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Sample records for gain transient control

  1. Gain transient control for wavelength division multiplexed access networks using semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbon, T. B.; Osadchiy, A. V.; Kjær, R.; Jensen, J. B.; Monroy, I. Tafur

    2009-06-01

    Gain transients can severely hamper the upstream network performance in wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) access networks featuring erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) or Raman amplification. We experimentally demonstrate for the first time using 10 Gb/s fiber transmission bit error rate measurements how a near-saturated semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) can be used to control these gain transients. An SOA is shown to reduce the penalty of transients originating in an EDFA from 2.3 dB to 0.2 dB for 10 Gb/s transmission over standard single mode fiber using a 2 31-1 PRBS pattern. The results suggest that a single SOA integrated within a WDM receiver at the metro node could offer a convenient all-optical solution for upstream transient control in WDM access networks.

  2. Digital automatic gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzdy, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Performance analysis, used to evaluated fitness of several circuits to digital automatic gain control (AGC), indicates that digital integrator employing coherent amplitude detector (CAD) is best device suited for application. Circuit reduces gain error to half that of conventional analog AGC while making it possible to automatically modify response of receiver to match incoming signal conditions.

  3. Helicopter high gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, T. B.; Nunn, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    High gain control is explored through a design study of the CH-47B helicopter. The plans are designed to obtain the maximum bandwidth possible given the hardware constraints. Controls are designed with modal control theory to specific bandwidths and closed loop mode shapes. Comparisons are made to an earlier complementary filter approach. Bandwidth improvement by removal of limitations is explored in order to establish hardware and mechanization options. Improvements in the pitch axis control system and in the rate gyro sensor noise characteristics in all axes are discussed. The use of rotor state feedback is assessed.

  4. Cochlear gain control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Marcel

    2005-03-01

    The nonlinear auditory phenomena of compression, suppression, and distortion are known to have a cochlear-mechanical origin. An instantaneous nonlinear transfer function is often assumed to underlie these phenomena, but there are experimental indications that auditory nonlinearity is sluggish rather than instantaneous. This study analyzes the consequences of such sluggishness, using automatic gain control (AGC) as a model noninstantaneous nonlinearity. The distinctive characteristic of AGC, its delayed action, is shown to produce a number of observable and measurable effects that distinguish AGC from instantaneous nonlinearities. A major class of such AGC-specific effects concerns the phase of aural distortion products. For example, the phase of the cancellation tone in the classical psychoacoustic cancellation paradigm is linearly related to the frequency spacing of the primary tones in an AGC, as opposed to the square-law relationship produced by an instantaneous nonlinearity. These and other predictions are confronted with experimental data from the literature. The impact of putative AGC-related delays on the interpretation of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) is discussed. Detailed suggestions are made for experiments specifically aimed at determining whether cochlear nonlinearity is instantaneous or delayed. .

  5. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A commutated automatic gain control system (AGC) was designed and constructed for the prototype Loran C receiver. The AGC is designed to improve the signal-to-signal ratio of the received Loran signals. The AGC design does not require any analog to digital conversion and it utilizes commonly available components. The AGC consists of: (1) a circuit which samples the peak of the envelope of the Loran signal to obtain an AGC voltage for each of three Loran stations, (2) a dc gain circuit to control the overall gain of the AGC system, and (3) an AGC amplification of the input RF signal. The performance of the AGC system was observed in bench and flight tests; it has improved the overall accuracy of the receiver. Improvements in the accuracy of the time difference calculations to within approx. + or - 1.5 microseconds of the observed time differnces for a given position are reported.

  6. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The commutated automatic gain control (AGC) system was designed and built for the prototype Loran-C receiver is discussed. The current version of the prototype receiver, the Mini L-80, was tested initially in 1980. The receiver uses a super jolt microcomputer to control a memory aided phase loop (MAPLL). The microcomputer also controls the input/output, latitude/longitude conversion, and the recently added AGC system. The AGC control adjusts the level of each station signal, such that the early portion of each envelope rise is about at the same amplitude in the receiver envelope detector.

  7. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A commutated automatic gain control (AGC) system was designed and built for a prototype Loran C receiver. The receiver uses a microcomputer to control a memory aided phase-locked loop (MAPLL). The microcomputer also controls the input/output, latitude/longitude conversion, and the recently added AGC system. The circuit designed for the AGC is described, and bench and flight test results are presented. The AGC circuit described actually samples starting at a point 40 microseconds after a zero crossing determined by the software lock pulse ultimately generated by a 30 microsecond delay and add network in the receiver front end envelope detector.

  8. Transient upsets in microprocessor controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. E.; Masson, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    The modeling and analysis of transient faults in microprocessor based controllers are discussed. Such controllers typically consist of a microprocessor, read only memory storing and application program, random access memory for data storage, and input/output devices for external communications. The effects of transient faults on the performance of the controller are reviewed. An instruction level perspective of performance is taken which is the basis of a useful high level program state description of the microprocessor controller. A transition matrix is defined which determines the controller's response to transient fault arrivals.

  9. Decision-directed automatic gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, W. J., III

    1979-01-01

    Logic circuitry determines whether gain fluctuation are result of signal-strength changes or of atypical strings of like data symbols. Automatic Gain Control (AGC) system provides tight control that is independent of short-term, average, received signal energy and has negligible degrading effect on probability of error for signal.

  10. Nonreciprocal gain control for ring laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dueker, G.; Lee, P.

    1967-01-01

    Nonreciprocal gain control is used in a ring laser where the two contracirculating beams may have differing intensities because of the residual Faraday rotation and other secondary nonreciprocal effects.

  11. Transient-gain photoionization x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weninger, Clemens; Rohringer, Nina

    2014-12-01

    We present a generalized theory based on one-dimensional Maxwell-Bloch equations to study the amplification process of an inner-shell photoionization-pumped atomic x-ray laser. Focusing an x-ray free-electron laser beam in an elongated neon-gas target results in a strong exponential amplification of K α fluorescence, as recently demonstrated [N. Rohringer et al., Nature (London) 481, 488 (2012), 10.1038/nature10721; C. Weninger et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 233902 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.233902]. Here, we present an in-depth theoretical study of the amplification process that goes beyond the previous theory based on a rate-equation approach. We study the evolution of the pulse characteristics during the amplification process for transform-limited Gaussian and broadband self-amplified spontaneous-emission pump pulses. We discuss the impact of the gain-dependent group velocity on the emitted x-ray radiation and the resulting gain-guiding effects. A thorough analysis of the spectral and temporal properties of the emitted radiation is presented, including higher-order field-correlation functions, to characterize the ensemble of emitted x-ray pulses.

  12. Controlling gain one photon at a time

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Gregory W; Rieke, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is a salient property of sensory processing. All adaptational or gain control mechanisms face the challenge of obtaining a reliable estimate of the property of the input to be adapted to and obtaining this estimate sufficiently rapidly to be useful. Here, we explore how the primate retina balances the need to change gain rapidly and reliably when photons arrive rarely at individual rod photoreceptors. We find that the weakest backgrounds that decrease the gain of the retinal output signals are similar to those that increase human behavioral threshold, and identify a novel site of gain control in the retinal circuitry. Thus, surprisingly, the gain of retinal signals begins to decrease essentially as soon as background lights are detectable; under these conditions, gain control does not rely on a highly averaged estimate of the photon count, but instead signals from individual photon absorptions trigger changes in gain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00467.001 PMID:23682314

  13. Transient response characteristics in a biomolecular integral controller.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shaunak

    2016-04-01

    The cellular behaviour of perfect adaptation is achieved through the use of an integral control element in the underlying biomolecular circuit. It is generally unclear how integral action affects the important aspect of transient response in these biomolecular systems, especially in light of the fact that it typically deteriorates the transient response in engineering contexts. To address this issue, the authors investigated the transient response in a computational model of a simple biomolecular integral control system involved in bacterial signalling. They find that the transient response can actually speed up as the integral gain parameter increases. On further analysis, they find that the underlying dynamics are composed of slow and fast modes and the speed-up of the transient response is because of the speed-up of the slow-mode dynamics. Finally, they note how an increase in the integral gain parameter also leads to a decrease in the amplitude of the transient response, consistent with the overall improvement in the transient response. These results should be useful in understanding the overall effect of integral action on system dynamics, particularly for biomolecular systems. PMID:26997660

  14. Transient gain-absorption of the probe field in triple quantum dots coupled by double tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Wan, Ren-Gang; Zhao, Shuai; Wu, Hao; Shu, Shi-Li; Wang, Li-Jie; Tong, Cun-Zhu

    2016-06-01

    The transient gain-absorption property of the probe field in a linear triple quantum dots coupled by double tunneling is investigated. It is found that the additional tunneling can dramatically affect the transient behaviors under the transparency condition. The dependence of transient behaviors on other parameters, such as probe detuning, the pure dephasing decay rate of the quantum dots and the initial conditions of the population, are also discussed. The results can be explained by the properties of the dressed states generated by the additional tunneling. The scheme may have important application in quantum information network and communication.

  15. Adaptive gain control during human perceptual choice

    PubMed Central

    Cheadle, Samuel; Wyart, Valentin; Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Myers, Nicholas; de Gardelle, Vincent; Castañón, Santiago Herce; Summerfield, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Neural systems adapt to background levels of stimulation. Adaptive gain control has been extensively studied in sensory systems, but overlooked in decision-theoretic models. Here, we describe evidence for adaptive gain control during the serial integration of decision-relevant information. Human observers judged the average information provided by a rapid stream of visual events (samples). The impact that each sample wielded over choices depended on its consistency with the previous sample, with more consistent or expected samples wielding the greatest influence over choice. This bias was also visible in the encoding of decision information in pupillometric signals, and in cortical responses measured with functional neuroimaging. These data can be accounted for with a new serial sampling model in which the gain of information processing adapts rapidly to reflect the average of the available evidence. PMID:24656259

  16. LPV Controller Interpolation for Improved Gain-Scheduling Control Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Fen; Kim, SungWan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new gain-scheduling control design approach is proposed by combining LPV (linear parameter-varying) control theory with interpolation techniques. The improvement of gain-scheduled controllers can be achieved from local synthesis of Lyapunov functions and continuous construction of a global Lyapunov function by interpolation. It has been shown that this combined LPV control design scheme is capable of improving closed-loop performance derived from local performance improvement. The gain of the LPV controller will also change continuously across parameter space. The advantages of the newly proposed LPV control is demonstrated through a detailed AMB controller design example.

  17. Automatic Gain Control in Compact Spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Protopopov, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    An image intensifier installed in the optical path of a compact spectrometer may act not only as a fast gating unit, which is widely used for time-resolved measurements, but also as a variable attenuator-amplifier in a continuous wave mode. This opens the possibility of an automatic gain control, a new feature in spectroscopy. With it, the user is relieved from the necessity to manually adjust signal level at a certain value that it is done automatically by means of an electronic feedback loop. It is even more important that automatic gain control is done without changing exposure time, which is an additional benefit in time-resolved experiments. The concept, algorithm, design considerations, and experimental results are presented. PMID:26810181

  18. Transient period process control for continuous manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Nembhard, H.B.; Birge, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    We develop a multiple objective nonlinear control model to optimize decision variables for correlated process characteristics during a transient phase. Given a continuous manufacturing process we show how to use the model to improve operations from startup to the end of the transient period (when steady-state is reached). We also show how to identify the end of the transient period and compare performance using the model during steady-state to traditional SPC techniques that assume the process is in statistical control.

  19. Gain control in the sonar of odontocetes.

    PubMed

    Ya Supin, Alexander; Nachtigall, Paul E

    2013-06-01

    The sonar of odontocetes processes echo-signals within a wide range of echo levels. The level of echoes varies widely by tens of decibels depending on the level of the emitted sonar pulse, the target strength, the distance to the target, and the sound absorption by the water media. The auditory system of odontocetes must be capable of effective perception, analysis, and discrimination of echo-signals within all this variability. The sonar of odontocetes has several mechanisms to compensate for the echo-level variation (gain control). To date, several mechanisms of the biosonar gain control have been revealed in odontocetes: (1) adjustment of emitted sonar pulse levels (the longer the distance to the target, the higher the level of the emitted pulse), (2) short-term variation of hearing sensitivity based on forward masking of the echo by the preceding self-heard emitted pulse and subsequent release from the masking, and (3) active long-term control of hearing sensitivity. Recent investigations with the use of the auditory evoked-potential technique have demonstrated that these mechanisms effectively minimize the variation of the response to the echo when either the emitted sonar pulse level, or the target distance, or both vary within a wide range. A short review of these data is presented herein. PMID:23132646

  20. Compensated gain control circuit for buck regulator command charge circuit

    DOEpatents

    Barrett, David M.

    1996-01-01

    A buck regulator command charge circuit includes a compensated-gain control signal for compensating for changes in the component values in order to achieve optimal voltage regulation. The compensated-gain control circuit includes an automatic-gain control circuit for generating a variable-gain control signal. The automatic-gain control circuit is formed of a precision rectifier circuit, a filter network, an error amplifier, and an integrator circuit.

  1. Compensated gain control circuit for buck regulator command charge circuit

    DOEpatents

    Barrett, D.M.

    1996-11-05

    A buck regulator command charge circuit includes a compensated-gain control signal for compensating for changes in the component values in order to achieve optimal voltage regulation. The compensated-gain control circuit includes an automatic-gain control circuit for generating a variable-gain control signal. The automatic-gain control circuit is formed of a precision rectifier circuit, a filter network, an error amplifier, and an integrator circuit. 5 figs.

  2. Hypoxia drives transient site-specific copy gain and drug-resistant gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Black, Joshua C.; Atabakhsh, Elnaz; Kim, Jaegil; Biette, Kelly M.; Van Rechem, Capucine; Ladd, Brendon; Burrowes, Paul d.; Donado, Carlos; Mattoo, Hamid; Kleinstiver, Benjamin P.; Song, Bing; Andriani, Grasiella; Joung, J. Keith; Iliopoulos, Othon; Montagna, Cristina; Pillai, Shiv; Getz, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Copy number heterogeneity is a prominent feature within tumors. The molecular basis for this heterogeneity remains poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia induces transient site-specific copy gains (TSSGs) in primary, nontransformed, and transformed human cells. Hypoxia-driven copy gains are not dependent on HIF1α or HIF2α; however, they are dependent on the KDM4A histone demethylase and are blocked by inhibition of KDM4A with a small molecule or the natural metabolite succinate. Furthermore, this response is conserved at a syntenic region in zebrafish cells. Regions with site-specific copy gain are also enriched for amplifications in hypoxic primary tumors. These tumors exhibited amplification and overexpression of the drug resistance gene CKS1B, which we recapitulated in hypoxic breast cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia provides a biological stimulus to create transient site-specific copy alterations that could result in heterogeneity within tumors and cell populations. These findings have major implications in our understanding of copy number heterogeneity and the emergence of drug resistance genes in cancer. PMID:25995187

  3. Transient increase in HDL-cholesterol during weight gain by hyperalimentation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Torbjörn; Kechagias, Stergios; Carlsson, Martin; Nystrom, Fredrik H

    2011-04-01

    Determination of lipid levels is fundamental in cardiovascular risk assessment. We studied the short-term effects of fast food-based hyperalimentation on lipid levels in healthy subjects. Twelve healthy men and six healthy women with a mean age of 26 ± 6.6 years and an aged-matched control group were recruited for this prospective interventional study. Subjects in the intervention group aimed for a body weight increase of 5-15% by doubling the baseline caloric intake by eating at least two fast food-based meals a day in combination with adoption of a sedentary lifestyle for 4 weeks. This protocol induced a weight gain from 67.6 ± 9.1 kg to 74.0 ± 11 kg (P < 0.001). A numerical increase in the levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol occurred in all subjects during the study and this was apparent already at the first week in 16/18 subjects (mean increase at week 1: +22.0 ± 16%, range from -7 to +50%), whereas the highest level of HDL during the study as compared with baseline values varied from +6% to +58% (mean +31.6 ± 15%). The intake of saturated fat in the early phase of the trial related positively with the HDL-cholesterol-increase in the second week (r = 0.53, P = 0.028). Although the levels of insulin doubled at week 2, the increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol was only +12 ± 17%, and there was no statistically significant changes in fasting serum triglycerides. We conclude that hyperalimentation can induce a fast but transient increase in HDL-cholesterol that is of clinical interest when estimating cardiovascular risk based on serum lipid levels. PMID:20814413

  4. Numerical studies of transient gain reduction process in a multi-wire proportional chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, Ken; Furukawa, Takuji; Noda, Koji

    2011-05-15

    A gain reduction process caused by successive beam irradiation in a multi-wire proportional chamber was numerically investigated to clarify the relations between the gas gain variation and the ion density distribution. A numerical code was developed based on a two-dimensional drift-diffusion model in order to evaluate the ion and electron density distributions and the electric field variation caused by the space charge effect. In order to consider the gain reduction process which occurs under the high rate and successive irradiation, the simulations were performed for the time period of {approx}10-100 {mu}s, which is much longer than the time required for ions to travel from an anode to a cathode. The numerical simulation results showed that for the low gas gain regime of {approx}10, quasi-stationary density distribution of the ions was formed by the high-rate beams of {approx}10{sup 8}- 10{sup 10} particles per second, and that the transient variation of the gas gain became constant after establishment of the quasi-stationary ion density distributions.

  5. Gain control mechanisms in the nociceptive system.

    PubMed

    Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2016-06-01

    The "gate control theory of pain" of 1965 became famous for integrating clinical observations and the understanding of spinal dorsal horn circuitry at that time into a testable model. Although it became rapidly clear that spinal circuitry is much more complex than that proposed by Melzack and Wall, their prediction of the clinical efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and spinal cord stimulation has left an important clinical legacy also 50 years later. In the meantime, it has been recognized that the sensitivity of the nociceptive system can be decreased or increased and that this "gain control" can occur at peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal levels. The resulting changes in pain sensitivity can be rapidly reversible or persistent, highly localized or widespread. Profiling of spatio-temporal characteristics of altered pain sensitivity (evoked pain to mechanical and/or heat stimuli) allows implications on the mechanisms likely active in a given patient, including peripheral or central sensitization, intraspinal or descending inhibition. This hypothesis generation in the diagnostic process is an essential step towards a mechanism-based treatment of pain. The challenge now is to generate the rational basis of multimodal pain therapy algorithms by including profile-based stratification of patients into studies on efficacy of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. This review outlines the current evidence base for this approach. PMID:26817644

  6. Collective Bargaining and Multiple Control Gains in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisci, Pat E.; Giancola, Joseph M.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a study of the use of "control gains" in collective bargaining contracts of teacher unions in Ohio. Control gains are contract items that give unions control over some aspect of the work environment in lieu of financial gains. They can be offered in contract negotiations when school boards have limited funds. (MD)

  7. GD SDR Automatic Gain Control Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) will provide experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The GD SDR platform and initial waveform were characterized on the ground before launch and the data will be compared to the data that will be collected during on-orbit operations. A desired function of the SDR is to estimate the received signal to noise ratio (SNR), which would enable experimenters to better determine on-orbit link conditions. The GD SDR does not have an SNR estimator, but it does have an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC). The AGCs can be used to estimate the SDR input power which can be converted into a SNR. Tests were conducted to characterize the AGC response to changes in SDR input power and temperature. This purpose of this paper is to describe the tests that were conducted, discuss the results showi ng how the AGCs relate to the SDR input power, and provide recommendations for AGC testing and characterization.

  8. GD SDR Automatic Gain Control Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) will provide experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The GD SDR platform and initial waveform were characterized on the ground before launch and the data will be compared to the data that will be collected during on-orbit operations. A desired function of the SDR is to estimate the received signal to noise ratio (SNR), which would enable experimenters to better determine on-orbit link conditions. The GD SDR does not have an SNR estimator, but it does have an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC). The AGCs can be used to estimate the SDR input power which can be converted into a SNR. Tests were conducted to characterize the AGC response to changes in SDR input power and temperature. This purpose of this paper is to describe the tests that were conducted, discuss the results showing how the AGCs relate to the SDR input power, and provide recommendations for AGC testing and characterization.

  9. Central Gain Control in Tinnitus and Hyperacusis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Benjamin D.; Rodrigues, Paulo V.; Salvi, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss induced by noise or ototoxic drug exposure reduces the neural activity transmitted from the cochlea to the central auditory system. Despite a reduced cochlear output, neural activity from more central auditory structures is paradoxically enhanced at suprathreshold intensities. This compensatory increase in the central auditory activity in response to the loss of sensory input is referred to as central gain enhancement. Enhanced central gain is hypothesized to be a potential mechanism that gives rise to hyperacusis and tinnitus, two debilitating auditory perceptual disorders that afflict millions of individuals. This review will examine the evidence for gain enhancement in the central auditory system in response to cochlear damage. Further, it will address the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this enhancement and discuss the contribution of central gain enhancement to tinnitus and hyperacusis. Current evidence suggests that multiple mechanisms with distinct temporal and spectral profiles are likely to contribute to central gain enhancement. Dissecting the contributions of these different mechanisms at different levels of the central auditory system is essential for elucidating the role of central gain enhancement in tinnitus and hyperacusis and, most importantly, the development of novel treatments for these disorders. PMID:25386157

  10. A variable-gain output feedback control design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim; Moerder, Daniel D.; Broussard, John R.; Taylor, Deborah B.

    1989-01-01

    A digital control system design technique is developed in which the control system gain matrix varies with the plant operating point parameters. The design technique is obtained by formulating the problem as an optimal stochastic output feedback control law with variable gains. This approach provides a control theory framework within which the operating range of a control law can be significantly extended. Furthermore, the approach avoids the major shortcomings of the conventional gain-scheduling techniques. The optimal variable gain output feedback control problem is solved by embedding the Multi-Configuration Control (MCC) problem, previously solved at ICS. An algorithm to compute the optimal variable gain output feedback control gain matrices is developed. The algorithm is a modified version of the MCC algorithm improved so as to handle the large dimensionality which arises particularly in variable-gain control problems. The design methodology developed is applied to a reconfigurable aircraft control problem. A variable-gain output feedback control problem was formulated to design a flight control law for an AFTI F-16 aircraft which can automatically reconfigure its control strategy to accommodate failures in the horizontal tail control surface. Simulations of the closed-loop reconfigurable system show that the approach produces a control design which can accommodate such failures with relative ease. The technique can be applied to many other problems including sensor failure accommodation, mode switching control laws and super agility.

  11. CSR induced microbunching gain estimation including transient effects in transport and recirculation arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Cheng; Douglas, David R.; Li, Rui

    2015-09-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport or recirculation arcs, may result in the microbunching instability (μBI). To accurately quantify the direct consequence of this effect, we further extend our previously developed semi-analytical Vlasov solver to include more relevant coherent radiation models than the steady-state free-space CSR impedance, such as the entrance and exit transient effects derived from upstream beam entering to and exiting from individual dipoles. The resultant microbunching gain functions and spectra for our example lattices are presented and compared with particle tracking simulation. Some underlying physics with inclusion of these effects are also discussed.

  12. Simulation of an X-ray laser in the transient gain-saturation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Starikov, F A; Volkov, V A; Gasparyan, P D; Roslov, V I

    2009-09-30

    By using the TRANS code, we performed three-dimensional calculations of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in X-ray lasers on the 3p-3s transition in Ne-like Ge ({lambda} = 19.6 nm) and Ti ({lambda} = 2.6 nm) operating in the transient regime upon irradiation of a flat target by a high-power picosecond laser pulse focused into a line with one or two nanosecond prepulses. The hydrodynamics and population kinetics of the active medium of X-ray lasers were calculated by using the SS-9M code. The pulse duration, the gain, the spatial structure of the laser beam and the type of influence of a 'travelling' pump wave on the ASE brightness obtained in calculations are in agreement with the experimental data. The use of the 'travelling pump wave' leads not only to the increase in the ASE brightness but also considerably reduces its angular divergence. (active media)

  13. Analytical solution of the transient temperature profile in gain medium of passively Q-switched microchip laser.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiahui; Li, Jianlang

    2014-11-01

    The transient temperature evolution in the gain medium of a continuous wave (CW) end-pumped passively Q-switched microchip (PQSM) laser is analyzed. By approximating the time-dependent population inversion density as a sawtooth function of time and treating the time-dependent pump absorption of a CW end-pumped PQSM laser as the superposition of an infinite series of short pumping pulses, the analytical expressions of transient temperature evolution and distribution in the gain medium for four- and three-level laser systems, respectively, are given. These analytical solutions are applied to evaluate the transient temperature evolution and distribution in the gain medium of CW end-pumped PQSM Nd:YAG and Yb:YAG lasers. PMID:25402922

  14. Serotonin affects movement gain control in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kunlin; Glaser, Joshua I; Deng, Linna; Thompson, Christopher K; Stevenson, Ian H; Wang, Qining; Hornby, Thomas George; Heckman, Charles J; Kording, Konrad P

    2014-09-17

    A fundamental challenge for the nervous system is to encode signals spanning many orders of magnitude with neurons of limited bandwidth. To meet this challenge, perceptual systems use gain control. However, whether the motor system uses an analogous mechanism is essentially unknown. Neuromodulators, such as serotonin, are prime candidates for gain control signals during force production. Serotonergic neurons project diffusely to motor pools, and, therefore, force production by one muscle should change the gain of others. Here we present behavioral and pharmaceutical evidence that serotonin modulates the input-output gain of motoneurons in humans. By selectively changing the efficacy of serotonin with drugs, we systematically modulated the amplitude of spinal reflexes. More importantly, force production in different limbs interacts systematically, as predicted by a spinal gain control mechanism. Psychophysics and pharmacology suggest that the motor system adopts gain control mechanisms, and serotonin is a primary driver for their implementation in force production. PMID:25232107

  15. Serotonin Affects Movement Gain Control in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Joshua I.; Deng, Linna; Thompson, Christopher K.; Stevenson, Ian H.; Wang, Qining; Hornby, Thomas George; Heckman, Charles J.; Kording, Konrad P.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental challenge for the nervous system is to encode signals spanning many orders of magnitude with neurons of limited bandwidth. To meet this challenge, perceptual systems use gain control. However, whether the motor system uses an analogous mechanism is essentially unknown. Neuromodulators, such as serotonin, are prime candidates for gain control signals during force production. Serotonergic neurons project diffusely to motor pools, and, therefore, force production by one muscle should change the gain of others. Here we present behavioral and pharmaceutical evidence that serotonin modulates the input–output gain of motoneurons in humans. By selectively changing the efficacy of serotonin with drugs, we systematically modulated the amplitude of spinal reflexes. More importantly, force production in different limbs interacts systematically, as predicted by a spinal gain control mechanism. Psychophysics and pharmacology suggest that the motor system adopts gain control mechanisms, and serotonin is a primary driver for their implementation in force production. PMID:25232107

  16. Finding Optimal Gains In Linear-Quadratic Control Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical method based on Volterra factorization leads to new approximations for optimal control gains in finite-time linear-quadratic control problem of system having infinite number of dimensions. Circumvents need to analyze and solve Riccati equations and provides more transparent connection between dynamics of system and optimal gain.

  17. Mitigation of pulsed RFI via automatic gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, R. W.-S.; Weinberg, A.

    1981-01-01

    Three automatic gain control (AGC) strategies and their potential capabilities for mitigation of pulsed radio frequency interference (RFI) over a coded, nonlinear channel are examined. The first updates the AGC control voltage once each symbol interval in accordance with a prespecified criterion. The second implementation is designed to first detect high level RFI and then appropriately update its gain. The final implementation is a wideband device which updates its gain once each symbol interval by reducing the gain in direct proportion to a suitable power measurement. Computed results treat pulsed noise and pulsed CW RFI and compare performances in terms of bit error rate (BER) at the output of a Viterbi decoder.

  18. Characterization of a high-gain Ne-like Fe transient x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Facnov, A; Fournier, K B; Moon, S J; Osterheld, A; Pikuz, T; Shlyaptsev, V N

    1999-09-13

    The authors present experimental results of a high efficiency Ne-like Fe transient collisional excitation x-ray laser using the COMET 15 TW table-top laser system at LLNL. The plasma formation, ionization and collision excitation of the x-ray laser have been optimized using two sequential laser pulses: a plasma formation beam with 5 J energy of 600 ps duration and a pump beam with 5 J energy of 1.2 ps duration. Since the observation of strong lasing on the 255 {angstrom} 3p-3s J = 0-1 transition of Ne-like Fe, they have achieved high gains of 35 cm{sup {minus}1} and saturation of the x-ray laser. A five-stage traveling wave excitation enhances the strongest Fe 3p-3s 255 {angstrom} lasing line as well as additional x-ray lines. A careful characterization of the plasma column conditions using L-shell spectroscopy indicates the degree of ionization along the line focus.

  19. Analysis and design of sliding mode controller gains for boost power factor corrector.

    PubMed

    Kessal, Abdelhalim; Rahmani, Lazhar

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a systematic procedure to compute the gains of sliding mode controller based on an optimization scheme. This controller is oriented to drive an AC-DC converter operating in continuous mode with power factor near unity, and in order to improve static and dynamic performances with large variations of reference voltage and load. This study shows the great influence of the controller gains on the global performances of the system. Hence, a methodology for choosing the gains is detailed. The sliding surface used in this study contains two state variables, input current and output voltage; the advantage of this surface is getting reactions against various disturbances-at the power source, the reference of the output, or the value of the load. The controller is experimentally confirmed for steady-state performance and transient response. PMID:23735439

  20. An output amplitude configurable wideband automatic gain control with high gain step accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaofeng, He; Taishan, Mo; Chengyan, Ma; Tianchun, Ye

    2012-02-01

    An output amplitude configurable wideband automatic gain control (AGC) with high gain step accuracy for the GNSS receiver is presented. The amplitude of an AGC is configurable in order to cooperate with baseband chips to achieve interference suppression and be compatible with different full range ADCs. And what's more, the gain-boosting technology is introduced and the circuit is improved to increase the step accuracy. A zero, which is composed by the source feedback resistance and the source capacity, is introduced to compensate for the pole. The AGC is fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The AGC shows a 62 dB gain control range by 1 dB each step with a gain error of less than 0.2 dB. The AGC provides 3 dB bandwidth larger than 80 MHz and the overall power consumption is less than 1.8 mA, and the die area is 800 × 300 μm2.

  1. Automatic gain control circuit handles wide input range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S. H.

    1966-01-01

    Automatic gain control circuit for a radio receiver handles a wide range of input signal levels without overloading the output stage. The transistorized circuit maintains a relatively constant output by varying attenuation of the input signal.

  2. Gain Scheduling for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Sara J.; Restrepo, Carolina I.; Madsen, Jennifer M.; Medina, Edgar A.; Proud, Ryan W.; Whitley, Ryan J.

    2011-01-01

    One of NASAs challenges for the Orion vehicle is the control system design for the Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV), which is required to abort safely at any time during the atmospheric ascent portion of ight. The focus of this paper is the gain design and scheduling process for a controller that covers the wide range of vehicle configurations and flight conditions experienced during the full envelope of potential abort trajectories from the pad to exo-atmospheric flight. Several factors are taken into account in the automation process for tuning the gains including the abort effectors, the environmental changes and the autopilot modes. Gain scheduling is accomplished using a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) approach for the decoupled, simplified linear model throughout the operational envelope in time, altitude and Mach number. The derived gains are then implemented into the full linear model for controller requirement validation. Finally, the gains are tested and evaluated in a non-linear simulation using the vehicles ight software to ensure performance requirements are met. An overview of the LAV controller design and a description of the linear plant models are presented. Examples of the most significant challenges with the automation of the gain tuning process are then discussed. In conclusion, the paper will consider the lessons learned through out the process, especially in regards to automation, and examine the usefulness of the gain scheduling tool and process developed as applicable to non-Orion vehicles.

  3. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  4. High gain proportional rf control stability at TESLA cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Elmar

    2007-05-01

    Fast proportional rf control is used as the basis for rf field regulation in actual linear accelerator projects like the international linear collider (ILC) and the European x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) based on TESLA technology. Additional control loops improve the field regulation by treating repetitive effects and compensating the beam loading. Nevertheless, the ability for high gain operation of the fast loops is desirable for the strong suppression of nonpredictive and nonrepetitive disturbances. TESLA cavities host nine fundamental modes (FMs) where only one is used for beam acceleration. The unwanted FMs have a significant influence on the proportional rf control loop stability at high gains. Within this paper, the stability of proportional rf control loops taking the FMs and digitalization effects into account will be discussed in detail together with measures enabling a significant increase of the gain values.

  5. Application of gain scheduling to the control of batch bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardello, Ralph; San, Ka-Yiu

    1987-01-01

    The implementation of control algorithms to batch bioreactors is often complicated by the inherent variations in process dynamics during the course of fermentation. Such a wide operating range may render the performance of fixed gain PID controllers unsatisfactory. In this work, a detailed study on the control of batch fermentation is performed. Furthermore, a simple batch controller design is proposed which incorporates the concept of gain-scheduling, a subclass of adaptive control, with oxygen uptake rate as an auxiliary variable. The control of oxygen tension in the biorector is used as a vehicle to convey the proposed idea, analysis and results. Simulation experiments indicate significant improvement in controller performance can be achieved by the proposed approach even in the presence of measurement noise.

  6. Gain-assisted control of the Goos-Haenchen shift

    SciTech Connect

    Ziauddin,; Qamar, Sajid

    2011-11-15

    A gain-assisted model is considered to study the Goos-Haenchen (GH) shift behavior in the reflected and transmitted light. In this model, a probe light is incident on a cavity containing three-level dilute gaseous atomic medium. The atom-field interaction follows two-photon Raman transitions, and the dielectric susceptibility of the medium exhibits dispersion and gain properties [L. J. Wang, A. Kuzmich, and A. Dogariu, Nature (London) 406, 227 (2000)]. Under appropriate conditions, two gain peaks are observed with anomalous dispersion between the peaks, whereas normal dispersion can be observed at and around the gain maxima. The manipulation of the detuning associated with the probe light field which interacts with the intracavity medium during its propagation through the cavity can lead to a control over negative and positive GH shift in the reflected and transmitted light beam via the anomalous and normal dispersion of the medium.

  7. Gain-phase margin analysis of dynamic fuzzy control systems.

    PubMed

    Perng, Jau-Woei; Wu, Bing-Fei; Chin, Hung-I; Lee, Tsu-Tian

    2004-10-01

    In this paper, we apply some effective methods, including the gain-phase margin tester, describing function and parameter plane, to predict the limit cycles of dynamic fuzzy control systems with adjustable parameters. Both continuous-time and sampled-data fuzzy control systems are considered. In general, fuzzy control systems are nonlinear. By use of the classical method of describing functions, the dynamic fuzzy controller may be linearized first. According to the stability equations and parameter plane methods, the stability of the equivalent linearized system with adjustable parameters is then analyzed. In addition, a simple approach is also proposed to determine the gain margin and phase margin which limit cycles can occur for robustness. Two examples of continuous-time fuzzy control systems with and without nonlinearity are presented to demonstrate the design procedure. Finally, this approach is also extended to a sampled-data fuzzy control system. PMID:15503509

  8. Chemotaxis Control of Transient Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis affords motile cells the ability to rapidly respond to environmental challenges by navigating cells to niches favoring growth. Such a property results from the activities of dedicated signal transduction systems on the motility apparatus, such as flagella, type IV pili, and gliding machineries. Once cells have reached a niche with favorable conditions, they often stop moving and aggregate into complex communities termed biofilms. An intermediate and reversible stage that precedes commitment to permanent adhesion often includes transient cell-cell contacts between motile cells. Chemotaxis signaling has been implicated in modulating the transient aggregation of motile cells. Evidence further indicates that chemotaxis-dependent transient cell aggregation events are behavioral responses to changes in metabolic cues that temporarily prohibit permanent attachment by maintaining motility and chemotaxis. This minireview discusses a few examples illustrating the role of chemotaxis signaling in the initiation of cell-cell contacts in bacteria moving via flagella, pili, or gliding. PMID:26216846

  9. Cognitive adaptation of sonar gain control in the bottlenose dolphin.

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Laura N; Smith, Adam B; Nachtigall, Paul E; Buck, John R; Simmons, James A; Pacini, Aude F

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating animals adjust the transmit intensity and receive sensitivity of their sonar in order to regulate the sensation level of their echoes; this process is often termed automatic gain control. Gain control is considered not to be under the animal's cognitive control, but previous investigations studied animals ensonifying targets or hydrophone arrays at predictable distances. To test whether animals maintain gain control at a fixed level in uncertain conditions, we measured changes in signal intensity for a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) detecting a target at three target distances (2.5, 4 and 7 m) in two types of sessions: predictable and unpredictable. Predictable sessions presented the target at a constant distance; unpredictable sessions moved the target randomly between the three target positions. In the predictable sessions the dolphin demonstrated intensity distance compensation, increasing the emitted click intensity as the target distance increased. Additionally, as trials within sessions progressed, the animal adjusted its click intensity even from the first click in a click train, which is consistent with the animal expecting a target at a certain range. In the unpredictable sessions there was no significant difference of intensity with target distance until after the 7th click in a click train. Together, these results demonstrate that the bottlenose dolphin uses learning and expectation for sonar gain control. PMID:25153530

  10. Cognitive Adaptation of Sonar Gain Control in the Bottlenose Dolphin

    PubMed Central

    Kloepper, Laura N.; Smith, Adam B.; Nachtigall, Paul E.; Buck, John R.; Simmons, James A.; Pacini, Aude F.

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating animals adjust the transmit intensity and receive sensitivity of their sonar in order to regulate the sensation level of their echoes; this process is often termed automatic gain control. Gain control is considered not to be under the animal's cognitive control, but previous investigations studied animals ensonifying targets or hydrophone arrays at predictable distances. To test whether animals maintain gain control at a fixed level in uncertain conditions, we measured changes in signal intensity for a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) detecting a target at three target distances (2.5, 4 and 7 m) in two types of sessions: predictable and unpredictable. Predictable sessions presented the target at a constant distance; unpredictable sessions moved the target randomly between the three target positions. In the predictable sessions the dolphin demonstrated intensity distance compensation, increasing the emitted click intensity as the target distance increased. Additionally, as trials within sessions progressed, the animal adjusted its click intensity even from the first click in a click train, which is consistent with the animal expecting a target at a certain range. In the unpredictable sessions there was no significant difference of intensity with target distance until after the 7th click in a click train. Together, these results demonstrate that the bottlenose dolphin uses learning and expectation for sonar gain control. PMID:25153530

  11. FSHAKER: a transient control program. [For HP 5451C

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, J L

    1980-10-01

    A description is given of FSHAKER, a transient control program for the performance of transient tests, written to run on the HP 5451C (Fourier) system. The report also contains a listing of a demonstration run made with FSHAKER. The appendix contains a commented listing of FSHAKER and listings of three Fortran user programs called by FSHAKER. (RWR)

  12. Flexible Contrast Gain Control in the Right Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okubo, Matia; Nicholls, Michael E. R.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates whether the right hemisphere has more flexible contrast gain control settings for the identification of spatial frequency. Right-handed participants identified 1 and 9 cycles per degree sinusoidal gratings presented either to the left visual field-right hemisphere (LVF-RH) or the right visual field-left hemisphere (RVF-LH).…

  13. Circuit controls transients in SCR inverters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, E. T.; Wilson, T. G.

    1964-01-01

    Elimination of starting difficulties in SCR inverters is accomplished by the addition of two taps of the output winding of the inverter. On starting or under transient loads, the two additional taps deliver power through diodes without requiring quenching of SCR currents in excess of normal starting load.

  14. Gain, Level, And Exposure Control For A Television Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Geoffrey J.; Hetherington, Rolfe W.

    1992-01-01

    Automatic-level-control/automatic-gain-control (ALC/AGC) system for charge-coupled-device (CCD) color television camera prevents over-loading in bright scenes using technique for measuring brightness of scene from red, green, and blue output signals and processing these into adjustments of video amplifiers and iris on camera lens. System faster, does not distort video brightness signals, and built with smaller components.

  15. Motivation by potential gains and losses affects control processes via different mechanisms in the attentional network.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Lena M; Walter, Henrik; Steimke, Rosa; Ludwig, Vera U; Gaschler, Robert; Schubert, Torsten; Stelzel, Christine

    2015-05-01

    Attentional control in demanding cognitive tasks can be improved by manipulating the motivational state. Motivation to obtain gains and motivation to avoid losses both usually result in faster reaction times and stronger activation in relevant brain areas such as the prefrontal cortex, but little is known about differences in the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms of these types of motivation in an attentional control context. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we tested whether potential gain and loss as motivating incentives lead to overlapping or distinct neural effects in the attentional network, and whether one of these conditions is more effective than the other. A Flanker task with word stimuli as targets and distracters was performed by 115 healthy participants. Using a mixed blocked and event-related design allowed us to investigate transient and sustained motivation-related effects. Participants could either gain money (potential gain) or avoid losing money (potential loss) in different task blocks. Participants showed a congruency effect with increased reaction times for incongruent compared to congruent trials. Potential gain led to generally faster responses compared to the neutral condition and to stronger improvements than potential loss. Potential loss also led to shorter response times compared to the neutral condition, but participants improved mainly during incongruent and not during congruent trials. The event-related fMRI data revealed a main effect of congruency with increased activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and inferior frontal junction area (IFJ), the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), bilateral insula, intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and visual word form area (VWFA). While potential gain led to increased activity in a cluster of the IFJ and the VWFA only during incongruent trials, potential loss was linked to activity increases in these regions during incongruent and congruent trials. The

  16. Commissural Gain Control Enhances the Midbrain Representation of Sound Location

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Llwyd David; Papasavvas, Christoforos A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate localization of sound sources is essential for survival behavior in many species. The inferior colliculi (ICs) are the first point in the auditory pathway where cues used to locate sounds, ie, interaural time differences (ITDs), interaural level differences (ILDs), and pinna spectral cues, are all represented in the same location. These cues are first extracted separately on each side of the midline in brainstem nuclei that project to the ICs. Because of this segregation, each IC predominantly represents stimuli in the contralateral hemifield. We tested the hypothesis that commissural connections between the ICs mediate gain control that enhances sound localization acuity. We recorded IC neurons sensitive to either ITDs or ILDs in anesthetized guinea pig, before, during, and following recovery from deactivation of the contralateral IC by cryoloop cooling or microdialysis of procaine. During deactivation, responses were rescaled by divisive gain change and additive shifts, which reduced the dynamic range of ITD and ILD response functions and the ability of neurons to signal changes in sound location. These data suggest that each IC exerts multiplicative gain control and subtractive shifts over the other IC that enhances the neural representation of sound location. Furthermore, this gain control operates in a similar manner on both ITD- and ILD-sensitive neurons, suggesting a shared mechanism operates across localization cues. Our findings reveal a novel dependence of sound localization on commissural processing. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sound localization, a fundamental process in hearing, is dependent on bilateral computations in the brainstem. How this information is transmitted from the brainstem to the auditory cortex, through several stages of processing, without loss of signal fidelity, is not clear. We show that the ability of neurons in the auditory midbrain to encode azimuthal sound location is dependent on gain control mediated by the commissure of

  17. Fixed gain and adaptive techniques for rotorcraft vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. H.; Saberi, H. A.; Walker, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an analysis effort performed to demonstrate the feasibility of employing approximate dynamical models and frequency shaped cost functional control law desgin techniques for helicopter vibration suppression are presented. Both fixed gain and adaptive control designs based on linear second order dynamical models were implemented in a detailed Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) simulation to validate these active vibration suppression control laws. Approximate models of fuselage flexibility were included in the RSRA simulation in order to more accurately characterize the structural dynamics. The results for both the fixed gain and adaptive approaches are promising and provide a foundation for pursuing further validation in more extensive simulation studies and in wind tunnel and/or flight tests.

  18. Thermal gain shutter control. Final report, preliminary design phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzdrall, J.A.

    1983-10-01

    The Thermal Gain Sensor is an insulation control system for manual and motorized solar shutters. Unlike ordinary systems, control is based on the actual net thermal flow through the window, rather than a tenuous or indirect measure. The sensor continuously and directly tracks the conduction, convection, and radiation losses as well as the attenuated solar input. Although basically simple and inexpensive, the Thermal Gain Sensor (TGS) reacts to the thermal flow with near perfect accuracy. It operates with equal effectiveness in both summer and winter. The hardware consists of a sensor, a control box, and an optional power controller for motorized shutters. The first objective of the preliminary design phase was to determine if, with properly selected materials and dimensions, a practical sensor could accurately determine the real thermal gain threshold under the wide range of installations, geographic locations, and weather conditions. The second objective, having found the best possible sensor design, was to determine whether the level of performance attainable produced significantly more energy savings than competitive control systems, namely time and sunlight activated systems. Another objective of this phase was to assure that the product could be made for an acceptable cost. To this end, a schematic design, including conceptual drawings, was prepared. From this conceptual design, manufacturing cost estimates were made using industry accepted estimating procedures. Finally, it was required to determine whether there was public interest in the product. For this, a preliminary assessment of the market was made, based on unsolicited inquiries and local discussions.

  19. Automatic gain control in the echolocation system of dolphins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Whitlow W. L.; Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    2003-06-01

    In bats and technological sonars, the gain of the receiver is progressively increased with time after the transmission of a signal to compensate for acoustic propagation loss. The current understanding of dolphin echolocation indicates that automatic gain control is not a part of their sonar system. In order to test this understanding, we have performed field measurements of free-ranging echolocating dolphins. Here we show that dolphins do possess an automatic gain control mechanism, but that it is implemented in the transmission phase rather than the receiving phase of a sonar cycle. We find that the amplitude of the dolphins' echolocation signals are highly range dependent; this amplitude increases with increasing target range, R, in a 20log(R) fashion to compensate for propagation loss. If the echolocation target is a fish school with many sound scatterers, the echoes from the school will remain nearly constant with range as the dolphin closes in on it. This characteristic has the same effect as time-varying gain in bats and technological sonar when considered from a sonar system perspective.

  20. Automatic gain control in the echolocation system of dolphins.

    PubMed

    Au, Whitlow W L; Benoit-Bird, Kelly J

    2003-06-19

    In bats and technological sonars, the gain of the receiver is progressively increased with time after the transmission of a signal to compensate for acoustic propagation loss. The current understanding of dolphin echolocation indicates that automatic gain control is not a part of their sonar system. In order to test this understanding, we have performed field measurements of free-ranging echolocating dolphins. Here we show that dolphins do possess an automatic gain control mechanism, but that it is implemented in the transmission phase rather than the receiving phase of a sonar cycle. We find that the amplitude of the dolphins' echolocation signals are highly range dependent; this amplitude increases with increasing target range, R, in a 20 log(R) fashion to compensate for propagation loss. If the echolocation target is a fish school with many sound scatterers, the echoes from the school will remain nearly constant with range as the dolphin closes in on it. This characteristic has the same effect as time-varying gain in bats and technological sonar when considered from a sonar system perspective. PMID:12815429

  1. Sustaining the gains made in malaria control and elimination.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Randall A; Lesser, Adriane

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the last 25 years to reduce the malaria burden, but considerable challenges remain. These gains have resulted from large investments in a range of control measures targeting malaria. Fana and co-authors find a strong relationship between education level and net usage with malaria parasitemia in pregnant women, suggesting the need for targeted control strategies. Mayala and co-workers find important links between agriculture and malaria with implications for inter-sectoral collaboration for malaria control. PMID:25960873

  2. Automatic gain control. [the Loran-C receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    An automatic gain control (AGC), designed to operate with the prototype Loran-C receiver, is described. The device is used to eliminate error which occurs when signals are received at different magnitudes. The automatic gain control is a three transistor circuit which requires a constant dc voltage of 8 volts. Tests conclude that this value may be in the range of 4 to 12 v without change in circuit performance. Two transistors are cascaded to pass and amplify the input signal. Their gain is controlled by a third transistor which itself is controlled by an external AGC voltage between 0 and 8 volts dc. The integrated circuit used is an 8 pin chip, which is a differential cascade amplifier designed for use in communications operating at frequencies from dc to 120 MHz. The integrated circuit was balanced for AGC capabilities, and has a wide operating current range. The maximum input current at pins 1 and 5 is 0.1 mAmps. AGC testing is described.

  3. Model of visual contrast gain control and pattern masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, A. B.; Solomon, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    We have implemented a model of contrast gain and control in human vision that incorporates a number of key features, including a contrast sensitivity function, multiple oriented bandpass channels, accelerating nonlinearities, and a devisive inhibitory gain control pool. The parameters of this model have been optimized through a fit to the recent data that describe masking of a Gabor function by cosine and Gabor masks [J. M. Foley, "Human luminance pattern mechanisms: masking experiments require a new model," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 1710 (1994)]. The model achieves a good fit to the data. We also demonstrate how the concept of recruitment may accommodate a variant of this model in which excitatory and inhibitory paths have a common accelerating nonlinearity, but which include multiple channels tuned to different levels of contrast.

  4. Simulation of automatic gain control method for laser radar receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiping; Shang, Hongbo; Wang, Lina; Yang, Shuang

    2008-12-01

    A receiver with high dynamic response and wide control range are necessary for a laser radar system. In this paper, an automatic gain control scheme for laser radar receiver is proposed. The scheme is based on a closed-loop logarithmic feedback method. Signal models for pulse laser radar system are created and as the input to the AGC model. The signal is supposed to be very weak and with a nanosecond order of pulse width in the light of the property of the laser radar. The method and the simulation for the AGC will be presented in detail.

  5. Feedback shape control for deployable mesh reflectors using gain scheduling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangmin; Shi, Hang; Alleyne, Andrew; Yang, Bingen

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the dynamic shape control problem of deployable mesh reflectors (DMRs) via feedback approaches. The reflector structure is simplified from a nonlinear model to be quasi-static with respect to temperature variations but dynamic with respect to mechanical vibrations. The orbital cycle is segmented into multiple temperature zones, and an H∞ robust state feedback controller is designed for each zone to guarantee the local stability of the system under the model uncertainty caused by thermal effects and to reject external force disturbances. At the same time, gain scheduling control method is adopted to compensate thermal distortions and to ensure smooth transition response when switching among the local robust controllers. A DMR model is considered in the case study to show the effectiveness of the control approach. The structural vibrations caused by external force disturbances can be sufficiently suppressed in a much shorter time. The closed loop response of the DMR structure shows that much higher surface accuracy is obtained during the orbiting mission compared to the open-loop configuration, and transient focal length and transient de-focus of the reflector are well controlled within the satisfactory bounds, demonstrating the numerical feasibility of the proposed method to solve the dynamic shape control problem of DMRs.

  6. Gain control dynamics of thulium-doped fiber amplifier at 2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamis, M. A.; Ennser, K.

    2016-02-01

    This work is novel in that it explains the modeling and simulation of a thulium-doped fiber amplifier (TDFA) in a reconfigurable wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) system operating at 2 μm. We use the optical gain-clamping technique in order to control gain amplification and eliminate deleterious channel power fluctuations resulting from input power variation at the TDFA. The investigated system consists of 12 channels with -4 dBm total input power. Simulation results indicate that approximately1.5dB power excursion is produced after dropping 11 channels in unclamped-gain amplifier, and only 0.005 dB in a clamped-gain amplifier. Additionally, a clamped configuration brings the power excursion from 4.2 dB to under 0.08 dB, after adding 11 channels to the investigated system. Hence, optical gainclamping is a simple and robust technique for controlling the power transient in amplifiers at 2 μm.

  7. Gantry cranes gain scheduling feedback control with friction compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Hanafy M.; Nayfeh, Ali H.

    2005-03-01

    We designed a controller based on gain-scheduling feedback to move a load on a gantry crane from point to point within one oscillation cycle and without inducing large swings. The settling time of the system is taken to be equal to the period of oscillation of the load. This criterion enables calculation of the controller feedback gains for varying load weight and cable length. Numerical simulations show that the controller is effective in reducing load oscillations and transferring the load in a reasonable time compared with that of optimal control. To experimentally validate the theory, we had to compensate for friction. To this end, we estimated the friction, and then applied an opposite control action to cancel it. To estimate the friction force, we assumed a mathematical model, and then we estimated the model coefficients using an off-line identification technique, such as the method of least squares (LS). First, the process of identification is applied to a theoretical model of a DC motor with known friction coefficients. From this example, some guidelines and rules are deduced for the choice of the LS parameters. Then, the friction coefficients of the gantry crane model are estimated and validated.

  8. Thermal gain shutter control. Preliminary design phase. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzdrall, J.A.

    1983-10-01

    The Thermal Gain Sensor is an insulation control system for manual and motorized solar shutters. Unlike ordinary systems, control is based on the actual net thermal flow through the window, rather than a tenuous or indirect measure. The sensor continuously and directly tracks the conduction, convection, and radiation losses as well as the attenuated solar input. The hardware consists of a sensor, a control box, and an optional power controller for motorized shutters. The purpose of the preliminary design phase, the first of a four phase product development program, is to assure that there are no technical, cost, or acceptance barriers to the potential product. Accordingly, the first objective of this phase was to determine if, with properly selected materials and dimensions, a practical sensor could accurately determine the real thermal gain threshold under the wide range of installations, geographic locations, and weather conditions. The second objective, having found the best possible sensor design, was to determine whether the level of performance attainable produced significantly more energy savings than competitive control systems, namely time and sunlight activated systems. Another objective of this phase was to assure that the product could be made for an acceptable cost. To this end, a schematic design, including conceptual drawings, was prepared. From this conceptual design, manufacturing cost estimates were made using industry accepted estimating procedures. Finally, it was required to determine whether there was public interest in the product. For this, a preliminary assessment of the market was made, based on unsolicited inquiries and local discussions.

  9. Dynamic modulation of visual and electrosensory gains for locomotor control.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Erin E; Demir, Alican; Stamper, Sarah A; Fortune, Eric S; Cowan, Noah J

    2016-05-01

    Animal nervous systems resolve sensory conflict for the control of movement. For example, the glass knifefish, Eigenmannia virescens, relies on visual and electrosensory feedback as it swims to maintain position within a moving refuge. To study how signals from these two parallel sensory streams are used in refuge tracking, we constructed a novel augmented reality apparatus that enables the independent manipulation of visual and electrosensory cues to freely swimming fish (n = 5). We evaluated the linearity of multisensory integration, the change to the relative perceptual weights given to vision and electrosense in relation to sensory salience, and the effect of the magnitude of sensory conflict on sensorimotor gain. First, we found that tracking behaviour obeys superposition of the sensory inputs, suggesting linear sensorimotor integration. In addition, fish rely more on vision when electrosensory salience is reduced, suggesting that fish dynamically alter sensorimotor gains in a manner consistent with Bayesian integration. However, the magnitude of sensory conflict did not significantly affect sensorimotor gain. These studies lay the theoretical and experimental groundwork for future work investigating multisensory control of locomotion. PMID:27170650

  10. Gain-Scheduled Fault Tolerance Control Under False Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Belcastro, Christine (Technical Monitor)

    2006-01-01

    An active fault tolerant control (FTC) law is generally sensitive to false identification since the control gain is reconfigured for fault occurrence. In the conventional FTC law design procedure, dynamic variations due to false identification are not considered. In this paper, an FTC synthesis method is developed in order to consider possible variations of closed-loop dynamics under false identification into the control design procedure. An active FTC synthesis problem is formulated into an LMI optimization problem to minimize the upper bound of the induced-L2 norm which can represent the worst-case performance degradation due to false identification. The developed synthesis method is applied for control of the longitudinal motions of FASER (Free-flying Airplane for Subscale Experimental Research). The designed FTC law of the airplane is simulated for pitch angle command tracking under a false identification case.

  11. Micro-Macro Bilateral Control Taking into Account Scaling of Control Gains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susa, Shigeru; Shimono, Tomoyuki; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    In micro-macro bilateral control systems, it is important to use position and force scaling factors that depend on the size of the master and slave system. Moreover, it is vital for control systems to use appropriate control gains depending on the scaling ratio between master and slave response. This paper proposes a micro-macro bilateral control system based on the scaling of control gains. In this system, the control gains of the master and slave system are adjusted to appropriate values by using control gain scaling factors. These scaling factors are obtained by designing a micro-macro bilateral control system to achieve ideal reproducibility. To verify the validity of the proposed system, analytical results for the reproducibility, operationality, and stability of the proposed control system are presented in this paper. Moreover, the proposed system is used in an experimental micro-macro bilateral system, and the results are presented.

  12. Inhibitory control gains from higher-order cognitive strategy training.

    PubMed

    Motes, Michael A; Gamino, Jacquelyn F; Chapman, Sandra B; Rao, Neena K; Maguire, Mandy J; Brier, Matthew R; Kraut, Michael A; Hart, John

    2014-02-01

    The present study examined the transfer of higher-order cognitive strategy training to inhibitory control. Middle school students enrolled in a comprehension- and reasoning-focused cognitive strategy training program and passive controls participated. The training program taught students a set of steps for inferring essential gist or themes from materials. Both before and after training or a comparable duration in the case of the passive controls, participants completed a semantically cued Go/No-Go task that was designed to assess the effects of depth of semantic processing on response inhibition and components of event-related potentials (ERP) related to response inhibition. Depth of semantic processing was manipulated by varying the level of semantic categorization required for response selection and inhibition. The SMART-trained group showed inhibitory control gains and changes in fronto-central P3 ERP amplitudes on inhibition trials; whereas, the control group did not. The results provide evidence of the transfer of higher-order cognitive strategy training to inhibitory control and modulation of ERPs associated with semantically cued inhibitory control. The findings are discussed in terms of implications for cognitive strategy training, models of cognitive abilities, and education. PMID:24286804

  13. Influence of distributed flow losses and gains on the estimation of transient storage parameters from stream tracer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeftel, Pascal; (Dan) Moore, R. D.; Weiler, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between mobile stream water and transient storage zones have been the subject of careful attention for decades. However, few studies have considered explicitly the influence of water exchange between the channel and neighbouring hydrological units when modelling transient storage processes, especially the lateral inflow coming from hillslope contributions and outflow to a deep aquifer or to hyporheic flow paths extending beyond the study reach. The objective of this study was to explore the influence of different conceptualizations of these hydrologic exchanges on the estimation of transient storage parameters. Slug injections of sodium chloride (NaCl) were carried out in eight contiguous reaches in the Cotton Creek Experimental Watershed (CCEW), located in south-east British Columbia. Resulting breakthrough curves were subsequently analysed using a Transient Storage Model (TSM) in an inverse modelling framework. We estimated solute transport parameters using three distinct, hypothetical spatial patterns of lateral inflow and outflow, all based on variations of the same five-parameter model structure. We compared optimized parameter values to those resulting from a distinct four-parameter model structure meant to represent the standard application of the TSM, in which only lateral inflow was implemented for net gaining reaches or only lateral outflow for net losing reaches. In the five-parameter model, solute mass was stored predominantly in the transient storage zone and slowly released back to the stream. Conversely, solute mass was predominantly removed from the stream via flow losses in the four-parameter model structure. This led to contrasting estimates of solute transport parameters and subsequent interpretation of solute transport dynamics. Differences in parameter estimates across variations of the five-parameter model structure were small yet statistically significant, except for the transient storage exchange rate coefficient α, for which

  14. Distributed control system for rapid astronomical transient detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, James A.; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Brumby, Steven P.; Casperson, Donald E.; Galassi, Mark C.; McGowan, Katherine; Starr, Daniel; Vestrand, W. T.; White, Robert; Wozniak, Przemek

    2002-11-01

    The Rapid Telescope for Optical Response (RAPTOR) program consists of a network of robotic telescopes dedicated to the search for fast optical transients. The pilot project is composed of three observatories separated by approximately 38 kilometers located near Los Alamos, New Mexico. Each of these observatories is composed of a telescope, mount, enclosure, and weather station, all operating robotically to perform individual or coordinated transient searches. The telescopes employ rapidly slewing mounts capable of slewing a 250 pound load 180 degrees in under 2 seconds with arcsecond precision. Each telescope consists of wide-field cameras for transient detection and a narrow-field camera with greater resolution and sensitivity. The telescopes work together by employing a closed-loop system for transient detection and follow-up. Using the combined data from simultaneous observations, transient alerts are generated and distributed via the Internet. Each RAPTOR telescope also has the capability of rapidly responding to external transient alerts received over the Internet from a variety of ground-based and satellite sources. Each observatory may be controlled directly, remotely, or robotically while providing state-of-health and observational results to the client and the other RAPTOR observatories. We discuss the design and implementation of the spatially distributed RAPTOR system.

  15. LPV gain-scheduled control of SCR aftertreatment systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisami-Azad, Mona; Mohammadpour, Javad; Grigoriadis, Karolos M.; Harold, Michael P.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and some of other polluting emissions produced by diesel engines are usually lower than those produced by gasoline engines. While great strides have been made in the exhaust aftertreatment of vehicular pollutants, the elimination of nitrogen oxide (NO x ) from diesel vehicles is still a challenge. The primary reason is that diesel combustion is a fuel-lean process, and hence there is significant unreacted oxygen in the exhaust. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a well-developed technology for power plants and has been recently employed for reducing NO x emissions from automotive sources and in particular, heavy-duty diesel engines. In this article, we develop a linear parameter-varying (LPV) feedforward/feedback control design method for the SCR aftertreatment system to decrease NO x emissions while keeping ammonia slippage to a desired low level downstream the catalyst. The performance of the closed-loop system obtained from the interconnection of the SCR system and the output feedback LPV control strategy is then compared with other control design methods including sliding mode, and observer-based static state-feedback parameter-varying control. To reduce the computational complexity involved in the control design process, the number of LPV parameters in the developed quasi-LPV (qLPV) model is reduced by applying the principal component analysis technique. An LPV feedback/feedforward controller is then designed for the qLPV model with reduced number of scheduling parameters. The designed full-order controller is further simplified to a first-order transfer function with a parameter-varying gain and pole. Finally, simulation results using both a low-order model and a high-fidelity and high-order model of SCR reactions in GT-POWER interfaced with MATLAB/SIMULINK illustrate the high NO x conversion efficiency of the closed-loop SCR system using the proposed parameter-varying control law.

  16. Electrical and optical control of optical gain in a coupled triple quantum dot system operating in telecommunication window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmannavaz, Mohammad Reza; Sattari, Hamed

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the light amplification and gain without inversion (GWI) in triple quantum dot molecules in both steady-state and transient state. We demonstrate that the light amplification and GWI of a light pulse can be controlled through the rates of the incoherent pumping and tunneling between electronic levels. The required switching times for switching of a light pulse from absorption to gain and vice versa is then discussed. We obtain switching time at about 40 ps, which resembles a high-speed optical switch in nanostructure. The proposed approach in QDMs may provide some new possibilities for technological applications in optoelectronics and solid-state quantum information science.

  17. On controllability of neuronal networks with constraints on the average of control gains.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang; Wang, Zidong; Gao, Huijun; Qiao, Hong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    Control gains play an important role in the control of a natural or a technical system since they reflect how much resource is required to optimize a certain control objective. This paper is concerned with the controllability of neuronal networks with constraints on the average value of the control gains injected in driver nodes, which are in accordance with engineering and biological backgrounds. In order to deal with the constraints on control gains, the controllability problem is transformed into a constrained optimization problem (COP). The introduction of the constraints on the control gains unavoidably leads to substantial difficulty in finding feasible as well as refining solutions. As such, a modified dynamic hybrid framework (MDyHF) is developed to solve this COP, based on an adaptive differential evolution and the concept of Pareto dominance. By comparing with statistical methods and several recently reported constrained optimization evolutionary algorithms (COEAs), we show that our proposed MDyHF is competitive and promising in studying the controllability of neuronal networks. Based on the MDyHF, we proceed to show the controlling regions under different levels of constraints. It is revealed that we should allocate the control gains economically when strong constraints are considered. In addition, it is found that as the constraints become more restrictive, the driver nodes are more likely to be selected from the nodes with a large degree. The results and methods presented in this paper will provide useful insights into developing new techniques to control a realistic complex network efficiently. PMID:24733036

  18. Accurately control and flatten gain spectrum of L-band erbium doped fiber amplifier based on suitable gain-clamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiuru; Meng, Xiangyu; Liu, Chunyu

    2016-04-01

    The increasing traffic with dynamic nature requires the applications of gain-clamped L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). However, the weak or over clamping may lead the unexpected gain-compression and flatness-worsening. In this article, to enhance practicality, we modify the partly gain-clamping configuration and utilize a pair of C-band fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to non-uniformly compress the gain spectrum of L-band. Through a comprehensive test and comparison, the suitable gain-clamping region for the amplified signals is found, and the gain in L-band is accurately controlled and flattened under the matched central wavelength of FBGs. The experimental results show that, our designed L-band EDFA achieves a trade-off among the output gain, flatness and stability. The ±0.44 dB flatness and 20.2 dB average gain are together obtained in the range of 1570-1610 nm, with the ±0.1 dB stability of signals in over 30 dBm dynamic range.

  19. A Modified Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) High Gain Antenna (HGA) Controller Based on Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Neerav

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was launched on June 18, 2009 and is currently in a 50 km mean altitude polar orbit around the Moon. LRO was designed and built by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. The spacecraft is three-axis stabilized via the attitude control system (ACS), which is composed of various control modes using different sets of sensors and actuators. In addition to pointing the spacecraft, the ACS is responsible for pointing LRO s two appendages, the Solar Array (SA) and the High Gain Antenna (HGA). This study reviews LRO s HGA control system. Starting with an overview of the HGA system, the paper delves into the single input single output (SISO) linear analysis followed by the controller design. Based on flight results, an alternate control scheme is devised to address inherent features in the flight control system. The modified control scheme couples the HGA loop with the spacecraft pointing control loop, and through analysis is shown to be stable and improve transient performance. Although proposed, the LRO project decided against implementing this modification.

  20. Design of chimeric antigen receptors with integrated controllable transient functions.

    PubMed

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Marechal, Alan; Filhol, Jean-Marie; Valton, Julien; Duclert, Aymeric; Poirot, Laurent; Duchateau, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control T cells engineered to permanently express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a key feature to improve safety. Here, we describe the development of a new CAR architecture with an integrated switch-on system that permits to control the CAR T-cell function. This system offers the advantage of a transient CAR T-cell for safety while letting open the possibility of multiple cytotoxicity cycles using a small molecule drug. PMID:26750734

  1. Multidimensional gain control in image representation and processing in vision.

    PubMed

    Furman, S; Zeevi, Y Y

    2015-04-01

    A generic model of automatic gain control (AGC) is proposed as a general framework for multidimensional automatic contrast sensitivity adjustment in vision, as well as in other sensory modalities. We show that a generic feedback AGC mechanism, incorporating a nonlinear synaptic interaction into the feedback loop of a neural network, can enhance and emphasize important image attributes, such as curvature, size, depth, convexity/concavity and more, similar to its role in the adjustment of photoreceptors and retinal network sensitivity over the extremely high dynamic range of environmental light intensities, while enhancing the contrast. We further propose that visual illusions, well established by psychophysical experiments, are a by-product of the multidimensional AGC. This hypothesis is supported by simulations implementing AGC, which reproduce psychophysical data regarding size contrast effects known as the Ebbinghaus illusion, and depth contrast effects. Processing of curvature by an AGC network illustrates that it is an important mechanism of image structure pre-emphasis, which thereby enhances saliency. It is argued that the generic neural network of AGC constitutes a universal, parsimonious, unified mechanism of neurobiological automatic contrast sensitivity control. This mechanism/model can account for a wide range of physiological and psychophysical phenomena, such as visual illusions and contour completion, in cases of occlusion, by a basic neural network. Likewise, and as important, biologically motivated AGC provides attractive new means for the development of intelligent computer vision systems. PMID:25413338

  2. Natural gas operations: considerations on process transients, design, and control.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Flavio

    2012-03-01

    This manuscript highlights tangible benefits deriving from the dynamic simulation and control of operational transients of natural gas processing plants. Relevant improvements in safety, controllability, operability, and flexibility are obtained not only within the traditional applications, i.e. plant start-up and shutdown, but also in certain fields apparently time-independent such as the feasibility studies of gas processing plant layout and the process design of processes. Specifically, this paper enhances the myopic steady-state approach and its main shortcomings with respect to the more detailed studies that take into consideration the non-steady state behaviors. A portion of a gas processing facility is considered as case study. Process transients, design, and control solutions apparently more appealing from a steady-state approach are compared to the corresponding dynamic simulation solutions. PMID:22056010

  3. Use of a photonic crystal for optical amplifier gain control

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2006-07-18

    An optical amplifier having a uniform gain profile uses a photonic crystal to tune the density-of-states of a gain medium so as to modify the light emission rate between atomic states. The density-of-states of the gain medium is tuned by selecting the size, shape, dielectric constant, and spacing of a plurality of microcavity defects in the photonic crystal. The optical amplifier is particularly useful for the regeneration of DWDM signals in long optical fibers.

  4. Rhythmic gain control during supramodal integration of approximate number.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Bernhard; Blankenburg, Felix; Summerfield, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    According to one view, neural oscillations structure information processing in time, determining whether sensory inputs have a strong or weak impact on behavior. Recent work showed that during sequential integration of visual inputs, stimuli that fall in the preferred phase of slow (1-3Hz), endogenous EEG activity carry greater weight in subsequent judgment. Here, we asked two questions. Firstly, is this phenomenon modality-specific, or is it supramodal? Secondly, does this effect occur at the level of sequential encoding, or only during decision formation? We analyzed scalp EEG recordings from healthy human participants while they compared the approximate number of visual, auditory or somatosensory pulses in two successive intervals (N1 and N2). Despite differences in activity evoked in different domains, a common, slowly-oscillating (~3Hz) choice-predictive signal was observed in all three modalities with a maximum coincident with pulse onset. Critically, this signal was present during N2 (when a decision was being formed) but absent during N1 (when perceptual information was encoded, but no decision could be made). In other words, rhythmic gain control during sequential processing is a supramodal phenomenon that occurs while information is integrated towards a categorical decision. PMID:26707891

  5. PID Controller Settings Based on a Transient Response Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Carlos M.; Lito, Patricia F.; Neves, Patricia S.; Da Silva, Francisco A.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental work on controller tuning for chemical engineering undergraduate students is proposed using a small heat exchange unit. Based upon process reaction curves in open-loop configuration, system gain and time constant are determined for first order model with time delay with excellent accuracy. Afterwards students calculate PID…

  6. Improved energy coupling into the gain region of the Ni-like Pd transient collisional x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Dunn, J; Filevich, J; Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V; Rocca, J; Hunter, J; Shepherd, R; Booth, R; Marconi, M

    2004-10-05

    We present within this paper a series of experiments, which yield new observations to further our understanding of the transient collisional x-ray laser medium. We use the recently developed technique of picosecond x-ray laser interferometry to probe the plasma conditions in which the x-ray laser is generated and propagates. This yields two dimensional electron density maps of the plasma taken at different times relative to the peak of the 600ps plasma-forming beam. In another experimental campaign, the output of the x-ray laser plasma column is imaged with a spherical multilayer mirror onto a CCD camera to give a two-dimensional intensity map of the x-ray laser output. Near-field imaging gives insights into refraction, output intensity and spatial mode structure. Combining these images with the density maps gives an indication of the electron density at which the x-ray laser is being emitted at (yielding insights into the effect of density gradients on beam propagation). Experimental observations coupled with simulations predict that most effective coupling of laser pump energy occurs when the duration of the main heating pulse is comparable to the gain lifetime ({approx}10ps for Ni-like schemes). This can increase the output intensity by more than an order of magnitude relative to the case were the same pumping energy is delivered within a shorter heating pulse duration (< 3ps). We have also conducted an experiment in which the output of the x-ray laser was imaged onto the entrance slit of a high temporal resolution streak camera. This effectively takes a one-dimensional slice of the x-ray laser spatial profile and sweeps it in time. Under some conditions we observe rapid movement of the x-ray laser ({approx} 3 {micro}m/ps) towards the target surface.

  7. Analytic Drag Controller guidance gains evaluation. Mission planning, mission analysis and software formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treybig, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a study to optimize the guidance gains for the analytical drag control entry guidance system are presented. The guidance gains were optimized for study points chosen in all phases of entry.

  8. Specification, Measurement, and Control of Electrical Switching Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javor, K.

    1999-01-01

    There have been several instances of susceptibility to switching transients. The Space Shuttle Spacelab Remote Acquisition Unit (RAU-A standard interface between Spacelab payloads and the Shuttle communications system) will shut down if the input 28 Vdc bus drops below 22 volts for more than 80 gs. Although a MIL-STD-461 derivative CS06 requirement was levied on the RAU, it failed to find this susceptibility. A heavy payload on one aircraft sags the 28 volt bus below 20 volts for milliseconds. Dc-dc converters have an operating voltage. A typical 28 Vdc-to-5 Vdc converter operates within tolerance when input potential is between 17-40 Vdc, A hold-up capacitor can be used to extend the time this range is presented to the convener when the line potential sags or surges outside this range. The designer must know the range of normal transients in order to choose the correct value of hold-up. This report describes the phenomena of electrical power bus transients induced by the switching of loads both on and off the bus, and control thereof.

  9. Robust gain-scheduling energy-to-peak control of vehicle lateral dynamics stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xinjie; Wang, Junmin

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the vehicle lateral dynamics stabilisation problem to enhance vehicle handling by considering time-varying longitudinal velocity. The longitudinal velocity is described by a polytope with finite vertices and a novel technique is proposed to reduce the number of vertices. Since the tyre dynamics is nonlinear, the cornering stiffness is represented via the norm-bounded uncertainty. Concerning the time-varying velocity and the nonlinear tyre model, a linear parameter-varying vehicle model is obtained. As the velocity and the states are measurable, a gain-scheduling state-feedback controller is introduced. In the lateral control, the sideslip angle is required to be as small as possible and the yaw rate is constrained to a certain level. Thus, the control objective is to minimise the sideslip angle while the yaw rate is under a prescribed level or constrain both the sideslip angle and the yaw rate to prescribed levels. To consider the transient response of the closed-loop system, the ?-stability is also employed in the energy-to-peak control. The optimal controller can be obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities. A nonlinear vehicle model is utilised to illustrate the design procedure and the effectiveness of the proposed design method. Finally, simulations and comparisons are carried out to show the significant advantage of the designed controller. Compared to the open-loop system, the closed-loop system with the designed controller can achieve much smaller sideslip angle and the yaw rate is closer to the desired yaw rate from a reference model. Therefore, the vehicle safety and the handling are both improved in our simulation cases.

  10. Parameter Transient Behavior Analysis on Fault Tolerant Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine (Technical Monitor); Shin, Jong-Yeob

    2003-01-01

    In a fault tolerant control (FTC) system, a parameter varying FTC law is reconfigured based on fault parameters estimated by fault detection and isolation (FDI) modules. FDI modules require some time to detect fault occurrences in aero-vehicle dynamics. This paper illustrates analysis of a FTC system based on estimated fault parameter transient behavior which may include false fault detections during a short time interval. Using Lyapunov function analysis, the upper bound of an induced-L2 norm of the FTC system performance is calculated as a function of a fault detection time and the exponential decay rate of the Lyapunov function.

  11. Exact methods for modal transient response analysis including feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melvin S.; Belvin, W. Keith

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a modal method for the analysis of controlled structural systems that retains the uncoupled nature of the classical transient response analysis of a structure subjected to a prescribed time-varying load. The control force is expanded as a Taylor series that remains on the right side of the equations, and it does not lead to a computational approach that requires coupling between modes on the left side. Retaining a sufficient number of terms in the series produces a solution to the modal equations that is accurate to machine precision. The approach is particularly attractive for large problems in which standard matrix exponential methods become computationally prohibitive. Numerical results are presented to show the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed approach for dynamic feedback compensation of a truss structure with local member modes in the controller bandwidth.

  12. Control of microbial fuel cell voltage using a gain scheduling control strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghani, Hitesh C.; Michie, Iain; Dinsdale, Richard M.; Guwy, Alan J.; Premier, Giuliano C.

    2016-08-01

    Recent microbial fuel cell (MFC) research frequently addresses matters associated with scale and deployability. Modularisation is often needed to reduce ohmic losses with increasing volume. Series/parallel is then often an obvious strategy to enhance power quality during operation, to make best use of generated electricity. Hence, voltage reversal resulting from power and voltage mismatch between cells become virtually unavoidable. Control MFC voltages could be used to stabilise MFC stacks. Here, nonlinear MFCs are controlled using simple gain scheduled Proportional + Integral actions. Parsimonious control may be necessary for implementation in MFC arrays, so minimising costs. Controller parameterisation used several linearised models over the dynamic operating range of the MFCs. Controller gains were then scheduled according to the operating conditions. A digital potentiometer was used to actuate the control, varying the current sourced from the MFC. The results show that the controller was able to control MFC voltages, rejecting the disturbances. It was shown that the controller was transferable between MFCs with different power performances. This study demonstrates that the control of MFCs can be achieved with relatively simple digital approaches, plausibly implementable using low cost microcontrollers, and likely to be useful in the effective deployment of MFCs in large scale arrays.

  13. Transient colloidal stability controls the particle formation of SBA-15.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Juanfang; Kjellman, Tomas; Sakamoto, Yasuhiro; Alfredsson, Viveka

    2012-08-01

    A hypothesis about (transient) colloidal stability as a controlling mechanism for particle formation in SBA-15 is presented. The hypothesis is based on results from both in situ and ex situ investigations, including cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), UV-vis spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cryo-TEM images show that particles grow via the formation of silica-Pluronic-water "flocs", which coalesce in a seemingly arbitrary manner. Despite this, the final material consists of well-defined particles with a small size distribution. We argue that the interface between the flocs and surrounding media is covered by Pluronic molecules, which provide steric stabilization. As the flocs grow, the coverage of polymers at the interface is increased until a stable size is reached, and that regulates the particle size. By targeting the characteristics of the Pluronic molecules, during the on-going synthesis, the hypothesis is tested. The results are consistent with the concept of (transient) colloidal stability. PMID:22758927

  14. Transient Colloidal Stability Controls the Particle Formation of SBA-15

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A hypothesis about (transient) colloidal stability as a controlling mechanism for particle formation in SBA-15 is presented. The hypothesis is based on results from both in situ and ex situ investigations, including cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), UV–vis spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cryo-TEM images show that particles grow via the formation of silica–Pluronic–water “flocs”, which coalesce in a seemingly arbitrary manner. Despite this, the final material consists of well-defined particles with a small size distribution. We argue that the interface between the flocs and surrounding media is covered by Pluronic molecules, which provide steric stabilization. As the flocs grow, the coverage of polymers at the interface is increased until a stable size is reached, and that regulates the particle size. By targeting the characteristics of the Pluronic molecules, during the on-going synthesis, the hypothesis is tested. The results are consistent with the concept of (transient) colloidal stability. PMID:22758927

  15. Subtractive, divisive and non-monotonic gain control in feedforward nets linearized by noise and delays

    PubMed Central

    Mejias, Jorge F.; Payeur, Alexandre; Selin, Erik; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André

    2014-01-01

    The control of input-to-output mappings, or gain control, is one of the main strategies used by neural networks for the processing and gating of information. Using a spiking neural network model, we studied the gain control induced by a form of inhibitory feedforward circuitry—also known as “open-loop feedback”—, which has been experimentally observed in a cerebellum-like structure in weakly electric fish. We found, both analytically and numerically, that this network displays three different regimes of gain control: subtractive, divisive, and non-monotonic. Subtractive gain control was obtained when noise is very low in the network. Also, it was possible to change from divisive to non-monotonic gain control by simply modulating the strength of the feedforward inhibition, which may be achieved via long-term synaptic plasticity. The particular case of divisive gain control has been previously observed in vivo in weakly electric fish. These gain control regimes were robust to the presence of temporal delays in the inhibitory feedforward pathway, which were found to linearize the input-to-output mappings (or f-I curves) via a novel variability-increasing mechanism. Our findings highlight the feedforward-induced gain control analyzed here as a highly versatile mechanism of information gating in the brain. PMID:24616694

  16. Two stage dual gate MESFET monolithic gain control amplifier for Ka-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolov, V.; Geddes, J.; Contolatis, A.

    1987-01-01

    A monolithic two stage gain control amplifier has been developed using submicron gate length dual gate MESFETs fabricated on ion implanted material. The amplifier has a gain of 12 dB at 30 GHz with a gain control range of over 30 dB. This ion implanted monolithic IC is readily integrable with other phased array receiver functions such as low noise amplifiers and phase shifters.

  17. Computer Models for IRIS Control System Transient Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gary D. Storrick; Bojan Petrovic; Luca Oriani

    2007-01-31

    This report presents results of the Westinghouse work performed under Task 3 of this Financial Assistance Award and it satisfies a Level 2 Milestone for the project. Task 3 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled “Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor” focuses on developing computer models for transient analysis. This report summarizes the work performed under Task 3 on developing control system models. The present state of the IRIS plant design – such as the lack of a detailed secondary system or I&C system designs – makes finalizing models impossible at this time. However, this did not prevent making considerable progress. Westinghouse has several working models in use to further the IRIS design. We expect to continue modifying the models to incorporate the latest design information until the final IRIS unit becomes operational. Section 1.2 outlines the scope of this report. Section 2 describes the approaches we are using for non-safety transient models. It describes the need for non-safety transient analysis and the model characteristics needed to support those analyses. Section 3 presents the RELAP5 model. This is the highest-fidelity model used for benchmark evaluations. However, it is prohibitively slow for routine evaluations and additional lower-fidelity models have been developed. Section 4 discusses the current Matlab/Simulink model. This is a low-fidelity, high-speed model used to quickly evaluate and compare competing control and protection concepts. Section 5 describes the Modelica models developed by POLIMI and Westinghouse. The object-oriented Modelica language provides convenient mechanisms for developing models at several levels of detail. We have used this to develop a high-fidelity model for detailed analyses and a faster-running simplified model to help speed the I&C development process

  18. Time Difference Amplifier with Robust Gain Using Closed-Loop Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakura, Toru; Mandai, Shingo; Ikeda, Makoto; Asada, Kunihiro

    This paper presents a Time Difference Amplifier (TDA) that amplifies the input time difference into the output time difference. Cross coupled chains of variable delay cells with the same number of stages are applicable for TDA, and the gain is adjusted via the closed-loop control. The TDA was fabricated using 65nm CMOS and the measurement results show that the time difference gain is 4.78 at a nominal power supply while the designed gain is 4.0. The gain is stable enough to be less than 1.4% gain shift under ±10% power supply voltage fluctuation.

  19. Gain-scheduled controller synthesis for a nonlinear PDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi Hashemi, Seyed; Werner, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Linear parameter-varying (LPV) modelling and control of a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) is considered in this article. The one-dimensional viscous Burgers' equation is discretised using a finite difference scheme; the boundary conditions are taken as control inputs and the velocities at two grid points are assumed to be measurable. A nonlinear high-order state space model is generated and proper orthogonal decomposition is used for model order reduction. After assessing the accuracy of the reduced model, a low-order functional observer is designed to estimate the reduced states which are linear combinations of the velocities at all grid points. A discrete-time quasi-LPV model that is affine in scheduling parameters is derived based on the reduced model. A polytopic LPV controller is synthesised based on a generalised plant containing the LPV model and the functional observer. More generally, the proposed method can be used to design an LPV controller for a quasi-LPV system with non-measurable scheduling parameters. Simulation results demonstrate the high tracking performance and disturbance and measurement noise rejection capabilities of the designed LPV controller compared with a linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller based on a linearised model.

  20. Galileo Spacecraft Scan Platform Celestial Pointing Cone Control Gain Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    In, C-H. C.; Hilbert, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    During September and October 1991, pictures of the Gaspra asteroid and neighboring stars were taken by the Galileo Optical Navigation (OPNAV) Team for the purpose of navigation the spacecraft for a successful Gaspra encounter. The star tracks in these pictures showed that the scan platform celestial pointing cone controller performed poorly in compensating for wobble-induced cone offsets.

  1. Transient analysis of energy Transfer Control (ECT) and compressor bleed concepts of remote lift fan control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The transient performance of two concepts for control of vertical takeoff aircraft remote lift fans is analyzed and discussed. Both concepts employ flow transfer between pairs of lift fans located in separate parts of the aircraft in order to obtain attitude control moments for hover and low-speed flight. The results presented are from a digital computer, dynamic analysis of the YJ97/LF460 remote drive turbofan. The transient responses of the two systems are presented for step demands in lift and moment.

  2. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Zahodne, Laura B.; Meyer, Oanh L.; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L.; Willis, Sherry L.; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L.; Rebok, George W.; Parisi, Jeanine M.

    2015-01-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  3. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE.

    PubMed

    Zahodne, Laura B; Meyer, Oanh L; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L; Willis, Sherry L; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L; Rebok, George W; Parisi, Jeanine M

    2015-09-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  4. Adaptive sliding mode control - convergence and gain boundedness revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Khayati, Karim

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews the main adaptive sliding mode controller (ASMC) designs for nonlinear systems with finite uncertainties of unknown bounds. Different statements of convergence referring to uniformly ultimate boundedness (UUB), asymptotic convergence (AC) and finite-time convergence (FTC) for ASMC shown in recent papers are analysed. Weaknesses and incomplete proofs apropos FTC are pointed out. Thereafter, a new approach is proposed to successfully demonstrate FTC of the so-called sliding variable. We identify a compensating phase and a reaching phase during the ASMC process. A new explicit form for estimating the upper-bound reaching time is provided for any bounded perturbation. An amended form of the real ASMC is recalled showing improved accuracy and chattering reduction. Finally, numerical and experimental applications are performed to convey the discussed results.

  5. Hemodynamic variability and cerebrovascular control after transient cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Philip D; Faulkner, James; O’Donnell, Terrence; Lanford, Jeremy; Wong, Lai-kin; Saleem, Saqib; Woolley, Brandon; Lambrick, Danielle; Stoner, Lee; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    We investigated if hemodynamic variability, cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, and their interrelationships differ between patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and controls. We recorded blood pressure (BP) and bilateral middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCAv) in a cohort of TIA patients (n = 17), and age-matched controls (n = 15). Spontaneous fluctuations in BP and MCAv were characterized by spectral power analysis, and CBF regulation was assessed by wavelet phase synchronization analysis in the very low- (0.02–0.07 Hz), low- (0.07–0.20 Hz), and high-frequency (0.20–0.40 Hz) ranges. Furthermore, cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity was assessed as a second metric of CBF regulation by inducing hypercapnia with 8% CO2 inhalation followed by hyperventilation driven hypocapnia. We found that TIA was associated with higher BP power (group effect, P < 0.05), but not MCAv power (P = 0.11). CBF regulation (assessed by wavelet phase synchronization and CO2 reactivity) was intact in patients (all P ≥ 0.075) across both hemispheres (all P ≥ 0.51). Pooled data (controls and affected hemisphere of patients) showed that BP and MCAv power were positively correlated at all frequency ranges (R2 = 0.20–0.80, all P < 0.01). Furthermore, LF phase synchronization index was a significant determinant of MCAv power (P < 0.05), while VLF and HF phase synchronization index, and TIA were not (all P ≥ 0.50). These results indicate that CBF stability and control is maintained in TIA patients, but BPV is markedly elevated. BPV attenuation may be an important therapeutic strategy for enhancing secondary stroke prevention in patients who suffer a TIA. PMID:26537345

  6. Hemodynamic variability and cerebrovascular control after transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Allan, Philip D; Faulkner, James; O'Donnell, Terrence; Lanford, Jeremy; Wong, Lai-Kin; Saleem, Saqib; Woolley, Brandon; Lambrick, Danielle; Stoner, Lee; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    We investigated if hemodynamic variability, cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, and their interrelationships differ between patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and controls. We recorded blood pressure (BP) and bilateral middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCAv) in a cohort of TIA patients (n = 17), and age-matched controls (n = 15). Spontaneous fluctuations in BP and MCAv were characterized by spectral power analysis, and CBF regulation was assessed by wavelet phase synchronization analysis in the very low- (0.02-0.07 Hz), low- (0.07-0.20 Hz), and high-frequency (0.20-0.40 Hz) ranges. Furthermore, cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity was assessed as a second metric of CBF regulation by inducing hypercapnia with 8% CO2 inhalation followed by hyperventilation driven hypocapnia. We found that TIA was associated with higher BP power (group effect, P < 0.05), but not MCAv power (P = 0.11). CBF regulation (assessed by wavelet phase synchronization and CO2 reactivity) was intact in patients (all P ≥ 0.075) across both hemispheres (all P ≥ 0.51). Pooled data (controls and affected hemisphere of patients) showed that BP and MCAv power were positively correlated at all frequency ranges (R(2) = 0.20-0.80, all P < 0.01). Furthermore, LF phase synchronization index was a significant determinant of MCAv power (P < 0.05), while VLF and HF phase synchronization index, and TIA were not (all P ≥ 0.50). These results indicate that CBF stability and control is maintained in TIA patients, but BPV is markedly elevated. BPV attenuation may be an important therapeutic strategy for enhancing secondary stroke prevention in patients who suffer a TIA. PMID:26537345

  7. Mechanisms of gain control by voltage-gated channels in intrinsically-firing neurons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ameera X; Burdakov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Gain modulation is a key feature of neural information processing, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In single neurons, gain can be measured as the slope of the current-frequency (input-output) relationship over any given range of inputs. While much work has focused on the control of basal firing rates and spike rate adaptation, gain control has been relatively unstudied. Of the limited studies on gain control, some have examined the roles of synaptic noise and passive somatic currents, but the roles of voltage-gated channels present ubiquitously in neurons have been less explored. Here, we systematically examined the relationship between gain and voltage-gated ion channels in a conductance-based, tonically-active, model neuron. Changes in expression (conductance density) of voltage-gated channels increased (Ca2+ channel), reduced (K+ channels), or produced little effect (h-type channel) on gain. We found that the gain-controlling ability of channels increased exponentially with the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window (voltage range associated with firing). For depolarization-activated channels, this produced a greater channel current per action potential at higher firing rates. This allowed these channels to modulate gain by contributing to firing preferentially at states of higher excitation. A finer analysis of the current-voltage relationship during tonic firing identified narrow voltage windows at which the gain-modulating channels exerted their effects. As a proof of concept, we show that h-type channels can be tuned to modulate gain by changing the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window. These results show how the impact of an ion channel on gain can be predicted from the relationship between channel kinetics and the membrane potential during firing. This is potentially relevant to understanding input-output scaling in a wide class of neurons found throughout the brain and other nervous systems

  8. Transient response and stability of the AGC-PI closed-loop controlled MEMS vibratory gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Chi, X. Z.; Ding, H. T.; Lin, L. T.; Yang, Z. C.; Yan, G. Z.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a detailed study on the transient response and stability of the automatic gain control (AGC) with a proportion-integral (PI) controller for a MEMS vibratory gyroscope, which constructs a closed-loop control system to make the gyroscope achieve a constant amplitude vibration at its resonant frequency. The nonlinear mathematical model for the control system is established by applying the averaging and linearization method, which is evaluated through numerical simulations. The stability and convergence characteristics of the whole loop are investigated by using the phase plane method and Routh-Hurwitz criterion. The analysis provides a quantitative methodology for selecting the system parameters to approach stability and an optimal transient response. The negative impact induced by drift of the resonant frequency and Q-factor is also discussed. Simulation results predicted by the model are shown to be in close agreement with the experimental results carried out on a doubly decoupled bulk micromachined gyroscope. By optimizing the control parameters, the measured rising time is less than 100 ms without obvious overshoot. The setting time of the whole loop is less than 200 ms with the relative fluctuation of velocity amplitude within approximately 16 ppm for an hour. The resulting overall performance of the gyroscope is tested under atmospheric pressure. The resonant frequencies and the Q-factor of the drive mode and sense mode are 2.986 kHz, 213 and 3.199 kHz, 233, respectively. The gyroscope achieves a scale factor of 27.6 mV/deg/s with nonlinearity less than 120 ppm in the full-scale range of 800° s-1. The threshold of sensitivity is measured to be about 0.005° s-1 with noise equivalent angular rate evaluated to be 0.001°/s/Hz1/2.

  9. Resistive wall mode feedback control in EXTRAP T2R with improved steady-state error and transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Brunsell, P. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Frassinetti, L.; Drake, J. R.

    2007-10-15

    Experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsa ring ker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] on feedback control of m=1 resistive wall modes (RWMs) are compared with simulations using the cylindrical linear magnetohydrodynamic model, including the dynamics of the active coils and power amplifiers. Stabilization of the main RWMs (n=-11,-10,-9,-8,+5,+6) is shown using modest loop gains of the order G{approx}1. However, other marginally unstable RWMs (n=-2,-1,+1,+2) driven by external field errors are only partially canceled at these gains. The experimental system stability limit is confirmed by simulations showing that the latency of the digital controller {approx}50 {mu}s is degrading the system gain margin. The transient response is improved with a proportional-plus-derivative controller, and steady-state error is improved with a proportional-plus-integral controller. Suppression of all modes is obtained at high gain G{approx}10 using a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controller.

  10. Reduced state feedback gain computation. [optimization and control theory for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H.

    1976-01-01

    Because application of conventional optimal linear regulator theory to flight controller design requires the capability of measuring and/or estimating the entire state vector, it is of interest to consider procedures for computing controls which are restricted to be linear feedback functions of a lower dimensional output vector and which take into account the presence of measurement noise and process uncertainty. Therefore, a stochastic linear model that was developed is presented which accounts for aircraft parameter and initial uncertainty, measurement noise, turbulence, pilot command and a restricted number of measurable outputs. Optimization with respect to the corresponding output feedback gains was performed for both finite and infinite time performance indices without gradient computation by using Zangwill's modification of a procedure originally proposed by Powell. Results using a seventh order process show the proposed procedures to be very effective.

  11. Coherent control in quantum dot gain media using shaped pulses: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Akhilesh Kumar; Karni, Ouri; Eisenstein, Gadi

    2015-11-16

    We present a numerical study of coherent control in a room temperature InAs/InP quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) using shaped ultra-short pulses. Both the gain and absorption regimes were analyzed for pulses with central wavelengths lying on either side of the inhomogeneously broadened gain spectrum. The numerical experiments predict that in the gain regime the coherent interactions between a QD SOA and a pulse can be controlled by incorporating a quadratic spectral phase (QSP) in the pulse profile. The sequential interaction with the gain medium of different spectral components of the pulse results in either suppression or enhancement of the coherent signatures on the pulse profile depending upon their proximity to the gain spectrum peak. In the absorption regime, positive QSP induces a negative chirp that adds up to that of a two photon absorption induced Kerr-like effect resulting in pulse compression while negative QSP enhances dispersive broadening of the pulse. PMID:26698476

  12. Gain competition induced mode evolution and resonance control in erbium-doped whispering-gallery microresonators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Fei; Lei, Fuchuan; Gao, Ming; Yang, Xu; Wang, Chuan; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Yang, Lan; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-05-01

    Precise control of resonance features in microcavities is of significant importance both for researches and applications. By exploiting gain provided by the doped rare earth ions or Raman gain, this can be achieved through changing the pump. Here we propose and experimentally show that by using gain competition, one can also control the evolution of resonance for the probe signal while the pump is kept unchanged. The transition of Lorentz peak, Fano-like resonance and Lorentz dip can be observed from the transmission spectra of the probe signal through tuning the auxiliary control signal. The theory based on coupled-mode theory and laser rate equations by setting the optical gains as time-dependent was constructed. This method can be used in the precise control of transmission spectra and the coupling regime between the waveguide and microcavities. PMID:27137568

  13. Loop gain stabilizing with an all-digital automatic-gain-control method for high-precision fiber-optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Chunxi; Li, Lijing; Song, Lailiang; Chen, Wen

    2016-06-10

    For a fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) using electronic dithers to suppress the dead zone, without a fixed loop gain, the deterministic compensation for the dither signals in the control loop of the FOG cannot remain accurate, resulting in the dither residuals in the FOG rotation rate output and the navigation errors in the inertial navigation system. An all-digital automatic-gain-control method for stabilizing the loop gain of the FOG is proposed. By using a perturbation square wave to measure the loop gain of the FOG and adding an automatic gain control loop in the conventional control loop of the FOG, we successfully obtain the actual loop gain and make the loop gain converge to the reference value. The experimental results show that in the case of 20% variation in the loop gain, the dither residuals are successfully eliminated and the standard deviation of the FOG sampling outputs is decreased from 2.00  deg/h to 0.62  deg/h (sampling period 2.5 ms, 10 points smoothing). With this method, the loop gain of the FOG can be stabilized over the operation temperature range and in the long-time application, which provides a solid foundation for the engineering applications of the high-precision FOG. PMID:27409016

  14. Gain control of photomultiplier tubes used in detecting differential absorption lidar returns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A technique for controlling the gain of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) 20. A voltage divider (resistors 45-49 in FIG. 1 and zener diodes 60-65 in FIG. 3) is used to control the potentials on dynodes 5, 7, and 9 of PMT 20. Transistor switches 53 and 58 provide the control of the voltage divider in FIG. 1 and photodiodes 66, 67 and 70 provide the control in FIG. 3. The gain control of PMT 20 is in the range from 100% to less than 0.001% (100,000 to 1).

  15. Strategies for Voltage Control and Transient Stability Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    2013-09-25

    As wind generation grows, its influence on power system performance will becoming increasingly noticeable. Wind generation di ffers from traditional forms of generation in numerous ways though, motivating the need to reconsider the usual approaches to power system assessment and performance enhancement. The project has investigated the impact of wind generation on transient stability and voltage control, identifying and addressing issues at three distinct levels of the power system: 1) at the device level, the physical characteristics of wind turbine generators (WTGs) are quite unlike those of synchronous machines, 2) at the wind-farm level, the provision of reactive support is achieved through coordination of numerous dissimilar devices, rather than straightforward generator control, and 3) from a systems perspective, the location of wind-farms on the sub-transmission network, coupled with the variability inherent in their power output, can cause complex voltage control issues. The project has sought to develop a thorough understanding of the dynamic behaviour of type-3 WTGs, and in particular the WECC generic model. The behaviour of such models is governed by interactions between the continuous dynamics of state variables and discrete events associated with limits. It was shown that these interactions can be quite complex, and may lead to switching deadlock that prevents continuation of the trajectory. Switching hysteresis was proposed for eliminating deadlock situations. Various type-3 WTG models include control blocks that duplicate integrators. It was shown that this leads to non-uniqueness in the conditions governing steady-state, and may result in pre- and post-disturbance equilibria not coinciding. It also gives rise to a zero eigenvalue in the linearized WTG model. In order to eliminate the anomalous behaviour revealed through this investigation, WECC has now released a new generic model for type-3 WTGs. Wind-farms typically incorporate a variety of

  16. Adaptation as a mechanism for gain control in cockroach ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Maria; Tichy, Harald

    2012-02-01

    In many sensory systems adaptation acts as a gain control mechanism that optimizes sensory performance by trading increased sensitivity to low stimulus intensity for decreased sensitivity to high stimulus intensity. Adaptation of insect antennal olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) has been studied for strong odour concentrations, either pulsed or constant. Here, we report that during slowly oscillating changes in the concentration of the odour of lemon oil, the ON and OFF ORNs on the antenna of the cockroach Periplaneta americana adapt to the actual odour concentration and the rate at which concentration changes. When odour concentration oscillates rapidly with brief periods, adaptation improves gain for instantaneous odour concentration and reduces gain for the rate of concentration change. Conversely, when odour concentration oscillates slowly with long periods, adaptation increases gain for the rate of change at the expense of instantaneous concentration. Without this gain control the ON and OFF ORNs would, at brief oscillation periods, soon reach their saturation level and become insensitive to further concentration increments and decrements. At long oscillation periods, on the other hand, the cue would simply be that the discharge begins to change. Because of the high gain for the rate of change, the cockroach will receive creeping changes in odour concentration, even if they persist in one direction. Gain control permits a high degree of precision at small rates when it counts most, without sacrificing the range of detection and without extending the measuring scale. PMID:22304687

  17. Nanoscale transient porosity controls large-scale metamorphic fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plümper, Oliver; Botan, Alexandru; Los, Catharina; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    investigations we used non-equilibrium thermodynamics and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the influence of nanoscale pore transport phenomena on metamorphic mineral replacement reactions. Our findings suggest that fluid transport through nanoscale transient pore networks may control regional-scale metamorphism and metasomatism, at least in the feldspar-dominated crust.

  18. A computational model for transient temperature rise in a dye laser gain medium pumped by a copper vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, V. S.; Gantayet, L. M.; Sridhar, G.; Singh, S.

    2014-02-01

    Spectrally stable dye lasers play an important role in techniques based on high resolution spectroscopy and atomic spectroscopy. The spectral purity of a dye laser is affected when the pump power to it is increased beyond the threshold. When the pump power is increased beyond the threshold, two mode oscillations occur which decrease the spectral purity of the dye laser. The effect of higher pump pulse energies on transient thermal effects has been studied using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model and the disturbances to the laser cavity have been studied using commercially available ray tracing software. The change in the cavity length was determined from the CFD model for several dye concentrations and pump powers. The results of the CFD model have been verified by published results and experimental results from our system. Our study shows that in the longitudinally pumped single mode laser change in the cavity length is a more dominant disturbance than thermal blooming. Our model is useful for the design of the dye cell.

  19. De Vries-Weber gain control and dark adaptation in human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Maarten A.

    2002-02-01

    Thresholds for seeing light from a stimulus are determined by a mechanism that pairs subliminal excitations from both halves of a twin unit. Such excitations stem from a package of k>=1 receptor responses. A half-unit contains one red or one green cone and P rods. The receptor's ``Weber machine'' controls the receptor's gain. Each half of a twin unit contains a ``de Vries machine,'' which controls the half's k number. In the dark the receptor's dark noise events reset its Weber machine and the receptor's relation to its de Vries machine. A pairing product for light perception also represents a direction event. The local time signs of the two subliminal excitations are crucial for the polarity, size, and pace of the direction event. In relation to the time when and the area in which the stimulus is presented, these signs have average latency periods that depend on intensity and average locations that depend on movement. Polarity depends on which of the two subliminal excitations happens to arrive first at the twin's pairing facility. The intra- and inter-twin pairings in a persepton for the perceptions of light, edge and movement and the probability summation of the pairing products of the mutually independent three sets of twins of the retrinet improve intensity discrimination. Cross-pairings of intra-receptor pairings in red and green cones of a trion for yellow improve visual discrimination further. Discrimination of stimuli that exploit the model's entire summation mechanisms and pairing facilities represents ``what the perfect human eye sees best.'' For the model this threshold of modulation in quantum absorption is the ideal limit that is prescribed by statistical physics. The lateral and meta interaction in a twin unit enhance the contrast of an edge and of a temporal transient. The precision of the local time sign of a half's stimulation determines the spatiotemporal hyperfunctions for location and speed. The model's design for the perfect retinal mosaic

  20. Adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control for the chaotic permanent magnet synchronous motor using Nussbaum gain

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shaohua

    2014-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control (DSC) for the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) system with chaotic behavior, disturbance and unknown control gain and parameters. Nussbaum gain is adopted to cope with the situation that the control gain is unknown. And the unknown items can be estimated by fuzzy logic system. The proposed controller guarantees that all the signals in the closed-loop system are bounded and the system output eventually converges to a small neighborhood of the desired reference signal. Finally, the numerical simulations indicate that the proposed scheme can suppress the chaos of PMSM and show the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  1. Adaptive tuning of feedback gain in time-delayed feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, J.; Hövel, P.; Flunkert, V.; Guzenko, P. Yu.; Fradkov, A. L.; Schöll, E.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that time-delayed feedback control can be improved by adaptively tuning the feedback gain. This adaptive controller is applied to the stabilization of an unstable fixed point and an unstable periodic orbit embedded in a chaotic attractor. The adaptation algorithm is constructed using the speed-gradient method of control theory. Our computer simulations show that the adaptation algorithm can find an appropriate value of the feedback gain for single and multiple delays. Furthermore, we show that our method is robust to noise and different initial conditions.

  2. Adaptive tuning of feedback gain in time-delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, J; Hövel, P; Flunkert, V; Guzenko, P Yu; Fradkov, A L; Schöll, E

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that time-delayed feedback control can be improved by adaptively tuning the feedback gain. This adaptive controller is applied to the stabilization of an unstable fixed point and an unstable periodic orbit embedded in a chaotic attractor. The adaptation algorithm is constructed using the speed-gradient method of control theory. Our computer simulations show that the adaptation algorithm can find an appropriate value of the feedback gain for single and multiple delays. Furthermore, we show that our method is robust to noise and different initial conditions. PMID:22225348

  3. Gain spectrum self controlling device and algorithm for mutiply pumped Raman amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia Ying

    2004-05-01

    For both forward- and backward-pumped Raman amplifiers, devices to perform gain-spectrum self-control of multi-laser pumps are depicted in this paper. The algorithm supporting the devices is presented also. The function of automatic control is suitable for on-line maintenance of WDM equipment.

  4. An ultrasonic transducer transient compensator design based on a simplified Variable Structure Control algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaodong; Wilkinson, Antony J; Paulson, Kevin S

    2014-02-01

    A non-linear control method, known as Variable Structure Control (VSC), is employed to reduce the duration of ultrasonic (US) transducer transients. A physically realizable system using a simplified form of the VSC algorithm is proposed for standard piezoelectric transducers and simulated. Results indicate a VSC-controlled transmitter reduces the transient duration to less than a carrier wave cycle. Applications include high capacity ultrasound communication and localization systems. PMID:23993746

  5. Visual angle is the critical variable mediating gain-related effects in manual control

    PubMed Central

    Haibach, Pamela. S.; Newell, Karl. M.

    2008-01-01

    Theoretically visual gain has been identified as a control variable in models of isometric force. However, visual gain is typically confounded with visual angle and distance, and the relative contribution of visual gain, distance, and angle to the control of force remains unclear. This study manipulated visual gain, distance, and angle in three experiments to examine the visual information properties used to regulate the control of a constant level of isometric force. Young adults performed a flexion motion of the index finger of the dominant hand in 20 s trials under a range of parameter values of the three visual variables. The findings demonstrate that the amount and structure of the force fluctuations were organized around the variable of visual angle, rather than gain or distance. Furthermore, the amount and structure of the force fluctuations changed considerably up to 1°, with little change higher than a 1° visual angle. Visual angle is the critical informational variable for the visuomotor system during the control of isometric force. PMID:16604313

  6. Automatic gain control in the bat's sonar receiver and the neuroethology of echolocation.

    PubMed

    Kick, S A; Simmons, J A

    1984-11-01

    The sensitivity of the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus, to sonar echoes at different time delays after sonar emissions was measured in a two-choice echo detection experiment. Since echo delay is perceptually equivalent to target range, the experiment effectively measured sensitivity to targets at different ranges. The bat's threshold for detecting sonar echoes at a short delay of only 1.0 msec after emissions (corresponding to a range of 17 cm) was 36 dB SPL (peak to peak), but the threshold decreased to 8 dB SPL at a longer delay of 6.4 msec (a range of 1.1 m). Prior research has shown that, at even longer delays (corresponding to ranges of 3 to 5 m), the bat's threshold is in the region of 0 dB SPL. Contractions of the bat's middle ear muscles synchronized with the production of echolocation sounds cause a transient loss in hearing sensitivity which appears to account for the observed echo detection threshold shifts. The bat's echo detection thresholds increase by approximately 11 dB for each reduction in target range by a factor of 2 over the span from 17 cm to 1.1 m. As range shortens, the amplitude of echoes from small targets also increases, by 12 dB for each 2-fold reduction in range. Thus, when approaching a target, the bat compensates for changes in echo strength as target range shortens by changing its hearing threshold. Since this compensation appears to occur in the middle ear, the bat regulates echoes reaching the cochlea to a stable amplitude during its approach to a target such as a flying insect. In addition to this automatic gain control linked to target range, the bat aims its head to track a target's position during approach, thus stabilizing echo amplitude even if the target's direction changes. We hypothesize that the bat's directional emissions, directional hearing, middle ear muscle contractions, and head aim response collectively create a three-dimensional spatial tracking filter which the bat locks onto targets to stabilize echo

  7. Controlled fundamental supermode operation of phase-locked arrays of gain-guided diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapon, E.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.; Katz, J.

    1984-01-01

    Uniform semiconductor laser arrays tend to oscillate in a superposition of their supermodes, thus leading to large beam divergence and spectral spread. Discrimination among the supermodes in phase-locked arrays is discussed theoretically. It is shown that supermode discrimination in gain-guided arrays, in favor of the fundamental supermode, is made possible by the near-field interference patterns which result from the complex optical fields of the gain-guided lasers. A fundamental supermode operation is demonstrated, for the first time, in GaAlAs/GaAs gain-guided laser arrays. This is achieved by control of the current (gain) profile across the array by means of individual laser contacts.

  8. Gain-scheduling Control of Rotary Inverted Pendulum by Weight Optimization and H∞ Loop Shaping Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yubai, Kazuhiro; Okuhara, Kazunori; Hirai, Junji

    Gain-scheduling control is one of effective methods for plants whose dynamics changes significantly according to its operating point. A frozen parameter method is known to be a practical gain-scheduling controller synthesis, which interpolates the controllers designed at the prespecified (frozen) operating points according to the current operation point. Hyde et al. proposed a gain-scheduling control that H∞ loop shaping procedure is adopted as a controller synthesis at each operating point. H∞ loop shaping procedure is based on loop shaping of an open loop characteristic by frequency weights and is known to be effective for plants with bad condition number. However, weight selection satisfying control specifications is hard job for a designer. This paper describes the design of a suboptimal weight and a controller by means of algorithm that maximizes the robust stability margin and shapes the open loop characteristic into the desired shape at each operating point. Moreover, we formulate a weight optimization problem as a generalized eigenvalue minimization problem, which reduces the designer's burden of weight selection. Finally, we realize robust and high performance control system by scheduling both weights and controllers. The effectiveness of the proposed control system is verified in terms of the achieved robust stability margin and experimental time responses of a rotary inverted pendulum which involves strong nonlinear dynamics.

  9. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  10. Sensory gain control (amplification) as a mechanism of selective attention: electrophysiological and neuroimaging evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Hillyard, S A; Vogel, E K; Luck, S J

    1998-01-01

    Both physiological and behavioral studies have suggested that stimulus-driven neural activity in the sensory pathways can be modulated in amplitude during selective attention. Recordings of event-related brain potentials indicate that such sensory gain control or amplification processes play an important role in visual-spatial attention. Combined event-related brain potential and neuroimaging experiments provide strong evidence that attentional gain control operates at an early stage of visual processing in extrastriate cortical areas. These data support early selection theories of attention and provide a basis for distinguishing between separate mechanisms of attentional suppression (of unattended inputs) and attentional facilitation (of attended inputs). PMID:9770220

  11. Gain scheduling adaptive control strategies for HVDC systems to accommodate large disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, J.; Sultan, M. )

    1994-02-01

    Techniques have been developed to permit the response of the controls for dc transmission systems to adapt to large system changes. A gain scheduling approach tunes the control as an on-line function of the effective short-circuit ratio and contingency indicators. The method has been tested by digital simulation, based on EMTP, of a back-to-back dc system. It has been found to be robust and control performance has been enhanced.

  12. Parallel climate model (PCM) control and transient simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, W. M.; Weatherly, J. W.; Meehl, G. A.; Semtner, A. J., Jr.; Bettge, T. W.; Craig, A. P.; Strand, W. G., Jr.; Arblaster, J.; Wayland, V. B.; James, R.; Zhang, Y.

    The Department of Energy (DOE) supported Parallel Climate Model (PCM) makes use of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3) and Land Surface Model (LSM) for the atmospheric and land surface components, respectively, the DOE Los Alamos National Laboratory Parallel Ocean Program (POP) for the ocean component, and the Naval Postgraduate School sea-ice model. The PCM executes on several distributed and shared memory computer systems. The coupling method is similar to that used in the NCAR Climate System Model (CSM) in that a flux coupler ties the components together, with interpolations between the different grids of the component models. Flux adjustments are not used in the PCM. The ocean component has 2/3° average horizontal grid spacing with 32 vertical levels and a free surface that allows calculation of sea level changes. Near the equator, the grid spacing is approximately 1/2° in latitude to better capture the ocean equatorial dynamics. The North Pole is rotated over northern North America thus producing resolution smaller than 2/3° in the North Atlantic where the sinking part of the world conveyor circulation largely takes place. Because this ocean model component does not have a computational point at the North Pole, the Arctic Ocean circulation systems are more realistic and similar to the observed. The elastic viscous plastic sea ice model has a grid spacing of 27km to represent small-scale features such as ice transport through the Canadian Archipelago and the East Greenland current region. Results from a 300year present-day coupled climate control simulation are presented, as well as for a transient 1% per year compound CO2 increase experiment which shows a global warming of 1.27°C for a 10year average at the doubling point of CO2 and 2.89°C at the quadrupling point. There is a gradual warming beyond the doubling and quadrupling points with CO2 held constant. Globally averaged sea level rise at the time of CO2 doubling is approximately 7cm and at the

  13. A model of top-down gain control in the auditory system.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Bruce A; Parker, Scott; Murphy, Dana

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate a model of top-down gain control in the auditory system, 6 participants were asked to identify 1-kHz pure tones differing only in intensity. There were three 20-session conditions: (1) four soft tones (25, 30, 35, and 40 dB SPL) in the set; (2) those four soft tones plus a 50-dB SPL tone; and (3) the four soft tones plus an 80-dB SPL tone. The results were well described by a top-down, nonlinear gain-control system in which the amplifier's gain depended on the highest intensity in the stimulus set. Individual participants' identification judgments were generally compatible with an equal-variance signal-detection model in which the mean locations of the distribution of effects along the decision axis were determined by the operation of this nonlinear amplification system. PMID:21487927

  14. Transient dynamics in motor control of patients with Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuter, Anne; Labrie, Christiane; Vasilakos, Konstantinon

    1991-10-01

    Experimental observations of movement disorders including tremor and voluntary microdisplacements recorded in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during a simple visuomotor tracking task are analyzed. The performance of patients with PD having a very large amplitude tremor is characterized either by the intermittent appearance of transient dynamics or by the presence of sudden transitions in the amplitude or frequency of the signal. The need to develop new tools to characterize changes in dynamics (i.e., transitions) and to redefine neurological degeneration, such as Parkinson's disease, in terms of qualitative changes in oscillatory behaviors is emphasized.

  15. A case-control study of transient global amnesia.

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, M; Anzalone, N; Morabito, A; Landi, G

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate risk factors and prognosis of transient global amnesia (TGA), three groups of 30 subjects each affected respectively by: (1) first-ever TGA; (2) first-ever transient ischaemic attack (TIA); (3) depressive neurosis, were compared. Prevalence of cerebrovascular risk factors was similar in patients with TGA and TIA, but significantly lower in the third group. CT showed more hypodense lesions in TIA patients than in those with TGA. In a mean follow-up of 36 months, five TGA patients experienced a TIA and three others had recurrence of TGA, but none suffered stroke or myocardial infarction. In the TIA group, four had recurrence of TIA, two suffered a stroke and two others a myocardial infarction, whereas none had TGA attacks. None of the patients of the third group had any ischaemic event during follow-up. The similar prevalence of risk factors, but the different prognosis between TGA and TIA patients, suggest that TGA is an ischaemic event, probably not triggered by thromboembolism but by a different, possibly vasospastic, mechanism. PMID:2926414

  16. Weight gain prevention in young adults: design of the study of novel approaches to weight gain prevention (SNAP) randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Weight gain during young adulthood is common and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Preventing this weight gain from occurring may be critical to improving long-term health. Few studies have focused on weight gain prevention, and these studies have had limited success. SNAP (Study of Novel Approaches to Weight Gain Prevention) is an NIH-funded randomized clinical trial examining the efficacy of two novel self-regulation approaches to weight gain prevention in young adults compared to a minimal treatment control. The interventions focus on either small, consistent changes in eating and exercise behaviors, or larger, periodic changes to buffer against expected weight gains. Methods/Design SNAP targets recruitment of six hundred young adults (18–35 years) with a body mass index between 21.0-30.0 kg/m2, who will be randomly assigned with equal probability to: (1) minimal intervention control; (2) self-regulation with Small Changes; or (3) self-regulation with Large Changes. Both interventions receive 8 weekly face-to-face group sessions, followed by 2 monthly sessions, with two 4-week refresher courses in each of subsequent years. Participants are instructed to report weight via web at least monthly thereafter, and receive monthly email feedback. Participants in Small Changes are taught to make small daily changes (~100 calorie changes) in how much or what they eat and to accumulate 2000 additional steps per day. Participants in Large Changes are taught to create a weight loss buffer of 5–10 pounds once per year to protect against anticipated weight gains. Both groups are encouraged to self-weigh daily and taught a self-regulation color zone system that specifies action depending on weight gain prevention success. Individualized treatment contact is offered to participants who report weight gains. Participants are assessed at baseline, 4 months, and then annually. The primary outcome is weight gain over an average of 3 years of follow

  17. Application of variable-gain output feedback for high-alpha control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.

    1990-01-01

    A variable-gain, optimal, discrete, output feedback design approach that is applied to a nonlinear flight regime is described. The flight regime covers a wide angle-of-attack range that includes stall and post stall. The paper includes brief descriptions of the variable-gain formulation, the discrete-control structure and flight equations used to apply the design approach, and the high performance airplane model used in the application. Both linear and nonlinear analysis are shown for a longitudinal four-model design case with angles of attack of 5, 15, 35, and 60 deg. Linear and nonlinear simulations are compared for a single-point longitudinal design at 60 deg angle of attack. Nonlinear simulations for the four-model, multi-mode, variable-gain design include a longitudinal pitch-up and pitch-down maneuver and high angle-of-attack regulation during a lateral maneuver.

  18. Non-Geiger mode single photon detector with multiple amplification and gain control mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nawar Rahman, Samia Hall, David; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2014-05-07

    A new type of single photon detector, Multiple Amplification Gain with Internal Control (MAGIC), is proposed and analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations based on a physical model of the device. The MAGIC detector has two coupled amplification mechanisms, avalanche multiplication and bipolar gain, and the net gain is regulated by a built-in feedback mechanism. Compared to conventional Geiger mode single photon avalanche detectors (SPADs), the MAGIC detector produces a much greater single photon detection efficiency of nearly 100%, low bit-error-ratio for single photon signals, and a large dynamic range. All these properties are highly desirable for applications that require single photon sensitivity and are absent for conventional Geiger-mode SPADs.

  19. Worst-case analysis and linear parameter-varying gain-scheduled control of aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob

    In this thesis, two main subjects are discussed. The first is a worst-case performance analysis, the second is a linear parameter varying (LPV) synthesis using a blending approach. On the first subject, a linear fractional transformation (LFT) model of the linearized X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) has been developed to facilitate the analysis of its flight control system. The LFT model represents uncertainty in nine aerodynamic stability derivatives at a given flight condition. The X-38 LFT model, combined with a controller at specific flight conditions, is used to determine the aerodynamic coefficients within a predefined set that result in the worst-case performance and worst-case gain/phase margins of the closed-loop system. LPV and mu controllers are synthesized for the X-38 CRV lateral-directional axes over the candidate flight envelope and compared with the baseline gain-scheduled classical control design. Worst-case analysis of the LPV and mu controllers are compared with the baseline gain-scheduled classical control design. Analysis and time simulations show that the LPV controller achieves significant performance and robustness improvements when compared to a linear mu controller and the baseline gain-scheduled controller. On the second subject, a quasi-LPV model of the F-16 longitudinal axes was developed using three methods: Jacobian linearization, state transformation and function substitution. Time simulations of quasi-LPV models show that the quasi-LPV models developed using state transformation and function substitution accurately represent the nonlinear dynamics of the F-16 longitudinal axes. In designing an LPV controller for the F-16 longitudinal axes, the function substitution quasi-LPV models are used since these quasi-LPV models can represent the nonlinear dynamics at non-trim points. Two LPV controllers are synthesized for the F-16 longitudinal axes for two separated flight envelopes: low and high altitude regions. Blending these controllers

  20. A novel analog/digital reconfigurable automatic gain control with a novel DC offset cancellation circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaofeng, He; Taishan, Mo; Chengyan, Ma; Tianchun, Ye

    2011-02-01

    An analog/digital reconfigurable automatic gain control (AGC) circuit with a novel DC offset cancellation circuit for a direct-conversion receiver is presented. The AGC is analog/digital reconfigurable in order to be compatible with different baseband chips. What's more, a novel DC offset cancellation (DCOC) circuit with an HPCF (high pass cutoff frequency) less than 10 kHz is proposed. The AGC is fabricated by a 0.18 μm CMOS process. Under analog control mode, the AGC achieves a 70 dB dynamic range with a 3 dB-bandwidth larger than 60 MHz. Under digital control mode, through a 5-bit digital control word, the AGC shows a 64 dB gain control range by 2 dB each step with a gain error of less than 0.3 dB. The DC offset cancellation circuits can suppress the output DC offset voltage to be less than 1.5 mV, while the offset voltage of 40 mV is introduced into the input. The overall power consumption is less than 3.5 mA, and the die area is 800 × 300 μm2.

  1. Auto gain control of EMCCD in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaoyi; Li, Dayu; Hu, Lifa; Mu, QuanQuan; Cao, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yukun; Wang, Shaoxin; Xuan, Li

    2016-12-01

    Electron multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) applied in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (S-H WFS) makes the wavefront sensing more efficient for adaptive optics (AO). However when the brightness of the observed target changes in large ranges in a few minutes, a fixed electron multiplying (EM) gain may not be optimum. Thus an auto-gain-control (AGC) method based on the spots image of the S-H WFS is proposed. The designed control value is the average value of the maximum signals of all the light spots in a frame. It has been demonstrated in the experiments that the control value is sensitive to the change of the target brightness, and is stable in the presence of detecting noises and turbulence influence. The goal value for control is predetermined based on the linear relation of the signal with the EM gain and the number of photons collected in sub-apertures. The conditions of the self-protection of the EMCCD are also considered for the goal value. Simulations and experiments indicate that the proposed control method is efficient, and keeps the sensing in a high SNR which reaches the upper SNR limit when sensing with EMCCD. The self-protection of the EMCCD is avoided during the whole sensing process.

  2. Effect of olive oil massage on weight gain in preterm infants: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Jabraeile, Mahnaz; Rasooly, Alehe Seyyed; Farshi, Mahni Rahkar; Malakouti, Jamileh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the fact that effect of massage with or without oil on the baby's weight gain is not clear, but recent studies have shown that massage with essential oils make lipid absorption through the skin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of olive oil massage on weight gain in preterm infants. Materials and Methods: This study was a single-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. In this study, infants who met inclusion criteria for the study were divided into two groups by using random numbers table. Newborns in intervention group were under massage for 10 days and 3 times for 15 min daily; the mother of these newborns had been trained already using olive oil. Moreover, the infants of the control group were under massaging without oil same as the above-mentioned method. Researchers weighed babies daily during 10 days and recorded it at the checklist. Data from the study were reviewed and analyzed by descriptive statistics and repeated measure test using the statistical software SPSS/13. Results: This study showed that the neonatal weight gain in the infants with the oil massage was 21 g daily in average, whereas the increase in infant massage without oil was 7 g. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Considering the positive effect of infant massage on weight gain in premature infants with olive oil, it is recommended that nurses use oil in infant massage in the neonatal units. PMID:27397955

  3. An optimal output feedback gain variation scheme for the control of plants exhibiting gross parameter changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moerder, Daniel D.

    1987-01-01

    A concept for optimally designing output feedback controllers for plants whose dynamics exhibit gross changes over their operating regimes was developed. This was to formulate the design problem in such a way that the implemented feedback gains vary as the output of a dynamical system whose independent variable is a scalar parameterization of the plant operating point. The results of this effort include derivation of necessary conditions for optimality for the general problem formulation, and for several simplified cases. The question of existence of a solution to the design problem was also examined, and it was shown that the class of gain variation schemes developed are capable of achieving gain variation histories which are arbitrarily close to the unconstrained gain solution for each point in the plant operating range. The theory was implemented in a feedback design algorithm, which was exercised in a numerical example. The results are applicable to the design of practical high-performance feedback controllers for plants whose dynamics vary significanly during operation. Many aerospace systems fall into this category.

  4. Experience gained with development and commissioning of retrofitted process control systems for large power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idzon, O. M.; Grekhov, L. L.

    2009-01-01

    Experience gained for many years at ZAO Interavtomatika with work on retrofitting control and monitoring systems of large power units is summarized. Principles based on which these systems should be retrofitted are considered together with the factors influencing the choice of retrofitting option, as well as decisions on constructing a process control system during full and partial retrofitting. Recommendations are given for the optimal scope of functions that should be incorporated in the software and hardware tools of a process control system during its retrofitting.

  5. Tandem chirped quasi-phase-matching grating optical parametric amplifier design for simultaneous group delay and gain control.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau-Lefort, M; Fejer, M M; Afeyan, Bedros

    2005-03-15

    We present a broadband optical parametric amplifier design using tapered gain and tandem chirped quasi-phase-matching gratings to obtain flat gain and group-delay spectra suitable for applications such as ultrashort-pulse amplification and fiber-optic communication systems. Although a tapered-gain amplifier consisting of a single chirped grating can provide constant gain over a wide frequency range, it cannot be used to control the group delay across the spectrum. We propose controlling both the gain and the group delay profiles using a two-stage amplifier configuration, in which the idler of the first is used as the input signal of the second. PMID:15792000

  6. Robust Gain-Scheduled Fault Tolerant Control for a Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Gregory, Irene

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an application of robust gain-scheduled control concepts using a linear parameter-varying (LPV) control synthesis method to design fault tolerant controllers for a civil transport aircraft. To apply the robust LPV control synthesis method, the nonlinear dynamics must be represented by an LPV model, which is developed using the function substitution method over the entire flight envelope. The developed LPV model associated with the aerodynamic coefficient uncertainties represents nonlinear dynamics including those outside the equilibrium manifold. Passive and active fault tolerant controllers (FTC) are designed for the longitudinal dynamics of the Boeing 747-100/200 aircraft in the presence of elevator failure. Both FTC laws are evaluated in the full nonlinear aircraft simulation in the presence of the elevator fault and the results are compared to show pros and cons of each control law.

  7. Post-Stall Aerodynamic Modeling and Gain-Scheduled Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Fen; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Kim, Sungwan

    2005-01-01

    A multidisciplinary research e.ort that combines aerodynamic modeling and gain-scheduled control design for aircraft flight at post-stall conditions is described. The aerodynamic modeling uses a decambering approach for rapid prediction of post-stall aerodynamic characteristics of multiple-wing con.gurations using known section data. The approach is successful in bringing to light multiple solutions at post-stall angles of attack right during the iteration process. The predictions agree fairly well with experimental results from wind tunnel tests. The control research was focused on actuator saturation and .ight transition between low and high angles of attack regions for near- and post-stall aircraft using advanced LPV control techniques. The new control approaches maintain adequate control capability to handle high angle of attack aircraft control with stability and performance guarantee.

  8. Extended Horizon Liftings for Periodic Gain Adjustments in Control Systems, and for Equalization of Communication Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Periodic gain adjustment in plants of irreducible order, n, or for equalization of communications channels is effected in such a way that the plant (system) appears to be minimum phase by choosing a horizon time N greater then n of liftings in periodic input and output windows Pu and Py, respectively, where N is an integer chosen to define the extent (length) of each of the windows Pu and Py, and n is the order of an irreducible input/output plant. The plant may be an electrical, mechanical or chemical system, in which case output tracking (OT) is carried out for feedback control or a communication channel, in which case input tracking (IT) is carried out. Conditions for OT are distinct from IT in terms of zero annihilation, namely for OT and of IT, where the OT conditions are intended for gain adjustments in the control system, and IT conditions are intended for equalization for communication channels.

  9. Distributed temperature sensing system using a commercial OTDR and a standard EDFA with controlled gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassan, Fabio R.; Salgado, Felipe C.; Fruett, Fabiano; Rosolem, Joao B.

    2016-05-01

    The distributed temperature sensor system based in the spontaneous Raman backscattering is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge, using a commercial OTDR (Optical Time Domain Reflectometer) and a standard erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) with controlled gain. We evaluated this approach in a 30 km of single mode fiber using an OTDR pulse width of 100 ns and an EDFA with 17 dBm of output power.

  10. Automatic control systems satisfying certain general criterions on transient behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boksenbom, Aaron S; Hood, Richard

    1952-01-01

    An analytic method for the design of automatic controls is developed that starts from certain arbitrary criterions on the behavior of the controlled system and gives those physically realizable equations that the control system can follow in order to realize this behavior. The criterions used are developed in the form of certain time integrals. General results are shown for systems of second order and of any number of degrees of freedom. Detailed examples for several cases in the control of a turbojet engine are presented.

  11. Top-down gain control of the auditory space map by gaze control circuitry in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Winkowski, Daniel E; Knudsen, Eric I

    2006-01-19

    High-level circuits in the brain that control the direction of gaze are intimately linked with the control of visual spatial attention. Immediately before an animal directs its gaze towards a stimulus, both psychophysical sensitivity to that visual stimulus and the responsiveness of high-order neurons in the cerebral cortex that represent the stimulus increase dramatically. Equivalent effects on behavioural sensitivity and neuronal responsiveness to visual stimuli result from focal electrical microstimulation of gaze control centres in monkeys. Whether the gaze control system modulates neuronal responsiveness in sensory modalities other than vision is unknown. Here we show that electrical microstimulation applied to gaze control circuitry in the forebrain of barn owls regulates the gain of midbrain auditory responses in an attention-like manner. When the forebrain circuit was activated, midbrain responses to auditory stimuli at the location encoded by the forebrain site were enhanced and spatial selectivity was sharpened. The same stimulation suppressed responses to auditory stimuli represented at other locations in the midbrain map. Such space-specific, top-down regulation of auditory responses by gaze control circuitry in the barn owl suggests that the central nervous system uses a common strategy for dynamically regulating sensory gain that applies across modalities, brain areas and classes of vertebrate species. This approach provides a path for discovering mechanisms that underlie top-down gain control in the central nervous system. PMID:16421572

  12. Bilateral gain control; an “innate predisposition” for all sorts of things

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Nicholas; Metta, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Empirical studies have revealed remarkable perceptual organization in neonates. Newborn behavioral distinctions have often been interpreted as implying functionally specific modular adaptations, and are widely cited as evidence supporting the nativist agenda. In this theoretical paper, we approach newborn perception and attention from an embodied, developmental perspective. At the mechanistic level, we argue that a generative mechanism based on mutual gain control between bilaterally corresponding points may underly a number of functionally defined “innate predispositions” related to spatial-configural perception. At the computational level, bilateral gain control implements beamforming, which enables spatial-configural tuning at the front end sampling stage. At the psychophysical level, we predict that selective attention in newborns will favor contrast energy which projects to bilaterally corresponding points on the neonate subject's sensor array. The current work extends and generalizes previous work to formalize the bilateral correlation model of newborn attention at a high level, and demonstrate in minimal agent-based simulations how bilateral gain control can enable a simple, robust and “social” attentional bias. PMID:24611045

  13. Sustained vs. Transient Cognitive Control: Evidence of a Behavioral Dissociation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funes, Maria Jesus; Lupianez, Juan; Humphreys, Glyn

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed whether two well known effects associated with cognitive control, conflict adaptation (the Gratton effect) and conflict context (proportion congruent effects), reflect a single common or separate control systems. To test this we examined if these two effects generalized from one kind of conflict to another by using a…

  14. Computer simulation of magnetization-controlled shunt reactors for calculating electromagnetic transients in power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karpov, A. S.

    2013-01-15

    A computer procedure for simulating magnetization-controlled dc shunt reactors is described, which enables the electromagnetic transients in electric power systems to be calculated. It is shown that, by taking technically simple measures in the control system, one can obtain high-speed reactors sufficient for many purposes, and dispense with the use of high-power devices for compensating higher harmonic components.

  15. Control Systems Engineering for Optimizing a Prenatal Weight Gain Intervention to Regulate Infant Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Danielle Symons; Dong, Yuwen; Rivera, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We used dynamical systems modeling to describe how a prenatal behavioral intervention that adapts to the needs of each pregnant woman may help manage gestational weight gain and alter the obesogenic intrauterine environment to regulate infant birth weight. Methods. This approach relies on integrating mechanistic energy balance, theory of planned behavior, and self-regulation models to describe how internal processes can be impacted by intervention dosages, and reinforce positive outcomes (e.g., healthy eating and physical activity) to moderate gestational weight gain and affect birth weight. Results. A simulated hypothetical case study from MATLAB with Simulink showed how, in response to our adaptive intervention, self-regulation helps adjust perceived behavioral control. This, in turn, changes the woman’s intention and behavior with respect to healthy eating and physical activity during pregnancy, affecting gestational weight gain and infant birth weight. Conclusions. This article demonstrates the potential for real-world applications of an adaptive intervention to manage gestational weight gain and moderate infant birth weight. This model could be expanded to examine the long-term sustainable impacts of an intervention that varies according to the participant’s needs on maternal postpartum weight retention and child postnatal eating behavior. PMID:24832411

  16. Vehicle rollover avoidance by application of gain-scheduled LQR controllers using state observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Poggetto, Vinicius F.; Serpa, Alberto L.

    2016-02-01

    Many researches have been conducted in the area of control applied to vehicle dynamics, aiming at reducing the possibility of the occurrence of the type of accident known as rollover. In this research, based on a common nonlinear model and its linearisation, a method for properly selecting matrices for solving the Riccati equation considering different speeds was proposed. The method showed in which ways speed really influences the choice of controller gains. By developing the dynamic equations for the yaw- and roll-coupled motions and modelling of controllers and state observers, it is possible to compare the efficacy of this control strategy using both linear and nonlinear simulations using Matlab. Significant results were obtained regarding the reduction of the rollover coefficient for a double-lane change manoeuvre at different speeds, thus indicating advantages of using this controller in practical cases.

  17. Preventing Weight Gain in Women in Rural Communities: A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, Catherine; Harrison, Cheryce; Kozica, Samantha; Zoungas, Sophia; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Teede, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions in both developed and developing countries. Even modest weight gain increases the risk for chronic illness, yet evidence-based interventions to prevent weight gain are rare. This trial will determine if a simple low-intensity intervention can prevent weight gain in women compared to general health information. Methods and Findings We conducted a 1-yr pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial in 41 Australian towns (clusters) randomised using a computer-generated randomisation list for intervention (n = 21) or control (n = 20). Women aged 18 to 50 yr were recruited from the general population to receive a 1-yr self-management lifestyle intervention (HeLP-her) consisting of one group session, monthly SMS text messages, one phone coaching session, and a program manual, or to a control group receiving one general women’s health education session. From October 2012 to April 2014 we studied 649 women, mean age 39.6 yr (+/− SD 6.7) and BMI of 28.8 kg/m2 (+/− SD 6.9) with the primary outcome weight change between groups at 1 yr. The mean change in the control was +0.44 kg (95% CI −0.09 to 0.97) and in the intervention group −0.48kg (95% CI −0.99 to 0.03) with an unadjusted between group difference of −0.92 kg (95% CI −1.67 to −0.16) or −0.87 kg (95% CI −1.62 to −0.13) adjusted for baseline values and clustering. Secondary outcomes included improved diet quality and greater self-management behaviours. The intervention appeared to be equally efficacious across all age, BMI, income, and education subgroups. Loss to follow-up included 23.8% in the intervention group and 21.8% in the control group and was within the anticipated range. Limitations include lack of sensitive tools to measure the small changes to energy intake and physical activity. Those who gained weight may have been less inclined to return for 1 yr weight measures. Conclusions A low intensity lifestyle program can prevent the

  18. A Nonlinear Excitation Controller Design Method for Terminal Voltage Regulation and Transient Stability Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chongxin; Zhang, Kaifeng; Dai, Xianzhong; Zang, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a cascade control method to design a nonlinear excitation controller to guarantee the terminal voltage regulation and the transient stability. Firstly, a nonlinear automatic voltage regulator (NAVR) in the inner loop is designed to control the terminal voltage exactly. Secondly, the generator model including the NAVR is transformed to be a reduced one. Subsequently, based on the reduced generator model, the nonlinear power system stabilizer in the external loop is designed to enhance the transient stability of the power systems. Furthermore, a coordination strategy is presented to improve the performances of the terminal voltage regulation in the steady state and the stability in the transient state. Finally, the proposed method is verified by numerous simulation results.

  19. Electronically controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications--Part 2: Transient tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Paul J.; Salant, Richard F.

    1995-01-01

    An electronically controlled mechanical seal for use as the purge gas seal in a liquid oxygen turbopump has been fabricated and tested under transient operating conditions. The thickness of the lubricating film is controlled by adjusting the coning of the carbon face. This is accomplished by applying a voltage to a piezoelectric actuator to which the carbon face is bonded. The seal has been operated with a closed-loop control system that utilizes either the leakage rate or seal face temperature as the feedback. Both speed and pressure transients have been imposed on the seal. The transient tests have demonstrated that the seal is capable of maintaing low leakage rates while limiting face temperatures.

  20. Design of Constant Gain Dissipative Controllers for Eigensystem Assignment in Passive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Gupta, Sandeep

    1998-01-01

    Partial eigensystem assignment with output feedback can lead to an unstable closed-loop system. However, output feedback with passive linear time-invariant systems, such as flexible space structures, is guaranteed to be stable if the controller is dissipative. This paper presents a novel approach for synthesis of dissipative output feedback gain matrices for assigning a selected number of closed-loop poles. Dissipativity of a gain matrix is known to be equivalent to positive semidefiniteness of the symmetric part of the matrix. A sequential procedure is presented to assign one self-conjugate pair of closed-loop eigenvalues at each step using dissipative output feedback gain matrices, while ensuring that the eigenvalues assigned in the previous steps are not disturbed. The problem of assigning one closed-loop pair is reduced to a constrained solution of a system of quadratic equations, and necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a solution are presented. A minimax approach is presented for determining parameters which satisfy these conditions. This method can assign as many closed-loop system poles as the number of control inputs. A numerical example of damping enhancement for a flexible structure is presented to demonstrate the approach.

  1. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A low power automatic gain control loop for a receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guofeng, Li; Zhiqing, Geng; Nanjian, Wu

    2010-09-01

    This paper proposes a new structure to lower the power consumption of a variable gain amplifier (VGA) and keep the linearity of the VGA unchanged. The structure is used in a high rate amplitude-shift keying (ASK) based IF-stage. It includes an automatic gain control (AGC) loop and ASK demodulator. The AGC mainly consists of six-stage VGAs. The IF-stage is realized in 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The measurement results show that the power consumption of the whole system is very low. The system consumes 730 μA while operating at 1.8 V. The minimum ASK signal the system could detect is 0.7 mV (peak to peak amplitude).

  2. Tonic Firing Rate Controls Dendritic Ca2+ Signaling and Synaptic Gain in Substantia Nigra Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Travis A.

    2015-01-01

    Substantia nigra dopamine neurons fire tonically resulting in action potential backpropagation and dendritic Ca2+ influx. Using Ca2+ imaging in acute mouse brain slices, we find a surprisingly steep relationship between tonic firing rate and dendritic Ca2+. Increasing the tonic rate from 1 to 6 Hz generated Ca2+ signals up to fivefold greater than predicted by linear summation of single spike-evoked Ca2+-transients. This “Ca2+ supralinearity” was produced largely by depolarization of the interspike voltage leading to activation of subthreshold Ca2+ channels and was present throughout the proximal and distal dendrites. Two-photon glutamate uncaging experiments show somatic depolarization enhances NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ signals >400 μm distal to the soma, due to unusually tight electrotonic coupling of the soma to distal dendrites. Consequently, we find that fast tonic firing intensifies synaptically driven burst firing output in dopamine neurons. These results show that modulation of background firing rate precisely tunes dendritic Ca2+ signaling and provides a simple yet powerful mechanism to dynamically regulate the gain of synaptic input. PMID:25855191

  3. SO2 control by electric utilities: What are the gains from trade?

    SciTech Connect

    Burtraw, D.; Carlson, C.; Cropper, M.; Palmer, K.

    1997-12-31

    Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, which establishes a market for transferrable sulfur dioxide discharge permits (SO{sub 2} allowances), has been hailed by economists as a triumph of economic incentives over command and control regulation. The gains from using economic incentives are a reduction in the costs of pollution control: Firms operating at high marginal pollution abatement costs are supposed to purchase the right to emit SO{sub 2} from firms operating at low marginal abatement costs, with cost savings resulting as abatement shifts from high-to-low marginal cost firms. flow large are the potential cost savings from SO{sub 2} allowance trading? How many of these gains have been realized during the first year of operation of the allowance market? To answer these questions requires estimates of the marginal cost of abating SO{sub 2} emissions for all generating units affected by Title IV of the CAAA. While there have been various engineering cost estimates of abatement costs and of the gains from trade, there have been no estimates based on the actual responses of plants to changes in emissions standards and input prices. The purpose of this paper is to provide such estimates. To provide econometric estimates of marginal abatement costs and the potential gains from trade we have assembled a database covering the years 1985-94, that contains over 800 coal-fired generating units. In 1994 these units produced 87 percent of the SO{sub 2} emissions generated by all coal-fired power plants in the United States and accounted for 77 percent of the heat input consumed by all coal-fired power plants. For each generating unit we have annual observations on labor, generating capital, abatement capital, and inputs of high- and low-sulfur coal. We also know the emissions standard facing the generator, as well as its output and mean annual emissions rate. Data on input prices complete the dataset.

  4. The effects of control-display gain on performance of race car drivers in an isometric braking task.

    PubMed

    de Winter, J C F; de Groot, S

    2012-12-01

    To minimise lap times during car racing, it is important to build up brake forces rapidly and maintain precise control. We examined the effect of the amplification factor (gain) between brake pedal force and a visually represented output value on a driver's ability to track a target value. The test setup was a formula racing car cockpit fitted with an isometric brake pedal. Thirteen racing drivers performed tracking tasks with four control-display gains and two target functions: a step function (35 trials per gain) and a multisine function (15 trials per gain). The control-display gain had only minor effects on root mean-squared error between output value and target value, but it had large effects on build-up speed, overshoot, within-participants variability, and self-reported physical load. The results confirm the hypothesis that choosing an optimum gain involves balancing stability against physical effort. PMID:22897409

  5. Sensori-sensory afferent conditioning with leg movement: gain control in spinal reflex and ascending paths.

    PubMed

    Brooke, J D; Cheng, J; Collins, D F; McIlroy, W E; Misiaszek, J E; Staines, W R

    1997-03-01

    Studies are reviewed, predominantly involving healthy humans, on gain changes in spinal reflexes and supraspinal ascending paths during passive and active leg movement. The passive movement research shows that the pathways of H reflexes of the leg and foot are down-regulated as a consequence of movement-elicited discharge from somatosensory receptors, likely muscle spindle primary endings, both ipsi- and contralaterally. Discharge from the conditioning receptors in extensor muscles of the knee and hip appears to lead to presynaptic inhibition evoked over a spinal path, and to long-lasting attenuation when movement stops. The ipsilateral modulation is similar in phase to that seen with active movement. The contralateral conditioning does not phase modulate with passive movement and modulates to the phase of active ipsilateral movement. There are also centrifugal effects onto these pathways during movement. The pathways of the cutaneous reflexes of the human leg also are gain-modulated during active movement. The review summarizes the effects across muscles, across nociceptive and non-nociceptive stimuli and over time elapsed after the stimulus. Some of the gain changes in such reflexes have been associated with central pattern generators. However, the centripetal effect of movement-induced proprioceptive drive awaits exploration in these pathways. Scalp-recorded evoked potentials from rapidly conducting pathways that ascend to the human somatosensory cortex from stimulation sites in the leg also are gain-attenuated in relation to passive movement-elicited discharge of the extensor muscle spindle primary endings. Centrifugal influences due to a requirement for accurate active movement can partially lift the attenuation on the ascending path, both during and before movement. We suggest that a significant role for muscle spindle discharge is to control the gain in Ia pathways from the legs, consequent or prior to their movement. This control can reduce the strength of

  6. Optimal control of transient dynamics in balanced networks supports generation of complex movements.

    PubMed

    Hennequin, Guillaume; Vogels, Tim P; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2014-06-18

    Populations of neurons in motor cortex engage in complex transient dynamics of large amplitude during the execution of limb movements. Traditional network models with stochastically assigned synapses cannot reproduce this behavior. Here we introduce a class of cortical architectures with strong and random excitatory recurrence that is stabilized by intricate, fine-tuned inhibition, optimized from a control theory perspective. Such networks transiently amplify specific activity states and can be used to reliably execute multidimensional movement patterns. Similar to the experimental observations, these transients must be preceded by a steady-state initialization phase from which the network relaxes back into the background state by way of complex internal dynamics. In our networks, excitation and inhibition are as tightly balanced as recently reported in experiments across several brain areas, suggesting inhibitory control of complex excitatory recurrence as a generic organizational principle in cortex. PMID:24945778

  7. Redesign of a Variable-Gain Output Feedback Longitudinal Controller Flown on the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a redesigned longitudinal controller that flew on the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) during calendar years (CY) 1995 and 1996. Linear models are developed for both the modified controller and a baseline controller that was flown in CY 1994. The modified controller was developed with three gain sets for flight evaluation, and several linear analysis results are shown comparing the gain sets. A Neal-Smith flying qualities analysis shows that performance for the low- and medium-gain sets is near the level 1 boundary, depending upon the bandwidth assumed, whereas the high-gain set indicates a sensitivity problem. A newly developed high-alpha Bode envelope criterion indicates that the control system gains may be slightly high, even for the low-gain set. A large motion-base simulator in the United Kingdom was used to evaluate the various controllers. Desired performance, which appeared to be satisfactory for flight, was generally met with both the low- and medium-gain sets. Both the high-gain set and the baseline controller were very sensitive, and it was easy to generate pilot-induced oscillation (PIO) in some of the target-tracking maneuvers. Flight target-tracking results varied from level 1 to level 3 and from no sensitivity to PIO. These results were related to pilot technique and whether actuator rate saturation was encountered.

  8. Gate Controlled Photocurrent Generation Mechanisms in High-Gain In₂Se₃ Phototransistors.

    PubMed

    Island, J O; Blanter, S I; Buscema, M; van der Zant, H S J; Castellanos-Gomez, A

    2015-12-01

    Photocurrent in photodetectors incorporating van der Waals materials is typically produced by a combination of photocurrent generation mechanisms that occur simultaneously during operation. Because of this, response times in these devices often yield to slower, high gain processes, which cannot be turned off. Here we report on photodetectors incorporating the layered material In2Se3, which allow complete modulation of a high gain, photogating mechanism in the ON state in favor of fast photoconduction in the OFF state. While photoconduction is largely gate independent, photocurrent from the photogating effect is strongly modulated through application of a back gate voltage. By varying the back gate, we demonstrate control over the dominant mechanism responsible for photocurrent generation. Furthermore, because of the strong photogating effect, these direct-band gap, multilayer phototransistors produce ultrahigh gains of (9.8 ± 2.5) × 10(4) A/W and inferred detectivities of (3.3 ± 0.8) × 10(13) Jones, putting In2Se3 among the most sensitive 2D materials for photodetection studied to date. PMID:26540135

  9. Voluntary Fasting to Control Post-Ramadan Weight Gain among Overweight and Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Suriani; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Latiff, Khalib A.; Saad, Hazizi A.; Majid, Latifah A.; Othman, Fadlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of an Islamic voluntary fasting intervention to control post-Ramadan weight gain. Methods: This study was conducted between July and November 2011. Two weight loss intervention programmes were developed and implemented among groups of overweight or obese Malay women living in the Malaysian cities of Putrajaya and Seremban: a standard programme promoting control of food intake according to national dietary guidelines (group B) and a faith-based programme promoting voluntary fasting in addition to the standard programme (group A). Participants’ dietary practices (i.e., voluntary fasting practices, frequency of fruit/vegetable consumption per week and quantity of carbohydrates/protein consumed per day), body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, fasting blood high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and total cholesterol (TC):HDL-C ratio were assessed before Ramadan and three months post-Ramadan. Results: Voluntary fasting practices increased only in group A (P <0.01). Additionally, the quantity of protein/carbohydrates consumed per day, mean diastolic pressure and TC:HDL-C ratio decreased only in group A (P <0.01, 0.05, 0.02 and <0.01, respectively). Frequency of fruit/vegetable consumption per week, as well as HDL-C levels, increased only in group A (P = 0.03 and <0.01, respectively). Although changes in BMI between the groups was not significant (P = 0.08), BMI decrease among participants in group A was significant (P <0.01). Conclusion: Control of post-Ramadan weight gain was more evident in the faith-based intervention group. Healthcare providers should consider faith-based interventions to encourage weight loss during Ramadan and to prevent post-Ramadan weight gain among patients. PMID:25685394

  10. Gain-scheduling multivariable LPV control of an irrigation canal system.

    PubMed

    Bolea, Yolanda; Puig, Vicenç

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multivariable linear parameter varying (LPV) controller with a gain scheduling Smith Predictor (SP) scheme applicable to open-flow canal systems. This LPV controller based on SP is designed taking into account the uncertainty in the estimation of delay and the variation of plant parameters according to the operating point. This new methodology can be applied to a class of delay systems that can be represented by a set of models that can be factorized into a rational multivariable model in series with left/right diagonal (multiple) delays, such as, the case of irrigation canals. A multiple pool canal system is used to test and validate the proposed control approach. PMID:27184416

  11. Adaptive control and noise suppression by a variable-gain gradient algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merhav, S. J.; Mehta, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    An adaptive control system based on normalized LMS filters is investigated. The finite impulse response of the nonparametric controller is adaptively estimated using a given reference model. Specifically, the following issues are addressed: The stability of the closed loop system is analyzed and heuristically established. Next, the adaptation process is studied for piecewise constant plant parameters. It is shown that by introducing a variable-gain in the gradient algorithm, a substantial reduction in the LMS adaptation rate can be achieved. Finally, process noise at the plant output generally causes a biased estimate of the controller. By introducing a noise suppression scheme, this bias can be substantially reduced and the response of the adapted system becomes very close to that of the reference model. Extensive computer simulations validate these and demonstrate assertions that the system can rapidly adapt to random jumps in plant parameters.

  12. Impacts of P-f & Q-V Droop Control on MicroGrids Transient Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao-xia, Xiao; Hong-wei, Fang

    Impacts of P-f & Q-V droop control on MicroGrid transient stability was investigated with a wind unit of asynchronous generator in the MicroGrid. The system frequency stability was explored when the motor load starts and its load power changes, and faults of different types and different locations occurs. The simulations were done by PSCAD/EMTDC.

  13. The Neural Basis of Sustained and Transient Attentional Control in Young Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banich, Marie T.; Burgess, Gregory C.; Depue, Brendan E.; Ruzic, Luka; Bidwell, L. Cinnamon; Hitt-Laustsen, Sena; Du, Yiping P.; Willcutt, Erik G.

    2009-01-01

    Differences in neural activation during performance on an attentionally demanding Stroop task were examined between 23 young adults with ADHD carefully selected to not be co-morbid for other psychiatric disorders and 23 matched controls. A hybrid blocked/single-trial design allowed for examination of more sustained vs. more transient aspects of…

  14. CONTROL OF TRANSIENT INCINERATOR EMISSIONS WITH AN OXYGEN BASED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The subject of this paper is the experience with a novel and field-proven method for the enhanced control of transient emissions from rotary kiln incinerators using oxygen enrichment. hen high-BTU content wastes are fed into rotary kiln incinerators in an intermittent mode (typic...

  15. Phase control of the transient resonance of the automatic ball balancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalczyk, Jerzy; Pakuła, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Hazards related to undesired increases of vibration amplitudes in transient resonance of vibroinsulated rotor systems with automatic ball balancer (ABB) are discussed in the paper. The application of the phase control method with taking into account the limited drive power is proposed for these amplitudes reduction. The high efficiency of this approach is indicated.

  16. Active control of the forced and transient response of a finite beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Structural vibrations from a point force are modelled on a finite beam. This research explores the theoretical limit on controlling beam vibrations utilizing another point source as an active controller. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. For harmonic excitation, control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam. Control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the required interval, is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. The form of the controller is specified as either one or two delayed pulses, thus constraining the controller to be casual. The best possible control is examined while varying the region of control and the controller location. It is found that control is always possible using either one or two control pulses.

  17. H∞ and H2 control of multi-agent systems with transient performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyao; Duan, Zhisheng; Zhao, Yu; Qin, Guozheng; Yan, Yingxin

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the H∞ consensus control and H2 robust control synthesised with transient performance problems are investigated for a group of autonomous agents with linear or linearised dynamics. Based on the relative information between neighbouring agents and a subset of absolute information of the agents, distributed controllers are proposed for both H∞ and H2 cases. Compared with the existing protocols, the one presented in this article focuses on improving the transient performance of the consensus problem. By using the tools from matrix analysis and robust control theory, conditions for the existence of controllers to those problems under an undirected communication topology are provided. Then, it is shown that the H2 performance limit of uncertain systems under a distributed controller equals the minimum H∞ consensus index synthesised with transient performance of a single agent by using a state feedback controller, independent of the communication topology. Finally, a simulation example as an application in Raptor-90 helicopter is proposed to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  18. Extended horizon lifting for periodic gain adjustment in control systems, and for equalization of communication channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Periodic gain adjustment in plants of irreducible order, n, or for equalization of communications channels is effected in such a way that the plant (system) appears to be minimum phase by choosing a horizon time N is greater than n of liftings in periodic input and output windows rho sub u and rho sub y, respectively, where N is an integer chosen to define the extent (length) of each of the windows rho sub u and rho sub y, and n is the order of an irreducible input/output plant. The plant may be an electrical, mechanical, or chemical system, in which case output tracking (OT) is carried out for feedback control or a communication channel, in which case input tracking (IT) is performed. Conditions for OT are distinct from IT in terms of zero annihilation, namely H(sub s)H(sub s)(sup +) = I for OT and H(sub s)H(sub s)(sup +) = I of IT, where the OT conditions are intended for gain adjustments in the control system, and IT conditions are intended for equalization for communication channels.

  19. Prediction of pressure and flow transients in a gaseous bipropellant reaction control rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowsky, J. J.; Mcmanus, H. N., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An analytic model is developed to predict pressure and flow transients in a gaseous hydrogen-oxygen reaction control rocket engine feed system. The one-dimensional equations of momentum and continuity are reduced by the method of characteristics from partial derivatives to a set of total derivatives which describe the state properties along the feedline. System components, e.g., valves, manifolds, and injectors are represented by pseudo steady-state relations at discrete junctions in the system. Solutions were effected by a FORTRAN IV program on an IBM 360/65. The results indicate the relative effect of manifold volume, combustion lag time, feedline pressure fluctuations, propellant temperature, and feedline length on the chamber pressure transient. The analytical combustion model is verified by good correlation between predicted and observed chamber pressure transients. The developed model enables a rocket designer to vary the design parameters analytically to obtain stable combustion for a particular mode of operation which is prescribed by mission objectives.

  20. Sucrose Represses the Developmentally Controlled Transient Activation of the Plastocyanin Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Dijkwel, P. P.; Kock, PAM.; Bezemer, R.; Weisbeek, P. J.; Smeekens, SCM.

    1996-01-01

    The plastocyanin (PC) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is activated independently of light during early seedling development. In etiolated seedlings, PC mRNA levels increase transiently and a maximum dark level is reached after 2 d of growth in darkness. In etiolated transgenic seedlings carrying a chimeric PC-promoter: luciferase fusion gene, luciferase activity is similarly increased after 2 d of growth. The transient increase in PC mRNA and luciferase activity levels can be repressed by sucrose. Nonmetabolizable sugars and polyethylene glycol do not have a major effect on PC gene expression. Also, light-grown seedlings show a similar transient and sucrose-sensitive increase in PC mRNA levels and luciferase activity, as in dark-grown seedlings, but here expression levels are 15- fold higher. These findings suggest the presence of a sucrose-sensitive, developmentally controlled expression mechanism that operates independently of light. PMID:12226197

  1. Concerted Efforts to Control or Eliminate Neglected Tropical Diseases: How Much Health Will Be Gained?

    PubMed Central

    Hontelez, Jan A. C.; Bakker, Roel; Blok, David J.; Cai, Rui; Houweling, Tanja A. J.; Kulik, Margarete C.; Lenk, Edeltraud J.; Luyendijk, Marianne; Matthijsse, Suzette M.; Redekop, William K.; Wagenaar, Inge; Jacobson, Julie; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.; Richardus, Jan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The London Declaration (2012) was formulated to support and focus the control and elimination of ten neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), with targets for 2020 as formulated by the WHO Roadmap. Five NTDs (lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminths and trachoma) are to be controlled by preventive chemotherapy (PCT), and four (Chagas’ disease, human African trypanosomiasis, leprosy and visceral leishmaniasis) by innovative and intensified disease management (IDM). Guinea worm, virtually eradicated, is not considered here. We aim to estimate the global health impact of meeting these targets in terms of averted morbidity, mortality, and disability adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 study provides prevalence and burden estimates for all nine NTDs in 1990 and 2010, by country, age and sex, which were taken as the basis for our calculations. Estimates for other years were obtained by interpolating between 1990 (or the start-year of large-scale control efforts) and 2010, and further extrapolating until 2030, such that the 2020 targets were met. The NTD disease manifestations considered in the GBD study were analyzed as either reversible or irreversible. Health impacts were assessed by comparing the results of achieving the targets with the counterfactual, construed as the health burden had the 1990 (or 2010 if higher) situation continued unabated. Principle Findings/Conclusions Our calculations show that meeting the targets will lead to about 600 million averted DALYs in the period 2011–2030, nearly equally distributed between PCT and IDM-NTDs, with the health gain amongst PCT-NTDs mostly (96%) due to averted disability and amongst IDM-NTDs largely (95%) from averted mortality. These health gains include about 150 million averted irreversible disease manifestations (e.g. blindness) and 5 million averted deaths. Control of soil-transmitted helminths accounts for one third of all

  2. Continuity of midwifery care and gestational weight gain in obese women: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The increased prevalence of obesity in pregnant women in Australia and other developed countries is a significant public health concern. Obese women are at increased risk of serious perinatal complications and guidelines recommend weight gain restriction and additional care. There is limited evidence to support the effectiveness of dietary and physical activity lifestyle interventions in preventing adverse perinatal outcomes and new strategies need to be evaluated. The primary aim of this project is to evaluate the effect of continuity of midwifery care on restricting gestational weight gain in obese women to the recommended range. The secondary aims of the study are to assess the impact of continuity of midwifery care on: women's experience of pregnancy care; women's satisfaction with care and a range of psychological factors. Methods/Design A two arm randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted with primigravid women recruited from maternity services in Victoria, Australia. Participants will be primigravid women, with a BMI≥30 who are less than 17 weeks gestation. Women allocated to the intervention arm will be cared for in a midwifery continuity of care model and receive an informational leaflet on managing weight gain in pregnancy. Women allocated to the control group will receive routine care in addition to the same informational leaflet. Weight gain during pregnancy, standards of care, medical and obstetric information will be extracted from medical records. Data collected at recruitment (self administered survey) and at 36 weeks by postal survey will include socio-demographic information and the use of validated scales to measure secondary outcomes. Discussion Continuity of midwifery care models are well aligned with current Victorian, Australian and many international government policies on maternity care. Increasingly, midwifery continuity models of care are being introduced in low risk maternity care, and information on their

  3. Transient Stability Improvement of Multi-machine Power System Using Fuzzy Controlled TCSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Gundala Srinivasa

    2012-07-01

    Power system is subjected to sudden changes in load levels. Stability is an important concept which determines the stable operation of power system. In general rotor angle stability is taken as index, but the concept of transient stability, which is the function of operating condition and disturbances deals with the ability of the system to remain intact after being subjected to abnormal deviations. A system is said to be synchronously stable (i.e., retain synchronism) for a given fault if the system variables settle down to some steady-state values with time, after the fault is removed.For the improvement of transient stability the general methods adopted are fast acting exciters, circuit breakers and reduction in system transfer reactance. The modern trend is to employ FACTS devices in the existing system for effective utilization of existing transmission resources. These FACTS devices contribute to power flow improvement besides they extend their services in transient stability improvement as well.In this paper, the studies had been carried out in order to improve the Transient Stability of WSCC 9 Bus System with Fixed Compensation on Various Lines and Optimal Location has been investigated using trajectory sensitivity analysis for better results.In this paper, in order to improve the Transient Stability margin further series FACTS device has been implemented. A fuzzy controlled Thyristor Controlled Series Compensation (TCSC) device has been used here and the results highlight the effectiveness of the application of a TCSC in improving the transient stability of a power system.In this paper, Trajectory sensitivity analysis (TSA) has been used to measure the transient stability condition of the system. The TCSC is modeled by a variable capacitor, the value of which changes with the firing angle. It is shown that TSA can be used in the design of the controller. The optimal locations of the TCSC-controller for different fault conditions can also be identified with

  4. Visual landmark information gains control of the head direction signal at the lateral mammillary nuclei.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Ryan M; Peck, James R; Taube, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-28

    The neural representation of directional heading is conveyed by head direction (HD) cells located in an ascending circuit that includes projections from the lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) to the anterodorsal thalamus (ADN) to the postsubiculum (PoS). The PoS provides return projections to LMN and ADN and is responsible for the landmark control of HD cells in ADN. However, the functional role of the PoS projection to LMN has not been tested. The present study recorded HD cells from LMN after bilateral PoS lesions to determine whether the PoS provides landmark control to LMN HD cells. After the lesion and implantation of electrodes, HD cell activity was recorded while rats navigated within a cylindrical arena containing a single visual landmark or while they navigated between familiar and novel arenas of a dual-chamber apparatus. PoS lesions disrupted the landmark control of HD cells and also disrupted the stability of the preferred firing direction of the cells in darkness. Furthermore, PoS lesions impaired the stable HD cell representation maintained by path integration mechanisms when the rat walked between familiar and novel arenas. These results suggest that visual information first gains control of the HD cell signal in the LMN, presumably via the direct PoS → LMN projection. This visual landmark information then controls HD cells throughout the HD cell circuit. PMID:25632114

  5. Visual Landmark Information Gains Control of the Head Direction Signal at the Lateral Mammillary Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Ryan M.; Peck, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The neural representation of directional heading is conveyed by head direction (HD) cells located in an ascending circuit that includes projections from the lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) to the anterodorsal thalamus (ADN) to the postsubiculum (PoS). The PoS provides return projections to LMN and ADN and is responsible for the landmark control of HD cells in ADN. However, the functional role of the PoS projection to LMN has not been tested. The present study recorded HD cells from LMN after bilateral PoS lesions to determine whether the PoS provides landmark control to LMN HD cells. After the lesion and implantation of electrodes, HD cell activity was recorded while rats navigated within a cylindrical arena containing a single visual landmark or while they navigated between familiar and novel arenas of a dual-chamber apparatus. PoS lesions disrupted the landmark control of HD cells and also disrupted the stability of the preferred firing direction of the cells in darkness. Furthermore, PoS lesions impaired the stable HD cell representation maintained by path integration mechanisms when the rat walked between familiar and novel arenas. These results suggest that visual information first gains control of the HD cell signal in the LMN, presumably via the direct PoS → LMN projection. This visual landmark information then controls HD cells throughout the HD cell circuit. PMID:25632114

  6. The Effect of Automatic Gain Control Structure and Release Time on Cochlear Implant Speech Intelligibility

    PubMed Central

    Khing, Phyu P.; Swanson, Brett A.; Ambikairajah, Eliathamby

    2013-01-01

    Nucleus cochlear implant systems incorporate a fast-acting front-end automatic gain control (AGC), sometimes called a compression limiter. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of replacing the front-end compression limiter with a newly proposed envelope profile limiter. A secondary objective was to investigate the effect of AGC speed on cochlear implant speech intelligibility. The envelope profile limiter was located after the filter bank and reduced the gain when the largest of the filter bank envelopes exceeded the compression threshold. The compression threshold was set equal to the saturation level of the loudness growth function (i.e. the envelope level that mapped to the maximum comfortable current level), ensuring that no envelope clipping occurred. To preserve the spectral profile, the same gain was applied to all channels. Experiment 1 compared sentence recognition with the front-end limiter and with the envelope profile limiter, each with two release times (75 and 625 ms). Six implant recipients were tested in quiet and in four-talker babble noise, at a high presentation level of 89 dB SPL. Overall, release time had a larger effect than the AGC type. With both AGC types, speech intelligibility was lower for the 75 ms release time than for the 625 ms release time. With the shorter release time, the envelope profile limiter provided higher group mean scores than the front-end limiter in quiet, but there was no significant difference in noise. Experiment 2 measured sentence recognition in noise as a function of presentation level, from 55 to 89 dB SPL. The envelope profile limiter with 625 ms release time yielded better scores than the front-end limiter with 75 ms release time. A take-home study showed no clear pattern of preferences. It is concluded that the envelope profile limiter is a feasible alternative to a front-end compression limiter. PMID:24312408

  7. Active Control of the Forced and Transient Response of a Finite Beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John Theodore

    1989-01-01

    When studying structural vibrations resulting from a concentrated source, many structures may be modelled as a finite beam excited by a point source. The theoretical limit on cancelling the resulting beam vibrations by utilizing another point source as an active controller is explored. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. In each case, a cost function is defined and minimized for numerous parameter variations. For the case of harmonic excitation, the cost function is obtained by integrating the mean squared displacement over a region of the beam in which control is desired. A controller is then found to minimize this cost function in the control interval. The control interval and controller location are continuously varied for several frequencies of excitation. The results show that control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam, but control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, the cost function is realized by integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the interval of the beam in which control is desired. This is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. A cost function representative of the beam vibration is obtained by integrating the transient displacement squared over a region of the beam and over all time. The form of the controller is chosen a priori as either one or two delayed pulses. Delays

  8. Single-beam water vapor detection system with automatic photoelectric conversion gain control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C. G.; Chang, J.; Wang, P. P.; Wang, Q.; Wei, W.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, S. S.

    2014-11-01

    A single-beam optical sensor system with automatic photoelectric conversion gain control is proposed for doing high reliability water vapor detection under relatively rough environmental conditions. Comparing to a dual-beam system, it can distinguish the finer photocurrent variations caused by the optical power drift and provide timely compensation by automatically adjusting the photoelectric conversion gain. This system can be rarely affected by the optical power drift caused by fluctuating ambient temperature or variation of fiber bending loss. The deviation of the single-beam system is below 1.11% when photocurrent decays due to fiber bending loss for bending radius of 5 mm, which is obviously lower than the dual-beam system (8.82%). We also demonstrate the long-term stability of the single-beam system by monitoring a 660 ppm by volume (ppmv) water vapor sample continuously for 24 h. The maximum deviation of the measured concentration during the whole testing period does not exceed 10 ppmv. Experiments have shown that the new system features better reliability and is more apt for remote sensing application which is often subject to light transmission loss.

  9. Total Transfer Capability Assessment Incorporating Corrective Controls for Transient Stability using TSCOPF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, Lukmanul; Kubokawa, Junji; Yorino, Naoto; Zoka, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Yutaka

    Advancements have been made towards inclusion of both static and dynamic security into transfer capability calculation. However, to the authors' knowledge, work on considering corrective controls into the calculation has not been reported yet. Therefore, we propose a Total Transfer Capability (TTC) assessment considering transient stability corrective controls. The method is based on the Newton interior point method for nonlinear programming and transfer capability is approached as a maximization of power transfer with both static and transient stability constraints are incorporated into our Transient Stability Constrained Optimal Power Flow (TSCOPF) formulation. An interconnected power system is simulated to be subjected to a severe unbalanced 3-phase 4-line to ground fault and following the fault, generator and load are shed in a pre-defined sequence to mimic actual corrective controls. In a deregulated electricity market, both generator companies and large load customers are encouraged to actively participate in maintaining power system stability as corrective controls upon agreement of compensation for being shed following a disturbance. Implementation of this proposal on the actual power system operation should be carried out through combining it with the existing transient stabilization controller system. Utilization of these corrective controls results in increasing TTC as suggested in our numerical simulation. As Lagrange multipliers can also describe sensitivity of both inequality and equality constraints to the objective function, then selection of which generator or load to be shed can be carried out on the basis of values of Lagrange multipliers of its respective generator's rotor angle stability and active power balance equation. Hence, the proposal in this paper can be utilized by system operator to assess the maximum TTC for specific loads and network conditions.

  10. Automated Gain Control Ion Funnel Trap for Orthogonal Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Liyu, Andrei V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS) is increasingly used in proteomics research. Herein, we report on the development and characterization of a TOF MS instrument with improved sensitivity equipped with an electrodynamic ion funnel trap (IFT) that employs an automated gain control (AGC) capability. The IFT-TOF MS was coupled to a reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography (RPLC) separation and evaluated in experiments with complex proteolytic digests. When applied to a global tryptic digest of Shewanella oneidensis proteins, an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to that of the conventional continuous mode of operation was achieved due to efficient ion accumulation prior to TOF MS analysis. As a result of this sensitivity improvement and related improvement in mass measurement accuracy, the number of unique peptides identified in the AGC-IFT mode was 5-fold greater than that obtained in the continuous mode. PMID:18512944

  11. Gain stabilization control system of the upgraded magnetic proton recoil neutron spectrometer at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoestrand, Henrik; Sunden, E. Andersson; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Giacomelli, L.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ronchi, E.; Weiszflog, M.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Popovichev, S. [EURATOM Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2009-06-15

    Burning plasma experiments such as ITER and DEMO require diagnostics capable of withstanding the harsh environment generated by the intense neutron flux and to maintain stable operating conditions for times longer than present day systems. For these reasons, advanced control and monitoring (CM) systems will be necessary for the reliable operation of diagnostics. This paper describes the CM system of the upgraded magnetic proton recoil neutron spectrometer installed at the Joint European Torus focusing in particular on a technique for the stabilization of the gain of the photomultipliers coupled to the neutron detectors. The results presented here show that this technique provides good results over long time scales. The technique is of general interest for all diagnostics that employ scintillators coupled to photomultiplier tubes.

  12. Engineering studies related to Skylab program. [assessment of automatic gain control data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayne, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    The relationship between the S-193 Automatic Gain Control data and the magnitude of received signal power was studied in order to characterize performance parameters for Skylab equipment. The r-factor was used for the assessment and is defined to be less than unity, and a function of off-nadir angle, ocean surface roughness, and receiver signal to noise ratio. A digital computer simulation was also used to assess to additive receiver, or white noise. The system model for the digital simulation is described, along with intermediate frequency and video impulse response functions used, details of the input waveforms, and results to date. Specific discussion of the digital computer programs used is also provided.

  13. Parafoveal Target Detectability Reversal Predicted by Local Luminance and Contrast Gain Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Beard, Bettina L.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    This project is part of a program to develop image discrimination models for the prediction of the detectability of objects in a range of backgrounds. We wanted to see if the models could predict parafoveal object detection as well as they predict detection in foveal vision. We also wanted to make our simplified models more general by local computation of luminance and contrast gain control. A signal image (0.78 x 0.17 deg) was made by subtracting a simulated airport runway scene background image (2.7 deg square) from the same scene containing an obstructing aircraft. Signal visibility contrast thresholds were measured in a fully crossed factorial design with three factors: eccentricity (0 deg or 4 deg), background (uniform or runway scene background), and fixed-pattern white noise contrast (0%, 5%, or 10%). Three experienced observers responded to three repetitions of 60 2IFC trials in each condition and thresholds were estimated by maximum likelihood probit analysis. In the fovea the average detection contrast threshold was 4 dB lower for the runway background than for the uniform background, but in the parafovea, the average threshold was 6 dB higher for the runway background than for the uniform background. This interaction was similar across the different noise levels and for all three observers. A likely reason for the runway background giving a lower threshold in the fovea is the low luminance near the signal in that scene. In our model, the local luminance computation is controlled by a spatial spread parameter. When this parameter and a corresponding parameter for the spatial spread of contrast gain were increased for the parafoveal predictions, the model predicts the interaction of background with eccentricity.

  14. Analog-digital simulation of transient-induced logic errors and upset susceptibility of an advanced control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carreno, Victor A.; Choi, G.; Iyer, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    A simulation study is described which predicts the susceptibility of an advanced control system to electrical transients resulting in logic errors, latched errors, error propagation, and digital upset. The system is based on a custom-designed microprocessor and it incorporates fault-tolerant techniques. The system under test and the method to perform the transient injection experiment are described. Results for 2100 transient injections are analyzed and classified according to charge level, type of error, and location of injection.

  15. Gaining control: reform, reimbursement and politics in New York's community hospitals, 1890--1915.

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, D

    1980-01-01

    This is an historical study of an early twentieth century political struggle regarding hospital reimbursement in New York City. During a period called the "Progressive Era" (1895--1915), administrators in the City's Comptroller's office sought to gain control over small, locally run community hospitals by dismantling the long-standing practice of flat-grant payments to institutions. Central office planners felt that these payments gave too much control to trustees. In its place, the Comptroller initiated a system of per-capita, per-diem reimbursement. Inspectors now judged for the institutions which services and which clients were appropriate for municipal reimbursement. From the perspective of the Comptroller's office, this change was an attempt to put rationality into the system of municipal support for charitable institutions. From the perspective of trustees and community representatives, however, this change was a political attack on the rights of institutions and local communities to control their own fate. Within the context of the larger Progressive Era "good government" movement to centralize decision-making in the hands of experts who believed strongly in the efficiency of larger institutions, it was generally the smallest, most financially troubled community institutions which felt the brunt of these changes. PMID:6990801

  16. What can we hope to gain for trypanosomiasis control from molecular studies on tsetse biology ?

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Serap; Hao, Zhengrong; Strickler, Patricia M

    2002-01-01

    At times of crisis when epidemics rage and begin to take their toll on affected populations, as we have been witnessing with African trypanosomiasis in subSahara, the dichotomy of basic versus applied research deepens. While undoubtedly the treatment of thousands of infected people is the top priority, without continued research and development on the biology of disease agents and on ecological and evolutionary forces impacting these epidemics, little progress can be gained in the long run for the eventual control of these diseases. Here, we argue the need for additional research in one under-investigated area, that is the biology of the tsetse vector. Lacking are studies aimed to understand the genetic and cellular basis of tsetse interactions with trypanosomes as well as the genetic and biochemical basis of its ability to transmit these parasites. We discuss how this knowledge has the potential to contribute to the development of new vector control strategies as well as to improve the efficacy and affordability of the existing control approaches. PMID:12234385

  17. Design and performance of an Automatic Gain Control system for the High Energy X-Ray Timing Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelling, Michael R.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Macdonald, Daniel R.; Hertel, Robert; Nishiie, Edward

    1991-01-01

    The High Energy X-Ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE), currently under development for the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE) mission, employs a closed loop gain control system to attain 0.5 percent stabilization of each of eight-phoswich detector gains. This Automatic Gain Control (AGC) system utilizes a split window discriminator scheme to control the response of each detector pulse height analyzer to gated Am-241 X-ray events at 60 keV. A prototype AGC system has been implemented and tested within the gain perturbation environment expected to be experienced by the HEXTE instrument in flight. The AGC system and test configuration are described. Response, stability and noise characteristics are measured and compared with theoretical predictions. The system is found to be generally suitable for the HEXTE application.

  18. Control methods for aiding a pilot during STOL engine failure transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. R.; Debra, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Candidate autopilot control laws that control the engine failure transient sink rates by demonstrating the engineering application of modern state variable control theory were defined. The results of approximate modal analysis were compared to those derived from full state analyses provided from computer design solutions. The aircraft was described, and a state variable model of its longitudinal dynamic motion due to engine and control variations was defined. The classical fast and slow modes were assumed to be sufficiently different to define reduced order approximations of the aircraft motion amendable to hand analysis control definition methods. The original state equations of motion were also applied to a large scale state variable control design program, in particular OPTSYS. The resulting control laws were compared with respect to their relative responses, ease of application, and meeting the desired performance objectives.

  19. Anfis Approach for Sssc Controller Design for the Improvement of Transient Stability Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuntia, Swasti R.; Panda, Sidhartha

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) method based on the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is applied to design a Static Synchronous Series Compensator (SSSC)-based controller for improvement of transient stability. The proposed ANFIS controller combines the advantages of fuzzy controller and quick response and adaptability nature of ANN. The ANFIS structures were trained using the generated database by fuzzy controller of SSSC. It is observed that the proposed SSSC controller improves greatly the voltage profile of the system under severe disturbances. The results prove that the proposed SSSC-based ANFIS controller is found to be robust to fault location and change in operating conditions. Further, the results obtained are compared with the conventional lead-lag controllers for SSSC.

  20. Distributed Hierarchical Control Architecture for Transient Dynamics Improvement in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Lian, Jianming; Kalsi, Karanjit; Du, Pengwei; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-08-24

    In this paper, a novel distributed hierarchical coordinated control architecture is proposed for large scale power systems. The newly considered architecture facilitates frequency restoration and power balancing functions to be decoupled and implemented at different levels. At the local level, decentralized robust generator controllers are designed to quickly restore frequency after large faults and disturbances in the system. The controllers presented herein are shown to improve transient stability performance, as compared to conventional governor and excitation control. At the area level, Automatic Generation Control (AGC) is modified and coordinates with the decentralized robust controllers to reach the interchange schedule in the tie lines. The interaction of local and zonal controllers is validated through detailed simulations.

  1. Gain-scheduled H∞ control via parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumalee, Sunan; Whidborne, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Synthesising a gain-scheduled output feedback H∞ controller via parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions for linear parameter-varying (LPV) plant models involves solving an infinite number of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). In practice, for affine LPV models, a finite number of LMIs can be achieved using convexifying techniques. This paper proposes an alternative approach to achieve a finite number of LMIs. By simple manipulations on the bounded real lemma inequality, a symmetric matrix polytope inequality can be formed. Hence, the LMIs need only to be evaluated at all vertices of such a symmetric matrix polytope. In addition, a construction technique of the intermediate controller variables is also proposed as an affine matrix-valued function in the polytopic coordinates of the scheduled parameters. Computational results on a numerical example using the approach were compared with those from a multi-convexity approach in order to demonstrate the impacts of the approach on parameter-dependent Lyapunov-based stability and performance analysis. Furthermore, numerical simulation results show the effectiveness of these proposed techniques.

  2. Forward-masking based gain control in odontocete biosonar: an evoked-potential study.

    PubMed

    Supin, Alexander Ya; Nachtigall, Paul E; Breese, Marlee

    2009-04-01

    Auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) were recorded during echolocation in a false killer whale Pseudorca crassidens. An electronically synthesized and played-back ("phantom") echo was used. Each electronic echo was triggered by an emitted biosonar pulse. The echo had a spectrum similar to that of the emitted biosonar clicks, and its intensity was proportional to that of the emitted click. The attenuation of the echo relative to the emitted click and its delay was controlled by the experimenter. Four combinations of echo attenuation and delay were tested (-31 dB, 2 ms), (-40 dB, 4 ms), (-49 dB, 8 ms), and (-58 dB, 16 ms); thus, attenuation and delay were associated with a rate of 9 dB of increased attenuation per delay doubling. AEPs related to emitted clicks displayed a regular amplitude dependence on the click level. Echo-related AEPs did not feature amplitude dependence on echo attenuation or emitted click levels, except in a few combinations of the lowest values of these two variables. The results are explained by a hypothesis that partial forward masking of the echoes by the preceding emitted sonar pulses serves as a kind of automatic gain control in the auditory system of echolocating odontocetes. PMID:19354417

  3. Hearing-aid automatic gain control adapting to two sound sources in the environment, using three time constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordqvist, Peter; Leijon, Arne

    2004-11-01

    A hearing aid AGC algorithm is presented that uses a richer representation of the sound environment than previous algorithms. The proposed algorithm is designed to (1) adapt slowly (in approximately 10 s) between different listening environments, e.g., when the user leaves a single talker lecture for a multi-babble coffee-break; (2) switch rapidly (about 100 ms) between different dominant sound sources within one listening situation, such as the change from the user's own voice to a distant speaker's voice in a quiet conference room; (3) instantly reduce gain for strong transient sounds and then quickly return to the previous gain setting; and (4) not change the gain in silent pauses but instead keep the gain setting of the previous sound source. An acoustic evaluation showed that the algorithm worked as intended. The algorithm was evaluated together with a reference algorithm in a pilot field test. When evaluated by nine users in a set of speech recognition tests, the algorithm showed similar results to the reference algorithm. .

  4. The afterhyperpolarization conductance exerts the same control over the gain and variability of motoneurone firing in anaesthetized cats

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Marin; Meunier, Claude; Donnet, Maud; Zytnicki, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Does the afterhyperpolarization current control the gain and discharge variability of motoneurones according to the same law? We investigated this issue in lumbar motoneurones of anaesthetized cats. Using dynamic clamp, we measured the conductance, time constant and driving force of the AHP current in a sample of motoneurones and studied how the gain was correlated to these quantities. To study the action of the AHP on the discharge variability and to compare it to its action on the gain, we injected an artificial AHP-like current in motoneurones. This increased the natural AHP. In three motoneurones, we abolished most of the natural AHP with the calcium chelator BAPTA to investigate the condition where the discharge was essentially controlled by the artificial AHP. Our results demonstrate that both the gain and the coefficient of variation of the firing rate are inversely proportional to the magnitude and to the time constant of the artificial AHP conductance. This indicates that the AHP exerts the same control over the gain and the variability. This mechanism ensures that the variability of the discharge is modulated with the gain. This guarantees a great regularity of the discharge when the motoneurone is in a low excitability state and hence good control of the force produced. PMID:16931549

  5. Transient Spectroscopy of Photoexcitations and Morphology Control of Organometal Trihalide Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yaxin; Lafalce, Evan; Sheng, Chuan-Xiang; Zhang, Chuang; Sun, Dali; Vardeny, Zeev Valy

    We studied the photoexcitation dynamics in various hybrid perovskites by using broadband ps transient photomodulation (PM) spectroscopy and variable stripe length (VSL) technique. We observed both excitonic and free carriers spectral features in MAPbI3 but mainly excitonic transition in MAPbI1.1Br1.9 and MAPbI3-xClx films. We also fabricated MAPbBr3 films with nano-crystal pinning (NCP) treatment, which allows for smaller crystalline grain size. The transient spectra show a narrower and longer-lived photobleaching band in NCP treated films consistent with the increase in the photoluminescence efficiency. In addition the net optical gain measured by VSL is markedly increased up to 300 cm-1, and the lasing threshold is concurrently reduced. Measurement of the waveguide losses in the NCP films shows that the improvement in lasing properties can partly be attributed to the reduced optical scattering. Work supported by the AFOSR through a MURI Grant RA 9550-14-1-0037.

  6. Transient Stability Enhancement of Power Systems by Lyapunov-Based Recurrent Neural Networks UPFC Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chia-Chi; Tsai, Hung-Chi; Chang, Wei-Neng

    A Lyapunov-based recurrent neural networks unified power flow controller (UPFC) is developed for improving transient stability of power systems. First, a simple UPFC dynamical model, composed of a controllable shunt susceptance on the shunt side and an ideal complex transformer on the series side, is utilized to analyze UPFC dynamical characteristics. Secondly, we study the control configuration of the UPFC with two major blocks: the primary control, and the supplementary control. The primary control is implemented by standard PI techniques when the power system is operated in a normal condition. The supplementary control will be effective only when the power system is subjected by large disturbances. We propose a new Lyapunov-based UPFC controller of the classical single-machine-infinite-bus system for damping enhancement. In order to consider more complicated detailed generator models, we also propose a Lyapunov-based adaptive recurrent neural network controller to deal with such model uncertainties. This controller can be treated as neural network approximations of Lyapunov control actions. In addition, this controller also provides online learning ability to adjust the corresponding weights with the back propagation algorithm built in the hidden layer. The proposed control scheme has been tested on two simple power systems. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed control strategy is very effective for suppressing power swing even under severe system conditions.

  7. LES of transient flows controlled by DBD plasma actuator over a stalled airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, K.; Nonomura, T.; Aono, H.; Sato, M.; Okada, K.; Fujii, K.

    2015-03-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) are employed to understand the flow field over a NACA 0015 airfoil controlled by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator. The Suzen body force model is utilised to introduce the effect of the DBD plasma actuator. The Reynolds number is fixed at 63,000. Transient processes arising due to non-dimensional excitation frequencies of one and six are discussed. The time required to establish flow authority is between four and six characteristic times, independent of the excitation frequency. If the separation is suppressed, the initial flow conditions do not affect the quasi-steady state, and the lift coefficient of the higher frequency case converges very quickly. The transient states can be categorised into following three stages: (1) the lift and drag decreasing stage, (2) the lift recovery stage, and (3) the lift and drag converging stage. The development of vortices and their influence on control is delineated. The simulations show that in the initial transient state, separation of flow suppression is closely related to the development spanwise vortices while during the later, quasi-steady state, three-dimensional vortices become more important.

  8. Polycomb Controls Gliogenesis by Regulating the Transient Expression of the Gcm/Glide Fate Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Diebold, Celine; Van de Bor, Véronique; Schuettengruber, Bernd; González, Inma; Busturia, Ana; Cavalli, Giacomo; Giangrande, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The Gcm/Glide transcription factor is transiently expressed and required in the Drosophila nervous system. Threshold Gcm/Glide levels control the glial versus neuronal fate choice, and its perdurance triggers excessive gliogenesis, showing that its tight and dynamic regulation ensures the proper balance between neurons and glia. Here, we present a genetic screen for potential gcm/glide interactors and identify genes encoding chromatin factors of the Trithorax and of the Polycomb groups. These proteins maintain the heritable epigenetic state, among others, of HOX genes throughout development, but their regulatory role on transiently expressed genes remains elusive. Here we show that Polycomb negatively affects Gcm/Glide autoregulation, a positive feedback loop that allows timely accumulation of Gcm/Glide threshold levels. Such temporal fine-tuning of gene expression tightly controls gliogenesis. This work performed at the levels of individual cells reveals an undescribed mode of Polycomb action in the modulation of transiently expressed fate determinants and hence in the acquisition of specific cell identity in the nervous system. PMID:23300465

  9. Sonar gain control and echo detection thresholds in the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A; Moffat, A J; Masters, W M

    1992-02-01

    The echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus, detects sonar echoes with a sensitivity that changes according to the time elapsed between broadcasting of each sonar signal and reception of echoes. When tested in an electronic target simulator on a two-choice echo-detection task, the bat's threshold improved by 11.5 dB as echo delay changed from 2.3 to 4.6 ms (target ranges of 40 and 80 cm). Earlier experiments measured the change in detection threshold for delays from 1 to 6.4 ms (target ranges from about 17 to 110 cm) and obtained about 11 dB of improvement per doubling of delay. The new experiments used electronic delay lines to simulate echo delay, thus avoiding movement of loudspeakers to different distances and the possible creation of delay-dependent backward masking between stimulus echoes and cluttering echoes from the loudspeaker surfaces. The slope of the threshold shift defines an echo gain control that keeps echoes from point targets at a fixed sensation level--reducing sensitivity by 11 to 12 dB as echo amplitude increases by 12 dB per halving of range during the bat's approach to the target. A recent experiment using loudness discrimination of echoes at 70 to 80 dB SPL (roughly 50 dB above threshold) found a slope of about 6 dB per halving of range, so the gain-control effect may be level dependent. The observed effect is operationally equivalent to forward masking of echoes by the transmission, but any events correlated with vocalization which impair hearing sensitivity for a short interval following transmissions could cause a decline in sensitivity to echoes. Contractions of the bat's middle-ear muscles synchronized to transmissions may account for the observed threshold shift, at least for a span of echo delays associated with the most critical portion of the approach stage of pursuit. Forward masking by the sonar transmissions may contribute to the threshold shift, too, but middle-ear muscle contractions do occur and must be a significant part of the

  10. Method and apparatus for controlling combustor temperature during transient load changes

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Chalfant, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus includes a fast acting air bypass valve connected in parallel with an air inlet to the combustor. A predetermined excess quantity of air is supplied from an air source to a series connected fuel cell and combustor. The predetermined excess quantity of air is provided in a sufficient amount to control the temperature of the combustor during start-up of the fuel processor when the load on the fuel cell is zero and to accommodate any temperature transients during operation of the fuel cell.

  11. Modeling and Control Systems Design for Air Intake System of Diesel Engines for Improvement of Transient Characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Arata; Sasaki, Jun; Kinoshita, Yusuke; Fujimoto, Junya; Maruyama, Tsugito; Shimotani, Keiji

    For the purpose of contributing to global environment protection, several research studies have been conducted involving clean-burning diesel engines. In recent diesel engines with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) systems and a Variable Nozzle Turbocharger (VNT), mutual interference between EGR and VNT has been noted. Hence, designing and adjusting control of the conventional PID controller is particularly difficult at the transient state in which the engine speed and fuel injection rate change. In this paper, we formulate 1st principal model of air intake system of diesel engines and transform it to control oriented model including an engine steady state model and a transient model. And we propose a model-based control system with the LQR Controller, Saturation Compensator, the Dynamic Feed-forward and Disturbance Observer using a transient model. Using this method, we achieved precise reference tracking and emission reduction in transient mode test with the real engine evaluations.

  12. Gain-Scheduled Approximations to H-Infinity Controllers for the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, Rick

    1999-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing will demonstrate technologies related to aeroservoelastic effects such as wing twist and load minimization. This paper presents a control design based on H-infinity synthesis that simultaneously considers the multiple objectives associated with handling qualities, actuator limitations, and loads. The controller is realized as a filter and gain set approximation to a state-space H-infinity controller. This approximation allows scheduling of the controller over a flight envelope.

  13. A current mode feed-forward gain control system for a 0.8 V CMOS hearing aid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanyang, Li; Haigang, Yang; Fei, Liu; Tao, Yin

    2011-06-01

    A current mode feed-forward gain control (CMFGC) technique is presented, which is applied in the front-end system of a hearing aid chip. Compared with conventional automatic gain control (AGC), CMFGC significantly improves the total harmonic distortion (THD) by digital gain control. To attain the digital gain control codes according to the extremely weak output signal from the microphone, a rectifier and a state controller implemented in current mode are proposed. A prototype chip has been designed based on a 0.13 μm standard CMOS process. The measurement results show that the supply voltage can be as low as 0.6 V. And with the 0.8 V supply voltage, the THD is improved and below 0.06% (-64 dB) at the output level of 500 mVp-p, yet the power consumption is limited to 40 μW. In addition, the input referred noise is only 4 μVrms and the maximum gain is maintained at 33 dB.

  14. Keeping returns optimal: gain control exerted through sensitivity adjustments in the harbour porpoise auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Linnenschmidt, Meike; Beedholm, Kristian; Wahlberg, Magnus; Højer-Kristensen, Jakob; Nachtigall, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Animals that use echolocation (biosonar) listen to acoustic signals with a large range of intensities, because echo levels vary with the fourth power of the animal's distance to the target. In man-made sonar, engineers apply automatic gain control to stabilize the echo energy levels, thereby rendering them independent of distance to the target. Both toothed whales and bats vary the level of their echolocation clicks to compensate for the distance-related energy loss. By monitoring the auditory brainstem response (ABR) during a psychophysical task, we found that a harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), in addition to adjusting the sound level of the outgoing signals up to 5.4 dB, also reduces its ABR threshold by 6 dB when the target distance doubles. This self-induced threshold shift increases the dynamic range of the biosonar system and compensates for half of the variation of energy that is caused by changes in the distance to the target. In combination with an increased source level as a function of target range, this helps the porpoise to maintain a stable echo-evoked ABR amplitude irrespective of target range, and is therefore probably an important tool enabling porpoises to efficiently analyse and classify received echoes. PMID:22279169

  15. A Neural Circuit That Controls Cortical State, Plasticity, and the Gain of Sensory Responses in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Stryker, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the visual cortex were first found to be exquisitely selective for particular properties of visual stimuli in anesthetized animals, including mice. Studies of alert mice in an apparatus that allowed them to stand or run revealed that locomotion causes a change in cortical state that dramatically increases the magnitude of responses in neurons of the visual cortex without altering selectivity, effectively changing the gain of sensory responses. Locomotion also dramatically enhances adult plasticity in the recovery from long-term visual deprivation. We have studied the elements and operation of the neural circuit responsible for the enhancement of activity and shown that it enhances plasticity even in mice not free to run. The circuit consists of projections ascending from the midbrain locomotor region (MLR) to the basal forebrain, activating cholinergic and perhaps other projections to excite inhibitory interneurons expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the visual cortex. VIP cells activated by locomotion inhibit interneurons that express somatostatin (SST), thereby disinhibiting the excitatory principal neurons and allowing them to respond more strongly to effective visual stimuli. These findings reveal in alert animals how the ascending reticular activating system described in anesthetized animals 50 years ago operates to control cortical state. PMID:25948638

  16. A digitally calibrated CMOS RMS power detector for RF automatic gain control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taotao, Yan; Hui, Wang; Jinbo, Li; Jianjun, Zhou

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a digitally calibrated CMOS wideband radio frequency (RF) root-mean-square (RMS) power detector for high accuracy RF automatic gain control (AGC). The proposed RMS power detector demonstrates accurate power detection in the presence of process, supply voltage, and temperature (PVT) variations by employing a digital calibration scheme. It also consumes low power and occupies a small chip area. The measurement results show that the scheme improves the accuracy of the detector to better than 0.3 dB over the PVT variations and wide operating frequency range from 0.2 to 0.8 GHz. Implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS process and occupying a small die area of 263 × 214 μm2, the proposed digitally calibrated CMOS RMS power detector only consumes 1.6 mA in power detection mode and 2.1 mA in digital calibration mode from a 1.8 V supply voltage.

  17. Keeping returns optimal: gain control exerted through sensitivity adjustments in the harbour porpoise auditory system.

    PubMed

    Linnenschmidt, Meike; Beedholm, Kristian; Wahlberg, Magnus; Højer-Kristensen, Jakob; Nachtigall, Paul E

    2012-06-01

    Animals that use echolocation (biosonar) listen to acoustic signals with a large range of intensities, because echo levels vary with the fourth power of the animal's distance to the target. In man-made sonar, engineers apply automatic gain control to stabilize the echo energy levels, thereby rendering them independent of distance to the target. Both toothed whales and bats vary the level of their echolocation clicks to compensate for the distance-related energy loss. By monitoring the auditory brainstem response (ABR) during a psychophysical task, we found that a harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), in addition to adjusting the sound level of the outgoing signals up to 5.4 dB, also reduces its ABR threshold by 6 dB when the target distance doubles. This self-induced threshold shift increases the dynamic range of the biosonar system and compensates for half of the variation of energy that is caused by changes in the distance to the target. In combination with an increased source level as a function of target range, this helps the porpoise to maintain a stable echo-evoked ABR amplitude irrespective of target range, and is therefore probably an important tool enabling porpoises to efficiently analyse and classify received echoes. PMID:22279169

  18. A New Turbo-shaft Engine Control Law during Variable Rotor Speed Transient Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Wei; Miao, Lizhen; Zhang, Haibo; Huang, Jinquan

    2015-12-01

    A closed-loop control law employing compressor guided vanes is firstly investigated to solve unacceptable fuel flow dynamic change in single fuel control for turbo-shaft engine here, especially for rotorcraft in variable rotor speed process. Based on an Augmented Linear Quadratic Regulator (ALQR) algorithm, a dual-input, single-output robust control scheme is proposed for a turbo-shaft engine, involving not only the closed loop adjustment of fuel flow but also that of compressor guided vanes. Furthermore, compared to single fuel control, some digital simulation cases using this new scheme about variable rotor speed have been implemented on the basis of an integrated system of helicopter and engine model. The results depict that the command tracking performance to the free turbine rotor speed can be asymptotically realized. Moreover, the fuel flow transient process has been significantly improved, and the fuel consumption has been dramatically cut down by more than 2% while keeping the helicopter level fight unchanged.

  19. Thresholds of Transient Cavitation Produced by Pulsed Ultrasound in a Controlled Nuclei Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Christy Katherine Smith

    The possibility of hazardous bioeffects from medical ultrasound examinations and therapy, although not demonstrated in current epidemiologic data, is still of interest to the medical community. In particular, concern persists over the potential of damage at the cellular level due to transient cavitation produced by diagnostic and high intensity therapeutic ultrasound. Transient cavitation is a discrete phenomenon which relies on the existence of stabilized nuclei, or pockets of gas within a host fluid, for its genesis. A convenient descriptor for assessing the likelihood of transient cavitation is the threshold pressure, or the minimum acoustic pressure necessary to initiate bubble growth and subsequent collapse. Experimental measurements of cavitation thresholds are presented here which elucidate the importance of ultrasound host fluid and nuclei parameters in determining these thresholds. These results are interpreted in the context of an approximate theory, included as an appendix, describing the relationship between these parameters and cavitation threshold pressures. An automated experimental apparatus has been developed to determine thresholds for cavitation produced in a fluid by short tone bursts of ultrasound at 0.76, 0.99, and 2.30 MHz. A fluid jet was used to convect potential cavitation nuclei through the focal region of the insonifying transducer. Potential nuclei tested include 1mum polystyrene spheres, microbubbles in the 1-10 μm range that are stabilized with human serum albumin, and whole blood constituents. Cavitation was detected by a passive acoustical technique which is sensitive to sound scattered from cavitation bubbles. Measurements of the transient cavitation threshold in water, in a fluid of higher viscosity, and in diluted whole blood are presented. Results from these experiments which permit the control of nuclei and host fluid properties are compared to the approximate analytical theory for the prediction of the onset of cavitation.

  20. An RF front-end with an automatic gain control technique for a U/V band CMMB receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinxin, Zhao; Xueqing, Hu; Yin, Shi; Lei, Wang

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a fully integrated RF front-end with an automatic gain control (AGC) scheme and a digitally controlled radio frequency varied gain amplifier (RFVGA) for a U/V band China Mobile Multimedia Broadcasting (CMMB) direct conversion receiver. The RFVGA provides a gain range of 50 dB with a 1.6 dB step. The adopted AGC strategy could improve immunity to adjacent channel signal, which is of importance for CMMB application. The front-end, composed of a low noise amplifier (LNA), an RFVGA, a mixer and AGC, achieves an input referred 3rd order intercept point (IIP3) of 4.9 dBm with the LNA in low gain mode and the RFVGA in medium gain mode, and a less than 4 dB double side band noise figure with both the LNA and the RFVGA in high gain mode. The proposed RF front-end is fabricated in a 0.35 μm SiGe BiCMOS technology and consumes 25.6 mA from a 3.0 V power supply.

  1. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel Experiencing a Fast Control Rod Ejection Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Ortensi, J.; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    A rapid increase of the temperature and the mechanical stress is expected in TRISO coated particle fuel that experiences a fast Total Control Rod Ejection (CRE) transient event. During this event the reactor power in the pebble bed core increases significantly for a short time interval. The power is deposited instantly and locally in the fuel kernel. This could result in a rapid increase of the pressure in the buffer layer of the coated fuel particle and, consequently, in an increase of the coating stresses. These stresses determine the mechanical failure probability of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). A new calculation procedure has been implemented at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), which analyzes the transient fuel performance behavior of TRISO fuel particles in PBRs. This early capability can easily be extended to prismatic designs, given the availability of neutronic and thermal-fluid solvers. The full-core coupled neutronic and thermal-fluid analysis has been modeled with CYNOD-THERMIX. The temperature fields for the fuel kernel and the particle coatings, as well as the gas pressures in the buffer layer, are calculated with the THETRIS module explicitly during the transient calculation. Results from this module are part of the feedback loop within the neutronic-thermal fluid iterations performed for each time step. The temperature and internal pressure values for each pebble type in each region of the core are then input to the PArticle STress Analysis (PASTA) code, which determines the particle coating stresses and the fraction of failed particles. This paper presents an investigation of a Total Control Rod Ejection (TCRE) incident in the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular reactor design using the above described calculation procedure. The transient corresponds to a reactivity insertion of $3 (~2000 pcm) reaching 35 times the nominal power in 0.5 seconds. For each position in the core

  2. Cross-Axis Proportional Gains Used to Control Gyroscopic Effects in a Magnetic- Bearing-Supported Flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.

    2001-01-01

    For magnetic-bearing-supported high-speed machines with significant gyroscopic effects, it is necessary to stabilize both forward and backward tilt whirling modes. Instability or the low damping of these modes can prevent the attainment of desired shaft speeds. Previous work elsewhere showed that cross-axis derivative gain in the magnetic bearing control law can improve the stability of the forward whirl mode, but it is commonly recognized that derivative gains amplify high-frequency noise and increase the required control effort. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, it has been shown previously that a simple cross-axis proportional gain can add stability (without adding noise) to either forward whirl or backward whirl, depending on the sign of the gain, but that such a gain destabilizes the other mode. It has been predicted by Glenn analysis that both modes can be stabilized by cross-axis proportional gains by utilizing the large-frequency separation of the two modes at speeds where the gyroscopic effects are significant. We use a modal controller that decouples the tilt and center-of-mass-translation modes. Only the tilt modes exhibit speed-dependent gyroscopic effects. The key to controlling them by the present method is to stabilize the backward whirl tilt mode with the appropriate sign of cross-axis proportional gain in the control law, but to include a low-pass filter on that gain term to restrict its effect only to the low-frequency backward-whirl mode. A second cross-axis term with the opposite sign and a high-pass filter stabilizes the forward whirl, which can have a frequency one or two orders of magnitude higher than the backward whirl, permitting very independent action of the two terms. Because the physical gyroscopic torques are proportional to the spinning speed of the shaft, it is convenient to gain-schedule the cross-axis control terms by making them proportional to shaft speed. This has the added benefit of avoiding a somewhat awkward zero

  3. Decision-directed automatic gain control for MAPSK systems. [M-ary Amplitude and Phase Shift Keying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, W. J., III

    1974-01-01

    An automatic gain control (AGC) loop is presented for use with M-ary amplitude and phase shift keying (MAPSK) systems. The gain control amplifier is regulated by an error signal formed by the difference between the estimated amplitude level and the received amplitude level. The AGC performance is thus independent of the short-term average received signal energy. AGC loop analysis and simulation is presented for M-ary amplitude shift keying and quadrature amplitude shift keying. The AGC is shown to have a negligible degradation on the symbol probability of error for most practical cases. A generalized AGC for an arbitrary MAPSK system is presented.

  4. The role of spiking nonlinearity in contrast gain control and information transmission.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuguo; Potetz, Brian; Lee, Tai Sing

    2005-03-01

    Threshold and saturation are two nonlinear features common to almost all spiking neurons. How these nonlinearities affect the performance gain of the transfer function and coding properties of the neurons has attracted much attention. Here, we deduce basic analytical relationships among these nonlinearities (threshold and saturation), performance gain and information transmission in neurons. We found that performance gain and information transmission can be maximized by input signals with optimal variance. The threshold and saturation inside the model determines the gain tuning property and maximum coding capacity. This framework provides an understanding of some basic design principles underlying information processing systems that can be adjusted to match the statistics of signals in the environment. This study also isolates the exact contributions of the nonlinearities on the contrast adaptation phenomena observed in real visual neurons. PMID:15621176

  5. Transient Plume Model Testing Using LADEE Spacecraft Attitude Control System Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We have learned it is conceivable that the Neutral Mass Spectrometer on board the Lunarr Atmosphere Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) could measure gases from surface-reflected Attitude Control System (ACS) thruster plume. At minimum altitude, the measurement would be maximized, and gravitational influence minimized ("short" time-of-flight (TOF) situation) Could use to verify aspects of thruster plume modeling Model the transient disturbance to NMS measurements due to ACS gases reflected from lunar surface Observe evolution of various model characteristics as measured by NMS Species magnitudes, TOF measurements, angular distribution, species separation effects

  6. Analysis and control of the transient aeroelastic response of rotors during shipboard engagement and disengagement operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Jonathan Allen

    2001-11-01

    An analysis has been developed to predict the transient aeroelastic response of a helicopter rotor system during shipboard engagement and disengagement operations. The coupled flap-lag-torsion equations of motion were developed using Hamilton's Principle and discretized spatially using the finite element method. Aerodynamics were simulated using nonlinear quasi-steady or time domain nonlinear unsteady models. The ship airwake environment was simulated with simple deterministic airwake distributions, results from experimental measurements or numerical predictions. The transient aeroelastic response of the rotor blades was then time-integrated along a specified rotor speed profile. The control of the rotor response for an analytic model of the H-46 Sea Knight rotor system was investigated with three different passive control techniques. Collective pitch scheduling was only successful in reducing the blade flapping response in a few isolated cases. In the majority of cases, the blade transient response was increased. The use of a discrete flap damper in the very low rotor speed region was also investigated. Only by raising the flap stop setting and using a flap damper four times the strength of the lag damper could the downward flap deflections be reduced. However, because the flap stop setting was raised the upward flap deflections were often increased. The use of extendable/retractable, gated leading-edge spoilers in the low rotor speed region was also investigated. Spoilers covering the outer 15% R of the rotor blade were shown to significantly reduce both the upward and downward flap response without increasing rotor torque. Previous aeroelastic analyses developed at the University of Southampton and at Penn State University were completed with flap-torsion degrees of freedom only. The addition of the lag degree of freedom was shown to significantly influence the blade response. A comparison of the two aerodynamic models showed that the nonlinear quasi

  7. Intraoperative bleeding control during cesarean delivery of complete placenta previa with transient occlusion of uterine arteries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Hyun; Joung, Eun-Ju; Lee, Soo-Jung; Kwack, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    There are few methods to control heavy intra-operative bleeding during cesarean delivery of placenta previa. Transient occlusion of uterine arteries (TOUA) during operation has previously been reported as a quick and safe method to control intra-operative uterine bleeding. We reported 2 cases of cesarean delivery with complete placenta previa in which TOUA was performed to safely reduce intra-operative complication, especially heavy intra-operative bleeding. In the 2 cases, cesarean deliveries were safe and without any complications under the TOUA method. TOUA can be a good method to control heavy intra-operative bleeding during cesarean delivery of complete placenta previa with risk of heavy bleeding. PMID:26623419

  8. The 2kW Mini-BRU Electrical Controls Concept and Transient Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2006-01-01

    The proposed Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter, JIMO, mission selected a Brayton power conversion system as its electrical power generator. Although the JIMO mission power conversion system was expected to produce in the order of 100 kW, an available 2 kW Brayton system was used to develop control system strategies for the JIMO mission. This report describes the shunt loading voltage/speed regulation control concept developed for the 2 kW system, and the transient performance of controls. The 2 kW alternator is a permanent magnet alternator as proposed for the JIMO mission, and operates at a similar speed and internal impedance, allowing it to be used as an accurate model for performance of the larger system. The JIMO mission was cancelled in September 2005.

  9. Continuous higher-order sliding mode control with time-varying gain for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Han, Yaozhen; Liu, Xiangjie

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a continuous higher-order sliding mode (HOSM) control scheme with time-varying gain for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. The proposed controller is derived from the concept of geometric homogeneity and super-twisting algorithm, and includes two parts, the first part of which achieves smooth finite time stabilization of pure integrator chains. The second part conquers the twice differentiable uncertainty and realizes system robustness by employing super-twisting algorithm. Particularly, time-varying switching control gain is constructed to reduce the switching control action magnitude to the minimum possible value while keeping the property of finite time convergence. Examples concerning the perturbed triple integrator chains and excitation control for single-machine infinite bus power system are simulated respectively to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed approach. PMID:26920085

  10. New results on the robust stability of PID controllers with gain and phase margins for UFOPTD processes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Q B; Liu, Q; Huang, B

    2016-03-01

    This paper considers the problem of determining all the robust PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers in terms of the gain and phase margins (GPM) for open-loop unstable first order plus time delay (UFOPTD) processes. It is the first time that the feasible ranges of the GPM specifications provided by a PID controller are given for UFOPTD processes. A gain and phase margin tester is used to modify the original model, and the ranges of the margin specifications are derived such that the modified model can be stabilized by a stabilizing PID controller based on Hermite-Biehlers Theorem. Furthermore, we obtain all the controllers satisfying a given margin specification. Simulation studies show how to use the results to design a robust PID controller. PMID:26708658

  11. Random Photon Absorption Model Elucidates How Early Gain Control in Fly Photoreceptors Arises from Quantal Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuoyi; Zhou, Yu; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Many diurnal photoreceptors encode vast real-world light changes effectively, but how this performance originates from photon sampling is unclear. A 4-module biophysically-realistic fly photoreceptor model, in which information capture is limited by the number of its sampling units (microvilli) and their photon-hit recovery time (refractoriness), can accurately simulate real recordings and their information content. However, sublinear summation in quantum bump production (quantum-gain-nonlinearity) may also cause adaptation by reducing the bump/photon gain when multiple photons hit the same microvillus simultaneously. Here, we use a Random Photon Absorption Model (RandPAM), which is the 1st module of the 4-module fly photoreceptor model, to quantify the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation. We show how quantum-gain-nonlinearity already results from photon sampling alone. In the extreme case, when two or more simultaneous photon-hits reduce to a single sublinear value, quantum-gain-nonlinearity is preset before the phototransduction reactions adapt the quantum bump waveform. However, the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation depends upon the likelihood of multi-photon-hits, which is strictly determined by the number of microvilli and light intensity. Specifically, its contribution to light-adaptation is marginal (≤ 1%) in fly photoreceptors with many thousands of microvilli, because the probability of simultaneous multi-photon-hits on any one microvillus is low even during daylight conditions. However, in cells with fewer sampling units, the impact of quantum-gain-nonlinearity increases with brightening light. PMID:27445779

  12. Determinants of Weight Gain Prevention in Young Adult and Midlife Women: Study Design and Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of overweight and obesity through body weight reduction has been monumentally ineffective as few individuals are able to sustain weight loss. Rather than treating weight gain once it has become problematic, prevention of weight gain over time may be more effective. Objective The aim of this research is to preclude the burden of adult obesity in women by identifying the determinants of weight gain prevention. The objective of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to compare a weight gain prevention intervention delivered by the registered dietitian versus counselor. Methods This is a 12-month parallel-arm weight gain prevention RCT designed to increase self-efficacy, self-regulation, outcome expectations and family and social support through the use of a nutrition education intervention in women, aged 18-45 years, from the Urbana-Champaign (Illinois, USA) area. Women have been randomized to registered dietitian, counselor or wait-list control groups (August 2014) and are undergoing weekly nutrition education sessions for four months, followed by monthly sessions for eight months (through August 2015). Outcome measures, including: (1) dietary intake, (2) physical activity, (3) anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, (4) biochemical markers of health, (5) eating behaviors and health perceptions, and (6) mediators of behavior change, were collected before the intervention began (baseline) and will be collected at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of the study. Results In total, 87 women have been randomized to intervention groups, and 81 women have completed first week of the study. Results are expected in early 2016. Conclusions This RCT is one of the first to examine weight gain prevention in women across normal, overweight, and obese body mass index categories. Results of this research are expected to have application to evidence-based practice in weight gain prevention for women and possibly have implication for policy regarding decreasing the

  13. Control of Growth Efficiency in Young Plantation Loblolly Pine and Sweetgum through Irrigation and Fertigation Enhancement of Leaf Carbon Gain

    SciTech Connect

    L. Samuelson

    1999-07-07

    The overall objective of this study was to determine if growth efficiency of young plantation loblolly pine and sweetgum can be maintained by intensive forest management and whether increased carbon gain is the mechanism controlling growth efficiency response to resource augmentation. Key leaf physiological processes were examined over two growing seasons in response to irrigation, fertigation (irrigation with a fertilizer solution), and fertigation plus pest control (pine only). Although irrigation improved leaf net photosynthesis in pine and decreased stomatal sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit in sweetgum, no consistent physiological responses to fertigation were detected in either species. After 4 years of treatment, a 3-fold increase in woody net primary productivity was observed in both species in response to fertigation. Trees supplemented with fertigation and fertigation plus pest control exhibited the largest increases in growth and biomass. Furthermore, growth efficiency was maintained by fertigation and fertigation plus pest control, despite large increases in crown development and self-shading. Greater growth in response to intensive culture was facilitated by significant gains in leaf mass and whole tree carbon gain rather than detectable increases in leaf level processes. Growth efficiency was not maintained by significant increases in leaf level carbon gain but was possibly influenced by changes in carbon allocation to root versus shoot processes.

  14. Integrated model of G189A and Aspen-plus for the transient modeling of extravehicular activity atmospheric control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodney, Matthew; Conger, Bruce C.

    1990-01-01

    A computerized modeling tool, under development for the transient modeling of an extravehicular activity atmospheric control subsystem is described. This subsystem includes the astronaut, temperature control, moisture control, CO2 removal, and oxygen make-up components. Trade studies evaluating competing components and subsystems to guide the selection and development of hardware for lunar and Martian missions will use this modeling tool. The integrated modeling tool uses the Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) to accomplish pseudosteady-state simulations, and the general environmental thermal control and life support program (G189A) to manage overall control of the run and transient input output, as well as transient modeling computations and database functions. Flow charts and flow diagrams are included.

  15. Exercise Training and Weight Gain in Obese Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial (ETIP Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Garnæs, Kirsti Krohn; Mørkved, Siv; Salvesen, Øyvind; Moholdt, Trine

    2016-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of exercise training for preventing excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is still uncertain. As maternal obesity is associated with both GWG and GDM, there is a special need to assess whether prenatal exercise training programs provided to obese women reduce the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Our primary aim was to assess whether regular supervised exercise training in pregnancy could reduce GWG in women with prepregnancy overweight/obesity. Secondary aims were to examine the effects of exercise in pregnancy on 30 outcomes including GDM incidence, blood pressure, blood measurements, skinfold thickness, and body composition. Methods and Findings This was a single-center study where we randomized (1:1) 91 pregnant women with a prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) ≥ 28 kg/m2 to exercise training (n = 46) or control (standard maternity care) (n = 45). Assessments were done at baseline (pregnancy week 12–18) and in late pregnancy (week 34–37), as well as at delivery. The exercise group was offered thrice weekly supervised sessions of 35 min of moderate intensity endurance exercise and 25 min of strength training. Seventeen women were lost to follow-up (eight in the exercise group and nine in the control group). Our primary endpoint was GWG from baseline testing to delivery. The principal analyses were done as intention-to-treat analyses, with supplementary per protocol analyses where we assessed outcomes in the women who adhered to the exercise program (n = 19) compared to the control group. Mean GWG from baseline to delivery was 10.5 kg in the exercise group and 9.2 kg in the control group, with a mean difference of 0.92 kg (95% CI −1.35, 3.18; p = 0.43). Among the 30 secondary outcomes in late pregnancy, an apparent reduction was recorded in the incidence of GDM (2009 WHO definition) in the exercise group (2 cases; 6.1%) compared to the control group (9 cases; 27.3%), with an odds ratio

  16. Discrimination of steady state and transient state of dither extremum seeking control via sinusoidal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Baojie; Li, Yaoyu; Seem, John E.

    2016-08-01

    A major class of extremum seeking control (ESC) is based on the use of periodic dither perturbation of plant input for extracting the gradient information. Presence of the dither input into the steady state operation is undesirable in practice due to the possible excessive wear of actuators. It is thus beneficial to stop the dithering action after the ESC reaches its steady state. In this paper, we propose a method for automatically discriminating between the steady state and the transient state modes of extremum seeking control process using the sinusoidal detection techniques. Some design guidelines are proposed for the parameter selection of the relevant sinusoidal detection scheme. The proposed scheme is validated with simulation study on dynamic virtual plant of two building HVAC systems.

  17. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  18. Which key properties controls the preferential transport in the vadose zone under transient hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, J.; Vanderborght, J.; Puetz, T.; Gerke, H. H.; Rupp, H.; Wollschlaeger, U.; Stumpp, C.; Priesack, E.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    % arrival time and potential key soil properties, site factors and boundary conditions will be presented in order to identify key properties which control the preferential transport in the vadose zone under transient hydrological conditions.

  19. Optimal camera exposure for video surveillance systems by predictive control of shutter speed, aperture, and gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan; Menéndez, José Manuel

    2015-02-01

    This paper establishes a real-time auto-exposure method to guarantee that surveillance cameras in uncontrolled light conditions take advantage of their whole dynamic range while provide neither under nor overexposed images. State-of-the-art auto-exposure methods base their control on the brightness of the image measured in a limited region where the foreground objects are mostly located. Unlike these methods, the proposed algorithm establishes a set of indicators based on the image histogram that defines its shape and position. Furthermore, the location of the objects to be inspected is likely unknown in surveillance applications. Thus, the whole image is monitored in this approach. To control the camera settings, we defined a parameters function (Ef ) that linearly depends on the shutter speed and the electronic gain; and is inversely proportional to the square of the lens aperture diameter. When the current acquired image is not overexposed, our algorithm computes the value of Ef that would move the histogram to the maximum value that does not overexpose the capture. When the current acquired image is overexposed, it computes the value of Ef that would move the histogram to a value that does not underexpose the capture and remains close to the overexposed region. If the image is under and overexposed, the whole dynamic range of the camera is therefore used, and a default value of the Ef that does not overexpose the capture is selected. This decision follows the idea that to get underexposed images is better than to get overexposed ones, because the noise produced in the lower regions of the histogram can be removed in a post-processing step while the saturated pixels of the higher regions cannot be recovered. The proposed algorithm was tested in a video surveillance camera placed at an outdoor parking lot surrounded by buildings and trees which produce moving shadows in the ground. During the daytime of seven days, the algorithm was running alternatively together

  20. pH-Dependent Transient Conformational States Control Optical Properties in Cyan Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Laricheva, Elena N.; Goh, Garrett B.; Dickson, Alex

    2015-01-01

    (namely, local solvation at the deprotonation site and a partial flexibility of the protein β-barrel structure) and provide the first evidence that transient conformational states can control optical properties of fluorescent proteins. PMID:25647152

  1. A Technology-Mediated Behavioral Weight Gain Prevention Intervention for College Students: Controlled, Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Courtney M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Sundstrom, Beth; Larsen, Chelsea; Magradey, Karen; Wilcox, Sara; Brandt, Heather M

    2016-01-01

    Background Both men and women are vulnerable to weight gain during the college years, and this phenomenon is linked to an increased risk of several chronic diseases and mortality. Technology represents an attractive medium for the delivery of weight control interventions focused on college students, given its reach and appeal among this population. However, few technology-mediated weight gain prevention interventions have been evaluated for college students. Objective This study examined a new technology-based, social media-facilitated weight gain prevention intervention for college students. Methods Undergraduates (n =58) in two sections of a public university course were allocated to either a behavioral weight gain prevention intervention (Healthy Weight, HW; N=29) or a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination awareness intervention (control; N=29). All students were enrolled, regardless of initial body weight or expressed interest in weight management. The interventions delivered 8 lessons via electronic newsletters and Facebook postings over 9 weeks, which were designed to foster social support and introduce relevant educational content. The HW intervention targeted behavioral strategies to prevent weight gain and provided participants with a Wi-Fi-enabled scale and an electronic physical activity tracker to facilitate weight regulation. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to examine within- and between-group differences in measures of self-reported weight control practices and objectively measured weight. Use of each intervention medium and device was objectively tracked, and intervention satisfaction measures were obtained. Results Students remained weight stable (HW: −0.48+1.9 kg; control: −0.45+1.4 kg), with no significant difference between groups over 9 weeks (P =.94). However, HW students reported a significantly greater increase in the number of appropriate weight control strategies than did controls (2.1+4.5 vs −1

  2. Raman gain induced mode evolution and on-demand coupling control in whispering-gallery-mode microcavities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Yilmaz, Huzeyfe; Lei, Fu-Chuan; Long, Gui-Lu; Yang, Lan

    2015-11-16

    Waveguide-coupled optical resonators have played an important role in a wide range of applications including optical communication, sensing, nonlinear optics, slow/fast light, and cavity QED. In such a system, the coupling regimes strongly affect the resonance feature in the light transmission spectra, and hence the performance and outcomes of the applications. Therefore it is crucial to control the coupling between the waveguide and the microresonator. In this work, we investigated a fiber-taper coupled whispering-gallery-mode microresonator system, in which the coupling regime is traditionally controlled by adjusting the distance between the resonator and the fiber-taper mechanically. We propose and experimentally demonstrate that by utilizing Raman gain one can achieve on-demand control of the coupling regime without any mechanical movement in the resonator system. Particularly, the application of Raman gain is accompanied by Q enhancement. We also show that with the help of Raman gain control, the transitions between various coupling regimes can affect the light transmission spectra so as to provide better resolvability and signal amplification. This all-optical approach is also suitable for monolithically integrated and packaged waveguide-resonator systems, whose coupling regime is fixed at the time of manufacturing. It provides an effective route to control the light transmission in a waveguide-couple resonator system without mechanically moving individual optical components. PMID:26698440

  3. Coaxial GaAs-AlGaAs core-multishell nanowire lasers with epitaxial gain control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stettner, T.; Zimmermann, P.; Loitsch, B.; Döblinger, M.; Regler, A.; Mayer, B.; Winnerl, J.; Matich, S.; Riedl, H.; Kaniber, M.; Abstreiter, G.; Koblmüller, G.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the growth and single-mode lasing operation of GaAs-AlGaAs core-multishell nanowires (NW) with radial single and multiple GaAs quantum wells (QWs) as active gain media. When subject to optical pumping lasing emission with distinct s-shaped input-output characteristics, linewidth narrowing and emission energies associated with the confined QWs are observed. Comparing the low temperature performance of QW NW laser structures having 7 coaxial QWs with a nominally identical structure having only a single QW shows that the threshold power density reduces several-fold, down to values as low as ˜2.4 kW/cm2 for the multiple QW NW laser. This confirms that the individual radial QWs are electronically weakly coupled and that epitaxial design can be used to optimize the gain characteristics of the devices. Temperature-dependent investigations show that lasing prevails up to 300 K, opening promising new avenues for efficient III-V semiconductor NW lasers with embedded low-dimensional gain media.

  4. A differential automatic gain control circuit with two-stage -10 to 50 dB tuning range VGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenbo, Wang; Luhong, Mao; Xindong, Xiao; Shilin, Zhang; Sheng, Xie

    2013-02-01

    A differential automatic gain control (AGC) circuit is presented. The AGC architecture contains two-stage variable gain amplifiers (VGAs) which are implemented with a Gilbert cell, a peak detector (PD), a low pass filter, an operational amplifier, and two voltage to current (V—I) convertors. One stage VGA achieves 30 dB gain due to the use of active load. The AGC circuit is implemented in UMC 0.18-μm single-poly six-metal CMOS process technology. Measurement results show that the final differential output swing of the 2nd stage VGA is about 0.9-Vpp; the total gain of the two VGAs can be varied linearly from -10 to 50 dB when the control voltage varies from 0.3 to 0.9 V. The final circuit (containing output buffers and a band-gap reference) consumes 37 mA from single 1.8 V voltage supply. For a 50 mV amplitude 60% modulation depth input AM signal it needs 100 μs to stabilize the output. The frequency response of the circuit has almost a constant -3 dB bandwidth of 2.2 MHz. Its OIP3 result is at 19 dBm.

  5. High Efficiency Automatic-Power-Controlled and Gain-Clamped EDFA for Broadband Passive Optical Networking Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jyi-Lai; Wei, Shui-Ken; Lin, Chin-Yuan; Iong Li, Ssu; Huang, Chih-Chuan

    2010-04-01

    The configuration of a simple improved high efficiency automatic-power-controlled and gain-clamped EDFA (APC-GC-EDFA) for broadband passive optical networking systems (BPON) is presented here. In order to compensate the phase and amplitude variation due to the different distance between the optical line terminal (OLT) and optical network units (ONU), the APC-GC-EDFA need to be employed. A single 980 nm laser module is employed as the primary pump. To extend the bandwidth, all C-band ASE is recycled as the secondary pump to enhance the gain efficiency. An electrical feedback circuit is used as a multi-wavelength channel transmitter monitor for the automatic power control to improve the gain-flattened flatness for stable amplification. The experimental results prove that the EDFA system can provide flatter clamped gain in both C-band and L-band configurations. The gain flatness wavelength ranging from 1530 to 1610 nm is within 32.83 ± 0.64 dB, i.e. below 1.95 %. The gains are clamped at 33.85 ± 0.65 dB for the input signal power of -40 dBm to -10 dBm. The range of noise figure is between 6.37 and 6.56, which is slightly lower compared to that of unclamped amplifiers. This will be very useful for measuring the gain flatness of APC-GC-EDFA. Finally, we have also demonstrated the records of the overall simultaneous dynamics measurements for the new system stabilization. The carrier to noise ratio (CNR) is 49.5 to 50.8 dBc which is above the National Television System Committee (NTSC) standard of 43 dBc, and both composite second order (CSO) 69.2 to 71.5 dBc and composite triple beat (CTB) of 69.8 to 72.2 dBc are above 53 dBc. The recorded corresponding rise-time of 1.087 ms indicates that the system does not exhibit any overshoot of gain or ASE variation due to the signal at the beginning of the pulse.

  6. Transient Plume Model Testing Using LADEE Spacecraft Attitude Control System Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Woronowicz, M. S.

    2011-05-20

    The Lunar Atmosphere Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft is being designed for a mission featuring low altitude orbits of the Moon to take relevant ambient measurements before that environment becomes altered by future exploration activities. Instruments include a neutral mass spectrometer capable of measuring ambient species density levels below 100 molecules/cm{sup 3}. Coincidentally, with a favorable combination of spacecraft orientations, it is also possible to measure plume gases from LADEE attitude control system thruster operations as they are reflected from the daytime lunar surface and subsequently intercepted by the spacecraft as it orbits overhead. Under such circumstances, it may be possible to test a variety of properties and assumptions associated with various transient plume models or to infer certain aspects regarding lunar surface properties.

  7. Transient Plume Model Testing Using LADEE Spacecraft Attitude Control System Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, M. S.

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft is being designed for a mission featuring low altitude orbits of the Moon to take relevant ambient measurements before that environment becomes altered by future exploration activities. Instruments include a neutral mass spectrometer capable of measuring ambient species density levels below 100 molecules/cu cm. Coincidentally, with a favorable combination of spacecraft orientations, it is also possible to measure plume gases from LADEE attitude control system thruster operations as they are reflected from the daytime lunar surface and subsequently intercepted by the spacecraft as it orbits overhead. Under such circumstances, it may be possible to test a variety of properties and assumptions associated with various transient plume models or to infer certain aspects regarding lunar surface properties.

  8. Weight gain in college females is not prevented by isoflavone-rich soy protein: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Berger, Paige K; Principe, Jessica L; Laing, Emma M; Henley, E C; Pollock, Norman K; Taylor, Ruth G; Blair, Robert M; Baile, Clifton A; Hall, Daniel B; Lewis, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Human clinical trials targeted at preventing gains in body weight using soy protein and isoflavones are limited to adults and yield conflicting results. We hypothesized that daily intake of soy protein/isoflavones would attenuate gains in body weight to a greater extent than a casein-based control in 18 to 19 year-old females. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial over 16 weeks to examine the effects of a soy protein/isoflavone-based meal replacement (experimental group) versus a casein-based meal replacement (control group) on body weight and body composition variables in female college freshmen (N = 120). Fat mass (FM), fat-free soft tissue mass (FFST), and percent body fat (%BF) were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA; Delphi A). Repeated measures mixed models were used to determine the effects of treatment on anthropometric and body composition variables (body weight, waist circumference, FM, FFST, and %BF). No significant group×time interactions were observed, even when body mass index was controlled for in the analysis. Over 16 weeks, body weight, FM, FFST, and %BF significantly increased in both groups (P < .05). Our findings show that female college freshmen gained a significant amount of weight over the course of the 16-week study. Gains in body weight and FM were similar among participants assigned to the soy protein/isoflavone- and the casein-based meal replacements. Future research is warranted to determine the effects of soy protein/isoflavone- and casein-based meal replacements versus a non-intervention (i.e., non-protein based) control. PMID:24418248

  9. Multi-axis transient vibration testing of space objects: Test philosophy, test facility, and control strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachenmayr, Georg

    1992-01-01

    IABG has been using various servohydraulic test facilities for many years for the reproduction of service loads and environmental loads on all kinds of test objects. For more than 15 years, a multi-axis vibration test facility has been under service, originally designed for earthquake simulation but being upgraded to the demands of space testing. First tests with the DFS/STM showed good reproduction accuracy and demonstrated the feasibility of transient vibration testing of space objects on a multi-axis hydraulic shaker. An approach to structural qualification is possible by using this test philosophy. It will be outlined and its obvious advantages over the state-of-the-art single-axis test will be demonstrated by example results. The new test technique has some special requirements to the test facility exceeding those of earthquake testing. Most important is the high reproduction accuracy demanded for a sophisticated control system. The state-of-the-art approach of analog closed-loop control circuits for each actuator combined with a static decoupling network and an off-line iterative waveform control is not able to meet all the demands. Therefore, the future over-all control system is implemented as hierarchical full digital closed-loop system on a highly parallel transputer network. The innermost layer is the digital actuator controller, the second one is the MDOF-control of the table movement. The outermost layer would be the off-line iterative waveform control, which is dedicated only to deal with the interaction of test table and test object or non-linear effects. The outline of the system will be presented.

  10. Effects of weight gain induced by controlled overfeeding on physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Bray, George A.; Smith, Steven R.; de Jonge, Lilian; Rood, Jennifer; Han, Hongmei; Redman, Leanne M.; Martin, Corby K.

    2014-01-01

    It is unclear whether physical activity changes following long-term overfeeding and in response to different dietary protein intakes. Twenty-five (16 males, 9 females) healthy adults (18–35 yr) with BMI ranging from 19 to 30 kg/m2 enrolled in this inpatient study. In a parallel group design, participants were fed 140% of energy needs, with 5, 15, or 25% of energy from protein, for 56 days. Participants wore an RT3 accelerometer for at least 59 days throughout baseline and during overfeeding and completed 24-h whole room metabolic chamber assessments at baseline and on days 1, 14, and 56 of overfeeding and on day 57, when the baseline energy intake was consumed, to measure percent of time active and spontaneous physical activity (SPA; kcal/day). Changes in activity were also assessed by doubly labeled water (DLW). From accelerometry, vector magnitude (VM), a weight-independent measure of activity, and activity energy expenditure (AEE) increased with weight gain during overfeeding. AEE remained increased after adjusting for changes in body composition. Activity-related energy expenditure (AREE) from DLW and percent activity and SPA in the metabolic chamber increased with overfeeding, but SPA was no longer significant after adjusting for change in body composition. Change in VM and AEE were positively correlated with weight gain; however, change in activity was not affected by protein intake. Overfeeding produces an increase in physical activity and in energy expended in physical activity after adjusting for changes in body composition, suggesting that increased activity in response to weight gain might be one mechanism to support adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:25294214