 selectively blocks dopamine uptake and its biochemical and pharmacological profiles suggest that it may possess antidepressant activity and be of value in treatment of Parkinson's disease. The tolerance, pharmacokinetics and influence on psychomotor performance of GBR 12909 were investigated in a randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study. Four healthy subjects were administered oral single doses of 100, 200 and 300 mg GBR 12909 and placebo, and four other healthy subjects received, 50, 100 and 150 mg GBR 12909 and placebo once daily for 7 days. The intermediate and highest doses resulted in mild to moderate side-effects such as difficulties in concentrating, asthenia, feeling of drug influence and palpitations. No changes were observed in haematological and clinico-chemical parameters. A dose-related effect on ECG was observed with a slight reduction of the T-wave amplitude. No signs of arrhythmia or decompensation during exercise until exhaustion were observed. Psychomotor performance indicated dose-related sedation in the single-dose study. Only minor deviations from first order kinetics were observed. Elimination half-life was estimated at 1-2 days. Steady-state serum concentrations of GBR 12909 appeared to be attained within 1 week. Based on the results of this study, the estimated therapeutic doses are expected to be well-tolerated in patients. PMID:2150527

  20. Cortical GABA Levels in Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Peter T.; Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Mason, Graeme F.; Forselius, Erica; Fasula, Madonna; Valentine, Gerald W.; Sanacora, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: GABA is increasingly recognized as an important neurotransmitter for the initiation and maintenance of sleep. We sought to measure cortical GABA content through proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in persons with and without primary insomnia, and relate brain GABA levels to polysomnographic sleep measures. Design: Two-group comparison study. Setting: Outpatient study at a university research clinic. Participants: Non-medicated persons with primary insomnia (N = 16) and no sleep complaints (N = 17). Interventions: Participants kept sleep diaries and a regular time-in-bed schedule for 9 days, culminating in 2 consecutive nights of ambulatory polysomnography and a single proton MRS session. The main outcome measure was occipital GABA/creatine ratios; secondary measures included sleep measurements and relationship between polysomnographically measured time awake after sleep onset and occipital GABA content. Measurements and Results: The primary insomnia group was distinguished from persons with no sleep complaints on self-reported and polysomnographically measured sleep. The two groups did not differ in age, sex, body mass index, habitual bed- and wake-times, napping, use of caffeine, or use of cigarettes. Mean occipital GABA level was 12% higher in persons with insomnia than in persons without sleep complaints (P < 0.05). In both groups, GABA levels correlated negatively with polysomnographically measured time awake after sleep onset (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Increased GABA levels in persons with insomnia may reflect an allostatic response to chronic hyperarousal. The preserved, negative relationship between GABA and time awake after sleep onset supports this notion, indicating that the possible allostatic response is adaptive. Citation: Morgan PT; Pace-Schott EF; Mason GF; Forselius E; Fasula M; Valentine GW; Sanacora G. Cortical GABA levels in primary insomnia. SLEEP 2012;35(6):807-814. PMID:22654200

  1. The impact of GABA in harpin-elicited biotic stress responses in Nicotiana tabaccum.

    PubMed

    Dimlioğlu, Gizem; Daş, Zeycan Akcan; Bor, Melike; Özdemir, Filiz; Türkan, İsmail

    2015-09-01

    Harpin is a bacterial elicitor protein that was first isolated from Erwinia amylovora. Infiltration of this elicitor into the leaves of plants activates systemic acquired resistance against a variety of plant pathogens via the salicyclic acid defense pathway. The non-protein amino acid, neurotransmission inhibitor molecule of mammals-GABA- is found in all organisms and is known to be an important component of stress responses in plants. We hypothesized a possible interaction between harpin-induced defense responses and GABA shunt. Therefore, we conducted experiments on harpin-infiltrated tobacco and analyzed the components of GABA shunt in relation to growth, photosynthesis and H2O2 levels. RGR, RWC and photosynthetic efficiency were all affected in harpin-infiltrated tobacco leaves, but the rate of decline was more remarkable on RGR. H2O2 levels showed significant difference on 7 days after harpin infiltration when the necrotic lesions were also visible. GABA accumulation was increased and glutamate levels were decreased parallel to the differences in GDH and GAD enzyme activities, especially on days 5 and 7 of harpin infiltration. Transcript abundance of GDH and GAD encoding genes were differentially regulated in harpin-infiltrated leaves as compared to that of control and mock groups. In the present study, for the first time we showed a relationship between harpin-elicited responses and GABA in tobacco that was not mediated by H2O2 accumulation. Harpin infiltration significantly induced the first components of the GABA shunt such as GDH, GAD, glutamate and GABA in tobacco. PMID:26432406

  2. The selective glycine uptake inhibitor org 25935 as an adjunctive treatment to atypical antipsychotics in predominant persistent negative symptoms of schizophrenia: results from the GIANT trial.

    PubMed

    Schoemaker, Joep H; Jansen, Wim T; Schipper, Jacques; Szegedi, Armin

    2014-04-01

    Using a selective glycine uptake inhibitor as adjunctive to second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) was hypothesized to ameliorate negative and/or cognitive symptoms in subjects with schizophrenia. Subjects with predominant persistent negative symptoms (previously stabilized ≥3 months on an SGA) were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to investigate adjunctive treatment with Org 25935, a selective inhibitor of type 1 glycine transporter, over 12 weeks in a flexible dose design. Org 25935 was tested at 4 to 8 mg twice daily and 12 to 16 mg twice daily versus placebo. Primary efficacy outcome was mean change from baseline in Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms composite score. Secondary efficacy end points were Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total and subscale scores, depressive symptoms (Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia), global functioning (Global Assessment of Functioning scale), and cognitive measures using a computerized battery (Central Nervous System Vital Signs). Responder rates were assessed post hoc. A total of 215 subjects were randomized, of which 187 (87%) completed the trial. Both dose groups of Org 25935 did not differ significantly from placebo on Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (total or subscale scores), Global Assessment of Functioning, or the majority of tested cognitive domains. Org 25935 was generally well tolerated within the tested dose range, with no meaningful effects on extrapyramidal symptoms and some reports of reversible visual adverse effects. Org 25935 did not differ significantly from placebo in reducing negative symptoms or improving cognitive functioning when administered as adjunctive treatment to SGA. In our study population, Org 25935 appeared to be well tolerated in the tested dose ranges. PMID:24525661

  3. Acute increases in synaptic GABA detectable in the living human brain: a [¹¹C]Ro15-4513 PET study.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Paul R A; Myers, Jim F; Kalk, Nicola J; Watson, Ben J; Erritzoe, David; Wilson, Sue J; Cunningham, Vincent J; Riano Barros, Daniela; Hammers, Alexander; Turkheimer, Federico E; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2014-10-01

    The inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmitter system is associated with the regulation of normal cognitive functions and dysregulation has been reported in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety disorders, schizophrenia and addictions. Investigating the role of GABA in both health and disease has been constrained by difficulties in measuring acute changes in synaptic GABA using neurochemical imaging. The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute increases in synaptic GABA are detectable in the living human brain using the inverse agonist GABA-benzodiazepine receptor (GABA-BZR) positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, [(11)C]Ro15-4513. We examined the effect of 15 mg oral tiagabine, which increases synaptic GABA by inhibiting the GAT1 GABA uptake transporter, on [(11)C]Ro15-4513 binding in 12 male participants using a paired, double blind, placebo-controlled protocol. Spectral analysis was used to examine synaptic α1 and extrasynaptic α5 GABA-BZR subtype availability in brain regions with high levels of [(11)C]Ro15-4513 binding. We also examined the test-retest reliability of α1 and a5-specific [(11)C]Ro15-4513 binding in a separate cohort of 4 participants using the same spectral analysis protocol. Tiagabine administration produced significant reductions in hippocampal, parahippocampal, amygdala and anterior cingulate synaptic α1 [(11)C]Ro15-4513 binding, and a trend significance reduction in the nucleus accumbens. These reductions were greater than test-retest reliability, indicating that they are not the result of chance observations. Our results suggest that acute increases in endogenous synaptic GABA are detectable in the living human brain using [(11)C]Ro15-4513 PET. These findings have potentially major implications for the investigation of GABA function in brain disorders and in the development of new treatments targeting this neurotransmitter system. PMID:24844747

  4. A neurobiological perspective on attachment problems in sexual offenders and the role of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in the treatment of such problems.

    PubMed

    Beech, Anthony R; Mitchell, Ian J

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes what is currently known about attachment from the development, social-cognitive and biological literatures and outlines the impact on organisms given adverse development experiences that can have an effect upon attachment formation in childhood across these three literatures. We then describe the effects that 'insecure' attachment styles arising in childhood can affect brain chemistry and brain function and subsequently adult social/romantic relationships. In the paper, we note that a number of sexual offenders report adverse childhood experiences and that they possess attachment styles that, taken together, make it likely that they will either seek out intimate attachments in ways where they will have sex with children, perhaps confusing sex with intimacy or in aggressive ways as particularly happens with men who sexually assault adult women. The last section of the paper describes chemical treatment for sexual offenders, focusing on the use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs). We note evidence for the role of SSRIs in promoting more social/affiliative behaviors and speculate on the effects that SSRIs have in the treatment of sexual offenders by targeting areas of the social brain. Here, we would argue that it would be useful to carry out treatment where there is a combination of SSRI treatment (to promote more prosocial feelings and behaviors) in conjunction with therapy that typically addresses thoughts and behaviors, i.e., cognitive-behavioral therapy/schema-focused therapy. PMID:15642645

  5. Fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake, potentiates morphine analgesia without altering its discriminative stimulus properties or affinity for opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.D.; Lochner, M.A.; Bemis, K.G.; Hymson, D.L.

    1985-06-17

    The analgesic effect of morphine in the rat tail jerk assay was enhanced by the serotonin uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. Tail jerk latency was not affected by fluoxetine alone. Morphine's affinity for opioid receptors labeled in vitro with /sup 3/H-naloxone or /sup 3/H-D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin was not altered by fluoxetine, which has no affinity for these sites at concentrations as high as 1000 nM. In rats trained to discriminate morphine from saline, fluoxetine at doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg were recognized as saline. Increasing the fluoxetine dose to 20 mg/kg did not result in generalization to either saline or morphine. The dose response curve for morphine generalization was not significantly altered by fluoxetine doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg. Those rats treated with the combination of morphine and 20 mg/kg of fluoxetine did not exhibit saline or morphine appropriate responding. Fluoxetine potentiates the analgesic properties of morphine without enhancing its affinity for opioid receptors or its discriminative stimulus properties. 30 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Brain regional distribution of GABA(A) receptors exhibiting atypical GABA agonism: roles of receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Halonen, Lauri M; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Chandra, Dev; Homanics, Gregg E; Korpi, Esa R

    2009-11-01

    The major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), has only partial efficacy at certain subtypes of GABA(A) receptors. To characterize these minor receptor populations in rat and mouse brains, we used autoradiographic imaging of t-butylbicyclophosphoro[(35)S]thionate ([(35)S]TBPS) binding to GABA(A) receptors in brain sections and compared the displacing capacities of 10mM GABA and 1mM 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), a competitive GABA-site agonist. Brains from GABA(A) receptor alpha1, alpha4, delta, and alpha4+delta subunit knockout (KO) mouse lines were used to understand the contribution of these particular receptor subunits to "GABA-insensitive" (GIS) [(35)S]TBPS binding. THIP displaced more [(35)S]TBPS binding than GABA in several brain regions, indicating that THIP also inhibited GIS-binding. In these regions, GABA prevented the effect of THIP on GIS-binding. GIS-binding was increased in the cerebellar granule cell layer of delta KO and alpha4+delta KO mice, being only slightly diminished in that of alpha1 KO mice. In the thalamus and some other forebrain regions of wild-type mice, a significant amount of GIS-binding was detected. This GIS-binding was higher in alpha4 KO mice. However, it was fully abolished in alpha1 KO mice, indicating that the alpha1 subunit was obligatory for the GIS-binding in the forebrain. Our results suggest that native GABA(A) receptors in brain sections showing reduced displacing capacity of [(35)S]TBPS binding by GABA (partial agonism) minimally require the assembly of alpha1 and beta subunits in the forebrain and of alpha6 and beta subunits in the cerebellar granule cell layer. These receptors may function as extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors. PMID:19397945

  7. Guinea Pig Horizontal Cells Express GABA, the GABA-Synthesizing Enzyme GAD65, and the GABA Vesicular Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chenying; Hirano, Arlene A.; Stella, Salvatore L.; Bitzer, Michaela; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2013-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is likely expressed in horizontal cells of all species, although conflicting physiological findings have led to considerable controversy regarding its role as a transmitter in the outer retina. This study has evaluated key components of the GABA system in the outer retina of guinea pig, an emerging retinal model system. The presence of GABA, its rate-limiting synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67 isoforms), the plasma membrane GABA transporters (GAT-1 and GAT-3), and the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) was evaluated by using immunohistochemistry with well-characterized antibodies. The presence of GAD65 mRNA was also evaluated by using laser capture microdissection and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Specific GABA, GAD65, and VGAT immunostaining was localized to horizontal cell bodies, as well as to their processes and tips in the outer plexiform layer. Furthermore, immunostaining of retinal whole mounts and acutely dissociated retinas showed GAD65 and VGAT immunoreactivity in both A-type and B-type horizontal cells. However, these cells did not contain GAD67, GAT-1, or GAT-3 immunoreactivity. GAD65 mRNA was detected in horizontal cells, and sequencing of the amplified GAD65 fragment showed approximately 85% identity with other mammalian GAD65 mRNAs. These studies demonstrate the presence of GABA, GAD65, and VGAT in horizontal cells of the guinea pig retina, and support the idea that GABA is synthesized from GAD65, taken up into synaptic vesicles by VGAT, and likely released by a vesicular mechanism from horizontal cells. PMID:20235161

  8. Presynaptic Na+-dependent transport and exocytose of GABA and glutamate in brain in hypergravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Pozdnyakova, N.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-glutamate are the most widespread neurotransmitter amino acids in the mammalian central nervous system. GABA is now widely recognized as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. L-glutamate mediates the most of excitatory synaptic neurotransmission in the brain. They involved in the main aspects of normal brain function. The nerve terminals (synaptosomes) offer several advantages as a model system for the study of general mechanisms of neurosecretion. Our data allowed to conclude that exposure of animals to hypergravity (centrifugation of rats at 10G for 1 hour) had a profound effect on synaptic processes in brain. Comparative analysis of uptake and release of GABA and glutamate have demonstrated that hypergravity loading evokes oppositely directed alterations in inhibitory and excitatory signal transmission. We studied the maximal velocities of [^3H]GABA reuptake and revealed more than twofold enhancement of GABA transporter activity (Vmax rises from 1.4 |pm 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 3.3 ± 0.59 nmol/min/mg of protein for animals exposed to hypergravity (P ≤ 0.05)). Recently we have also demonstrated the significant lowering of glutamate transporter activity (Vmax of glutamate reuptake decreased from 12.5 ± 3.2 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 5.6 ± 0.9 nmol/min/mg of protein in the group of animals, exposed to the hypergravity stress (P ≤ 0.05)). Significant changes occurred in release of neurotransmitters induced by stimulating exocytosis with the agents, which depolarized nerve terminal plasma membrane. Depolarization-evoked Ca2+-stimulated release was more abundant for GABA (7.2 ± 0.54% and 11,74 ±1,2 % of total accumulated label for control and hypergravity, respectively (P≤0.05)) and was essentially less for glutamate (14.4 ± 0.7% and 6.2 ± 1.9%) after exposure of animals to centrifuge induced artificial gravity. Changes observed in depolarization-evoked exocytotic release

  9. GABA and glycine in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    GABA and glycine are major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the CNS and act on receptors coupled to chloride channels. During early developmental periods, both GABA and glycine depolarize membrane potentials due to the relatively high intracellular Cl(-) concentration. Therefore, they can act as excitatory neurotransmitters. GABA and glycine are involved in spontaneous neural network activities in the immature CNS such as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in neonatal hippocampal neurons, which are generated by the synchronous activity of GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic principal neurons. GDPs and GDP-like activities in the developing brains are thought to be important for the activity-dependent functiogenesis through Ca(2+) influx and/or other intracellular signaling pathways activated by depolarization or stimulation of metabotropic receptors. However, if GABA and glycine do not shift from excitatory to inhibitory neurotransmitters at the birth and in maturation, it may result in neural disorders including autism spectrum disorders. PMID:26951057

  10. Effects of the novel endocannabinoid uptake inhibitor, LY2183240, on fear-potentiated startle and alcohol-seeking behaviors in mice selectively bred for high alcohol preference

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Matthew S.; Barrenha, Gustavo D.; Mlinac, Nate S.; Barker, Eric L.; Chester, Julia A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Alcohol-use disorders often occur together with anxiety disorders in humans which may be partly due to common inherited genetic factors. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of individuals with anxiety and/or alcohol-use disorders. Objectives The present study assessed the effects of a novel endocannabinoid uptake inhibitor, LY2183240, on anxiety- and alcohol-seeking behaviors in a unique animal model that may represent increased genetic risk to develop comorbid anxiety and alcohol-use disorders in humans. Mice selectively bred for high alcohol preference (HAP) show greater fear-potentiated startle (FPS) than mice selectively bred for low alcohol preference (LAP). We examined the effects of LY2183240 on the expression of FPS in HAP and LAP mice and on alcohol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) and limited-access alcohol drinking behavior in HAP mice. Results Repeated administration of LY2183240 (30 mg/kg) reduced the expression of FPS in HAP but not LAP mice when given prior to a second FPS test 48 h after fear conditioning. Both the 10 and 30 mg/kg doses of LY2183240 enhanced the expression of alcohol-induced CPP and this effect persisted in the absence of the drug. LY2183240 did not alter limited-access alcohol drinking behavior, unconditioned startle responding, or locomotor activity. Conclusions These findings suggest that ECS modulation influences both conditioned fear and conditioned alcohol reward behavior. LY2183240 may be an effective pharmacotherapy for individuals with anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, but may not be appropriate for individuals with co-morbid anxiety and alcohol-use disorders. PMID:20838777

  11. The dopamine uptake inhibitor 3 alpha-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)metoxy]-tropane reduces cocaine-induced early-gene expression, locomotor activity, and conditioned reward.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Sánchez, Clara; Ferragud, Antonio; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Nácher, Amparo; Merino, Virginia; Cardá, Miguel; Murga, Juan; Canales, Juan J

    2009-11-01

    Benztropine (BZT) analogs, a family of high-affinity dopamine transporter ligands, are molecules that exhibit pharmacological and behavioral characteristics predictive of significant therapeutic potential in cocaine addiction. Here, we examined in mice the effects of 3 alpha-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)metoxy]-tropane (AHN-1055) on motor activity, conditioned place preference (CPP) and c-Fos expression in the striatum. AHN-1055 produced mild attenuation of spontaneous locomotor activity at a low dose (1 mg/kg) and weak stimulation at a higher dose (10 mg/kg). In parallel, the BZT analog significantly increased c-Fos expression in the dorsolateral caudoputamen at the high dose, whereas producing marginal decreases at low and moderate doses (1, 3 mg/kg) in both dorsal and ventral striatum. Interaction assays showed that cocaine's ability to stimulate locomotor activity was decreased by AHN-1055 treatment, but not by treatment with D-amphetamine. Such reduced ability did not result from an increase in stereotyped behavior. Another dopamine uptake inhibitor, nomifensine, decreased cocaine-induced locomotor activity but evoked by itself intense motor stereotypies. Remarkably, the BZT analog dose-dependently blocked cocaine-induced CPP without producing CPP when given alone, and blocked in conditioned mice cocaine-stimulated early-gene activation in the nucleus accumbens and dorsomedial striatum. These observations provide evidence that AHN-1055 does not behave as a classical psychomotor stimulant and that some of its properties, including attenuation of cocaine-induced striatal c-Fos expression, locomotor stimulation, and CPP, support its candidacy, and that of structurally related molecules, as possible pharmacotherapies in cocaine addiction. PMID:19606084

  12. The putative P-gp inhibitor telmisartan does not affect the transcellular permeability and cellular uptake of the calcium channel antagonist verapamil in the P-glycoprotein expressing cell line MDCK II MDR1

    PubMed Central

    Saaby, Lasse; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Brodin, Birger

    2015-01-01

    Verapamil is used in high doses for the treatment of cluster headache. Verapamil has been described as a P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) substrate. We wished to evaluate in vitro whether co administration of a P-gp inhibitor with verapamil could be a feasible strategy for increasing CNS uptake of verapamil. Fluxes of radiolabelled verapamil across MDCK II MDR1 monolayers were measured in the absence and presence of the putative P-gp inhibitor telmisartan (a clinically approved drug compound). Verapamil displayed a vectorial basolateral-to-apical transepithelial efflux across the MDCK II MDR1 monolayers with a permeability of 5.7 × 10−5 cm sec−1 compared to an apical to basolateral permeability of 1.3 × 10−5 cm sec-1. The efflux could be inhibited with the P-gp inhibitor zosuquidar. Zosuquidar (0.4 μmol/L) reduced the efflux ratio (PB-A/PA-B) for verapamil 4.6–1.6. The presence of telmisartan, however, only caused a slight reduction in P-gp-mediated verapamil transport to an efflux ratio of 3.4. Overall, the results of the present in vitro approach indicate, that clinical use of telmisartan as a P-gp inhibitor may not be an effective strategy for increasing brain uptake of verapamil by co-administration with telmisartan. PMID:26171231

  13. Production of gaba (γ - Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  14. Isoflurane modulates excitability in the mouse thalamus via GABA-dependent and GABA-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shui-Wang; Werner, David F; Homanics, Gregg E; Harrison, Neil L; Goldstein, Peter A

    2009-02-01

    GABAergic neurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) synapse onto thalamocortical neurons in the ventrobasal (VB) thalamus, and this reticulo-thalamocortical pathway is considered an anatomic target for general anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. A mutant mouse was engineered to harbor two amino acid substitutions (S270H, L277A) in the GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)-R) alpha1 subunit; this mutation abolished sensitivity to the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in recombinant GABA(A)-Rs, and reduced in vivo sensitivity to isoflurane in the loss-of-righting-reflex assay. We examined the effects of the double mutation on GABA(A)-R-mediated synaptic currents and isoflurane sensitivity by recording from thalamic neurons in brain slices. The double mutation accelerated the decay, and decreased the (1/2) width of, evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) in VB neurons and attenuated isoflurane-induced prolongation of the eIPSC. The hypnotic zolpidem, a selective modulator of GABA(A)-Rs containing the alpha1 subunit, prolonged eIPSC duration regardless of genotype, indicating that mutant mice incorporate alpha1 subunit-containing GABA(A)-Rs into synapses. In RTN neurons, which lack the alpha1 subunit, eIPSC duration was longer than in VB, regardless of genotype. Isoflurane reduced the efficacy of GABAergic transmission from RTN to VB, independent of genotype, suggesting a presynaptic action in RTN neurons. Consistent with this observation, isoflurane inhibited both tonic action potential and rebound burst firing in the presence of GABA(A)-R blockade. The suppressed excitability in RTN neurons is likely mediated by isoflurane-enhanced Ba(2+)-sensitive, but 4-aminopyridine-insenstive, potassium conductances. We conclude that isoflurane enhances inhibition of thalamic neurons in VB via GABA(A)-R-dependent, but in RTN via GABA(A)-R-independent, mechanisms. PMID:18948126

  15. An excitatory GABA loop operating in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Astorga, Guadalupe; Bao, Jin; Marty, Alain; Augustine, George J.; Franconville, Romain; Jalil, Abdelali; Bradley, Jonathan; Llano, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    While it has been proposed that the conventional inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA can be excitatory in the mammalian brain, much remains to be learned concerning the circumstances and the cellular mechanisms governing potential excitatory GABA action. Using a combination of optogenetics and two-photon calcium imaging in vivo, we find that activation of chloride-permeable GABAA receptors in parallel fibers (PFs) of the cerebellar molecular layer of adult mice causes parallel fiber excitation. Stimulation of PFs at submaximal stimulus intensities leads to GABA release from molecular layer interneurons (MLIs), thus creating a positive feedback loop that enhances excitation near the center of an activated PF bundle. Our results imply that elevated chloride concentration can occur in specific intracellular compartments of mature mammalian neurons and suggest an excitatory role for GABAA receptors in the cerebellar cortex of adult mice. PMID:26236197

  16. [GABA-ergic system in defense against excitatory kynurenines].

    PubMed

    Lapin, I P

    1997-01-01

    Protection against the excitatory action of L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid in mice is related to the activation of GABA-B and dopamine receptors of the brain and to much lesser degree to the activation of GABA-A receptors. It is hardly believable that the anticonvulsant effect of phenibut (beta-phenyl-GABA), baclofen (CL-phenibut), sodium hydroxybutyrate and taurine against seizures induced by these two kynurenines is determined by alterations in metabolism of GABA. PMID:9503572

  17. A novel GABA-mediated corticotropin-releasing hormone secretory mechanism in the median eminence.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroki; Okawa, Yuta; Yamashita, Miho; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Itoi, Keiichi; Suda, Takafumi; Oki, Yutaka; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2016-08-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, plays an important role in the endocrine stress response. The excitability of CRH neurons is regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing neurons projecting to the PVN. We investigated the role of GABA in the regulation of CRH release. The release of CRH was impaired, accumulating in the cell bodies of CRH neurons in heterozygous GAD67-GFP (green fluorescent protein) knock-in mice (GAD67(+/GFP)), which exhibited decreased GABA content. The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1), but not the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC2), were expressed in the terminals of the CRH neurons at the median eminence (ME). In contrast, CRH neuronal somata were enriched with KCC2 but not with NKCC1. Thus, intracellular Cl(-) concentrations ([Cl(-)]i) may be increased at the terminals of CRH neurons compared with concentrations in the cell body. Moreover, GABAergic terminals projecting from the arcuate nucleus were present in close proximity to CRH-positive nerve terminals. Furthermore, a GABAAR agonist increased the intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) levels in the CRH neuron terminals but decreased the Ca(2+) levels in their somata. In addition, the increases in Ca(2+) concentrations were prevented by an NKCC1 inhibitor. We propose a novel mechanism by which the excitatory action of GABA maintains a steady-state CRH release from axon terminals in the ME. PMID:27540587

  18. A novel GABA-mediated corticotropin-releasing hormone secretory mechanism in the median eminence

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroki; Okawa, Yuta; Yamashita, Miho; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Itoi, Keiichi; Suda, Takafumi; Oki, Yutaka; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, plays an important role in the endocrine stress response. The excitability of CRH neurons is regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)–containing neurons projecting to the PVN. We investigated the role of GABA in the regulation of CRH release. The release of CRH was impaired, accumulating in the cell bodies of CRH neurons in heterozygous GAD67-GFP (green fluorescent protein) knock-in mice (GAD67+/GFP), which exhibited decreased GABA content. The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and the Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1), but not the K+-Cl− cotransporter (KCC2), were expressed in the terminals of the CRH neurons at the median eminence (ME). In contrast, CRH neuronal somata were enriched with KCC2 but not with NKCC1. Thus, intracellular Cl− concentrations ([Cl−]i) may be increased at the terminals of CRH neurons compared with concentrations in the cell body. Moreover, GABAergic terminals projecting from the arcuate nucleus were present in close proximity to CRH-positive nerve terminals. Furthermore, a GABAAR agonist increased the intracellular calcium (Ca2+) levels in the CRH neuron terminals but decreased the Ca2+ levels in their somata. In addition, the increases in Ca2+ concentrations were prevented by an NKCC1 inhibitor. We propose a novel mechanism by which the excitatory action of GABA maintains a steady-state CRH release from axon terminals in the ME. PMID:27540587

  19. Oxytocin regulates changes of extracellular glutamate and GABA levels induced by methamphetamine in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jia; Han, Wen-Yan; Yang, Jing-Yu; Wang, Li-Hui; Dong, Ying-Xu; Wang, Fang; Song, Ming; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2012-07-01

    Oxytocin (OT), a neurohypophyseal neuropeptide, affects adaptive processes of the central nervous system. In the present study, we investigated the effects of OT on extracellular levels of glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) induced by methamphetamine (MAP) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal hippocampus (DHC) of freely moving mice, using in vivo microdialysis coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. The results showed that OT had no effect on basal Glu levels, but attenuated MAP-induced Glu increase in the mPFC and decrease in the DHC. OT increased the basal levels of extracellular GABA in mPFC and DHC of mice, and inhibited the MAP-induced GABA decrease in DHC. Western blot results indicated that OT significantly inhibited the increased glutamatergic receptor (NR1 subunit) levels in the PFC after acute MAP administration, whereas OT further enhanced the elevated levels of glutamatergic transporter (GLT1) induced by MAP in the hippocampus of mice. Atosiban, a selective inhibitor of OT receptor, antagonized the effects of OT. The results provided the first neurochemical evidence that OT, which exerted its action via its receptor, decreased Glu release induced by MAP, and attenuated the changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission partially via regulation of NR1 and GLT1 expression. OT-induced extracellular GABA increase also suggests that OT acts potentially as an inhibitory neuromodulator in mPFC and DHC of mice. PMID:22507692

  20. Involvement of GABA in environmental temperature-induced change in body temperature.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Poddar, M K

    1988-12-01

    Acute exposure of adult male albino rats (110-120 g) to higher environmental temperature (40 +/- 1 degrees C) increased body temperature (BT). This increase of BT was also dependent on the duration of exposure. Treatment with muscimol (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a GABA agonist, produced hypothermia at room temperature (28 +/- 1 degree C) and resistance to increase the body temperature when exposed to higher temperature (40 +/- 1 degree C). Administration of bicuculline (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a GABA antagonist, on the other hand, enhanced BT more than that observed in control (normal) rat exposed to higher temperature (40 +/- 1 degree C), although at room temperature bicuculline treatment did not show any effect on BT. Pretreatment with ethanolamine-O-sulfate (EOS) (2 g/kg, s.c.), a GABA transaminase inhibitor, to rats exposed to higher temperature increased BT as in control (normal) rat. Inhibition of central GAD activity with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) (70 mg/kg, i.p.) produced resistance to increase BT during its period of action when rats were exposed to higher environmental temperature (28 +/- 1 degree C). These results thus suggest that central inhibitory neuron, GABA, plays a regulatory role in thermoregulation. PMID:3236943

  1. Dynamic regulation of glycine–GABA co-transmission at spinal inhibitory synapses by neuronal glutamate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Junya; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Nabekura, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    Fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system is mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine, which are accumulated into synaptic vesicles by a common vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter (VIAAT) and are then co-released. However, the mechanisms that control the packaging of GABA + glycine into synaptic vesicles are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate the dynamic control of the GABA–glycine co-transmission by the neuronal glutamate transporter, using paired whole-cell patch recording from monosynaptically coupled cultured spinal cord neurons derived from VIAAT-Venus transgenic rats. Short step depolarization of presynaptic neurons evoked unitary (cell-to-cell) inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). Under normal conditions, the fractional contribution of postsynaptic GABA or glycine receptors to the unitary IPSCs did not change during a 1 h recording. Intracellular loading of GABA or glycine via a patch pipette enhanced the respective components of inhibitory transmission, indicating the importance of the cytoplasmic concentration of inhibitory transmitters. Raised extracellular glutamate levels increased the amplitude of GABAergic IPSCs but reduced glycine release by enhancing glutamate uptake. Similar effects were observed when presynaptic neurons were intracellularly perfused with glutamate. Interestingly, high-frequency trains of stimulation decreased glycinergic IPSCs more than GABAergic IPSCs, and repetitive stimulation occasionally failed to evoke glycinergic but not GABAergic IPSCs. The present results suggest that the enhancement of GABA release by glutamate uptake may be advantageous for rapid vesicular refilling of the inhibitory transmitter at mixed GABA/glycinergic synapses and thus may help prevent hyperexcitability. PMID:23690564

  2. Assignment of the human GABA transporter gene (GABATHG) locus to chromosome 3p24-p25

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Fang; Fei, Jian; Guo, Li-He

    1995-09-01

    An essential regulatory process of synaptic transmission is the inactivation of released neurotransmitters by the transmitter-specific uptake mechanism, {gamma}-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory transmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system; its activity is terminated by a high-affinity Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} -dependent specific GABA transporter (GAT), which carries the neurotransmitter to the presynaptic neuron and/or glial elements surrounding the synaptic cleft. Deficiency of the transporter may cause epilepsy and some other nervous diseases. The human GAT gene (GABATHG), approximately 25 kb in length, has been cloned and sequenced by our colleagues (7). Here the results of the in situ hybridization mapping with the gene are presented. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid on skate retinal horizontal cells: evidence for an electrogenic uptake mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Malchow, R P; Ripps, H

    1990-01-01

    In the retinae of many vertebrates, there are classes of horizontal cell that probably utilize gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as a neurotransmitter. As with other amino acid transmitter agents, the postsynaptic action of GABA is thought to be terminated by uptake into neurons and glia surrounding the release site. The present study examined whether an uptake system for GABA could be detected in isolated skate horizontal cells by means of electrophysiological methods. Pressure ejection of GABA onto voltage-clamped horizontal cells produced an inward current that showed no sign of desensitization regardless of the GABA concentration. The dose-response relationship followed simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a half-maximal response elicited at approximately 110 microM. Nipecotic acid produced a similar current and reduced the responses to GABA when introduced in the bath solution prior to the GABA pulse. On the other hand, application of 500 microM muscimol or 1 mM baclofen, GABAA and GABAB receptor agonists, respectively, were completely without effect. The GABA-induced current was not blocked by superfusion with 500 microM bicuculline, 500 microM picrotoxin, or 500 microM phaclofen. However, the responses to GABA were abolished when the cells were superfused in Ringer's solution in which choline or lithium had been substituted for sodium, and were reduced when the extracellular chloride concentration was decreased from 266 mM to 16 mM. Current-voltage data showed a maximal response to GABA when the cells were held at or below their resting potential. At more depolarized levels, the inward current became progressively smaller until, near +50 mV, it could no longer be detected; over the range tested (-90 to +50 mV), the response never reversed into an outward current. These findings suggest that the GABA-induced currents in skate horizontal cells are mediated by an electrogenic uptake mechanism. PMID:2247470

  4. [Anti-arrhythmic properties of GABA and GABA-ergic system activators].

    PubMed

    Tiurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N

    2002-01-01

    Clinical and experimental data available in the literature are summarized, which are indicative of the antiarrhythmogenic properties of GABA and substances possessing GABA-positive activity (phenibut, piracetam, sodium hydroxybutyrate, lithium hydroxybutyrate, etc.). The antiarrhythmic effects are manifested in various cases of the heart rhythm violation. The mechanism of this action is related to activation of the central and peripheral retarding GABAergic system, as well as to antihypoxant, antioxidant, and antistressor effects. PMID:12025796

  5. Colocalization of synaptic GABA(C)-receptors with GABA (A)-receptors and glycine-receptors in the rodent central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Frazao, Renata; Nogueira, Maria Ines; Wässle, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    Fast inhibition in the nervous system is preferentially mediated by GABA- and glycine-receptors. Two types of ionotropic GABA-receptor, the GABA(A)-receptor and GABA(C)-receptor, have been identified; they have specific molecular compositions, different sensitivities to GABA, different kinetics, and distinct pharmacological profiles. We have studied, by immunocytochemistry, the synaptic localization of glycine-, GABA(A)-, and GABA(C)-receptors in rodent retina, spinal cord, midbrain, and brain-stem. Antibodies specific for the alpha1 subunit of the glycine-receptor, the gamma2 subunit of the GABA(A)-receptor, and the rho subunits of the GABA(C)-receptor have been applied. Using double-immunolabeling, we have determined whether these receptors are expressed at the same postsynaptic sites. In the retina, no such colocalization was observed. However, in the spinal cord, we found the colocalization of glycine-receptors with GABA(A)- or GABA(C)-receptors and the colocalization of GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors in approximately 25% of the synapses. In the midbrain and brain-stem, GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors were colocalized in 10%-15% of the postsynaptic sites. We discuss the possible expression of heteromeric (hybrid) receptors assembled from GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptor subunits. Our results suggest that GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors are colocalized in a minority of synapses of the central nervous system. PMID:17610086

  6. GABA binding to an insect GABA receptor: a molecular dynamics and mutagenesis study.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Jamie A; McGonigle, Ian V; Price, Kerry L; Cohen, Netta; Comitani, Federico; Dougherty, Dennis A; Molteni, Carla; Lummis, Sarah C R

    2012-11-21

    RDL receptors are GABA-activated inhibitory Cys-loop receptors found throughout the insect CNS. They are a key target for insecticides. Here, we characterize the GABA binding site in RDL receptors using computational and electrophysiological techniques. A homology model of the extracellular domain of RDL was generated and GABA docked into the binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations predicted critical GABA binding interactions with aromatic residues F206, Y254, and Y109 and hydrophilic residues E204, S176, R111, R166, S176, and T251. These residues were mutated, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and their functions assessed using electrophysiology. The data support the binding mechanism provided by the simulations, which predict that GABA forms many interactions with binding site residues, the most significant of which are cation-π interactions with F206 and Y254, H-bonds with E204, S205, R111, S176, T251, and ionic interactions with R111 and E204. These findings clarify the roles of a range of residues in binding GABA in the RDL receptor, and also show that molecular dynamics simulations are a useful tool to identify specific interactions in Cys-loop receptors. PMID:23200041

  7. Dopamine-related drugs act presynaptically to potentiate GABA(A) receptor currents in VTA dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Michaeli, Avner; Yaka, Rami

    2011-01-01

    Electrical activity of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons is immediately inhibited following in vivo administration of cocaine and other DA-related drugs. While various forms of synaptic modulation were demonstrated in the VTA following exposure to DA-related drugs, comprehensive understanding of their ability to inhibit the activity of DA neurons, however, is still lacking. In this study, using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices, a novel form of synaptic modulation induced by DA-related drugs was isolated. DA exposure was shown to cause potentiation of γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) receptor type A (GABA(A)R)-mediated evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs), recorded from VTA DA neurons, under conditions of potassium channels blockade. The potentiation of these eIPSCs lasted for more than twenty minutes, could be mimicked by activation of D2-like but not D1-like DA receptors, and was accompanied by an increase in the frequency of GABA(A)R-mediated spontaneous miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). Furthermore, exposure to inhibitors of DA transporter (DAT) led to potentiation of GABA(A) currents in a manner similar to the DA-mediated potentiation. Finally, a prolonged presence of l-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric-oxide (NO) signaling was found to conceal the potentiation of GABA(A) currents induced by the DA-related drugs. Taken together, this study demonstrates a new modulatory form of VTA GABA(A) neurotransmission mediated by DA-related drugs. These results also suggest better understanding of the initial inhibitory action of DA-related drugs on the activity of DA neurons in the VTA. PMID:21527263

  8. Linking Metabolism to Membrane Signaling: The GABA-Malate Connection.

    PubMed

    Gilliham, Matthew; Tyerman, Stephen D

    2016-04-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration increases rapidly in tissues when plants encounter abiotic or biotic stress, and GABA manipulation affects growth. This, coupled to GABA's well-described role as a neurotransmitter in mammals, led to over a decade of speculation that GABA is a signal in plants. The discovery of GABA-regulated anion channels in plants provides compelling mechanistic proof that GABA is a legitimate plant-signaling molecule. Here we examine research avenues unlocked by this finding and propose that these plant 'GABA receptors' possess novel properties ideally suited to translating changes in metabolic status into physiological responses. Specifically, we suggest they have a role in signaling altered cycling of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) intermediates during stress via eliciting changes in electrical potential differences across membranes. PMID:26723562

  9. [A pharmaco-ethological study of the GABA-ergic mechanisms regulating the depression-like behavior of mice].

    PubMed

    Belozertseva, I V; Andreev, B V

    1997-01-01

    It is known that repeated stress may result in depression-like alterations of behavior. This behavior is characterized by decreased social exploratory activity and increase in occurrence of defensive postures in a social interaction test in mice. The passive defensive behavior is effectively antagonized by antidepressant drugs thus providing a useful animal model of depression. Effects of several GABAergic drugs were studied in opponent test in individually housed male mice. For two weeks preceding the test, mice were repeatedly exposed to foot shock stimulation and/or social confrontation with an aggressive mouse. Muscimol, a selective agonist of GABA(A) receptors, decreased the frequency and duration of defensive postures and increased the duration of some forms of individual activity (grooming and eating), like the agonist of GABA(B) receptors baclofen. Muscimol was the only compound that facilitated exploratory activity towards an unfamiliar partner and did not suppress the locomotion. Effects of another agonist of GABA(B) receptors phenibut and inhibitor of GABA transaminase valproate Na were less specific and consisted in general suppression of behavior (prevalence of static forms of behavior). It can be thought that GABA(A) receptors are essential for regulation of depression-like behavior of mice. PMID:9472168

  10. Effects of ABA and CaCl₂ on GABA accumulation in fava bean germinating under hypoxia-NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Hui, Qianru; Gu, Zhenxin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and CaCl2 on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation of germinated fava bean under hypoxia-NaCl stress were investigated. Exogenous ABA resulted in the enhancement of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and diamine oxidase (DAO) activity as well as GABA content in cotyledon and shoot. CaCl2 increased both enzyme activities in shoot and GABA content in cotyledon and shoot. ABA downregulated GAD expression in cotyledon and radicle, while upregulated that in shoot; it also upregulated DAO expression in each organ. CaCl2 upregulated GAD expression in cotyledon, while downregulated that in radicle. However, it upregulated DAO expression in shoot, downregulated that in radicle. ABA inhibitor fluridon and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid inhibited GAD and DAO activities significantly so that inhibited GABA accumulation through reducing ABA biosynthesis and chelating Ca(2+), respectively. However, they upregulated GAD and DAO expression in varying degrees. These results indicate that ABA and Ca(2+) participate in GABA biosynthesis in fava bean during germination under hypoxia-NaCl stress. PMID:26644273

  11. Impact of exogenous GABA treatments on endogenous GABA metabolism in anthurium cut flowers in response to postharvest chilling temperature.

    PubMed

    Aghdam, Morteza Soleimani; Naderi, Roohangiz; Jannatizadeh, Abbasali; Babalar, Mesbah; Sarcheshmeh, Mohammad Ali Askari; Faradonbe, Mojtaba Zamani

    2016-09-01

    Anthurium flowers are susceptible to chilling injury, and the optimum storage temperature is 12.5-20 °C. The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt pathway may alleviate chilling stress in horticultural commodities by providing energy (ATP), reducing molecules (NADH), and minimizing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this experiment, the impact of a preharvest spray treatment with 1 mM GABA and postharvest treatment of 5 mM GABA stem-end dipping on GABA shunt pathway activity of anthurium cut flowers (cv. Sirion) in response to cold storage (4 °C for 21 days) was investigated. GABA treatments resulted in lower glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and higher GABA transaminase (GABA-T) activities in flowers during cold storage, which was associated with lower GABA content and coincided with higher ATP content. GABA treatments also enhanced accumulation of endogenous glycine betaine (GB) in flowers during cold storage, as well as higher spathe relative water content (RWC). These findings suggest that GABA treatments may alleviate chilling injury of anthurium cut flowers by enhancing GABA shunt pathway activity leading to provide sufficient ATP and promoting endogenous GB accumulation. PMID:27135813

  12. Flexible and biomimetic analogs of triple uptake inhibitor 4-((((3S,6S)-6-benzhydryltetrahydro-2H-pyran-3-yl)amino)methyl)phenol : Synthesis, biological characterization, and development of a pharmacophore model

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Horrick; Santra, Soumava; Debnath, Joy; Antonio, Tamara; Reith, Maarten; Dutta, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have generated a pharmacophore model of triple uptake inhibitor compounds based on novel asymmetric pyran derivatives and the newly developed asymmetric furan derivatives. The model revealed features important for inhibitors to exhibit a balanced activity against dopamine transporter (DAT), serotonin transporter (SERT), and norepinephrine transporter (NET). In particular, a ‘folded’ conformation was found common to the active pyran compounds in the training set and was crucial to triple uptake inhibitory activity. Furthermore, the distances between the benzhydryl moiety and the N-benzyl group as well as the orientation of the secondary nitrogen were also important for TUI activity. We have validated our findings by synthesizing and testing novel asymmetric pyran analogs. The present work has also resulted in the discovery of a new series of asymmetric tetrahydrofuran derivatives as novel TUIs. Lead compounds 41 and 42 exhibited moderate TUI activity. Interestingly, the highest TUI activity by lead tetrahydrofuran compounds e.g. 41 and 42, was exhibited in a stereochemical preference similar to pyran TUI e.g. D-161. PMID:24315194

  13. Mutation of a single threonine in the cytoplasmic NH2 terminus disrupts trafficking of renal betaine-GABA transporter 1 during hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Schweikhard, Eva S; Kempson, Stephen A; Ziegler, Christine; Burckhardt, Birgitta C

    2014-07-01

    Betaine is an important osmolyte and is, compared with other organs, much more abundant in the kidneys, where it enters cells in the medulla by betaine-GABA transporter 1 (BGT1) to balance osmoregulation in the countercurrent system. In wild-type (wt-)BGT1-expressing oocytes, GABA-mediated currents were diminished by preincubation of oocytes with 100 nM PMA or 5 μM dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol, activators of PKC, whereas the application of staurosporine before the application of dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol restored the response to GABA. Four potential phosphorylation sites on BGT1 were mutated to alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutants (T235A, S428A, and S564A) evoked GABA currents comparable in magnitude to currents observed in wt-BGT1-expressing oocytes, whereas GABA currents in T40A were barely detectable. Uptake of [(3)H]GABA was also determined in human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged BGT1 with the same mutations. T235A, S428A, and S564A showed upregulation of GABA uptake after hypertonic stress and downregulation by PMA similar to EGFP-wt-BGT1. In contrast, T40A did not respond to either hypertonicity or PMA. Confocal microscopy of the EGFP-BGT1 mutants expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells revealed that T40A was present in the cytoplasm after 24 h of hypertonic stress. whereas the other mutants and EGFP-wt-BGT1 were in the plasma membrane. All mutants, including T40A, comigrated with wt-BGT1 on Western blots, suggesting that they are full-length proteins. T40A, however, cannot be phosphorylated, as revealed using a specific anti-phosphoantibody, and, therefore, T40 may be important for the trafficking and insertion of BGT1 in the plasma membrane. PMID:24829506

  14. GABA-BZD Receptor Modulating Mechanism of Panax quinquefolius against 72-h Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety like Behavior: Possible Roles of Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chanana, Priyanka; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Panax quinquefolius (American Ginseng) is known for its therapeutic potential against various neurological disorders, but its plausible mechanism of action still remains undeciphered. GABA (Gamma Amino Butyric Acid) plays an important role in sleep wake cycle homeostasis. Thus, there exists rationale in exploring the GABA-ergic potential of Panax quinquefolius as neuroprotective strategy in sleep deprivation induced secondary neurological problems. Objective: The present study was designed to explore the possible GABA-ergic mechanism in the neuro-protective effect of Panax quinquefolius against 72-h sleep deprivation induced anxiety like behavior, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, HPA-axis activation and neuroinflammation. Materials and Methods: Male laca mice were sleep deprived for 72-h by using Grid suspended over water method. Panax quinquefolius (American Ginseng 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) was administered alone and in combination with GABA modulators (GABA Cl− channel inhibitor, GABA-benzodiazepine receptor inhibitor and GABAA agonist) for 8 days, starting 5 days prior to 72-h sleep deprivation period. Various behavioral (locomotor activity, mirror chamber test), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase, nitrite levels), mitochondrial complexes, neuroinflammation marker (Tumor Necrosis Factor, TNF-alpha), serum corticosterone, and histopathological sections of brains were assessed. Results: Seventy two hours sleep deprivation significantly impaired locomotor activity, caused anxiety-like behavior, conditions of oxidative stress, alterations in mitochondrial enzyme complex activities, raised serum corticosterone levels, brain TNFα levels and led to neuroinflammation like signs in discrete brain areas as compared to naive group. Panax quinquefolius (100 and 200 mg/kg) treatment restored the behavioral, biochemical, mitochondrial, molecular and histopathological alterations. Pre-treatment of GABA Cl− channel

  15. GABA shapes the dynamics of bistable perception.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Anouk M; Knapen, Tomas; Scholte, H Steven; St John-Saaltink, Elexa; Donner, Tobias H; Lamme, Victor A F

    2013-05-01

    Sometimes, perception fluctuates spontaneously between two distinct interpretations of a constant sensory input. These bistable perceptual phenomena provide a unique window into the neural mechanisms that create the contents of conscious perception. Models of bistable perception posit that mutual inhibition between stimulus-selective neural populations in visual cortex plays a key role in these spontaneous perceptual fluctuations. However, a direct link between neural inhibition and bistable perception has not yet been established experimentally. Here, we link perceptual dynamics in three distinct bistable visual illusions (binocular rivalry, motion-induced blindness, and structure from motion) to measurements of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations in human visual cortex (as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and to pharmacological stimulation of the GABAA receptor by means of lorazepam. As predicted by a model of neural interactions underlying bistability, both higher GABA concentrations in visual cortex and lorazepam administration induced slower perceptual dynamics, as reflected in a reduced number of perceptual switches and a lengthening of percept durations. Thus, we show that GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter, shapes the dynamics of bistable perception. These results pave the way for future studies into the competitive neural interactions across the visual cortical hierarchy that elicit conscious perception. PMID:23602476

  16. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed. PMID:26852594

  17. GABA and GABA receptors in the gastrointestinal tract: from motility to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Auteri, Michelangelo; Zizzo, Maria Grazia; Serio, Rosa

    2015-03-01

    Although an extensive body of literature confirmed γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as mediator within the enteric nervous system (ENS) controlling gastrointestinal (GI) function, the true significance of GABAergic signalling in the gut is still a matter of debate. GABAergic cells in the bowel include neuronal and endocrine-like cells, suggesting GABA as modulator of both motor and secretory GI activity. GABA effects in the GI tract depend on the activation of ionotropic GABAA and GABAC receptors and metabotropic GABAB receptors, resulting in a potential noteworthy regulation of both the excitatory and inhibitory signalling in the ENS. However, the preservation of GABAergic signalling in the gut could not be limited to the maintenance of physiologic intestinal activity. Indeed, a series of interesting studies have suggested a potential key role of GABA in the promising field of neuroimmune interaction, being involved in the modulation of immune cell activity associated with different systemic and enteric inflammatory conditions. Given the urgency of novel therapeutic strategies against chronic immunity-related pathologies, i.e. multiple sclerosis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease, an in-depth comprehension of the enteric GABAergic system in health and disease could provide the basis for new clinical application of nerve-driven immunity. Hence, in the attempt to drive novel researches addressing both the physiological and pathological importance of the GABAergic signalling in the gut, we summarized current evidence on GABA and GABA receptor function in the different parts of the GI tract, with particular focus on the potential involvement in the modulation of GI motility and inflammation. PMID:25526825

  18. Lobelane analogues containing 4-hydroxy and 4-(2-fluoroethoxy) aromatic substituents: Potent and selective inhibitors of [(3)H]dopamine uptake at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

    PubMed

    Joolakanti, Shyamsunder R; Nickell, Justin R; Janganati, Venumadhav; Zheng, Guangrong; Dwoskin, Linda P; Crooks, Peter A

    2016-05-15

    A series of lobelane and GZ-793A analogues that incorporate aromatic 4-hydroxy and 4-(2-fluoroethoxy) substituents were synthesized and evaluated for inhibition of [(3)H]dopamine (DA) uptake at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) and the dopamine transporter (DAT), and [(3)H]serotonin uptake at the serotonin transporter (SERT). Most of these compounds exhibited potent inhibition of DA uptake at VMAT2 in the nanomolar range (Ki=30-70nM). The two most potent analogues, 7 and 14, both exhibited a Ki value of 31nM for inhibition of VMAT2. The lobelane analogue 14, incorporating 4-(2-fluoroethoxy) and 4-hydroxy aromatic substituents, exhibited 96- and 335-fold greater selectivity for VMAT2 versus DAT and SERT, respectively, in comparison to lobelane. Thus, lobelane analogues bearing hydroxyl and fluoroethoxy moieties retain the high affinity for VMAT2 of the parent compound, while enhancing selectivity for VMAT2 versus the plasmalemma transporters. PMID:27080180

  19. Antiseizure Activity of Midazolam in Mice Lacking δ-Subunit Extrasynaptic GABA(A) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sandesh D; Younus, Iyan; Clossen, Bryan L; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2015-06-01

    Midazolam is a benzodiazepine anticonvulsant with rapid onset and short duration of action. Midazolam is the current drug of choice for acute seizures and status epilepticus, including those caused by organophosphate nerve agents. The antiseizure activity of midazolam is thought to result from its allosteric potentiation of synaptic GABA(A) receptors in the brain. However, there are indications that benzodiazepines promote neurosteroid synthesis via the 18-kDa cholesterol transporter protein (TSPO). Therefore, we investigated the role of neurosteroids and their extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor targets in the antiseizure activity of midazolam. Here, we used δ-subunit knockout (DKO) mice bearing a targeted deletion of the extrasynaptic receptors to investigate the contribution of the extrasynaptic receptors to the antiseizure activity of midazolam using the 6-Hz and hippocampus kindling seizure models. In both models, midazolam produced rapid and dose-dependent protection against seizures (ED50, 0.4 mg/kg). Moreover, the antiseizure potency of midazolam was undiminished in DKO mice compared with control mice. Pretreatment with PK11195 [1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide], a TSPO blocker, or finasteride, a 5α-reductase neurosteroid inhibitor, did not affect the antiseizure effect of midazolam. The antiseizure activity of midazolam was significantly reversed by pretreatment with flumazenil, a benzodiazepine antagonist. Plasma and brain levels of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone were not significantly greater in midazolam-treated animals. These studies therefore provide strong evidence that neurosteroids and extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors are not involved in the antiseizure activity of midazolam, which mainly occurs through synaptic GABA(A) receptors via direct binding to benzodiazepine sites. This study reaffirms midazolam's use for controlling acute seizures and status epilepticus. PMID:25784648

  20. WAY-855 (3-amino-tricyclo[2.2.1.02.6]heptane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid): a novel, EAAT2-preferring, nonsubstrate inhibitor of high-affinity glutamate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, John; Eliasof, Scott; Stack, Gary; McIlvain, H Beal; Greenfield, Alexander; Kowal, Dianne; Petroski, Robert; Carrick, Tikva

    2003-01-01

    The pharmacological profile of a novel glutamate transport inhibitor, WAY-855 (3-amino-tricyclo[2.2.1.02.6]heptane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid), on the activity of the human forebrain glutamate transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 expressed in stable mammalian cell lines and in Xenopus laevis oocytes is presented. WAY-855 inhibited glutamate uptake mediated by all three subtypes in a concentration-dependent manner, with preferential inhibition of the CNS-predominant EAAT2 subtype in both cells and oocytes. IC50 values for EAAT2 and EAAT3 inhibition in cells were 2.2 and 24.5 μM, respectively, while EAAT1 activity was inhibited by 50% at 100 μM (IC50 values determined in oocytes were 1.3 μM (EAAT2), 52.5 μM (EAAT3) and 125.9 μM (EAAT1)). Application of WAY-855 to EAAT-expressing oocytes failed to induce a transporter current, and the compound failed to exchange with accumulated [3H]D-aspartate in synaptosomes consistent with a nonsubstrate inhibitor. WAY-855 inhibited D-aspartate uptake into cortical synaptosomes by a competitive mechanism, and with similar potency to that observed for the cloned EAAT2. WAY-855 failed to agonise or antagonise ionotropic glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurones, or the human metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 expressed in a stable cell line. WAY-855 represents a novel structure in glutamate transporter pharmacology, and exploration of this structure might provide insights into the discrimination between EAAT2 and other EAAT subtypes. PMID:14517179

  1. Medicinal and aromatic plant materials as nitrification inhibitors for augmenting yield and nitrogen uptake of Japanese mint (Mentha arvensis L. Var. Piperascens).

    PubMed

    Kiran, Usha; Patra, D D

    2003-02-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the relative performance of medicinal and aromatic plant materials and dicyandiamide (DCD) as nitrification inhibitors to regulate transformation of N from urea. Their effect on the efficiencies of use of N by Japanese mint (Mentha arvensis cv. Hy 77) was tested. Urea was coated with these materials viz., Mentha spicata, Artemisia annua or DCD at the rate of 5% (w/w) of fertilizer urea using an appropriate coating technique. Nimin (tetranortriterpenoids, an ethanol extract of neem (Azadirachta indica Juss) coating was done at the rate of 1% w/w of urea. Fertilizer nitrogen was applied at 100 and 200 mg kg(-1) soil. These natural coating materials significantly increased the herb and essential oil yields of the crop at both rates of fertilizer nitrogen compared to urea alone and were found to be as effective as DCD in retarding NO3- formation in soil. Herb yield increased by 6-81% when compared to uncoated urea. The increase in essential oil yield ranged between 3% and 68% due to coating. The effectiveness of the nitrification-inhibitor--coated urea, however, varied with the soils used and the rate of fertilizer nitrogen applied. The results suggest that the natural products could be potential nitrification inhibitors for increasing fertilizer N use efficiency. PMID:12688470

  2. Iontophoretic studies on rat hippocampus with some novel GABA antagonists.

    PubMed

    Dalkara, T; Saederup, E; Squires, R F; Krnjevic, K

    1986-08-01

    Twelve substances which appear to be GABA antagonists, judging by their ability to reverse the inhibitory effect of GABA on 35S-TBPS binding to rat brain membranes, were tested iontophoretically on population spikes in the rat hippocampus. Eight of them, including seven which completely reversed the inhibitory action of GABA on 35S-TBPS binding, caused a marked enhancement of population spikes, with slow onset and long duration and they antagonized the inhibition of population spikes by GABA. These effects were similar to those produced by bicuculline. Electrophysiologically, the most potent of the "complete reversers" were bathophenanthroline disulfonate and brucine. In vitro, amoxapine and brucine most effectively reversed the inhibitory action of GABA on 35S-TBPS binding. Of the five substances which only partly reversed the inhibitory effect of GABA on 35S-TBPS binding, four depressed the population spikes and potentiated the inhibitory action of GABA. The fifth "partial reverser", pipazethate, potently increased the population spikes, like the "complete reversers". Although other interpretations are possible the results are consistent with the existence of several GABA-A receptor types in brain, only some of which are blocked by certain partial reversers. PMID:2874465

  3. Development of potent dopamine-norepinephrine uptake inhibitors (DNRIs) based on a (2S,4R,5R)-2-benzhydryl-5-((4-methoxybenzyl)amino)tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-ol molecular template.

    PubMed

    Santra, Soumava; Sharma, Horrick; Vedachalam, Seenuvasan; Antonio, Tamara; Reith, Maarten; Dutta, Aloke

    2015-02-15

    Current therapy of depression is less than ideal with remission rates of only 25-35% and response rates of 45-60%. It has been hypothesized that a dysfunctional dopaminergic system in the mesocorticolimbic pathway in depressive disorder may lead to development of anhedonia associated with loss of pleasure and interest along with loss of motivation. The current antidepressants do not address dopamine dysfunction which might explain their low efficacy. In this report, we have described an SAR study on our pyran-based triple reuptake inhibitors (TRIs) which are being investigated as the next-generation antidepressants. In the present work we demonstrate that our lead TRIs can be modified with appropriate aromatic substitutions to display a highly potent SSRI profile for compounds 2a and 4a (Ki (SERT); 0.71 and 2.68nM, respectively) or a potent DNRI profile for compounds 6b and 6h (Ki (DAT/NET); 8.94/4.76 and 13/7.37nM, respectively). Compounds 4g-4i exhibited potencies at all three monoamine transporters. The results provide insights into the structural requirements for developing selective dual- and triple-uptake inhibitors from a unique pyran molecular template for an effective management of depression and related disorders. PMID:25593099

  4. Development of potent dopamine-norepinephrine uptake inhibitors (DNRIs) based on a (2S,4R,5R)-2-benzhydryl-5-((4-methoxybenzyl)amino)tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-ol molecular template

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Soumava; Sharma, Horrick; Vedachalam, Seenuvasan; Antonio, Tamara; Reith, Maarten; Dutta, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    Current therapy of depression is less than ideal with remission rates of only 25–35% and response rates of 45–60%. It has been hypothesized that a dysfunctional dopaminergic system in the mesocorticolimbic pathway in depressive disorder may lead to development of anhedonia associated with loss of pleasure and interest along with loss of motivation. The current antidepressants do not address dopamine dysfunction which might explain their low efficacy. In this report, we have described an SAR study on our pyran-based triple reuptake inhibitors (TRIs) which are being investigated as the next-generation antidepressants. In the present work we demonstrate that our lead TRIs can be modified with appropriate aromatic substitutions to display a highly potent SSRI profile for compounds 2a and 4a (Ki (SERT); 0.71 and 2.68 nM, respectively) or a potent DNRI profile for compounds 6b and 6h (Ki (DAT/NET); 8.94/ 4.76 and 13/ 7.37 nM, respectively). Compounds 4g–4i exhibited potencies at all three monoamine transporters. The results provide insights into the structural requirements for developing selective dual- and triple-uptake inhibitors from a unique pyran molecular template for an effective management of depression and related disorders. PMID:25593099

  5. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment and cortical responses to adenosine and GABA.

    PubMed

    Mally, J; Connick, J H; Stone, T W

    1990-10-22

    The effects of chronic treatment of mice with clonazepam have been examined on the responses of neocortical slices to adenosine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Responses to these agonists were measured as changes in the depolarisation induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Added to the superfusion medium diazepam blocked responses to adenosine but not 5-HT; this effect was not observed with 2-chloroadenosine or in the presence of 2-hydroxynitrobenzylthioguanosine. GABA was inactive in control slices but chronic treatment with clonazepam induced responses to GABA and enhanced responses to adenosine but not 5-HT. It is suggested that the induction of GABA responses may reflect the up-regulation of GABA receptors, but the increase of adenosine responses by clonazepam implies that there is no simple relationship between adenosine receptor binding and functional responses. PMID:1979931

  6. Study of GABA in Healthy Volunteers: Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junfeng; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Liu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yi; Mao, Fei; Mao, Junjun; Lu, Xiaolan; Jiang, Dongdong; Wan, Yun; Lv, Jia-Ying; Cao, Guoying; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Naiqing; Atkinson, Mark; Greiner, Dale L.; Prud'homme, Gerald J.; Jiao, Zheng; Li, Yiming; Wang, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies show that GABA exerts anti-diabetic effects in rodent models of type 1 diabetes. Because little is known about its absorption and effects in humans, we investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of GABA in healthy volunteers. Twelve subjects were subjected to an open-labeled, three-period trial involving sequential oral administration of placebo, 2 g GABA once, and 2 g GABA three times/day for 7 days, with a 7-day washout between each period. GABA was rapidly absorbed (Tmax: 0.5 ~ 1 h) with the half-life (t1/2) of 5 h. No accumulation was observed after repeated oral GABA administration for 7 days. Remarkably, GABA significantly increased circulating insulin levels in the subjects under either fasting (1.6-fold, single dose; 2.0-fold, repeated dose; p < 0.01) or fed conditions (1.4-fold, single dose; 1.6-fold, repeated dose; p < 0.01). GABA also increased glucagon levels only under fasting conditions (1.3-fold, single dose, p < 0.05; 1.5-fold, repeated dose, p < 0.01). However, there were no significant differences in the insulin-to-glucagon ratio and no significant change in glucose levels in these healthy subjects during the study period. Importantly, GABA significantly decreased glycated albumin levels in the repeated dosing period. Subjects with repeated dosing showed an elevated incidence of minor adverse events in comparison to placebo or the single dosing period, most notably transient discomforts such as dizziness and sore throat. However, there were no serious adverse events observed throughout the study. Our data show that GABA is rapidly absorbed and tolerated in human beings; its endocrine effects, exemplified by increasing islet hormonal secretion, suggest potential therapeutic benefits for diabetes. PMID:26617516

  7. GABA selectively increases mucin-1 expression in isolated pig jejunum.

    PubMed

    Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Sponder, Gerhard; Pieper, Robert; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Deiner, Carolin

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase, which is expressed in the central nervous system and in various other tissues including the intestine. Moreover, GABA can be ingested in vegetarian diets or produced by bacterial commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. As previous studies in lung have suggested a link between locally increased GABA availability and mucin 5AC production, the present study sought to test whether the presence or lack of GABA (and its precursor glutamine) has an effect on intestinal mucin expression. Porcine jejunum epithelial preparations were incubated with two different amounts of GABA or glutamine on the mucosal side for 4 h, and changes in the relative gene expression of seven different mucins, enzymes involved in mucin shedding, GABA B receptor, enzymes involved in glutamine/GABA metabolism, glutathione peroxidase 2, and interleukin 10 were examined by quantitative PCR (TaqMan(®) assays). Protein expression of mucin-1 (MUC1) was analyzed by Western blot. On the RNA level, only MUC1 was significantly up-regulated by both GABA concentrations compared with the control. Glutamine-treated groups showed the same trend. On the protein level, all treatment groups showed a significantly higher MUC1 expression than the control group. We conclude that GABA selectively increases the expression of MUC1, a cell surface mucin that prevents the adhesion of microorganisms, because of its size and negative charge, and therefore propose that the well-described positive effects of glutamine on enterocytes and intestinal integrity are partly attributable to effects of its metabolite GABA. PMID:26471792

  8. The effects of agonists of ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors on learning.

    PubMed

    Zyablitseva, Evgeniya A; Kositsyn, Nikolay S; Shul'gina, Galina I

    2009-05-01

    The research described here investigates the role played by inhibitory processes in the discriminations made by the nervous system of humans and animals between familiar and unfamiliar and significant and nonsignificant events. This research compared the effects of two inhibitory mediators of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA): 1) phenibut, a nonselective agonist of ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors and 2) gaboxadol a selective agonist of ionotropic GABA(A) receptors on the process of developing active defensive and inhibitory conditioned reflexes in alert non-immobilized rabbits. It was found that phenibut, but not gaboxadol, accelerates the development of defensive reflexes at an early stage of conditioning. Both phenibut and gaboxadol facilitate the development of conditioned inhibition, but the effect of gaboxadol occurs at later stages of conditioning and is less stable than that of phenibut. The earlier and more stable effects of phenibut, as compared to gaboxadol, on storage in memory of the inhibitory significance of a stimulus may occur because GABA(B) receptors play the dominant role in the development of internal inhibition during an early stage of conditioning. On the other hand this may occur because the participation of both GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors are essential to the process. We discuss the polyfunctionality of GABA receptors as a function of their structure and the positions of the relevant neurons in the brain as this factor can affect regulation of various types of psychological processes. PMID:19476215

  9. Neurosteroids and GABA-A Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingde

    2011-01-01

    Neurosteroids represent a class of endogenous steroids that are synthesized in the brain, the adrenals, and the gonads and have potent and selective effects on the GABAA-receptor. 3α-hydroxy A-ring reduced metabolites of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, and testosterone are positive modulators of GABAA-receptor in a non-genomic manner. Allopregnanolone (3α-OH-5α-pregnan-20-one), 5α-androstane-3α, 17α-diol (Adiol), and 3α5α-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (3α5α-THDOC) enhance the GABA-mediated Cl- currents acting on a site (or sites) distinct from the GABA, benzodiazepine, barbiturate, and picrotoxin binding sites. 3α5α-P and 3α5α-THDOC potentiate synaptic GABAA-receptor function and activate δ-subunit containing extrasynaptic receptors that mediate tonic currents. On the contrary, 3β-OH pregnane steroids and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are GABAA-receptor antagonists and induce activation-dependent inhibition of the receptor. The activities of neurosteroid are dependent on brain regions and types of neurons. In addition to the slow genomic action of the parent steroids, the non-genomic, and rapid actions of neurosteroids play a significant role in the GABAA-receptor function and shift in mood and memory function. This review describes molecular mechanisms underlying neurosteroid action on the GABAA-receptor, mood changes, and cognitive functions. PMID:22654809

  10. Interaction of pyracetam with specific /sup 3/H-imipramine binding sites and GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex of brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhanets, V.V.; Chakhbra, K.K.; Danchev, N.D.; Malin, K.M.; Rusakov, D.Yu.; Val'dman, A.V.

    1986-06-01

    This paper studies the effect of pyracetam on parameters of specific binding of tritium-imipramine and GABA-activated binding of tritium-flunitrazepam with rat brain membranes. The experimental method is described and it is shown that pyracetam and mebicar in experiments in vivo on normal animals can exert their anxiolytic action without the participation of bensodiazepine receptors. Either the interaction of pyracetam and mebicar with benzodiazeprine receptors has a different interpretation than competition of these compounds with specific binding sites of tritium-flunitrazepam, or in experiments on normal animals in vivo GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex does not accept pyracetam and mebicar, for it contains endogenous inhibitors of GABA-modulating action.

  11. Mechanisms of carbacholine and GABA action on resting membrane potential and Na+/K+-ATPase of Lumbricus terrestris body wall muscles.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Eugeny M; Nurullin, Leniz F; Volkov, Michael E; Nikolsky, Eugeny E; Vyskočil, Frantisek

    2011-04-01

    This work was aimed to identify the action of several ion channel and pump inhibitors as well as nicotinic, GABAergic, purinergic and serotoninergic drugs on the resting membrane potential (RMP) and assess the role of cholinergic and GABAergic sensitivity in earthworm muscle electrogenesis. The nicotinic agonists acetylcholine (ACh), carbacholine (CCh) and nicotine depolarize the RMP at concentrations of 5 μM and higher. The nicotinic antagonists (+)tubocurarine, α-bungarotoxin, muscarinic antagonists atropine and hexamethonium do not remove or prevent the CCh-induced depolarization. Verapamil, tetrodotoxin, removal of Cl(-) and Ca(2+) from the solution also cannot prevent the depolarization by CCh. In a Na(+)-free medium, however, CCh lost this depolarization ability and this indicates that the drug opens the sodium permeable pathway. Serotonin, glutamate, glycine, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (GABA(C) receptor antagonist) had no effect on the RMP. On the other hand, isoguvacin, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and baclofen (GABA(B) receptor agonist) hyperpolarized the RMP. Ouabain, bicucullin (GABA(A) antagonist) and phaclofen (GABA(B) antagonist), as well as the removal of Cl(-), suppressed the effect of GABA and baclofen. CCh did not enhance the depolarization generated by ouabain but, on the other hand, hindered the hyperpolarizing activity of baclofen both in the absence and presence of atropine and (+)tubocurarine. The long-term application of CCh depolarizes the RMP primarily by inhibiting the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. The muscle membrane also contains A and B type GABA binding sites, the activation of which increases the RMP at the expense of increasing the action of ouabain- and Cl(-) -sensitive electrogenic pumps. PMID:21184841

  12. GABA[subscript A] Receptor Downregulation in Brains of Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the…

  13. Trans-synaptic (GABA-dopamine) modulation of cocaine induced dopamine release: A potential therapeutic strategy for cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, S.L.; Straughter-Moore, R.; Chen, R.

    1995-05-01

    We recently developed a new experimental strategy for measuring interactions between functionally-linked neurotransmitter systems in the primate and human brain with PET. As part of this research, we demonstrated that increases in endogenous GABA concentrations significantly reduced striatal dopamine concentrations in the primate brain. We report here the application of the neurotransmitter interaction paradigm with PET and with microdialysis to the investigation of a novel therapeutic strategy for treating cocaine abuse based on the ability of GABA to inhibit cocaine induced increases in striatal dopamine. Using gamma-vinyl GABA (GVG, a suicide inhibitor of GABA transaminase), we performed a series of PET studies where animals received a baseline PET scan with labeled raclopride injection, animals received cocaine (2.0 mg/kg). Normally, a cocaine challenge significantly reduces the striatal binding of {sup 11}C-raclopride. However, in animals pretreated with GVG, {sup 11}C-raclopride binding was less affected by a cocaine challenge compared to control studies. Furthermore, microdialysis studies in freely moving rats demonstrate that GVG (300 mg/kg) significantly inhibited cocaine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine release. GVG also attenuated cocaine-induced increases in locomotor activity. However, at a dose of 100 mg/kg, GVG had no effect. Similar findings were obtained with alcohol. Alcohol pretreatment dose dependantly (1-4 g/kg) inhibited cocaine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine concentrations in freely moving rats. Taken together, these studies suggest that therapeutic strategies targeted at increasing central GABA concentrations may be beneficial for the treatment of cocaine abuse.

  14. Reactive oxygen species induced by presynaptic glutamate receptor activation is involved in [(3)H]GABA release from rat brain cortical nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, A; Krupko, O; Himmelreich, N

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a response to presynaptic glutamate receptor activation, and the role of ROS in neurotransmitter (GABA) release. Experiments were performed with rat brain cortical synaptosomes using glutamate, NMDA and kainate as agonists of glutamate receptors. ROS production was evaluated with the fluorogenic compound dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCF-DA), and GABA release was studied using synaptosomes loaded with [(3)H]GABA. All agonists were found to stimulate ROS production, and specific antagonists of NMDA and kainate/AMPA receptors, dizocilpine hydrogen maleate (MK-801) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-done (CNQX), significantly inhibited the ROS increase. Spontaneous as well as agonist-evoked ROS production was effectively attenuated by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a commonly used potent inhibitor of NADPH oxidase activity, that suggests a high contribution of NADPH-oxidase to this process. The replacement of glucose with pyruvate or the simultaneous presence of both substrates in the medium led to the decrease in spontaneous and NMDA-evoked ROS production, but to the increase in ROS production induced by kainate. Scavenging of agonist-evoked ROS production by a potent antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was tightly correlated with the inhibition of agonist-evoked GABA release. Together, these findings show that the activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors induces an increase in ROS production, and there is a tight correlation between ROS production and GABA secretion. The pivotal role of kainate/AMPA receptors in ROS production is under discussion. PMID:22864357

  15. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/-S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and trazolate, and a diaryl-triazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin

  16. Effects of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom and its toxin TsTX-V on neurotransmitter uptake in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchini, Alessandra L.; Vasconcelos, Flavio; Giglio, Jose Roberto; Arantes, Eliane Candiani . E-mail: ecabraga@fcfrp.usp.br

    2006-12-01

    Scorpion neurotoxins targeting the Na{sub v} channel can be classified into two classes: {alpha}- and {beta}-neurotoxins and are reported as highly active in mammalian brain. In this work, we evaluate the effects of Tityus serrulatus venom (Ts venom) and its {alpha}-neurotoxin TsTX-V on {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine (DA) and glutamate (Glu) uptake in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. TsTX-V was isolated from Ts venom by ion exchange chromatography followed by reverse-phase (C18) high-performance liquid chromatography. Neither Ts venom nor TsTX-V was able to affect {sup 3}H-Glu uptake. On the other hand, Ts venom (0.13 {mu}g/mg) significantly inhibited both {sup 3}H-GABA and {sup 3}H-DA uptake ({approx} 50%). TsTX-V showed IC{sub 5} values of 9.37 {mu}M and 22.2 {mu}M for the inhibition of {sup 3}H-GABA and {sup 3}H-DA uptake, respectively. These effects were abolished by pre-treatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 {mu}M), indicating the involvement of voltage-gated Na{sup +} channels in this process. In the absence of Ca{sup 2+}, and at low Ts venom concentrations, the reduction of {sup 3}H-GABA uptake was not as marked as in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. TsTX-V did not reduce {sup 3}H-GABA uptake in COS-7 cells expressing the GABA transporters GAT-1 and GAT-3, suggesting that this toxin indirectly reduces the transport. The reduced {sup 3}H-GABA uptake by synaptosomes might be due to rapid cell depolarization as revealed by confocal microscopy of C6 glioma cells. Thus, TsTX-V causes a reduction of {sup 3}H-GABA and {sup 3}H-DA uptake in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner, not directly affecting GABA transporters, but, in consequence of depolarization, involving voltage-gated Na{sup +} channels.

  17. Functional properties of GABA synaptic inputs onto GABA neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Diana C; Olezene, Cameron; Miyamae, Takeaki; Povysheva, Nadezhda V; Zaitsev, Aleksey V; Lewis, David A; Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo

    2015-03-15

    In rodent cortex GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated synapses are a significant source of input onto GABA neurons, and the properties of these inputs vary among GABA neuron subtypes that differ in molecular markers and firing patterns. Some features of cortical interneurons are different between rodents and primates, but it is not known whether inhibition of GABA neurons is prominent in the primate cortex and, if so, whether these inputs show heterogeneity across GABA neuron subtypes. We thus studied GABAAR-mediated miniature synaptic events in GABAergic interneurons in layer 3 of monkey dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Interneurons were identified on the basis of their firing pattern as fast spiking (FS), regular spiking (RS), burst spiking (BS), or irregular spiking (IS). Miniature synaptic events were common in all of the recorded interneurons, and the frequency of these events was highest in FS neurons. The amplitude and kinetics of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (mIPSPs) also differed between DLPFC interneuron subtypes in a manner correlated with their input resistance and membrane time constant. FS neurons had the fastest mIPSP decay times and the strongest effects of the GABAAR modulator zolpidem, suggesting that the distinctive properties of inhibitory synaptic inputs onto FS cells are in part conferred by GABAARs containing α1 subunits. Moreover, mIPSCs differed between FS and RS interneurons in a manner consistent with the mIPSP findings. These results show that in the monkey DLPFC GABAAR-mediated synaptic inputs are prominent in layer 3 interneurons and may differentially regulate the activity of different interneuron subtypes. PMID:25540225

  18. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lightstone, Felice C.

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a ‘funnel’ that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  19. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Timothy S; Lightstone, Felice C

    2016-04-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a 'funnel' that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  20. Regulation of GABA-modulin phosphorylation and GABA receptor binding by excitatory amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccarino, F.; Guidotti, A.

    1987-05-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells phosphorylate numerous proteins including GABA-modulin (GM), which is a putative allosteric modulator of GABA receptors. Cell depolarization and treatment with dicarboxylic excitatory amino acids, which activate PI turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ influx and guanylate cyclase in granule cells increase the phosphorylation of specific proteins. To determine GM phosphorylation by endogenous protein kinases in living granule cell cultures, GM was isolated by immunoprecipitation and reverse-phase HPLC. High K/sup +/, veratridine, glutamate and NMDA treatment stimulated GM phosphorylation over 2-fold. This increase was abolished by the absence of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and was antagonized by Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and by AVP. The excitatory amino acid action was mimicked by phorbol esters but not by forskolin or by cGMP, and thus may be mediated by an activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Moreover, excitatory amino acids increase /sup 3/H-labelled phorbol ester binding sites in granule cell membrane. The same cultures, treated with glutamate or kainate, showed a 50-fold greater efficacy of muscimol for the stimulation of benzodiazepine (BZ) binding. These data-suggest that excitatory amino acid stimulation of neurons triggers PKC translocation and the activated enzyme phosphorylates GM. The extent of GM phosphorylation may regulate the coupling between GABA and BZ binding sites.

  1. The selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, D-84, suppresses cocaine self-administration, but does not occasion cocaine-like levels of generalization.

    PubMed

    Batman, Angela M; Dutta, Aloke K; Reith, Maarten E A; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2010-12-01

    A successful replacement pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine dependency would likely reduce cocaine's abuse, support a low abuse liability, overlap cocaine's subjective effects, and have a long duration of action. Inhibitors with varying selectivity at the dopamine transporter (DAT) have approximated these properties. The objective of the present study was to characterize the behavioural effects of an extremely selective DAT inhibitor, (+) trans-4-(2-Benzhydryloxyethyl)-1-(4-fluorobenzyl) piperadin-3-ol (D-84), a 3-hydroxy substituted piperidine derivative of GBR-12935, for its cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, its effects on cocaine self-administration, and for its own self-administration. During cocaine discrimination tests, cocaine occasioned the 10 mg/kg cocaine training stimulus with an ED(50) value of 3.13 (1.54-6.34) mg/kg, and reduced response rates with an ED(50) value of 20.39 (7.24-57.44) mg/kg. D-84 incompletely generalized to the cocaine stimulus occasioning a maximal 76% cocaine-lever responding, while reducing response rates with lower potency than cocaine (ED(50)=30.94 (12.34-77.60) mg/kg). Pretreatment with D-84 (9.6-30.4 mg/kg) significantly (P<0.05) reduced cocaine intake at 17.1 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.5 mg/kg/infusion, and at 30.4 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.1, 0.5 .and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. During self-administration tests with D-84 (0.1-1 mg/kg/infusion), numbers of infusions significantly exceeded vehicle levels at 0.3 mg/kg/infusion. These results show that D-84 pretreatment can decrease cocaine intake especially when high doses of cocaine are being self-administered. This observation, combined with its incomplete generalization to the cocaine discriminative stimulus and its reported long duration of action, provides a profile consistent with a potential replacement therapy for treating cocaine-abusing patients. PMID:20840845

  2. Agonist pharmacology of two Drosophila GABA receptor splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The Drosophila melanogaster gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunits, RDLac and DRC 17-1-2, form functional homo-oligomeric receptors when heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The subunits differ in only 17 amino acids, principally in regions of the N-terminal domain which determine agonist pharmacology in vertebrate ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors. A range of conformationally restricted GABA analogues were tested on the two homo-oligomers and their agonists pharmacology compared with that of insect and vertebrate iontropic GABA receptors. 2. The actions of GABA, isoguvacine and isonipecotic acid on RDLac and DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers were compared, by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp. All three compounds were full agonists of both receptors, but were 4-6 fold less potent agonists of DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers than of RDLac. However, the relative potencies of these agonists on each receptor were very similar. 3. A more complete agonist profile was established for RDLac homo-oligomers. The most potent agonists of these receptors were GABA, muscimol and trans-aminocrotonic acid (TACA), which were approximately equipotent. RDLac homo-oligomers were fully activated by a range of GABA analogues, with the order of potency: GABA > ZAPA ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid) > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid > or = isonipecotic acid > or = cis-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) > beta-alanine. 3-Aminopropane sulphonic acid (3-APS), a partial agonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, was the weakest agonist tested and 100 fold less potent than GABA. 4. SR95531, an antagonist of vertebrate GABAA receptors, competitively inhibited the GABA responses of RDLac homo-oligomers, which have previously been found to insensitive to bicuculline. However, its potency (IC50 500 microM) was much reduced when compared to GABAA receptors. 5. The agonist pharmacology of Drosophila RDLac homo-oligomers exhibits aspects of the characteristic pharmacology of

  3. Chemical integrity of ( sup 3 H)GABA used in binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Balcar, V.J. )

    1989-07-01

    A method which is claimed to be able to determine the proportion of true GABA within radiolabeled GABA used in binding studies was tested using (3H)GABA. The method was found to be unsuitable for {sup 3}H-labeled GABA and, furthermore, both theoretical considerations and the present experimental data indicated that it could also produce misleading results with ({sup 14}C)GABA.

  4. Bioassay-guided fractionation of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) using an in vitro measure of GABA transaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Awad, Rosalie; Muhammad, Asim; Durst, Tony; Trudeau, Vance L; Arnason, John T

    2009-08-01

    A novel pharmacological mechanism of action for the anxiolytic botanical Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) is reported. The methanol extract was identified as a potent in vitro inhibitor of rat brain GABA transaminase (GABA-T), an enzyme target in the therapy of anxiety, epilepsy and related neurological disorders. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the identification and isolation of rosmarinic acid (RA) and the triterpenoids, ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) as active principles. Phytochemical characterization of the crude extract determined RA as the major compound responsible for activity (40% inhibition at 100 microg/mL) since it represented approximately 1.5% of the dry mass of the leaves. Synergistic effects may also play a role. PMID:19165747

  5. How and why does tomato accumulate a large amount of GABA in the fruit?

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Mariko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has received much attention as a health-promoting functional compound, and several GABA-enriched foods have been commercialized. In higher plants, GABA is primarily metabolized via a short pathway called the GABA shunt. The GABA shunt bypasses two steps (the oxidation of α-ketoglutarate to succinate) of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle via reactions catalyzed by three enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase, GABA transaminase, and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. The GABA shunt plays a major role in primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism and is an integral part of the TCA cycle under stress and non-stress conditions. Tomato is one of the major crops that accumulate a relatively high level of GABA in its fruits. The GABA levels in tomato fruits dramatically change during fruit development; the GABA levels increase from flowering to the mature green stage and then rapidly decrease during the ripening stage. Although GABA constitutes up to 50% of the free amino acids at the mature green stage, the molecular mechanism of GABA accumulation and the physiological function of GABA during tomato fruit development remain unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies of GABA accumulation in tomato fruits and discuss the potential biological roles of GABA in tomato fruit development. PMID:26322056

  6. Metabotropic GABA signalling modulates longevity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Lei; Gong, Jianke; Yuan, Fengling; Zhang, Bi; Liu, Hongkang; Zheng, Tianlin; Yu, Teng; Xu, X. Z. Shawn; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important but poorly understood role in modulating longevity. GABA, a prominent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is best known to regulate nervous system function and behaviour in diverse organisms. Whether GABA signalling affects aging, however, has not been explored. Here we examined mutants lacking each of the major neurotransmitters in C. elegans, and find that deficiency in GABA signalling extends lifespan. This pro-longevity effect is mediated by the metabotropic GABAB receptor GBB-1, but not ionotropic GABAA receptors. GBB-1 regulates lifespan through G protein-PLCβ signalling, which transmits longevity signals to the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO, a key regulator of lifespan. Mammalian GABAB receptors can functionally substitute for GBB-1 in lifespan control in C. elegans. Our results uncover a new role of GABA signalling in lifespan regulation in C. elegans, raising the possibility that a similar process may occur in other organisms. PMID:26537867

  7. [GABA-Receptors in Modulation of Fear Memory Extinction].

    PubMed

    Dubrovina, N I

    2016-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system determining the efficacy of neuronal interaction. GABA-receptors play a key role in different aspects of fear memory--acquisition and consolidation, retention, reconsolidation and extinction. Extinction is an important behavioural phenomenon which allows organism to adapt its behavior to a changing environment. Extinction of fear memory is a form of new inhibitory learning which interferes with expression of the initial acquired fear conditioning. Resistance to extinction is symptom of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. The aim of the present review was to summarize own and literary data about GABAergic modulation of fear extinction and pharmacological correction of extinction impairment at influences on GABA(A)- and GABA(B)- receptors. PMID:27538279

  8. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  9. Parkinson's Disease and Neurodegeneration: GABA-Collapse Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Błaszczyk, Janusz W.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of age-related disorders that are characterized by a slow but irreversible deterioration of brain functions. Evidence accumulated over more than two decades has implicated calcium-related homeostatic mechanisms, giving rise to the Ca2+ hypothesis of brain aging and, ultimately, cell death. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter within the central (CNS), peripheral and enteric nervous systems. It appears to be involved in a wide variety of physiological functions within and outside the nervous system, that are maintained through a complex interaction between GABA and calcium-dependent neurotransmission and cellular metabolic functions. Within CNS the Ca2+/GABA mechanism stabilizes neuronal activity both at cellular and systemic levels. Decline in the Ca2+/GABA control initiates several cascading processes leading to both weakened protective barriers (in particular the blood-brain barrier) and accumulations of intracellular deposits of calcium and Lewy bodies. Linking such a vital mechanism of synaptic transmission with metabolism (both at cellular and tissue level) by means of a common reciprocal Ca2+/GABA inhibition results in a fragile balance, which is prone to destabilization and auto-destruction. The GABA decline etiology proposed here appears to apply to all human neurodegenerative processes initiated by abnormal intracellular calcium levels. Therefore, the original description of Parkinson's disease (PD) as due to the selective damage of dopaminergic neurons in the mesencephalon should be updated into the concept of a severe multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder of the nervous system, whose clinical symptoms reflect the localization and progression of the most advanced GABA pathology. A future and more complete therapeutic approach to PD should be aimed first at slowing (or stopping) the progression of Ca2+/GABA functional decline. PMID:27375426

  10. Parkinson's Disease and Neurodegeneration: GABA-Collapse Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Janusz W

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of age-related disorders that are characterized by a slow but irreversible deterioration of brain functions. Evidence accumulated over more than two decades has implicated calcium-related homeostatic mechanisms, giving rise to the Ca(2+) hypothesis of brain aging and, ultimately, cell death. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter within the central (CNS), peripheral and enteric nervous systems. It appears to be involved in a wide variety of physiological functions within and outside the nervous system, that are maintained through a complex interaction between GABA and calcium-dependent neurotransmission and cellular metabolic functions. Within CNS the Ca(2+)/GABA mechanism stabilizes neuronal activity both at cellular and systemic levels. Decline in the Ca(2+)/GABA control initiates several cascading processes leading to both weakened protective barriers (in particular the blood-brain barrier) and accumulations of intracellular deposits of calcium and Lewy bodies. Linking such a vital mechanism of synaptic transmission with metabolism (both at cellular and tissue level) by means of a common reciprocal Ca(2+)/GABA inhibition results in a fragile balance, which is prone to destabilization and auto-destruction. The GABA decline etiology proposed here appears to apply to all human neurodegenerative processes initiated by abnormal intracellular calcium levels. Therefore, the original description of Parkinson's disease (PD) as due to the selective damage of dopaminergic neurons in the mesencephalon should be updated into the concept of a severe multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder of the nervous system, whose clinical symptoms reflect the localization and progression of the most advanced GABA pathology. A future and more complete therapeutic approach to PD should be aimed first at slowing (or stopping) the progression of Ca(2+)/GABA functional decline. PMID:27375426

  11. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells.

    PubMed

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  12. In vivo measurements of glutamate, GABA, and NAAG in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Laura M; Kontson, Kimberly; West, Jeffrey; Edden, Richard A; Zhu, He; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Holcomb, Henry H; Barker, Peter B

    2013-09-01

    The major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), respectively, are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide that modulates the Glu system, may also be altered in schizophrenia. This study investigated GABA, Glu + glutamine (Glx), and NAAG levels in younger and older subjects with schizophrenia. Forty-one subjects, 21 with chronic schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls, participated in this study. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was used to measure GABA, Glx, and NAAG levels in the anterior cingulate (AC) and centrum semiovale (CSO) regions. NAAG in the CSO was higher in younger schizophrenia subjects compared with younger control subjects. The opposite pattern was observed in the older groups. Glx was reduced in the schizophrenia group irrespective of age group and brain region. There was a trend for reduced AC GABA in older schizophrenia subjects compared with older control subjects. Poor attention performance was correlated to lower AC GABA levels in both groups. Higher levels of CSO NAAG were associated with greater negative symptom severity in schizophrenia. These results provide support for altered glutamatergic and GABAergic function associated with illness course and cognitive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The study also highlights the importance of studies that combine MRS measurements of NAAG, GABA, and Glu for a more comprehensive neurochemical characterization of schizophrenia. PMID:23081992

  13. Involvement of GABA(A) receptors in myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, R R; Truong, D D; Nguyen, K D; Dang, A T; Hoang, T T; Vo, P Q; Sandroni, P

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in multiple neurochemical systems have been reported in animal and human studies of posthypoxic myoclonus. It is impossible, however, to establish causative relationships between the observed changes and the myoclonic movements from these studies. Therefore, to establish causative links between neurochemical changes and myoclonus, ligands that target neurotransmitter systems that are altered in posthypoxic myoclonus were microinjected into the lateral ventricles of normal rats to identify the changes that can produce myoclonus. Of the ligands that were tested, only the GABA(A) antagonists produced myoclonus after intracerebroventricular administration, suggesting the importance of disinhibition of GABAergic systems in myoclonus. To further examine the role of GABA in myoclonus, GABAergic antagonists were microinjected into the nucleus reticularis of the thalamus (NRT), an area of the brain in which extensive pathologic changes are seen in posthypoxic animals. GABA(A), but not GABA(B), antagonists produced myoclonus after microinjection into the NRT. Earlier investigators have further reported the ability of GABA(A) antagonists to produce myoclonus after microinjection into the caudate. The data therefore suggest that disruption of activity at GABA(A) receptors at any one of a number of levels in the neural axis can produce myoclonus. PMID:10755272

  14. A Role for GAT-1 in Presynaptic GABA Homeostasis?

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Fiorenzo; Melone, Marcello; Fattorini, Giorgia; Bragina, Luca; Ciappelloni, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    In monoamine-releasing terminals, neurotransmitter transporters – in addition to terminating synaptic transmission by clearing released transmitters from the extracellular space – are the primary mechanism for replenishing transmitter stores and thus regulate presynaptic homeostasis. Here, we analyze whether GAT-1, the main plasma membrane GABA transporter, plays a similar role in GABAergic terminals. Re-examination of existing literature and recent data gathered in our laboratory show that GABA homeostasis in GABAergic terminals is dominated by the activity of the GABA synthesizing enzyme and that GAT-1-mediated GABA transport contributes to cytosolic GABA levels. However, analysis of GAT-1 KO, besides demonstrating the effects of reduced clearance, reveals the existence of changes compatible with an impaired presynaptic function, as miniature IPSCs frequency is reduced by one-third and glutamic acid decarboxylases and phosphate-activated glutaminase levels are significantly up-regulated. Although the changes observed are less robust than those reported in mice with impaired dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin plasma membrane transporters, they suggest that in GABAergic terminals GAT-1 impacts on presynaptic GABA homeostasis, and may contribute to the activity-dependent regulation of inhibitory efficacy. PMID:21503156

  15. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Heiko J.; Fukuda, A.; Kilb, W.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca2+ transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  16. GABA-independent GABAA Receptor Openings Maintain Tonic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka I.; Sylantyev, Sergiy; Herd, Murray B.; Kersanté, Flavie; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Linthorst, Astrid C.E.; Semyanov, Alexey; Belelli, Delia; Pavlov, Ivan; Walker, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) produces two forms of inhibition: ‘phasic’ inhibition generated by the rapid, transient activation of synaptic GABAARs by presynaptic GABA release, and tonic inhibition generated by the persistent activation of peri- or extrasynaptic GABAARs which can detect extracellular GABA. Such tonic GABAAR-mediated currents are particularly evident in dentate granule cells in which they play a major role in regulating cell excitability. Here we show that in rat dentate granule cells in ex-vivo hippocampal slices, tonic currents are predominantly generated by GABA-independent GABAA receptor openings. This tonic GABAAR conductance is resistant to the competitive GABAAR antagonist SR95531, which at high concentrations acts as a partial agonist, but can be blocked by an open channel blocker picrotoxin. When slices are perfused with 200 nM GABA, a concentration that is comparable to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations but is twice that measured by us in the hippocampus in vivo using zero-net-flux microdialysis, negligible GABA is detected by dentate granule cells. Spontaneously opening GABAARs, therefore, maintain dentate granule cell tonic currents in the face of low extracellular GABA concentrations. PMID:23447601

  17. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, A; Kilb, W

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca(2+) transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  18. P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity GABA and glutamate transport into rat brain cortex synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Barros-Barbosa, A R; Lobo, M G; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P; Cordeiro, J M

    2015-10-15

    Sodium-dependent high-affinity amino-acid transporters play crucial roles in terminating synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). However, there is lack of information about the mechanisms underlying the regulation of amino-acid transport by fast-acting neuromodulators, like ATP. Here, we investigated whether activation of the ATP-sensitive P2X7 receptor modulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate uptake into nerve terminals (synaptosomes) of the rat cerebral cortex. Radiolabeled neurotransmitter accumulation was evaluated by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The cell-permeant sodium-selective fluorescent indicator, SBFI-AM, was used to estimate Na(+) influx across plasma membrane. 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP (BzATP, 3-300 μM), a prototypic P2X7 receptor agonist, concentration-dependently decreased [(3)H]GABA (14%) and [(14)C]glutamate (24%) uptake; BzATP decreased transport maximum velocity (Vmax) without affecting the Michaelis constant (Km) values. The selective P2X7 receptor antagonist, A-438079 (3 μM), prevented inhibition of [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake by BzATP (100 μM). The inhibitory effect of BzATP coincided with its ability to increase intracellular Na(+) and was mimicked by Na(+) ionophores, like gramicidin and monensin. Increases in intracellular Na(+) (with veratridine or ouabain) or substitution of extracellular Na(+) by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG)(+) all decreased [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake and attenuated BzATP effects. Uptake inhibition by BzATP (100 μM) was also attenuated by calmidazolium, which selectively inhibits Na(+) currents through the P2X7 receptor pore. In conclusion, disruption of the Na(+) gradient by P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates high-affinity GABA and glutamate uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes. Interference with amino-acid transport efficacy may constitute a novel target for therapeutic management of cortical excitability. PMID

  19. Quantitative autoradiographic characterization of GA-BA sub B receptors in mammalian central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.Chin-Mei.

    1989-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of the amino acid neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) within the nervous system appear to be mediated through two distinct classes of receptors: GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} receptors. A quantitative autoradiographic method with {sup 3}H-GABA was developed to examine the hypotheses that GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} sites have distinct anatomical distributions, pharmacologic properties, and synaptic localizations within the rodent nervous system. The method was also applied to a comparative study of these receptors in postmortem human brain from individuals afflicted with Alzheimer's disease and those without neurologic disease. The results indicated that GABA{sub B} receptors occur in fewer numbers and have a lower affinity for GABA than GABA{sub A} receptors in both rodent and human brain. Within rodent brain, the distribution of these two receptor populations were clearly distinct. GABA{sub B} receptors were enriched in the medial habenula, interpeduncular nucleus, cerebellar molecular layer and olfactory glomerular layer. After selective lesions of postsynaptic neurons of the corticostriatal and perforant pathway, both GABA{sub B} and GABA{sub A} receptors were significantly decreased in number. Lesions of the presynaptic limbs of the perforant but not the corticostriatal pathway resulted in upregulation of both GABA receptors in the area of innervation. GABA{sub B} receptors were also upregulated in CA3 dendritic regions after destruction of dentate granule neurons.

  20. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and tracazolate, and a diaryltriazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin and LY81067 on the saturable binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS in cortical membranes are compared. The present findings are consistent with the interpretation that /sup 35/S-TBPS bind at or near the picrotoxin-sensitive anion recognition sites of the GABA/benzodiazepine/picrotoxin receptor complex.

  1. GABA receptors, alcohol dependence and criminal behavior.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Claudio; Tucci, Marianna; Sartore, Daniela; Cavarzeran, Fabiano; Di Pietra, Laura; Barzon, Luisa; Palù, Giorgio; Ferrara, Santo D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the connection between alcohol dependence and criminal behavior by an integrated genetic-environmental approach. The research, structured as a case-control study, examined 186 alcohol-dependent males; group 1 (N = 47 convicted subjects) was compared with group 2 (N = 139 no previous criminal records). Genetic results were innovative, highlighting differences in genotype distribution (p = 0.0067) in group 1 for single-nucleotide polymorphism rs 3780428, located in the intronic region of subunit 2 of the GABA B receptor gene (GABBR2). Some environmental factors (e.g., grade repetition) were associated with criminal behavior; others (e.g., attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous) were inversely related to convictions. The concomitant presence of the genetic and environmental factors found to be associated with the condition of alcohol-dependent inmate showed a 4-fold increase in the risk of antisocial behavior. The results need to be replicated on a larger population to develop new preventive and therapeutic proposals. PMID:23822588

  2. Silencing the brain may be better than stimulating it. The GABA effect.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, Francesca; Sarà, Marco; Sacco, Simona; Franceschini, Marco; Carolei, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Cases of recovery from vegetative and minimally conscious state after the administration of various pharmacological agents have been recently reported. These agents include CNS depressants (zolpidem, baclofen, lamotrigine) and CNS stimulants (tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, dopaminergic agents, methylphenidate). The action of CNS depressants as awakening agents sounds paradoxical, as they are commonly prescribed to slow down brain activity in the management of anxiety, muscle tension, pain, insomnia and seizures. How these drugs may improve the level of consciousness in some brain-injured patients is the subject of intense debate. Here we hypothesize that CNS depressants may promote consciousness recovery by reversing a condition of GABA impairment in the injured brain, restoring the normal ratio between synaptic excitation and inhibition, which is the prerequisite for any transition from a resting state to goal-oriented activities (GABA impairment hypothesis). Alternative or complementary mechanisms underlying the improvement of consciousness may include the reversal of a neurodormant state within areas affected by diaschisis (diaschisis hypothesis) and the modulation of an informative overload to the cortex as a consequence of filter failure in the injured brain (informative overload hypothesis). A better understanding of how single agents act on neural networks, whose functioning is critical for recovery, may help to advance a tailored pharmacological approach in the treatment of severely brain injured patients. PMID:24025066

  3. Role of GABA-active neurosteroids in the efficacy of metyrapone against cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Schmoutz, Christopher D; Guerin, Glenn F; Goeders, Nicholas E

    2014-09-01

    Previous research has demonstrated a complicated role for stress and HPA axis activation in potentiating various cocaine-related behaviors in preclinical models of drug dependence. However, the investigation of several antiglucocorticoid therapies has yielded equivocal results in reducing cocaine-related behaviors, possibly because of varying mechanisms of actions. Specifically, research suggests that metyrapone (a corticosterone synthesis inhibitor) may reduce cocaine self-administration in rats via a nongenomic, extra-adrenal mechanism without altering plasma corticosterone. In the current experiments, male rats were trained to self-administer cocaine infusions and food pellets in a multiple, alternating schedule of reinforcement. Metyrapone pretreatment dose-dependently decreased cocaine self-administration as demonstrated previously. Pharmacological inhibition of neurosteroid production by finasteride had significant effects on cocaine self-administration, regardless of metyrapone pretreatment. However, metyrapone's effects on cocaine self-administration were significantly attenuated with bicuculline pretreatment, suggesting a role for GABA-active neurosteroids in cocaine-reinforced behaviors. In vitro binding data also confirmed that metyrapone does not selectively bind to GABA-related proteins. The results of these experiments support the hypothesis that metyrapone may increase neurosteroidogenesis to produce effects on cocaine-related behaviors. PMID:24959859

  4. Antitarget Interaction, Acute Toxicity and Protein Binding Studies of Quinazolinedione Sulphonamides as GABA1 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Ajeet; Verma, Mansi; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Diseases characterized by recurrent seizures are known as epilepsy. One of the most important mechanisms for handling it is GABA1 receptor mediated inhibition. In the same context while studying the treatment of epilepsy we observed significant effects by derivatives of sulfonamides, which prompted us to design novel derivatives by means of in silico resources with antiepileptic effects. Molecular docking approaches are routinely used in modern drug design to help understand drug–receptor interaction. This study has been performed with the help of Chemdraw Ultra 7.0, GUSAR online tool for IC50 and LD50 predictions, AutoDock Vina (Python Prescription 0.8), and PaDEL software. Results revealed that ligand-protein interaction affinity of all 10 designed molecules ranges from -5.7 Kcal/mol to -5.2 Kcal/mol, which is approximately comparable to pre-existing GABA1 inhibitor i.e. phenytoin (CID: 1775, ligand-protein interaction affinity is -6.5 Kcal/mol). PMID:27168681

  5. Learning-Dependent Plasticity of the Barrel Cortex Is Impaired by Restricting GABA-Ergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Posluszny, Anna; Liguz-Lecznar, Monika; Turzynska, Danuta; Zakrzewska, Renata; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Experience-induced plastic changes in the cerebral cortex are accompanied by alterations in excitatory and inhibitory transmission. Increased excitatory drive, necessary for plasticity, precedes the occurrence of plastic change, while decreased inhibitory signaling often facilitates plasticity. However, an increase of inhibitory interactions was noted in some instances of experience-dependent changes. We previously reported an increase in the number of inhibitory markers in the barrel cortex of mice after fear conditioning engaging vibrissae, observed concurrently with enlargement of the cortical representational area of the row of vibrissae receiving conditioned stimulus (CS). We also observed that an increase of GABA level accompanied the conditioning. Here, to find whether unaltered GABAergic signaling is necessary for learning-dependent rewiring in the murine barrel cortex, we locally decreased GABA production in the barrel cortex or reduced transmission through GABAA receptors (GABAARs) at the time of the conditioning. Injections of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA), an inhibitor of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), into the barrel cortex prevented learning-induced enlargement of the conditioned vibrissae representation. A similar effect was observed after injection of gabazine, an antagonist of GABAARs. At the behavioral level, consistent conditioned response (cessation of head movements in response to CS) was impaired. These results show that appropriate functioning of the GABAergic system is required for both manifestation of functional cortical representation plasticity and for the development of a conditioned response. PMID:26641862

  6. Potentiation of the ionotropic GABA receptor response by whiskey fragrance.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2002-11-01

    It is well-known that the target of most mood-defining compounds is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activity in the human brain. To study the effects of whiskey fragrance on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting rat whole brain mRNA or cRNA prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors. Most whiskey components such as phenol, ethoxy, and lactone derivatives potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors, especially ethyl phenylpropanoate (EPP), which strongly potentiated the response. When this compound was applied to mice through respiration, the convulsions induced by pentetrazole were delayed, suggesting that EPP was absorbed by the brain, where it could potentiate the GABA(A) receptor responses. The extract of other alcoholic drinks such as wine, sake, brandy, and shochu also potentiated the responses to varying degrees. Although these fragrant components are present in alcoholic drinks at low concentrations (extremely small quantities compared with ethanol), they may also modulate the mood or consciousness of the human through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic fragrant compounds are easily absorbed into the brain through the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. PMID:12405783

  7. Production of gaba (γ – Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K.; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  8. Marlin-1, a novel RNA-binding protein associates with GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Couve, Andrés; Restituito, Sophie; Brandon, Julia M; Charles, Kelly J; Bawagan, Hinayana; Freeman, Katie B; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Moss, Stephen J

    2004-04-01

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Whereas heterodimerization between GABA(B) receptor GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits is essential for functional expression, how neurons coordinate the assembly of these critical receptors remains to be established. Here we have identified Marlin-1, a novel GABA(B) receptor-binding protein that associates specifically with the GABA(B)R1 subunit in yeast, tissue culture cells, and neurons. Marlin-1 is expressed in the brain and exhibits a granular distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. Marlin-1 binds different RNA species including the 3'-untranslated regions of both the GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 mRNAs in vitro and also associates with RNA in cultured neurons. Inhibition of Marlin-1 expression via small RNA interference technology results in enhanced intracellular levels of the GABA(B)R2 receptor subunit without affecting the level of GABA(B)R1. Together our results suggest that Marlin-1 functions to regulate the cellular levels of GABA(B) R2 subunits, which may have significant effects on the production of functional GABA(B) receptor heterodimers. Therefore, our observations provide an added level of regulation for the control of GABA(B) receptor expression and for the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission. PMID:14718537

  9. Hyposensitivity to gamma-aminobutyric acid in the ventral tegmental area during alcohol withdrawal: reversal by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arora, Devinder S; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Teppen, Tara L; McElvain, Maureen A; Sakharkar, Amul J; You, Chang; Pandey, Subhash C; Brodie, Mark S

    2013-08-01

    Putative dopaminergic (pDAergic) ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons have an important role in alcohol addiction. Acute ethanol increases the activity of pDAergic neurons, and withdrawal from repeated ethanol administration produces a decreased sensitivity of pDAergic VTA neurons to GABA. Recent studies show that behavioral changes induced by chronic alcohol are reversed by inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Whether HDAC-induced histone modifications regulate changes in GABA sensitivity of VTA pDAergic neurons during withdrawal is unknown. Here, we investigated modulation of withdrawal-induced changes in GABA sensitivity of pDAergic VTA neurons by HDAC inhibitors (HDACi), and also measured the levels of HDAC2, histone (H3-K9) acetylation, and GABA-Aα1 receptor (GABA (A-α1) R) subunit in VTA during ethanol withdrawal. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (ip) with either ethanol (3.5 g/kg) or saline twice daily for 3 weeks. In recordings from pDAergic VTA neurons in brain slices from ethanol-withdrawn mice, sensitivity to GABA (50-500 μM) was reduced. In brain slices from ethanol-withdrawn mice incubated with the HDACi SAHA (vorinostat) or trichostatin A (TSA) for 2 h, the hyposensitivity of pDAergic VTA neurons to GABA was significantly attenuated. There was no effect of TSA or SAHA on GABA sensitivity of pDAergic VTA neurons from saline-treated mice. In addition, ethanol withdrawal was associated with an increase in levels of HDAC2 and a decrease in histone (H3-K9) acetylation and levels of GABA (A-α1) R subunits in the VTA. Therefore, blockade of upregulation of HDAC2 by HDACi normalizes GABA hyposensitivity of pDAergic neurons developed during withdrawal after chronic ethanol treatment, which suggests the possibility that inhibition of HDACs can reverse ethanol-induced neuroadaptational changes in reward circuitry. PMID:23474591

  10. Estrous cycle regulation of extrasynaptic δ-containing GABA(A) receptor-mediated tonic inhibition and limbic epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Gangisetty, Omkaram; Carver, Chase Matthew; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2013-07-01

    The ovarian cycle affects susceptibility to behavioral and neurologic conditions. The molecular mechanisms underlying these changes are poorly understood. Deficits in cyclical fluctuations in steroid hormones and receptor plasticity play a central role in physiologic and pathophysiologic menstrual conditions. It has been suggested that synaptic GABA(A) receptors mediate phasic inhibition in the hippocampus and extrasynaptic receptors mediate tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus. Here we report a novel role of extrasynaptic δ-containing GABA(A) receptors as crucial mediators of the estrous cycle-related changes in neuronal excitability in mice, with hippocampus subfield specificity. In molecular and immunofluorescence studies, a significant increase occurred in δ-subunit, but not α4- and γ2-subunits, in the dentate gyrus during diestrus. However, δ-subunit upregulation was not evident in the CA1 region. The δ-subunit expression was undiminished by age and ovariectomy and in mice lacking progesterone receptors, but it was significantly reduced by finasteride, a neurosteroid synthesis inhibitor. Electrophysiologic studies confirmed greater potentiation of GABA currents by progesterone-derived neurosteroid allopregnanolone in dissociated dentate gyrus granule cells in diestrus than in CA1 pyramidal cells. The baseline conductance and allopregnanolone potentiation of tonic currents in dentate granule cells from hippocampal slices were higher than in CA1 pyramidal cells. In behavioral studies, susceptibility to hippocampus kindling epileptogenesis was lower in mice during diestrus. These results demonstrate the estrous cycle-related plasticity of neurosteroid-sensitive, δ-containing GABA(A) receptors that mediate tonic inhibition and seizure susceptibility. These findings may provide novel insight on molecular cascades of menstrual disorders like catamenial epilepsy, premenstrual syndrome, and migraine. PMID:23667248

  11. Spinal GABA-B receptor modulates neutrophil recruitment to the knee joint in zymosan-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Gabriel S; do C Malvar, David; Cunha, Thiago M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Kanashiro, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the central nervous system controls inflammatory responses by activating complex efferent neuroimmune pathways. The present study was designed to evaluate the role that central gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA-B) receptor plays in neutrophil migration in a murine model of zymosan-induced arthritis by using different pharmacological tools. We observed that intrathecal administration of baclofen, a selective GABA-B agonist, exacerbated the inflammatory response in the knee after zymosan administration characterized by an increase in the neutrophil recruitment and knee joint edema, whereas saclofen, a GABA-B antagonist, exerted the opposite effect. Intrathecal pretreatment of the animals with SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) blocked the pro-inflammatory effect of baclofen. On the other hand, systemic administration of guanethidine, a sympatholytic drug that inhibits catecholamine release, and nadolol, a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, reversed the effect of saclofen. Moreover, saclofen suppressed the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines into the knee joint (ELISA) and pain-related behaviors (open field test). Since the anti-inflammatory effect of saclofen depends on the sympathetic nervous system integrity, we observed that isoproterenol, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, mimics the central GABA-B blockade decreasing knee joint neutrophil recruitment. Together, these results demonstrate that the pharmacological manipulation of spinal GABAergic transmission aids control of neutrophil migration to the inflamed joint by modulating the activation of the knee joint-innervating sympathetic terminal fibers through a mechanism dependent on peripheral beta-adrenergic receptors and central components, such as p38 MAPK. PMID:27106212

  12. Biphasic effects of direct, but not indirect, GABA mimetics and antagonists on haloperidol-induced catalepsy.

    PubMed

    Worms, P; Lloyd, K G

    1980-03-01

    At very low doses the GABA agonists SL 76002 and muscimol diminish haloperidol-induced catalepsy. At somewhat higher doses these compounds potentiate catalepsy. Biphasic effects on DA-receptor mediated functions have previously been noted with bicuculline and picrotoxinin. In contrast, manipulation of GABA levels by enzyme inhibition induced only a monophasic effect on dopamine-mediated behaviour. The potentiation of GABA levels by enzyme inhibition induced only a monophasic effect on dopamine-mediated behaviour. The potentiation of haloperidol-induced catalepsy by GABA mimetics is also observed with dipropylacetate, delta-aminovaleric acid and gamma-acetylenic GABA. This GABA-mimetic potentiation of catakepsy was blocked by the coadministration of bicuculline. These results confirm and extend the hypothesis that GABA-neurons influence DA neuron function. Furthermore they suggest that more than one group of GABA receptors influence directly and/or indirectly DA neuronal function, with different resultant effects. PMID:7189827

  13. GABA depolarizes immature neurons and inhibits network activity in the neonatal neocortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kirmse, Knut; Kummer, Michael; Kovalchuk, Yury; Witte, Otto W; Garaschuk, Olga; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-01-01

    A large body of evidence from in vitro studies suggests that GABA is depolarizing during early postnatal development. However, the mode of GABA action in the intact developing brain is unknown. Here we examine the in vivo effects of GABA in cells of the upper cortical plate using a combination of electrophysiological and Ca(2+)-imaging techniques. We report that at postnatal days (P) 3-4, GABA depolarizes the majority of immature neurons in the occipital cortex of anaesthetized mice. At the same time, GABA does not efficiently activate voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and fails to induce action potential firing. Blocking GABA(A) receptors disinhibits spontaneous network activity, whereas allosteric activation of GABA(A) receptors has the opposite effect. In summary, our data provide evidence that in vivo GABA acts as a depolarizing neurotransmitter imposing an inhibitory control on network activity in the neonatal (P3-4) neocortex. PMID:26177896

  14. S-(N, N-diethylcarbamoyl)glutathione (carbamathione), a disulfiram metabolite and its effect on nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex dopamine, GABA, and glutamate: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Faiman, Morris D; Kaul, Swetha; Latif, Shaheen A; Williams, Todd D; Lunte, Craig E

    2013-12-01

    Disulfiram (DSF), used for the treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) for over six decades, most recently has shown promise for treating cocaine dependence. Although DSF's mechanism of action in alcohol abuse is due to the inhibition of liver mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), its mechanism of action in the treatment of cocaine dependence is unknown. DSF is a pro-drug, forming a number of metabolites each with discrete pharmacological actions. One metabolite formed during DSF bioactivation is S-(N, N-diethylcarbamoyl) glutathione (carbamathione) (carb). We previously showed that carb affects glutamate binding. In the present studies, we employed microdialysis techniques to investigate the effect of carb administration on dopamine (DA), GABA, and glutamate (Glu) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), two brain regions implicated in substance abuse dependence. The effect of DSF on DA, GABA, and Glu in the NAc also was determined. Both studies were carried out in male rats. Carb (20, 50, 200 mg/kg i v) in a dose-dependent manner increased DA, decreased GABA, and had a biphasic effect on Glu, first increasing and then decreasing Glu in both the NAc and mPFC. These changes all occurred concurrently. After carb administration, NAc and mPFC carb, as well as carb in plasma, were rapidly eliminated with a half-life for each approximately 4 min, while the changes in DA, GABA, and GLu in the NAc and mPFC persisted for approximately two hours. The maximal increase in carb (Cmax) in the NAc and mPFC after carb administration was dose-dependent, as was the area under the curve (AUC). DSF (200 mg/kg i p) also increased DA, decreased GABA, and had a biphasic effect on Glu in the NAc similar to that observed in the NAc after carb administration. When the cytochrome P450 inhibitor N-benzylimidazole (NBI) (20 mg/kg i p) was administered before DSF dosing, no carb could be detected in the NAc and plasma and also no changes in NAc DA, GABA

  15. Facilitation of amphetamine-induced hypothermia in mice by GABA agonists and CCK-8.

    PubMed Central

    Boschi, G.; Launay, N.; Rips, R.

    1991-01-01

    1. Amphetamine-induced hypothermia in mice is facilitated by dopaminergic stimulation and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic inhibition. The present study was designed to investigate: (a) the involvement of other neuronal systems, such as the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the opioid and the cholecystokinin (CCK-8) systems; (b) the possible contribution of hydroxylated metabolites of amphetamine to the hypothermia; (c) the capacity of dopamine itself to induce hypothermia and its mechanisms, in order to clarify the resistance of amphetamine-induced hypothermia to certain neuroleptics. 2. Pretreatment with the GABA antagonists, bicuculline and picrotoxin, did not inhibit amphetamine-induced hypothermia. The GABAB agonist, baclofen (2.5 mg kg-1, i.p.) potentiated this hypothermia, whereas the GABAA agonist, muscimol, did not. gamma-Butyrolactone (GBL) (40 mg kg-1, i.p.) and the neuropeptide CCK-8 (0.04 mg kg-1, i.p.) also induced potentiation. The opioid antagonist, naloxone, was without effect. 3. Dopamine itself (3, 9, 16 and 27 micrograms, i.c.v.) induced less hypothermia than the same doses of amphetamine. Sulpiride did not block dopamine-induced hypothermia, but pimozide (4 mg kg-1, i.p.), cis(z)flupentixol (0.25 mg kg-1, i.p.) and haloperidol (5 micrograms, i.c.v.) did. The direct dopamine receptor agonist, apomorphine, did not alter the hypothermia. Neither the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor blocker, cyproheptadine, nor the inhibitor of 5-HT synthesis, p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), modified dopamine-induced hypothermia. Fluoxetine, an inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, had no effect, whereas quipazine (6 mg kg-1, i.p.), a 5-HT agonist, totally prevented the hypothermia. Hypothermia was unaffected by pretreatment with CCK-8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1855128

  16. Regulation of Local Ambient GABA Levels via Transporter-Mediated GABA Import and Export for Subliminal Learning.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Osamu

    2015-06-01

    Perception of supraliminal stimuli might in general be reflected in bursts of action potentials (spikes), and their memory traces could be formed through spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). Memory traces for subliminal stimuli might be formed in a different manner, because subliminal stimulation evokes a fraction (but not a burst) of spikes. Simulations of a cortical neural network model showed that a subliminal stimulus that was too brief (10 msec) to perceive transiently (more than about 500 msec) depolarized stimulus-relevant principal cells and hyperpolarized stimulus-irrelevant principal cells in a subthreshold manner. This led to a small increase or decrease in ongoing-spontaneous spiking activity frequency (less than 1 Hz). Synaptic modification based on STDP during this period effectively enhanced relevant synaptic weights, by which subliminal learning was improved. GABA transporters on GABAergic interneurons modulated local levels of ambient GABA. Ambient GABA molecules acted on extrasynaptic receptors, provided principal cells with tonic inhibitory currents, and contributed to achieving the subthreshold neuronal state. We suggest that ongoing-spontaneous synaptic alteration through STDP following subliminal stimulation may be a possible neuronal mechanism for leaving its memory trace in cortical circuitry. Regulation of local ambient GABA levels by transporter-mediated GABA import and export may be crucial for subliminal learning. PMID:25774546

  17. Up-regulation of GABA transporters and GABA(A) receptor α1 subunit in tremor rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoyuan; Guo, Feng; Yu, Junling; Min, Dongyu; Wang, Zhanyou; Xie, Ni; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Cai, Jiqun

    2010-12-17

    The loss of GABAergic neurotransmission has been closely linked with epileptogenesis. The modulation of the synaptic activity occurs both via the removal of GABA from the synaptic cleft and by GABA transporters (GATs) and by modulation of GABA receptors. The tremor rat (TRM; tm/tm) is the parent strain of the spontaneously epileptic rat (SER; zi/zi, tm/tm), which exhibits absence-like seizure after 8 weeks of age. However, there are no reports that can elucidate the effects of GATs and GABA(A) receptors (GABARs) on TRMs. The present study was conducted to detect GATs and GABAR α1 subunit in TRMs hippocampus at mRNA and protein levels. In this study, total synaptosomal GABA content was significantly decreased in TRMs hippocampus compared with control Wistar rats by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); mRNA and protein expressions of GAT-1, GAT-3 and GABAR α1 subunit were all significantly increased in TRMs hippocampus by real time PCR and Western blot, respectively; GAT-1 and GABAR α1 subunit proteins were localized widely in TRMs and control rats hippocampus including CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions whereas only a wide distribution of GAT-3 was observed in CA1 region by immunohistochemistry. These data demonstrate that excessive expressions of GAT-1 as well as GAT-3 and GABAR α1 subunit in TRMs hippocampus may provide the potential therapeutic targets for genetic epilepsy. PMID:20851161

  18. Refuting the challenges of the developmental shift of polarity of GABA actions: GABA more exciting than ever!

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Woodin, Melanie A.; Sernagor, Evelyne; Cancedda, Laura; Vinay, Laurent; Rivera, Claudio; Legendre, Pascal; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Bordey, Angelique; Wenner, Peter; Fukuda, Atsuo; van den Pol, Anthony N.; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Cherubini, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    During brain development, there is a progressive reduction of intracellular chloride associated with a shift in GABA polarity: GABA depolarizes and occasionally excites immature neurons, subsequently hyperpolarizing them at later stages of development. This sequence, which has been observed in a wide range of animal species, brain structures and preparations, is thought to play an important role in activity-dependent formation and modulation of functional circuits. This sequence has also been considerably reinforced recently with new data pointing to an evolutionary preserved rule. In a recent “Hypothesis and Theory Article,” the excitatory action of GABA in early brain development is suggested to be “an experimental artefact” (Bregestovski and Bernard, 2012). The authors suggest that the excitatory action of GABA is due to an inadequate/insufficient energy supply in glucose-perfused slices and/or to the damage produced by the slicing procedure. However, these observations have been repeatedly contradicted by many groups and are inconsistent with a large body of evidence including the fact that the developmental shift is neither restricted to slices nor to rodents. We summarize the overwhelming evidence in support of both excitatory GABA during development, and the implications this has in developmental neurobiology. PMID:22973192

  19. User's manual for the GABAS spectrum computer code. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, D.D.; Lurie, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Gamma and Beta Spectrum computer code (GABAS) was developed at IRT Corporation for calculating time-dependent beta and/or gamma spectra from decaying fission products. GABAS calculates composite fission product spectra based on the technique used by England, et al., in conjunction with the CINDER family of fission product codes. Multigroup beta and gamma spectra for individual nuclides are folded with their corresponding time-dependent activities (usually generated by a fission product inventory code) to produce a composite time-dependent fission product spectrum. This manual contains the methodology employed by GABAS, input requirements for proper execution, a sample problem and a FORTRAN listing compatible with a UNIVAC machine. The code is available in a UNIVAC 1100/81 version and a VAX 11/780 version. The former may be obtained from the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC); the latter may be obtained directly from IRT Corporation.

  20. Drosophila neuroligin 4 regulates sleep through modulating GABA transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhou, Zikai; Zhang, Xinwang; Tong, Huawei; Li, Peipei; Zhang, Zi Chao; Jia, Zhengping; Xie, Wei; Han, Junhai

    2013-09-25

    Sleep is an essential and evolutionarily conserved behavior that is closely related to synaptic function. However, whether neuroligins (Nlgs), which are cell adhesion molecules involved in synapse formation and synaptic transmission, are involved in sleep is not clear. Here, we show that Drosophila Nlg4 (DNlg4) is highly expressed in large ventral lateral clock neurons (l-LNvs) and that l-LNv-derived DNlg4 is essential for sleep regulation. GABA transmission is impaired in mutant l-LNv, and sleep defects in dnlg4 mutant flies can be rescued by genetic manipulation of GABA transmission. Furthermore, dnlg4 mutant flies exhibit a severe reduction in GABAA receptor RDL clustering, and DNlg4 associates with RDLs in vivo. These results demonstrate that DNlg4 regulates sleep through modulating GABA transmission in l-LNvs, which provides the first known link between a synaptic adhesion molecule and sleep in Drosophila. PMID:24068821

  1. Developing oligodendrocytes express functional GABA(B) receptors that stimulate cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Luyt, Karen; Slade, Timothy P; Dorward, Jienchi J; Durant, Claire F; Wu, Yue; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Mundell, Stuart J; Váradi, Anikó; Molnár, Elek

    2007-02-01

    GABA(B) receptors (GABA(B)Rs) are involved in early events during neuronal development. The presence of GABA(B)Rs in developing oligodendrocytes has not been established. Using immunofluorescent co-localization, we have identified GABA(B)R proteins in O4 marker-positive oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in 4-day-old mouse brain periventricular white matter. In culture, OPCs, differentiated oligodendrocytes (DOs) and type 2 astrocytes (ASTs) express both the GABA(B1abcdf) and GABA(B2) subunits of the GABA(B)R. Using semiquantitative PCR analysis with GABA(B)R isoform-selective primers we found that the expression level of GABA(B1abd) was substantially higher in OPCs or ASTs than in DOs. In contrast, the GABA(B2) isoform showed a similar level of expression in OPCs and DOs, and a significantly higher level in ASTs. This indicates that the expression of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits are under independent control during oligodendroglial development. Activation of GABA(B)Rs using the selective agonist baclofen demonstrated that these receptors are functionally active and negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. Manipulation of GABA(B)R activity had no effect on OPC migration in a conventional agarose drop assay, whereas baclofen significantly increased OPC migration in a more sensitive transwell microchamber-based assay. Exposure of cultured OPCs to baclofen increased their proliferation, providing evidence for a functional role of GABA(B)Rs in oligodendrocyte development. The presence of GABA(B)Rs in developing oligodendrocytes provides a new mechanism for neuronal-glial interactions during development and may offer a novel target for promoting remyelination following white matter injury. PMID:17144904

  2. GABA-receptor complex in monkeys treated with MPTP

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, R.D.; Ticku, M.K.

    1986-03-01

    Tissue samples from the brains of monkeys made parkinsonian by the depletion of dopamine (DA) with dopaminergic neurotoxin (N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (1.4-3.4 mg/kg, i.v.) were assayed for changed in GABA ((/sup 3/H)-GABA), benzodiazepine ((/sup 3/H)-flunitrazepam) and picrotoxin ((/sup 35/S)-TBPS) binding sites. One point binding assays were performed on globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra reticulata (SN/sub R/) and VA-VL thalamic samples. GABA binding was markedly increased in the SN/sub R/ (129 +/- 12%, n = 2) and GP (108 +/- 33%, n = 4) and not altered in the striatum or thalamus. However, benzodiazepine binding was increased in the striatum (170%; 257 fm/mg, control; 692 fm/mg, treated) and GP (28%; 317 fm/mg, control, 405 fm/mg, treated) and (/sup 35/S)-TBPS binding was also increased in GP (100%; 32.5 fm/mg, control; 65.5 fm/mg, treated). atScatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)-GABA binding was also performed on tissue samples of motor cortex, cerebellar vermis and striatum pooled from half brains of 4 parkinsonian and 2 control monkeys. Depletion of DA (92 +/- 5%) in the striatum of these monkeys was not associated with any change in the K/sub D/ or B/sub max/ for the high or low affinity GABA binding sites in the striatum, motor cortex or cerebellum. Thus, in the basal ganglia, DA depletion is associated with an increase in GABA binding sites in GP and SN/sub R/, an increase in picrotoxin binding sites in GP and an increase in benzodiazepine binding sites in the striatum.

  3. Rubidium (Potassium) Uptake by Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Polley, L. David; Hopkins, Johns W.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments are reported in which the uptake of 86Rb+, used as an analog of K+, into cultured cells of Arabidopsis thaliana is investigated. A single transport system is found with Km = 0.34 millimolar and Vmax = 14 nmoles per milligram of protein per hour. This system is blocked by the metabolic inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) and by cold. At high concentrations of external K+ (above 1 millimolar), a significant fraction of total uptake is energy-independent. No evidence is found for more than one energy-dependent uptake system or for concentration-dependent modifications of a carrier as postulated in multiphasic transport models. Rb+ uptake was also examined in cultured cells derived from an “osmotic mutant” of Arabidopsis. The system closely resembles that found in wild type cells with the exception that the Michaelis-Menten constants are higher: Km = 1 millimolar and Vmax = 32 nanomoles per milligram of protein per hour. The possibility that these results are artifacts associated with use of cultured cells was checked by examining 86Rb+ uptake by roots of intact seedlings of wild type Arabidopsis. A single energy-dependent transport system is found with Km = 0.42 millimolar which is not significantly different from the Km of cultured cells. There is also energy-independent uptake at high external ion concentration. PMID:16660969

  4. A bioluminescent assay for measuring glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Valley, Michael P; Karassina, Natasha; Aoyama, Natsuyo; Carlson, Coby; Cali, James J; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2016-07-15

    Identifying activators and inhibitors of glucose uptake is critical for both diabetes management and anticancer therapy. To facilitate such studies, easy-to-use nonradioactive assays are desired. Here we describe a bioluminescent glucose uptake assay for measuring glucose transport in cells. The assay is based on the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and the enzymatic detection of the 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate that accumulates. Uptake can be measured from a variety of cell types, it can be inhibited by known glucose transporter inhibitors, and the bioluminescent assay yields similar results when compared with the radioactive method. With HCT 116 cells, glucose uptake can be detected in as little as 5000 cells and remains linear up to 50,000 cells with signal-to-background values ranging from 5 to 45. The assay can be used to screen for glucose transporter inhibitors, or by multiplexing with viability readouts, changes in glucose uptake can be differentiated from overall effects on cell health. The assay also can provide a relevant end point for measuring insulin sensitivity. With adipocytes and myotubes, insulin-dependent increases in glucose uptake have been measured with 10- and 2-fold assay windows, respectively. Significant assay signals of 2-fold or more have also been measured with human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes and skeletal myoblasts. PMID:27130501

  5. Inhibition of protein kinase C decreases sensitivity of GABA receptor subtype to fipronil insecticide in insect neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Laurence; Hamon, Alain; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Itier, Valérie; Quinchard, Sophie; Lapied, Bruno

    2011-12-01

    Phosphorylation by serine/threonine kinases has been described as a new mechanism for regulating the effects of insecticides on insect neuronal receptors and channels. Although insect GABA receptors are commercially important targets for insecticides (e.g. fipronil), their modulation by kinases is poorly understood and the influence of phosphorylation on insecticide sensitivity is unknown. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the modulatory effect of PKC and CaMKinase II on GABA receptor subtypes (GABAR1 and GABAR2) in DUM neurons isolated from the terminal abdominal ganglion (TAG) of Periplaneta americana. Chloride currents through GABAR2 were selectively abolished by PMA and PDBu (the PKC activators) and potentiated by Gö6983, an inhibitor of PKC. Furthermore, using KN-62, a specific CaMKinase II inhibitor, we demonstrated that CaMKinase II activation was also involved in the regulation of GABAR2 function. In addition, using CdCl(2) (the calcium channel blocker) and LOE-908, a blocker of TRPγ, we revealed that calcium influx through TRPγ played an important role in kinase activations. Comparative studies performed with CACA, a selective agonist of GABAR1 in DUM neurons confirmed the involvement of these kinases in the specific regulation of GABAR2. Furthermore, our study reported that GABAR1 was less sensitive than GABAR2 to fipronil. This was demonstrated by the biphasic concentration-response curve and the current-voltage relationship established with both GABA and CACA. Finally, we demonstrated that GABAR2 was 10-fold less sensitive to fipronil following inhibition of PKC, whereas inhibition of CaMKinase II did not alter the effect of fipronil. PMID:21684305

  6. Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectroscopy of Intra-Vesicular Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luke Y.-J.; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under 1H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall. PMID:24109882

  7. The GABA system in schizophrenia: cells, molecules and microcircuitry.

    PubMed

    Benes, Francine M

    2015-09-01

    This is an overview of several papers that have been published in the Special Issue of Schizophrenia Research entitled The GABA System in Schizophrenia: Cells, Molecules and Microcircuitry. This issue presents a broad range of original reports and scholarly reviews regarding recent progress in studies of neural circuitry in corticolimbic brain regions in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26255083

  8. Single rodent mesohabenular axons release glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Root, David H.; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Huiling; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is involved in reward, aversion, addiction, and depression, through descending interactions with several brain structures, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA provides reciprocal inputs to LHb, but their actions are unclear. Here we show that the majority of rat and mouse VTA neurons innervating LHb co-express markers for both glutamate-signaling (vesicular glutamate transporter 2, VGluT2) and GABA-signaling (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD; and vesicular GABA transporter, VGaT). A single axon from these mesohabenular neurons co-expresses VGluT2-protein and VGaT-protein, and surprisingly establishes symmetric and asymmetric synapses on LHb neurons. In LHb slices, light activation of mesohabenular fibers expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) driven by VGluT2 or VGaT promoters elicits release of both glutamate and GABA onto single LHb neurons. In vivo light-activation of mesohabenular terminals inhibits or excites LHb neurons. Our findings reveal an unanticipated type of VTA neuron that co-transmits glutamate and GABA, and provides the majority of mesohabenular inputs. PMID:25242304

  9. Novel functions of GABA signaling in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Adalto; Zhang, Yonggang; Hu, Wenhui

    2013-10-01

    Neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutiric acid (GABA) through ionotropic GABAA and metabotropic GABAB receptors plays key roles in modulating the development, plasticity and function of neuronal networks. GABA is inhibitory in mature neurons but excitatory in immature neurons, neuroblasts and neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs). The switch from excitatory to inhibitory occurs following the development of glutamatergic synaptic input and results from the dynamic changes in the expression of Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter NKCC1 driving Cl(-) influx and neuron-specific K(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter KCC2 driving Cl(-) efflux. The developmental transition of KCC2 expression is regulated by Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. The excitatory GABA signaling during early neurogenesis is important to the activity/experience-induced regulation of NSC quiescence, NPC proliferation, neuroblast migration and newborn neuronal maturation/functional integration. The inhibitory GABA signaling allows for the sparse and static functional networking essential for learning/memory development and maintenance. PMID:24285940

  10. Novel functions of GABA signaling in adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    PONTES, Adalto; ZHANG, Yonggang; HU, Wenhui

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutiric acid (GABA) through ionotropic GABAA and metabotropic GABAB receptors plays key roles in modulating the development, plasticity and function of neuronal networks. GABA is inhibitory in mature neurons but excitatory in immature neurons, neuroblasts and neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs). The switch from excitatory to inhibitory occurs following the development of glutamatergic synaptic input and results from the dynamic changes in the expression of Na+/K+/2Cl− co-transporter NKCC1 driving Cl− influx and neuron-specific K+/Cl− co-transporter KCC2 driving Cl− efflux. The developmental transition of KCC2 expression is regulated by Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. The excitatory GABA signaling during early neurogenesis is important to the activity/experience-induced regulation of NSC quiescence, NPC proliferation, neuroblast migration and newborn neuronal maturation/functional integration. The inhibitory GABA signaling allows for the sparse and static functional networking essential for learning/memory development and maintenance. PMID:24285940

  11. Role of proline and GABA in sexual reproduction of angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Biancucci, Marco; Mattioli, Roberto; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar; Costantino, Paolo; Trovato, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Two glutamate derivatives, proline and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), appear to play pivotal roles in different aspects of sexual reproduction in angiosperms, although their precise function in plant reproduction and the molecular basis of their action are not yet fully understood. Proline and GABA have long been regarded as pivotal amino acids in pollen vitality and fertility. Proline may constitute up to 70% of the free amino acid pool in pollen grains and it has been recently shown that Arabidopsis mutants affected in the first and rate-limiting step in proline synthesis produce aberrant and infertile pollen grains, indicating that proline synthesis is required for pollen development and fertility. Concerning GABA, a large body of evidence points to this glutamate derivative as a key determinant of post-pollination fertilization. Intriguingly, proline has also been associated with pollination, another aspect of sexual reproduction, since honeybees were reported to show a strong preference for proline-enriched nectars. In this review, we survey current knowledge on the roles of proline and GABA in plant fertility, and discuss future perspectives potentially capable to improve our understanding on the functions of these amino acids in pollen development, pollination, and pollen tube guidance. PMID:26388884

  12. Role of proline and GABA in sexual reproduction of angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Biancucci, Marco; Mattioli, Roberto; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar; Costantino, Paolo; Trovato, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Two glutamate derivatives, proline and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), appear to play pivotal roles in different aspects of sexual reproduction in angiosperms, although their precise function in plant reproduction and the molecular basis of their action are not yet fully understood. Proline and GABA have long been regarded as pivotal amino acids in pollen vitality and fertility. Proline may constitute up to 70% of the free amino acid pool in pollen grains and it has been recently shown that Arabidopsis mutants affected in the first and rate-limiting step in proline synthesis produce aberrant and infertile pollen grains, indicating that proline synthesis is required for pollen development and fertility. Concerning GABA, a large body of evidence points to this glutamate derivative as a key determinant of post-pollination fertilization. Intriguingly, proline has also been associated with pollination, another aspect of sexual reproduction, since honeybees were reported to show a strong preference for proline-enriched nectars. In this review, we survey current knowledge on the roles of proline and GABA in plant fertility, and discuss future perspectives potentially capable to improve our understanding on the functions of these amino acids in pollen development, pollination, and pollen tube guidance. PMID:26388884

  13. Action of tremorgenic mycotoxins on GABA/sub A/ receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gant, D.B.; Cole, R.J.; Valdes, J.J.; Eldefrawi, M.E.; Eldefrawi, A.T.

    1987-11-09

    The effects of four tremorgenic and one nontremorgenic mycotoxins were studied on ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA/sub A/) receptor binding and function in rat brain and on binding of a voltage-operated Cl/sup -/ channel in Torpedo electric organ. None of the mycotoxins had significant effect on (/sup 3/H)muscimol or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding to the GAMA/sup A/ receptor. However, only the four tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibited GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx and (/sup 35/S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ((/sup 35/S)TBPS) binding in rate brain membranes, while the nontremorgenic verruculotoxin had no effect. Inhibition of (/sup 35/S)TBPS binding by paspalinine was non-competitive. This suggests that tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibit GABA/sub A/ receptor function by binding close to the receptor's Cl/sup -/ channel. On the voltage-operated Cl/sup -/ channel, only high concentrations of verruculogen and verruculotoxin caused significant inhibition of the channel's binding of (/sup 35/S)TBPS. The data suggest that the tremorgenic action of these mycotoxins may be due in part to their inhibition of GABA/sub A/ receptor function. 21 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  14. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Joseph E; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE) neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL) activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies. PMID:24551133

  15. Nitrite Uptake into Intact Pea Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Brunswick, Pamela; Cresswell, Christopher F.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between net nitrite uptake and its reduction in intact pea chloroplasts was investigated employing electron transport regulators, uncouplers, and photophosphorylation inhibitors. Observations confirmed the dependence of nitrite uptake on stromal pH and nitrite reduction but also suggested a partial dependance upon PSI phosphorylation. It was also suggested that ammonia stimulates nitrogen assimilation in the dark by association with stromal protons. Inhibition of nitrite uptake by N-ethylmaleimide and dinitrofluorobenzene could not be completely attributed to their inhibition of carbon dioxide fixation. Other protein binding reagents which inhibited photosynthesis showed no effect on nitrite uptake, except for p-chlormercuribenzoate which stimulated nitrite uptake. The results with N-ethylmaleimide and dinitrofluorobenzene tended to support the proposed presence of a protein permeation channel for nitrite uptake in addition to HNO2 penetration. On the basis of a lack of effect by known anion uptake inhibitors, it was concluded that the nitrite uptake mechanism was distinct from that of phosphate and chloride/sulfate transport. PMID:16665917

  16. GABA(B) receptor subunit 1 binds to proteins affected in 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zunner, Dagmar; Deschermeier, Christina; Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2010-03-01

    GABA(B) receptors mediate slow inhibitory effects of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. They function as heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors composed of the seven-transmembrane domain proteins GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), which are linked through a coiled-coil interaction. The ligand-binding subunit GABA(B1) is at first retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and is transported to the cell surface only upon assembly with GABA(B2). Here, we report that GABA(B1), via the coiled-coil domain, can also bind to soluble proteins of unknown function, that are affected in 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome and are therefore referred to as DiGeorge critical region 6 (DGCR6). In transfected neurons the GABA(B1)-DGCR6 association resulted in a redistribution of both proteins into intracellular clusters. Furthermore, the C-terminus of GABA(B2) interfered with the novel interaction, consistent with heterodimer formation overriding transient DGCR6-binding to GABA(B1). Thus, sequential coiled-coil interactions may direct GABA(B1) into functional receptors. PMID:20036641

  17. Fast detection of extrasynaptic GABA with a whole-cell sniffer

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Rasmus K.; Petersen, Anders V.; Schmitt, Nicole; Perrier, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory transmitter of the brain. It operates by binding to specific receptors located both inside and outside synapses. The extrasynaptic receptors are activated by spillover from GABAergic synapses and by ambient GABA in the extracellular space. Ambient GABA is essential for adjusting the excitability of neurons. However, due to the lack of suitable methods, little is known about its dynamics. Here we describe a new technique that allows detection of GABA transients and measurement of the steady state GABA concentration with high spatial and temporal resolution. We used a human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell line that stably expresses GABAA receptors composed of α1, β2, and γ2 subunits. We recorded from such a HEK cell with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The presence of GABA near the HEK cell generated a measurable electric current whose magnitude increased with concentration. A fraction of the current did not inactivate during prolonged exposition to GABA. This technique, which we refer to as a “sniffer” allows the measurement of ambient GABA concentration inside nervous tissue with a resolution of few tens of nanomolars. In addition, the sniffer detects variations in the extrasynaptic GABA concentration with millisecond time resolution. Pilot experiments demonstrate that the sniffer is able to report spillover of GABA induced by synaptic activation in real time. This is the first report on a GABA sensor that combines the ability to detect fast transients and to measure steady concentrations. PMID:24860433

  18. Are presynaptic GABA-Cρ2 receptors involved in anti-nociception?

    PubMed

    Tadavarty, R; Hwang, J; Rajput, P S; Soja, P J; Kumar, U; Sastry, B R

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the anti-nociceptive effects of GABA-C receptors in the central nervous system. Intracisternal injection of CACA, a GABA-C receptor agonist or isoguvacine, a GABA-A receptor agonist, significantly increased the tail-withdrawal latency. TPMPA, a GABA-C receptor antagonist blocked the effects of CACA but not isoguvacine indicating that GABA-C receptors are involved in regulating pain. Further, double-labelled immunofluorescence studies revealed that GABA-Cρ2 receptors are expressed presynaptically in the spinal dorsal horn, especially, substantia gelatinosa, a region that has been previously implicated in analgesia by regulating nociceptive inflow. These data provide a provenance for future work looking at presynaptic spinal GABA-C receptors in the control of nociception. PMID:26327143

  19. Local GABA Concentration Predicts Perceptual Improvements After Repetitive Sensory Stimulation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Heba, Stefanie; Puts, Nicolaas A. J.; Kalisch, Tobias; Glaubitz, Benjamin; Haag, Lauren M.; Lenz, Melanie; Dinse, Hubert R.; Edden, Richard A. E.; Tegenthoff, Martin; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Learning mechanisms are based on synaptic plasticity processes. Numerous studies on synaptic plasticity suggest that the regulation of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays a central role maintaining the delicate balance of inhibition and excitation. However, in humans, a link between learning outcome and GABA levels has not been shown so far. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of GABA prior to and after repetitive tactile stimulation, we show here that baseline GABA+ levels predict changes in perceptual outcome. Although no net changes in GABA+ are observed, the GABA+ concentration prior to intervention explains almost 60% of the variance in learning outcome. Our data suggest that behavioral effects can be predicted by baseline GABA+ levels, which provide new insights into the role of inhibitory mechanisms during perceptual learning. PMID:26637451

  20. The endogenous GABA bioactivity of camel, bovine, goat and human milks.

    PubMed

    Limon, Agenor; Gallegos-Perez, Jose-Luis; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge M; Aljohi, Mohammad A; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Miledi, Ricardo

    2014-02-15

    GABA orally administered has several beneficial effects on health, including the regulation of hyperglycaemic states in humans. Those effects are similar to the effects reported for camel milk (CMk); however, it is not known whether compounds with GABAergic activity are present in milk from camels or other species. We determined CMk free-GABA concentration by LS/MS and its bioactivity on human GABA receptors. We found that camel and goat milks have significantly more bioavailable GABA than cow and human milks and are able to activate GABAρ receptors. The relationship between GABA and taurine concentrations suggests that whole camel milk may be more efficient to activate GABAρ1 receptors than goat milk. Because GABAρ receptors are normally found in enteroendocrine cells in the lumen of the digestive tract, these results suggest that GABA in camel and goat milk may participate in GABA-modulated functions of enteroendocrine cells in the GI lumen. PMID:24128504

  1. The role of GABA in the regulation of GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Miho; Fukuda, Atsuo; Nabekura, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons form the final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) has long been implicated as one of the major players in the regulation of GnRH neurons. Although GABA is typically an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature adult central nervous system, most mature GnRH neurons show the unusual characteristic of being excited by GABA. While many reports have provided much insight into the contribution of GABA to the activity of GnRH neurons, the precise physiological role of the excitatory action of GABA on GnRH neurons remains elusive. This brief review presents the current knowledge of the role of GABA signaling in GnRH neuronal activity. We also discuss the modulation of GABA signaling by neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and the functional consequence of GABAergic inputs to GnRH neurons in both the physiology and pathology of reproduction. PMID:25506316

  2. Prefrontal Cortical GABA Modulation of Spatial Reference and Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Meagan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysfunction in prefrontal cortex (PFC) GABA transmission has been proposed to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia, yet how this system regulates different cognitive and mnemonic functions remains unclear. Methods: We assessed the effects of pharmacological reduction of GABAA signaling in the medial PFC of rats on spatial reference/working memory using different versions of the radial-arm maze task. We used a massed-trials procedure to probe how PFC GABA regulates susceptibility to proactive interference. Male rats were well-trained to retrieve food from the same 4 arms of an 8-arm maze, receiving 5 trials/day (1–2min intervals). Results: Infusions of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (12.5–50ng) markedly increased working and reference memory errors and response latencies. Similar treatments also impaired short-term memory on an 8-baited arm task. These effects did not appear to be due to increased susceptibility to proactive interference. In contrast, PFC inactivation via infusion of GABA agonists baclofen/muscimol did not affect reference/working memory. In comparison to the pronounced effects on the 8-arm maze tasks, PFC GABAA antagonism only causes a slight and transient decrease in accuracy on a 2-arm spatial discrimination. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that prefrontal GABA hypofunction severely disrupts spatial reference and short-term memory and that disinhibition of the PFC can, in some instances, perturb memory processes not normally dependent on the frontal lobes. Moreover, these impairments closely resemble those observed in schizophrenic patients, suggesting that perturbation in PFC GABA signaling may contribute to these types of cognitive deficits associated with the disorder. PMID:25552433

  3. Allosteric modulation of retinal GABA receptors by ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Cecilia I.; Vickers, Evan; Moraga Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.; von Gersdorff, Henrique; Calvo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA and GABAC) belong to the cys-loop receptor family of ligand-gated ion channels. GABAC receptors are highly expressed in the retina, mainly localized at the axon terminals of bipolar cells. Ascorbic acid, an endogenous redox agent, modulates the function of diverse proteins, and basal levels of ascorbic acid in the retina are very high. However, the effect of ascorbic acid on retinal GABA receptors has not been studied. Here we show that the function of GABAC and GABAA receptors is regulated by ascorbic acid. Patch-clamp recordings from bipolar cell terminals in goldfish retinal slices revealed that GABAC receptor-mediated currents activated by tonic background levels of extracellular GABA, and GABAC currents elicited by local GABA puffs, are both significantly enhanced by ascorbic acid. In addition, a significant rundown of GABA-puff evoked currents was observed in the absence of ascorbic acid. GABA-evoked Cl- currents mediated by homomeric ρ1 GABAC receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were also potentiated by ascorbic acid in a concentration-dependent, stereospecific, reversible, and voltage-independent manner. Studies involving the chemical modification of sulfhydryl groups showed that the two cys-loop cysteines and histidine 141, all located in the ρ1 subunit extracellular domain, each play a key role in the modulation of GABAC receptors by ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that retinal GABAA IPSCs and heterologously expressed GABAA receptor currents are similarly augmented by ascorbic acid. Our results suggest that ascorbic acid may act as an endogenous agent capable of potentiating GABAergic neurotransmission in the CNS. PMID:21715633

  4. Polyamine Uptake in Carrot Cell Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Pistocchi, Rossella; Bagni, Nello; Creus, José A.

    1987-01-01

    Putrescine and spermidine uptake into carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells in culture was studied. The time course of uptake showed that the two polyamines were very quickly transported into the cells, reaching a maximum absorption within 1 minute. Increasing external polyamine concentrations up to 100 millimolar showed the existence of a biphasic system with different affinities at low and high polyamine concentrations. The cellular localization of absorbed polyamines was such that a greater amount of putrescine was present in the cytoplasmic soluble fraction, while spermidine was mostly present in cell walls. The absorbed polyamines were released into the medium in the presence of increasing external concentrations of the corresponding polyamine or Ca2+. The effects of Ca2+ were different for putrescine and spermidine; putrescine uptake was slightly stimulated by 10 micromolar Ca2+ and inhibited by higher concentrations, while for spermidine uptake there was an increasing stimulation in the Ca2+ concentration range between 10 micromolar and 1 millimolar. La3+ nullified the stimulatory effect of 10 micromolar Ca2+ on putrescine uptake and that of 1 millimolar Ca2+ on spermidine uptake. La3+ at 0.5 to 1 millimolar markedly inhibited the uptake of both polyamines, suggesting that it interferes with the sites of polyamine uptake. Putrescine uptake was affected to a lesser extent by metabolic inhibitors than was spermidine uptake. It is proposed that the entry of polyamines into the cells is driven by the transmembrane electrical gradient, with a possible antiport mechanism between external and internal polyamine molecule. PMID:16665446

  5. Opioid systems in the lateral hypothalamus regulate feeding behavior through orexin and GABA neurons.

    PubMed

    Ardianto, C; Yonemochi, N; Yamamoto, S; Yang, L; Takenoya, F; Shioda, S; Nagase, H; Ikeda, H; Kamei, J

    2016-04-21

    The hypothalamus controls feeding behavior. Since central opioid systems may regulate feeding behavior, we examined the role of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), the hunger center, in feeding behavior of mice. Non-selective (naloxone; 3 mg/kg, s.c.) and selective μ- (β-funaltrexamine, β-FNA; 10 mg/kg, s.c.), δ- (naltrindole; 3 mg/kg, s.c.) and κ- (norbinaltorphimine, norBNI; 20 mg/kg, s.c.) opioid receptor antagonists significantly decreased food intake in food-deprived mice. The injection of naloxone (20 μg/side) into the LH significantly decreased food intake whereas the injection of naloxone (20 μg/side) outside of the LH did not affect food intake. The injection of β-FNA (2 μg/side), naltrindole (1 μg/side) or norBNI (2 μg/side) into the LH significantly decreased food intake. Furthermore, all these antagonists significantly decreased the mRNA level of preproorexin, but not those of other hypothalamic neuropeptides. In addition, the injection of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (5 μg/side) into the LH significantly decreased food intake, and this effect was abolished by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (50 μg/side). Muscimol (1mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the mRNA level of preproorexin in the hypothalamus. Naloxone (3mg/kg, s.c.) significantly increased the GABA level in the LH and both bicuculline and the GABA release inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MP, 5 μg/side) attenuated the inhibitory effect of naloxone on feeding behavior. 3-MP also attenuated the effects of β-FNA and norBNI, but not that of naltrindole. These results show that opioid systems in the LH regulate feeding behavior through orexin neurons. Moreover, μ- and κ-, but not δ-, opioid receptor antagonists inhibit feeding behavior by activating GABA neurons in the LH. PMID:26855191

  6. Insecticidal 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides specifically bind with high affinity to a novel allosteric site in housefly GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Kita, Tomo; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Nakao, Toshifumi; Sato, Kazuyuki; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABARs) are an important target for existing insecticides such as fiproles. These insecticides act as noncompetitive antagonists (channel blockers) for insect GABARs by binding to a site within the intrinsic channel of the GABAR. Recently, a novel class of insecticides, 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides (BPBs), was shown to inhibit GABARs by binding to a site distinct from the site for fiproles. We examined the binding site of BPBs in the adult housefly by means of radioligand-binding and electrophysiological experiments. 3-Benzamido-N-(2,6-dimethyl-4-perfluoroisopropylphenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (BPB 1) (the N-demethyl BPB) was a partial, but potent, inhibitor of [(3)H]4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate (GABA channel blocker) binding to housefly head membranes, whereas the 3-(N-methyl)benzamido congener (the N-methyl BPB) had low or little activity. A total of 15 BPB analogs were tested for their abilities to inhibit [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to the head membranes. The N-demethyl analogs, known to be highly effective insecticides, potently inhibited the [(3)H]BPB 1 binding, but the N-methyl analogs did not even though they, too, are considered highly effective. [(3)H]BPB 1 equally bound to the head membranes from wild-type and dieldrin-resistant (rdl mutant) houseflies. GABA allosterically inhibited [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. By contrast, channel blocker-type antagonists enhanced [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to housefly head membranes by increasing the affinity of BPB 1. Antiparasitic macrolides, such as ivermectin B1a, were potent inhibitors of [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. BPB 1 inhibited GABA-induced currents in housefly GABARs expressed in Xenopus oocytes, whereas it failed to inhibit l-glutamate-induced currents in inhibitory l-glutamate receptors. Overall, these findings indicate that BPBs act at a novel allosteric site that is different from the site for channel blocker-type antagonists and that is probably overlapped with the site for macrolides

  7. Targeted Deletion of Vesicular GABA Transporter from Retinal Horizontal Cells Eliminates Feedback Modulation of Photoreceptor Calcium Channels123

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue; Boulter, Jim; Grove, James; Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cellular mechanisms underlying feedback signaling from horizontal cells to photoreceptors, which are important for the formation of receptive field surrounds of early visual neurons, remain unsettled. Mammalian horizontal cells express a complement of synaptic proteins that are necessary and sufficient for calcium-dependent exocytosis of inhibitory neurotransmitters at their contacts with photoreceptor terminals, suggesting that they are capable of releasing GABA via vesicular release. To test whether horizontal cell vesicular release is involved in feedback signaling, we perturbed inhibitory neurotransmission in these cells by targeted deletion of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT), the protein responsible for the uptake of inhibitory transmitter by synaptic vesicles. To manipulate horizontal cells selectively, an iCre mouse line with Cre recombinase expression controlled by connexin57 (Cx57) regulatory elements was generated. In Cx57-iCre mouse retina, only horizontal cells expressed Cre protein, and its expression occurred in all retinal regions. After crossing with a VGATflox/flox mouse line, VGAT was selectively eliminated from horizontal cells, which was confirmed immunohistochemically. Voltage-gated ion channel currents in horizontal cells of Cx57-VGAT−/− mice were the same as Cx57-VGAT+/+ controls, as were the cell responses to the ionotropic glutamate receptor agonist kainate, but the response to the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol in Cx57-VGAT−/− mice was larger. In contrast, the feedback inhibition of photoreceptor calcium channels, which in control animals is induced by horizontal cell depolarization, was completely absent in Cx57-VGAT−/− mice. The results suggest that vesicular release of GABA from horizontal cells is required for feedback inhibition of photoreceptors. PMID:27022629

  8. Targeted Deletion of Vesicular GABA Transporter from Retinal Horizontal Cells Eliminates Feedback Modulation of Photoreceptor Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Arlene A; Liu, Xue; Boulter, Jim; Grove, James; Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C

    2016-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying feedback signaling from horizontal cells to photoreceptors, which are important for the formation of receptive field surrounds of early visual neurons, remain unsettled. Mammalian horizontal cells express a complement of synaptic proteins that are necessary and sufficient for calcium-dependent exocytosis of inhibitory neurotransmitters at their contacts with photoreceptor terminals, suggesting that they are capable of releasing GABA via vesicular release. To test whether horizontal cell vesicular release is involved in feedback signaling, we perturbed inhibitory neurotransmission in these cells by targeted deletion of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT), the protein responsible for the uptake of inhibitory transmitter by synaptic vesicles. To manipulate horizontal cells selectively, an iCre mouse line with Cre recombinase expression controlled by connexin57 (Cx57) regulatory elements was generated. In Cx57-iCre mouse retina, only horizontal cells expressed Cre protein, and its expression occurred in all retinal regions. After crossing with a VGAT(flox/flox) mouse line, VGAT was selectively eliminated from horizontal cells, which was confirmed immunohistochemically. Voltage-gated ion channel currents in horizontal cells of Cx57-VGAT(-/-) mice were the same as Cx57-VGAT(+/+) controls, as were the cell responses to the ionotropic glutamate receptor agonist kainate, but the response to the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol in Cx57-VGAT(-/-) mice was larger. In contrast, the feedback inhibition of photoreceptor calcium channels, which in control animals is induced by horizontal cell depolarization, was completely absent in Cx57-VGAT(-/-) mice. The results suggest that vesicular release of GABA from horizontal cells is required for feedback inhibition of photoreceptors. PMID:27022629

  9. GABA transporters control GABAergic neurotransmission in the mouse subplate.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, P; Kirischuk, S; Luhmann, H J

    2015-09-24

    The subplate is a transient layer between the cortical plate and intermediate zone in the developing cortex. Thalamo-cortical axons form temporary synapses on subplate neurons (SPns) before invading the cortical plate. Neuronal activity within the subplate is of critical importance for the development of neocortical circuits and architecture. Although both glutamatergic and GABAergic inputs on SPns were reported, short-term plasticity of GABAergic transmission has not been investigated yet. GABAergic postsynaptic currents (GPSCs) were recorded from SPns in coronal neocortical slices prepared from postnatal day 3-4 mice using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Evoked GPSCs (eGPSCs) elicited by electrical paired-pulse stimulation demonstrated paired-pulse depression at all interstimulus intervals tested. Baclofen, a specific GABAB receptor (GABABR) agonist, reduced eGPSC amplitudes and increased paired-pulse ratio (PPR), suggesting presynaptic location of functional GABABRs. Baclofen-induced effects were alleviated by (2S)-3-[[(1S)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino-2-hydroxypropyl](phenylmethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP55845), a selective GABABR blocker. Moreover, CGP55845 increased eGPSC amplitudes and decreased PPR even under control conditions, indicating that GABABRs are tonically activated by ambient GABA. Because extracellular GABA concentration is mainly regulated by GABA transporters (GATs), we asked whether GATs release GABA. 1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-[2-[[(diphenylmethylene)amino]oxy]ethyl]-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid (NNC-711) (10μM), a selective GAT-1 blocker, increased eGPSC decay time, decreased eGPSC amplitudes and PPR. The two last effects but not the first one were blocked by CGP55845, indicating that GAT-1 blockade causes an elevation of extracellular GABA concentration and in turn activation of extrasynaptic GABAARs and presynaptic GABABRs. 1-[2-[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]ethyl]-(S)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid (SNAP-5114), a specific GAT-2/3 blocker, failed

  10. A GABA-activated chloride-conductance not blocked by picrotoxin on spiny lobster neuromuscular preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, J.; Lingle, C. J.; Marder, E.; O'Neil, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    Conductance increases to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were recorded in the gm6b and opener muscle of the spiny lobsters, Panulirus interruptus and P. argus. GABA-evoked responses were insensitive to picrotoxin at concentrations as high as 5 X 10(-5) M. Some blockade by picrotoxin was observed at higher concentrations. In normal physiological saline, the reversal potential of the Panulirus GABA-induced response was near the resting potential. The reversal potential was unaffected by reductions in sodium and calcium. Reduction of chloride by 50% resulted in a greater than 10 mV shift in the reversal potential of the GABA-induced response. Muscimol was able to mimic the action of GABA while baclofen was without effect. Bicuculline was a weak blocker. Avermectin B1a irreversibly increased the chloride permeability of the gm6b membrane. This conductance increase was blocked by picrotoxin over a range of concentrations similar to those required for blockade of the GABA-induced response. GABA-induced responses of the gm6b muscle of Homarus americanus were blocked almost completely by picrotoxin 10(-6) M. Sensitivity to picrotoxin is not invariably associated with GABA-activated chloride-mediated conductance increases. It is suggested that alteration in the binding-site for picrotoxin on the GABA-activated chloride-ion channel does not change other functional characteristics of the GABA-induced response. PMID:3708210