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Sample records for galactic halo stars

  1. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    2011-03-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introductory Papers: 1. What is the galaxy's halo population?; 2. Theoretical properties of horizontal-branch stars; 3. A review of A-type horizontal-branch stars; Part II. Surveys: 4. A progress report on the Edinburgh-Cape object survey; 5. A 300 square degree survey of young stars at high galactic latitudes; 6. The isolation of a new sample of B stars in the halo; 7. A northern catalog of FHB/A stars; 8. Recent progress on a continuing survey of galactic globular clusters for blue stragglers; 9. UV observations with FAUST and the galactic model; 10. Hot stars at the South Galactic Pole; Part III. Clusters: 11. Population II horizontal branches: a photometric study of globular clusters; 12. The period-shift effect in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters; 13. UV photometry of hot stars in omega centauri; 14. Spectroscopic and UBV observations of blue stars at the NGP; 15. Population I horizontal branches: probing the halo-to-disk transition; Part IV. Stars: 16. Very hot subdwarf O stars; 17. Quantitative spectroscopy of the very hot subluminous O-stars: K646, PG1159-035, and KPD0005+5106; 18. Analyzing the helium-rich hot sdO stars in the Palomar Green Survey; 19. Late type companions of hot sd O stars; 20. Hot stars in globular clusters; 21. Faint blue stars from the Hamburg Schmidt Survey; 22. Stellar winds and the evolution of sdB's to sdO's; 23. Halo stars in the Vilnius photometric system; 24. Horizontal branch stars in the geneva photometric system; 25. Zeeman observations of FHB stars and hot subdwarf stars; 26. What does a FHB star's spectrum look like?; 27. A technique for distinguishing FHB stars from A-type stars; 28. eEemental abundances of halo A and interloper stars; 29. The mass of blue horizontal branch stars in the globular cluster NGC6397; 30. IUE observations of blue HB stars in the globular clusters M3 and NGC6752; 31. Metallicities and kinematics of the local RR lyraes: lukewarm stars

  2. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    1994-08-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introductory Papers: 1. What is the galaxy's halo population?; 2. Theoretical properties of horizontal-branch stars; 3. A review of A-type horizontal-branch stars; Part II. Surveys: 4. A progress report on the Edinburgh-Cape object survey; 5. A 300 square degree survey of young stars at high galactic latitudes; 6. The isolation of a new sample of B stars in the halo; 7. A northern catalog of FHB/A stars; 8. Recent progress on a continuing survey of galactic globular clusters for blue stragglers; 9. UV observations with FAUST and the galactic model; 10. Hot stars at the South Galactic Pole; Part III. Clusters: 11. Population II horizontal branches: a photometric study of globular clusters; 12. The period-shift effect in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters; 13. UV photometry of hot stars in omega centauri; 14. Spectroscopic and UBV observations of blue stars at the NGP; 15. Population I horizontal branches: probing the halo-to-disk transition; Part IV. Stars: 16. Very hot subdwarf O stars; 17. Quantitative spectroscopy of the very hot subluminous O-stars: K646, PG1159-035, and KPD0005+5106; 18. Analyzing the helium-rich hot sdO stars in the Palomar Green Survey; 19. Late type companions of hot sd O stars; 20. Hot stars in globular clusters; 21. Faint blue stars from the Hamburg Schmidt Survey; 22. Stellar winds and the evolution of sdB's to sdO's; 23. Halo stars in the Vilnius photometric system; 24. Horizontal branch stars in the geneva photometric system; 25. Zeeman observations of FHB stars and hot subdwarf stars; 26. What does a FHB star's spectrum look like?; 27. A technique for distinguishing FHB stars from A-type stars; 28. eEemental abundances of halo A and interloper stars; 29. The mass of blue horizontal branch stars in the globular cluster NGC6397; 30. IUE observations of blue HB stars in the globular clusters M3 and NGC6752; 31. Metallicities and kinematics of the local RR lyraes: lukewarm stars

  3. Cool Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we report current status of search and study for Faint High Latitude Carbon Stars (FHLCs). Data for more than 1800 spectroscopically confirmed FHLCs are known, which are found thanks to objective prism surveys and photometric selections. More than half of the detected objects belongs to group of dwarf Carbon (dC) stars. Many-sided investigations based on modern astrophysical databases are necessary to study the space distribution of different groups of the FHLC stars and their possible origin in the Halo of our Galaxy. We report about the selection of FHLCs by the spectroscopic surveys: First Byurakan Survey (FBS), Hamburg/ESO Survey (HES), LAMOST Pilot Survey and SDSS, as well as by photometric selection: APM Survey for Cool Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo, SDSS and 2MASS JHK colours.

  4. Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totten, E. J.; Irwin, M. J.

    1996-04-01

    A byproduct of the APM high redshift quasar survey (Irwin et al. 1991) was the discovery of ~ 20 distant (20-100kpc) cool AGB carbon stars (all N-type) at high Galactic latitude. In August we used the INT+IDS to survey the rest of the high latitude SGC sky visible from La Palma and found 10 more similar carbon stars. Before this work there were only a handful of published faint high latitude cool carbon stars known (eg. Margon et al., 1984, Mould et al., 1985) and there has been speculation as to their origin (eg. Sanduleak, 1980, van den Bergh & Lafontaine, 1984). Intermediate age carbon stars (3 -- 7 Gyrs) seem unlikely to have formed in the halo in isolation from other star forming regions so how did they get there ? One possiblity that we are investigating, is that they arise from either the disruption of tidally captured dSph galaxies or are a manifestion of the long sought after optical component of the Magellanic Stream. Lack of proper motion rules out the possibility of them being dwarf carbon stars (eg. Warren et al., 1992); indeed no N-type carbon stars have been found to be dwarf carbon stars. Our optical spectroscopy confirms their carbon star type (they are indistinguishable from cool AGB carbon stars in nearby dwarf galaxies) and hence probable large distances. We are extending our survey to the NGC region, obtaining radial velocities and good S:N fluxed spectra for all the carbon stars. This will enable us to investigate their kinematics, true spatial distribution and hence their origin. Even, in the event that these objects are somehow an integral part of the Galactic halo, then their velocities and large distances will enable direct studies of the velocity ellipsoid and rotation of the outer halo (eg. Green et al., 1994).

  5. Neutron stars and white dwarfs in galactic halos?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Olive, Keith A.; Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that galactic halos are composed of stellar remnants such as neutron stars and white dwarfs is discussed. On the basis of a simple model for the evolution of galactic halos, researchers follow the history of halo matter, luminosity, and metal and helium abundances. They assume conventional yields for helium and the heavier elements. By comparing with the observational constraints, which may be considered as fairly conservative, it is found that, for an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR) with e-folding time tau, only values between 6 x 10(8) less than similar to tau less than similar to 2 x 10(9) years are allowed together with a very limited range of masses for the initial mass function (IMF). Star formation is allowed for 2 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 8 solar mass if tau = 2 x 10(9) years, and for 4 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 6 solar mass if tau = 10(9) years. For tau = 6 x 10(8) years, the lower and upper mass limits merge to similar to 5 solar mass. Researchers conclude that, even though the possibility of neutron stars as halo matter may be ruled out, that of white dwarfs may still be a viable hypothesis, though with very stringent constraints on allowed parameters, that merits further consideration.

  6. Neutron stars and white dwarfs in galactic halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Olive, Keith A.; Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that galactic halos are composed of stellar remnants such as neutron stars and white dwarfs is discussed. On the basis of a simple model for the evolution of galactic halos, researchers follow the history of halo matter, luminosity, and metal and helium abundances. They assume conventional yields for helium and the heavier elements. By comparing with the observational constraints, which may be considered as fairly conservative, it is found that, for an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR) with e-folding time tau, only values between 6 x 10(8) less than similar to tau less than similar to 2 x 10(9) years are allowed together with a very limited range of masses for the initial mass function (IMF). Star formation is allowed for 2 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 8 solar mass if tau = 2 x 10(9) years, and for 4 solar mass less than similar to m less than similar to 6 solar mass if tau = 10(9) years. For tau = 6 x 10(8) years, the lower and upper mass limits merge to similar to 5 solar mass. Researchers conclude that, even though the possibility of neutron stars as halo matter may be ruled out, that of white dwarfs may still be a viable hypothesis, though with very stringent constraints on allowed parameters, that merits further consideration.

  7. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC HALO STARS IN VIRGO

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Thomas G.; Mateo, Mario; Martinez-Delgado, David E-mail: mmateo@umich.ed

    2010-11-15

    We present multi-slit radial velocity measurements for 111 stars in the direction of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS). The stars were photometrically selected to be probable main-sequence stars in the Galactic halo. When compared with the radial velocity distribution expected for the halo of the Milky Way, as well as the distribution seen in a control field, we observe a significant excess of negative velocity stars in the field, which can likely be attributed to the presence of a stellar stream. This kinematic excess peaks at a Galactic standard of rest radial velocity of -75 km s{sup -1}. A rough distance estimate suggests that this feature extends from {approx}15 kpc out to, and possibly beyond, the {approx}30 kpc limit of the study. The mean velocity of these stars is incompatible with those of the VSS itself (V{sub gsr} {approx} 130 km s{sup -1}), which we weakly detect, but it is consistent with radial velocity measurements of nearby 2MASS M-giants and SDSS+SEGUE K/M-giants and blue horizontal branch stars that constitute the leading tidal tail of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Some oblate models for the shape of the Milky Way's dark matter halo predict that the leading arm of the Sagittarius Stream should pass through this volume, and have highly negative (V{sub gsr} {approx}< -200 km s{sup -1}) radial velocities, as it descends down from the northern Galactic hemisphere toward the Galactic plane. The kinematic feature observed in this study, if it is in fact Sagittarius debris, is not consistent with these predictions, and instead, like other leading stream radial velocity measurements, is consistent with a recently published triaxial halo model, or, if axisymmetry is imposed, favors a prolate shape for the Galactic halo potential. However, a rough distance estimate to the observed kinematic feature places it somewhat closer (D {approx} 15-30 kpc) than the Sagittarius models predict (D {approx} 35-45 kpc).

  8. HUBBLE'S SEARCH FOR FAINT FIELD STARS IN GALACTIC HALO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a randomly selected area of sky taken to search for faint red stars that might constitute dark matter in our Milky Way Galaxy. (Dark matter is material of an unknown type that makes up most of the mass of our galaxy). If the dark matter in our Galaxy was made of faint red stars -- as many scientists have previously conjectured -- then about 38 such stars should have been visible in this HST image. The simulated stars (diamond-shaped symbols), based on theoretical calculations, illustrate what scientists would have seen if the dark matter were locked-up in faint red stars. These surprising results rule out dim stars as an explanation for dark matter in our Galaxy. Right The unmodified HST image shows the region is actually so devoid of stars that far more distant background galaxies can easily be seen. The field is in the constellation Eridanus, far outside the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This region was chosen to highlight stars in the galactic halo, where dark matter exists, and to avoid the contribution of faint stars in the plane of the Galaxy. Technical Information: The image was constructed from seven exposures totaling almost three hours of searching by HST. The field shown is about 1.5 arc-minutes across. The image was taken in near-infrared light (814 nm) with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, on Feb 8, 1994. This observation is part of the HST parallel observing program. Credit: J Bahcall, Institute for Advance Study, Princeton and NASA

  9. An extremely primitive star in the Galactic halo.

    PubMed

    Caffau, Elisabetta; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; François, Patrick; Sbordone, Luca; Monaco, Lorenzo; Spite, Monique; Spite, François; Ludwig, Hans-G; Cayrel, Roger; Zaggia, Simone; Hammer, François; Randich, Sofia; Molaro, Paolo; Hill, Vanessa

    2011-09-01

    The early Universe had a chemical composition consisting of hydrogen, helium and traces of lithium; almost all other elements were subsequently created in stars and supernovae. The mass fraction of elements more massive than helium, Z, is known as 'metallicity'. A number of very metal-poor stars has been found, some of which have a low iron abundance but are rich in carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. For theoretical reasons and because of an observed absence of stars with Z < 1.5 × 10(-5), it has been suggested that low-mass stars cannot form from the primitive interstellar medium until it has been enriched above a critical value of Z, estimated to lie in the range 1.5 × 10(-8) to 1.5 × 10(-6) (ref. 8), although competing theories claiming the contrary do exist. (We use 'low-mass' here to mean a stellar mass of less than 0.8 solar masses, the stars that survive to the present day.) Here we report the chemical composition of a star in the Galactic halo with a very low Z (≤ 6.9 × 10(-7), which is 4.5 × 10(-5) times that of the Sun) and a chemical pattern typical of classical extremely metal-poor stars--that is, without enrichment of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. This shows that low-mass stars can be formed at very low metallicity, that is, below the critical value of Z. Lithium is not detected, suggesting a low-metallicity extension of the previously observed trend in lithium depletion. Such lithium depletion implies that the stellar material must have experienced temperatures above two million kelvin in its history, given that this is necessary to destroy lithium. PMID:21886158

  10. Evidence for recent star formation in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.

    1986-09-01

    Observational data for PHL 346 obtained with the 2.5 m Issac Newton telescope on August 1985 are studied. Measured stellar Stromgren colors, hydrogen-line profiles, and helium and metal-line equivalent widths are compared with those predicted by local thermodynamic equilibrium model-atmosphere calculations. Effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity, and helium and metal abundances for the star are derived. A mass of 13 + or - 2 solar masses, a lifetime of 11 x 10 to the 6th yr, a distance from the galactic plane of 8.7 + or - 1.5 kpc, and a velocity in the z direction of +56 + or - 10 km/s are calculated for the star. The data reveal that the star was not ejected from the galactic plane, but that it formed out of galactic fountain gas at about 6 kpc from the disc.

  11. Contributions to the Galactic halo from in-situ, kicked-out, and accreted stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Allyson A.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Majewski, Steven R.

    2016-08-01

    We report chemical abundances for a sample of 66 M giants with high S/N high-resolution spectroscopy in the inner halo of the Milky Way. The program giant stars have radial velocities that vary significantly from those expected for stars moving on uniform circular orbits in the Galactic disk. Thus, based on kinematics, we expect a sample dominated by halo stars. Abundances are derived for α-elements and neutron capture elements. By analyzing the multi-dimensional abundance space, the formation site of the halo giants - in-situ or accreted - can be assessed. Of particular interest are a class of stars that form in-situ, deep in the Milky Way's gravitational potential well, but are ``kicked out'' of the disk into the halo due to a perturbation event. We find: (1) our sample is dominated by accreted stars and (2) tentative evidence of a small kicked-out population in our Milky Way halo sample.

  12. Armchair cartography - A map of the Galactic halo based on observations of local, metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Zhen, Chen

    1990-01-01

    The velocity distribution of metal-poor halo stars in the solar neighborhood is studied to extract data on the global spatial and kinematic properties of the Galactic stellar halo. A global model of the solar neighborhood stars is constructed from observed positions and three-dimensional velocity of local, metal-poor halo stars in terms of a discrete sum of orbits. The characteristics of the reconstructed halo are examined and used to study the evolution of the halo subsystems.

  13. Neutron-capture element and Sc abundances in low- and high-alpha Galactic halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, David; Fishlock, Cherie; Karakas, Amanda

    2015-08-01

    Nissen & Schuster (2010) identified two samples of Galactic halo stars with distinct kinematic and chemical properties. The "high-alpha" population is associated with the dissipative monolithic collapse of a proto-Galactic gas cloud while the "low-alpha" population was likely accreted from dwarf galaxies having experienced slower star formation rates. For a subset of these stars, we measured precise abundances of Sc, Zr, La, Ce, Nd and Eu. We find differences in the abundance ratios of [Sc/Fe], [Zr/Fe], and [La/Zr] between the low- and high-alpha groups. The most intriguing result is that the low-alpha stars appear to have higher [Eu/Fe] ratios than the high-alpha stars, in contrast to the expectation that Eu should follow the alpha elements. These data challenge the hypothesis that the high-alpha stars formed in regions only enriched by massive stars and that the low-alpha received additional enrichment from SNeIa and low-mass AGB stars. This work has three main consequences for galaxy halos: 1. The new Eu data could be explained by different IMFs for the two halo populations; 2. The low [alpha/Fe] ratios in some, and perhaps all, dwarf galaxies may be driven (in part of in whole) by different IMFs rather than SNeIa contributions; 3. These data may provide important new constraints on the origin of Eu.

  14. Post Asymptotic Giant Branch and Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Post asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars, central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe) and planetary nebulae (PNe) are important phases of stellar evolution as the material they feedback is the seed of subsequent star formation in a galaxy. The majority of low and intermediate mass stars are expected to evolve through these channels, however, it is uncertain how many actually do, and at what rate. The Galactic halo, with its older population, provides a direct test of evolutionary models for low mass stars. Birthrate estimates of PNe are uncertain and worse still, are in contradiction with accepted white dwarf (WD) birthrate estimates. Much of the uncertainty stems from the lack of complete samples and poorly determined distance estimates. New surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Galaxy Evolutionary Explorer (GALEX) and the INT Photometric Ha Survey (IPHAS) have discovered many new PNe and have observed the far edges of the Galaxy. Improved methods of determining distances to CSPNe are presented here, using model atmospheres, evolutionary tracks and high resolution reddening maps utilising these revolutionary surveys. Locating the CSPN is non-trivial particularly for evolved PNe, as they are extended with their central star often displaced from the centre of the nebula. Therefore, photometric criteria are required to locate the CSPN in the nebula's field. Synthetic photometry of the CSPNe is derived from spectral energy distributions (SEDs) computed from a grid of model atmospheres covering the parameter range of CSPNe. The SEDs are convolved with filter transmission curves to compute synthetic magnitudes for a given photometric system which are then calibrated with standard stars and WDs. A further project borne out of a search for luminous central stars of faint PNe, resulted in a systematic search for post-AGB stars in the Galactic halo. In this work, new candidate halo post-AGB stars are discovered from a search through the SDSS spectroscopic

  15. New cluster members and halo stars of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, Colin A.; Martell, Sarah L.; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2015-10-01

    NGC 1851 is an intriguing Galactic globular cluster, with multiple stellar evolutionary sequences, light and heavy element abundance variations and indications of a surrounding stellar halo. We present the first results of a spectroscopic study of red giant stars within and outside of the tidal radius of this cluster. Our results identify nine probable new cluster members (inside the tidal radius) with heliocentric radial velocities consistent with that of NGC 1851. We also identify, based on their radial velocities, four probable extratidal cluster halo stars at distances up to ˜3.1 times the tidal radius, which are supportive of previous findings that NGC 1851 is surrounded by an extended stellar halo. Proper motions were available for 12 of these 13 stars and all are consistent with that of NGC 1851. Apart from the cluster members and cluster halo stars, our observed radial velocity distribution agrees with the expected distribution from a Besançon disc/N-body stellar halo Milky Way model generated by the GALAXIA code, suggesting that no other structures at different radial velocities are present in our field. The metallicities of these stars are estimated using equivalent width measurements of the near-infrared calcium triplet absorption lines and are found, within the limitations of this method, to be consistent with that of NGC 1851. In addition we recover 110 red giant cluster members from previous studies based on their radial velocities and identify three stars with unusually high radial velocities.

  16. Highly-Ionized Gas in the Galactic Halo: A FUSE Survey of O 6 Absorption toward 22 Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsargo, J.; Sembach, K. R.; Howk, J. C.; Savage, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of 22 Galactic halo stars are studied to determine the amount of O 6 in the Galactic halo between ~0.3 and ~10 kpc from the Galactic mid-plane. Strong O 6 λ 1031.93 absorption was detected toward 21 stars, and a reliable 3 σ upper limit was obtained toward HD 97991. The weaker member of the O 6 doublet at 1037.62 Å could be studied toward only six stars. The observed columns are reasonably consistent with a patchy exponential O 6 distribution with a mid-plane density of 1.7x10-8 cm-3 and scale height between 2.3 and 4 kpc. We do not see clear signs of strong high-velocity components in O 6 absorption along the Galactic sight lines, which indicates the general absence of high velocity O 6 within 2-5 kpc of the Galactic mid-plane. The correlation between the H 1 and O 6 intermediate velocity absorption is also poor. The O 6 velocity dispersions are much larger than the value of ~18 km/s expected from thermal broadening for gas at T ~ 3x105 K, the temperature at which O 6 is expected to reach its peak abundance in collisional ionization equilibrium. Turbulence, inflow, and outflow must have an effect on the shape of the O 6 profiles. Kinematical comparisons of O 6 with Ar 1 reveal that 9 of 21 sight lines are closely aligned in LSR velocity (|Δ VLSR| <=5 km/s ), while 8 of 21 exhibit significant velocity differences (|Δ VLSR| >= 15 km/s ). This dual behavior may indicate the presence of two different types of O 6-bearing environments toward the Galactic sight lines. Comparison of O 6 with other highly-ionized species suggests that the high ions are produced primarily by cooling hot gas in the Galactic fountain flow, and that turbulent mixing also has a significant contribution. The role of turbulent mixing is most important toward sight lines that sample supernova remnants like Loop I and IV. We are also able to show that the O 6 enhancement toward the Galactic center region that was observed in the FUSE

  17. THE FRACTION OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SECOND-GENERATION STARS IN THE GALACTIC HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Vesperini, Enrico; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; D'Antona, Francesca; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2010-08-01

    Many observational studies have revealed the presence of multiple stellar generations in Galactic globular clusters. These studies suggest that second-generation stars make up a significant fraction of the current mass of globular clusters, with the second-generation mass fraction ranging from {approx}50% to 80% in individual clusters. In this Letter, we carry out hydrodynamical simulations to explore the dependence of the mass of second-generation stars on the initial mass and structural parameters and stellar initial mass function (IMF) of the parent cluster. We then use the results of these simulations to estimate the fraction f{sub SG,H} of the mass of the Galactic stellar halo composed of second-generation stars that originated in globular clusters. We study the dependence of f{sub SG,H} on the parameters of the IMF of the Galactic globular cluster system. For a broad range of initial conditions, we find that the fraction of mass of the Galactic stellar halo in second-generation stars is always small, f{sub SG,H} < 4%-6% for a Kroupa-1993 IMF and f{sub SG,H} < 7%-9% for a Kroupa-2001 IMF.

  18. Hot subdwarf stars in the Galactic halo Tracers of prominent events in late stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Stephan; Kupfer, Thomas; Schaffenroth, Veronika; Heber, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are the stripped cores of red giants located at the bluest extension of the horizontal branch. They constitute the dominant population of UV-bright stars in old stellar environments and are most likely formed by binary interactions. We perform the first systematic, spectroscopic analysis of a sample of those stars in the Galactic halo based on data from SDSS. In the course of this project we discovered 177 close binary candidates. A significant fraction of the sdB binaries turned out to have close substellar companions, which shows that brown dwarfs and planets can significantly influence late stellar evolution. Close hot subdwarf binaries with massive white dwarf companions on the other hand are good candidates for the progenitors of type Ia supernovae. We discovered a hypervelocity star, which not only turned out to be the fastest unbound star known in our Galaxy, but also the surviving companion of such a supernova explosion.

  19. The Milky Way Halo and the First Stars: New Frontiers in Galactic Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Tumlinson, Jason; O'Shea, Brian; Peruta, Carolyn; Carollo, Daniela

    2010-11-01

    We discuss plans for a new joint effort between observers and theorists to understand the formation of the Milky Way halo back to the first epochs of chemical evolution. New models based on high-resolution N-body simulations coupled to simple models of Galactic chemical evolution show that surviving stars from the epoch of the first galaxies remain in the Milky Way today and should bear the nucleosynthetic imprint of the first stars. We investigate the key physical influences on the formation of stars in the first galaxies and how they appear today, including the relationship between cosmic reionization and surviving Milky Way stars. These models also provide a physically motivated picture of the formation of the Milky Ways “outer halo,” which has been identified from recent large samples of stars from SDSS. The next steps are to use these models to guide rigorous gas simulations of Milky Way formation, including its disk, and to gradually build up the fully detailed theoretical “Virtual Galaxy” that is demanded by the coming generation of massive Galactic stellar surveys.

  20. The Abundance Pattern of Two Barium Stars in the Galactic Halo: HD 104340 and HD 206983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, S.; Pereira, C. B.

    2001-07-01

    We present the abundance pattern of two barium stars in the Galactic halo, HD 104340 and HD 206983, based on high-resolution optical spectra. We also determined the spectroscopic stellar atmospheric parameters, temperature, and microturbulent velocity, as well as stellar surface gravity from a solution of excitation and ionization equilibria of Fe I and Fe II lines under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The abundance analysis reveals HD 104340 to be a metal-poor K giant with [Fe/H]=-1.72 and HD 206983 also a metal-poor K giant with [Fe/H]=-1.43. From a set of Fe I lines, the radial velocity is found to be 263.3+/-0.6 km s-1 and -319.2+/-4.4 km s-1 for HD 104340 and HD 206983, respectively. Their high velocity, low metallicity, and high galactic latitude imply that both stars are members of a Galactic halo population. From our study and by using information from the literature we believe that HD 206983 is another member of a group known as metal-deficient barium stars. We compare the abundance pattern with the abundances of a halo population. We found that the abundances of the iron group, α-elements, manganese, copper, and zinc, as well as sodium and magnesium, of HD 104340 and HD 206983 follow the abundance pattern of a halo population. The heavy element abundance pattern of both stars shows enhancement by a factor of 4-8 with respect to the metal-poor stars with the same metallicity as that analyzed by us. We also discuss the abundances of the s-process elements and compare our results with other objects that display the same degree of enrichment due to neutron capture reactions, binary systems, and AGB stars, through a diagram of metallicity versus neutron exposure given by the [hs/ls] index. Based on the observations made with the 1.52 m telescope at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) under agreement with Observatório Nacional (Brazil).

  1. The role of neutron star mergers in the chemical evolution of the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescutti, G.; Romano, D.; Matteucci, F.; Chiappini, C.; Hirschi, R.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The dominant astrophysical production site of the r-process elements has not yet been unambiguously identified. The suggested main r-process sites are core-collapse supernovae and merging neutron stars. Aims: We explore the problem of the production site of Eu. We also use the information present in the observed spread in the Eu abundances in the early Galaxy, and not only its average trend. Moreover, we extend our investigations to other heavy elements (Ba, Sr, Rb, Zr) to provide additional constraints on our results. Methods: We adopt a stochastic chemical evolution model that takes inhomogeneous mixing into account. The adopted yields of Eu from merging neutron stars and from core-collapse supernovae are those that are able to explain the average [Eu/Fe]-[Fe/H] trend observed for solar neighbourhood stars, the solar abundance of Eu, and the present-day abundance gradient of Eu along the Galactic disc in the framework of a well-tested homogeneous model for the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. Rb, Sr, Zr, and Ba are produced by both the s- and r-processes. The r-process yields were obtained by scaling the Eu yields described above according to the abundance ratios observed in r-process rich stars. The s-process contribution by spinstars is the same as in our previous papers. Results: Neutron star binaries that merge in less than 10 Myr or neutron star mergers combined with a source of r-process generated by massive stars can explain the spread of [Eu/Fe] in the Galactic halo. The combination of r-process production by neutron star mergers and s-process production by spinstars is able to reproduce the available observational data for Sr, Zr, and Ba. We also show the first predictions for Rb in the Galactic halo. Conclusions: We confirm previous results that either neutron star mergers on a very short timescale or both neutron star mergers and at least a fraction of Type II supernovae have contributed to the synthesis of Eu in the Galaxy. The r

  2. MAPPING THE GALACTIC HALO WITH BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS FROM THE TWO-DEGREE FIELD QUASAR REDSHIFT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    De Propris, Roberto; Harrison, Craig D.; Mares, Peter J.

    2010-08-20

    We use 666 blue horizontal branch stars from the 2Qz Redshift Survey to map the Galactic halo in four dimensions (position, distance, and velocity). We find that the halo extends to at least 100 kpc in Galactocentric distance, and obeys a single power-law density profile of index {approx}-2.5 in two different directions separated by about 150{sup 0} on the sky. This suggests that the halo is spherical. Our map shows no large kinematically coherent structures (streams, clouds, or plumes) and appears homogeneous. However, we find that at least 20% of the stars in the halo reside in substructures and that these substructures are dynamically young. The velocity dispersion profile of the halo appears to increase toward large radii while the stellar velocity distribution is non-Gaussian beyond 60 kpc. We argue that the outer halo consists of a multitude of low luminosity overlapping tidal streams from recently accreted objects.

  3. WEAK GALACTIC HALO-DWARF SPHEROIDAL CONNECTION FROM RR LYRAE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentino, Giuliana; Bono, Giuseppe; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Martínez-Vásquez, Clara E.; Tolstoy, Eline; Salaris, Maurizio; Bernard, Edouard J.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role that dwarf galaxies may have played in the formation of the Galactic halo (Halo) using RR Lyrae stars (RRL) as tracers of their ancient stellar component. The comparison is performed using two observables (periods, luminosity amplitudes) that are reddening and distance independent. Fundamental mode RRL in 6 dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) and 11 ultra faint dwarf galaxies (∼1300) show a Gaussian period distribution well peaked around a mean period of (Pab) = 0.610 ± 0.001 days (σ = 0.03). The Halo RRL (∼15,000) are characterized by a broader period distribution. The fundamental mode RRL in all the dSphs apart from Sagittarius are completely lacking in High Amplitude Short Period (HASP) variables, defined as those having P ≲ 0.48 days and A{sub V} ≥ 0.75 mag. Such variables are not uncommon in the Halo and among the globular clusters and massive dwarf irregulars. To further interpret this evidence, we considered 18 globulars covering a broad range in metallicity (–2.3 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ –1.1) and hosting more than 35 RRL each. The metallicity turns out to be the main parameter, since only globulars more metal-rich than [Fe/H] ∼ –1.5 host RRL in the HASP region. This finding suggests that dSphs similar to the surviving ones do not appear to be the major building-blocks of the Halo. Leading physical arguments suggest an extreme upper limit of ∼50% to their contribution. On the other hand, massive dwarfs hosting an old population with a broad metallicity distribution (Large Magellanic Cloud, Sagittarius) may have played a primary role in the formation of the Halo.

  4. The Century Survey Galactic Halo Project III: A Complete 4300 DEG2 Survey of Blue Horizontal Branch Stars in the Metal-Weak Thick Disk and Inner Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.; Beers, Timothy C.; Wilhelm, Ronald; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kurtz, Michael J.

    2008-02-01

    We present a complete spectroscopic survey of 2414 2MASS-selected blue horizontal branch (BHB) candidates selected over 4300 deg2 of the sky. We identify 655 BHB stars in this non-kinematically selected sample. We calculate the luminosity function of field BHB stars, and find evidence for very few hot BHB stars in the field. The BHB stars located at a distance from the Galactic plane |Z| < 4 kpc trace what is clearly a metal-weak thick disk population, with a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.7, a rotation velocity gradient of dvrot/d|Z| = -28 ± 3.4 km s-1 in the region |Z| < 6 kpc, and a density scale height of hZ = 1.26 ± 0.1 kpc. The BHB stars located at 5 < |Z| < 9 kpc are a predominantly inner-halo population, with a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.0 and a mean Galactic rotation of -4 ± 31 km s-1. We infer the density of halo and thick disk BHB stars is 104 ± 37 kpc-3 near the Sun, and the relative normalization of halo to thick-disk BHB stars is 4 ± 1% near the Sun.

  5. A reservoir of ionized gas in the galactic halo to sustain star formation in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J Christopher

    2011-11-18

    Without a source of new gas, our Galaxy would exhaust its supply of gas through the formation of stars. Ionized gas clouds observed at high velocity may be a reservoir of such gas, but their distances are key for placing them in the galactic halo and unraveling their role. We have used the Hubble Space Telescope to blindly search for ionized high-velocity clouds (iHVCs) in the foreground of galactic stars. We show that iHVCs with 90 ≤ |v(LSR)| ≲ 170 kilometers per second (where v(LSR) is the velocity in the local standard of rest frame) are within one galactic radius of the Sun and have enough mass to maintain star formation, whereas iHVCs with |v(LSR)| ≳ 170 kilometers per second are at larger distances. These may be the next wave of infalling material. PMID:21868626

  6. The Century Survey Galactic Halo Project. II. Global Properties and the Luminosity Function of Field Blue Horizontal Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Beers, Timothy C.; Wilhelm, Ronald

    2005-09-01

    We discuss a 175 deg2 spectroscopic survey for blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars in the Galactic halo. We use the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to select BHB candidates, and we find that the 2MASS and SDSS color selection is 38% and 50% efficient, respectively, for BHB stars. Our samples include one likely runaway B7 star 6 kpc below the Galactic plane. The global properties of the BHB samples are consistent with membership in the halo population: the median metallicity is [Fe/H]=-1.7, the velocity dispersion is 108 km s-1, and the mean Galactic rotation of the BHB stars 3 kpc<|z|<15 kpc is -4+/-30 km s-1. We discuss the theoretical basis of the Preston, Shectman, and Beers MV-color relation for BHB stars and conclude that the intrinsic shape of the BHB MV-color relation results from the physics of stars on the horizontal branch. We calculate the luminosity function for the field BHB star samples using the maximum likelihood method of Efstathiou and coworkers, which is unbiased by density variations. The field BHB luminosity function exhibits a steep rise at bright luminosities, a peak between 0.8stars and BHB stars in globular clusters share a common distribution of luminosities, with the exception of globular clusters with extended BHBs.

  7. Do gamma-ray bursts originate from an extended Galactic Halo of high-velocity neutron stars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brown, Lawrence E.; The, Lih-Sin; Linder, Eric V.; Petrosian, Vahe; Blumenthal, George R.; Hurley, Kevin C.

    1994-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst brightness distribution is inhomogeneous and the distribution on the sky is nearly isotropic. These features argue against an association of gamma-ray bursts with those Galactic objects that are known to exhibit a strong concentration toward the Galactic center or plane. The observed statistical properties indicate a cosmological origin. Circumstantial evidence suggests that neutron stars are involved in the burst phenomenon. Here we consider Population II neutron stars in an extended Galactic Halo (EGH) as an alternative to cosmological scenarios. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) data indicate a small deviation from isotropy near the 2 sigma level of statistical significance. If confirmed for an increasing number of bursts, these anisotropies could rule out cosmological scenarios. On the other hand, EGH models require small anisotropies like those observed by BATSE. We consider simple distribution models to determine the generic properties such halos must have to be consistent with the observations and discuss the implications of the corresponding distance scale on burst models.

  8. SEGUE-2 LIMITS ON METAL-RICH OLD-POPULATION HYPERVELOCITY STARS IN THE GALACTIC HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Juna A.; Gould, Andrew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Rockosi, Constance; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Knapp, Gillian; Morrison, Heather; Harding, Paul; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2010-11-01

    We present new limits on the ejection of metal-rich old-population hypervelocity stars (HVSs) from the Galactic center (GC) as probed by the SEGUE-2 survey. Our limits are a factor of 3-10 more stringent than previously reported, depending on stellar type. Compared to the known population of B-star ejectees, there can be no more than 30 times more metal-rich old-population F/G stars ejected from the GC. Because B stars comprise a tiny fraction of a normal stellar population, this places significant limits on the combination of the GC mass function and the ejection mechanism for HVSs. In the presence of a normal GC mass function, our results require an ejection mechanism that is about 5.5 times more efficient at ejecting B stars compared to low-mass F/G stars.

  9. Clouds Dominate the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Using the exquisite sensitivity of the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), astronomer Jay Lockman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, W. Va., has produced the best cross-section ever of the Milky Way Galaxy's diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. This image confirms the presence of discrete hydrogen clouds in the halo, and could help astronomers understand the origin and evolution of the rarefied atmosphere that surrounds our Galaxy. Lockman presented his findings at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle, WA. Hydrogen Clouds Graphic Artist's Rendering of the Milky Way (background) with insert showing GBT image of cross-section of neutral atomic Hydrogen Credit: Kirk Woellert/National Science Foundation Patricia Smiley, NRAO. "The first observations with the Green Bank Telescope suggested that the hydrogen in the lower halo, the transition zone between the Milky Way and intergalactic space, is very clumpy," said Lockman. "The latest data confirm these results and show that instead of trailing away smoothly from the Galactic plane, a significant fraction of the hydrogen gas in the halo is concentrated in discrete clouds. There are even some filaments." Beyond the star-filled disk of the Milky Way, there exists an extensive yet diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. For years, astronomers have speculated about the origin and structure of this gas. "Even the existence of neutral hydrogen in the halo has been somewhat of a puzzle," Lockman remarked. "Unlike the Earth's atmosphere, which is hot enough to hold itself up against the force of gravity, the hydrogen in the halo is too cool to support itself against the gravitational pull of the Milky Way." Lockman points out that some additional factor has to be involved to get neutral hydrogen to such large distances from the Galactic plane. "This force could be cosmic rays, a supersonic wind, the blast waves from supernovae, or something we have not thought of

  10. "Invisible" Galactic Halos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugt, Karel Vander

    1993-01-01

    Develops a simple core-halo model of a galaxy that exhibits the main features of observed rotation curves and quantitatively illustrates the need to postulate halos of dark matter. Uses only elementary mechanics. (Author/MVL)

  11. A Speeding Binary in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of a hyper-velocity binary star system in the halo of the Milky Way poses a mystery: how was this system accelerated to its high speed?Accelerating StarsUnlike the uniform motion in the Galactic disk, stars in the Milky Ways halo exhibit a huge diversity of orbits that are usually tilted relative to the disk and have a variety of speeds. One type of halo star, so-called hyper-velocity stars, travel with speeds that can approach the escape velocity of the Galaxy.How do these hyper-velocity stars come about? Assuming they form in the Galactic disk, there are multiple proposed scenarios through which they could be accelerated and injected into the halo, such as:Ejection after a close encounter with the supermassive black hole at the Galactic centerEjection due to a nearby supernova explosionEjection as the result of a dynamical interaction in a dense stellar population.Further observations of hyper-velocity stars are necessary to identify the mechanism responsible for their acceleration.J1211s SurpriseModels of J1211s orbit show it did not originate from the Galactic center (black dot). The solar symbol shows the position of the Sun and the star shows the current position of J1211. The bottom two panels show two depictions(x-y plane and r-z plane) of estimated orbits of J1211 over the past 10 Gyr. [Nmeth et al. 2016]To this end, a team of scientists led by Pter Nmeth (Friedrich Alexander University, Erlangen-Nrnberg) recently studied the candidate halo hyper-velocity star SDSS J121150.27+143716.2. The scientists obtained spectroscopy of J1211 using spectrographs at the Keck Telescope in Hawaii and ESOs Very Large Telescope in Chile. To their surprise, they discovered the signature of a companion in the spectra: J1211 is actually a binary!Nmeth and collaborators found that J1211, located roughly 18,000 light-years away, is moving at a rapid ~570 km/s relative to the galactic rest frame. The binary system consists of a hot (30,600 K) subdwarf and a

  12. A NEW MILKY WAY HALO STAR CLUSTER IN THE SOUTHERN GALACTIC SKY

    SciTech Connect

    Balbinot, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Da Costa, L.; Maia, M. A. G.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.; Majewski, S. R.; Nidever, D.; Thomas, D.; Wechsler, R. H.; Yanny, B.

    2013-04-20

    We report on the discovery of a new Milky Way (MW) companion stellar system located at ({alpha}{sub J2000,}{delta}{sub J2000}) = (22{sup h}10{sup m}43{sup s}.15, 14 Degree-Sign 56 Prime 58 Double-Prime .8). The discovery was made using the eighth data release of SDSS after applying an automated method to search for overdensities in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey footprint. Follow-up observations were performed using Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope/MegaCam, which reveal that this system is comprised of an old stellar population, located at a distance of 31.9{sup +1.0}{sub -1.6} kpc, with a half-light radius of r{sub h}= 7.24{sup +1.94}{sub -1.29} pc and a concentration parameter of c = log{sub 10}(r{sub t} /r{sub c} ) = 1.55. A systematic isochrone fit to its color-magnitude diagram resulted in log (age yr{sup -1}) = 10.07{sup +0.05}{sub -0.03} and [Fe/H] = -1.58{sup +0.08}{sub -0.13}. These quantities are typical of globular clusters in the MW halo. The newly found object is of low stellar mass, whose observed excess relative to the background is caused by 95 {+-} 6 stars. The direct integration of its background decontaminated luminosity function leads to an absolute magnitude of M{sub V} = -1.21 {+-} 0.66. The resulting surface brightness is {mu}{sub V} = 25.90 mag arcsec{sup -2}. Its position in the M{sub V} versus r{sub h} diagram lies close to AM4 and Koposov 1, which are identified as star clusters. The object is most likely a very faint star cluster-one of the faintest and lowest mass systems yet identified.

  13. Pathways to massive black holes and compact star clusters in pre-galactic dark matter haloes with virial temperatures >~10000K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, John A.; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2009-06-01

    Large dynamic range numerical simulations of atomic cooling driven collapse of gas in pre-galactic dark matter haloes with Tvir ~ 10000 K show that the gas loses 90 per cent and more of its angular momentum before rotational support sets in. In a fraction of these haloes where the metallicity is low and ultraviolet (UV) radiation suppresses H2 cooling, conditions are thus very favourable for the rapid build-up of massive black holes. Depending on the progression of metal enrichment, the continued suppression of H2 cooling by external and internal UV radiation and the ability to trap the entropy produced by the release of gravitational energy, the gas at the centre of the halo is expected to form a supermassive star, a stellar-mass black hole accreting at super-Eddington accretion rates or a compact star-cluster undergoing collisional run-away of massive stars at its centre. In all three cases, a massive black hole of initially modest mass finds itself at the centre of a rapid inflow of gas with inflow rates of >~1Msolaryr-1. The massive black hole will thus grow quickly to a mass of 105- 106Msolar until further inflow is halted either by consumption of gas by star formation or by the increasing energy and momentum feedback from the growing massive black hole. Conditions for the formation of massive seed black holes in this way are most favourable in haloes with Tvir ~ 15000K and Vvir ~ 20 km s-1 with less massive haloes not allowing collapse of gas by atomic cooling and more massive haloes being more prone to fragmentation. This should imprint a characteristic mass on the mass spectrum of an early population of massive black hole seeds in pre-galactic haloes which will later grow into the observed population of supermassive black holes in galactic bulges.

  14. The role of binaries in the enrichment of the early Galactic halo. III. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars - CEMP-s stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. T.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Beers, T. C.; Placco, V. M.; Yoon, J.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    natal clouds by an external (distant) source. This finding has important implications for our understanding of carbon enrichment in the early Galactic halo and some high-redshift damped lyman alpha (DLA) systems, and of the mass loss from extremely metal-poor AGB stars.

  15. Mapping the Galactic Halo. VIII. Quantifying Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Morrison, Heather L.; Harding, Paul; van Woerden, Hugo; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Norris, John E.; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Dohm-Palmer, R. C.; Frey, Lucy; Oravetz, Dan

    2009-06-01

    We have measured the amount of kinematic substructure in the Galactic halo using the final data set from the Spaghetti project, a pencil-beam high-latitude sky survey. Our sample contains 101 photometrically selected and spectroscopically confirmed giants with accurate distance, radial velocity, and metallicity information. We have developed a new clustering estimator: the "4distance" measure, which when applied to our data set leads to the identification of one group and seven pairs of clumped stars. The group, with six members, can confidently be matched to tidal debris of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. Two pairs match the properties of known Virgo structures. Using models of the disruption of Sagittarius in Galactic potentials with different degrees of dark halo flattening, we show that this favors a spherical or prolate halo shape, as demonstrated by Newberg et al. using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. One additional pair can be linked to older Sagittarius debris. We find that 20% of the stars in the Spaghetti data set are in substructures. From comparison with random data sets, we derive a very conservative lower limit of 10% to the amount of substructure in the halo. However, comparison to numerical simulations shows that our results are also consistent with a halo entirely built up from disrupted satellites, provided that the dominating features are relatively broad due to early merging or relatively heavy progenitor satellites.

  16. Accretion in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Alex Courtney

    2000-10-01

    The Milky Way disk is enveloped in a diffuse, dynamically-hot collection of stars and star clusters collectively known as the ``stellar halo''. Photometric and chemical analyses suggest that these stars are ancient fossils of the galaxy formation epoch. Yet, little is known about the origin of this trace population. Is this system merely a vestige of the initial burst of star formation within the decoupled proto-Galaxy, or is it the detritus of cannibalized satellite galaxies? In an attempt to unravel the history of the Milky Way's stellar halo, I performed a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 55 metal-poor stars possessing ``extreme'' kinematic properties. It is thought that stars on orbits that either penetrate the remote halo or exhibit large retrograde velocities could have been associated with assimilated (or ``accreted'') dwarf galaxies. The hallmark of an accreted halo star is presumed to be a deficiency (compared with normal stars) of the α-elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti) with respect to iron, a consequence of sporadic bursts of star formation within the diminutive galaxies. Abundances for a select group of light metals (Li, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti), iron-peak nuclides (Cr, Fe, Ni), and neutron-capture elements (Y, Ba) were calculated using line-strengths measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectral observations collected with the Keck I 10-m and KPNO 4-m telescopes. The abundances extracted from the spectra reveal: (1)The vast majority of outer halo stars possess supersolar [α/Fe] > 0.0) ratios. (2)The [α/Fe] ratio appears to decrease with increasing metallicity. (3)The outer halo stars have lower ratios of [α/Fe] than inner halo stars at a given metallicity. (4)At the largest metallicities, there is a large spread in the observed [α/Fe] ratios. (5)[α/Fe] anti-correlates with RAPO. (6)Only one star (BD+80° 245) exhibits the peculiar abundances expected of an assimilated star. The general conclusion extracted from these data is that the

  17. The role of binaries in the enrichment of the early Galactic halo. II. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: CEMP-no stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. T.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Beers, T. C.; Placco, V. M.; Yoon, J.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The detailed composition of most metal-poor halo stars has been found to be very uniform. However, a fraction of 20-70% (increasing with decreasing metallicity) exhibit dramatic enhancements in their abundances of carbon; these are the so-called carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars. A key question for Galactic chemical evolution models is whether this non-standard composition reflects that of the stellar natal clouds or is due to local, post-birth mass transfer of chemically processed material from a binary companion; CEMP stars should then all be members of binary systems. Aims: Our aim is to determine the frequency and orbital parameters of binaries among CEMP stars with and without over-abundances of neutron-capture elements - CEMP-s and CEMP-no stars, respectively - as a test of this local mass-transfer scenario. This paper discusses a sample of 24 CEMP-no stars, while a subsequent paper will consider a similar sample of CEMP-s stars. Methods: High-resolution, low S/N spectra of the stars were obtained at roughly monthly intervals over a time span of up to eight years with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. Radial velocities of ~100 m s-1 precision were determined by cross-correlation after each observing night, allowing immediate, systematic follow-up of any variable object. Results: Most programme stars exhibit no statistically significant radial-velocity variation over this period and appear to be single, while four are found to be binaries with orbital periods of 300-2000 days and normal eccentricity; the binary frequency for the sample is 17 ± 9%. The single stars mostly belong to the recently identified low-C band, while the binaries have higher absolute carbon abundances. Conclusions: We conclude that the nucleosynthetic process responsible for the strong carbon excess in these ancient stars is unrelated to their binary status; the carbon was imprinted on their natal molecular clouds in the early Galactic interstellar

  18. Inhomogeneous chemical enrichment in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2016-08-01

    In a galaxy, chemical enrichment takes place in an inhomogeneous fashion, and the Galactic Halo is one of the places where the inhomogeneous effects are imprinted and can be constrained from observations. I show this using my chemodynamical simulations of Milky Way type galaxies. The scatter in the elemental abundances originate from radial migration, merging/accretion of satellite galaxies, local variation of star formation and chemical enrichment, and intrinsic variation of nucleosynthesis yields. In the simulated galaxies, there is no strong age-metallicity relation. This means that the most metal-poor stars are not always the oldest stars, and can be formed in chemically unevolved clouds at later times. The long-lifetime sources of chemical enrichment such as asymptotic giant branch stars or neutron star mergers can contribute at low metallicities. The intrinsic variation of yields are important in the early Universe or metal-poor systems such as in the Galactic halo. The carbon enhancement of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars can be best explained by faint supernovae, the low [α/Fe] ratios in some EMP stars naturally arise from low-mass (~ 13 - 15M ⊙) supernovae, and finally, the [α/Fe] knee in dwarf spheroidal galaxies can be produced by subclasses of Type Ia supernovae such as SN 2002cx-like objects and sub-Chandrasekhar mass explosions.

  19. Oxygen Abundances in Nearby FGK Stars and the Galactic Chemical Evolution of the Local Disk and Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, I.; Allende Prieto, C.; Lambert, D. L.

    2013-02-01

    Atmospheric parameters and oxygen abundances of 825 nearby FGK stars are derived using high-quality spectra and a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis of the 777 nm O I triplet lines. We assign a kinematic probability for the stars to be thin-disk (P 1), thick-disk (P 2), and halo (P 3) members. We confirm previous findings of enhanced [O/Fe] in thick-disk (P 2 > 0.5) relative to thin-disk (P 1 > 0.5) stars with [Fe/H] <~ -0.2, as well as a "knee" that connects the mean [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] trend of thick-disk stars with that of thin-disk members at [Fe/H] >~ -0.2. Nevertheless, we find that the kinematic membership criterion fails at separating perfectly the stars in the [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane, even when a very restrictive kinematic separation is employed. Stars with "intermediate" kinematics (P 1 < 0.7, P 2 < 0.7) do not all populate the region of the [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane intermediate between the mean thin-disk and thick-disk trends, but their distribution is not necessarily bimodal. Halo stars (P 3 > 0.5) show a large star-to-star scatter in [O/Fe]-[Fe/H], but most of it is due to stars with Galactocentric rotational velocity V < -200 km s-1 halo stars with V > -200 km s-1 follow an [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation with almost no star-to-star scatter. Early mergers with satellite galaxies explain most of our observations, but the significant fraction of disk stars with "ambiguous" kinematics and abundances suggests that scattering by molecular clouds and radial migration have both played an important role in determining the kinematic and chemical properties of solar neighborhood stars.

  20. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN NEARBY FGK STARS AND THE GALACTIC CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE LOCAL DISK AND HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, I.; Lambert, D. L.; Allende Prieto, C.

    2013-02-10

    Atmospheric parameters and oxygen abundances of 825 nearby FGK stars are derived using high-quality spectra and a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis of the 777 nm O I triplet lines. We assign a kinematic probability for the stars to be thin-disk (P {sub 1}), thick-disk (P {sub 2}), and halo (P {sub 3}) members. We confirm previous findings of enhanced [O/Fe] in thick-disk (P {sub 2} > 0.5) relative to thin-disk (P {sub 1} > 0.5) stars with [Fe/H] {approx}< -0.2, as well as a 'knee' that connects the mean [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] trend of thick-disk stars with that of thin-disk members at [Fe/H] {approx}> -0.2. Nevertheless, we find that the kinematic membership criterion fails at separating perfectly the stars in the [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane, even when a very restrictive kinematic separation is employed. Stars with 'intermediate' kinematics (P {sub 1} < 0.7, P {sub 2} < 0.7) do not all populate the region of the [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane intermediate between the mean thin-disk and thick-disk trends, but their distribution is not necessarily bimodal. Halo stars (P {sub 3} > 0.5) show a large star-to-star scatter in [O/Fe]-[Fe/H], but most of it is due to stars with Galactocentric rotational velocity V < -200 km s{sup -1}; halo stars with V > -200 km s{sup -1} follow an [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation with almost no star-to-star scatter. Early mergers with satellite galaxies explain most of our observations, but the significant fraction of disk stars with 'ambiguous' kinematics and abundances suggests that scattering by molecular clouds and radial migration have both played an important role in determining the kinematic and chemical properties of solar neighborhood stars.

  1. The Outer Galactic Halo As Probed By RR Lyr Stars From the Palomar Transient Facility + Keck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Judith; Sesar, Branimir; Banholzer, Sophianna

    2016-08-01

    We present initial results from our study of the outer halo of the Milky Way using a large sample of RR Lyr(ab) variables datamined from the archives of the Palomar Transient Facility. Of the 464 RR Lyr in our sample with distances exceeding 50 kpc, 62 have been observed spectroscopically at the Keck Observatory. vr and σ(vr ) are given as a function of distance between 50 and 110 kpc, and a very preliminary rather low total mass for the Milky Way out to 110 kpc of ~7+/-1.5×1011 M ⊙ is derived from our data.

  2. Looking for building blocks of the Galactic halo: variable stars in the Fornax, Bootes I, Canes Venatici II dwarfs and in NGC 2419

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Claudia; Clementini, Gisella; Held, E. V.; Poretti, E.; Catelan, M.; Federici, L.; Maio, M.; Gullieuszik, M.; Ripepi, V.; Dall'Ora, M.; Di Fabrizio, L.; Kinemuchi, K.; Di Crescienzo, M.; Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Pritzl, B.; Rest, A.; De Lee, N.; Smith, H.

    2010-01-01

    Λ cold-dark-matter hierarchical models of galaxy formation suggest that the halo of the Milky Way (MW) has been assembled, at least in part, through accretion of protogalactic fragments partially resembling the present-day dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of the MW. Investigation of the stellar populations of the MW's globular clusters (GCs) and dSph companions can thus provide excellent tests to infer the dominant Galaxy-formation scenario, whether merger/accretion or cloud collapse. Pulsating variable stars offer a very powerful tool in this context, since variables of different types allow tracing the different stellar generations in a galaxy and to reconstruct the galaxy's star-formation history and assembly back to the first epochs of galaxy formation. In particular, the RR Lyrae stars, belonging to the old population (t > 10 Gyr), witnessed the epoch of halo formation, and thus hold a crucial role to identify the MW satellites that may have contributed to build up the Galactic halo. In the MW, most GCs with an RR Lyrae population sharply divide into two distinct groups (Oosterhoff types I and II) based on the mean periods and relative proportion of fundamental-mode (RRab) and first-overtone (RRc) RR Lyrae stars. On the other hand, the Galactic-halo field RR Lyrae stars show a dominance of Oosterhoff I properties. Here, we investigate the Oosterhoff properties of a number of different stellar systems, starting from relatively undisturbed dwarf galaxies (the Fornax dSph and its globular clusters), through distorted and tidally disrupting ones (the Bootes and Canes Venatici II dSphs), to possible final relics of the disruption process (the Galactic globular cluster NGC 2419). We are addressing the crucial question of whether the RR Lyrae pulsation properties in these systems conform to the Oosterhoff dichotomy characterizing the MW variables. If they do not, the Galaxy's halo cannot have been assembled by dSph-like protogalactic fragments resembling the

  3. THE GALACTIC CENTER S-STARS AND THE HYPERVELOCITY STARS IN THE GALACTIC HALO: TWO FACES OF THE TIDAL BREAKUP OF STELLAR BINARIES BY THE CENTRAL MASSIVE BLACK HOLE?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Fupeng; Lu Youjun; Yu Qingjuan

    2013-05-10

    In this paper, we investigate the link between the hypervelocity stars (HVSs) discovered in the Galactic halo and the Galactic center (GC) S-stars, under the hypothesis that they are both the products of the tidal breakup of the same population of stellar binaries by the central massive black hole (MBH). By adopting several hypothetical models for binaries to be injected into the vicinity of the MBH and doing numerical simulations, we realize the tidal breakup processes of the binaries and their follow-up dynamical evolution. We find that many statistical properties of the detected HVSs and GC S-stars could be reproduced under some binary injecting models, and their number ratio can be reproduced if the stellar initial mass function is top-heavy (e.g., with slope {approx} - 1.6). The total number of the captured companions is {approx}50 that have masses in the range {approx}3-7 M{sub Sun} and semimajor axes {approx}< 4000 AU and survive to the present within their main-sequence lifetime. The innermost one is expected to have a semimajor axis {approx}300-1500 AU and a pericenter distance {approx}10-200 AU, with a significant probability of being closer to the MBH than S2. Future detection of such a close star would offer an important test to general relativity. The majority of the surviving ejected companions of the GC S-stars are expected to be located at Galactocentric distances {approx}< 20 kpc, and have heliocentric radial velocities {approx} - 500-1500 km s{sup -1} and proper motions up to {approx}5-20 mas yr{sup -1}. Future detection of these HVSs may provide evidence for the tidal breakup formation mechanism of the GC S-stars.

  4. Probing the galactic disk and halo. 2: Hot interstellar gas toward the inner galaxy star HD 156359

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembach, Kenneth R.; Savage, Blair D.; Lu, Limin

    1995-01-01

    We present Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph intermediate-resolution measurements of the 1233-1256 A spectral region of HD 156396, a halo star at l = 328.7 deg, b = -14.5 deg in the inner Galaxy with a line-of sight distance of 11.1 kpc and a z-distance of -2.8 kpc. The data have a resolution of 18 km/s Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) and a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 50:1. We detect interstellar lines of Mg II, S II, S II, Ge II, and N V and determine log N/(Mg II) = 15.78 +0.25, -0.27, log N(Si II) greater than 13.70, log N(S II) greater than 15.76, log N(Ge II) = 12.20 +0.09,-0.11, and log N(N v) = 14.06 +/- 0.02. Assuming solar reference abundances, the diffuse clouds containing Mg, S, and Ge along the sight line have average logarithmic depletions D(Mg) = -0.6 +/- 0.3 dex, D(S) greater than -0.2 dex, and D(Ge) = -0.2 +/- 0.2 dex. The Mg and Ge depletions are approximately 2 times smaller than is typical of diffuse clouds in the solar vicinity. Galactic rotational modeling of the N v profiles indicates that the highly ionized gas traced by this ion has a scale height of approximately 1 kpc if gas at large z-distances corotates with the underlying disk gas. Rotational modeling of the Si iv and C iv profiles measured by the IUE satellite yields similar scale height estimates. The scale height results contrast with previous studies of highly ionized gas in the outer Milky Way that reveal a more extended gas distribtion with h approximately equals 3-4 kpc. We detect a high-velocity feature in N v and Si II v(sub LSR) approximately equals + 125 km/s) that is probably created in an interface between warm and hot gas.

  5. The large, oxygen-rich halos of star-forming galaxies are a major reservoir of galactic metals.

    PubMed

    Tumlinson, J; Thom, C; Werk, J K; Prochaska, J X; Tripp, T M; Weinberg, D H; Peeples, M S; O'Meara, J M; Oppenheimer, B D; Meiring, J D; Katz, N S; Davé, R; Ford, A B; Sembach, K R

    2011-11-18

    The circumgalactic medium (CGM) is fed by galaxy outflows and accretion of intergalactic gas, but its mass, heavy element enrichment, and relation to galaxy properties are poorly constrained by observations. In a survey of the outskirts of 42 galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, we detected ubiquitous, large (150-kiloparsec) halos of ionized oxygen surrounding star-forming galaxies; we found much less ionized oxygen around galaxies with little or no star formation. This ionized CGM contains a substantial mass of heavy elements and gas, perhaps far exceeding the reservoirs of gas in the galaxies themselves. Our data indicate that it is a basic component of nearly all star-forming galaxies that is removed or transformed during the quenching of star formation and the transition to passive evolution. PMID:22096191

  6. The Milky Way, the Galactic Halo, and the Halos of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Ortwin

    2016-08-01

    The Milky Way, ``our'' Galaxy, is currently the subject of intense study with many ground-based surveys, in anticipation of upcoming results from the Gaia mission. From this work we have been learning about the full three-dimensional structure of the Galactic box/peanut bulge, the distribution of stars in the bar and disk, and the many streams and substructures in the Galactic halo. The data indicate that a large fraction of the Galactic halo has been accreted from outside. Similarly, in many external galaxy halos there is now evidence for tidal streams and accretion of satellites. To study these features requires exquisite, deep photometry and spectroscopy. These observations illustrate how galaxy halos are still growing, and sometimes can be used to ``time'' the accretion events. In comparison with cosmological simulations, the structure of galaxy halos gives us a vivid illustration of the hierarchical nature of our Universe.

  7. Quasar-microlensing versus star-microlensing evidence of small-planetary-mass objects as the dominant inner-halo galactic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Schild, Rudolph E.

    2011-11-01

    We examine recent results of two kinds of microlensing experiments intended to detect galactic dark matter objects, and we suggest that the lack of short period star-microlensing events observed for stars near the Galaxy does not preclude either the "rogue planets" identified from quasar-microlensing by Schild 1996 as the missing-mass of a lens galaxy, or the "Primordial Fog Particles" (PFPs) in Proto-Globular-star-Cluster (PGC) clumps predicted by Gibson 1996 - 2000 as the dominant inner-halo galactic dark matter component from a new hydrodynamic gravitational structure formation theory. We point out that hydro-gravitational processes acting on a massive population of such micro-brown-dwarfs in their nonlinear accretional cascades to form stars gives intermittent lognormal number density np distributions for the PFPs within the PGC gas-stabilized-clumps. Hence, star-microlensing searches that focus on a small fraction of the sky assuming a uniform distribution for np are subject to vast underestimates of the mean ⟨np⟩mean. Sparse independent samples give modes 10-4 - 10-6 smaller than means of the highly skewed lognormal distributions expected. Quasar-microlensing searches with higher optical depths are less affected by np intermittency. We attempt to reconcile the results of the star-microlensing and quasar-microlensing studies, with particular reference to the necessarily hydrogenous and primordial small-planetary-mass range. We conclude that star microlensing searches cannot exclude and are unlikely even to detect these low-mass candidate-galactic-dark-matter-objects so easily observed by quasar-microlensing and so robustly predicted by the new theory.

  8. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  9. Evidence for Distinct Components of the Galactic Stellar Halo from 838 RR Lyrae Stars Discovered in the LONEOS-I Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Miceli, A; Rest, A; Stubbs, C W; Hawley, S L; Cook, K H; Magnier, E A; Krisciunas, K; Bowell, E; Koehn, B

    2007-02-23

    We present 838 ab-type RR Lyrae stars from the Lowell Observatory Near Earth Objects Survey Phase I (LONEOS-I). These objects cover 1430 deg{sup 2} and span distances ranging from 3-30kpc from the Galactic Center. Object selection is based on phased, photometric data with 28-50 epochs. We use this large sample to explore the bulk properties of the stellar halo, including the spatial distribution. The period-amplitude distribution of this sample shows that the majority of these RR Lyrae stars resemble Oosterhoff type I, but there is a significant fraction (26%) which have longer periods and appear to be Oosterhoff type II. We find that the radial distributions of these two populations have significantly different profiles ({rho}{sub OoI} {approx} R{sup -2.26{+-}0.07} and {rho}{sub OoII} {approx} R{sup -2.88{+-}0.11}). This suggests that the stellar halo was formed by at least two distinct accretion processes and supports dual-halo models.

  10. Dark matter particles in the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabei, R. Belli, P.; Montecchia, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Prosperi, D.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, J. M.; Sheng, X. D.; Ye, Z. P.

    2009-12-15

    Arguments on the investigation of the DarkMatter particles in the galactic halo are addressed. Recent results obtained by exploiting the annual modulation signature are summarized and the perspectives are discussed.

  11. Dark matter particles in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Montecchia, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Prosperi, D.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, J. M.; Sheng, X. D.; Ye, Z. P.

    2009-12-01

    Arguments on the investigation of the DarkMatter particles in the galactic halo are addressed. Recent results obtained by exploiting the annual modulation signature are summarized and the perspectives are discussed.

  12. The SEGUE K Giant Survey. III. Quantifying Galactic Halo Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesh, William; Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Rockosi, Constance; Starkenburg, Else; Xue, Xiang Xiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Harding, Paul; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer; Lee, Young Sun; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    We statistically quantify the amount of substructure in the Milky Way stellar halo using a sample of 4568 halo K giant stars at Galactocentric distances ranging over 5-125 kpc. These stars have been selected photometrically and confirmed spectroscopically as K giants from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration project. Using a position-velocity clustering estimator (the 4distance) and a model of a smooth stellar halo, we quantify the amount of substructure in the halo, divided by distance and metallicity. Overall, we find that the halo as a whole is highly structured. We also confirm earlier work using blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars which showed that there is an increasing amount of substructure with increasing Galactocentric radius, and additionally find that the amount of substructure in the halo increases with increasing metallicity. Comparing to resampled BHB stars, we find that K giants and BHBs have similar amounts of substructure over equivalent ranges of Galactocentric radius. Using a friends-of-friends algorithm to identify members of individual groups, we find that a large fraction (˜33%) of grouped stars are associated with Sgr, and identify stars belonging to other halo star streams: the Orphan Stream, the Cetus Polar Stream, and others, including previously unknown substructures. A large fraction of sample K giants (more than 50%) are not grouped into any substructure. We find also that the Sgr stream strongly dominates groups in the outer halo for all except the most metal-poor stars, and suggest that this is the source of the increase of substructure with Galactocentric radius and metallicity.

  13. The Milky Way, the Galactic halo, and the Halos of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Ortwin

    2015-08-01

    The Milky Way, "our" Galaxy, is currently the subject of intense study with many ground-based surveys, in anticipation of upcoming results from the GAIA mission. From this work we have been learning about the full three-dimensional structure of the Galactic box/peanut bulge, the distribution of stars in the bar and disk, and the many streams in the Galactic halo. The data tell us that most of the Galactic bulge formed from the disk, and that a large fraction of the Galactic halo has been accreted from outside. Similarly, in many external galaxy halos there is now evidence for tidal streams and accretion of satellites. To see these features requires exquisite data - mostly very deep photometry, but some halo substructures have also been found with kinematic data. These observations illustrate how galaxy halos are still growing, and sometimes can be used to "time" the accretion events. In comparison with cosmological simulations, the structure of galaxy halos gives us a vivid illustration of the hierarchical nature of our Universe.

  14. MODIFIED GRAVITY SPINS UP GALACTIC HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Li, Baojiu; Koyama, Kazuya

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the effect of modified gravity on the specific angular momentum of galactic halos by analyzing the halo catalogs at z = 0 from high-resolution N-body simulations for a f(R) gravity model that meets the solar-system constraint. It is shown that the galactic halos in the f(R) gravity model tend to acquire significantly higher specific angular momentum than those in the standard {Lambda}CDM model. The largest difference in the specific angular momentum distribution between these two models occurs for the case of isolated galactic halos with mass less than 10{sup 11} h {sup -1} M {sub Sun }, which are likely least shielded by the chameleon screening mechanism. As the specific angular momentum of galactic halos is rather insensitive to other cosmological parameters, it can in principle be an independent discriminator of modified gravity. We speculate a possibility of using the relative abundance of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) as a test of general relativity given that the formation of the LSBGs occurs in fast spinning dark halos.

  15. Static galactic halo and galactic wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Chung-Ming

    1993-01-01

    Although the exact state of the interstellar medium (ISM) in our Galaxy (other galaxies as well) is not clear at all, the 'common consensus' is that a rough pressure balance (or equipartition of energy) exists between different components and phases: cold, warm, hot phases of the ISM, magnetic field, cosmic rays, etc. If the halo of a galaxy is taken to be an extension of the ISM, then its structure is influenced by various ISM components. A 'complete' description of the halo is evidently very complicated. This paper gives a brief account on cosmic ray halo, which emphasizes the role played by cosmic rays. The interaction between cosmic rays and thermal plasma is facilitated by magnetic field. The cosmic rays are scattered by hydromagnetic waves (e.g., Alfven waves) which in turn can be generated by cosmic ray streaming instability. This constitutes a self-consistent picture. Since we are interested in the structure of the halo, we adopted a hydrodynamic model in which the cosmic rays and waves are described by their pressures. In general there are two classes of halos: static and dynamic.

  16. Magnetized galactic haloes and velocity lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Irwin, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analytic model of a magnetized galactic halo surrounding a Mestel gravitating disc. The magnetic field is taken to be in energy equipartition with the pressure dominant rotating halo gas (not with the cosmic rays), and the whole system is in a steady state. A more flexible `anisotropic equipartition' model is also explored. A definite pressure law is required to maintain the equilibrium, but the halo density is constant. The velocity/magnetic system is scale-free. The objective is to find the rotational velocity lag in such a halo. The magnetic field is not force-free so that angular momentum may be transported from the halo to the intergalactic medium. We find that the `X'-shaped structure observed for halo magnetic fields can be obtained together with a simple analytic formula for the rate of decline of the velocity with height z. The formula also predicts the change in lag with radius, r.

  17. Distant Galactic Halo Substructures Observed by the Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesar, Branimir

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of Galactic halo substructures is important as their kinematic and chemical properties help constrain the properties of the Galactic dark matter halo, the formation history of the Milky Way, and the galaxy formation process in general. The best practical choice for finding distant halo substructures are pulsating RR Lyrae stars, due to their intrinsic brightness (M_V = 0.6 mag) and distinct light curves. I will present kinematic and chemical properties of two distant halo substructures that were traced using RR Lyrae stars observed by the Palomar Transient Factory. One of these substructures, located at 90 kpc from the Sun in the Cancer constellation, consists of two groups of RR Lyrae stars moving away from the Galaxy at ~80 and ~20 km/s, respectively. The second substructure is located at ~65 kpc from the Sun in the Hercules constellation. The kinematics of RR Lyrae stars tracing this substructure suggest a presence of 2 or 3 stellar streams extending in the similar direction on the sky. Due to their spatial extent, both of these substructures are clearly disrupted and would be very difficult to detect using tradiitonal techniques such as the color-magnitude diagram filtering.

  18. The role of binaries in the enrichment of the early Galactic halo. I. r-process-enhanced metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. T.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Beers, T. C.; Yoon, J.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The detailed chemical composition of most metal-poor halo stars has been found to be highly uniform, but a minority of stars exhibit dramatic enhancements in their abundances of heavy neutron-capture elements and/or of carbon. The key question for Galactic chemical evolution models is whether these peculiarities reflect the composition of the natal clouds, or if they are due to later (post-birth) mass transfer of chemically processed material from a binary companion. If the former case applies, the observed excess of certain elements was implanted within selected clouds in the early ISM from a production site at interstellar distances. Aims: Our aim is to determine the frequency and orbital properties of binaries among these chemically peculiar stars. This information provides the basis for deciding whether local mass transfer from a binary companion is necessary and sufficient to explain their unusual compositions. This paper discusses our study of a sample of 17 moderately (r-I) and highly (r-II) r-process-element enhanced VMP and EMP stars. Methods: High-resolution, low signal-to-noise spectra of the stars were obtained at roughly monthly intervals over eight years with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. From these spectra, radial velocities with an accuracy of ~100 m s-1 were determined by cross-correlation against an optimized template. Results: Fourteen of the programme stars exhibit no significant radial-velocity variation over this temporal window, while three are binaries with orbits of typical eccentricity for their periods, resulting in a normal binary frequency of ~18 ± 6% for the sample. Conclusions: Our results confirm our preliminary conclusion from 2011, based on partial data, that the chemical peculiarity of the r-I and r-II stars is not caused by any putative binary companions. Instead, it was imprinted on the natal molecular clouds of these stars by an external, distant source. Models of the ISM in early galaxies

  19. Does SEGUE/SDSS indicate a dual galactic halo?

    SciTech Connect

    Schönrich, Ralph; Asplund, Martin; Casagrande, Luca

    2014-05-01

    We re-examine recent claims of observational evidence for a dual Galactic halo in SEGUE/SDSS data, and trace them back to improper error treatment and neglect of selection effects. In particular, the detection of a vertical abundance gradient in the halo can be explained as a metallicity bias in distance. A similar bias and the impact of disk contamination affect the sample of blue horizontal branch stars. These examples highlight why non-volume complete samples require forward modeling from theoretical models or extensive bias-corrections. We also show how observational uncertainties produce the specific non-Gaussianity in the observed azimuthal velocity distribution of halo stars, which can be erroneously identified as two Gaussian components. A single kinematic component yields an excellent fit to the observed data, when we model the measurement process including distance uncertainties. Furthermore, we show that sample differences in proper motion space are the direct consequence of kinematic cuts and are enhanced when distance estimates are less accurate. Thus, their presence is neither proof of a separate population nor a measure of reliability for the applied distances. We conclude that currently there is no evidence from SEGUE/SDSS that would favor a dual Galactic halo over a single halo that is full of substructure.

  20. Galactic evolution. II - Disk galaxies with massive halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, J. P.; Thuan, T. X.

    1975-01-01

    Models of galactic evolution are computed in which matter shed by dying halo stars accumulates in a smaller, more rapidly rotating disk. The models are simpler and more successful than one-zone (pure disk) models in that (1) the observed absence of low-metal-abundance low-mass dwarfs is expected, not anomalous and (2) the relative birthrate function (or IMF) need not be a strongly variable function of time in agreement with recent interpretations of observed stellar populations and neutral hydrogen in our own and other galaxies. Even a simple 'Salpeter' IMF for both disk and halo will produce an acceptable model. The model with a halo 'Salpeter' IMF, roughly one-quarter of the mass in the secondary disk, and approximately half the metals produced in the halo seems most compatible with observations of the metal abundance in low-mass stars, the deuterium abundance, halo planetary nebulae, and light from Population II stars, as well as with arguments on the stability of the disk.

  1. Are ancient dwarf satellites the building blocks of the Galactic halo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitoni, E.; Vincenzo, F.; Matteucci, F.; Romano, D.

    2016-05-01

    According to the current cosmological cold dark matter paradigm, the Galactic halo could have been the result of the assemblage of smaller structures. Here we explore the hypothesis that the classical and ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way have been the building blocks of the Galactic halo by comparing their [α/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] versus [Fe/H] patterns with the ones observed in Galactic halo stars. The α elements deviate substantially from the observed abundances in the Galactic halo stars for [Fe/H] values larger than -2 dex, while they overlap for lower metallicities. On the other hand, for the [Ba/Fe] ratio, the discrepancy is extended at all [Fe/H] values, suggesting that the majority of stars in the halo are likely to have been formed in situ. Therefore, we suggest that [Ba/Fe] ratios are a better diagnostic than [α/Fe] ratios. Moreover, for the first time we consider the effects of an enriched infall of gas with the same chemical abundances as the matter ejected and/or stripped from dwarf satellites of the Milky Way on the chemical evolution of the Galactic halo. We find that the resulting chemical abundances of the halo stars depend on the assumed infall time-scale, and the presence of a threshold in the gas for star formation. In particular, in models with an infall time-scale for the halo around 0.8 Gyr coupled with a threshold in the surface gas density for the star formation (4 M⊙ pc-2), and the enriched infall from dwarf spheroidal satellites, the first halo stars formed show [Fe/H]>-2.4 dex. In this case, to explain [α/Fe] data for stars with [Fe/H]<-2.4 dex, we need stars formed in dSph systems.

  2. GCN: a gaseous Galactic halo stream?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shoko

    2010-10-01

    We show that a string of HI clouds that form part of the high-velocity cloud complex known as GCN is a probable gaseous stream extending over more than 50° in the Galactic halo. The radial velocity gradient along the stream is used to deduce transverse velocities as a function of distance, enabling a family of orbits to be computed. We find that a direction of motion towards the Galactic disc coupled with a mid-stream distance of ~20kpc provides a good match to the observed sky positions and radial velocities of the HI clouds comprising the stream. With an estimated mass of 105Msolar, its progenitor is likely to be a dwarf galaxy. However, no stellar counterpart has been found amongst the currently known Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies or stellar streams and the exact origin of the stream is therefore currently unknown.

  3. On the alleged duality of the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönrich, Ralph; Asplund, Martin; Casagrande, Luca

    2011-08-01

    We examine the kinematics of the Galactic halo based on SDSS/SEGUE data by Carollo et al. We find that their claims of a counter-rotating halo are the result of substantial biases in distance estimates (of the order of 50 per cent): the claimed retrograde component, which makes up only a tiny fraction of the entire sample, prone to contaminations, is identified as the tail of distance overestimates. The strong overestimates also result in a lift in the vertical velocity component, which explains the large altitudes those objects were claimed to reach. Errors are worst for the lowest metallicity stars, which explains the metal-poor nature of the artificial component. We also argue that measurement errors were not properly accounted for and that the use of Gaussian fitting on intrinsically non-Gaussian Galactic components invokes the identification of components that are distorted or even artificial. Our evaluation of the data leads to a revision of the estimated velocity ellipsoids and does not yield any reliable evidence for a counter-rotating halo component. If a distinct counter-rotating halo component exists, then it must be far weaker than claimed by Carollo et al. Finally, we note that their revised analysis presented in Beers et al. does not alleviate our main concerns.

  4. The age of the halo as determined from halo field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin-Cheng; Liu, Chao; Liu, Ji-Feng

    2016-03-01

    The age of the Galactic halo is a critical parameter that can constrain the origin of the stellar halo. In general, the Galactic stellar halo is believed to be very old. However, different independent measurements and techniques based on various types of stars are required so that the age estimates of the Galactic halo are accurate, robust, and reliable. In this work, we provide a novel approach to determine the age of the halo with turn-off stars. We first carefully select 63 field halo turn-off stars from the literature. Then, we compare them with the GARSTEC model, which takes the process of atomic diffusion into account in the B - V vs. metallicity plane. Finally, we run Monte Carlo simulations to consider the uncertainty of the color index and obtain the age of 10.5 ± 1.5 Gyr. This result is in agreement with previous studies. Future works are needed to collect more turn-off samples with more accurate photometry to reduce the uncertainty of the age.

  5. Massive black holes in galactic halos?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, C. G.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    In the present attempt to resolve the problems posed by the composition of dark halos and the heating of stellar disks, under the assumption that galaxy halos are composed of massive black holes, it is noted that the black holes must have masses of the order of one million solar masses. The heating mechanism proposed yields predictions for the dependence of the velocity dispersion on time, and for the shape of the velocity ellipsoid, which are in good agreement with observations. Attention is given to the constraints set by dynamical friction causing black holes to spiral to the Galactic center, by the possible presence of dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and by the accretion of interstellar gas by the black holes that produce luminous objects in the Galaxy.

  6. Production and Recycling of Carbon in the Early Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Johannes; Thidemann Hansen, Terese; Nordström, Birgitta

    2015-08-01

    Extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars - [Fe/H] below ~ -3 - are fossil records of the conditions in the early halo. High-resolution 8m-class spectroscopy has shown that the detailed abundance pattern of EMP giant stars is surprisingly uniform and essentially Solar (e.g. Bonifacio+ 2012), apart from the usual α-enhancement in the halo. In the simplest picture, iron is a proxy for both overall metallicity and time, so the EMP stars should form before the oldest and most metal-poor Galactic globular clusters, notably at the lowest metallicities ([Fe/H] ≲ -3.5).It is thus striking that 20-40% of the EMP giants are strongly enhanced in carbon - the CEMP stars (Lucatello+ 2006). This is conventionally ascribed to mass transfer from a former AGB binary companion, and from a limited compilation of data, Lucatello+ (2005) concluded that most or all CEMP stars are indeed binaries, similar to the classical Ba and CH stars (e.g. Jorissen+ 1998). However, most of the sample was of the inner-halo CEMP-s variety (C and s-process elements both enhanced), while CEMP-no stars dominate the outer halo (Carollo+ 2014). Our precise radial velocity monitoring for CEMP stars over 8 years shed light on this issue.Our data suggest a normal binary frequency for the CEMP-no stars; i.e. the C was not produced in a binary companion, but in sites at interstellar distances, e.g. ‘faint’ SNe, and imprinted on the natal clouds of the low-mass stars we observe. This has immediate implications for the formation of dust in primitive, high-redshift galaxies (Watson+ 2015) and the origin of C-enhanced DLAs (Cooke+ 2011, 2012). The CEMP-s binary orbits are also revealing, with periods up to several decades and generally low amplitudes and eccentricities, suggesting that EMP AGB stars have very large radii, facilitating extensive mass loss. More work on faint SNe and EMP AGB envelopes is needed!

  7. Baryonic dark clusters in galactic halos and their observable consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserman, Ira; Salpeter, Edwin E.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the possibility that approximately 10% of the mass of a typical galaxy halo is in the form of massive (approximately 10(exp 7) solar masses), compact (escape speeds approximately 100 km/s) baryonic clusters made of neutron stars (approximately 10% by mass), black holes (less than or approximately equal to 1%) and brown dwarfs, asteroids, and other low-mass debris (approximately 90%). These general properties are consistent with several different observational and phenomenological constraints on cluster properties subject to the condition that neutron stars comprise approximately 1% of the total halo mass. Such compact, dark clusters could be the sites of a variety of collisional phenomena involving neutron stars. We find that integrated out to the Hubble distance approximately one neutron star-neutron star or neutron star-black hole collision occurs daily. Of order 0.1-1 asteroid-neutron star collisions may also happen daily in the halo of the Milky Way if there is roughly equal cluster mass per logarithmic particle mass interval between asteroids and brown dwarfs. These event rates are comparable to the frequency of gamma-ray burst detections by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Observatory, implying that if dark halo clusters are the sites of most gamma-ray bursts, perhaps approximately 90% of all bursts are extragalactic, but approximately 10% are galactic. It is possible that dark clusters of the kind discussed here could be detected directly by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) or Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). If the clusters considered in this paper exist, they should produce spatially correlated gravitational microlensing of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). If 10% of the halo is in the form of dark baryonic clusters, and the remaining 90% is in brown dwarfs and other dark objects which are either unclustered or collected into low-mass clusters, then we expect that two events within

  8. GAS CONDENSATION IN THE GALACTIC HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, M. Ryan; Bryan, Greg L.; Putman, Mary E.

    2012-02-01

    Using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hydrodynamic simulations of vertically stratified hot halo gas, we examine the conditions under which clouds can form and condense out of the hot halo medium to potentially fuel star formation in the gaseous disk. We find that halo clouds do not develop from linear isobaric perturbations. This is a regime where the cooling time is longer than the Brunt-Vaeisaelae time, confirming previous linear analysis. We extend the analysis into the nonlinear regime by considering mildly or strongly nonlinear perturbations with overdensities up to 100, also varying the initial height, the cloud size, and the metallicity of the gas. Here, the result depends on the ratio of cooling time to the time required to accelerate the cloud to the sound speed (similar to the dynamical time). If the ratio exceeds a critical value near unity, the cloud is accelerated without further cooling and gets disrupted by Kelvin-Helmholtz and/or Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. If it is less than the critical value, the cloud cools and condenses before disruption. Accreting gas with overdensities of 10-20 is expected to be marginally unstable; the cooling fraction will depend on the metallicity, the size of the incoming cloud, and the distance to the galaxy. Locally enhanced overdensities within cold streams have a higher likelihood of cooling out. Our results have implications on the evolution of clouds seeded by cold accretion that are barely resolved in current cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and absorption line systems detected in galaxy halos.

  9. The FUSE Survey of 0 VI in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Savage, B. D.; Wakker, B. P.; Sembach, K. R.; Jenkins, E. B.; Moos, H. W.; Shull, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) program to study 0 VI in the Milky Way halo. Spectra of 100 extragalactic objects and two distant halo stars are analyzed to obtain measures of O VI absorption along paths through the Milky Way thick disk/halo. Strong O VI absorption over the velocity range from -100 to 100 km/s reveals a widespread but highly irregular distribution of O VI, implying the existence of substantial amounts of hot gas with T approx. 3 x 10(exp 5) K in the Milky Way thick disk/halo. The overall distribution of O VI is not well described by a symmetrical plane-parallel layer of patchy O VI absorption. The simplest departure from such a model that provides a reasonable fit to the observations is a plane-parallel patchy absorbing layer with an average O VI mid-plane density of n(sub 0)(O VI) = 1.7 x 10(exp -2)/cu cm, a scale height of approx. 2.3 kpc, and a approx. 0.25 dex excess of O VI in the northern Galactic polar region. The distribution of O VI over the sky is poorly correlated with other tracers of gas in the halo, including low and intermediate velocity H I, Ha emission from the warm ionized gas at approx. l0(exp 4) K, and hot X-ray emitting gas at approx. l0(exp 6) K . The O VI has an average velocity dispersion, b approx. 60 km/s and standard deviation of 15 km/s. Thermal broadening alone cannot explain the large observed profile widths. A combination of models involving the radiative cooling of hot fountain gas, the cooling of supernova bubbles in the halo, and the turbulent mixing of warm and hot halo gases is required to explain the presence of O VI and other highly ionized atoms found in the halo. The preferential venting of hot gas from local bubbles and superbubbles into the northern Galactic polar region may explain the enhancement of O VI in the North.

  10. An origin for multiphase gas in galactic winds and haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Todd A.; Quataert, Eliot; Zhang, Dong; Weinberg, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The physical origin of high-velocity cool gas seen in galactic winds remains unknown. Following work by B. Wang, we argue that radiative cooling in initially hot thermally-driven outflows can produce fast neutral atomic and photoionized cool gas. The inevitability of adiabatic cooling from the flow's initial 107-108 K temperature and the shape of the cooling function for T ≲ 107 K imply that outflows with hot gas mass-loss rate relative to star formation rate of β =dot{M}_hot/dot{M}_star ≳ 0.5 cool radiatively on scales ranging from the size of the energy injection region to tens of kpc. We highlight the β and star formation rate surface density dependence of the column density, emission measure, radiative efficiency, and velocity. At rcool, the gas produces X-ray and then UV/optical line emission with a total power bounded by ˜10-2 L⋆ if the flow is powered by steady-state star formation with luminosity L⋆. The wind is thermally unstable at rcool, potentially leading to a multiphase medium. Cooled winds decelerate significantly in the extended gravitational potential of galaxies. The cool gas precipitated from hot outflows may explain its prevalence in galactic haloes. We forward a picture of winds whereby cool clouds are initially accelerated by the ram pressure of the hot flow, but are rapidly shredded by hydrodynamical instabilities, thereby increasing β, seeding radiative and thermal instability, and cool gas rebirth. If the cooled wind shocks as it sweeps up the circumgalactic medium, its cooling time is short, thus depositing cool gas far out into the halo. Finally, conduction can dominate energy transport in low-β hot winds, leading to flatter temperature profiles than otherwise expected, potentially consistent with X-ray observations of some starbursts.

  11. Ages, chemistry, and type 1A supernovae: Clues to the formation of the galactic stellar halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1993-01-01

    We endeavor to resolve two conflicting constraints on the duration of the formation of the Galactic stellar halo - 2-3 Gyr age differences in halo stars, and the time scale inferred from the observed constant values of chemical element abundance ratios characteristic of enrichment by Type II supernovae - by investigating the time scale for the onset of Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in the currently favored progenitor model - mergers of carbon and oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs).

  12. Experimental searches for galactic halo axions.

    PubMed

    van Bibber, Karl A; Kinion, S Darin

    2003-11-15

    A very light axion would be copiously produced during the Big Bang as a zero-temperature Bose gas, and it would possess vanishingly small couplings to matter and radiation. It thus represents an ideal cold dark matter candidate. Galactic halo axions may be detected by their resonant conversion to microwave photons in a high-Q cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field. A large-scale search for the axion is ongoing in the US with sufficient sensitivity to see axions of plausible model couplings. Dramatic breakthroughs in the development of near-quantum limited superconducting quantum interference device amplifiers promise to improve the sensitivity of the experiment by a factor of 30 in the near future. In Japan, a group has been developing a Rydberg atom single-quantum detector as an alternative to linear amplifiers for a microwave-cavity axion experiment. Should the axion be discovered, the predicted fine structure in the axion signal would be rich in information about the history of galactic formation. PMID:14667317

  13. Compact binary mergers as the origin of r-process elements in the Galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Yuhri; Wanajo, Shinya; Prantzos, Nikos

    2014-05-02

    Compact binary mergers (of double neutron star and black hole-neutron star systems) are suggested to be the major site of the r-process elements in the Galaxy by recent hydrodynamical and nucleosynthesis studies. It has been pointed out, however, that estimated long lifetimes of compact binaries are in conflict with the presence of r-process-enhanced stars at the metallicity [Fe/H] ∼ −3. To resolve this problem, we examine the role of compact binary mergers in the early Galactic chemical evolution on the assumption that our Galactic halo was formed from merging sub-halos. The chemical evolutions are modeled for sub-halos with their total stellar masses between 10{sup 4}M{sub ⊙} and 2 × 10{sup 8}M{sub ⊙}. The lifetimes of compact binaries are assumed to be 100 Myr (95%) and 1 Myr (5%) according to recent binary population synthesis studies. We find that the r-process abundances (relative to iron; [r/Fe]) start increasing at [Fe/H] ≤ −3 if the star formation rates are smaller for less massive sub-halos. Our models also suggest that the star-to-star scatter of [r/Fe]'s observed in Galactic halo stars can be interpreted as a consequence of greater gas outflow rates for less massive sub-halos. In addition, the sub-solar [r/Fe]'s (observed as [Ba/Fe] ∼ −1.5 for [Fe/H] < −3) are explained by the contribution from the short-lived (∼ 1 Myr) binaries. Our result indicates, therefore, that compact binary mergers can be potentially the origin of the r-process elements throughout the Galactic history.

  14. Building the Galactic halo from globular clusters: evidence from chemically unusual red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, S. L.; Smolinski, J. P.; Beers, T. C.; Grebel, E. K.

    2011-10-01

    We present a spectroscopic search for halo field stars that originally formed in globular clusters. Using moderate-resolution SDSS-III/SEGUE-2 spectra of 561 red giants with typical halo metallicities (-1.8 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ -1.0), we identify 16 stars, 3% of the sample, with CN and CH bandstrength behavior indicating depleted carbon and enhanced nitrogen abundances relative to the rest of the data set. Since globular clusters are the only environment known in which stars form with this pattern of atypical light-element abundances, we claim that these stars are second-generation globular cluster stars that have been lost to the halo field via normal cluster mass-loss processes. Extrapolating from theoretical models of two-generation globular cluster formation, this result suggests that globular clusters contributed significant numbers of stars to the construction of the Galactic halo: we calculate that a minimum of 17% of the present-day mass of the stellar halo was originally formed in globular clusters. The ratio of CN-strong to CN-normal stars drops with Galactocentric distance, suggesting that the inner-halo population may be the primary repository of these stars. Full Tables 1 and 3 are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/534/A136

  15. SMASH: Spitzer Merger History and Shape of the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Kathryn; Scowcroft, Vicky; Madore, Barry; Freedman, Wendy; Scowcroft, Victoria; Clementini, Gisella; Cioni, Maria-Rosa; van der Marel, Roeland; Udalski, Andrzej; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Soszynski, Igor; Nidever, David; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Besla, Gurtina; Majewski, Steve; Monson, Andy; Seibert, Mark; Smith, Horace; Preston, George; Kollmeier, Juna; Bono, Giuseppe; Marengo, Massimo; Persson, Eric; Law, David; Grillmair, Carl; Cohen, Judy; Sesar, Branimir; Price-Whelan, Adrian; Fabrizio, Michele

    2013-10-01

    The existence of a period-luminosity relation for RR Lyrae variables as measured at IRAC mid-infrared wavelengths allows Spitzer to estimate distances to individual stars with 2% errors. The SMASH program will exploit this unprecedented opportunity to precisely map structures throughout the halo of our Galaxy. SMASH will construct the first 3-D map of one of the larger satellites of the Milky Way (Sagittarius), it will determine precise distances to four more satellites (Ursa Minor, Carina, Sculptor & Bootes) and make the only measurements of stars in tidal streams accurate enough to determine their individual positions within the debris. This proposal describes some of the ground-breaking science enabled by this program, from increased accuracy in determining the orbits of satellite galaxies, to revolutionary constraints on the mass, shape and orientation of our Milky Way's dark matter halo. The foundational importance of these data sets cannot be overstated. These Milky Way structures lie far beyond the reach of any current or proposed future direct parallax measurements. Moreover, the combination of the SMASH results with proper motions from ESA's upcoming astrometric mission, Gaia, can effectively stretch Gaia's horizon for full 6D phase-space maps of our Galaxy by nearly four orders of magnitude in volume! These data and the resulting distance measurements will become Spitzer's legacy to the Galactic Astronomy community for years to come.

  16. Highly ionized gas in the Galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    1994-01-01

    We reexamine the values of electron density n(sub e) and gas pressure P/k in the interstellar medium (ISM) of the Galactic halo, as inferred from C IV emission and absorption lines and using current C IV atomic data. In a homogeneous model with 4.7 less than or equal to log T less than or equal to 5.3, the data are consistent with 0.01 less than or equal to n(sub e) less than or equal to 0.02/cu cm and 2200 less than or equal to P/k less than or equal to 3700/cu cm K, a factor of 2-3 higher than advocated by Martin & Bowyer (1990) and comparable to the thermal pressure in the disk. If some of the C IV absorption arises from nonemitting, photoionized gas, then the inferred density and pressure will increase accordingly. The volume filling factor for homogeneous models ranges from 0.5% to 5%. Because of the constraints arising from filling factor and radiated power, most of the C IV must arise from gas near the peak of the cooling curve, at log t less than or equal to 5.6. We relate both emission-line and absorption-line observations to recent models in which turbulent mixing layers and isobarically cooling supernova remnants (SNRs) provide significant amounts of halo gas at approximately 10(exp 5.3) K and process 20-40 solar mass/yr with a power of approximately 10(exp 41) ergs/sec. Since the observed C IV and N V absorption scale heights have been reported to differ, at 4.9 kpc and 1.6 kpc, respectively, we examine inhomogeneous models with different exponential scale heights of T, P, and SN energy input. The ISM may change its character with distance above the Galactic plane, as superbubbles and mixing layers dominate over isolated SNRs as the source of the C IV. For appropiate scale heights, the midplane pressure is twice the homogeneous values quoted above. The O IV lambda 1034 diffuse emission line, which can be used as a temperature diagnostic of the hot gas, is predicted to be comparable in strength to that of C IV lambda 1549 (approximately 6000 photons

  17. Constraints on baryonic dark matter in the Galactic halo and Local Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richstone, Douglas; Gould, Andrew; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Flynn, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A four-color method and deep CCD data are used to search for very faint metal-poor stars in the direction of the south Galactic pole. The results make it possible to limit the contribution of ordinary old, metal-poor stars to the dynamical halo of the Galaxy or to the Local Group. The ratio of the mass of the halo to its ordinary starlight must be more than about 2000, unless the halo is very small. For the Local Group, this ratio is greater than about 400. If this local dark matter is baryonic, the process of compact-object formation must produce very few 'impurities' in the form of stars similar to those found in globular clusters. The expected number of unbound stars with MV not greater than 6 within 100 pc of the sun is less than 1 based on the present 90-percent upper limit to the Local Group starlight.

  18. The metallicity distributon function of halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, T. C.; Christlieb, N.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past two decades a worldwide effort to obtain medium-resolution spectroscopic confirmation of candidate low-metallicity stars in the halo and thick disk of the Galaxy has produced ~ 8000 1-2 A observations of stars selected from the HK objective prism survey of Beers and colleagues. More recently the Hamburg/ESO prism survey of Christlieb and collaborators has produced a larger and better understood selection of metal-poor candidates that explore a much larger volume of the Galaxy than was available to the HK survey. We summarize the final derived Metallicity Distribution Function (MDF) of the HK survey objects and compare it with that obtained from the first several years of the HES follow-up effort. In particular we investigate whether there is evidence for a change in the nature of the MDF as a function of distance from the Galactic center which could have profound implications for the nature of the formation and evolution of the Milky Way and for galaxy formation in general.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The SEGUE K giant survey. III. Galactic halo (Janesh+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesh, W.; Morrison, H. L.; Ma, Z.; Rockosi, C.; Starkenburg, E.; Xue, X. X.; Rix, H.-W.; Harding, P.; Beers, T. C.; Johnson, J.; Lee, Y. S.; Schneider, D. P.

    2016-03-01

    We statistically quantify the amount of substructure in the Milky Way stellar halo using a sample of 4568 halo K giant stars at Galactocentric distances ranging over 5-125kpc. These stars have been selected photometrically and confirmed spectroscopically as K giants from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) project. Using a position-velocity clustering estimator (the 4distance) and a model of a smooth stellar halo, we quantify the amount of substructure in the halo, divided by distance and metallicity. Overall, we find that the halo as a whole is highly structured. We also confirm earlier work using blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars which showed that there is an increasing amount of substructure with increasing Galactocentric radius, and additionally find that the amount of substructure in the halo increases with increasing metallicity. Comparing to resampled BHB stars, we find that K giants and BHBs have similar amounts of substructure over equivalent ranges of Galactocentric radius. Using a friends-of-friends algorithm to identify members of individual groups, we find that a large fraction (~33%) of grouped stars are associated with Sgr, and identify stars belonging to other halo star streams: the Orphan Stream, the Cetus Polar Stream, and others, including previously unknown substructures. A large fraction of sample K giants (more than 50%) are not grouped into any substructure. We find also that the Sgr stream strongly dominates groups in the outer halo for all except the most metal-poor stars, and suggest that this is the source of the increase of substructure with Galactocentric radius and metallicity. (2 data files).

  20. Post-AGB Stars in the Halos of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    1999-02-01

    The visually brightest members of Population II are post-AGB (PAGB) stars evolving through spectral types F and A. The aim of this proposal is to find such PAGB stars in the halos of three galaxies that lie just outside the Local Group: Sextans A, NGC 3109, and NGC 5237. The importance of PAGB stars is: (1) they can probe the structure of galactic halos, in the form of test particles much more numerous than planetary nebulae or globular clusters, with which we can look for features such as clumps or tidal streams; (2) the number counts will tell us the theoretically poorly known transition time from AGB to planetary nebula; and (3) we believe that PAGB stars will prove to be a superb new PRIMARY distance indicator, comparable to or better than Cepheids. PAGB stars of types F and A are easily recognized because of their large Balmer jumps. Our uBVI photometric system is optimal for revealing them in galactic halos, due to their unique u-B colors, and the method is extremely efficient in its telescope time requirements. Sextans A and NGC 3109 have Cepheid and TRGB distances, so they are excellent test beds for a confrontation with our proposed Pop II primary standard candles. NGC 5237 has an uncertain distance, which PAGB stars should considerably improve. The 0.9-m telescope will be used (1) to obtain uBVI calibrations of our fields, thus saving the 4-m BTC mosaic for the deep observations; and (2) to complete our survey of Milky Way globular clusters for PAGB stars to used as Galactic calibrators of their luminosities and metallicity dependence.

  1. Did globular clusters contribute to the stellar population of the Galactic halo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnel, Corinne; Krause, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The origin of Galactic halo stars and the contribution of globular clusters (GC) to this stellar population have long been (and still are) debated. The discovery of multiple stellar populations with peculiar chemical properties in GCs both in the Milky Way and in Local Group galaxies recently brought a renewal on these questions. Indeed most of the scenarios that compete to reproduce the present-day GC characteristics call for fast expulsion of both gas and low-mass stars from these clusters in their early infancy. In this framework, the initial masses of GCs could have been 8 to 25 times higher than their present-day stellar mass, and they could have contributed to 5 to 20 % of the low-mass stars in the Galactic halo. Here we revisit these conclusions, which are in tension with observations of dwarf galaxies and of young massive star clusters in the Local Group. We come back in particular on the paradigm of gas expulsion from massive star clusters, and propose an alternative interpretation of the GC abundance properties. We conclude by proposing a major revision of the current concepts regarding the role massive star clusters play in the assembly of galactic haloes.

  2. Correlating galaxy colour and halo concentration: a tunable halo model of galactic conformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Kovač, Katarina; Hartley, William G.; Pahwa, Isha

    2015-12-01

    We extend the halo occupation distribution (HOD) framework to generate mock galaxy catalogues exhibiting varying levels of `galactic conformity', which has emerged as a potentially powerful probe of environmental effects in galaxy evolution. Our model correlates galaxy colours in a group with the concentration of the common parent dark halo through a `group quenching efficiency' ρ which makes older, more concentrated haloes at fixed mass preferentially host redder galaxies. We find that, for a specific value of ρ, this 1-halo conformity matches corresponding measurements in a group catalogue based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our mocks also display conformity at large separations from isolated objects, potentially an imprint of halo assembly bias. A detailed study - using mocks with assembly bias erased while keeping 1-halo conformity intact - reveals a rather nuanced situation, however. At separations ≲4 Mpc, conformity is mainly a 1-halo effect dominated by the largest haloes and is not a robust indicator of assembly bias. Only at very large separations (≳8 Mpc) does genuine 2-halo conformity, driven by the assembly bias of small haloes, manifest distinctly. We explain all these trends in standard halo model terms. Our model opens the door to parametrized HOD analyses that self-consistently account for galactic conformity at all scales.

  3. Ghostly Halos in Dwarf Galaxies: a probe of star formation in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hoyoung; Ricotti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We carry out numerical simulations to characterize the size, stellar mass, and stellar mass surface density of extended stellar halos in dwarf galaxies as a function of dark matter halo mass. We expect that for galaxies smaller than a critical value, these ghostly halos will not exist because the smaller galactic subunits that build it up, do not form any stars. The detection of ghostly halos around isolated dwarf galaxies is a sensitive test of the efficiency of star formation in the first galaxies and of whether ultra-faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way are fossils of the first galaxies.

  4. Star formation in Galactic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M < 100 M⊙), and up to sizes approaching 10 pc for higher mass regions (M > 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  5. Two New Ultra-Faint Star Clusters in the Milky Way Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwon

    2016-08-01

    Kim 1 & 2 are two new star clusters discovered in the Stromlo Missing Satellite Survey. Kim 1, located at a heliocentric distance of 19.8 +/- 0.9 kpc, features an extremely low total luminosity (M V = 0.3 +/- 0.5 mag) and low star concentration. Together with the large ellipticity (ɛ = 0.42 +/- 0.10) and irregular isophotes, these properties suggest that Kim 1 is an intermediate mass star cluster being stripped by the Galactic tidal field. Kim 2 is a rare ultra-faint outer halo globular cluster located at a heliocentric distance of 104.7 +/- 4.1 kpc. The cluster exhibits evidence of significant mass loss such as extra-tidal stars and mass-segregation. Kim 2 is likely to follow an orbit confined to the peripheral region of the Galactic halo, and/or to have formed in a dwarf galaxy that was later accreted into the Galactic halo.

  6. Mixing between high velocity clouds and the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  7. Could wormholes form in dark matter galactic halos?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Farook; Shit, G. C.; Sen, Banashree; Ray, Saibal

    2016-01-01

    We estimate expression for velocity as a function of the radial coordinate r by using polynomial interpolation based on the experimental data of rotational velocities at distant outer regions of galaxies. The interpolation technique has been used to estimate fifth degree polynomial followed by cubic spline interpolation. This rotational velocity is used to find the geometry of galactic halo regions within the framework of Einstein's general relativity. In this paper we have analyzed features of galactic halo regions based on two possible choices for the dark matter density profile, viz. Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) type (Navarro et al. in Astrophys. J. 462:563, 1996) and Universal Rotation Curve (URC) (Castignani et al. in Nat. Sci. 4:265, 2012). It is argued that spacetime of the galactic halo possesses some of the characteristics needed to support traversable wormholes.

  8. Mixing between High Velocity Clouds and the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  9. The gamma-ray-flux PDF from galactic halo substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Samuel K.; Ando, Shin'ichiro; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-07-01

    One of the targets of the recently launched Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a diffuse gamma-ray background from dark-matter annihilation or decay in the Galactic halo. N-body simulations and theoretical arguments suggest that the dark matter in the Galactic halo may be clumped into substructure, rather than smoothly distributed. Here we propose the gamma-ray-flux probability distribution function (PDF) as a probe of substructure in the Galactic halo. We calculate this PDF for a phenomenological model of halo substructure and determine the regions of the substructure parameter space in which the PDF may be distinguished from the PDF for a smooth distribution of dark matter. In principle, the PDF allows a statistical detection of substructure, even if individual halos cannot be detected. It may also allow detection of substructure on the smallest microhalo mass scales, ~ M⊕, for weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Furthermore, it may also provide a method to measure the substructure mass function. However, an analysis that assumes a typical halo substructure model and a conservative estimate of the diffuse background suggests that the substructure PDF may not be detectable in the lifespan of Fermi in the specific case that the WIMP is a neutralino. Nevertheless, for a large range of substructure, WIMP annihilation, and diffuse background models, PDF analysis may provide a clear signature of substructure.

  10. Post-AGB Stars in the Halos of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    1999-02-01

    The visually brightest members of Population II are post-AGB (PAGB) stars evolving through spectral types F and A. The aim of this proposal is to find such PAGB stars in the halos of Sextans A and B (two galaxies just outside the Local Group) and of NGC 4236 (a nearly edge-on spiral in the M81 Group). The importance of these stars is: (1) they will serve as probes of the structure of galactic halos, in the form of test particles much more numerous than planetary nebulae or globular clusters, with which we can look for features such as clumps or tidal streams; (2) the number counts will tell us the theoretically poorly known transition time from AGB to planetary nebula; and (3) we believe that PAGB stars will prove to be a superb new PRIMARY distance indicator, comparable to or better than Cepheids. PAGB stars of types F and A are easily recognized because of their large Balmer jumps. Our uBVI photometric system is optimal for revealing them in galactic halos, due to their unique u-B colors, and the method is extremely efficient in its telescope time requirements. In Sextans A and B PAGB stars will appear at V~eq22.3, and in NGC 4236 at V~eq24. Sextans A and B have Cepheid and TRGB distances, and NGC 4236 is a Tully-Fisher calibrator, so they are excellent test beds for a confrontation with our proposed Pop II primary standard candles. We will use the 0.9-m telescope for uBVI calibrations of our fields, saving the 4-m for the deep observations.

  11. The sagittarius tidal stream and the shape of the galactic stellar halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, Matthew T.

    The stellar halo that surrounds our Galaxy contains clues to understanding galaxy formation, cosmology, stellar evolution, and the nature of dark matter. Gravitationally disrupted dwarf galaxies form tidal streams, which roughly trace orbits through the Galactic halo. The Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf tidal debris is the most dominant of these streams, and its properties place important constraints on the distribution of mass (including dark matter) in the Galaxy. Stars not associated with substructures form the "smooth" component of the stellar halo, the origin of which is still under investigation. Characterizing halo substructures such as the Sgr stream and the smooth halo provides valuable information on the formation history and evolution of our galaxy, and places constraints on cosmological models. This thesis is primarily concerned with characterizing the 3-dimensional stellar densities of the Sgr tidal debris system and the smooth stellar halo, using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). F turnoff stars are used to infer distances, as they are relatively bright, numerous, and distributed about a single intrinsic brightness (magnitude). The inherent spread in brightnesses of these stars is overcome through the use of the recently-developed technique of statistical photometric parallax, in which the bulk properties of a stellar population are used to create a probability distribution for a given star's distance. This was used to build a spatial density model for the smooth stellar halo and tidal streams. The free parameters in this model are then fit to SDSS data with a maximum likelihood technique, and the parameters are optimized by advanced computational methods. Several computing platforms are used in this study, including the RPI SUR Bluegene and the Milkyway home volunteer computing project. Fits to the Sgr stream in 18 SDSS data stripes were performed, and a continuous density profile is found for the major Sgr stream. The stellar halo is found to

  12. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in typical and extreme galaxies. The typical galaxies are selected to be free of active galactic nuclei (AGN), while the extreme galaxies host quasars (the most luminous class of AGN). These two environments are each insightful in their own way; quasars are among the most violent objects in the universe, literally reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to small galaxies which are forming stars at unsustainably high rates. The current paradigm of galaxy formation and evolution suggests that extreme circumstances are key stepping stones in the assembly of galaxies like our Milky Way. To test this paradigm and fully explore its ramifications, this dual approach is needed. My sample of AGN-free galaxies is drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. This Halpha-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to detect star-forming galaxies without a bias toward continuum luminosity. This type of selection ensures that this sample is not biased toward galaxies that are large or nearby. My work studies the KISS galaxies in the mid- and far-infrared using photometry from the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. These infrared bands are particularly interesting for star formation studies because the ultraviolet light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-infrared (24mum MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transitions features in the mid-infrared (8.0mum IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The work I present here examines the efficiencies of PAH and thermal dust emission as tracers of star-formation rates over a wide range of galactic stellar masses. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has a highly variable efficiency that does not systematically depend on galactic stellar mass

  13. Galactic Sodium from AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; Gibson, B. K.; Stancliffe, R. J.

    2007-11-01

    Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models which include sodium from type II supernovae (SNe) alone underestimate the abundance of sodium in the interstellar medium by a factor of 2 to 3 over about 3 ridex in metallicity and predict a flat behavior in the evolution of riNafe at super-solar metallicities. Conversely, recent observations of stars with rifeh ˜ +0.4 suggest that riNafe increases at high metallicity. We have combined stellar evolution models of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars with the latest SN yields in an attempt to resolve these problems dots and have created many more.

  14. HaloSat- A CubeSat to Study the Hot Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    We propose to develop, build, and fly HaloSat, a CubeSat capable of measuring the oxygen line emission from the hot Galactic halo. A dedicated CubeSat enables an instrument design and observing strategy to maximize the halo signal while minimizing foregrounds from solar wind charge exchange interactions within the solar system. We will use HaloSat to map the distribution of hot gas in the Milky Way and determine whether it fills an extended, and thus massive halo, or whether the halo is compact, and thus does not contribute significantly to the total mass of the Milky Way. HaloSat can be accomplished at modest cost using a CubeSat, a novel platform for space astrophysics missions. We will use a commercially available CubeSat bus and commercially available X-ray detectors to reduce development risk and minimize overall mission cost. HaloSat builds on the initiatives of GSFC/Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) in the development of CubeSats for low cost access to space and relies on the technical expertise of WFF personnel for spacecraft and mission design and operations. The team, from University of Iowa (UI), GSFC, Johns Hopkins, and CNRS (France), contains experts in X-ray detector development and data analysis and the astrophysics of hot plasmas and Galactic structure. The UI team will include a number of junior researchers (undergraduates, graduate students, and a postdoc) and help train them for future leadership roles on NASA space flight missions.

  15. The Chemical Composition of Halo Stars on Extreme Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Alex

    1999-04-01

    Presented within is a fine spectroscopic analysis of 11 metal-poor (-2.15<[Fe/H]<-1.00) dwarf stars on orbits that penetrate the outermost regions of the Galactic halo. Abundances for a select group of light metals (Na, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti), Fe-peak nuclides (Cr, Fe, and Ni), and neutron-capture elements (Y and Ba) were calculated using line strengths measured from high-resolution (R~48,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N~110pixel^-1) echelle spectra acquired with the Keck I 10 m telescope and HIRES spectrograph. Ten of the stars have apogalactica, a proxy for stellar birthplace, which stretch between 25 and 90 kpc; however, these ``outer halo'' stars exhibit strikingly uniform abundances. The average, Fe-normalized abundances-<[Mg/Fe]>=+0.23+/-0.09, <[Si/Fe]>=+0.24+/-0.10, <[Ca/Fe]>=+0.22+/-0.07, <[Ti/Fe]>=+0.20+/-0.08, <[Cr/Fe]>=0.02+/-0.07, <[Ni/Fe]>=-0.09+/-0.07, and <[Ba/Fe]>=+0.01+/-0.12-exhibit little intrinsic scatter; moreover, the evolution of individual ratios (as a function of [Fe/H]) is generally consistent with the predictions of galactic chemical evolution models dominated by the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. Only <[Y/Fe]>=-0.13+/-0.21 exhibits a dispersion larger than observational uncertainties, which suggests a different nucleosynthesis site for this element. It has been conjectured that stars on high-energy orbits-either those that penetrate the remote halo or ones with extreme retrograde velocities-were once associated with a cannibalized satellite galaxy. Such stars, as shown here, are indistinguishable from metal-poor dwarfs of the inner Galactic halo. The uniformity of the abundances, regardless of kinematic properties, suggests that physically, spatially, and temporally distinct star-forming regions within (or near) the growing Milky Way experienced grossly similar chemical evolution histories. Implications for galaxy formation scenarios are discussed.

  16. GALACTIC ARCHEOLOGY AND THE HIGH-REDSHIFT DETECTABILITY OF MILKY WAY HALO PROGENITOR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Okrochkov, Mikhail; Tumlinson, Jason

    2010-06-10

    Using a simple model of Milky Way halo formation and chemical evolution, we examine the criteria for observing Milky Way-like progenitor galaxies and the stellar populations within them with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). We determine that Milky Way progenitors are visible in deep fields (AB = 30-31) up to z = 7 with low dust content and up to z = 9 with no dust content. These models allow us to determine the fraction of Milky Way halo stars formed in galaxies that should be visible with Near-Infrared Camera on JWST, as a function of metallicity. We show that galaxies in which Galactic halo stars of metallicity above [Fe/H] = -2.5 formed can be detected. Galaxies that form stars with higher metallicities should be visible in deep fields and can be studied by combining observations within the Galaxy as well as external galaxies. We find that halo stars with [Fe/H] <-2.8 formed in progenitor galaxies that are not visible to JWST and that examining their remnants within the Milky Way provides the only realistic prospect of studying these ancient stellar populations. The oldest visible stellar populations are shown to be centrally concentrated, with the stars that formed in visible galaxies at z > 3 residing preferentially within the central 10 kpc region of the Galaxy.

  17. THE STELLAR METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION OF THE GALACTIC HALO FROM SDSS PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Lee, Young Sun; Bovy, Jo; Ivezic, Zeljko; Carollo, Daniela; Newby, Matthew

    2013-01-20

    We explore the stellar metallicity distribution function of the Galactic halo based on SDSS ugriz photometry. A set of stellar isochrones is calibrated using observations of several star clusters and validated by comparisons with medium-resolution spectroscopic values over a wide range of metal abundance. We estimate distances and metallicities for individual main-sequence stars in the multiply scanned SDSS Stripe 82, at heliocentric distances in the range 5-8 kpc and |b| > 35 Degree-Sign , and find that the in situ photometric metallicity distribution has a shape that matches that of the kinematically selected local halo stars from Ryan and Norris. We also examine independent kinematic information from proper-motion measurements for high Galactic latitude stars in our sample. We find that stars with retrograde rotation in the rest frame of the Galaxy are generally more metal poor than those exhibiting prograde rotation, which is consistent with earlier arguments by Carollo et al. that the halo system comprises at least two spatially overlapping components with differing metallicity, kinematics, and spatial distributions. The observed photometric metallicity distribution and that of Ryan and Norris can be described by a simple chemical evolution model by Hartwick (or by a single Gaussian distribution); however, the suggestive metallicity-kinematic correlation contradicts the basic assumption in this model that the Milky Way halo consists primarily of a single stellar population. When the observed metallicity distribution is deconvolved using two Gaussian components with peaks at [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -1.7 and -2.3, the metal-poor component accounts for {approx}20%-35% of the entire halo population in this distance range.

  18. The Stellar Metallicity Distribution Function of the Galactic Halo from SDSS Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Deokkeun; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Lee, Young Sun; Bovy, Jo; Ivezić, Željko; Carollo, Daniela; Newby, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    We explore the stellar metallicity distribution function of the Galactic halo based on SDSS ugriz photometry. A set of stellar isochrones is calibrated using observations of several star clusters and validated by comparisons with medium-resolution spectroscopic values over a wide range of metal abundance. We estimate distances and metallicities for individual main-sequence stars in the multiply scanned SDSS Stripe 82, at heliocentric distances in the range 5-8 kpc and |b| > 35°, and find that the in situ photometric metallicity distribution has a shape that matches that of the kinematically selected local halo stars from Ryan & Norris. We also examine independent kinematic information from proper-motion measurements for high Galactic latitude stars in our sample. We find that stars with retrograde rotation in the rest frame of the Galaxy are generally more metal poor than those exhibiting prograde rotation, which is consistent with earlier arguments by Carollo et al. that the halo system comprises at least two spatially overlapping components with differing metallicity, kinematics, and spatial distributions. The observed photometric metallicity distribution and that of Ryan & Norris can be described by a simple chemical evolution model by Hartwick (or by a single Gaussian distribution); however, the suggestive metallicity-kinematic correlation contradicts the basic assumption in this model that the Milky Way halo consists primarily of a single stellar population. When the observed metallicity distribution is deconvolved using two Gaussian components with peaks at [Fe/H] ≈ -1.7 and -2.3, the metal-poor component accounts for ~20%-35% of the entire halo population in this distance range.

  19. HaloSat - A CubeSat to Study the Hot Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Observations of the nearby universe fail to locate about half of the normal matter (baryons) observed in the early universe. The missing baryons may be in hot galactic halos. HaloSat is a CubeSat designed to map oxygen line emission (O VII and O VIII) around the Milky Way in order to constrain the mass and spatial distribution of hot gas in the halo. HaloSat has a grasp competitive with current X-ray observatories. Its observing program will be optimized to minimize contributions from solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission that limit the accuracy of current measurements. We will describe the HaloSat mission concept, progress towards its implementation, and plans for archiving and distribution of the data.

  20. IC 1257: A New Globular Cluster in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, W. E.; Phelps, R. L.; Madore, B. F.; Pevunova, O.; Skiff, B. A.; Crute, C.; Wilson, B.

    1996-01-01

    New CCD photometry of the faint, compact star cluster IC 1257 (L = 17? = +/- 15?obtained with the Palomar 5m telescope, reveals that it is a highly reddened globular cluster well beyond the Galactic center.

  1. A skewer survey of the Galactic halo from deep CFHT and INT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pila-Díez, B.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Kuijken, K.; van der Burg, R. F. J.; Hoekstra, H.

    2015-07-01

    We study the density profile and shape of the Galactic halo using deep multicolour images from the MENeaCS and CCCP projects, over 33 fields selected to avoid overlap with the Galactic plane. Using multicolour selection and point spread function homogenization techniques we obtain catalogues of F stars (near-main sequence turnoff stars) out to Galactocentric distances up to 60 kpc. Grouping nearby lines of sight, we construct the stellar density profiles through the halo in eight different directions by means of photometric parallaxes. Smooth halo models are then fitted to these profiles. We find clear evidence for a steepening of the density profile power law index around R = 20 kpc, from -2.50 ± 0.04 to -4.85 ± 0.04, and for a flattening of the halo towards the poles with best-fit axis ratio 0.79 ± 0.02. Furthermore, we cannot rule out a mild triaxiality (w ≥ 0.88 ± 0.07). We recover the signatures of well-known substructure and streams that intersect our lines of sight. These results are consistent with those derived from wider but shallower surveys, and augur well for upcoming, wide-field surveys of comparable depth to our pencil beam surveys.

  2. Galactic orbital motions of star clusters: static versus semicosmological time-dependent Galactic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, Hosein; Zonoozi, Akram Hasani; Taghavi, Saeed

    2015-07-01

    In order to understand the orbital history of Galactic halo objects, such as globular clusters, authors usually assume a static potential for our Galaxy with parameters that appear at the present day. According to the standard paradigm of galaxy formation, galaxies grow through a continuous accretion of fresh gas and a hierarchical merging with smaller galaxies from high redshift to the present day. This implies that the mass and size of disc, bulge, and halo change with time. We investigate the effect of assuming a live Galactic potential on the orbital history of halo objects and its consequences on their internal evolution. We numerically integrate backwards the equations of motion of different test objects located in different Galactocentric distances in both static and time-dependent Galactic potentials in order to see if it is possible to discriminate between them. We show that in a live potential, the birth of the objects, 13 Gyr ago, would have occurred at significantly larger Galactocentric distances, compared to the objects orbiting in a static potential. Based on the direct N-body calculations of star clusters carried out with collisional N-body code, NBODY6, we also discuss the consequences of the time-dependence of a Galactic potential on the early- and long-term evolution of star clusters in a simple way, by comparing the evolution of two star clusters embedded in galactic models, which represent the galaxy at present and 12 Gyr ago, respectively. We show that assuming a static potential over a Hubble time for our Galaxy as it is often done, leads to an enhancement of mass-loss, an overestimation of the dissolution rates of globular clusters, an underestimation of the final size of star clusters, and a shallower stellar mass function.

  3. A NEW DELIVERY ROUTE TO GALACTIC NUCLEI: WARM HALO CLOUD IMPACTS

    SciTech Connect

    McKernan, Barry; Ford, K. E. Saavik; Maller, Ariyeh

    2010-08-01

    We propose a new mechanism for the delivery of gas to the heart of galactic nuclei. We show that warm halo clouds (WHCs) must periodically impact galactic centers and potentially deliver a large ({approx}10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M{sub sun}) mass of gas to the galactic nucleus in a singular event. The impact of an accreting WHC originating far in the galactic halo can, depending on mixing, produce a nuclear starburst of low-metallicity stars as well as low-luminosity accretion onto the central black hole. Based on multiphase cooling around a {Lambda}CDM distribution of halos, we calculate the nuclear impact rate, the mass captured by the central black hole, and the fraction of active nuclei for impacting cloud masses in the range 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M{sub sun}. If there is moderate braking during cloud infall, our model predicts an average fraction of low-luminosity active nuclei consistent with observations.

  4. Characterizing the X-Ray Spectrum of the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine the spectrum of the Galactic halo's soft X-ray emission. These photons are emitted by hot, diffuse gas hundreds to thousands of parsecs from the Galactic plane. Thus, the emission is weak, can be confused with locally produced photons, and must be distinguished from noise. My co-I has made significant progress on determining the background. I have been working on a complementary aspect of the project: computer simulations of the hot gas in the local and distant regions.

  5. V474 Car: A RARE HALO RS CVn BINARY IN RETROGRADE GALACTIC ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Bubar, Eric J.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Walter, Frederick M.

    2011-04-15

    We report the discovery that the star V474 Car is an extremely active, high velocity halo RS CVn system. The star was originally identified as a possible pre-main-sequence star in Carina, given its enhanced stellar activity, rapid rotation (10.3 days), enhanced Li, and absolute magnitude which places it above the main sequence (MS). However, its extreme radial velocity (264 km s{sup -1}) suggested that this system was unlike any previously known pre-MS system. Our detailed spectroscopic analysis of echelle spectra taken with the CTIO 4 m finds that V474 Car is both a spectroscopic binary with an orbital period similar to the photometric rotation period and metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx_equal}-0.99). The star's Galactic orbit is extremely eccentric (e {approx_equal} 0.93) with a perigalacticon of only {approx}0.3 kpc of the Galactic center-and the eccentricity and smallness of its perigalacticon are surpassed by only {approx}0.05% of local F/G-type field stars. The observed characteristics are consistent with V474 Car being a high-velocity, metal-poor, tidally locked, chromospherically active binary, i.e., a halo RS CVn binary, and one of only a few such specimens known.

  6. VERY METAL-POOR OUTER-HALO STARS WITH ROUND ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Kohei; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Beers, Timothy C.; Carollo, Daniela; Lee, Young Sun

    2013-01-20

    The orbital motions of halo stars in the Milky Way reflect the orbital motions of the progenitor systems in which they formed, making it possible to trace the mass-assembly history of the Galaxy. Direct measurement of three-dimensional velocities, based on accurate proper motions and line-of-sight velocities, has revealed that the majority of halo stars in the inner-halo region move in eccentric orbits. However, our understanding of the motions of distant, in situ halo-star samples is still limited, due to the lack of accurate proper motions for these stars. Here we explore a model-independent analysis of the line-of-sight velocities and spatial distribution of a recent sample of 1865 carefully selected halo blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars within 30 kpc of the Galactic center. We find that the mean rotational velocity of the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -2.0) BHB stars significantly lags behind that of the relatively more metal-rich ([Fe/H] > -2.0) BHB stars. We also find that the relatively more metal-rich BHB stars are dominated by stars with eccentric orbits, as previously observed for other stellar samples in the inner-halo region. By contrast, the very metal-poor BHB stars are dominated by stars on rounder, lower-eccentricity orbits. Our results indicate that the motion of the progenitor systems of the Milky Way that contributed to the stellar populations found within 30 kpc correlates directly with their metal abundance, which may be related to their physical properties such as gas fractions. These results are consistent with the existence of an inner/outer halo structure for the halo system, as advocated by Carollo et al.

  7. Very Metal-poor Outer-halo Stars with Round Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kohei; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Beers, Timothy C.; Carollo, Daniela; Lee, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    The orbital motions of halo stars in the Milky Way reflect the orbital motions of the progenitor systems in which they formed, making it possible to trace the mass-assembly history of the Galaxy. Direct measurement of three-dimensional velocities, based on accurate proper motions and line-of-sight velocities, has revealed that the majority of halo stars in the inner-halo region move in eccentric orbits. However, our understanding of the motions of distant, in situ halo-star samples is still limited, due to the lack of accurate proper motions for these stars. Here we explore a model-independent analysis of the line-of-sight velocities and spatial distribution of a recent sample of 1865 carefully selected halo blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars within 30 kpc of the Galactic center. We find that the mean rotational velocity of the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -2.0) BHB stars significantly lags behind that of the relatively more metal-rich ([Fe/H] > -2.0) BHB stars. We also find that the relatively more metal-rich BHB stars are dominated by stars with eccentric orbits, as previously observed for other stellar samples in the inner-halo region. By contrast, the very metal-poor BHB stars are dominated by stars on rounder, lower-eccentricity orbits. Our results indicate that the motion of the progenitor systems of the Milky Way that contributed to the stellar populations found within 30 kpc correlates directly with their metal abundance, which may be related to their physical properties such as gas fractions. These results are consistent with the existence of an inner/outer halo structure for the halo system, as advocated by Carollo et al.

  8. Probable new halo stars toward L = 360 deg, B = +30 deg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Wayne; MacConnell, D. J.

    1987-12-01

    Eighty-three probable halo giants have been identified in Stock's recently published objective-prism survey of an intermediate galactic latitude field. Approximate radial velocities derived from the objective-prism plates yield a velocity dispersion of 98±8 km sec-1 for these stars.

  9. Beryllium in the Galactic halo - Surface abundances from standard, diffusive, and rotational stellar evolution, and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    1990-01-01

    The recently observed upper limits to the beryllium abundances in population II stars are much lower than population I detections. This difference reflects an intrinsic difference in the initial abundances and is not caused by different degrees of depletion driven by stellar evolution processes from similar initial abundances. Evolutionary sequences of models from the early premain sequence to beyond the turnoff that correspond to halo dwarfs with Fe/H abundances of -1.3, -2.3, and -3.3 are constructed, and standard, diffusive, and rotational mechanisms are used to estimate a maximal possible beryllium depletion. Halo star models in the T(eff) range 6000 to 5000 K might be rotationally depleted by a factor of 1.5-2, and the total depletion should be no more than (conservatively) a factor of 3. Implications for cosmology, cosmic-ray theory, and Galactic chemical evolution are discussed.

  10. The Fractions of Inner- and Outer-halo Stars in the Local Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Deokkeun; Beers, Timothy C.; Santucci, Rafael M.; Carollo, Daniela; Placco, Vinicius M.; Lee, Young Sun; Rossi, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    We obtain a new determination of the metallicity distribution function (MDF) of stars within ˜5-10 kpc of the Sun, based on recently improved co-adds of ugriz photometry for Stripe 82 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our new estimate uses the methodology developed previously by An et al. to study in situ halo stars, but is based on a factor of two larger sample than available before, with much-improved photometric errors and zero-points. The newly obtained MDF can be divided into multiple populations of halo stars, with peak metallicities at [Fe/H] ≈ -1.4 and -1.9, which we associate with the inner-halo and outer-halo populations of the Milky Way, respectively. We find that the kinematics of these stars (based on proper-motion measurements at high Galactic latitude) supports the proposed dichotomy of the halo, as stars with retrograde motions in the rest frame of the Galaxy are generally more metal-poor than stars with prograde motions, consistent with previous claims. In addition, we generate mock catalogs of stars from a simulated Milk Way halo system, and demonstrate for the first time that the chemically and kinematically distinct properties of the inner- and outer-halo populations are qualitatively in agreement with our observations. The decomposition of the observed MDF and our comparison with the mock catalog results suggest that the outer-halo population contributes on the order of ˜35%-55% of halo stars in the local volume.

  11. The ionization conditions in the Milky Way halo - Infalling gas toward the North Galactic Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Observations of gas in the Milky Way halo are studied with an eye toward the theoretical predictions of the Galactic Fountain model for the production of halo gas. Data are shown that indicate significant variations in the ionization conditions in infalling halo gas in the northern galactic hemisphere. Understanding the nature of Milky Way halo gas plays a critical role in interpreting QSO absorption lines in the investigation of galaxies at high redshift.

  12. Linking dwarf galaxies to halo building blocks with the most metal-poor star in Sculptor.

    PubMed

    Frebel, Anna; Kirby, Evan N; Simon, Joshua D

    2010-03-01

    Current cosmological models indicate that the Milky Way's stellar halo was assembled from many smaller systems. On the basis of the apparent absence of the most metal-poor stars in present-day dwarf galaxies, recent studies claimed that the true Galactic building blocks must have been vastly different from the surviving dwarfs. The discovery of an extremely iron-poor star (S1020549) in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy based on a medium-resolution spectrum cast some doubt on this conclusion. Verification of the iron-deficiency, however, and measurements of additional elements, such as the alpha-element Mg, are necessary to demonstrate that the same type of stars produced the metals found in dwarf galaxies and the Galactic halo. Only then can dwarf galaxy stars be conclusively linked to early stellar halo assembly. Here we report high-resolution spectroscopic abundances for 11 elements in S1020549, confirming its iron abundance of less than 1/4,000th that of the Sun, and showing that the overall abundance pattern follows that seen in low-metallicity halo stars, including the alpha-elements. Such chemical similarity indicates that the systems destroyed to form the halo billions of years ago were not fundamentally different from the progenitors of present-day dwarfs, and suggests that the early chemical enrichment of all galaxies may be nearly identical. PMID:20203604

  13. Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology database for stars in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, T.; Hidaka, J.; Ishigaki, M.; Katsuta, Y.; Yamada, S.; Komiya, Y.; Fujimoto, M. Y.; Aoki, W.

    We present a new database for observed stars in dwarf galaxies in the local group. This is an extension of the Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) database (Suda et al. 2008, PASJ, 60, 1159) that deals with metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The main features of the new database are the same as the database for Galactic halo stars. Users can access and select data based on various criteria, and then inspect the selected data on a diagram with user-specified axes. The database includes more than two hundred stars based on high-resolution spectra for 20 galaxies, while the number of data is more than five thousand by including the data with medium-resolution spectra. We briefly discuss the characteristics of stars in dwarf galaxies using the database.

  14. Origin of strong magnetic fields in Milky Way-like galactic haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Alexander; Dolag, Klaus; Lesch, Harald

    2015-08-01

    An analytical model predicting the growth rates, the absolute growth times and the saturation values of the magnetic field strength within galactic haloes is presented. The analytical results are compared to cosmological MHD simulations of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation performed with the N-body / SPMHD code GADGET. The halo has a mass of approximately 3*10^{12} solar masses and a virial radius of approximately 270 kpc. The simulations in a LCDM cosmology also include radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback and the description of non-ideal MHD. A primordial magnetic seed field ranging from 10^{-10} to 10^{-34} G in strength agglomerates together with the gas within filaments and protohaloes.There, it is amplified within a couple of hundred million years up to equipartition with the corresponding turbulent energy. The magnetic field strength increases by turbulent small-scale dynamo action. The turbulence is generated by the gravitational collapse and by supernova feedback. Subsequently, a series of halo mergers leads to shock waves and amplification processes magnetizing the surrounding gas within a few billion years. At first, the magnetic energy grows on small scales and then self-organizes to larger scales.Magnetic field strengths of microG are reached in the center of the halo and drop to nG in the IGM. Analyzing the saturation levels and growth rates, the model is able to describe the process of magnetic amplification notably well and confirms the results of the simulations. Additionally, we investigate magnetic seed fields created self-consistently by supernova explosions naturally occuring during the star formation in galaxies. Within starforming regions and given typical dimensions and magnetic field strengths in canonical SN remnants, we inject a dipole-shape magnetic field at a rate of nG/Gyr.In our model for the evolution of galactic magnetic fields, the seed magnetic field determined self-consistently by the star formation process

  15. Structure Formation inside Triaxial Dark Matter Halos: Galactic Disks, Bulges, and Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Clayton H.; Shlosman, Isaac; Athanassoula, E.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate formation and evolution of galactic disks immersed in assembling live DM halos. Models have been evolved from cosmological initial conditions and represent the collapse of an isolated density perturbation. The baryons include gas participating in star formation (SF) and stars with the energy feedback onto the ISM. We find that (1) the triaxial halo figure tumbling is insignificant and the angular momentum (J) is channeled into the internal circulation, while the baryonic collapse is stopped by the centrifugal barrier; (2) density response of the (disk) baryons is out of phase with DM, thus washing out the inner halo ellipticity; (3) the total J is neatly conserved, even in models accounting for stellar feedback; (4) the specific J for DM is nearly constant, while that for baryons is decreasing; (5) early stage of disk formation resembles the cat's cradle-a small amorphous disk fueled via radial string patterns-followed by growing oval disk whose shape varies with its orientation to the halo major axis; (6) the disk gas layer thins when the SF rate drops below ~5 Msolar yr-1 (7) about half of the baryons remain outside the disk SF region or in the halo as a hot gas; (8) rotation curves appear to be flat and account for the observed disk/halo contributions; (9) a range of bulge-dominated to bulgeless disks was obtained, depending on the stellar feedback parameter, ɛSF: smaller ɛSF leads to a larger and earlier bulge; lower density threshold for SF leads to a smaller, thicker disk; gas gravitational softening mimics a number of intrinsic processes within the ISM; (10) models are characterized by an extensive bar-forming activity; (11) nested bars form in response to the gas inflow along the primary bars, as shown by Heller, Shlosman, and Athanassoula.

  16. A CATALOG OF GALACTIC INFRARED CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.

    2012-02-15

    We collected almost all of the Galactic infrared carbon stars (IRCSs) from literature published up to the present to organize a catalog of 974 Galactic IRCSs in this paper. Some of their photometric properties in the near-, mid-, and far-infrared are discussed.

  17. Assembling the Largest, Most Distant Sample of Halo Wide Binaries for Galactic Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, J.; Chanamé, J.

    2015-10-01

    Samples of wide binaries (agtrsim \\ 100\\ AU) are a gold mine for Galactic studies. They have been used on a large list of applications in a diversity of fields. In the dynamical arena, wide binaries provided the first meaningful constraints on the mass and nature of disk dark matter and, more recently, they were used to close the remaining parameter space of MACHO-like halo dark matter not accessible to the micro-lensing campaigns. All these applications were possible when samples of these objects became large enough to not be dominated by random, chance alignments of two unrelated stars projected on the sky. Nevertheless, still today the largest available sample of the particularly valuable halo wide binaries free from selection biases, contains not much more than 100 systems, and conclusions on dark matter are very sensitive to this fact.

  18. Origin of strong magnetic fields in Milky Way-like galactic haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A. M.; Lesch, H.; Dolag, K.; Kotarba, H.; Geng, A.; Stasyszyn, F. A.

    2012-05-01

    An analytical model predicting the growth rates, the absolute growth times and the saturation values of the magnetic field strength within galactic haloes is presented. The analytical results are compared to cosmological magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation performed with the N-body/SPMHD code GADGET. The halo has a mass of ≈3 × 1012 M⊙ and a virial radius of ≈270 kpc. The simulations in a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology also include radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback and the description of non-ideal MHD. A primordial magnetic seed field ranging from 10-10 to 10-34 G in strength agglomerates together with the gas within filaments and protohaloes. There, it is amplified within a couple of hundred million years up to equipartition with the corresponding turbulent energy. The magnetic field strength increases by turbulent small-scale dynamo action. The turbulence is generated by the gravitational collapse and by supernova feedback. Subsequently, a series of halo mergers leads to shock waves and amplification processes magnetizing the surrounding gas within a few billion years. At first, the magnetic energy grows on small scales and then self-organizes to larger scales. Magnetic field strengths of ≈10-6 G are reached in the centre of the halo and drop to ≈10-9 G in the intergalactic medium. Analysing the saturation levels and growth rates, the model is able to describe the process of magnetic amplification notably well and confirms the results of the simulations.

  19. Inflow of halo gas from the direction of the Galactic north pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Boer, K. S.; Savage, B. D.

    1984-01-01

    A far-UV echelle spectrum has been obtained of the UV-bright star vZ1128 in the globular cluster M3. This cluster lies in a direction 11 deg off the Galactic north pole at a distance of about 10 kpc. Only the usually strong interstellar lines are recognizable in the faint spectrum, and they show absorption at velocities from near +40 km/s to -100 km/s. Since in the direction observed the line-of-sight component of the Milky Way rotation is negligible, the detected velocities demonstrate for this direction the motion of gas from the Milky Way halo toward the disk. Gas returning to the disk in a galactic fountainlike flow may explain the observations.

  20. Discy dwarf disruption and the shape of the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, S. L. J.; Belokurov, V.; Erkal, D.; Evans, N. W.

    2016-05-01

    The shape of the Galactic dark halo can, in principle, be inferred through modelling of stellar tidal streams in the Milky Way halo. The brightest and the longest of these, the Sagittarius stream, reaches out to large Galactocentric distances and hence can deliver the tightest constraints on the Galaxy's potential. In this contribution, we revisit the idea that the Sagittarius Stream was formed from a rotating progenitor. We demonstrate that the angle between the disc's angular momentum and the progenitor's orbital angular momentum does not remain constant throughout the disruption. Instead, it undergoes a dramatic evolution caused, in part, by the changes in the progenitor's moment of inertia tensor. We show that, even in a spherical potential, the streams produced as a result of a discy dwarf disruption appear to be `precessing'. Yet, this debris plane evolution is illusory as it is solely caused by the swaying and wobbling of the progenitor's disc. Stream plane precession is therefore not an unambiguous indicator of asphericity of the dark halo.

  1. Prospects for detecting supersymmetric dark matter in the Galactic halo.

    PubMed

    Springel, V; White, S D M; Frenk, C S; Navarro, J F; Jenkins, A; Vogelsberger, M; Wang, J; Ludlow, A; Helmi, A

    2008-11-01

    Dark matter is the dominant form of matter in the Universe, but its nature is unknown. It is plausibly an elementary particle, perhaps the lightest supersymmetric partner of known particle species. In this case, annihilation of dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way should produce gamma-rays at a level that may soon be observable. Previous work has argued that the annihilation signal will be dominated by emission from very small clumps (perhaps smaller even than the Earth), which would be most easily detected where they cluster together in the dark matter haloes of dwarf satellite galaxies. Here we report that such small-scale structure will, in fact, have a negligible impact on dark matter detectability. Rather, the dominant and probably most easily detectable signal will be produced by diffuse dark matter in the main halo of the Milky Way. If the main halo is strongly detected, then small dark matter clumps should also be visible, but may well contain no stars, thereby confirming a key prediction of the cold dark matter model. PMID:18987737

  2. Modelling galactic conformity with the colour-halo age relation in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Aaron D.; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sales, Laura V.; Zhu, Emily; Genel, Shy; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Torrey, Paul; Nelson, Dylan; Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons between observational surveys and galaxy formation models find that dark matter haloes' mass can largely explain their galaxies' stellar mass. However, it remains uncertain whether additional environmental variables, known as assembly bias, are necessary to explain other galaxy properties. We use the Illustris simulation to investigate the role of assembly bias in producing galactic conformity by considering 18 000 galaxies with Mstellar > 2 × 109 M⊙. We find a significant signal of galactic conformity: out to distances of about 10 Mpc, the mean red fraction of galaxies around redder galaxies is higher than around bluer galaxies at fixed stellar mass. Dark matter haloes exhibit an analogous conformity signal, in which the fraction of haloes formed at earlier times (old haloes) is higher around old haloes than around younger ones at fixed halo mass. A plausible interpretation of galactic conformity is the combination of the halo conformity signal with the galaxy colour-halo age relation: at fixed stellar mass, particularly towards the low-mass end, Illustris' galaxy colours correlate with halo age, with the reddest galaxies (often satellites) preferentially found in the oldest haloes. We explain the galactic conformity effect with a simple semi-empirical model, assigning stellar mass via halo mass (abundance matching) and galaxy colour via halo age (age matching). Regarding comparison to observations, we conclude that the adopted selection/isolation criteria, projection effects, and stacking techniques can have a significant impact on the measured amplitude of the conformity signal.

  3. Aberration in proper motions for Galactic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.-C.; Xie, Y.; Zhu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Accelerations of both the solar system barycenter (SSB) and stars in the MilkyWay cause a systematic observational effect on the stellar proper motions, which was first studied by J. Kovalevsky (2003). This paper intends to extend that work and aims to estimate the magnitude and significance of the aberration in proper motions of stars, especially in the region near the Galactic center (GC). We adopt two models for the Galactic rotation curve to evaluate the aberrational effect on the Galactic plane. We show that the effect of aberration in proper motions depends on the galactocentric distance of stars; it is dominated by the acceleration of stars in the central region of the Galaxy. Then we investigate the applicability of the theoretical expressions: if the orbital period of stars is only a fraction of the light time from the star to the SSB, the expression with approximation proposed by Kovalevsky is not appropriate. With a more suitable formulation, we found that the aberration has no effect on the determination of the stellar orbits on the celestial sphere. In the future this aberrational effect under consideration should be considered with high-accurate astrometry, particularly in constructing the Gaia celestial reference system realized by Galactic stars.

  4. Formation of a Giant Galactic Gaseous Halo: Metal-Absorption Lines and High-Velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fan

    1992-04-01

    A Galactic gaseous halo formed through the interstellar disk-halo connection is simulated by means of a two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic code based upon the chimney model of the interstellar medium, a new version of the galactic fountain. Galactic rotation, heating processes by diffuse UV flux, and radiative cooling processes are taken into account. The resulting gaseous halo can be divided into three categories, i.e., wind-type halo, bound-type halo, and cooled-type halo. In this way, we try to reproduce the column densities of C IV, N V, O VI, and Si IV in the observed absorption lines of halo stars. Assuming that the radiatively cooled halo gas condenses into clouds due to thermal instabilities, we can calculate their distribution and ballistic motions in the Galactic gravitational field. These correspond to the high- and intermediate-velocity clouds observed at high Galactic latitudes. We find that a cooled-type halo with a gas temperature between 5 X 10^5 and 10^6 K and a density between 10^-3 and 10^-2 cm^-3 at the disk-halo interface can reproduce the observational facts about our Galaxy. Supposing that the metal-absorption-line systems of QSOs arise from the halos of intervening galaxies formed by similar processes, we calculate features of the Ca II, Mg II, C IV, and Si IV absorption lines in various stages of galactic evolution. We conclude that C IV systems which are greater than 50 kpc in size correspond to the wind-type halo. On the other hand, Mg II and Ca II systems can only be detected in a very restricted region ( Metaxa, SMALL FAINT CLUSTERS IN THE LMC This is a short review of the main results of my Ph.D. thesis concerning some important problems on the dynamical properties of the LMC star clusters. The topic of this thesis was to find and study the dynamical paramters (tidal radius r_t core radius r_c concentration parameters log (r_t/r_c), and total mass M) for a large sample of small LMC clusters and to define their location in the

  5. Large-scale gas dynamical processes affecting the origin and evolution of gaseous galactic halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of galactic halo gas are consistent with an interpretation in terms of the galactic fountain model in which supernova heated gas in the galactic disk escapes into the halo, radiatively cools and forms clouds which fall back to the disk. The results of a new study of several large-scale gas dynamical effects which are expected to occur in such a model for the origin and evolution of galactic halo gas will be summarized, including the following: (1) nonequilibrium absorption line and emission spectrum diagnostics for radiatively cooling halo gas in our own galaxy, as well the implications of such absorption line diagnostics for the origin of quasar absorption lines in galactic halo clouds of high redshift galaxies; (2) numerical MHD simulations and analytical analysis of large-scale explosions ad superbubbles in the galactic disk and halo; (3) numerical MHD simulations of halo cloud formation by thermal instability, with and without magnetic field; and (4) the effect of the galactic fountain on the galactic dynamo.

  6. Star counts as an indicator of galactic structure and quasar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Soneira, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed model of the stellar content of the Galaxy is described briefly. Illustrative applications of the model are made, using existing data, to indicate how star counts can be used to determine some parameters of galactic structure, to detect a massive (stellar) halo, and to constrain models of quasar evolution.

  7. Galactic membership of BL Her type variable stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkovic, M. I.; Stojanovic, M.; Ninkovic, S.

    2016-05-01

    As the RR Lyrae stars evolve on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram they are believed to become short period Type II Cepheids, known as BL Her type (with a pulsation period from 1 to 3-8 days). Assuming that their mass is around 0.5-0.6M_Sol, and that they are low metallicity objects, they were thought to belong to the halo of the Milky Way. We investigated seven Galactic short period Type II Cepheids (BL Her, SW Tau, V553 Cen, DQ And, BD Cas, V383 Cyg, and KT Com) in order to establish their membership within the Galactic structure using the kinematic approach. Gaia should provide us with more data needed to conduct the study of the whole sample.

  8. The lives and deaths of star clusters near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, S. L. W.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2001-12-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of young star clusters formed within 10 pc of the Galactic Center. Dynamical friction between a cluster and its surroundings tends to drive it toward the Galactic Center, ultimately leading to the cluster's disruption by tidal forces. During the inspiral, dynamical evolution drives the star cluster toward core collapse; the most massive stars segregate to the cluster center while lower mass stars segregate to the cluster halo. At the same time the cluster halo is stripped by the Galactic tidal field. Lower mass stars therefore tend to be lost from the cluster at larger distances from the Galactic center, while higher mass stars can reach farther in. We find a clear relation between galactocentric distance and the mean mass of stars left behind by the cluster. If the cluster goes into deep core collapse before it reaches the Galactic Center a collision runaway may occur, possibly resulting in the formation of a single object of several hundred solar masses. We acknowledge support from NASA under grants NAG5-9264 and NAG5-10775. SPZ is a Hubble Fellow.

  9. EXPLORING HALO SUBSTRUCTURE WITH GIANT STARS: SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE LOCAL HALO AS SEEN IN THE GRID GIANT STAR SURVEY INCLUDING EXTENDED TIDAL DEBRIS FROM {omega}CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.; Damke, Guillermo J.; Patterson, Richard J.; Garcia Perez, Ana E.; Smith, Verne V.; Kunkel, William E.; Bizyaev, Dmitry E-mail: dln5q@virginia.edu E-mail: ricky@virginia.edu E-mail: vsmith@noao.edu E-mail: dmbiz@apo.nmsu.edu

    2012-03-10

    We present the latitude-normalized radial velocity (v{sub b} ) distribution of 3318 subsolar metallicity, V {approx}< 13.5 stars from the Grid Giant Star Survey (GGSS) in southern hemisphere fields. The sample includes giants mostly within {approx}5 kpc from the Galactic disks and halo. The nearby halo is found to (1) exhibit significant kinematical substructure, and (2) be prominently represented by several velocity coherent structures, including a very retrograde 'cloud' of stars at l {approx} 285 Degree-Sign and extended, retrograde 'streams' visible as relatively tight l-v{sub b} sequences. One sequence in the fourth Galactic quadrant lies within the l-v{sub b} space expected to contain tidal debris from the 'star cluster' {omega}Centauri. Not only does {omega}Cen lie precisely in this l-v{sub b} sequence, but the positions and v{sub b} of member stars match those of N-body simulations of tidally disrupting dwarf galaxies on orbits ending with {omega}Cen's current position and space motion. But the ultimate proof that we have very likely found extended parts of the {omega}Cen tidal stream comes from echelle spectroscopy of a subsample of the stars that reveals a very particular chemical abundance signature known to occur only in {omega}Cen. The newly discovered {omega}Cen debris accounts for almost all fourth Galactic quadrant retrograde stars in the southern GGSS, which suggests {omega}Cen is a dominant contributor of retrograde giant stars in the inner Galaxy.

  10. Thermal instabilities in cooling galactic coronae: fuelling star formation in galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Alexander; Read, Justin; Power, Chris; Cole, David

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the means by which cold gas can accrete on to Milky Way mass galaxies from a hot corona of gas, using a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, `SPHS'. We find that the `cold clumps' seen in many classic SPH simulations in the literature are not present in our SPHS simulations. Instead, cold gas condenses from the halo along filaments that form at the intersection of supernovae-driven bubbles from previous phases of star formation. This positive feedback feeds cold gas to the galactic disc directly, fuelling further star formation. The resulting galaxies in the SPH and SPHS simulations differ greatly in their morphology, gas phase diagrams and stellar content. We show that the classic SPH cold clumps owe to a numerical thermal instability caused by an inability for cold gas to mix in the hot halo. The improved treatment of mixing in SPHS suppresses this instability leading to a dramatically different physical outcome. In our highest resolution SPHS simulation, we find that the cold filaments break up into bound, physically motivated clumps that form stars. The filaments are overdense by a factor of 10-100 compared to the surrounding gas, suggesting that the fragmentation results from a physical non-linear instability driven by the overdensity. This `fragmenting filament' mode of disc growth has important implications for galaxy formation, in particular the role of star formation in bringing cold gas into disc galaxies.

  11. Lithium in halo stars from standard stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Demarque, Pierre; Kawaler, Steven D.

    1990-01-01

    A grid has been constructed of theoretical evolution sequences of models for low-metallicity stars from the premain-sequence to the giant branch phases. The grid is used to study the history of surface Li abundance during standard stellar evolution. The Li-7 observations of halo stars by Spite and Spite (1982) and subsequent observations are synthesized to separate the halo stars by age. The theory of surface Li abundance is illustrated by following the evolution of a reference halo star model from the contracting fully convective premain sequence to the giant branch phase. The theoretical models are compared with observed Li abundances. The results show that the halo star lithium abundances can be explained in the context of standard stellar evolution theory using completely standard assumptions and physics.

  12. Precessing Gamma Jets in the extended and evaporating galactic halo as the sources of GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele; Salis, Andrea

    1996-08-01

    Precessing Gamma Jets (GJ) in binary systems located in extended or evaporating galactic halos should be the sources of GRBs. The GJ are born by Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) of thermal photons (optical, infrared,...) onto (power law) electron jets (from GeV energies and above) produced by spinning pulsars or black holes. The thermal photons are emitted by the binary companion (or by their nearby accreting disk). The collimated GJ beam is trembling with the characteristic pulsar millisecond period and it is bent by the companion magnetic field interactions, as a lighthouse, in a nearly conical shape within the characteristic Keplerian period; an additional nutation due to the asymmetric inertial momentum may lead, in general, to aperiodic behaviour of GRB signals. SGRs are GRBs seen at the periphery of the hard energy GJ beam core. The original birth locations of GJ (SNRs, planetary nebulae, globular clusters,...) are smeared out by the high escape velocity of the system; the Neutron Star (NS) high velocity is possibly due to the asymmetric jet precession, and consequent ``rowing'' acceleration, related to the eccentricity of the binary system. The GJ power is, for realistic parameters, comparable to that needed for GRBs in an extended or evaporating galactic halo. Their detailed spectra and time evolution fit the observed data. The expected GRB source number (within present BATSE sensitivity) is tens of thousands, compatible with the allowed presence of 10-20% GRB repeaters.

  13. Neutral hydrogen in galaxy haloes at the peak of the cosmic star formation history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan; Muratov, Alexander L.; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2015-05-01

    We use high-resolution cosmological zoom-in simulations from the FIRE (Feedback in Realistic Environments) project to make predictions for the covering fractions of neutral hydrogen around galaxies at z = 2-4. These simulations resolve the interstellar medium of galaxies and explicitly implement a comprehensive set of stellar feedback mechanisms. Our simulation sample consists of 16 main haloes covering the mass range Mh ≈ 109-6 × 1012 M⊙ at z = 2, including 12 haloes in the mass range Mh ˜ 1011-1012 M⊙ corresponding to Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). We process our simulations with a ray tracing method to compute the ionization state of the gas. Galactic winds increase the H I covering fractions in galaxy haloes by direct ejection of cool gas from galaxies and through interactions with gas inflowing from the intergalactic medium. Our simulations predict H I covering fractions for Lyman limit systems (LLSs) consistent with measurements around z ˜ 2-2.5 LBGs; these covering fractions are a factor ˜2 higher than our previous calculations without galactic winds. The fractions of H I absorbers arising in inflows and in outflows are on average ˜50 per cent but exhibit significant time variability, ranging from ˜10 to ˜90 per cent. For our most massive haloes, we find a factor ˜3 deficit in the LLS covering fraction relative to what is measured around quasars at z ˜ 2, suggesting that the presence of a quasar may affect the properties of halo gas on ˜100 kpc scales. The predicted covering fractions, which decrease with time, peak at Mh ˜ 1011-1012 M⊙, near the peak of the star formation efficiency in dark matter haloes. In our simulations, star formation and galactic outflows are highly time dependent; H I covering fractions are also time variable but less so because they represent averages over large areas.

  14. F Turnoff Distribution in the Galactic Halo Using Globular Clusters as Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, Matthew; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Simones, Jacob; Cole, Nathan; Monaco, Matthew

    2011-12-01

    F turnoff stars are important tools for studying Galactic halo substructure because they are plentiful, luminous, and can be easily selected by their photometric colors from large surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We describe the absolute magnitude distribution of color-selected F turnoff stars, as measured from SDSS data, for 11 globular clusters in the Milky Way halo. We find that the Mg distribution of turnoff stars is intrinsically the same for all clusters studied, and is well fit by two half-Gaussian functions, centered at μ = 4.18, with a bright-side σ = 0.36, and with a faint-side σ = 0.76. However, the color errors and detection efficiencies cause the observed σ of the faint-side Gaussian to change with magnitude due to contamination from redder main-sequence stars (40% at 21st magnitude). We present a function that will correct for this magnitude-dependent change in selected stellar populations, when calculating stellar density from color-selected turnoff stars. We also present a consistent set of distances, ages, and metallicities for 11 clusters in the SDSS Data Release 7. We calculate a linear correction function to Padova isochrones so that they are consistent with SDSS globular cluster data from previous papers. We show that our cluster population falls along the Milky Way age-metallicity relationship (AMR), and further find that isochrones for stellar populations on the AMR have very similar turnoffs; increasing metallicity and decreasing age conspire to produce similar turnoff magnitudes and colors for all old clusters that lie on the AMR.

  15. F TURNOFF DISTRIBUTION IN THE GALACTIC HALO USING GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AS PROXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Matthew; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Simones, Jacob; Cole, Nathan; Monaco, Matthew E-mail: heidi@rpi.edu

    2011-12-20

    F turnoff stars are important tools for studying Galactic halo substructure because they are plentiful, luminous, and can be easily selected by their photometric colors from large surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We describe the absolute magnitude distribution of color-selected F turnoff stars, as measured from SDSS data, for 11 globular clusters in the Milky Way halo. We find that the M{sub g} distribution of turnoff stars is intrinsically the same for all clusters studied, and is well fit by two half-Gaussian functions, centered at {mu} = 4.18, with a bright-side {sigma} = 0.36, and with a faint-side {sigma} = 0.76. However, the color errors and detection efficiencies cause the observed {sigma} of the faint-side Gaussian to change with magnitude due to contamination from redder main-sequence stars (40% at 21st magnitude). We present a function that will correct for this magnitude-dependent change in selected stellar populations, when calculating stellar density from color-selected turnoff stars. We also present a consistent set of distances, ages, and metallicities for 11 clusters in the SDSS Data Release 7. We calculate a linear correction function to Padova isochrones so that they are consistent with SDSS globular cluster data from previous papers. We show that our cluster population falls along the Milky Way age-metallicity relationship (AMR), and further find that isochrones for stellar populations on the AMR have very similar turnoffs; increasing metallicity and decreasing age conspire to produce similar turnoff magnitudes and colors for all old clusters that lie on the AMR.

  16. F Turnoff Distribution in the Galactic Halo Using Globular Clusters as Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, Matthew; Newberg, H. J.; Simones, J.; Monaco, M.; Cole, N.

    2012-01-01

    F turnoff stars are important tools for studying Galactic halo substructure because they are plentiful, luminous, and can be easily selected by their photometric colors from large surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We describe the absolute magnitude distribution of color-selected F turnoff stars, as measured from SDSS data, for eleven globular clusters in the Milky Way halo. We find that the absolute magnitude distribution of turnoff stars is intrinsically the same for all clusters studied, and is well fit by two half Gaussian functions, centered at μ = 4.18, with a bright-side σ = 0.36, and with a faint-side σ = 0.76. However, the color errors and detection efficiencies cause the observed σ of the faint-side Gaussian to change with magnitude due to contamination from redder main sequence stars (40% at 21st magnitude). We present a function that will correct for this magnitude-dependent change in selected stellar populations, when calculating stellar density from color-selected turnoff stars. We also present a consistent set of distances, ages and metallicities for eleven clusters in the SDSS Data Release 7. We calculate a linear correction function to Padova isochrones so that they are consistent with SDSS globular cluster data from previous papers. We show that our cluster population falls along the theoretical Age-Metallicity Relationship (AMR), and further find that isochrones for stellar populations on the AMR have very similar turnoffs; increasing metallicity and decreasing age conspire to produce similar turnoff magnitudes and colors for all old clusters that lie on the AMR. This research was supported by NSF grant AST 10-09670 and the NASA/NY Space Grant.

  17. Absolute proper motions to B approximately 22.5: Evidence for kimematical substructure in halo field stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majewski, Steven R.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    1994-01-01

    Radial velocities have been obtained for six of nine stars identified on the basis of similar distances and common, extreme transverse velocities in the proper motion survey of Majewski (1992) as a candidate halo moving group at the north Galactic pole. These radial velocities correspond to velocities perpendicular to the Galactic plane which span the range -48 +/- 21 to -128 +/- 9 km/sec (but a smaller range, -48 +/- 21 to -86 +/- 19 km/sec, when only our own measurements are considered), significantly different than the expected distribution, with mean 0 km/sec, for a random sample of either halo or thick disk stars. The probability of picking such a set of radial velocities at random is less than 1%. Thus the radial velocity data support the hypothesis that these stars constitute part of a halo moving group or star stream at a distance of approximately 4-5 kpc above the Galactic plane. If real, this moving group is evidence for halo phase space substructure which may be the fossil remains of a destroyed globular cluster, Galactic satellite, or Searle & Zinn (1978) 'fragment.'

  18. Connecting Galaxies, Halos, and Star Formation Rates Across Cosmic Time

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-06-02

    A simple, observationally-motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs--i.e. more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. This 'abundance matching' technique has been shown previously to reproduce the observed luminosity- and scale-dependence of galaxy clustering over a range of epochs. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo-galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the normalization of the observed star formation rate--stellar mass relation to z {approx} 1. The data demands, for example, that the star formation rate density is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.0-10.5} M{sub {circle_dot}} from 0 < z < 1, and that such galaxies over these epochs reside in halos with M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 11.5-12.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The star formation rate--halo mass relation is approximately Gaussian over the range 0 < z < 1 with a mildly evolving mean and normalization. This model is then used to shed light on a number of issues, including (1) a clarification of 'downsizing', (2) the lack of a sharp characteristic halo mass at which star formation is truncated, and (3) the dominance of star formation over merging to the stellar build-up of galaxies

  19. Chemical and kinematic correlations in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Carol Renee

    2000-11-01

    Abundances and kinematics have been determined for sixty-one low metallicity ([Fe/H] < -1.30) stars in an attempt to find correlations between stellar chemistry and dynamics. Distances for program stars have been re-derived spectroscopically, and the computed stellar distances agree with the parallaxes reported by Hipparcos (ESA 1997). Stellar orbits were calculated using the Galactic mass model of Bahcall et al. (1983). We find that the general kinematic results (U, V, W, Rapo, Z max, eccentricity) are more extreme than previously thought, but in good agreement with recent studies of this nature. We have also adopted the chemical and kinematic results for 34 additional stars from the work of others to supplement our sample. Our LTE abundance results concur with previous studies. Specifically, we have found that the alpha-capture elements (Mg, Ca, and Ti) are consistently overabundant by 0.4 dex (i.e. [alpha/Fe] = +0.4) except in the cases of four stars: HD 134439, HD 134440, BD+80 245 and G4-36. Additionally, we have found a typical oxygen overabundance of +0.70 dex, and a sodium abundance of [Na/Fe] = -0.60 dex after an empirical correction for NLTE effects. We find no statistically sound correlations between various kinematic parameters and abundances. We confirm the unusual abundance signatures of HD 134439/HD 134440 and BD+80 245. The former stars are a proper-motion pair with mildly deficient alpha-capture abundances. The latter star possesses a pronounced alpha-capture deficiency combined with an extremely low Ba abundance. Its Na and O are apparently normal. We have also discovered a star with extremely unusual abundances: G4-36 possesses marked deficiencies in O, Mg, Al, Ca, Sr, and Ba, but overabundances of Fe-peak elements Mn, Ni, and Zn. We suggest that the nucleosynthetic origin of G4-36 is substantially different from that of BD+80 245 and the proper motion pair HD 134439/134440. All four unusual stars are in retrograde orbits, as are half the stars

  20. LIGHT CURVE TEMPLATES AND GALACTIC DISTRIBUTION OF RR LYRAE STARS FROM SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY STRIPE 82

    SciTech Connect

    Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko; Grammer, Skyler H.; Morgan, Dylan P.; Becker, Andrew C.; Juric, Mario; De Lee, Nathan; Annis, James; Lampeitl, Hubert; Beers, Timothy C.; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; Lupton, Robert H.; Gunn, James E.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Johnston, David E.; Jester, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    We present an improved analysis of halo substructure traced by RR Lyrae stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) stripe 82 region. With the addition of SDSS-II data, a revised selection method based on new ugriz light curve templates results in a sample of 483 RR Lyrae stars that is essentially free of contamination. The main result from our first study persists: the spatial distribution of halo stars at galactocentric distances 5-100 kpc is highly inhomogeneous. At least 20% of halo stars within 30 kpc from the Galactic center can be statistically associated with substructure. We present strong direct evidence, based on both RR Lyrae stars and main-sequence stars, that the halo stellar number density profile significantly steepens beyond a Galactocentric distance of approx30 kpc, and a larger fraction of the stars are associated with substructure. By using a novel method that simultaneously combines data for RR Lyrae and main-sequence stars, and using photometric metallicity estimates for main-sequence stars derived from deep co-added u-band data, we measure the metallicity of the Sagittarius dSph tidal stream (trailing arm) toward R.A. approx2{sup h}-3{sup h} and decl. approx 0{sup 0} to be 0.3 dex higher ([Fe/H] = -1.2) than that of surrounding halo field stars. Together with a similar result for another major halo substructure, the Monoceros stream, these results support theoretical predictions that an early forming, smooth inner halo, is metal-poor compared to high surface brightness material that have been accreted onto a later-forming outer halo. The mean metallicity of stars in the outer halo that are not associated with detectable clumps may still be more metal-poor than the bulk of inner-halo stars, as has been argued from other data sets.

  1. Chemical Tagging in the SDSS-III/APOGEE Survey: New Identifications of Halo Stars with Globular Cluster Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, Sarah L.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Lucatello, Sara; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; García Hernández, D. A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Nidever, David L.

    2016-07-01

    We present new identifications of five red giant stars in the Galactic halo with chemical abundance patterns that indicate they originally formed in globular clusters. Using data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) Survey available through Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12, we first identify likely halo giants, and then search those for the well-known chemical tags associated with globular clusters, specifically enrichment in nitrogen and aluminum. We find that 2% of the halo giants in our sample have this chemical signature, in agreement with previous results. Following the interpretation in our previous work on this topic, this would imply that at least 13% of halo stars originally formed in globular clusters. Recent developments in the theoretical understanding of globular cluster formation raise questions about that interpretation, and we concede the possibility that these migrants represent a small fraction of the halo field. There are roughly as many stars with the chemical tags of globular clusters in the halo field as there are in globular clusters, whether or not they are accompanied by a much larger chemically untaggable population of former globular cluster stars.

  2. HaloSat: A CubeSat to Map the Distribution of Baryonic Matter in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Drew M.

    2016-04-01

    Approximately half of predicted baryonic matter in the Milky Way remains unidentified. One possible explanation for the location of this missing matter is in an extended Galactic halo. HaloSat is a CubeSat that aims to constrain the mass and distribution of the halo’s baryonic matter by obtaining an all-sky map of O VII and O VIII emission in the hot gas associated with the halo of the Milky Way. HaloSat offers an improvement in the quality of measurements of oxygen line emission over existing X-ray observatories and an observation plan dedicated to mapping the hot gas in the Galactic halo. In addition to the missing baryon problem, HaloSat will assign a portion of its observations to the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) in order to calibrate models of SCWX emission. We present here the current status of HaloSat and the progression of instrument development in anticipation of a 2018 launch.

  3. DUST-SCATTERED ULTRAVIOLET HALOS AROUND BRIGHT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, Richard Conn

    2011-06-10

    We have discovered ultraviolet (UV) halos extending as far as 5 deg. around four (of six) bright UV stars using data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite. These halos are due to scattering of the starlight from nearby thin, foreground dust clouds. We have placed limits of 0.58 {+-} 0.12 and 0.72 {+-} 0.06 on the phase function asymmetry factor (g) in the FUV (1521 A) and NUV (2320 A) bands, respectively. We suggest that these halos are a common feature around bright stars and may be used to explore the scattering function of interstellar grains at small angles.

  4. CONNECTING GALAXIES, HALOS, AND STAR FORMATION RATES ACROSS COSMIC TIME

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2009-05-01

    A simple, observationally motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs, i.e., more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. This 'abundance matching' technique has been shown previously to reproduce the observed luminosity and scale dependence of galaxy clustering over a range of epochs. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo-galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the normalization of the observed star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass relation to z {approx} 1. The data demands, for example, that the star formation rate density is dominated by galaxies with M {sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.0-10.5} M {sub sun} from 0 < z < 1, and that such galaxies over these epochs reside in halos with M {sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 11.5-12.5} M {sub sun}. The SFR-halo mass relation is approximately Gaussian over the range 0 < z < 1 with a mildly evolving mean and normalization. This model is then used to shed light on a number of issues, including (1) a clarification of {sup d}ownsizing{sup ,} (2) the lack of a sharp characteristic halo mass at which star formation is truncated, and (3) the dominance of star formation over merging to the stellar buildup of galaxies with M {sub star

  5. ASSEMBLY OF THE OUTER GALACTIC STELLAR HALO IN THE HIERARCHICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Murante, Giuseppe; Curir, Anna; Poglio, Eva; Villalobos, Alvaro E-mail: curir@oato.inaf.i E-mail: villalobos@oats.inaf.i

    2010-06-20

    We provide a set of numerical N-body simulations for studying the formation of the outer Milky Ways' stellar halo through accretion events. After simulating minor mergers of prograde and retrograde orbiting satellite halos with a dark matter main halo, we analyze the signal left by satellite stars in the rotation velocity distribution. The aim is to explore the orbital conditions where a retrograde signal in the outer part of the halo can be obtained, in order to give a possible explanation of the observed rotational properties of the Milky Way stellar halo. Our results show that, for satellites more massive than {approx}1/40 of the main halo, the dynamical friction has a fundamental role in assembling the final velocity distributions resulting from different orbits and that retrograde satellites moving on low-inclination orbits deposit more stars in the outer halo regions and therefore can produce the counter-rotating behavior observed in the outer Milky Way halo.

  6. Changes in interstellar atomic abundances from the galactic plane to the halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.

    1982-01-01

    A few, specially selected interstellar absorption lines were measured in the high resolution, far ultraviolet spectra of 200 O and B type stars observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). For lines of sight extending beyond about 500 pc from the galactic plane, the abundance of singly ionized iron atoms increases relative to singly ionized sulfur. However, the relative abundances of singly ionized sulfur, silicon and aluminum do not seem to change appreciably. An explanation for the apparent increase of iron is the partial sputtering of material off the surfaces of dust grains by interstellar shocks. Another possibility might be that the ejecta from type I supernovae enrich the low density medium in the halo with iron.

  7. Domain wall model in the galactic Bose-Einstein condensate halo

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, J.C.C. de; Pires, M.O.C. E-mail: marcelo.pires@ufabc.edu.br

    2013-05-01

    We assume that the galactic dark matter halo, considered composed of an axionlike particles Bose-Einstein condensate [1], can present topological defects, namely domain walls, arising as the dark soliton solution for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in a self-graviting potential. We investigate the influence that such substructures would have in the gravitational interactions within a galaxy. We find that, for the simple domain wall model proposed, the effects are too small to be identified, either by means of a local measurement of the gradient of the gravitational field or by analysing galaxy rotation curves. In the first case, the gradient of the gravitational field in the vicinity of the domain wall would be 10{sup −31} (m/s{sup 2})/m. In the second case, the ratio of the tangential velocity correction of a star due to the presence of the domain wall to the velocity in the spherical symmetric case would be 10{sup −8}.

  8. Star formation around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.

    1987-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (Seyfert nuclei and their relatives) and intense star formation can both deliver substantial amounts of energy to the vicinity of a galactic nucleus. Many luminous nuclei have energetics dominated by one of these mechanisms, but detailed observations show that some have a mixture. Seeing both phenomena at once raises several interesting questions: (1) Is this a general property of some kinds of nuclei? How many AGNs have surround starbursts, and vice versa? (2) As in 1, how many undiscovered AGNs or starbursts are hidden by a more luminous instance of the other? (3) Does one cause the other, and by what means, or do both reflect common influences such as potential well shape or level of gas flow? (4) Can surrounding star formation tell us anything about the central active nuclei, such as lifetimes, kinetic energy output, or mechanical disturbance of the ISM? These are important points in the understanding of activity and star formation in galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, the observational ways of addressing them are as yet not well formulated. Some preliminary studies are reported, aimed at clarifying the issues involved in study of the relationships between stellar and nonstellar excitement in galactic nuclei.

  9. PG 0832 + 676 - An apparently normal B1 V star 18 kiloparsecs above the galactic plane

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.J.F.; Dufton, P.L.; Keenan, F.P.; Boksenberg, A.; King, D.L.

    1989-04-01

    Stellar equivalent widths and line profiles, measured from optical spectra obtained with the 5 m Hale telescope and the 2.5 m Isaac Newton telescope, are used in conjunction with model atmosphere calculations to determine the atmospheric parameters and chemical composition of the faint, blue, high-galactic latitude star PG 0832 + 676. The effective temperature (Teff = 25,000 K), surface gravity (log g = 3.9), and abundances of He, C, N, O, Mg, Al, and Si are similar to those of Population I OB-type stars, from which it is concluded that PG 0832 + 676 is a normal star at a distance from the galactic plane of about 18 kpc. The star's kinematics and evolutionary age suggest that it formed in the halo, possibly from galactic fountain material. 51 refs.

  10. Isolated Hot Stars in Galactic Center Vicinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotera, Angela S.; Simpson, Janet P.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Burton, Michael G.; Allen, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Using near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy, we discuss the discovery of six emission-line sources within approx. 20 pc of Sgr A West but outside of the central parsec. The objects are coincident with stars seen in. the J, H, and K' images; all have Br(gamma) (2.166 microns) in emission, several also have He I (2.058 and 2.112/3 micrometers), and some have He II (2.189 micrometers) emission lines. Comparison of the H- and K-band spectra of the newly discovered stars with recently published infrared spectral atlases of optically classified stars suggests that most of these stars are similar to massive stars in transition (e.g., Ofpe/WN9, B[e], and LBV), although one is definitely a WN6 star. Two of the potential stars are associated with the radio emission regions A-D near Sgr A East, three are near or within the radio emission regions Hl-H8, the last is near GO.10+0.02 and is likely to be associated with the GO.12+0.02 (Arches) cluster of stars, discussed in a previous paper. The stars are shown to be significant sources of ionization for their associated radio emission regions, with several capable of completely ionizing the regions. These results provide additional support for the idea that these thermal radio regions, and similar such regions in the Galactic center, are indeed photoionized by hot young stars.

  11. White dwarf stars and the age of the Galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    The history of the Galaxy is written in its oldest stars, the white dwarf (WD) stars. Significant limits can be placed on both the Galactic age and star formation history. A wide range of input WD model sequences is used to derive the current limits to the age estimates suggested by fitting to the observed falloff in the WD luminosity function. The results suggest that the star formation rate over the history of the Galaxy has been relatively constant, and that the disk age lies in the range 6-12 billion years, depending upon the assumed structure of WD stars, and in particular on the core composition and surface helium layer mass. Using plausible mixed C/O core input models, the estimates for the disk age range from 8-10.5 Gyr, i.e.,sustantially younger than most age estimates for the halo globular clusters. After speculating on the significance of the results, expected observational and theoretical refinements which will further enhance the reliability of the method are discussed.

  12. r-Process Elements in EMP stars: Indicators of Inhomogeneous Early Halo Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Johannes; Nordström, Birgitta; Thidemann Hansen, Terese

    2015-08-01

    Extremely metal-poor (EMP) halo stars with [Fe/H] below ~ -3 are considered to be fossil records of conditions in the early halo. In the simplest picture where iron is a proxy for overall metallicity and indirectly for time, EMP stars formed before the oldest and most metal-poor Galactic globular clusters. High-resolution spectroscopy with 8m-class telescopes has shown the detailed abundance pattern of these stars to be surprisingly uniform (e.g. Bonifacio+ 2012) and essentially Solar, apart from the α-enhancement typical of SN II nucleosynthesis. A small fraction (~3%) of EMP stars, however, is strongly enhanced in the heaviest (r-process) neutron-capture elements, highlighting that the periodic system of elements was fully populated already this early.These striking departures from the general chemical homogeneity could be produced by local or distant sources. The former case is simple - mass transfer from a binary companion that evolved to produce a highly neutron-rich environment (one or more NS). Alternatively, the r-process elements were formed in a site at interstellar distance and preferentially seeded into the natal clouds of the present-day EMP-r stars. Our long-term, precise monitoring of the radial velocities of a sample of such stars (Hansen+ 2011) disproved the binary hypothesis, which would in fact also fail to explain the existence of r-process poor stars, such as HD 122653. We thus conclude that the chemical enrichment of the early halo was far more complex, patchy and likely anisotropic than assumed in current models of Galactic chemical evolution: The EMP-r stars are not just peculiarities to be ignored, but indicate that a new level of complexity must be invoked. That r-process elements have not (yet) been observed in high-redshift DLA systems is readily explained by their low abundance relative to the lighter species and the rarity of strong enrichment events.

  13. CALET's sensitivity to Dark Matter annihilation in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motz, H.; Asaoka, Y.; Torii, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2015-12-01

    CALET (Calorimetric Electron Telescope), installed on the ISS in August 2015, directly measures the electron+positron cosmic rays flux up to 20 TeV. With its proton rejection capability of 1 : 105 and an aperture of 1200 cm2· sr, it will provide good statistics even well above one TeV, while also featuring an energy resolution of 2%, which allows it to detect fine structures in the spectrum. Such structures may originate from Dark Matter annihilation or decay, making indirect Dark Matter search one of CALET's main science objectives among others such as identification of signatures from nearby supernova remnants, study of the heavy nuclei spectra and gamma astronomy. The latest results from AMS-02 on positron fraction and total electron+positron flux can be fitted with a parametrization including a single pulsar as an extra power law source with exponential cut-off, which emits an equal amount of electrons and positrons. This single pulsar scenario for the positron excess is extrapolated into the TeV region and the expected CALET data for this case are simulated. Based on this prediction for CALET data, the sensitivity of CALET to Dark Matter annihilation in the galactic halo has been calculated. It is shown that CALET could significantly improve the limits compared to current data, especially for those Dark Matter candidates that feature a large fraction of annihilation directly into e+ + e-, such as the LKP (Lightest Kaluza-Klein particle).

  14. Small-scale clumps in the Galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Berezinsky, V. S.; Dokuchaev, V. I. Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2010-01-15

    A mass function of small-scale dark matter clumps is calculated. We take into account the tidal destruction of clumps at early stages of structure formation starting from a time of clump detachment from the Universe expansion. Only a small fraction of these clumps, {approx}0.1%, in each logarithmic mass interval {Delta} log M {approx} 1 survives the stage of hierarchical clustering. We calculate the probability of surviving of the remnants of dark matter clumps in the Galaxy by modelling the tidal destruction of the small-scale clumps by disk and stars. It is demonstrated that a substantial fraction of clump remnants may survive through the tidal destruction during the lifetime of the Galaxy if a radius of core is rather small. The resulting mass spectrum of survived clumps is extended down to the mass of the core of the cosmologically produced clumps with a minimal mass. The survived dense remnants of tidally destructed clumps provides a large contribution to the annihilation signal in the Galaxy. We describe the anisotropy of dark matter clump distribution caused by tidal destruction of clumps in the Galactic disk. A corresponding annihilation of dark matter particles in small-scale clumps produces the anisotropic gamma-ray signal with respect to the Galactic disk.

  15. Characterizing stellar halo populations II: The age gradient in blue horizontal-branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Payel; Williams, Angus; Binney, James

    2016-08-01

    The distribution of Milky Way halo blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars is examined using action-based extended distribution functions (EDFs) that describe the locations of stars in phase space, metallicity, and age. The parameters of the EDFs are fitted using stars observed in the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration-II (SEGUE-II) survey that trace the phase-space kinematics and chemistry out to ˜70 kpc. A maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimate method and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method are applied, taking into account the selection function in positions, distance, and metallicity for the survey. The best-fit EDF declines with actions less steeply at actions characteristic of the inner halo than at the larger actions characteristic of the outer halo, and older ages are found at smaller actions than at larger actions. In real space, the radial density profile steepens smoothly from -2 at ˜2 kpc to -4 in the outer halo, with an axis ratio ˜0.7 throughout. There is no indication for rotation in the BHBs, although this is highly uncertain. A moderate level of radial anisotropy is detected, with βs varying from isotropic to between ˜0.1 and ˜0.3 in the outer halo depending on latitude. The BHB data are consistent with an age gradient of -0.03 Gyr kpc-1, with some uncertainty in the distribution of the larger ages. These results are consistent with a scenario in which older, larger systems contribute to the inner halo, whilst the outer halo is primarily comprised of younger, smaller systems.

  16. The Most Ancient Stars in the Milky Way's Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.; Casey, Andrew R.

    2015-08-01

    The earliest phase of the assembly of the Milky Way's stellar halo is encoded in the detailed abundances of its oldest stars. It is tempting to assert that extremely metal-poor stars in the halo are the direct descendants of the first stars. This is not necessarily the case though, as metal-poor stars form over a range of redshift in halos of varying mass and environment. Since halos form from the inside out, the oldest stars at a given metallicity are found near the center of a halo on the most tightly-bound orbits. The oldest stars in the Milky Way are therefore the most metal-poor stars in -- but not necessarily of -- the bulge. We have developed a new selection that uses only public infrared photometry to identify metal-poor star candidates through their lack of molecular absorption near 4.6 microns. A pilot high-resolution follow-up program has verified that our selection is as efficient as previous techniques, yet is capable of finding bright metal-poor stars in areas of high reddening. Our pilot survey has already identified three of the most metal-poor stars known in the bulge. We find that with the exception of scandium, all three stars follow the abundance trends identified previously for metal-poor halo stars. These three stars have the lowest [Sc/Fe] abundances yet seen in alpha-enhanced giant stars in the Galaxy. The only place that a similar abundance pattern has been observed is the ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxy Coma Berenices, which is thought to have an age of 13.9 +/- 0.3 Gyr. Theoretical models predict that there is a 30% chance that at least one of these stars formed at z > 15, while there is a 70% chance that at least one formed at 10 < z < 15. These observations imply that by z ˜ 10, the progenitor galaxies of the Milky Way had both reached [Fe/H] ˜ -3.0 and established the abundance pattern observed in extremely metal-poor stars.

  17. Photoionization of the diffuse interstellar medium and galactic halo by OB associtations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, James B.; Shull, J. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Assuming smoothly varying H I distributions in te Galactic disk, we have calculated the geometry of diffuse II regions due to OB associations in the Galactic plane. Near the solar circle, OB associations with a Lyman continuum (Lyc) photon luminosity Psi(sub Lyc) = 3.3 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -2) s(exp -1), produce H II regions that are density bounded in the vertical direction (H II chimneys) allowing Lyc to escape the gaseous disk and penetrate into the Galactic halo. We provide analytic formulae for the Lyc escape fraction as functions of S(sub 0) O-star catalog of Garmany and a new Lyc stellar stellar Lyc stellar flux calibration, we find a production rate of Lyc photons by OB associations within 2.5 kpc of Psi(sub Lyc) = 3.3 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -2) s(exp -1). Integrating the fraction of Lyc photons that escape the disk over our adopted luminosity function of OB associations, we estimate that approximately 7% of the ionizing photons, or Phi(sub Lyc) = 2.3 x 10(exp 6) cm(exp -2) s(exp -1), escape each side of the H I disk layer and penetrate the diffuse ionized medium ('Reynolds layer'). This flux is sufficient to explain the potoionization of this, although we have not constructed a model for the observed H-alpha emission and pulsar dispersion measures that is fully consistent with the absorption rate of Lyc in the H II layer. Since our quiescent model does not account for the effects of dynamic chimneys and superbubbles, which should enhance Lyc escape, we conclude the O stars are the probable source of ionizing radiation for the Reynolds layer. For a random distribution of OB associations throughout the disk, the Lyc flux is nearly uniform for heights Z is greater than approximately 0.8 kpc above the midplane.

  18. Changing Amplitudes: Detecting RR Lyrae Light Curve Shape Variations in the Galactic Disk and Inner Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lee, Nathan M.; Kinemuchi, K.; Pepper, J.; Rodriguez, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    In this poster we will discuss our ongoing program to use extant light curves from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) survey to find and characterize RR Lyrae (RRL) stars in the disk and inner halo of the Milky Way. RRL stars are of particular interest because they are standard candles and can be used to map out structure in the galaxy. The periods and shape of RRL light curves also contain information about their Oosterhoff type, which can probe galactic formation history, and metallicity respectively. Although there have been several large photometric surveys for RR Lyrae in the nearby galaxy (OGLE, NSVS, ASAS, and MACHO to name a few), they have each been limited in either sky coverage or number of epochs. The KELT survey represents a new generation of surveys that has many epochs over a large portion of the sky. KELT samples 60% of the sky in both northern and southern hemispheres, and has a long-time-baseline of 4-8 years with a very high cadence rate of less than 20 minutes. This translates into 4,000 to 9,000 epochs per light curve with completeness out to 3 kpc from the Sun. Recent results from both Kepler and ground based surveys results suggest that as many as 50% of RR Lyrae stars show long-term modulation of their light curve shapes (Blazhko effect). These stars combined with RRL stars that pulsate in more than one mode give a sample of objects that the KELT survey is uniquely suited to explore. This poster concentrates on a pilot project to examine RRL stars in a limited number of KELT fields. In particular, we focus on, detecting RR Lyrae, developing a light curve shape-metallicity relationship in the KELT band-pass, and some initial characterization of RRL with either amplitude-modulated or period-modulated light curves.

  19. IDENTIFYING STAR STREAMS IN THE MILKY WAY HALO

    SciTech Connect

    King, Charles III; Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J. E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-05-01

    We develop statistical methods for identifying star streams in the halo of the Milky Way that exploit observed spatial and radial velocity distributions. Within a great circle, departures of the observed spatial distribution from random provide a measure of the likelihood of a potential star stream. Comparisons between the radial velocity distribution within a great circle and the radial velocity distribution of the entire sample also measure the statistical significance of potential streams. The radial velocities enable construction of a more powerful joint statistical test for identifying star streams in the Milky Way halo. Applying our method to halo stars in the Hypervelocity Star (HVS) survey, we detect the Sagittarius stream at high significance. Great circle counts and comparisons with theoretical models suggest that the Sagittarius stream comprises 10%-17% of the halo stars in the HVS sample. The population of blue stragglers and blue horizontal branch stars varies along the stream and is a potential probe of the distribution of stellar populations in the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy prior to disruption.

  20. Dynamics and X-Ray Emission of a Galactic Superwind Interacting with Disk and Halo Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchkov, A. A.; Balsara, D. S.; Heckman, T. M.; Leitherer, C.

    1993-12-01

    There is a general agreement that the conspicuous extranuclear x-ray, optical-line, and radio-continuum emission of starbursts is associated with powerful galactic superwinds blowing from their centers. However, despite the significant advances in observational studies of superwinds, there is no consensus on the nature of the emitting material and even on the emission mechanisms themselves. This is to a great extent a consequence of a poor understanding of dynamical processes in the starburst superwind regions. To address this issue, we have conducted two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of galactic superwinds. While previous similar studies have used a single (disk) component to represent the ISM of the starburst galaxy, we analyse the interaction of the wind with a two-component disk--halo ambient interstellar medium. This two-component representation is argued to be crucial for adequate modelling of starbursts. The emphasis of this study is on the geometry and structure of the wind region and the x-ray emission arising in the wind material and the shocked gas in the disk and the halo of the galaxy. The simulation results have shown that a clear-cut bipolar wind can easily develop under a range of very different conditions. On the other hand, a complex `filamentary' structure associated with the entrained dense disk material is found to arise within the hot bubble blown out by the wind. The flow pattern within the bubble is dominated equally by the central biconic outflow and a system of whirling motions related to the origin and development of the `filaments'. The `filament' parameters make them a good candidate for optical-emission-line filamentary gas observed in starburst halos. We find that the history of mass and energy deposition in the starburst region of the galaxy is crucial for wind dynamics. A ``mild'' early wind, which arises as a result of the cumulative effect of stellar winds from massive stars, produces a bipolar vertical cavity in the disk

  1. Chronography of the Milky Way's Halo System with Field Blue Horizontal-branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santucci, Rafael M.; Beers, Timothy C.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Carollo, Daniela; Rossi, Silvia; Lee, Young Sun; Denissenkov, Pavel; Tumlinson, Jason; Tissera, Patricia B.

    2015-11-01

    In a pioneering effort, Preston et al. reported that the colors of blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars in the halo of the Galaxy shift with distance, from regions near the Galactic center to about 12 kpc away, and interpreted this as a correlated variation in the ages of halo stars, from older to younger, spanning a range of a few Gyrs. We have applied this approach to a sample of some 4700 spectroscopically confirmed BHB stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to produce the first “chronographic map” of the halo of the Galaxy. We demonstrate that the mean de-reddened g - r color, < {(g-r)}0> , increases outward in the Galaxy from -0.22 to -0.08 (over a color window spanning [-0.3: 0.0]) from regions close to the Galactic center to ˜40 kpc, independent of the metallicity of the stars. Models of the expected shift in the color of the field BHB stars based on modern stellar evolutionary codes confirm that this color gradient can be associated with an age difference of roughly 2-2.5 Gyr, with the oldest stars concentrated in the central ˜15 kpc of the Galaxy. Within this central region, the age difference spans a mean color range of about 0.05 mag (˜0.8 Gyr). Furthermore, we show that chronographic maps can be used to identify individual substructures, such as the Sagittarius Stream, and overdensities in the direction of Virgo and Monoceros, based on the observed contrast in their mean BHB colors with respect to the foreground/background field population.

  2. An ancient F-type subdwarf from the halo crossing the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.-D.; Heber, U.; Heuser, C.; Ziegerer, E.; Geier, S.; Niederhofer, F.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: We selected the bluest object, WISE J0725-2351, from Luhman's new high proper motion (HPM) survey based on observations with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for spectroscopic follow-up observations. Our aim was to unravel the nature of this relatively bright (V ~ 12, J ~ 11) HPM star (μ = 267 mas/yr). Methods: We obtained low- and medium-resolution spectra with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) New Technology Telescope (NTT)/EFOSC2 and Very Large Telescope (VLT)/X-Shooter instruments, investigated the radial velocity and performed a quantitative spectral analysis that allowed us to determine physical parameters. The fit of the spectral energy distribution based on the available photometry to low-metallicity model spectra and the similarity of our target to a metal-poor benchmark star (HD 84937) allowed us to estimate the distance and space velocity. Results: As in the case of HD 84937, we classified WISE J0725-2351 as sdF5: or a metal-poor turnoff star with [ Fe/H ] = -2.0 ± 0.2, Teff = 6250 ± 100 K, log g = 4.0 ± 0.2, and a possible age of about 12 Gyr. At an estimated distance of more than 400 pc, its proper motion translates to a tangential velocity of more than 500 km s-1. Together with its constant (on timescales of hours, days, and months) and large radial velocity (about +240 km s-1), the resulting Galactic restframe velocity is about 460 km s-1, implying a bound retrograde orbit for this extreme halo object that currently crosses the Galactic plane at high speed. Based on observations at the La Silla-Paranal Observatory of the European Southern Observatory for programmes 092.D-0040(A) and 093.D-0127(A).

  3. RR Lyrae in XSTPS: The Halo Density Profile in the North Galactic Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccioli, L.; Smith, M. C.; Yuan, H.-B.; Zhang, H.-H.; Liu, X.-W.; Zhao, H.-B.; Yao, J.-S.

    2014-06-01

    We present a catalog of RR Lyrae stars (RRLs) observed by the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey (XSTPS). The area we consider is located in the north Galactic cap, covering ≈376.75 deg2 at α ≈ 150° and δ ≈ 27° down to a magnitude limit of i ≈ 19. Using the variability information afforded by the multi-epoch nature of our XSTPS data, combined with colors from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we are able to identify candidate RRLs. We find 318 candidates, derive distances to them, and estimate the detection efficiency. The majority of our candidates have more than 12 observations, and for these we are able to calculate periods. These also allow us to estimate our contamination level, which we predict is between 30% and 40%. Finally, we use the sample to probe the halo density profile in the 9-49 kpc range and find that it can be well fitted by a double power law. We find good agreement between this model and the models derived for the south Galactic cap using the Watkins et al. and Sesar et al. RRL data sets, after accounting for possible contamination in our data set from Sagittarius stream members. We consider non-spherical double power-law models of the halo density profile and again find agreement with literature data sets, although we have limited power to constrain the flattening due to our small survey area. Much tighter constraints will be placed by current and future wide-area surveys, most notably ESA's astrometric Gaia mission. Our analysis demonstrates that surveys with a limited number of epochs can effectively be mined for RRLs. Our complete sample is provided as accompanying online material; as an example the first few entries of each electronic table are shown in the text.

  4. RR Lyrae in XSTPS: The halo density profile in the north galactic cap

    SciTech Connect

    Faccioli, L.; Smith, M. C.; Yuan, H.-B.; Liu, X.-W.; Zhang, H.-H.; Zhao, H.-B.; Yao, J.-S. E-mail: msmith@shao.ac.cn

    2014-06-20

    We present a catalog of RR Lyrae stars (RRLs) observed by the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey (XSTPS). The area we consider is located in the north Galactic cap, covering ≈376.75 deg{sup 2} at α ≈ 150° and δ ≈ 27° down to a magnitude limit of i ≈ 19. Using the variability information afforded by the multi-epoch nature of our XSTPS data, combined with colors from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we are able to identify candidate RRLs. We find 318 candidates, derive distances to them, and estimate the detection efficiency. The majority of our candidates have more than 12 observations, and for these we are able to calculate periods. These also allow us to estimate our contamination level, which we predict is between 30% and 40%. Finally, we use the sample to probe the halo density profile in the 9-49 kpc range and find that it can be well fitted by a double power law. We find good agreement between this model and the models derived for the south Galactic cap using the Watkins et al. and Sesar et al. RRL data sets, after accounting for possible contamination in our data set from Sagittarius stream members. We consider non-spherical double power-law models of the halo density profile and again find agreement with literature data sets, although we have limited power to constrain the flattening due to our small survey area. Much tighter constraints will be placed by current and future wide-area surveys, most notably ESA's astrometric Gaia mission. Our analysis demonstrates that surveys with a limited number of epochs can effectively be mined for RRLs. Our complete sample is provided as accompanying online material; as an example the first few entries of each electronic table are shown in the text.

  5. The Evolution of Pristine Gas: Implications for Milky Way Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmento, Richard J.; Scannapieco, Evan; Pan, Liubin

    2016-06-01

    We implement a new subgrid model for turbulent mixing to accurately follow the cosmological evolution of the first stars, the mixing of their supernova ejecta and the impact on the chemical composition of the Galactic Halo. Using the cosmological adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, we implement a model for the pollution of pristine gas as described in Pan et al. (2013). This allows us to account for the fraction of Z < Zcrit stars formed throughout the simulation volume, even in regions in which the average metallicity is well above Zcrit. Further, as a result of modeling the pristine fraction of gas, we also improve our modeling of the metallicity of the polluted fraction, fpol, of both the gas and stars.Additionally, we track the evolution of the “primordial metals” generated by Pop III supernovae. These metals are taken up by second-generation stars and are likely to lead to unique abundance signatures characteristic of carbon enhanced, metal poor (CEMP) stars. As an illustrative example, we associate primordial metals with abundance ratios used by Keller at al (2014) to explain the source of metals in the star SMSS J031300.36- 670839.3, finding good agreement with the observed [Fe/H], [C/H], [O/H] and [Mg/Ca] ratios in CEMP Milky Way (MW) halo stars.

  6. A model atmosphere analysis of the faint early-type halo star PHL 346

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.; Lennon, D. J.; Brown, P. J. F.; Dufton, P. L.

    1986-08-01

    Stellar equivalent widths and hydrogen line profiles, measured from high-resolution optical spectra obtained with the 2.5 m Issac Newton Telescope, are used in conjunction with model atmosphere calculations to determine the atmospheric parameters and chemical composition of the faint, high galactic latitude early-type star PHL 346. The effective temperature (Teff = 22,600 + or - 1000 K) and surface gravity (log g = 3.6 + or - 0.2), as well as the chemical composition, are found to be similar to those of normal OB stars. Therefore, it is concluded that PHL 346 is an ordinary Population I object, at a z distance of 8.7 + or - 1.5 kpc. The relatively small stellar velocity in the z-direction (Vz = +56 + or - 10 km/s) then implies that PHL 346 must have been formed in the halo, possibly from galactic fountain material at a z distance of about 6 kpc.

  7. Ultrahigh energy neutrinos from galactic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the production rate of ultrahigh energy (UHE) neutrinos from galactic neutron stars. The statistics of various stellar populations are reviewed as well as an evolutionary scheme linking several neutron star environments. An observational test for predicting stellar evolution is made using two mass ratio intervals of less than 0.3 and greater than or approximately equal to 0.3, which is supported by kinematical evidence. Attention is given to the problem of the target material that is required by UHE protons accelerated from the pulsar's surface to their rotational kinetic energy, and to the detectability of neutron stars in the UHE neutrinos by employing the deep underwater muon and neutrino detector (DUMAND) array.

  8. THE CLUSTERING AND HALO MASSES OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dolley, Tim; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Palamara, David P.; Beare, Richard; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Brodwin, Mark; Kochanek, C. S.; Dey, Arjun; Atlee, David W.

    2014-12-20

    We present clustering measurements and halo masses of star-forming galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. After excluding active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we construct a sample of 22,553 24 μm sources selected from 8.42 deg{sup 2} of the Spitzer MIPS AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of Boötes. Mid-infrared imaging allows us to observe galaxies with the highest star formation rates (SFRs), less biased by dust obscuration afflicting the optical bands. We find that the galaxies with the highest SFRs have optical colors that are redder than typical blue cloud galaxies, with many residing within the green valley. At z > 0.4 our sample is dominated by luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}) and is composed entirely of LIRGs and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}) at z > 0.6. We observe weak clustering of r {sub 0} ≈ 3-6 h {sup –1} Mpc for almost all of our star-forming samples. We find that the clustering and halo mass depend on L {sub TIR} at all redshifts, where galaxies with higher L {sub TIR} (hence higher SFRs) have stronger clustering. Galaxies with the highest SFRs at each redshift typically reside within dark matter halos of M {sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.9} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}. This is consistent with a transitional halo mass, above which star formation is largely truncated, although we cannot exclude that ULIRGs reside within higher mass halos. By modeling the clustering evolution of halos, we connect our star-forming galaxy samples to their local descendants. Most star-forming galaxies at z < 1.0 are the progenitors of L ≲ 2.5 L {sub *} blue galaxies in the local universe, but star-forming galaxies with the highest SFRs (L {sub TIR} ≳ 10{sup 11.7} L {sub ☉}) at 0.6 < z < 1.0 are the progenitors of early-type galaxies in denser group environments.

  9. Are Pressure-Confined Clouds in Galactic Halos Possible for a Model of Lyman Alpha Clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahata, K.; Ikeuchi, S.

    Lanzetta et al (1995) found that most luminous galaxies at low redshifts produce Ly alpha absorptions at the mean impact parameter ~160h-1 kpc. Motivated by this observation, we propose the two-component protogalaxy model as a model for the Ly alpha cloud besed upon the previous work (MI 1995). In our model, the Ly alpha clouds are supposed to be stable cold clouds confined by the pressure of ambient hot gas in galactic halo. We determine the properties of these cold clouds and hot gas on the basis of theoretical and observational constraints. Especially, we take into account the stability of cold cloud in the galactic halo in addition to the general stability conditions in a two-component medium, and compare the derived quantities of Ly alpha cloud both cases in galactic halo and in intergalactic medium. We conclude that the condition that cloud is stable against both evaporation and tidal destruction by a hot galactic halo is very severe. As a result, at z ~0.5, it is concluded that a pressure-confined, stable spherical Ly alpha cloud of typical column density NHI = 1014 cm-2 cannot survive in the galactic halo, although much higher column density clouds of NHI = 1017 cm-2 can do there. We discuss how our result constraints an alternative model for a Ly alpha cloud which associates with galaxy observed by Lanzetta et.al.

  10. How Galactic Environment Regulates Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidt, Sharon E.

    2016-02-01

    In a new simple model I reconcile two contradictory views on the factors that determine the rate at which molecular clouds form stars—internal structure versus external, environmental influences—providing a unified picture for the regulation of star formation in galaxies. In the presence of external pressure, the pressure gradient set up within a self-gravitating turbulent (isothermal) cloud leads to a non-uniform density distribution. Thus the local environment of a cloud influences its internal structure. In the simple equilibrium model, the fraction of gas at high density in the cloud interior is determined simply by the cloud surface density, which is itself inherited from the pressure in the immediate surroundings. This idea is tested using measurements of the properties of local clouds, which are found to show remarkable agreement with the simple equilibrium model. The model also naturally predicts the star formation relation observed on cloud scales and at the same time provides a mapping between this relation and the closer-to-linear molecular star formation relation measured on larger scales in galaxies. The key is that pressure regulates not only the molecular content of the ISM but also the cloud surface density. I provide a straightforward prescription for the pressure regulation of star formation that can be directly implemented in numerical models. Predictions for the dense gas fraction and star formation efficiency measured on large-scales within galaxies are also presented, establishing the basis for a new picture of star formation regulated by galactic environment.

  11. Large Variety of New Pulsating Stars in the OGLE-III Galactic Disk Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrukowicz, P.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Mróz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of a search for pulsating stars in the 7.12 deg2 OGLE-III Galactic disk area in the direction tangent to the Centaurus Arm. We report the identification of 20 Classical Cepheids, 45 RR Lyr type stars, 31 Long-Period Variables, such as Miras and Semi-Regular Variables, one pulsating white dwarf, and 58 very likely δ Sct type stars. Based on asteroseismic models constructed for one quadruple-mode and six triple-mode δ Sct type pulsators, we estimated masses, metallicities, ages, and distance moduli to these objects. The modeled stars have masses in the range 0.9-2.5 MSun and are located at distances between 2.5 kpc and 6.2 kpc. Two triple-mode and one double-mode pulsators seem to be Population II stars of the SX Phe type, probably from the Galactic halo. Our sample also includes candidates for Type II Cepheids and unclassified short-period (P<0.23 d) multi-mode stars which could be either δ Sct or β Cep type stars. One of the detected variables is a very likely δ Sct star with an exceptionally high peak-to-peak I-band amplitude of 0.35 mag at the very short period of 0.0196 d. All reported pulsating variable stars but one object are new discoveries. They are included in the OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars. Finally, we introduce the on-going OGLE-IV Galactic Disk Survey, which covers more than half of the Galactic plane. For the purposes of future works on the spiral structure and star formation history of the Milky Way, we have already compiled a list of known Galactic Classical Cepheids.

  12. The Segue K giant survey. II. A catalog of distance determinations for the Segue K giants in the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Ma, Zhibo; Morrison, Heather L.; Harding, Paul; Beers, Timothy C.; Ivans, Inese I.; Jacobson, Heather R.; Johnson, Jennifer; Lee, Young Sun; Lucatello, Sara; Rockosi, Constance M.; Yanny, Brian; Zhao, Gang; Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    We present an online catalog of distance determinations for 6036 K giants, most of which are members of the Milky Way's stellar halo. Their medium-resolution spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey/Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration are used to derive metallicities and rough gravity estimates, along with radial velocities. Distance moduli are derived from a comparison of each star's apparent magnitude with the absolute magnitude of empirically calibrated color-luminosity fiducials, at the observed (g – r){sub 0} color and spectroscopic [Fe/H]. We employ a probabilistic approach that makes it straightforward to properly propagate the errors in metallicities, magnitudes, and colors into distance uncertainties. We also fold in prior information about the giant-branch luminosity function and the different metallicity distributions of the SEGUE K-giant targeting sub-categories. We show that the metallicity prior plays a small role in the distance estimates, but that neglecting the luminosity prior could lead to a systematic distance modulus bias of up to 0.25 mag, compared to the case of using the luminosity prior. We find a median distance precision of 16%, with distance estimates most precise for the least metal-poor stars near the tip of the red giant branch. The precision and accuracy of our distance estimates are validated with observations of globular and open clusters. The stars in our catalog are up to 125 kpc from the Galactic center, with 283 stars beyond 50 kpc, forming the largest available spectroscopic sample of distant tracers in the Galactic halo.

  13. Magnetic fields and galactic star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-10

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ≃0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas (n{sub H}>10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 μG. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  14. Visibility of stars, halos, and rainbows during solar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Können, Gunther P; Hinz, Claudia

    2008-12-01

    The visibility of stars, planets, diffraction coronas, halos, and rainbows during the partial and total phases of a solar eclipse is studied. The limiting magnitude during various stages of the partial phase is presented. The sky radiance during totality with respect to noneclipse conditions is revisited and found to be typically 1/4000. The corresponding limiting magnitude is +3.5. At totality, the signal-to-background ratio of diffraction coronas, halos, and rainbows has dropped by a factor of 250. It is found that diffraction coronas around the totally eclipsed Sun may nevertheless occur. Analyses of lunar halo observations during twilight indicate that bright halo displays may also persist during totality. Rainbows during totality seem impossible. PMID:19037334

  15. Star Formation at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Could stars be forming in the inhospitable environment near Sagittarius A* in the heart of the Milky Way? A possible signature of low-mass star formation has recently been found just two light-years from the black hole at the center of our galaxy — a region that was previously thought to be too hostile for such activity. Searching for Signatures: Previous observations of the central few light-years of the Milky Way had focused on a population of about 200 massive, young and very bright stars in tight orbits around Sgr A*. These stars are only a few million years old and prompted scientists to wonder: have they somehow managed to form in situ, in spite of their close proximity to the black hole, or did they form further out and then migrate in? Motivated by this mystery, Farhad Yusef-Zadeh of Northwestern University and collaborators looked for evidence of even younger stars close to Sagittarius A*, which would demonstrate that star formation in the area is an ongoing process. Using the Very Large Array (VLA), the collaboration discovered several small sources in one arm of activity near Sgr A*. This 34-GHz image provides a close-up view of two protoplanetary disk candidates (labeled P26 and P8) located near Sgr A*. These objects are outlined on the right side by a bow shock caused by impacting stellar wind that streams from the young, hot stars closer to the Galactic center. The disks are thought to contain recently-formed, low-mass stars. (Credit: Yusef-Zadeh et al., 2015) Heated Disks: The team identified these sources as candidate photoevaporative protoplanetary disks, or “proplyds” — areas of dense, ionized gas and dust surrounding young, newly formed stars. The proplyd candidates are between 10,000 and 100,000 years old, and they lie along the edge of a large molecular cloud. It is likely that this cloud produced the disks by providing a reservoir of gas to feed the star-formation activity. The region surrounding these proplyds is blasted with harsh

  16. Star Streams in Triaxial Isochrone Potentials with Sub-halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, R. G.

    2015-07-01

    The velocity, position, and action variable evolutions of a tidal stream drawn out of a star cluster in a triaxial isochrone potential, containing a sub-halo population, reproduces many of the orbital effects of more general cosmological halos but allows for the easy calculation of orbital actions. We employ a spherical shell code, which we show accurately reproduces the results of a tree gravity code for a collisionless star cluster. Streams from clusters on high eccentricity orbits, e≳ 0.6, can spread out so much that the amount of material at high enough surface density to stand out on the sky may be only a few percent of the stream’s total mass. Low eccentricity streams remain more spatially coherent, but sub-halos both broaden the stream and displace the centerline with details depending on the orbits allowed within the potential. Overall, the majority of stream particles have changes in their total actions of only 1%-2%, leaving the mean stream relatively undisturbed. A halo with 1% of the mass in sub-halos typically spreads the velocity distribution about a factor of two wider than would be expected for a smooth halo. Strong density variations, “gaps,” along with mean velocity offsets, are clearly detected in low eccentricity streams for even a 0.2% sub-halo mass fraction. Around one hundred velocity measurements per kiloparsec of stream will enable tests for the presence of a local sub-halo density as small as 0.2%-0.5% of the local mass density, with about 1% predicted for 30 kpc orbital radii streams.

  17. Studies of the Hot Gas in the Galactic halo and Local Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robin L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a report on the progress made on Studies of the Hot Gas in the Galactic halo and Local Bubble at Johns Hopkins University. The broad goals of this project are to determine the physical conditions and history of the hot phase of the Galaxy's interstellar medium. Such gas resides in the Galactic halo, the Local Bubble surrounding the solar neighborhood, other bubbles, and supernova remnants. A better understanding of the hot gas and the processes occurring within it requires several types of work, including ultraviolet and X-ray data analyses and computer modeling.

  18. Wormhole solutions for f(G) gravity in galactic halo region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Ismat Fatima, H.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study static spherically symmetric wormhole solutions in galactic halo region. Two observational results, Navarro-Frenk-White energy density profile in standard cosmological model and the observed flat rotational curves, are used to discuss traversable wormholes supported by galactic halo in modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We explore these solutions either by considering a viable f(G) model to construct shape function or by specifying the shape function to deduce f(G) model. We explore energy conditions and find physically acceptable wormhole solutions threaded by normal matter for all values of r. Finally, we investigate stability of the resulting wormhole solutions.

  19. Carbon Stars in the Satellites and Halo of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamren, Katherine; Beaton, Rachael L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Boyer, Martha L.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Smith, Graeme H.; Majewski, Steven R.; Howley, Kirsten

    2016-09-01

    We spectroscopically identify a sample of carbon stars in the satellites and halo of M31 using moderate-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda’s Stellar Halo survey. We present the photometric properties of our sample of 41 stars, including their brightness with respect to the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) and their distributions in various color–color spaces. This analysis reveals a bluer population of carbon stars fainter than the TRGB and a redder population of carbon stars brighter than the TRGB. We then apply principal component analysis to determine the sample’s eigenspectra and eigencoefficients. Correlating the eigencoefficients with various observable properties reveals the spectral features that trace effective temperature and metallicity. Putting the spectroscopic and photometric information together, we find the carbon stars in the satellites and halo of M31 to be minimally impacted by dust and internal dynamics. We also find that while there is evidence to suggest that the sub-TRGB stars are extrinsic in origin, it is also possible that they are are particularly faint members of the asymptotic giant branch.

  20. Exploring the Hot Galactic Halo Using Shadows of High Latitude Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juda, M.; Petre, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this proposal was to measure variations in the 1/4 keV emission from the galactic halo, using ROSAT (x-ray astronomy satellite) Position Sensitive Proportional Counters (PSPC) observations toward known enhancements in the absorbing column density along the line-of-sight out of the Galaxy. Target directions were selected to have a low total hydrogen column density but to also show significant gradients in the amount of absorbing material, as traced by Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) 100 micron emission, on angular scales that would be contained within the PSPC field of view. In addition, we restricted the galactic latitude of the target directions to be greater than 60 degrees or less than -60 degrees in order to enable a cleaner separation of Galactic halo emission from that of the Galactic disk. The observations would also provide a measurement of the brightness of the emission from the Local Bubble.

  1. Numerical simulation of the plasma and gravitational dynamics of a galactic magnetic monopole halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farouki, R.; Shapiro, S. L.; Wasserman, I.

    1984-09-01

    Numerical and analytical calculations designed to assess the viability of a Galactic magnetic monopole halo are presented. The dynamical interplay between magnetic currents and the Galactic magnetic field is treated self-consistently, taking full account of the temporal evolution of currents and fields. It is found that in general self-consistent bounds on the Galactic magnetic monopole flux based on the survival of the Galactic magnetic field are far less restrictive than the Parker limit. The halo models are consistent with monopole masses m(M) approximately equal to or less than 7 x 10 to the 19th GeV, and monopole fluxes in the range F(M) approximately equal to or greater than 3 x 10 to the -13th per sq cm per s. Topics for future, more detailed studies are enumerated and discussed.

  2. A Method for Deriving Accurate Gas-Phase Abundances for the Multiphase Interstellar Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howk, J. Christopher; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Savage, Blair D.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a new method for accurately determining total gas-phase abundances for the Galactic halo interstellar medium with minimal ionization uncertainties. For sight lines toward globular clusters containing both ultraviolet-bright stars and radio pulsars, it is possible to measure column densities of H I and several ionization states of selected metals using ultraviolet absorption line measurements and of H II using radio dispersion measurements. By measuring the ionized hydrogen column, we minimize ionization uncertainties that plague abundance measurements of Galactic halo gas. We apply this method for the first time to the sight line toward the globular cluster Messier 3 [(l,b)=(42.2d,+78.7d), d=10.2 kpc, z=10.0 kpc] using Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectroscopy of the post-asymptotic giant branch star von Zeipel 1128 and radio observations by Ransom et al. of recently discovered millisecond pulsars. The fraction of hydrogen associated with ionized gas along this sight line is 45%+/-5%, with the warm (T~104 K) and hot (T>~105 K) ionized phases present in roughly a 5:1 ratio. This is the highest measured fraction of ionized hydrogen along a high-latitude pulsar sight line. We derive total gas-phase abundances logN(S)/N(H)=-4.87+/-0.03 and logN(Fe)/N(H)=-5.27+/-0.05. Our derived sulfur abundance is in excellent agreement with recent solar system determinations of Asplund, Grevesse, & Sauval. However, it is -0.14 dex below the solar system abundance typically adopted in studies of the interstellar medium. The iron abundance is ~-0.7 dex below the solar system abundance, consistent with the significant incorporation of iron into interstellar grains. Abundance estimates derived by simply comparing S II and Fe II to H I are +0.17 and +0.11 dex higher, respectively, than the abundance estimates derived from our refined approach. Ionization corrections to the gas-phase abundances measured in the standard way are

  3. Subhalo statistics of galactic haloes: beyond the resolution limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cautun, Marius; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Frenk, Carlos S.; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Sawala, Till

    2014-12-01

    We study the substructure population of Milky Way (MW)-mass haloes in the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology using a novel procedure to extrapolate subhalo number statistics beyond the resolution limit of N-body simulations. The technique recovers the mean and the variance of the subhalo abundance, but not its spatial distribution. It extends the dynamic range over which precise statistical predictions can be made by the equivalent of performing a simulation with 50 times higher resolution, at no additional computational cost. We apply this technique to MW-mass haloes, but it can easily be applied to haloes of any mass. We find up to 20 per cent more substructures in MW-mass haloes than found in previous studies. Our analysis lowers the mass of the MW halo required to accommodate the observation that the MW has only three satellites with a maximum circular velocity Vmax ≥ 30 km s- 1 in the ΛCDM cosmology. The probability of having a subhalo population similar to that in the MW is 20 per cent for a virial mass, M200 = 1 × 1012 M⊙ and practically zero for haloes more massive than M200 = 2 × 1012 M⊙.

  4. On the relevance of chaos for halo stars in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffione, N. P.; Gómez, F. A.; Cincotta, P. M.; Giordano, C. M.; Cooper, A. P.; O'Shea, B. W.

    2015-11-01

    We show that diffusion due to chaotic mixing in the neighbourhood of the Sun may not be as relevant as previously suggested in erasing phase space signatures of past Galactic accretion events. For this purpose, we analyse solar neighbourhood-like volumes extracted from cosmological simulations that naturally account for chaotic orbital behaviour induced by the strongly triaxial and cuspy shape of the resulting dark matter haloes, among other factors. In the approximation of an analytical static triaxial model, our results show that a large fraction of stellar halo particles in such local volumes have chaos onset times (i.e. the time-scale at which stars commonly associated with chaotic orbits will exhibit their chaotic behaviour) significantly larger than a Hubble time. Furthermore, particles that do present a chaotic behaviour within a Hubble time do not exhibit significant diffusion in phase space.

  5. The Origin of the Hot Gas in the Galactic Halo: Testing Galactic Fountain Models' X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin; Hill, Alex S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2015-02-01

    We test the X-ray emission predictions of galactic fountain models against XMM-Newton measurements of the emission from the Milky Way's hot halo. These measurements are from 110 sight lines, spanning the full range of Galactic longitudes. We find that a magnetohydrodynamical simulation of a supernova-driven interstellar medium, which features a flow of hot gas from the disk to the halo, reproduces the temperature but significantly underpredicts the 0.5-2.0 keV surface brightness of the halo (by two orders of magnitude, if we compare the median predicted and observed values). This is true for versions of the model with and without an interstellar magnetic field. We consider different reasons for the discrepancy between the model predictions and the observations. We find that taking into account overionization in cooled halo plasma, which could in principle boost the predicted X-ray emission, is unlikely in practice to bring the predictions in line with the observations. We also find that including thermal conduction, which would tend to increase the surface brightnesses of interfaces between hot and cold gas, would not overcome the surface brightness shortfall. However, charge exchange emission from such interfaces, not included in the current model, may be significant. The faintness of the model may also be due to the lack of cosmic ray driving, meaning that the model may underestimate the amount of material transported from the disk to the halo. In addition, an extended hot halo of accreted material may be important, by supplying hot electrons that could boost the emission of the material driven out from the disk. Additional model predictions are needed to test the relative importance of these processes in explaining the observed halo emission.

  6. The Abundance of Deuterium in the Warm Neutral Medium of the Lower Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Lehner, Nicolas; Fox, Andrew; Wakker, Bart; Sembach, Kenneth

    2007-04-01

    We use high-resolution ultraviolet spectra to obtain Milky Way interstellar column densities of H I, D I, O I, S II, Fe II, and P II toward the QSO HE 0226-4110 in the Galactic direction l=253.4deg and b=-65.77deg. We obtain D/H=21+8-6 ppm from an analysis of the strong damped Lyα line of H I and the weak higher Lyman series absorption of D I. Correcting for a small amount of foreground contamination from D and H in the Local Bubble we obtain D/H=22+8-6 for the warm neutral medium of the lower Galactic halo. The medium sampled has [O/H]=0.12+0.41-0.20 and [Fe/H]=-1.01+0.10-0.09. This suggests the abundances in the gas in the halo toward HE 0226-4110 are not affected by the infall of low-metallicity gas and that the gas originates in the disk and is elevated into the halo by energetic processes that erode but do not totally destroy the dust grains. We compare our result to measured values of D/H in other astrophysical sites. The value we measure in the halo gas is consistent with the hypothesis that for many Galactic disk lines of sight D is incorporated into dust. The high average value of D/H=23.1+/-2.4(1 σ) ppm measured along five sight lines through disk gas in the solar neighborhood is similar to D/H in the lower Galactic halo. These disk and halo observations imply the abundance of deuterium in the Galaxy has only been reduced by a factor of 1.12+/-0.13 since its formation. In contrast, current galactic chemical evolution models predict the astration reduction factor should be in the range from 1.39 to 1.83.

  7. Lithium abundance in a turnoff halo star on an extreme orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spite, M.; Spite, F.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.

    2015-10-01

    Context. The lithium abundance in turnoff stars of the old population of our Galaxy is remarkably constant in the metallicity interval -2.8 < [Fe/H] < -2.0, defining a plateau. The Li abundance of these turnoff stars is clearly lower than the abundance predicted by the primordial nucleosynthesis in the frame of the standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Different scenarios have been proposed for explaining this discrepancy, along with the very low scatter of the lithium abundance around the plateau. Aims: The recently identified very high velocity star, WISE J0725-2351 appears to belong to the old Galactic population, and appears to be an extreme halo star on a bound, retrograde Galactic orbit. In this paper, we study the abundance ratios and, in particular the lithium abundance, in this star. Methods: The available spectra (ESO-Very Large Telescope) are analyzed and the abundances of Li, C, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Sr and Ba are determined. Results: The abundance ratios in WISE J0725-2351 are those typical of old turnoff stars. The lithium abundance in this star is in close agreement with the lithium abundance found in the metal-poor turnoff stars located at moderate distance from the Sun. This high velocity star confirms, in an extreme case, that the very small scatter of the lithium plateau persists independent of the dynamic and kinematic properties of the stars. Based on observations obtained at the ESO Paranal Observatory, Chile Programmes 093.D-0127, PI: S. Geier and 189.B-0925, PI: S. Trager.Table 2 (line by line abundances of the elements) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A74

  8. Assembly history of subhalo populations in galactic and cluster sized dark haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lizhi; Gao, Liang

    2015-12-01

    We make use of two suits of ultrahigh resolution N-body simulations of individual dark matter haloes from the Phoenix and the Aquarius Projects to investigate systematics of assembly history of subhaloes in dark matter haloes differing by a factor of 1000 in the halo mass. We have found that real progenitors which built up present-day subhalo population are relatively more abundant for high-mass haloes, in contrast to previous studies claiming a universal form independent of the host halo mass. That is mainly because of repeated counting of the `re-accreted' (progenitors passed through and were later re-accreted to the host more than once) and inclusion of the `ejected' progenitor population (progenitors were accreted to the host in the past but no longer members at present day) in previous studies. The typical accretion time for all progenitors vary strongly with the host halo mass, which is typical about z ˜ 5 for the galactic Aquarius and about z ˜ 3 for the cluster sized Phoenix haloes. Once these progenitors start to orbit their parent haloes, they rapidly lose their original mass but not their identifiers, more than 55 (50) per cent of them survive to present day for the Phoenix (Aquarius) haloes. At given redshift, survival fraction of the accreted subhalo is independent of the parent halo mass, whilst the mass-loss of the subhalo is more efficient in high-mass haloes. These systematics results in similarity and difference in the subhalo population in dark matter haloes of different masses at present day.

  9. Structure in the motions of the fastest halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re Fiorentin, P.; Helmi, A.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Spagna, A.

    2005-08-01

    We analyzed the catalog published by Beers et al. (2000, ApJ, 119, 2866) of 2106 non-kinematically selected metal poor stars in the solar neighborhood, with the goal of quantifying the amount of substructure in the motions of the fastest halo stars. We computed the two-point velocity correlation function for a subsample of halo stars within 1-2 kpc of the Sun, and found statistical evidence of substructure with a similar amplitude to that predicted by high resolution CDM simulations. The signal is due to a small kinematic group whose dynamical properties are compared to the stellar "stream" previously discovered by Helmi et al. (1999). If real, this high velocity moving group would provide further support for the idea that substructures remain as fossils from the formation of the Galaxy as expected in the CDM scenario.

  10. The abundance of boron in three halo stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Lambert, David L.; Lemke, Michael

    1992-01-01

    B abundances for three halo stars: HD 140283, HD 19445, and HD 201891 are presented. Using recent determinations of the Be abundance in HD 140283, B/Be of 10 +5/-4 is found for this star, and similar ratios are inferred for HD 19445 and HD 201891. This ratio is equal to the minimum value of 10 expected from a synthesis of B and Be by high-energy cosmic-ray spallation reactions in the interstellar medium. It is shown that the accompanying synthesis of Li by alpha on alpha fusion reactions is probably a minor contributor to the observed 'primordial' Li of halo stars. The observed constant ratios of B/O and Be/O are expected if the principal channel of synthesis involves cosmic-ray CNO nuclei from the supernovae colliding with interstellar protons.

  11. PROBING THE OUTER GALACTIC HALO WITH RR LYRAE FROM THE CATALINA SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A.; Donalek, C.; Williams, R.; Catelan, M.; Torrealba, G.; Belokurov, V.; Koposov, S. E.; Prieto, J. L.; Larson, S.; Christensen, E.; Beshore, E.

    2013-01-20

    We present analysis of 12,227 type-ab RR Lyraes (RRLs) found among the 200 million public light curves in Catalina Surveys Data Release 1. These stars span the largest volume of the Milky Way ever surveyed with RRLs, covering {approx}20,000 deg{sup 2} of the sky (0 Degree-Sign < {alpha} < 360 Degree-Sign , -22 Degree-Sign < {delta} < 65 Degree-Sign ) to heliocentric distances of up to 60 kpc. Each of the RRLs is observed between 60 and 419 times over a six-year period. Using period finding and Fourier fitting techniques we determine periods and apparent magnitudes for each source. We find that the periods are generally accurate to {sigma} = 0.002% in comparison to 2842 previously known RRLs and 100 RRLs observed in overlapping survey fields. We photometrically calibrate the light curves using 445 Landolt standard stars and show that the resulting magnitudes are accurate to {approx}0.05 mag using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data for {approx}1000 blue horizontal branch stars and 7788 RRLs. By combining Catalina photometry with SDSS spectroscopy, we analyze the radial velocity and metallicity distributions for >1500 of the RRLs. Using the accurate distances derived for the RRLs, we show the paths of the Sagittarius tidal streams crossing the sky at heliocentric distances from 20 to 60 kpc. By selecting samples of Galactic halo RRLs, we compare their velocity, metallicity, and distance with predictions from a recent detailed N-body model of the Sagittarius system. We find that there are some significant differences between the distances and structures predicted and our observations.

  12. Lyman-Alpha Absorption at Low Redshifts and Hot Gas in Galactic Haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, H. J.

    1994-08-01

    Motivated by the recent observation of Lanzetta et al. that most luminous galaxies at low redshifts produce Lyα absorptions at impact parameter l <~ 160 h^-1^ kpc, we propose that these absorbers are clouds confined by the pressure of ambient hot gas in galactic haloes. We determine the properties of this hot gas and of the absorption systems on the basis of observational and theoretical constraints. The absorbing clouds need to be replenished on a time-scale of about one orbital time (~10^9^ yr) in the galactic halo. The pressure and temperature of the gas at radius r~100 kpc are P = (10-100) cm^-3^ K and T = 10^5.5-6.5^ K. The model requires that about 10 per cent of the gas in low-redshift galactic haloes be in the hot phase. Such gas in galactic haloes emits X-rays with a bolometric luminosity of the order of 10^37-40^1 erg s^-1^. The likelihood that such gas exists in current models of galaxy formation is discussed.

  13. Exploring the Milky Way halo with SDSS-II SN survey RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lee, Nathan

    This thesis details the creation of a large catalog of RR Lyrae stars, their lightcurves, and their associated photometric and kinematic parameters. This catalog contains 421 RR Lyrae stars with 305 RRab and 116 RRc. Of these, 241 stars have stellar spectra taken with either the Blanco 4m RC spectrograph or the SDSS/SEGUE survey, and in some cases taken by both. From these spectra and photometric methods derived from them, an analysis is conducted of the RR lyrae's distribution, metallicity, kinematics, and photometric properties within the halo. All of these RR Lyrae originate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. The SDSS-II SN Survey covers a 2.5 degree equatorial stripe ranging from -60 to +60 degrees in RA. This corresponds to relatively high southern galactic latitudes in the anti-center direction. The full catalog ranges from g 0 magnitude 13 to 20 which covers a distance of 3 to 95 kpc from the sun. Using this sample, we explore the Oosterhoff dichotomy through the D log P method as a function of | Z | distance from the plane. This results in a clear division of the RRab stars into OoI and OoII groups at lower | Z |, but the population becomes dominated by OoI stars at higher | Z |. The idea of a dual halo is explored primarily in the context of radial velocity distributions as a function of | Z |. In particular, V gsr , the radial velocity in the galactic standard of rest, is used as a proxy for V [straight phi] , the cylindrical rotational velocity. This is then compared against a single halo model galaxy, which results in very similar V gsr histograms for both at low to medium | Z |. However, at high | Z | there is a clear separation into two distinct velocity groups for the data without a corresponding separation in the model, suggesting that at least a two-component model for the halo is necessary. The final part of the analysis involves [Fe/H] measurements from both spectra and photometric relations cut in both | Z | and radial velocity. In this case

  14. ORIGIN OF THE GALACTIC CENTER S-STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Griv, Evgeny

    2009-09-01

    The supermassive black hole at the Galactic center is surrounded by a parsec-scale star disk, with about a hundred massive young stars that move in approximately circular Keplerian orbits. Another group of roughly 20 young stars ('S-stars') follow eccentric, randomly oriented orbits well inside the disk stars. A model is proposed to explain the S-stars. Accordingly, the stars formed originally in the parsec-scale disk through gravitational fragmentation of gas. The newly formed S-stars then migrated inward via the gravitational torques exerted by a Lin-Shu-type spiral density wave on the stars at an inner Lindblad resonance.

  15. Transonic galactic outflows in a dark matter halo with a central black hole and its application to the Sombrero galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Asuka; Mori, Masao; Nitta, Shin-ya

    2014-10-01

    We have classified possible transonic solutions of galactic outflows in the gravitational potential of the dark matter halo (DMH) and supermassive black hole (SMBH) under the assumptions of isothermal, spherically symmetric and steady state. It is clarified that the gravity of SMBH adds a new branch of transonic solutions with the transonic point in very close proximity to the centre in addition to the outer transonic point generated by the gravity of DMH. Because these two transonic solutions have substantially different mass fluxes and starting points, these solutions may have different influences on the evolution of galaxies and the release of metals into intergalactic space. We have applied our model to the Sombrero galaxy and obtained a new type of galactic outflow: a slowly accelerated transonic outflow through the transonic point at very distant region (≃126 kpc). In this galaxy, previous works reported that although the trace of the galactic outflow is observed by X-ray, the gas density distribution is consistent with the hydrostatic state. We have clarified that the slowly accelerating outflow has a gas density profile quite similar to that of the hydrostatic solution in the widely spread subsonic region. Thus, the slowly accelerating transonic solution cannot be distinguished from the hydrostatic solution in the observed region (≤25 kpc) even if slow transonic flow exists. Our model provides a new perspective of galactic outflows and is applicable even to quiescent galaxies with inactive star formation.

  16. Chronography of the Milky Way's Halo System with Field Blue Horizontal-Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Carollo, Daniela; Santucci, Rafael; Rossi, Siliva; Lee, Young Sun; Denissenkov, Pavel; Tumlinson, Jason; Tissera, Patricia; Lentner, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    In a pioneering effort, Preston et al. (1991, AJ 375, 121) reported that the colors of blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars in the halo of the Galaxy shift with distance, from regions near the Galactic center to about 12 kpc away, and interpreted this as a correlated variation in the ages of halo stars, from older to younger, spanning a range of a few Gyrs. We have applied this approach to a sample of some 4700 spectroscopically confirmed BHB stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to produce the first "chronographic map" of the halo of the Galaxy.We demonstrate that the mean de-reddened g-r color increases outward in the Galaxy from -0.22 to -0.08 (over a color window spanning [-0.3:0.0]) from regions close to the Galactic center to ~40 kpc, independent of the metallicity of the stars. Models of the expected shift in the color of the field BHB stars based on modern stellar evolutionary codes confirm that this color gradient can be associated with an age difference of roughly 2-2.5 Gyrs, with the oldest stars concentrated in the central ~15 kpc of the Galaxy. Within this centralregion, which we refer to as the Ancient Chronographic Sphere (ACS), the age difference spans a mean color range of about 0.05 mag (~0.8 Gyrs). Interestingly, the ACS extends far enough to include the Solar Neighborhood, suggesting that ancient metal-poor stars should be readily detectable in the vicinity of the Sun. Furthermore, we show that chronographic maps can be used to identify individual substructures, such as the Sagittarius Stream, and overdensities in the direction of Virgo and Monoceros, based on the observed contrast in their mean BHB colors with respect to the foreground/background field population.We acknowledge partial support from the grant PHY 14-30152; Physics Frontier Center/JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements (JINA-CEE), awarded by the US National Science Foundation.

  17. CARBON-ENHANCED METAL-POOR STARS IN THE INNER AND OUTER HALO COMPONENTS OF THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Carollo, Daniela; Norris, John E.; Freeman, Ken C.; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Kennedy, Catherine R.; Bovy, Jo; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Aoki, Wako E-mail: kcf@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: beers@pa.msu.edu E-mail: kenne257@msu.edu E-mail: sivarani@iiap.res.in

    2012-01-10

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in the halo components of the Milky Way are explored, based on accurate determinations of the carbon-to-iron ([C/Fe]) abundance ratios and kinematic quantities for over 30,000 calibration stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using our present criterion that low-metallicity stars exhibiting [C/Fe] ratios ({sup c}arbonicity{sup )} in excess of [C/Fe] =+0.7 are considered CEMP stars, the global frequency of CEMP stars in the halo system for [Fe/H] <-1.5 is 8%, for [Fe/H] <-2.0 it is 12%, and for [Fe/H] <-2.5 it is 20%. We also confirm a significant increase in the level of carbon enrichment with declining metallicity, growing from ([C/Fe]) {approx}+1.0 at [Fe/H] =-1.5 to ([C/Fe]) {approx}+1.7 at [Fe/H] =-2.7. The nature of the carbonicity distribution function (CarDF) changes dramatically with increasing distance above the Galactic plane, |Z|. For |Z| <5 kpc, relatively few CEMP stars are identified. For distances |Z| >5 kpc, the CarDF exhibits a strong tail toward high values, up to [C/Fe] > +3.0. We also find a clear increase in the CEMP frequency with |Z|. For stars with -2.0 < [Fe/H] <-1.5, the frequency grows from 5% at |Z| {approx}2 kpc to 10% at |Z| {approx}10 kpc. For stars with [Fe/H] <-2.0, the frequency grows from 8% at |Z| {approx}2 kpc to 25% at |Z| {approx}10 kpc. For stars with -2.0 < [Fe/H] <-1.5, the mean carbonicity is ([C/Fe]) {approx}+1.0 for 0 kpc < |Z| < 10 kpc, with little dependence on |Z|; for [Fe/H] <-2.0, ([C/Fe]) {approx}+1.5, again roughly independent of |Z|. Based on a statistical separation of the halo components in velocity space, we find evidence for a significant contrast in the frequency of CEMP stars between the inner- and outer-halo components-the outer halo possesses roughly twice the fraction of CEMP stars as the inner halo. The carbonicity distribution also differs between the inner-halo and outer-halo components-the inner halo has a greater portion of stars with modest carbon

  18. The effect of active galactic nuclei feedback on the halo mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Weiguang; Borgani, Stefano; Murante, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    We investigate baryon effects on the halo mass function (HMF), with emphasis on the role played by active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback. Haloes are identified with both friends-of-friends (FoF) and spherical overdensity (SO) algorithms. We embed the standard SO algorithm into a memory-controlled frame program and present the Python spherIcAl Overdensity code - PIAO (Chinese character: ). For both FoF and SO haloes, the effect of AGN feedback is that of suppressing the HMFs to a level even below that of dark matter (DM) simulations. The ratio between the HMFs in the AGN and in the DM simulations is ˜0.8 at overdensity Δc = 500, a difference that increases at higher overdensity Δc = 2500, with no significant redshift and mass dependence. A decrease of the halo masses ratio with respect to the DM case induces the decrease of the HMF in the AGN simulation. The shallower inner density profiles of haloes in the AGN simulation witnesses that mass reduction is induced by the sudden displacement of gas induced by thermal AGN feedback. We provide fitting functions to describe halo mass variations at different overdensities, which can recover the HMFs with a residual random scatter ≲5 per cent for halo masses larger than 1013 h-1 M⊙.

  19. VERY METAL-POOR STARS IN THE OUTER GALACTIC BULGE FOUND BY THE APOGEE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia Perez, Ana E.; Majewski, Steven R.; Hearty, Fred R.; Cunha, Katia; Shetrone, Matthew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Zasowski, Gail; Smith, Verne V.; Beers, Timothy C.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Holtzman, Jon; Nidever, David; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Ebelke, Garrett; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Girardi, Leo; and others

    2013-04-10

    Despite its importance for understanding the nature of early stellar generations and for constraining Galactic bulge formation models, at present little is known about the metal-poor stellar content of the central Milky Way. This is a consequence of the great distances involved and intervening dust obscuration, which challenge optical studies. However, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), a wide-area, multifiber, high-resolution spectroscopic survey within Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, is exploring the chemistry of all Galactic stellar populations at infrared wavelengths, with particular emphasis on the disk and the bulge. An automated spectral analysis of data on 2403 giant stars in 12 fields in the bulge obtained during APOGEE commissioning yielded five stars with low metallicity ([Fe/H] {<=} -1.7), including two that are very metal-poor [Fe/H] {approx} -2.1 by bulge standards. Luminosity-based distance estimates place the 5 stars within the outer bulge, where 1246 of the other analyzed stars may reside. A manual reanalysis of the spectra verifies the low metallicities, and finds these stars to be enhanced in the {alpha}-elements O, Mg, and Si without significant {alpha}-pattern differences with other local halo or metal-weak thick-disk stars of similar metallicity, or even with other more metal-rich bulge stars. While neither the kinematics nor chemistry of these stars can yet definitively determine which, if any, are truly bulge members, rather than denizens of other populations co-located with the bulge, the newly identified stars reveal that the chemistry of metal-poor stars in the central Galaxy resembles that of metal-weak thick-disk stars at similar metallicity.

  20. IUE observations of blue halo high luminosity stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, M.; Franco, M. L.; Stalio, R.

    1981-01-01

    Two high luminosity population II blue stars of high galactic latitude, BD+33 deg 2642 and HD 137569 were observed at high resolution. The stellar spectra show the effect of mass loss in BD+33 deg 2642 and abnormally weak metallic lines in HD 137569. The interstellar lines in the direction of BD+33 deg 2642, which lies at a height z greater than or equal to 6.2 kpc from the galactic plane, are split into two components. No high ionization stages are found at the low velocity component; nor can they be detected in the higher velocity clouds because of mixing with the corresponding stellar/circumstellar lines.

  1. Infrared Halo Frames a Newborn Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-08-01

    Summary: Observations with the VLT of a star-forming cloud have revealed, for the first time, a ring of infrared light around a nascent star. The images also show the presence of jets that emanate from the young object and collide with the surrounding cloud. ESO PR Photo 26a/03 ESO PR Photo 26a/03 [Preview - JPEG: 974 x 400 pix - 404k [Normal - JPEG: 1947 x 800 pix - 1M] The DC303.8-14.2 globule A small and dark interstellar cloud with the rather cryptic name of DC303.8-14.2 is located in the inner part of the Milky Way galaxy. It is seen in the southern constellation Chamaeleon and consists of dust and gas. Astronomers classify it as a typical example of a "globule". As many other globules, this cloud is also giving birth to a star. Some years ago, observations in the infrared spectral region with the ESA IRAS satellite observatory detected the signature of a nascent star at its centre. Subsequent observations with the Swedish ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) at La Silla (Chile) were carried out by Finnish astronomer Kimmo Lehtinen . He revealed that DC303.8-14.2 is collapsing under its own gravity, a process which will ultimately result in the birth of a new star from the gas and dust in this cloud. Additional SEST observations of the millimetre emission of carbon monoxide (CO) molecules demonstrated a strong outflow from the nascent star. A small part of the gas that falls inward onto the central object is re-injected into the surrounding via this outward-bound "bipolar stream" . The structure of DC303.8-14.2 The left panel in PR Photo 26a/03 shows the DC303.8-14.2 globule as it looks in red light. This image was obtained at wavelength 700 nm and has been reproduced from the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) [1]. It covers a sky region of 20 x 20 arcmin 2 , or about 50% of the area of the full moon. The dust particles in the cloud reflect the light from stars, causing the cloud to appear brighter than the adjacent sky. The brightness distribution over the cloud

  2. Anisotropies at Ultra High Energies and the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfendale, Arnold

    1999-08-01

    A measure of consistency is appearing in measurements of the anisotropy of arrival directions above 1017 eV and these show a Galactic Plane Enhancement and a S-N excess, to about 3.1018 eV. The implication is that Galactic particles predominate here. At higher energies, where an Extragalactic origin is preferred, a contender for the `sources' is exotic dark matter particles. However, an analysis of the anisotropy at the highest energies, or, rather, the lack of it, makes this interpretation highly unlikely. Instead, `bottom-up' acceleration, in galaxy-systems is preferred; the likely mass mixture of the primaries, above 1018 eV, helps to explain why strong clustering of arrival is not observed.

  3. X-ray detection of warm ionized matter in the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, F.; Senatore, F.; Gupta, A.; Guainazzi, M.; Mathur, S.; Krongold, Y.; Elvis, M.; Piro, L.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of the cold and mildly ionized gaseous baryonic metal components of our Galaxy, through the analysis of high-resolution Chandra and XMM-Newton spectra of two samples of Galactic and extragalactic sources. The comparison between lines of sight towards sources located in the disc of our Galaxy and extragalactic sources allows us for the first time to clearly distinguish between gaseous metal components in the disc and halo of our Galaxy. We find that a warm ionized metal medium (WIMM) permeates a large volume above and below the Galaxy's disc, perhaps up to the circum-galactic space. This halo WIMM imprints virtually the totality of the O I and O II absorption seen in the spectra of our extragalactic targets, has a temperature of T_{WIMM}^{Halo}=2900 ± 900 K, a density < n_H > _{WIMM}^{Halo} = 0.023 ± 0.009 cm-3 and a metallicity Z_{WIMM}^{Halo} = (0.4 ± 0.1) Z⊙. Consistently with previous works, we also confirm that the disc of the Galaxy contains at least two distinct gaseous metal components, one cold and neutral (the CNMM: cold neutral metal medium) and one warm and mildly ionized, with the same temperature of the halo WIMM, but higher density (< n_H > _{WIMM}^{Disc} = 0.09 ± 0.03 cm-3) and metallicity (Z_{WIMM}^{Disc} = 0.8 ± 0.1 Z⊙). By adopting a simple disc+sphere geometry for the Galaxy, we estimate masses of the CNMM and the total (disc + halo) WIMM of MCNMM ≲ 8 × 108 M⊙ and MWIMM ≃ 8.2 × 109 M⊙.

  4. A general relativistic approach to the Navarro Frenk White galactic halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Núñez, Darío; Sussman, Roberto A.

    2004-11-01

    Although galactic dark matter halos are basically Newtonian structures, the study of their interplay with large-scale cosmic evolution and with relativistic effects, such as gravitational lenses, quintessence sources or gravitational waves, makes it necessary to obtain adequate relativistic descriptions for these self-gravitating systems. With this purpose in mind, we construct a post-Newtonian fluid framework for the 'Navarro Frenk White' (NFW) models of galactic halos that follow from N-body numerical simulations. Since these simulations are unable to resolve regions very near the halo centre, the extrapolation of the fitting formula leads to a spherically averaged 'universal' density profile that diverges at the origin. We remove this inconvenient feature by replacing a small central region of the NFW halo with an interior Schwarzschild solution with constant density, continuously matched to the remaining NFW spacetime. A model of a single halo, as an isolated object with finite mass, follows by smoothly matching the NFW spacetime to a Schwarzschild vacuum exterior along the virial radius, the physical 'cut-off' customarily imposed, as the mass associated with NFW profiles diverges asymptotically. Numerical simulations assume weakly interacting collisionless particles, hence we suggest that NFW halos approximately satisfy an 'ideal gas' type of equation of state, where mass-density is the dominant rest-mass contribution to matter-energy, with the internal energy contribution associated with an anisotropic kinetic pressure. We show that, outside the central core, this pressure and the mass density roughly satisfy a polytropic relation. Since stellar polytropes are the equilibrium configurations in Tsallis' non-extensive formalism of statistical mechanics, we argue that NFW halos might provide a rough empirical estimate of the free parameter q of Tsallis' formalism.

  5. Orbits of selected stars in a barred Galactic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega-Mendoza, Hector; Allen, Christine; Moreno, Edmundo

    2008-10-01

    Stellar orbits were numerically integrated in the barred Galactic potential of Pichardo, Martos and Moreno (2004). The stellar sample was taken from the catalog of low-metallicity stars of Beers et al. (2000) with known kinematic information. We present a preliminary comparison of orbital parameters in both axisymmetric and barred potentials, emphasizing the dispersive effects introduced by the central Galactic bar.

  6. emission from stars and dust in the Galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Annual Average Maps at 3.5, 25, 100, and 240 Aum. Galactic coordinate Mollweide projection maps of the entire sky at four wavelengths showing emission from stars and dust in the Galactic plane (horizontal feature) and light scattered and emitted by dust in the solar system (S-shape).

  7. The evolution of galaxy star formation activity in massive haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popesso, P.; Biviano, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Wilman, D.; Salvato, M.; Magnelli, B.; Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Rodighiero, G.; Ziparo, F.; Berta, S.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Lutz, D.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Cimatti, A.; Fadda, D.; Ilbert, O.; Le Floch, E.; Nordon, R.; Poglitsch, A.; Xu, C. K.

    2015-02-01

    Context. There is now a large consensus that the current epoch of the cosmic star formation history (CSFH) is dominated by low mass galaxies while the most active phase, between redshifts 1 and 2, is dominated by more massive galaxies, which evolve more quickly. Aims: Massive galaxies tend to inhabit very massive haloes, such as galaxy groups and clusters. We aim to understand whether the observed "galaxy downsizing" could be interpreted as a "halo downsizing", whereas the most massive haloes, and their galaxy populations, evolve more rapidly than the haloes with lower mass. Methods: We studied the contribution to the CSFH of galaxies inhabiting group-sized haloes. This is done through the study of the evolution of the infra-red (IR) luminosity function of group galaxies from redshift 0 to redshift ~1.6. We used a sample of 39 X-ray-selected groups in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), the Chandra Deep Field North (CDFN), and the COSMOS field, where the deepest available mid- and far-IR surveys have been conducted with Spitzer MIPS and with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on board the Herschel satellite. Results: Groups at low redshift lack the brightest, rarest, and most star forming IR-emitting galaxies observed in the field. Their IR-emitting galaxies contribute ≤10% of the comoving volume density of the whole IR galaxy population in the local Universe. At redshift ≳1, the most IR-luminous galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) are mainly located in groups, and this is consistent with a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR) vs. density anti-correlation observed in the nearby Universe. At these redshifts, group galaxies contribute 60-80% of the CSFH, i.e. much more than at lower redshifts. Below z ~ 1, the comoving number and SFR densities of IR-emitting galaxies in groups decline significantly faster than those of all IR-emitting galaxies. Conclusions: Our results are consistent with a "halo downsizing" scenario and highlight the

  8. The distribution of stars in space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, G.

    Contents: 1. A didactic ramble. 2. Star counts and galactic structure. 3. Integrated surface-brightness measurements. 4. Specific tracers of galactic structure. 5. The analysis of star-count data. 6. The shape of the metal-poor halo.

  9. Enrichment history of elements in the galactic stars based on the SAGA database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, S.; Suda, T.; Komiya, Y.; Fujimoto, M. Y.

    2012-09-01

    We analyze the enrichment histories of chemical elements in the Galactic halo stars with use of large abundance data compiled in the Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) database [4]. We find four different populations represented by stars divided at [Fe/H] ~= -1.8, ~= -2.2 and ~= -3.3 across which mean enrichments of C, Mg, Si, Ca, Ni, Co and Zn decrease by ~ 0.1 or ~ 0.1-0.3 dex toward higher metallicity. The first one is common to both α-elements (C, Mg, Si and Ca) and iron-group elements (Ni and Zn). And the second one is seen for C, Co and Zn, but not for other α-elements and Ni, while the third one is only seen for Co and Zn. We also investigate the correlation of Zn enrichment with the spatial distribution of stars. The difference near [Fe/H] ~= -1.8 is detected for stars with the vertical distance from the disk less than 500pc and unclear for stars greater than it. The offset near [Fe/H] ~= -2.2 is detected for stars greater than 500pc, but does not exist for stars less than it.

  10. The Frequency of Field Blue-Straggler Stars in the Thick Disk and Halo System of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santucci, Rafael M.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Rossi, Silvia; Beers, Timothy C.; Reggiani, Henrique M.; Lee, Young Sun; Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Carollo, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of a new, large sample of field blue-straggler stars (BSSs) in the thick disk and halo system of the Galaxy, based on stellar spectra obtained during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). Using estimates of stellar atmospheric parameters obtained from application of the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline, we obtain a sample of some 8000 BSSs, which are considered along with a previously selected sample of some 4800 blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars. We derive the ratio of BSSs to BHB stars, FBSS/BHB, as a function of Galactocentric distance and distance from the Galactic plane. The maximum value found for FBSS/BHB is ∼ 4.0 in the thick disk (at 3 kpc\\lt |Z|\\lt 4 kpc), declining to on the order of ∼ 1.5-2.0 in the inner-halo region; this ratio continues to decline to ∼1.0 in the outer-halo region. We associate a minority of field BSSs with a likely extragalactic origin; at least 5% of the BSS sample exhibit radial velocities, positions, and distances commensurate with membership in the Sagittarius Stream.

  11. Soft X-Ray Observations of the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robin; Kuntz, K. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this project, my co-I (K.D. Kuntz) and I plan to extract the soft X-ray spectrum emitted by the hot gas along a high latitude line of sight. We plan to subtract off the local component (garnered from other observations) in order to isolate the halo component. We then plan to combine this spectral information with the ultraviolet resonance line emission produced by slightly cooler gas along the line of sight and use the two observations as a constraint on models. My co-I, K.D., Kuntz has been working on the determination of the instrumental background. I have not yet drawn any of the funds for this project. I have just moved from J h s Hopkins University to the University of Georgia and anticipate finishing the project while at the University of Georgia.

  12. Using accurate phase space coordinates of ~100,00 halo field stars to constrain the Milky Way halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Monica

    2015-08-01

    The current cosmological paradigm predicts that dark matter halos are triaxial overall, but oblate in regions where baryons dominate. However recent measurements of the shape of the Milky Way dark matter halo find it to be very triaxial with a shape and orientation that are significantly at odds with theoretical predictions. The ESA’s Gaia satellite will soon map the entire Milky Way giving us six phase-space coordinates, ages and abundances for hundreds of thousands of halo stars. I will report progress on a new code based on the Schwarzschild orbit superposition method and orbital frequency mapping, to determine the global shape of the Milky Way's dark matter halo using field stars from Gaia. This technique will simultaneously yield the self-consistent phase-space distribution function of the stellar halo in the inner 20-30kpc region. Detailed analysis of correlations between the chemical abundances, ages and orbits of halo stars in this distribution function will enable us to extract clues to the formation history of the Milky Way that are encoded in orbital properties of halo stars.

  13. The galactic halo in mixed dark matter cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderhalden, D.; Diemand, J.; Schneider, A.; Bertone, G.; Macciò, A.V. E-mail: diemand@physik.uzh.ch E-mail: maccio@mpia.de

    2012-10-01

    A possible solution to the small scale problems of the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario is that the dark matter consists of two components, a cold and a warm one. We perform a set of high resolution simulations of the Milky Way halo varying the mass of the WDM particle (m{sub WDM}) and the cosmic dark matter mass fraction in the WDM component ( f-bar {sub W}). The scaling ansatz introduced in combined analysis of LHC and astroparticle searches postulates that the relative contribution of each dark matter component is the same locally as on average in the Universe (e.g. f{sub W,s}un = f-bar {sub W}). Here we find however, that the normalised local WDM fraction (f{sub W,s}un / f-bar {sub W}) depends strongly on m{sub WDM} for m{sub WDM} < 1 keV. Using the scaling ansatz can therefore introduce significant errors into the interpretation of dark matter searches. To correct this issue a simple formula that fits the local dark matter densities of each component is provided.

  14. An Extremely Fast Halo Hot Subdwarf Star in a Wide Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Péter; Ziegerer, Eva; Irrgang, Andreas; Geier, Stephan; Fürst, Felix; Kupfer, Thomas; Heber, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    New spectroscopic observations of the halo hyper-velocity star candidate SDSS J121150.27+143716.2 (V = 17.92 mag) revealed a cool companion to the hot subdwarf primary. The components have a very similar radial velocity and their absolute luminosities are consistent with the same distance, confirming the physical nature of the binary, which is the first double-lined hyper-velocity candidate. Our spectral decomposition of the Keck/ESI spectrum provided an sdB+K3V pair, analogous to many long-period subdwarf binaries observed in the Galactic disk. We found the subdwarf atmospheric parameters: {T}{{eff}}=30\\600+/- 500 K, {log}g=5.57+/- 0.06 cm s‑2, and He abundance {log}(n{{He}}/n{{H}})=-3.0+/- 0.2. Oxygen is the most abundant metal in the hot subdwarf atmosphere, and Mg and Na lines are the most prominent spectral features of the cool companion, consistent with a metallicity of [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]=-1.3. The non-detection of radial velocity variations suggest the orbital period to be a few hundred days, in agreement with similar binaries observed in the disk. Using the SDSS-III flux calibrated spectrum we measured the distance to the system d=5.5+/- 0.5 {{kpc}}, which is consistent with ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometric constraints derived from binary spectral energy distributions. Our kinematic study shows that the Galactic rest-frame velocity of the system is so high that an unbound orbit cannot be ruled out. On the other hand, a bound orbit requires a massive dark matter halo. We conclude that the binary either formed in the halo or was accreted from the tidal debris of a dwarf galaxy by the Milky Way.

  15. An Extremely Fast Halo Hot Subdwarf Star in a Wide Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Péter; Ziegerer, Eva; Irrgang, Andreas; Geier, Stephan; Fürst, Felix; Kupfer, Thomas; Heber, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    New spectroscopic observations of the halo hyper-velocity star candidate SDSS J121150.27+143716.2 (V = 17.92 mag) revealed a cool companion to the hot subdwarf primary. The components have a very similar radial velocity and their absolute luminosities are consistent with the same distance, confirming the physical nature of the binary, which is the first double-lined hyper-velocity candidate. Our spectral decomposition of the Keck/ESI spectrum provided an sdB+K3V pair, analogous to many long-period subdwarf binaries observed in the Galactic disk. We found the subdwarf atmospheric parameters: {T}{{eff}}=30\\600+/- 500 K, {log}g=5.57+/- 0.06 cm s-2, and He abundance {log}(n{{He}}/n{{H}})=-3.0+/- 0.2. Oxygen is the most abundant metal in the hot subdwarf atmosphere, and Mg and Na lines are the most prominent spectral features of the cool companion, consistent with a metallicity of [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]=-1.3. The non-detection of radial velocity variations suggest the orbital period to be a few hundred days, in agreement with similar binaries observed in the disk. Using the SDSS-III flux calibrated spectrum we measured the distance to the system d=5.5+/- 0.5 {{kpc}}, which is consistent with ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometric constraints derived from binary spectral energy distributions. Our kinematic study shows that the Galactic rest-frame velocity of the system is so high that an unbound orbit cannot be ruled out. On the other hand, a bound orbit requires a massive dark matter halo. We conclude that the binary either formed in the halo or was accreted from the tidal debris of a dwarf galaxy by the Milky Way.

  16. A SEARCH FOR FIELD HORIZONTAL-BRANCH STARS NEAR THE SOUTH GALACTIC POLE

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, R.; Wilhelm, R.; Costa, R. D. D.; Rossi, S.

    2010-03-15

    Searches for field horizontal-branch (FHB) stars in the halo of the Galaxy in the past have been carried out by several techniques, such as objective-prism surveys and visual or infrared photometric surveys. By choosing adequate color criteria, it is possible to improve the efficiency of identifying bona fide FHB stars among the other objects that exhibit similar characteristics, such as main-sequence A-stars, blue stragglers, subdwarfs, etc. In this work, we report the results of a spectroscopic survey carried out near the south Galactic pole intended to validate FHB stars originally selected from the HK objective-prism survey of Beers and colleagues, based on near-infrared color indices. A comparison between the stellar spectra obtained in this survey with theoretical stellar atmosphere models allows us to determine T {sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] for 13 stars in the sample. Stellar temperatures were calculated from measured (B - V) {sub o}, when this measurement was available (16 stars). The color index criteria adopted in this work are shown to correctly classify 30% of the sample as FHB, 25% as non-FHB (main-sequence stars and subdwarfes), whereas 40% could not be distinguished between FHB and main-sequence stars. We compare the efficacy of different color criteria in the literature intended to select FHB stars, and discuss the use of the Mg II 4481 line to estimate the metallicity.

  17. Collision of the Smith Cloud and its dark matter halo with the magnetized Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    The Smith Cloud is a massive High Velocity Cloud (HVC) that may have passed through the Milky Way disk in the recent past. Previous studies using hydrodynamic simulations suggest that a dark matter halo may have provided the confinement neccessary for the Smith Cloud to survive passage through the Galactic corona and disk. However, the models of the Galaxy that were used in these studies did not include a magnetic field, while magnetic fields are known to have confining properties. Other studies have shown that the Galactic magnetic field can inhibit mass exchange between the corona and the disk due to magnetic field compression. We extend upon these studies via FLASH magnetohydrodynamic simulations to consider the effects of a Galactic magnetic field on an infalling, dark matter confined HVC.

  18. Planck early results. XXIV. Dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Abergel, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Blagrave, K.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cantalupo, C. M.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chiang, C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Joncas, G.; Jones, A.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lockman, F. J.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pinheiro Gonçalves, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the first results from a comparison of Planck dust maps at 353, 545 and 857GHz, along with IRAS data at 3000 (100 μm) and 5000GHz (60 μm), with Green Bank Telescope 21-cm observations of Hi in 14 fields covering more than 800 deg2 at high Galactic latitude. The main goal of this study is to estimate the far-infrared to sub-millimeter (submm) emissivity of dust in the diffuse local interstellar medium (ISM) and in the intermediate-velocity (IVC) and high-velocity clouds (HVC) of the Galactic halo. Galactic dust emission for fields with average Hi column density lower than 2 × 1020 cm-2 is well correlated with 21-cm emission because in such diffuse areas the hydrogen is predominantly in the neutral atomic phase. The residual emission in these fields, once the Hi-correlated emission is removed, is consistent with the expected statistical properties of the cosmic infrared background fluctuations. The brighter fields in our sample, with an average Hi column density greater than 2 × 1020 cm-2, show significant excess dust emission compared to the Hi column density. Regions of excess lie in organized structures that suggest the presence of hydrogen in molecular form, though they are not always correlated with CO emission. In the higher Hi column density fields the excess emission at 857 GHz is about 40% of that coming from the Hi, but over all the high latitude fields surveyed the molecular mass faction is about 10%. Dust emission from IVCs is detected with high significance by this correlation analysis. Its spectral properties are consistent with, compared to the local ISM values, significantly hotter dust (T ~ 20K), lower submm dust opacity normalized per H-atom, and a relative abundance of very small grains to large grains about four times higher. These results are compatible with expectations for clouds that are part of the Galactic fountain in which there is dust shattering and fragmentation. Correlated dust emission in HVCs is not detected

  19. Advective and diffusive cosmic ray transport in galactic haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesen, Volker; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; Krause, Marita; Beck, Rainer; Stein, Yelena

    2016-05-01

    We present 1D cosmic ray transport models, numerically solving equations of pure advection and diffusion for the electrons and calculating synchrotron emission spectra. We find that for exponential halo magnetic field distributions advection leads to approximately exponential radio continuum intensity profiles, whereas diffusion leads to profiles that can be better approximated by a Gaussian function. Accordingly, the vertical radio spectral profiles for advection are approximately linear, whereas for diffusion they are of `parabolic' shape. We compare our models with deep Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of two edge-on galaxies, NGC 7090 and 7462, at λλ 22 and 6 cm. Our result is that the cosmic ray transport in NGC 7090 is advection dominated with V=150^{+80}_{-30} km s^{-1}, and that the one in NGC 7462 is diffusion dominated with D=3.0± 1.0 × 10^{28}E_GeV^{0.5} cm^2 s^{-1}. NGC 7090 has both a thin and thick radio disc with respective magnetic field scale heights of hB1 = 0.8 ± 0.1 kpc and hB2 = 4.7 ± 1.0 kpc. NGC 7462 has only a thick radio disc with hB2 = 3.8 ± 1.0 kpc. In both galaxies, the magnetic field scale heights are significantly smaller than what estimates from energy equipartition would suggest. A non-negligible fraction of cosmic ray electrons can escape from NGC 7090, so that this galaxy is not an electron calorimeter.

  20. CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS OF KINEMATICALLY SELECTED OUTER HALO STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lan; Zhao Gang; Ishigaki, Miho; Chiba, Masashi; Aoki, Wako E-mail: zhanglan@bao.ac.c E-mail: chiba@astr.tohoku.ac.j

    2009-12-01

    Chemical abundances of 26 metal-poor dwarfs and giants are determined from high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra obtained with the Subaru/High Dispersion Spectrograph. The sample is selected so that most of the objects have outer-halo kinematics. Self-consistent atmospheric parameters were determined by an iterative procedure based on spectroscopic analysis. Abundances of 13 elements, including alpha-elements (Mg, Si, Ca, Ti), odd-Z light elements (Na, Sc), iron-peak elements (Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn), and neutron-capture elements (Y, Ba), are determined by two independent data reduction and local thermodynamic equillibrium analysis procedures, confirming the consistency of the stellar parameters and abundances results. We find a decreasing trend of [alpha/Fe] with increasing [Fe/H] for the range of -3.5< [Fe/H] <-1, as found by Stephens and Boesgaard. [Zn/Fe] values of most objects in our sample are slightly lower than the bulk of halo stars previously studied. These results are discussed as possible chemical properties of the outer halo in the Galaxy.

  1. Dynamics and X-ray emission of a galactic superwind interacting with disk and halo gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchkov, Anatoly A.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Leitherer, Claus

    1994-08-01

    There is a general agreement that the conspicuous extranuclear X-ray, optical-line, and radio-contiuum emission of starbursts is associated with powerful galactic superwinds blowing from their centers. However, despite the significant advances in observational studies of superwinds, there is no consensus on the nature of the emitting material and even on the emission mechanisms themselves. This is to a great extent a consequence of a poor understanding of dynamical processes in the starburst superwind regions. To address this issue, we have conducted two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of galactic superwinds. While previous similar studies have used a single (disk) component to represent the ISM of the starburst galaxy, we analyze the interaction of the wind with a two-component disk-halo ambient interstellar medium and argue that this two-component representation is crucial for adequate modeling of starbursts. The emphasis of this study is on the geometry and structure of the wind region and the X-ray emission arising in the wind material and the shocked gas in the disk and the halo of the galaxy. The simulation results have shown that a clear-cut bipolar wind can easily develop under a range of very different conditions. On the other hand, a complex 'filamentary' structure associated with the entrained dense disk material is found to arise within the hot bubble blown out by the wind. The flow pattern within the bubble is dominated equally by the central biconic outflow and a system of whirling motions r elated to the origin and development of the 'filaments'. The filament parameters make them a good candidate for optical-emission-line filamentary gas observed in starburst halos. We find that the history of mass and energy deposition in the starburst region of the galaxy is crucial for wind dynamics. A 'mild' early wind, which arises as a result of the cumulative effect of stellar winds from massive stars, produces a bipolar vertical cavity in the disk and

  2. Dynamics and X-ray emission of a galactic superwind interacting with disk and halo gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suchkov, Anatoly A.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Leitherner, Claus

    1994-01-01

    There is a general agreement that the conspicuous extranuclear X-ray, optical-line, and radio-contiuum emission of starbursts is associated with powerful galactic superwinds blowing from their centers. However, despite the significant advances in observational studies of superwinds, there is no consensus on the nature of the emitting material and even on the emission mechanisms themselves. This is to a great extent a consequence of a poor understanding of dynamical processes in the starburst superwind regions. To address this issue, we have conducted two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of galactic superwinds. While previous similar studies have used a single (disk) component to represent the ISM of the starburst galaxy, we analyze the interaction of the wind with a two-component disk-halo ambient interstellar medium and argue that this two-component representation is crucial for adequate modeling of starbursts. The emphasis of this study is on the geometry and structure of the wind region and the X-ray emission arising in the wind material and the shocked gas in the disk and the halo of the galaxy. The simulation results have shown that a clear-cut bipolar wind can easily develop under a range of very different conditions. On the other hand, a complex 'filamentary' structure associated with the entrained dense disk material is found to arise within the hot bubble blown out by the wind. The flow pattern within the bubble is dominated equally by the central biconic outflow and a system of whirling motions r elated to the origin and development of the 'filaments'. The filament parameters make them a good candidate for optical-emission-line filamentary gas observed in starburst halos. We find that the history of mass and energy deposition in the starburst region of the galaxy is crucial for wind dynamics. A 'mild' early wind, which arises as a result of the cumulative effect of stellar winds from massive stars, produces a bipolar vertical cavity in the disk and

  3. The white dwarf luminosity function - A possible probe of the galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamanaha, Christopher M.; Silk, Joseph; Wood, M. A.; Winget, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamically inferred dark halo mass density, amounting to above 0.01 solar masses/cu pc at the sun's Galactocentric radius, can be composed of faint white dwarfs provided that the halo formed in a sufficiently early burst of star formation. The model is constrained by the observed disk white dwarf luminosity function which falls off below log (L/solar L) = -4.4, due to the onset of star formation in the disk. By using a narrow range for the initial mass function and an exponentially decaying halo star formation rate with an e-folding time equal to the free-fall time, all the halo dark matter is allowed to be in cool white dwarfs which lie beyond the falloff in the disk luminosity function. Although it is unlikely that all the dark matter is in these dim white dwarfs, a definite signature in the low-luminosity end of the white dwarf luminosity function is predicted even if they comprise only 1 percent of the dark matter. Current CCD surveys should answer the question of the existence of this population within the next few years.

  4. Constraints of the Origin of the Remarkable Lithium Abundance in the Halo Star BD+23 3912

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy R.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Boesgaard, Ann Merchant

    1996-12-01

    The Li abundance of the halo star BD+23 3912 ([Fe/H]=-1.5) lies a factor of 2 - 3 above the Spite plateau. This remarkable difference could reflect either less-than-average stellar Li depletion from a higher primordial Li abundance (as predicted by the Yale rotational stellar evolutionary models), which may have interesting implications for Big Bang nucleosynthesis, or the extraordinary action of Galactic Li production mechanisms. It is also possible that both processes have acted. We use our high resolution, high S/N Keck HIRES spectrum of BD+23 3912 to determine the s-process element abundances and 6Li/7Li ratio in this star. These values serve as signatures for two possible Li production scenarios: the 7Be transport mechanism in AGB stars, and cosmic ray interactions with the ISM. The unremarkable abundances of Y, Zr, Ba, La, Nd, and Sm that we derive argue against a significant contribution to this star' S excess Li from AGB production mechanisms carrying an s-process signature. Since halo subgiants like BD+23 3912 are expected to be particularly good 6Li preservers, our conservative upper limit of 6Li/7Li≤0.15 (compared to 0.25-0.50 expected from cosmic ray production) argues against cosmic ray + ISM interactions as the source for the excess Li, unless Li depletion from an even higher abundance has occurred with preferential 6Li depletion. Highly speculative RGB production scenarios also seem unlikely given the normal Na and M abundances we find and the normal C and 0 abundances determined by others. The totality of Li data on halo subgiants argues against possible diffusion scenarios, in which all such stars dredge up Li that diffused during the main sequence. While the high Li abundance in BD+23 3912 is consistent with that expected from Yale rotational models having a lower-than-average initial angular momentum, future observations of -process elements (particularly 11B) produced in supernovae should provide additional constraints on any enrichment

  5. BVRI and UBV Photometry of Metal-Poor and Horizontal-Branch Candidates in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lee, N.; Beers, T. C.; Smith, H. A.; Marsteller, B.; Krugler, J.; Lee, Y.; Wilhelm, R.; Terndrup, D.

    2005-12-01

    We report on UBVRI CCD photometry that has been obtained over the course of the past seven years for a sample of over 1600 metal-poor (MP), field horizontal-branch (FHB), and other A-type candidates selected from two large objective-prism surveys, the HK survey of Beers and collaborators and the Hamburg/ESO stellar survey of Christlieb and colleagues. These stars either have, or soon will have, medium-resolution (1-2 Å) spectroscopy obtained with various 2.5m - 4m class telescopes, including the SOAR 4.1m. These observations are being employed for several purposes. In the case of the FHB/A stars, the UBV photometry is useful for separating out low-gravity stars from the high-gravity ones. The subsample of high-gravity A-type stars includes Blue Metal Poor stars, halo and thick-disk blue stragglers, main-sequence A-type dwarfs, and Am and Ap stars. These observations are also being used to derive photometric distance estimates that will aid studies of high-velocity hydrogen clouds in the Galaxy, as well as to refine Galactic mass measurements. The data for the low-metallicity objects will be used to obtain estimates of temperatures that are required for elemental abundance studies based on future high-resolution spectroscopic observations, as well as to estimate distances for use in kinematic studies. T.C.B. and Y.L. acknowledge partial support from grant AST 04-06784, as well as from grant PHY 02-16783, Physics Frontier Center/Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), awarded by the US National Science Foundation.

  6. POPULATION III STAR FORMATION IN LARGE COSMOLOGICAL VOLUMES. I. HALO TEMPORAL AND PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Brian D.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Smith, Britton D.; Turk, Matthew J.; Hahn, Oliver

    2013-08-20

    We present a semi-analytic, computationally inexpensive model to identify halos capable of forming a Population III star in cosmological simulations across a wide range of times and environments. This allows for a much more complete and representative set of Population III star forming halos to be constructed, which will lead to Population III star formation simulations that more accurately reflect the diversity of Population III stars, both in time and halo mass. This model shows that Population III and chemically enriched stars coexist beyond the formation of the first generation of stars in a cosmological simulation until at least z {approx} 10, and likely beyond, though Population III stars form at rates that are 4-6 orders of magnitude lower than chemically enriched stars by z = 10. A catalog of more than 40,000 candidate Population III forming halos were identified, with formation times temporally ranging from z = 30 to z = 10, and ranging in mass from 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} to 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. At early times, the environment that Population III stars form in is very similar to that of halos hosting chemically enriched star formation. At later times Population III stars are found to form in low-density regions that are not yet chemically polluted due to a lack of previous star formation in the area. Population III star forming halos become increasingly spatially isolated from one another at later times, and are generally closer to halos hosting chemically enriched star formation than to another halo hosting Population III star formation by z {approx} 10.

  7. EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. II. HALO STRUCTURE AND SUBSTRUCTURE TRACED BY RR LYRAE STARS TO 30 kpc

    SciTech Connect

    Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko; Morgan, Dylan M.; Becker, Andrew C.; Stuart, J. Scott; Sharma, Sanjib; Palaversa, Lovro; Juric, Mario; Wozniak, Przemyslaw; Oluseyi, Hakeem

    2013-08-01

    We present a sample of {approx}5000 RR Lyrae stars selected from the recalibrated LINEAR data set and detected at heliocentric distances between 5 kpc and 30 kpc over {approx}8000 deg{sup 2} of sky. The coordinates and light curve properties, such as period and Oosterhoff type, are made publicly available. We analyze in detail the light curve properties and Galactic distribution of the subset of {approx}4000 type ab RR Lyrae (RRab) stars, including a search for new halo substructures and the number density distribution as a function of Oosterhoff type. We find evidence for the Oosterhoff dichotomy among field RR Lyrae stars, with the ratio of the type II and I subsamples of about 1:4, but with a weaker separation than for globular cluster stars. The wide sky coverage and depth of this sample allow unique constraints for the number density distribution of halo RRab stars as a function of galactocentric distance: it can be described as an oblate ellipsoid with an axis ratio q = 0.63 and with either a single or a double power law with a power-law index in the range -2 to -3. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the Oosterhoff type II subsample has a steeper number density profile than the Oosterhoff type I subsample. Using the group-finding algorithm EnLink, we detected seven candidate halo groups, only one of which is statistically spurious. Three of these groups are near globular clusters (M53/NGC 5053, M3, M13), and one is near a known halo substructure (Virgo Stellar Stream); the remaining three groups do not seem to be near any known halo substructures or globular clusters and seem to have a higher ratio of Oosterhoff type II to Oosterhoff type I RRab stars than what is found in the halo. The extended morphology and the position (outside the tidal radius) of some of the groups near globular clusters are suggestive of tidal streams possibly originating from globular clusters. Spectroscopic follow-up of detected halo groups is encouraged.

  8. Dusty Mass Loss from Galactic Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Meixner, Margaret; Kastner, Joel H.

    2016-06-01

    We are probing how mass loss from Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars depends upon their metallicity. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are evolved stars that eject large parts of their mass in outflows of dust and gas in the final stages of their lives. Our previous studies focused on mass loss from AGB stars in lower metallicity galaxies: the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). In our present study, we analyze AGB star mass loss in the Galaxy, with special attention to the Bulge, to investigate how mass loss differs in an overall higher metallicity environment. We construct radiative transfer models of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of stars in the Galaxy identified as AGB stars from infrared and optical surveys. Our Magellanic Cloud studies found that the AGB stars with the highest mass loss rates tended to have outflows with carbon-rich dust, and that overall more carbon-rich (C-rich) dust than oxygen-rich (O-rich) was produced by AGB stars in both LMC and SMC. Our radiative transfer models have enabled us to determine reliably the dust chemistry of the AGB star from the best-fit model. For our Galactic sample, we are investigating both the dust chemistries of the AGB stars and their mass-loss rates, to compare the balance of C-rich dust to O-rich dust between the Galactic bulge and the Magellanic Clouds. We are also constructing detailed dust opacity models of AGB stars in the Galaxy for which we have infrared spectra; e.g., from the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). This detailed dust modeling of spectra informs our choice of dust properties to use in radiative transfer modeling of SEDs of Galactic AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX15AF15G.

  9. Trajectories of Cepheid variable stars in the Galactic nuclear bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2012-06-01

    The central region of our Galaxy provides us with a good opportunity to study the evolution of galactic nuclei and bulges because we can observe various phenomena in detail at the proximity of 8 kpc. There is a hierarchical alignment of stellar systems with different sizes; from the extended bulge, the nuclear bulge, down to the compact cluster around the central supermassive blackhole. The nuclear bulge contains stars as young as a few Myr, and even hosts the ongoing star formation. These are in contrast to the more extended bulge which are dominated by old stars, ~10Gyr. It is considered that the star formation in the nuclear bulge is caused by fresh gas provided from the inner disk. In this picture, the nuclear bulge plays an important role as the interface between the gas supplier, the inner disk, and the galactic nucleus. Kinematics of young stars in the nuclear bulge is important to discuss the star forming process and the gas circulation in the Galactic Center. We here propose spectroscopic observations of Cepheid variable stars, ~25 Myr, which we recently discovered in the nuclear bulge. The spectra taken in this proposal will allow timely estimates of the systemic velocities of the variable stars.

  10. Metal-poor stars towards the Galactic bulge: A population potpourri⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; McWilliam, Andrew; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive chemical abundance analysis of five red giants and two horizontal branch (HB) stars towards the southern edge of the Galactic bulge, at (l, b) ~ (0°,-11°). Based on high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Magellan/MIKE spectrograph, we derived up to 23 chemical element abundances and identify a mixed bag of stars, representing various populations in the central regions of the Galaxy. Although cosmological simulations predict that the inner Galaxy was host to the first stars in the Universe, we see no chemical evidence of the ensuing massive supernova explosions: all of our targets exhibit halo-like, solar [Sc/Fe] ratios, which is in contrast to the low values predicted from Population III nucleosynthesis. One of the targets is a CEMP-s star at [Fe/H] = -2.52 dex, and another target is a moderately metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -1.53 dex) CH star with strong enrichment in s-process elements (e.g., [Ba/Fe] = 1.35). These individuals provide the first contenders of these classes of stars towards the bulge. Four of the carbon-normal stars exhibit abundance patterns reminiscent of halo star across a metallicity range spanning -2.0 to -2.6 dex, i.e., enhanced α-elements and solar Fe-peak and neutron-capture elements, and the remaining one is a regular metal-rich bulge giant. The position, distance, and radial velocity of one of the metal-poor HB stars coincides with simulations of the old trailing arm of the disrupted Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. While their highly uncertain proper motions prohibit a clear kinematic separation, the stars' chemical abundances and distances suggest that these metal-poor candidates, albeit located towards the bulge, are not of the bulge, but rather inner halo stars on orbits that make them pass through the central regions. Thus, we caution similar claims of detections of metal-poor stars as true habitants of the bulge. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 meter Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas

  11. Beyond halo mass: galactic conformity as a smoking gun of central galaxy assembly bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Watson, Douglas F.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2015-09-01

    Quenched central galaxies tend to reside in a preferentially quenched large-scale environment, a phenomenon that has been dubbed galactic conformity. Remarkably, this tendency persists out to scales far larger than the virial radius of the halo hosting the central. Therefore, conformity manifestly violates the widely adopted assumption that the dark matter halo mass Mvir exclusively governs galaxy occupation statistics. This paper is the first in a series studying the implications of the observed conformity signal for the galaxy-dark matter connection. We show that recent measurements of conformity on scales r ˜ 1-5 Mpc imply that central galaxy quenching statistics cannot be correctly predicted with the knowledge of Mvir alone. We also demonstrate that ejected (or `backsplash') satellites cannot give rise to the signal. We then invoke the age matching model, which is predicated on the co-evolution of galaxies and haloes. We find that this model produces a strong signal, and that central galaxies are solely responsible. We conclude that large-scale `two-halo' conformity represents a smoking gun of central galaxy assembly bias, and indicates that contemporary models of satellite quenching have systematically overestimated the influence of post-infall processes.

  12. Hidden Galactic Accretion: The Discovery of Low-Velocity Halo Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peek, J. E. G.; Putman, M. E.; Sommer-Larsen, J.; Heiles, C. E.; Stanimirovic, S.; Douglas, K.; Gibson, S.; Korpela, E.

    2007-12-01

    High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs) have been thought to be part of the Galactic accretion process since their discovery more than 40 years ago. Two modes through which HVCs may be generated and contribute to the ongoing growth of our Galaxy are (1) the tidal stripping of satellite galaxies and (2) the fragmented condensation of the Galaxy's hot baryonic halo. We have run cosmological Tree-SPH simulations of a Milky-Way sized galaxy, in which we can resolve clouds down to 10^5 M⊙, in an attempt to probe the cooling halo accretion process. The simulations show that this HVC generation mechanism can indeed reproduce the characteristics of observed population of HVCs, including the flux, velocity and cloud clustering properties. These simulations also predict an equally large population of halo clouds moving at lower radial velocities: Low-Velocity Halo Clouds (LVHCs). These clouds would not be observed as HVCs, but would rather be confused with local disk gas. Taking advantage of the known empirical result that HVCs have undetectably low infrared dust flux compared to their 21cm column, we search for these clouds in the preliminary GALFA-HI survey and IRAS. We announce the discovery of the first examples of these clouds, and describe their properties. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST 04-06987 and NSF grant AST 07-09347.

  13. On the onset of galactic winds in quiescent star forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Y.; Teyssier, R.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The hierarchical model of galaxy formation, despite its many successes, still overpredicts the baryons fraction locked in galaxies as a condensed phase. The efficiency of supernovae feedback, proposed a long time ago as a possible solution for this so-called “overcooling” problem, is still under debate, mainly because modelling supernovae explosions within a turbulent interstellar medium, while capturing realistic large scale flows around the galaxy is a very demanding task. Aims: Our goal is to study the effect of supernovae feedback on a disc galaxy, taking into account the impact of infalling gas on both the star formation history and the corresponding outflow structure, the apparition of a supernovae-driven wind being highly sensitive to the halo mass, the galaxy spin and the star formation efficiency. Methods: We model our galaxies as cooling and collapsing NFW spheres. The dark matter component is modelled as a static external potential, while the baryon component is described by the Euler equations using the AMR code RAMSES. Metal-dependent cooling and supernovae-heating are also implemented using state-of-the-art recipes coming from cosmological simulations. We allow for three parameters to vary: the halo circular velocity, the spin parameter and the star formation efficiency. Results: We found that the ram pressure of infalling material is the key factor limiting the apparition of galactic winds. We obtain a very low feedback efficiency, with supernovae to wind energy conversion factor around one percent, so that only low circular velocity galaxies give rise to strong winds. For massive galaxies, we obtain a galactic fountain, for which we discuss the observational properties. Conclusions: We conclude that for quiescent isolated galaxies, galactic winds appear only in very low mass systems. Although this can quite efficiently enrich the IGM with metals, they do not carry away enough cold material to solve the overcooling problem.

  14. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE GALACTIC HALO MAGNETIC FIELD USING ROTATION MEASURES OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES TOWARD THE OUTER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Brown, J. C.; Van Eck, C. L.; Stil, J. M.; Taylor, A. R.; Haverkorn, M.; Kronberg, P. P.; Shukurov, A.

    2012-08-10

    We present a study of the Milky Way disk and halo magnetic field, determined from observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) toward 641 polarized extragalactic radio sources in the Galactic longitude range 100 Degree-Sign -117 Degree-Sign , within 30 Degree-Sign of the Galactic plane. For |b| < 15 Degree-Sign , we observe a symmetric RM distribution about the Galactic plane. This is consistent with a disk field in the Perseus arm of even parity across the Galactic mid-plane. In the range 15 Degree-Sign < |b| < 30 Degree-Sign , we find median RMs of -15 {+-} 4 rad m{sup -2} and -62 {+-} 5 rad m{sup -2} in the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres, respectively. If the RM distribution is a signature of the large-scale field parallel to the Galactic plane, then this suggests that the halo magnetic field toward the outer Galaxy does not reverse direction across the mid-plane. The variation of RM as a function of Galactic latitude in this longitude range is such that RMs become more negative at larger |b|. This is consistent with an azimuthal magnetic field of strength 2 {mu}G (7 {mu}G) at a height 0.8-2 kpc above (below) the Galactic plane between the local and the Perseus spiral arm. We propose that the Milky Way could possess spiral-like halo magnetic fields similar to those observed in M51.

  15. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC O-TYPE STARS. I. SHORT-TERM CONSTANT VELOCITY STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S. J.; Gies, D. R.; Hillwig, T. C.; McSwain, M. V.; Huang, W. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: mcswain@lehigh.edu

    2011-11-15

    We present radial velocities for 18 Galactic O-type stars. These stars display small radial velocity scatter over timescales of one to two weeks. Some of them are long-period binaries while others are probably single stars. By fitting model spectra to our observed spectra we obtain estimates for effective temperature, log g, rotational velocity, and average radial velocity for each target.

  16. Rotational Velocities of B Stars in the Outer Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmany, Catharine D.; Glaspey, J. W.; Bensby, T.; Daflon, S.; Cunha, K.; Oey, M. S.; Wolff, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    Metallicity gradients in the Milky Way disk are important constraints to models of chemical evolution and galaxy formation. As part of a long term project to better constrain the galactic metallicity gradient (Daflon & Cunha) we have obtained spectra of early B stars in the outer disk with the Magellan 6.5m (Clay) and MIKE double echelle spectrograph. We present herein a preliminary analysis of the projected rotational velocities (v sin i), for 150 early B stars in the third galactic quadrant. The stars were selected from the Case-Hamburg Catalog of Luminous Stars (Reed, 2005). Distances have been computed from the reddening-free Q parameter and published Mv values. We use the spectral type information in the catalog to further refine distances of the non-main sequence B stars in our sample. We have followed the method described by Daflon et al (2007) to estimate v sin i for these stars from their He I lines. These stars are primarily field B stars, with galactocentric distances between 8 and 16 kpc, and most of them lie outside dense clusters and associations. Our analysis will address two questions: 1) Is there any evidence for a difference in mean rotation rate as a function of galactocentric distance and/or metallicity; and 2) Do these stars have on average low rotation rates, as seem to characterize stars in the field and in expanding associations near the Sun (Wolff, et al. 2007).

  17. Super Star Clusters: the Engines of Galactic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, Kelly; Lu, Jessica R.; Kewley, Lisa; Kudritzki, Rolf; Barnes, Joshua Edward

    2015-08-01

    Winds in starburst galaxies are ubiquitous; however, we still do not understand how winds from individual star clusters unite into a large-scale galactic outflow. Recent work suggests that radiation pressure from young (<7 Myr) massive super star clusters (SSCs) may be a necessary first step in launching global starburst winds. We have begun a program using integral field spectroscopy with Keck/OSIRIS to investigate the winds from these very young clusters, and how energy is transferred from the stellar population to the surrounding medium to launch galactic-scale outflows. We present preliminary work on a sample of young massive clusters from the Antennae.

  18. Star-forming galactic contrails as a source of metal enrichment and ionizing radiation at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Michael; Becker, George D.; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Gauthier, Jean-Rene

    2014-06-01

    A spectroscopically detected Lyman α emitting halo at redshift 3.216 in the GOODS-N field is found to reside at the convergence of several line-emitting filaments. Spatially extended emission apparently by He II 1640 Å and several metal transitions is seen within several arcseconds from the position of the central galaxy. The V = 24.9 galaxy mainly responsible for the continuum emission at the centre of the halo has broad-band colours and spectral features consistent with a z = 3.216 star-forming galaxy. Hubble Space Telescope images show that some of the filaments coincide, in projection, with several, mostly blue galaxies, with pronounced head-tail structures partly aligned with each other. These objects, for which we cannot rule that they are foreground, chance projections in front of the high-redshift halo, are seen over an area with a linear extent of at least 12 arcsec. The broad-band images of some galaxies suggest the presence of ram-pressure stripping, including possible evidence for recent star formation in the stripped contrails. Spatial gradients in the appearance of several galaxies may represent a stream of galaxies passing from a colder to a hotter intergalactic medium. The release of the enriched interstellar medium from galaxies and the occurrence of star formation and stellar feedback in the galactic contrails suggest a mechanism for the metal enrichment of the high-redshift intergalactic medium that does not require long-range galactic winds. If these galaxies are at the same redshift as the Lyα halo, their very blue colours may be a consequence of the stripping of gas. A stripped stellar population and star formation in galactic contrails suggest promising sites for the escape of ionizing radiation from high-redshift galaxies.

  19. Coronal Emission from dG Halo Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Harnden, F. R.

    2005-01-01

    The halo dG star HD 114762 was observed with the XMM-Newton satellite on 28-29 June 2004, during orbit 834, and the data were processed using the XMM-Newton Science Analysis System (SAS), version 6.0.0. Somewhat surprisingly, the target was NOT detected during this approx.30 ks exposure, which yielded instead a count rate upper limit of less than 0.0041 cts/s. We computed an X-ray flux upper limit by assuming a Raymond-Smith thermal spectrum of coronal temperature 1 million degrees K, typical of quiet old stars, a hydrogen column density of 2-10$^{19)$ cm$^{-2)$ and sub-solar abundances of 0.2. Our calculated X-ray luminosity upper limit in the 0.25-7.8 keV band is L$_x < 4.95 $\\time$10$^{26)$ erg/s, where we have assumed a stellar distance of 28 pc. This relatively low upper limit has implications for the capability of metal poor stars to host solar-like dynamos, as we will report in a forthcoming paper (now in preparation).

  20. Emission from the Local Galactic Halo in the 1/4 keV Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juda, M.

    1994-12-01

    Pointed observations with the ROSAT PSPC toward clouds at high galactic latitude provide a unique opportunity to probe emission from the local galactic halo in the 1/4 keV band. I present data from five fields toward clouds at |b| > 60(deg) identified through their IRAS 100 microns emission, two in the north galactic hemisphere and three in the south. In four of the five fields significant shadows are detected (2 north, 2 south). The derivation of the brightness of the shadowed component depends strongly on the assumed location and amount of absorbing material. Scaling the IRAS 100 microns emission by 10(20) H atom cm(-2) /MJy sr(-1) and correcting for the difference from the observed average 21 cm derived column density, the implied brightness of the distant emitting component is the same for the two northern latitude fields at { ~ 1.2*E(-3) counts s(-1) arcmin(-2}) ; this brightness is lower than that seen in the direction of Draco (Burrows & Mendenhall 1991, Snowden et al. 1991) and higher than in Ursa Major (Snowden et al. 1994). The two southern fields also have the same derived distant brightness at nearly the same level as the northern fields, { ~ 1.0*E(-3) counts s(-1) arcmin(-2}) . Approximately 20% of this emission may be attributed to an extragalactic background (Hasinger et al. 1993). The remaining emission, { ~ 0.8*E(-3) counts s(-1) arcmin(-2}) , would be provided by the local galactic halo. If these x-rays arise from a collisionally excited plasma at a temperature of 10(6) K the required emission measure is { ~ 0.0033 cm(-6) pc}. Burrows & Mendenhall 1991, Nature, 351, 629. Hasinger et al. 1993, A&A, 275, 1. Snowden et al. 1991, Science, 252, 1529. Snowden et al. 1994, ApJ, 430, 601.

  1. The interaction of high-velocity clouds with the galactic halo gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerp, J.; Kalberla, P. M. W.

    The analysis of the new Leiden/Dwingeloo 21-cm line and the ROSAT all-sky-survey data provided evidence for the interaction of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) with the gas of the galactic halo. The quantitative correlation of both surveys gave evidence that the Milky Way is enclosed within a gaseous halo with a vertical scale height of 4.4 kpc and a radial scale length of 15 kpc. Within this gaseous halo, soft X-ray plasma (T ~= 10^{6.2} K) as well as cold neutral atomic hydrogen seems to coexist. Using this gaseous halo model we can derive the intensity distribution of the soft X-ray background across the entire sky. However, towards the prominent HVC complexes we found excess soft X-ray emission. These areas of enhanced X-ray emission are by a factor of 2 to 3 brighter than the total ``calm'' SXRB intensity. These soft X-ray enhancements, as well as the recently detected H alpha-emission of HVCs may indicate that the HVCs interact with their environment. In the X-ray regime the excess radiation releases about 1036 {erg}/{s}. Compared to the kinetic energy of an HVC complex with MHVC ~= 10^6 - 10^7 M_{\\odot} and Ekin ~= 1053 - 1054 {erg}/{s}, only a tiny fraction of the HVCs motion is transferred into heating of the HVC material. Our results indicate that the HVC matter itself is heated up, not only the surrounding gaseous halo medium, because the determined emission measures of EM ~= 0.015 cm^{-6} pc (T ~= 10^{6.2} - 10^{6.3}) K are an order of magnitude larger than the surrounding volume density.

  2. Galactic Star Cluster mass evolution. High performance star by star simulations. Observations vs. modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berczik, Peter; Just, Andreas; Ernst, Andreas; Spurzem, Rainer

    2015-08-01

    We carry out the large set of Galactic Star Cluster simulations (from 1e2 up to 5e5 Msol initial masses) using our high performance parallel direct N-body code phi-GRAPE+GPU with the maximum possible numerical resolution (one particle one star) on the largest astrophysical GPU clusters (in Germany and China). Our main goal was to investigate the cluster initial volume "filling" factor to the process of the cluster mass loss as well us the cluster whole lifetime. We also investigate the evolution of the present day Cluster Mass Function in solar cylinder depending on the initial parameters of the star formation, Initial Cluster Mass Function and the star clusters masses and initial "filling" factors.

  3. Star formation scales and efficiency in Galactic spiral arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, D. J.; Moore, T. J. T.; Urquhart, J. S.; Elia, D.; Plume, R.; Rigby, A. J.; Thompson, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    We positionally match a sample of infrared-selected young stellar objects, identified by combining the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and Herschel Space Observatory Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey, to the dense clumps identified in the millimetre continuum by the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey in two Galactic lines of sight centred towards l = 30° and 40°. We calculate the ratio of infrared luminosity, LIR, to the mass of the clump, Mclump, in a variety of Galactic environments and find it to be somewhat enhanced in spiral arms compared to the interarm regions when averaged over kiloparsec scales. We find no compelling evidence that these changes are due to the mechanical influence of the spiral arm on the star formation efficiency rather than, e.g. different gradients in the star formation rate due to patchy or intermittent star formation, or local variations that are not averaged out due to small source samples. The largest variation in LIR/Mclump is found in individual clump values, which follow a lognormal distribution and have a range of over three orders of magnitude. This spread is intrinsic as no dependence of LIR/Mclump with Mclump was found. No difference was found in the luminosity distribution of sources in the arm and interarm samples and a strong linear correlation was found between LIR and Mclump.

  4. Fractional Yields Inferred from Halo and Thick Disk Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caimmi, R.

    2013-12-01

    Linear [Q/H]-[O/H] relations, Q = Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, are inferred from a sample (N=67) of recently studied FGK-type dwarf stars in the solar neighbourhood including different populations (Nissen and Schuster 2010, Ramirez et al. 2012), namely LH (N=24, low-α halo), HH (N=25, high-α halo), KD (N=16, thick disk), and OL (N=2, globular cluster outliers). Regression line slope and intercept estimators and related variance estimators are determined. With regard to the straight line, [Q/H]=a_{Q}[O/H]+b_{Q}, sample stars are displayed along a "main sequence", [Q,O] = [a_{Q},b_{Q},Δ b_{Q}], leaving aside the two OL stars, which, in most cases (e.g. Na), lie outside. The unit slope, a_{Q}=1, implies Q is a primary element synthesised via SNII progenitors in the presence of a universal stellar initial mass function (defined as simple primary element). In this respect, Mg, Si, Ti, show hat a_{Q}=1 within ∓2hatσ_ {hat a_{Q}}; Cr, Fe, Ni, within ∓3hatσ_{hat a_{Q}}; Na, Ca, within ∓ rhatσ_{hat a_{Q}}, r>3. The empirical, differential element abundance distributions are inferred from LH, HH, KD, HA = HH + KD subsamples, where related regression lines represent their theoretical counterparts within the framework of simple MCBR (multistage closed box + reservoir) chemical evolution models. Hence, the fractional yields, hat{p}_{Q}/hat{p}_{O}, are determined and (as an example) a comparison is shown with their theoretical counterparts inferred from SNII progenitor nucleosynthesis under the assumption of a power-law stellar initial mass function. The generalized fractional yields, C_{Q}=Z_{Q}/Z_{O}^{a_{Q}}, are determined regardless of the chemical evolution model. The ratio of outflow to star formation rate is compared for different populations in the framework of simple MCBR models. The opposite situation of element abundance variation entirely due to cosmic scatter is also considered under reasonable assumptions. The related differential element abundance

  5. Reconstructing the Accretion History of the Galactic Halo Using Stellar Chemical Abundance Ratio Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duane Morris; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Sen, Bodhisattva; Jessop, Will

    2015-08-01

    In this study we tested the prospects of using 2D chemical abundance ratio distributions (CARDs) found in stars of the stellar halo to determine its formation history. First, we used simulated data from eleven ``MW-like'' halos to generate satellite template sets of 2D CARDs of accreted dwarf satellites which are comprised of accreted dwarfs from various mass regimes and epochs of accretion. Next, we randomly drew samples of ~103-4 mock observations of stellar chemical abundance ratios ([α/Fe], [Fe/H]) from those eleven halos to generate samples of the underlying densities for our CARDs to be compared to our templates in our analysis. Finally, we used the expectation-maximization algorithm to derive accretion histories in relation to the satellite template set (STS) used and the sample size. For certain STS used we typically can identify the relative mass contributions of all accreted satellites to within a factor of 2. We also find that this method is particularly sensitive to older accretion events involving low-luminous dwarfs e.g. ultra-faint dwarfs --- precisely those events that are too ancient to be seen by phase-space studies of stars and too faint to be seen by high-z studies of the early Universe. Since our results only exploit two chemical dimensions and near-future surveys promise to provide ~6-9 dimensions, we conclude that these new high-resolution spectroscopic surveys of the stellar halo will allow us (given the development of new CARD-generating dwarf models) to recover the luminosity function of infalling dwarf galaxies --- and the detailed accretion history of the halo --- across cosmic time.

  6. Reconstructing the Accretion History of the Galactic Halo Using Stellar Chemical Abundance Ratio Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duane M.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Sen, Bodhisattva; Jessop, Will

    2016-08-01

    In this study we tested the prospects of using 2D chemical abundance ratio distributions (CARDs) found in stars of the stellar halo to determine its formation history. First, we used simulated data from eleven ``MW-like'' halos to generate satellite template sets of 2D CARDs of accreted dwarf satellites which are comprised of accreted dwarfs from various mass regimes and epochs of accretion. Next, we randomly drew samples of ~ 103-4 mock observations of stellar chemical abundance ratios ([α/Fe], [Fe/H]) from those eleven halos to generate samples of the underlying densities for our CARDs to be compared to our templates in our analysis. Finally, we used the expectation-maximization algorithm to derive accretion histories in relation to the satellite template set (STS) used and the sample size. For certain STS used we typically can identify the relative mass contributions of all accreted satellites to within a factor of 2. We also find that this method is particularly sensitive to older accretion events involving low-luminous dwarfs e.g. ultra-faint dwarfs - precisely those events that are too ancient to be seen by phase-space studies of stars and too faint to be seen by high-z studies of the early Universe. Since our results only exploit two chemical dimensions and near-future surveys promise to provide ~ 6-9 dimensions, we conclude that these new high-resolution spectroscopic surveys of the stellar halo will allow us (given the development of new CARD-generating dwarf models) to recover the luminosity function of infalling dwarf galaxies - and the detailed accretion history of the halo - across cosmic time.

  7. Metallicity of the Stars at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    A recent study suggests that the stars in the central parsec of our galaxy are not a single, roughly solar-metallicity population, as previously thought. Instead, these stars have a large variation in metallicities which has interesting implications for the formation history of the Milky Ways nuclear star cluster.Clues from AbundancesWhy do we care about the metallicity of stars and stellar populations? Metallicity measurements can help us to separate multiple populations of stars and figure out when and where they were formed.Measurements of the chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way have demonstrated that theres a metallicity gradient in the galaxy: on average, its below solar metallicity at the outer edges of the disk and increases to above solar metallicity within the central 5 kpc of the galaxy.So far, measurements of stars in the very center of the galaxy are consistent with this galactic trend: theyre all slightly above solar metallicity, with little variation between them. But these measurements exist for only about a dozen stars within the central 10 pc of the galaxy! Due to the high stellar density in this region, a larger sample is needed to get a complete picture of the abundances and thats what this study set out to find.Different PopulationsLed by Tuan Do (Dunlap Fellow at the University of Toronto and member of the Galactic Center Group at UCLA), the authors of this study determined the metallicities of 83 late-type giant stars within the central parsec of the galaxy. The metallicities were found by fitting the stars K-band spectra from observations by the NIFS instrument on the Gemini North telescope.In contrast to the previous studies, the authors found that the 83 stars exhibited a wide range of metallicities, from a tenth of solar metallicity all the way to super-solar metallicities.The abundances of the low-metallicity stars they found are consistent with globular cluster metallicities, suggesting that these stars (about 6% of the sample

  8. An Isolated Forming Star in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, Christopher; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Green, Joel D.

    2014-08-01

    We present photometry and spectroscopy of a candidate new FU Orionis object in the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS). The GBS is an X-ray survey of the Galactic Bulge region targeted at identifying new Low Mass X-ray Binaries in quiescence. It is a wide field survey, covering 12 square degrees above and below the Galactic Plane, and as such we have many different types of X-ray sources with implications for a broad cross-section of astronomy. One such object undergoes an optical and infrared outburst of at least 6 magnitudes which lasts for at least 4 years. It has a strong infrared excess, indicating the presence of a cloud of dust around it. We propose that this object is a protostar undergoing an FU Orionis outburst, despite being in a region far from molecular clouds or large star forming regions. We discuss implications of this isolation for models of star formation in the Galaxy.

  9. On the Origin of the High Lithium Abundance in the Halo Star BD+23{\\ }3912

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, C. P.; King, J. R.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    1996-09-01

    The Li abundance of the halo star BD+23{\\ }3912 ([Fe/H]=-1.5) lies a factor of 2-3 above the Spite plateau. This remarkable difference could reflect either less-than-average stellar Li depletion from a higher primordial Li abundance (as predicted by the Yale rotational stellar evolutionary models), which may have interesting implications for Big Bang nucleosynthesis, or the extraordinary action of Galactic Li production mechanisms (or both). We use our high resolution, high S/N Keck HIRES spectrum of BD+23{\\ }3912 to determine the s-process element abundances and (6) Li/(7) Li ratio in this star. These values serve as signatures for two possible Li production scenarios: {\\ }the (7) Be transport mechanism in AGB stars, and cosmic ray interactions with the ISM. The unremarkable abundances of Y, Zr, Ba, La, Nd, and Sm that we derive argue against a significant contribution to this star's excess Li from AGB production mechanisms carrying an s-process signature. Our conservative upper limit of (6) Li/(7) Li{<=}0.15 (compared to 0.25-0.50 expected from cosmic ray production) argues against cosmic ray + ISM interactions as the source for the excess Li, unless Li depletion from an even higher abundance has occurred with preferential (6) Li depletion. Highly speculative RGB production scenarios also seem unlikely given the normal Na and Al abundances we find and the normal C and O abundances determined by others. While the high Li abundance in BD+23{\\ }3912 is consistent with that expected from Yale rotational models having a lower-than-average initial angular momentum, future observations of ν-process elements (particularly (11) B) produced in supernovae should provide additional constraints on any enrichment scenarios seeking to explain the large Li abundance of this interesting star.

  10. Constraints on the Origin of the Remarkable Lithium Abundance of the Halo Star BD+23 3912

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy R.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Boesgaard, Ann M.

    1997-02-01

    The Li abundance of the halo star BD+23 3912 ([Fe/(H)] = -1.5) lies a factor of 2 - 3 above the Spite Plateau. This remarkable difference could reflect either less-than-average stellar Li depletion from a higher primordial Li abundance (as predicted by the Yale rotational stellar evolutionary models) having interesting implications for Big Bang nucleosynthesis, or the extraordinary action of Galactic Li production mechanisms. It is also possible that both mechanisms have acted. We use our high resolution, high S/(N) Keck HIRES spectrum of BD+23 3912 to determine the n-capture abundances and 6Li/(7Li) ratio in this star. These values serve as signatures for two possible Li production scenarios: the 7Be transport mechanism in AGB stars and cosmic ray interactions with the ISM. The unremarkable abundances of Y, Zr, Ba, La, Nd, and Sm that we derive argue against a significant contribution to this star's excess Li from AGB production mechanisms carrying an s-process signature. Our conservative upper limit of 6Li/(7Li)<=0.15, compared to 0.25 - 0.50 expected from cosmic ray production, argues against cosmic ray + ISM interactions as the source for the excess Li, unless Li depletion from an even higher abundance has occurred with preferential 6Li depletion. Highly speculative RGB production scenarios also seem unlikely given the normal Na and Al abundances we find and the normal C and O abundances determined by others. While the high Li abundance in BD+23 3912 is consistent with that expected from Yale rotational models having a lower-than-average initial angular momentum, future observations of ν-process elements (particularly 11B) produced in supernovae should provide additional constraints on any enrichment scenarios seeking to explain the large Li abundance of this interesting star.