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Sample records for galactic magnetic fields

  1. Observations of galactic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are enchored in gas clouds. Field lines are tangled in spiral arms, but highly regular between the arms. The similarity of pitch angles between gaseous and magnetic arms suggests a coupling between the density wave and the magnetic wave. Observations of large-scale patterns in Faraday rotation favour a dynamo origin of the regular fields. Fields in barred galaxies do not reveal the strong shearing shocks observed in the cold gas, but swing smoothly from the upstream region into the bar. Magnetic fields are important for the dynamcis of gas clouds, for the formation of spiral structures, bars and halos, and for mass and angular momentum transport in central regions.

  2. Modeling the evolution of galactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yar-Mukhamedov, D.

    2015-04-15

    An analytic model for evolution of galactic magnetic fields in hierarchical galaxy formation frameworks is introduced. Its major innovative components include explicit and detailed treatment of the physics of merger events, mass gains and losses, gravitational energy sources and delays associated with formation of large-scale magnetic fields. This paper describes the model, its implementation, and core results obtained by its means.

  3. Galactic and Intergalactic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, U.; Fletcher, A.

    This course-tested textbook conveys the fundamentals of magnetic fields and relativistic plasma in diffuse cosmic media, with a primary focus on phenomena that have been observed at different wavelengths. Theoretical concepts are addressed wherever necessary, with derivations presented in sufficient detail to be generally accessible. In the first few chapters the authors present an introduction to various astrophysical phenomena related to cosmic magnetism, with scales ranging from molecular clouds in star-forming regions and supernova remnants in the Milky Way, to clusters of galaxies. Later chapters address the role of magnetic fields in the evolution of the interstellar medium, galaxies and galaxy clusters. The book is intended for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students in astronomy and physics and will serve as an entry point for those starting their first research projects in the field.

  4. Magnetic Field Generation in Galactic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, Merav; Cowley, Steve; Maron, Jason; McWilliams, James

    2000-10-01

    The origin of the magnetic field in the universe is one of the great problems in astrophysics. The observed magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, for example, are of the order of microgauss and are coherent over galactic scales. It is usually assumed that turbulent fluid motions will enhance a seed field. In the present work we investigate the growth of the magnetic field in plasmas with high magnetic Prandtl number (the ratio of viscosity to resistivity). This growth occurs initially at scales below the viscous scale [1]. Kinney et al. [2] showed that in 2D the field saturates at an amplitude independent of the mean scale of the field. We discuss the initial growth in the three dimensional case where the dynamics of the field are on scales less than the viscosity scale [3]. At low initial field, the field grows and the scale decreases until the resistive scale is reached. The field then grows at a reduced rate until it reaches an equilibrium with the mean scale at a resistive scale. At higher initial amplitude, the field saturates before the mean scale has decreased to the resistive scale. The subsequent evolution is a slow decrease of the scale to the resistive scale, at which point it reaches equilibrium and stops evolving. To explain the large scale coherence of galactic fields, an inverse cascade is necessary. There is no evidence of an inverse cascade. We will present results for extended physics models including tensor viscosity and ambipular diffusion. [1] R. Kulsrud, and S. Anderson, Astrophys. J., 396, 606 (1992); A. Gruzinov, S. Cowley, and R. Sudan, Phys.Rev.Lett., 77, 4342 (1996). [2] R. M. Kinney, B. Chandran, S. Cowley, J. C. McWilliams, Astrophys. J., accepted to publication (2000). [3] M. Opher, S. Cowley, R. M. Kinney, B. Chandran, J. Maron and J.C. McWilliams, in preparation (2000).

  5. Magnetic Field Generation in Galactic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, M.; Cowley, S.; Schekochihin, A.; Kinney, R. M.; Chandran, B.; Maron, J.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2001-05-01

    The origin of the magnetic field in the universe is one of the great problems in astrophysics. The observed magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, for example, are of the order of microgauss and are coherent over galactic scales. Its is usually assumed that turbulent fluid motions will enhance a seed field. In the present work we invetigate the growth of the magnetic field in plasmas with high magnetic Prandtl number (the ratio of viscosity to resistivity). This growth occur initially at scales below the viscous scale [1]. Kinney et al. [2] showed that in 2D the field saturates at an amplitude independent of the mean scale of the field. We discuss the initial growth in the three dimensional case where the dynamics of the field on scales less than the viscosity scale [3]. At low initial field, the field grows and the scale decreases until the resistive scale is reached. The field then grows at a reduced rate until it reaches an equilibrium with the mean scale at a resistive scale. At higher initial amplitude, the field saturates before the mean scale has decreased to the resistive scale. The subsequent evolution is a slow decrease of the scale to the resistive scale, at which point it reaches equilibrium and stops evolving. To explain the large scale coherence of galactic fields, an inverse cascade is necessary. There is no evidence of an inverse cascade. We will present results for extended physics models including tensor viscosity and ambipular diffusion. [1] R. Kulsrud, and S. Anderson, Astrophys. J., 396, 606 (1992); A. Gruzinov, S. Cowley, and R. Sudan, Phys.Rev.Lett., 77, 4342 (1996). [2] R. M. Kinney, B. Chandran, S. Cowley, J. C. McWilliams, Astrophys. J., accepted to publication (2000). [3] M. Opher, S. Cowley, A. Schekochihin, R. M. Kinney, B. Chandran, J. Maron and J.C. McWilliams, in preparation (2001).

  6. Magnetic fields and galactic star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-10

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ≃0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas (n{sub H}>10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 μG. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  7. H II REGION DRIVEN GALACTIC BUBBLES AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2012-12-01

    The relative alignments of mid-infrared traced Galactic bubbles are compared to the orientation of the mean Galactic magnetic field in the disk. The orientations of bubbles in the northern Galactic plane were measured and are consistent with random orientations-no preferential alignment with respect to the Galactic disk was found. A subsample of H II region driven Galactic bubbles was identified, and as a single population they show random orientations. When this subsample was further divided into subthermal and suprathermal H II regions, based on hydrogen radio recombination linewidths, the subthermal H II regions showed a marginal deviation from random orientations, but the suprathermal H II regions showed significant alignment with the Galactic plane. The mean orientation of the Galactic disk magnetic field was characterized using new near-infrared starlight polarimetry and the suprathermal H II regions were found to preferentially align with the disk magnetic field. If suprathermal linewidths are associated with younger H II regions, then the evolution of young H II regions is significantly affected by the Galactic magnetic field. As H II regions age, they cease to be strongly linked to the Galactic magnetic field, as surrounding density variations come to dominate their morphological evolution. From the new observations, the ratios of magnetic-to-ram pressures in the expanding ionization fronts were estimated for younger H II regions.

  8. TESTING GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD MODELS USING NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P.; Pinnick, A. F. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2012-04-10

    This work combines new observations of NIR starlight linear polarimetry with previously simulated observations in order to constrain dynamo models of the Galactic magnetic field. Polarimetric observations were obtained with the Mimir instrument on the Perkins Telescope in Flagstaff, AZ, along a line of constant Galactic longitude (l = 150 Degree-Sign ) with 17 pointings of the 10' Multiplication-Sign 10' field of view between -75 Degree-Sign < b < 10 Degree-Sign , with more frequent pointings toward the Galactic midplane. A total of 10,962 stars were photometrically measured and 1116 had usable polarizations. The observed distribution of polarization position angles with Galactic latitude and the cumulative distribution function of the measured polarizations are compared to predicted values. While the predictions lack the effects of turbulence and are therefore idealized, this comparison allows significant rejection of A0-type magnetic field models. S0 and disk-even halo-odd magnetic field geometries are also rejected by the observations, but at lower significance. New predictions of spiral-type, axisymmetric magnetic fields, when combined with these new NIR observations, constrain the Galactic magnetic field spiral pitch angle to -6 Degree-Sign {+-} 2 Degree-Sign .

  9. SOFIA/HAWC+: Mapping the Galactic Center Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Michael W.; Dowell, C. Darren; Chuss, D. T.; Morris, M. R.; Novak, G.

    2013-01-01

    Polarimetry of the far infrared emission from magnetically-aligned interstellar grains is one of the best ways of studying the magnetic field at the Galactic Center. We describe the HAWC+ instrument, under development for flight on SOFIA starting in 2015, which will provide a major advance in capability for these critically important measurements.

  10. Neutrino mass and the origin of galactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, K. ); Semikoz, V. IZMIRAN, Academy of Sciences, Troitsk 142092 ); Shukurov, A. Computing Center, Moscow University, Moscow 119899 ); Sokoloff, D. Isaac Newton Institute, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 0EH )

    1993-11-15

    We compare two constraints on the strength of the cosmological primordial magnetic field: the one following from the restrictions on the Dirac neutrino spin flip in the early Universe, and another one based on the galactic dynamo theory for the Milky Way (presuming that the seed magnetic field has a relic origin). Since the magnetic field facilitates transitions between left- and right-handed neutrino states, thereby affecting [sup 4]He production at primordial nucleosynthesis, we can obtain a guaranteed [ital upper] limit on the strength of the relic magnetic field in the protogalaxy, [ital B][sub [ital c

  11. The Galactic Magnetic Field as Viewed from the VLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eck, Cameron; Brown, Jo-Anne

    2009-05-01

    Interstellar magnetic fields play critical roles in many astrophysical processes. Yet despite their importance, our knowledge about magnetic fields in our Galaxy remains limited. For the field within the Milky Way much of what we do know comes from radio astronomy, through observations of polarization and Faraday rotation measures (RMs) of extragalactic sources and pulsars. A high angular density of RM measurements in several critical areas of the Galaxy is needed to clarify the Galactic magnetic field structure. Understanding the overall structure of the magnetic field will subsequently help us determine the origin and evolution of the field. In an effort to determine the overall structure of the field, Sun et al. (2008) produced 3 models of the Galactic magnetic field based on RM measurements available at the time. These models made distinct predictions for RMs in a region of the inner Galaxy at low Galactic latitude. Using observations made with the Very Large Array (VLA), we have determined RMs for sources in this critical region. In this talk we will present the results of our study and show how the RMs strongly support the ASS+RING model.

  12. The WENSS & Dwingeloo surveys and the Galactic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Katgert, P.; Haverkorn, M.; de Bruyn, A. G.

    2007-01-01

    Aims:We investigate the structure of the Galactic magnetic field in the 2nd Galactic quadrant using radio continuum polarization data from the 325 MHz WENSS (WEsterbork Northern Sky Survey) survey in combination with earlier single-dish observations. Methods: We study gradients in polarization angle along Galactic longitude and latitude in the region 130° ⪉ l ⪉ 173° and -5° ⪉ b ⪉ 31°. These gradients were determined with a new method that we developed to efficiently and reliably fit linear gradients to periodic data like polarization angles. Since the WENSS data were obtained with a synthesis array they suffer from the "missing short spacing" problem. We have tried to repair this by adding an estimate of the large-scale emission based on the single-dish (Dwingeloo) data obtained by Brouw and Spoelstra. Combining all available data we derive a rotation measure map of the area, from which we estimate all 3 components of the magnetic field vector. Results: In the part of WENSS where large-scale structure in polarized intensity is relatively unimportant, we find that the magnetic field is predominantly perpendicular to the line-of-sight, and parallel to the Galactic plane. The magnetic field components along the line-of-sight and along Galactic latitude have comparable values, and the strength of these components is much smaller than the strength of the total magnetic field. Our observations also cover part of the so-called "fan" region, an area of strong polarized intensity, where large-scale structure is missing from our WENSS data. We tentatively show that Faraday rotation occurring in front of the Perseus arm is causing both the WENSS RM and the RM towards the fan region observed in previous single-dish surveys, and we suggest that the fan is formed by local emission that originates in front of the emission we see in WENSS.

  13. The Galactic Magnetic Field and its lensing of Ultrahigh Energy and Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Glennys

    2015-08-01

    It has long been recognized that magnetic fields play an important role in many astrophysical environments, but the magnetic field strength and structure has only been quantitatively determined for relatively few systems beyond our solar system.Our understanding of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) has improved tremendously in recent years. The Jansson-Farrar (2012) (JF12) GMF model is the most realistic and comprehensive model available. It was constrained by fitting all-sky Faraday Rotation Measures of ~40k extragalactic sources, simultaneously with WMAP polarized (Q,U) and total synchrotron emission maps - together providing a total of more than 10,000 independent datapoints, each with measured astrophysical variance. In addition to disk and toroidal halo components, a previously overlooked coherent poloidal halo field proves to be necessary to account for the RM, Q and U data. Moreover a “striated” random component is needed in addition to a fully random component, in both disk and halo.The talk will give a concise review of the JF12 model and its derivation, with emphasis on which features of the GMF are well or poorly established. I will show that the data unambiguously demand a large scale coherent component to the halo field which is a diverging-spiral centered on the Galactic center, with field lines running from Southern to Northern hemispheres. The puzzles posed by the large scale coherent halo and disk magnetic fields, and their possible origins, will be discussed.Having a good model of the Galactic magnetic field is crucial for determining the sources of UHECRs, for modeling the transport of Galactic CRs (the halo field provides a heretofore-overlooked escape route for by diffusion along its field lines), and for calculating the background to dark matter and CMB-cosmology studies. I will present new results on the lensing effect of the GMF on UHECRs, which produces multiple images and dramatic magnification and demagnification that varies with

  14. Wiggle Instability of Galactic Spiral Shocks: Effects of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Woong-Tae; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that the wiggle instability (WI) of spiral shocks in a galactic disk is responsible for the formation of gaseous feathers observed in grand-design spiral galaxies. We perform both a linear stability analysis and numerical simulations to investigate the effect of magnetic fields on the WI. The disk is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, and non-self-gravitating. We control the strengths of magnetic fields and spiral-arm forcing using the dimensionless parameters β and {F}, respectively. By solving the perturbation equations as a boundary-eigenvalue problem, we obtain dispersion relations of the WI for various values of β =1-∞ and {F}=5% and 10%. We find that the WI arising from the accumulation of potential vorticity at disturbed shocks is suppressed, albeit not completely, by magnetic fields. The stabilizing effect of magnetic fields is not from the perturbed fields but from the unperturbed fields that reduce the density compression factor in the background shocks. When {F}=5% and β ≲ 10 or {F}=10% and β ˜ 5-10, the most unstable mode has a wavelength of ˜0.1-0.2 times the arm-to-arm separation, which appears consistent with a mean spacing of observed feathers.

  15. Wiggle Instability of Galactic Spiral Shocks: Effects of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Woong-Tae; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that the wiggle instability (WI) of spiral shocks in a galactic disk is responsible for the formation of gaseous feathers observed in grand-design spiral galaxies. We perform both a linear stability analysis and numerical simulations to investigate the effect of magnetic fields on the WI. The disk is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, and non-self-gravitating. We control the strengths of magnetic fields and spiral-arm forcing using the dimensionless parameters β and {F}, respectively. By solving the perturbation equations as a boundary-eigenvalue problem, we obtain dispersion relations of the WI for various values of β =1-∞ and {F}=5% and 10%. We find that the WI arising from the accumulation of potential vorticity at disturbed shocks is suppressed, albeit not completely, by magnetic fields. The stabilizing effect of magnetic fields is not from the perturbed fields but from the unperturbed fields that reduce the density compression factor in the background shocks. When {F}=5% and β ≲ 10 or {F}=10% and β ∼ 5–10, the most unstable mode has a wavelength of ∼0.1–0.2 times the arm-to-arm separation, which appears consistent with a mean spacing of observed feathers.

  16. Pulsar rotation and dispersion measures and the galactic magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manchester, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Use of observations of pulsar polarization and pulse time of arrival at frequencies between 250 and 500 MHz to determine rotation and dispersion measures for 19 and 21 pulsars, respectively. These measurements have been used to calculate mean line-of-sight components of the magnetic field in the path to the pulsars. These and other observations show that there is probably no contribution to the observed rotation measure from the pulsar itself. Low-latitude, low-dispersion pulsars are observed to have strong field components, and a strong dependence of rotation-measure sign on galactic longitude has been found. The observations are consistent with a relatively uniform field of about 3.5 microgauss directed toward about l = 90 deg in the local region, but appear to be inconsistent with the helical model for the local field.

  17. Magnetic monopole plasma oscillations and the survival of Galactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, E.N.

    1987-10-01

    This paper explores the general nature of magnetic-monopole plasma oscillations as a theoretical possibility for the observed Galactic magnetic field in the presence of a high abundance of magnetic monopoles. The modification of the hydromagnetic induction equation by the monopole oscillations produces the half-velocity effect, in which the magnetic field is transported bodily with a velocity midway between the motion of the conducting fluid and the monopole plasma. Observational studies of the magnetic field in the Galaxy, and in other galaxies, exclude the half-velocity effect, indicating that the magnetic fields is not associated with monopole oscillations. In any case the phase mixing would destroy the oscillations in less than 100 Myr. The conclusion is that magnetic monopole oscillations do not play a significant role in the galactic magnetic fields. Hence the existence of galactic magnetic fields places a low limit on the monopole flux, so that their detection - if they exist at all - requires a collecting area at least as large as a football field. 47 references.

  18. Using red clump stars to decompose the galactic magnetic field with distance

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    A new method for measuring the large-scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field is presented. The Galactic magnetic field has been probed through the Galactic disk with near-infrared starlight polarimetry; however, the distance to each background star is unknown. Using red clump stars as near-infrared standard candles, this work presents the first attempt to decompose the line-of-sight structure of the sky-projected Galactic magnetic field. Two example lines of sight are decomposed: toward a field with many red clump stars and toward a field with few red clump stars. A continuous estimate of magnetic field orientation over several kiloparsecs of distance is possible in the field with many red clump stars, while only discrete estimates are possible in the sparse example. Toward the outer Galaxy, there is a continuous field orientation with distance that shows evidence of perturbation by the Galactic warp. Toward the inner Galaxy, evidence for a large-scale change in the magnetic field geometry is consistent with models of magnetic field reversals, independently derived from Faraday rotation studies. A photo-polarimetric method for identifying candidate intrinsically polarized stars is also presented. The future application of this method to large regions of the sky will begin the process of mapping the Galactic magnetic field in a way never before possible.

  19. Using Red Clump Stars to Decompose the Galactic Magnetic Field with Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    A new method for measuring the large-scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field is presented. The Galactic magnetic field has been probed through the Galactic disk with near-infrared starlight polarimetry; however, the distance to each background star is unknown. Using red clump stars as near-infrared standard candles, this work presents the first attempt to decompose the line-of-sight structure of the sky-projected Galactic magnetic field. Two example lines of sight are decomposed: toward a field with many red clump stars and toward a field with few red clump stars. A continuous estimate of magnetic field orientation over several kiloparsecs of distance is possible in the field with many red clump stars, while only discrete estimates are possible in the sparse example. Toward the outer Galaxy, there is a continuous field orientation with distance that shows evidence of perturbation by the Galactic warp. Toward the inner Galaxy, evidence for a large-scale change in the magnetic field geometry is consistent with models of magnetic field reversals, independently derived from Faraday rotation studies. A photo-polarimetric method for identifying candidate intrinsically polarized stars is also presented. The future application of this method to large regions of the sky will begin the process of mapping the Galactic magnetic field in a way never before possible.

  20. The Ties that Bind? Galactic Magnetic Fields and Ram Pressure Stripping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Stone, James

    2014-11-01

    One process affecting gas-rich cluster galaxies is ram pressure stripping (RPS), i.e., the removal of galactic gas through direct interaction with the intracluster medium (ICM). Galactic magnetic fields may have an important impact on the stripping rate and tail structure. We run the first magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of RPS that include a galactic magnetic field, using 159 pc resolution throughout our entire domain in order to resolve mixing throughout the tail. We find very little difference in the total amount of gas removed from the unmagnetized and magnetized galaxies, although a magnetic field with a radial component will initially accelerate stripped gas more quickly. In general, we find that magnetic fields in the disk lead to slower velocities in the stripped gas near the disk and faster velocities farther from the disk. We also find that magnetic fields in the galactic gas lead to larger unmixed structures in the tail. Finally, we discuss whether ram pressure stripped tails can magnetize the ICM. We find that the total magnetic energy density grows as the tail lengthens, likely through turbulence. There are μG-strength fields in the tail in all of our MHD runs, which survive to at least 100 kpc from the disk (the edge of our simulated region), indicating that the area-filling factor of magnetized tails in a cluster could be large.

  1. The spectrum of random magnetic fields in the mean field dynamo theory of the Galactic magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Anderson, Stephen W.

    1992-01-01

    The fluctuation spectrum that must arise in a mean field dynamo generation of galactic fields if the initial field is weak is considered. A kinetic equation for its evolution is derived and solved. The spectrum evolves by transfer of energy from one magnetic mode to another by interaction with turbulent velocity modes. This kinetic equation is valid in the limit that the rate of evolution of the magnetic modes is slower than the reciprocal decorrelation time of the turbulent modes. This turns out to be the case by a factor greater than 3. Most of the fluctuation energy concentrates on small scales, shorter than the hydrodynamic turbulent scales. The fluctuation energy builds up to equipartition with the turbulent energy in times that are short compared to the e-folding time of the mean field. The turbulence becomes strongly modified before the dynamo amplification starts. Thus, the kinematic assumption of the mean dynamo theory is invalid. Thus, the galactic field must have a primordial origin, although it may subsequently be modified by dynamo action.

  2. Bilateral symmetry in supernova remnants and the connection to the Galactic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Jennifer Lorraine; Safi-Harb, Samar; Jaffe, Tess; Kothes, Roland; Foster, Tyler; Landecker, Tom

    2015-08-01

    Supernova explosions are some of the most significant and transformative events in our Universe. Understanding Supernova Remnants (SNRs), the leftover remains of these explosions, is fundamental to our understanding of the chemical enrichment and magnetism in galaxies, including our own Milky Way. We model the radio synchrotron emission from Galactic SNRs using the “Hammurabi” synchrotron modelling code. We incorporate current models of Galactic magnetic field and electron density to simulate the emission from the SNRs as a function of their position in the Galaxy. We do this in an effort to understand the connection between SNRs and their environment and to investigate the relationship between the angle of the symmetry axis of the SNR and the Galactic Magnetic field. This relationship has implications for understanding the magnetic field geometry and cosmic ray electron distribution in SNRs, and possibly even a new method for determining or constraining the distances to SNRs.

  3. The Galactic Magnetic Field and Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Federico R.

    The Galactic Magnetic Field is a peeving and importune screen between Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays and us cosmologists, engaged in the combat to unveil their properties and origin, as it deviates their paths towards the Earth in unpredictable ways. I will, in this order: briefly review the available field models on the market; explain a little trick which allows one to obtain cosmic rays deflection variances without even knowing what the (random) GMF model is; and argue that there is a lack of anisotropy in the large scales cosmic rays signal, which the Galactic field can do nothing about.

  4. The Large Scale Structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field and High Energy Cosmic Ray Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Stanev, Todor

    2006-10-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field in our Galaxy are complex and usually difficult to interpret. A spiral regular field in the disk is favored by observations, however the number of field reversals is still under debate. Measurements of the parity of the field across the Galactic plane are also very difficult due to the presence of the disk field itself. In this work we demonstrate that cosmic ray protons in the energy range 1018 to 1019eV, if accelerated near the center of the Galaxy, are sensitive to the large scale structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field (GMF). In particular if the field is of even parity, and the spiral field is bi-symmetric (BSS), ultra high energy protons will predominantly come from the Southern Galactic hemisphere, and predominantly from the Northern Galactic hemisphere if the field is of even parity and axi-symmetric (ASS). There is no sensitivity to the BSS or ASS configurations if the field is of odd parity.

  5. Origin of strong magnetic fields in Milky Way-like galactic haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Alexander; Dolag, Klaus; Lesch, Harald

    2015-08-01

    An analytical model predicting the growth rates, the absolute growth times and the saturation values of the magnetic field strength within galactic haloes is presented. The analytical results are compared to cosmological MHD simulations of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation performed with the N-body / SPMHD code GADGET. The halo has a mass of approximately 3*10^{12} solar masses and a virial radius of approximately 270 kpc. The simulations in a LCDM cosmology also include radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback and the description of non-ideal MHD. A primordial magnetic seed field ranging from 10^{-10} to 10^{-34} G in strength agglomerates together with the gas within filaments and protohaloes.There, it is amplified within a couple of hundred million years up to equipartition with the corresponding turbulent energy. The magnetic field strength increases by turbulent small-scale dynamo action. The turbulence is generated by the gravitational collapse and by supernova feedback. Subsequently, a series of halo mergers leads to shock waves and amplification processes magnetizing the surrounding gas within a few billion years. At first, the magnetic energy grows on small scales and then self-organizes to larger scales.Magnetic field strengths of microG are reached in the center of the halo and drop to nG in the IGM. Analyzing the saturation levels and growth rates, the model is able to describe the process of magnetic amplification notably well and confirms the results of the simulations. Additionally, we investigate magnetic seed fields created self-consistently by supernova explosions naturally occuring during the star formation in galaxies. Within starforming regions and given typical dimensions and magnetic field strengths in canonical SN remnants, we inject a dipole-shape magnetic field at a rate of nG/Gyr.In our model for the evolution of galactic magnetic fields, the seed magnetic field determined self-consistently by the star formation process

  6. Galactic ménage à trois: simulating magnetic fields in colliding galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotarba, H.; Lesch, H.; Dolag, K.; Naab, T.; Johansson, P. H.; Donnert, J.; Stasyszyn, F. A.

    2011-08-01

    We present high-resolution simulations of a multiple merger of three disc galaxies, including the evolution of magnetic fields, performed with the N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code GADGET. For the first time, we embed the galaxies in a magnetized, low-density medium, thus modelling an ambient intergalactic medium (IGM). The simulations include radiative cooling and a model for star formation and supernova feedback. Magnetohydrodynamics is followed using the SPH method. The progenitor discs have initial magnetic seed fields in the range 10-9-10-6 G and the IGM has initial fields of 10-12-10-9 G. The simulations are compared to a run excluding magnetic fields. We show that the propagation of interaction-driven shocks depends significantly on the initial magnetic field strength. The shocks propagate faster in simulations with stronger initial field, suggesting that the shocks are supported by magnetic pressure. The Mach numbers of the shocks range from approximately M= 1.5 for the non-magnetized case up to M= 6 for the highest initial magnetization, resulting in higher temperatures of the shock-heated IGM gas. The magnetic field in the system saturates rapidly after the mergers at ˜10-6 G within the galaxies and ˜10-8 G in the IGM independent of the initial value. These field strengths agree with observed values and correspond to the equipartition value of the magnetic pressure with the turbulent pressure in the system. We also present synthetic radio and polarization maps for different phases of the evolution, showing that shocks driven by the interaction produce a high amount of polarized emission. These idealized simulations indicate that magnetic fields play an important role for the hydrodynamics of the IGM during galactic interactions. We also show that even weak seed fields are efficiently strengthened during multiple galactic mergers. This interaction-driven amplification might have been a key process for the magnetization of the Universe.

  7. Galactic cosmic ray currents and magnetic field irregularity degree in high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmin, A. I.; Samsonov, I. S.; Samsonova, Z. N.

    1985-01-01

    Currents of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) obtained by global survey method are analyzed. The cases of almost total disappearance of GCR currents are compared with the results of direct measurements of the solar wind parameters. The conclusion is made on a restricted application of the convective-diffusive mechanism of the GCR modulation by the solar wind during the occurrence of stationary and regular magnetic fields in the interplanetary medium.

  8. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE GALACTIC HALO MAGNETIC FIELD USING ROTATION MEASURES OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES TOWARD THE OUTER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Brown, J. C.; Van Eck, C. L.; Stil, J. M.; Taylor, A. R.; Haverkorn, M.; Kronberg, P. P.; Shukurov, A.

    2012-08-10

    We present a study of the Milky Way disk and halo magnetic field, determined from observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) toward 641 polarized extragalactic radio sources in the Galactic longitude range 100 Degree-Sign -117 Degree-Sign , within 30 Degree-Sign of the Galactic plane. For |b| < 15 Degree-Sign , we observe a symmetric RM distribution about the Galactic plane. This is consistent with a disk field in the Perseus arm of even parity across the Galactic mid-plane. In the range 15 Degree-Sign < |b| < 30 Degree-Sign , we find median RMs of -15 {+-} 4 rad m{sup -2} and -62 {+-} 5 rad m{sup -2} in the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres, respectively. If the RM distribution is a signature of the large-scale field parallel to the Galactic plane, then this suggests that the halo magnetic field toward the outer Galaxy does not reverse direction across the mid-plane. The variation of RM as a function of Galactic latitude in this longitude range is such that RMs become more negative at larger |b|. This is consistent with an azimuthal magnetic field of strength 2 {mu}G (7 {mu}G) at a height 0.8-2 kpc above (below) the Galactic plane between the local and the Perseus spiral arm. We propose that the Milky Way could possess spiral-like halo magnetic fields similar to those observed in M51.

  9. A Constraint on the Organization of the Galactic Center Magnetic Field Using Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, C. J.; Brentjens, M. A.; Novak, G.

    2011-04-01

    We present new 6 and 20 cm Very Large Array (VLA) observations of polarized continuum emission of roughly 0.5 deg2 of the Galactic center (GC) region. The 6 cm observations detect diffuse linearly polarized emission throughout the region with a brightness of roughly 1 mJy per 15''×10'' beam. The Faraday rotation measure (RM) toward this polarized emission has structure on degree size scales and ranges from roughly +330 rad m-2 east of the dynamical center (Sgr A) to-880 rad m-2 west of the dynamical center. This RM structure is also seen toward several nonthermal radio filaments, which implies that they have a similar magnetic field orientation and constrains models for their origin. Modeling shows that the RM and its change with Galactic longitude are best explained by the high electron density and strong magnetic field of the GC region. Considering the emissivity of the GC plasma shows that while the absolute RM values are indirect measures of the GC magnetic field, the RM longitude structure directly traces the magnetic field in the central kiloparsec of the Galaxy. Combining this result with previous work reveals a larger RM structure covering the central ~2° of the Galaxy. This RM structure is similar to that proposed by Novak and coworkers, but is shifted roughly 50 pc west of the dynamical center of the Galaxy. If this RM structure originates in the GC region, it shows that the GC magnetic field is organized on ~300 pc size scales. The pattern is consistent with a predominantly poloidal field geometry, pointing from south to north, that is perturbed by the motion of gas in the Galactic disk.

  10. A CONSTRAINT ON THE ORGANIZATION OF THE GALACTIC CENTER MAGNETIC FIELD USING FARADAY ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C. J.; Brentjens, M. A.; Novak, G.

    2011-04-10

    We present new 6 and 20 cm Very Large Array (VLA) observations of polarized continuum emission of roughly 0.5 deg{sup 2} of the Galactic center (GC) region. The 6 cm observations detect diffuse linearly polarized emission throughout the region with a brightness of roughly 1 mJy per 15''x10'' beam. The Faraday rotation measure (RM) toward this polarized emission has structure on degree size scales and ranges from roughly +330 rad m{sup -2} east of the dynamical center (Sgr A) to-880 rad m{sup -2} west of the dynamical center. This RM structure is also seen toward several nonthermal radio filaments, which implies that they have a similar magnetic field orientation and constrains models for their origin. Modeling shows that the RM and its change with Galactic longitude are best explained by the high electron density and strong magnetic field of the GC region. Considering the emissivity of the GC plasma shows that while the absolute RM values are indirect measures of the GC magnetic field, the RM longitude structure directly traces the magnetic field in the central kiloparsec of the Galaxy. Combining this result with previous work reveals a larger RM structure covering the central {approx}2{sup 0} of the Galaxy. This RM structure is similar to that proposed by Novak and coworkers, but is shifted roughly 50 pc west of the dynamical center of the Galaxy. If this RM structure originates in the GC region, it shows that the GC magnetic field is organized on {approx}300 pc size scales. The pattern is consistent with a predominantly poloidal field geometry, pointing from south to north, that is perturbed by the motion of gas in the Galactic disk.

  11. A model for the magnetic field in the molecular disk at the Galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, M.; Konigl, A. )

    1990-10-01

    A model for the magnetic field configuration in the Galactic center disk is presented. The field has an open geometry and represents the poloidal field detected at larger distances from the Galactic center, stretched and twisted by the effects of advection and shear in a magnetized accretion disk. It is concluded that the 100 micron polarization measurements of Hildebrand et al. (1990) imply that the radial and azimuthal components of the magnetic field in the disk are comparable and have opposite signs, consistent with the generation of B(phi) from B(r) by differential rotation. The polarization measurements indicate that the z-component of the field is smaller than both /B(phi)/ and /B(r)/; thus, they do not by themselves require that the field lines thread the disk. The field strengths of order 1 mG inferred from the Zeeman measurements and the fact that /B(phi)/ and /B(r)/ exceed B(z) imply that the field could remove the excess angular momentum of the accreted matter in the form of a centrifugally driven outflow. 31 refs.

  12. Modelling the Galactic magnetic field on the plane in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, T. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Banday, A. J.; Leach, S. M.; Lowe, S. R.; Wilkinson, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for parametric modelling of the physical components of the Galaxy's magnetized interstellar medium, simulating the observables and mapping out the likelihood space using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis. We then demonstrate it using total and polarized synchrotron emission data as well as rotation measures of extragalactic sources. With these three data sets, we define and study three components of the magnetic field: the large-scale coherent field, the small-scale isotropic random field and the ordered field. In this first paper, we use only data along the Galactic plane and test a simple two-dimensional (2D) logarithmic spiral model for the magnetic field that includes a compression and a shearing of the random component giving rise to an ordered component. We demonstrate with simulations that the method can indeed constrain multiple parameters yielding measures of, for example, the ratios of the magnetic field components. Though subject to uncertainties in thermal and cosmic ray electron densities and depending on our particular model parametrization, our preliminary analysis shows that the coherent component is a small fraction of the total magnetic field and an ordered component comparable in strength to the isotropic random component is required to explain the polarization fraction of synchrotron emission. We outline further work to extend this type of analysis to study the magnetic spiral arm structure, the details of the turbulence as well as the 3D structure of the magnetic field.

  13. Mapping magnetic fields in the cold dust at the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuss, David Thomas

    We present polarimetry results of the Galactic center with two complementary instruments: SPARO (Submillimeter Polarimeter for Antarctic Remote Observing), a 450 μm polarimeter with 6' resolution, and Hertz, a 350 μm polarimeter with 20' resolution operating on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The design of SPARO is reviewed. A description of the data acquisition and analysis for SPARO is included. Finally, results are presented for the two instruments that are consistent with a model for the Galactic center magnetosphere in which an initially poloidal field has been sheared into a toroidal configuration in regions in which the energy density of gravity dominates that of magnetic fields. The SPARO data show that at low latitudes over much of the central 200 pc of the Galactic center, the field is toroidal. The Hertz data focus on the central 30 pc and find a clumpy matter distribution in which the dense regions are dominated by a toroidal field, while in the less dense regions, the field is preferentially poloidal. We use this model to estimate a characteristic field strength in this region of ˜3 mG.

  14. A SURVEY OF EXTRAGALACTIC FARADAY ROTATION AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE: THE VERTICAL MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE MILKY WAY TOWARD THE GALACTIC POLES

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Madsen, G. J.; Haverkorn, M.; Zweibel, E. G.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Shukurov, A.; Kronberg, P. P.

    2010-05-10

    We present a study of the vertical magnetic field of the Milky Way toward the Galactic poles, determined from observations of Faraday rotation toward more than 1000 polarized extragalactic radio sources at Galactic latitudes |b| {>=} 77{sup 0}, using the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We find median rotation measures (RMs) of 0.0 {+-} 0.5 rad m{sup -2} and +6.3 {+-} 0.7 rad m{sup -2} toward the north and south Galactic poles, respectively, demonstrating that there is no coherent vertical magnetic field in the Milky Way at the Sun's position. If this is a global property of the Milky Way's magnetism, then the lack of symmetry across the disk rules out pure dipole or quadrupole geometries for the Galactic magnetic field. The angular fluctuations in RM seen in our data show no preferred scale within the range {approx}0.{sup 0}1 to {approx}25{sup 0}. The observed standard deviation in RM of {approx}9 rad m{sup -2} then implies an upper limit of {approx}1 {mu}G on the strength of the random magnetic field in the warm ionized medium at high Galactic latitudes.

  15. Origin of strong magnetic fields in Milky Way-like galactic haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A. M.; Lesch, H.; Dolag, K.; Kotarba, H.; Geng, A.; Stasyszyn, F. A.

    2012-05-01

    An analytical model predicting the growth rates, the absolute growth times and the saturation values of the magnetic field strength within galactic haloes is presented. The analytical results are compared to cosmological magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation performed with the N-body/SPMHD code GADGET. The halo has a mass of ≈3 × 1012 M⊙ and a virial radius of ≈270 kpc. The simulations in a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology also include radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback and the description of non-ideal MHD. A primordial magnetic seed field ranging from 10-10 to 10-34 G in strength agglomerates together with the gas within filaments and protohaloes. There, it is amplified within a couple of hundred million years up to equipartition with the corresponding turbulent energy. The magnetic field strength increases by turbulent small-scale dynamo action. The turbulence is generated by the gravitational collapse and by supernova feedback. Subsequently, a series of halo mergers leads to shock waves and amplification processes magnetizing the surrounding gas within a few billion years. At first, the magnetic energy grows on small scales and then self-organizes to larger scales. Magnetic field strengths of ≈10-6 G are reached in the centre of the halo and drop to ≈10-9 G in the intergalactic medium. Analysing the saturation levels and growth rates, the model is able to describe the process of magnetic amplification notably well and confirms the results of the simulations.

  16. ANISOTROPY AS A PROBE OF THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY PROPAGATION AND HALO MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Hong-bo; Xue, Liang

    2012-05-01

    The anisotropy of cosmic rays (CRs) in the solar vicinity is generally attributed to CR streaming due to the discrete distribution of CR sources or local magnetic field modulation. Recently, the two-dimensional large-scale CR anisotropy has been measured by many experiments in the TeV-PeV energy range in both hemispheres. The tail-in excess along the tangential direction of the local spiral arm and the loss cone deficit pointing to the north Galactic pole direction agree with what have been obtained in tens to hundreds of GeV. The persistence of the two large-scale anisotropy structures in such a wide energy range suggests that the anisotropy might be due to global streaming of the Galactic CRs (GCRs). This work tries to extend the observed CR anisotropy picture from the solar system to the whole galaxy. In such a case, we can find a new interesting signature, a loop of GCR streaming, of the GCR propagation. We further calculate the overall GCR streaming induced magnetic field, and find a qualitative consistency with the observed structure of the halo magnetic field.

  17. The energy spectrum and geometrical structure of Galactic turbulent magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Gaensler, Bryan; Mcclure-Griffiths, Naomi; Purcell, Cormac; Hill, Alex; Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, Alex

    2012-04-01

    The energy spectrum and geometrical structure of the turbulent magnetic field can offer a solid test of different theoretical models on the generation and evolution of Galactic magnetic fields. They are also pivotal to understanding the propagation of cosmic-ray particles. However, the energy spectrum has been difficult to determine and the geometrical structure has never been obtained so far, due to lack of proper methods and observations. We aim to infer these quantities by applying our newly developed techniques to polarisation images. These images are required to be observed with high angular resolution and broadband multi-channel polarimetry, which is possible only recently using the ATCA. As a pilot study, we plan to map the 2X2 degree high-latitude field centred at l=255.5 degree and b=-38 degree at 1.1-3.1 GHz in total intensity and polarisation.

  18. The energy spectrum and geometrical structure of Galactic turbulent magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Gaensler, Bryan; Mcclure-Griffiths, Naomi; Purcell, Cormac; Hill, Alex; Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, Alex

    2012-10-01

    The energy spectrum and geometrical structure of the turbulent magnetic field can offer a solid test of different theoretical models on the generation and evolution of Galactic magnetic fields. They are also pivotal to understanding the propagation of cosmic-ray particles. However, the energy spectrum has been difficult to determine and the geometrical structure has never been obtained so far, due to lack of proper methods and observations. We aim to infer these quantities by applying our newly developed techniques to polarisation images. These images are required to be observed with high angular resolution and broadband multi-channel polarimetry, which is possible only recently using the ATCA. As a pilot study, we plan to map the 2X2 degree high-latitude field centred at l=255.5 degree and b=-38 degree at 1.1-3.1 GHz in total intensity and polarisation.

  19. Effects of the galactic magnetic field upon large scale anisotropies of extragalactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, D.; Mollerach, S.; Roulet, E. E-mail: mollerach@cab.cnea.gov.ar

    2010-11-01

    The large scale pattern in the arrival directions of extragalactic cosmic rays that reach the Earth is different from that of the flux arriving to the halo of the Galaxy as a result of the propagation through the galactic magnetic field. Two different effects are relevant in this process: deflections of trajectories and (de)acceleration by the electric field component due to the galactic rotation. The deflection of the cosmic ray trajectories makes the flux intensity arriving to the halo from some direction to appear reaching the Earth from another direction. This applies to any intrinsic anisotropy in the extragalactic distribution or, even in the absence of intrinsic anisotropies, to the dipolar Compton-Getting anisotropy induced when the observer is moving with respect to the cosmic rays rest frame. For an observer moving with the solar system, cosmic rays traveling through far away regions of the Galaxy also experience an electric force coming from the relative motion (due to the rotation of the Galaxy) of the local system in which the field can be considered as being purely magnetic. This produces small changes in the particles momentum that can originate large scale anisotropies even for an isotropic extragalactic flux.

  20. THE INVARIANT TWIST OF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE RELATIVISTIC JETS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Kazanas, Demosthenes E-mail: dimitris_christodoulou@uml.edu E-mail: gabuzda@physics.ucc.ie

    2009-09-10

    The origin of cosmic magnetic (B) fields remains an open question. It is generally believed that very weak primordial B fields are amplified by dynamo processes, but it appears unlikely that the amplification proceeds fast enough to account for the fields presently observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters. In an alternative scenario, cosmic B fields are generated near the inner edges of accretion disks in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by azimuthal electric currents due to the difference between the plasma electron and ion velocities that arises when the electrons are retarded by interactions with photons. While dynamo processes show no preference for the polarity of the (presumably random) seed field that they amplify, this alternative mechanism uniquely relates the polarity of the poloidal B field to the angular velocity of the accretion disk, resulting in a unique direction for the toroidal B field induced by disk rotation. Observations of the toroidal fields of 29 AGN jets revealed by parsec-scale Faraday rotation measurements show a clear asymmetry that is consistent with this model, with the probability that this asymmetry came about by chance being less than 1%. This lends support to the hypothesis that the universe is seeded by B fields that are generated in AGNs via this mechanism and subsequently injected into intergalactic space by the jet outflows.

  1. The Invariant Twist of Magnetic Fields in the Relativistic Jets of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Gabuzda, Denise C.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of cosmic magnetic (B) fields remains an open question. It is generally believed that very weak primordial B fields are amplified by dynamo processes, but it appears unlikely that the amplification proceeds fast enough to account for the fields presently observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters. In an alternative scenario, cosmic B fields are generated near the inner edges of accretion disks in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) by azimuthal electric currents due to the difference between the plasma electron and ion velocities that arises when the electrons are retarded by interactions with photons. While dynamo processes show no preference for the polarity of the (presumably random) seed field that they amplify, this alternative mechanism uniquely relates the polarity of the poloidal B field to the angular velocity of the accretion disk, resulting in a unique direction for the toroidal B field induced by disk rotation. Observations of the toroidal fields of 29 AGN jets revealed by parsec-scale Faraday rotation measurements show a clear asymmetry that is consistent with this model, with the probability that this asymmetry came about by chance being less than 1 %. This lends support to the hypothesis that the Universe is seeded by B fields that are generated in AGN via this mechanism

  2. The Origin of Galactic and Metagalactic Magnetic Fields: The Black Hole Accretion Disk Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, S.; Li, H.; Beckley, H.; Finn, J.; Pariev, V.

    1998-12-01

    The frequent star-disk collisions in the accretion disk forming the massive black hole of galaxies is an efficient, robust mechanism for generating the alpha -helicity in the alpha -Omega dynamo. In the rotating frame of the disk, these collisions result in axially directed, expanding plumes which "un-twist" due to their increased moment of inertia. We have demonstrated this flow field and its feasibility in the laboratory in preparation for a dynamo experiment using liquid sodium. The near-infinite number of rotations of the inner accretion disk and hence, amplification, ensures that this dynamo will saturate at the maximum accretion disk stress, where Bmax ~ 50 kG, corresponding to a luminosity, L ~ 10(46) ergs/s. The magnetic flux expelled as a collimated Poynting flux is sufficient to explain the magnetic flux of the galaxy as well as that of galactic clusters. The dissipation of a fraction of this magnetic energy is the likely source of the AGN/quasar phenomena.

  3. Two Point Autocorrelation Analysis of Auger Highest Energy Events Backtracked in Galactic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yevgeniy

    2009-10-01

    Searches for sources of the highest-energy cosmic rays traditionally have included looking for clusters of event arrival directions on the sky. The smallest cluster is a pair of events falling within some angular window. In contrast to the standard two point (2-pt) autocorrelation analysis, this work takes into account influence of the galactic magnetic field (GMF). The highest energy events, those above 50EeV, collected by the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory between January 1, 2004 and May 31, 2009 are used in the analysis. Having assumed protons as primaries, events are backtracked through BSS/S, BSS/A, ASS/S and ASS/A versions of Harari-Mollerach-Roulet (HMR) model of the GMF. For each version of the model, a 2-pt autocorrelation analysis is applied to the backtracked events and to 105 isotropic Monte Carlo realizations weighted by the Auger exposure. Scans in energy, separation angular window and different model parameters reveal clustering at different angular scales. Small angle clustering at 2-3 deg is particularly interesting and it is compared between different field scenarios. The strength of the autocorrelation signal at those angular scales differs between BSS and ASS versions of the HMR model. The BSS versions of the model tend to defocus protons as they arrive to Earth whereas for the ASS, in contrary, it is more likely to focus them.

  4. DOES GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD DISTURB THE CORRELATION OF THE HIGHEST ENERGY COSMIC RAYS WITH THEIR SOURCES?

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2010-12-01

    The propagation trajectories of the highest energy cosmic rays (HECRs) are deflected by not only intergalactic magnetic field but also Galactic magnetic field (GMF). These magnetic fields can weaken the positive correlation between the arrival directions of HECRs and the positions of their sources. In order to explore the effect of GMF on the expected correlation, we simulate the arrival distribution of protons with energy above 6 x 10{sup 19} eV taking several GMF models into account, and then test the correlation between the protons and their sources assumed in the simulation. The dependence of the correlation signals on GMF models is also investigated. The correlation can be observed by accumulating {approx}200 protons in a half-hemisphere. The typical angular scale at which the positive signal of the correlation is maximized depends on the spiral component of the GMF model. That angular scale is {approx}5{sup 0} for bisymmetric spiral (BS) GMF models and {approx}7{sup 0} for axisymmetric spiral (AS) GMF models if the number density of HECR sources, n{sub s} , is {approx}10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3}. An additional vertical (dipole) component of GMF affects these angular scales by 0.{sup 0}5-1{sup 0}. The difference between the correlation signal for the BS models and that for the AS models is prominent in the northern sky. The significance of the positive correlation depends on source distribution. The probability that the number of simulated HECR events correlating with sources is smaller than the number of random events correlating with the same sources by chance is much less than 10{sup -3} ({approx}3{sigma}) in almost all the source distributions with n{sub s} = 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3} for detection of under 200 protons, but {approx}10% of source distributions predict a chance probability more than 10{sup -3} in the AS GMF model. In addition, we also briefly discuss the effect of GMF for heavy-nuclei-dominated composition.

  5. The connection between supernova remnants and the Galactic magnetic field: A global radio study of the axisymmetric sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. L.; Safi-Harb, S.; Jaffe, T.; Kothes, R.; Landecker, T. L.; Foster, T.

    2016-03-01

    The study of supernova remnants (SNRs) is fundamental to understanding the chemical enrichment and magnetism in galaxies, including our own Milky Way. In an effort to understand the connection between the morphology of SNRs and the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), we have examined the radio images of all known SNRs in our Galaxy and compiled a large sample that have an axisymmetric morphology, which we define to mean SNRs with a bilateral or barrel-shaped morphology, in addition to one-sided shells. We selected the cleanest examples and model each of these at their appropriate Galactic position using two GMF models, one of which includes a vertical halo component, and another that is oriented entirely parallel to the plane. Since the magnitude and relative orientation of the magnetic field changes with distance from the sun, we analyze a range of distances, from 0.5 to 10 kpc in each case. Using a physically motivated model of an SNR expanding into an ambient GMF that includes a vertical halo component, we find it is able to reproduce observed morphologies of many SNRs in our sample. These results strongly support the presence of an off-plane, vertical component to the GMF, and the importance of the Galactic field on SNR morphology. Our approach also provides a potentially new method for determining distances to SNRs, or conversely, distances to features in the large-scale GMF if SNR distances are known.

  6. Energetic secondary electrons and the nonthermal galactic radio background - A probe of the magnetic field in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Brown, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A previous analysis of the manifestations of charged-pion-decay secondary electrons in interstellar cloud material is extended to include those contributions to the Galactic radio and soft gamma-ray backgrounds that are directly attributable to energetic secondaries. The equilibrium distribution of secondary electrons in dense interstellar clouds is calculated, synchrotron emissivity from isolated interstellar clouds is examined, and it is shown how the value of the magnetic field in these clouds may be determined by observing the radio emission in their directions. The contribution that such clouds make to the integrated radio background is evaluated, and the Galactic distribution of bremsstrahlung gamma rays that arise from interactions of secondary electrons with thermal material in dense clouds is computed. The results indicate that a magnetic field of no more than 80 microgauss is characteristic of dense clouds and that the integrated synchrotron radiation from secondary electrons in interstellar clouds will contribute a significant fraction of the nonthermal brightness along the Galactic equator even if the mean cloud field is as low as 35 microgauss.

  7. MAGNETIC FIELD TRANSPORT FROM DISK TO HALO VIA THE GALACTIC CHIMNEY PROCESS IN NGC 6946

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, George H.

    2012-08-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies is directly affected by the mass and energy outflows originating in regions of star formation. Magnetic fields are an essential ingredient of the ISM, but their connection to the gaseous medium and its evolution remains poorly understood. Here, we present the detection of a gradient in Faraday rotation measure (RM), co-located with a hole in the neutral hydrogen (H I) distribution in the disk of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 6946. The gas kinematics in the same location show evidence for infall of cold gas. The combined characteristics of this feature point to a substantial vertical displacement of the initially plane-parallel-ordered magnetic field, driven by a localized star formation event. This reveals how the large-scale magnetic field pattern in galaxy disks is directly influenced by internal energetic phenomena. Conversely, magnetic fields are observed to be an important ingredient in disk-halo interactions, as predicted in MHD simulations. Turbulent magnetic fields at smaller spatial scales than the observed RM gradient will also be carried from the disk and provide a mechanism for the dynamo process to amplify the ordered magnetic field without quenching. We discuss the observational biases and suggest that this is a common feature of star-forming galaxies with active disk-halo flows.

  8. Rotation Measures of Extragalactic Sources behind the Southern Galactic Plane: New Insights into the Large-Scale Magnetic Field of the Inner Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. C.; Haverkorn, M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Taylor, A. R.; Bizunok, N. S.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Dickey, J. M.; Green, A. J.

    2007-07-01

    We present new Faraday rotation measures (RMs) for 148 extragalactic radio sources behind the southern Galactic plane (253deg<=l<=356deg, |b|<=1.5deg), and use these data in combination with published data to probe the large-scale structure of the Milky Way's magnetic field. We show that the magnitudes of these RMs oscillate with longitude in a manner that correlates with the locations of the Galactic spiral arms. The observed pattern in RMs requires the presence of at least one large-scale magnetic reversal in the fourth Galactic quadrant, located between the Sagittarius-Carina and Scutum-Crux spiral arms. To quantitatively compare our measurements to other recent studies, we consider all available extragalactic and pulsar RMs in the region we have surveyed, and jointly fit these data to simple models in which the large-scale field follows the spiral arms. In the best-fitting model, the magnetic field in the fourth Galactic quadrant is directed clockwise in the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm (as viewed from the north Galactic pole), but is oriented counterclockwise in the Scutum-Crux arm. This contrasts with recent analyses of pulsar RMs alone, in which the fourth-quadrant field was presumed to be directed counterclockwise in the Sagittarius-Carina arm. Also in contrast to recent pulsar RM studies, our joint modeling of pulsar and extragalactic RMs demonstrates that large numbers of large-scale magnetic field reversals are not required to account for observations.

  9. Magnetic Field Strength in an Intermediate-velocity Ionized Filament in the First Galactic Quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stil, J. M.; Hryhoriw, A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the magnetic field in an intermediate-velocity filament for which the Hα intensity in the WHAM survey correlates with excess Faraday rotation of extragalactic radio sources over the length of the filament from b ≈ 20° to b ≈ 55°. The density-weighted mean magnetic field is 2.8 +/- 0.8 μ {{G}}, derived from rotation measures and an empirical relation between Hα emission measure and dispersion measure from Berkhuijsen et al. In view of the uncertainties in the derived magnetic field strength, we propose an alternative use of the available data, rotation measure, and emission measure, to derive a lower limit to the Alfvén speed, weighted by electron density {n}e3/2. We find lower limits to the Alfvén speed that are comparable to or larger than the sound speed in a {10}4 {{K}} plasma, and conclude that the magnetic field is dynamically important. We discuss the role of intermediate-velocity gas as a locus of Faraday rotation in the interstellar medium, and propose that this lower limit to the Alfvén speed may also be applicable to Faraday rotation by galaxy clusters.

  10. On the structure of the magnetic field near a black hole in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Zheltoukhov, A. A.

    2013-04-01

    Using the Grad-Shafranov equation, we consider a new analytical model of the black hole magnetosphere based on the assumption that the magnetic field is radial near the horizon and uniform (cylindrical) in the jet region. Within this model, we have managed to show that the angular velocity of particles ΩF near the rotation axis of the black hole can be smaller than ΩH/2. This result is consistent with the latest numerical simulations.

  11. Evolution and Distribution of Magnetic Fields from Active Galactic Nuclei in Galaxy Clusters. II. The Effects of Cluster Size and Dynamical State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Li, Hui; Collins, David C.; Li, Shengtai; Norman, Michael L.

    2011-10-01

    Theory and simulations suggest that magnetic fields from radio jets and lobes powered by their central super massive black holes can be an important source of magnetic fields in the galaxy clusters. This is Paper II in a series of studies where we present self-consistent high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement cosmological magnetohydrodynamic simulations that simultaneously follow the formation of a galaxy cluster and evolution of magnetic fields ejected by an active galactic nucleus. We studied 12 different galaxy clusters with virial masses ranging from 1 × 1014 to 2 × 1015 M sun. In this work, we examine the effects of the mass and merger history on the final magnetic properties. We find that the evolution of magnetic fields is qualitatively similar to those of previous studies. In most clusters, the injected magnetic fields can be transported throughout the cluster and be further amplified by the intracluster medium (ICM) turbulence during the cluster formation process with hierarchical mergers, while the amplification history and the magnetic field distribution depend on the cluster formation and magnetism history. This can be very different for different clusters. The total magnetic energies in these clusters are between 4 × 1057 and 1061 erg, which is mainly decided by the cluster mass, scaling approximately with the square of the total mass. Dynamically older relaxed clusters usually have more magnetic fields in their ICM. The dynamically very young clusters may be magnetized weakly since there is not enough time for magnetic fields to be amplified.

  12. Magnetized galactic haloes and velocity lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Irwin, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analytic model of a magnetized galactic halo surrounding a Mestel gravitating disc. The magnetic field is taken to be in energy equipartition with the pressure dominant rotating halo gas (not with the cosmic rays), and the whole system is in a steady state. A more flexible `anisotropic equipartition' model is also explored. A definite pressure law is required to maintain the equilibrium, but the halo density is constant. The velocity/magnetic system is scale-free. The objective is to find the rotational velocity lag in such a halo. The magnetic field is not force-free so that angular momentum may be transported from the halo to the intergalactic medium. We find that the `X'-shaped structure observed for halo magnetic fields can be obtained together with a simple analytic formula for the rate of decline of the velocity with height z. The formula also predicts the change in lag with radius, r.

  13. Evolution and Distribution of Magnetic Fields from Active Galactic Nuclei in Galaxy Clusters. I. The Effect of Injection Energy and Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Li, Hui; Collins, David C.; Li, Shengtai; Norman, Michael L.

    2010-12-01

    We present a series of cosmological magnetohydrodynamic simulations that simultaneously follow the formation of a galaxy cluster and evolution of magnetic fields ejected by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we investigate the influence of both the epoch of the AGN (z ~ 3-0.5) and the AGN energy (~3 × 1057- 2 × 1060 erg) on the final magnetic field distribution in a relatively massive cluster (M vir ~ 1015 M sun). We find that as long as the AGN magnetic fields are ejected before the major mergers in the cluster formation history, magnetic fields can be transported throughout the cluster and can be further amplified by the intracluster medium (ICM) turbulence caused by hierarchical mergers during the cluster formation process. The total magnetic energy in the cluster can reach ~1061 erg, with micro Gauss fields distributed over the ~Mpc scale. The amplification of the total magnetic energy by the ICM turbulence can be significant, up to ~1000 times in some cases. Therefore even weak magnetic fields from AGNs can be used to magnetize the cluster to the observed level. The final magnetic energy in the ICM is determined by the ICM turbulent energy, with a weak dependence on the AGN injection energy. We discuss the properties of magnetic fields throughout the cluster and the synthetic Faraday rotation measure maps they produce. We also show that high spatial resolution over most of the magnetic regions of the cluster is very important to capture the small-scale dynamo process and maintain the magnetic field structure in our simulations.

  14. EVOLUTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN GALAXY CLUSTERS. I. THE EFFECT OF INJECTION ENERGY AND REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Li Shengtai; Collins, David C.; Norman, Michael L. E-mail: hli@lanl.go E-mail: dcollins@physics.ucsd.ed

    2010-12-20

    We present a series of cosmological magnetohydrodynamic simulations that simultaneously follow the formation of a galaxy cluster and evolution of magnetic fields ejected by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we investigate the influence of both the epoch of the AGN (z {approx} 3-0.5) and the AGN energy ({approx}3 x 10{sup 57}- 2 x 10{sup 60} erg) on the final magnetic field distribution in a relatively massive cluster (M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 15} M{sub sun}). We find that as long as the AGN magnetic fields are ejected before the major mergers in the cluster formation history, magnetic fields can be transported throughout the cluster and can be further amplified by the intracluster medium (ICM) turbulence caused by hierarchical mergers during the cluster formation process. The total magnetic energy in the cluster can reach {approx}10{sup 61} erg, with micro Gauss fields distributed over the {approx}Mpc scale. The amplification of the total magnetic energy by the ICM turbulence can be significant, up to {approx}1000 times in some cases. Therefore even weak magnetic fields from AGNs can be used to magnetize the cluster to the observed level. The final magnetic energy in the ICM is determined by the ICM turbulent energy, with a weak dependence on the AGN injection energy. We discuss the properties of magnetic fields throughout the cluster and the synthetic Faraday rotation measure maps they produce. We also show that high spatial resolution over most of the magnetic regions of the cluster is very important to capture the small-scale dynamo process and maintain the magnetic field structure in our simulations.

  15. Small-scale variations in the galactic magnetic field - The rotation measure structure function and birefringence in interstellar scintillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonetti, J. H.; Cordes, J. M.; Spangler, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The structure function of rotation measures of extragalactic sources and birefringence in interstellar scintillations are used to investigate variations in the interstellar magnetic field on length scales of about 0.01-100 pc and 10 to the 11th cm, respectively. Model structure functions are derived for the case of a power-law power spectrum of irregularities in the quantity (n(e)B), and an estimate for the structure function is computed for several regions of the sky using data on extragalactic sources. The results indicate an outer angular scale for rotation measure (RM) variations of not less than about 5 deg (a linear scale of about 9-90 pc at a distance of 0.1-1 kpc). There is also evidence for RM variations on angular scales as small as 1 arcmin, but it cannot be determined whether these are intrinsic to the source or caused by the interstellar medium. The effect of a random, Faraday-active medium on the diffraction of radio waves is derived, and an upper limit to the variations in n(e)B on a length scale of 10 to the 11th cm is obtained from available observations.

  16. Numerical simulation of the plasma and gravitational dynamics of a galactic magnetic monopole halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farouki, R.; Shapiro, S. L.; Wasserman, I.

    1984-09-01

    Numerical and analytical calculations designed to assess the viability of a Galactic magnetic monopole halo are presented. The dynamical interplay between magnetic currents and the Galactic magnetic field is treated self-consistently, taking full account of the temporal evolution of currents and fields. It is found that in general self-consistent bounds on the Galactic magnetic monopole flux based on the survival of the Galactic magnetic field are far less restrictive than the Parker limit. The halo models are consistent with monopole masses m(M) approximately equal to or less than 7 x 10 to the 19th GeV, and monopole fluxes in the range F(M) approximately equal to or greater than 3 x 10 to the -13th per sq cm per s. Topics for future, more detailed studies are enumerated and discussed.

  17. Asteroseismology for Galactic archaeology: bridging two fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Stello, Dennis; Huber, Daniel; Serenelli, Aldo; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Milone, Antonino; Asplund, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Asteroseismology has the capability of precisely determining stellar properties that would otherwise be inaccessible, such as radii, masses, and thus ages of field stars. When coupling this information with classical determinations of stellar parameters, such as metallicities, effective temperatures, and angular diameters, powerful new diagnostics for Galactic studies can be obtained. An overview of the ongoing Strömgren survey for Asteroseismology and Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) is presented, along with recent results using asteroseismology to investigate the age structure of the Milky Way disc.

  18. A mechanism for inducing climatic variations through ozone destruction: Screening of galactic cosmic rays by solar and terrestrial magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A perturbation analysis, allowing for temperature and opacity feedbacks, is developed to calculate depletions in the O3 abundance and reductions of stratospheric solar heating that result from increases in NOx concentration. A pair of perturbation coefficients give the reduction in O3 and temperature through the stratosphere for a specified NOx increase. This type of analysis illustrates the tendency for various levels to self-heal when a perturbation occurs. Physical arguments indicate that the expected sign of the climatic effect is correct, with colder surface temperatures produced by reduced magnetic shielding. In addition, four qualitative reasons are suggested for thinking that significant ozone reductions by cosmic ray influxes will lead to an increased terrestrial albedo from stratospheric condensation. In this view, long-term (approximately 10,000 years) climatic changes have resulted from secular geomagnetic variations while shorter (approximately 100 years) excursions are related to changes in solar activity.

  19. Collision of the Smith Cloud and its dark matter halo with the magnetized Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    The Smith Cloud is a massive High Velocity Cloud (HVC) that may have passed through the Milky Way disk in the recent past. Previous studies using hydrodynamic simulations suggest that a dark matter halo may have provided the confinement neccessary for the Smith Cloud to survive passage through the Galactic corona and disk. However, the models of the Galaxy that were used in these studies did not include a magnetic field, while magnetic fields are known to have confining properties. Other studies have shown that the Galactic magnetic field can inhibit mass exchange between the corona and the disk due to magnetic field compression. We extend upon these studies via FLASH magnetohydrodynamic simulations to consider the effects of a Galactic magnetic field on an infalling, dark matter confined HVC.

  20. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Silchenko, O.; Sokoloff, D.; Horellou, C.; Beck, R.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. The investigation of these magnetic fields can be helpful for understanding galactic evolution; however, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Aims: Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. Methods: We use tested methods for modelling α-Ω galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Results: Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513, where the ring counter-rotates with respect to the disc. Strong shear in the region between the disc and the ring is associated with unusually strong dynamo drivers in such counter-rotators. The effect of the strong drivers is found to be unexpectedly moderate. With counter-rotation in the disc, a generic model shows that a steady mixed parity magnetic configuration that is unknown for classical spiral galaxies, may be excited, although we do not specifically model NGC 4513. Conclusions: We deduce that ring galaxies constitute a morphological class of galaxies in which identification of large-scale magnetic fields from observations of polarized radio emission, as well as dynamo modelling, may be possible. Such studies have the potential to throw additional light on the physical nature of rings, their lifetimes, and evolution.

  1. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    We calculate, in the free Maxwell theory, the renormalized quantum vacuum expectation value of the two-point magnetic correlation function in de Sitter inflation. We find that quantum magnetic fluctuations remain constant during inflation instead of being washed out adiabatically, as usually assumed in the literature. The quantum-to-classical transition of super-Hubble magnetic modes during inflation allow us to treat the magnetic field classically after reheating, when it is coupled to the primeval plasma. The actual magnetic field is scale independent and has an intensity of few×10(-12)  G if the energy scale of inflation is few×10(16)  GeV. Such a field accounts for galactic and galaxy cluster magnetic fields. PMID:23971556

  2. MAGNETIC FLUX PARADIGM FOR RADIO LOUDNESS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2013-02-20

    We argue that the magnetic flux threading the black hole (BH), rather than BH spin or Eddington ratio, is the dominant factor in launching powerful jets and thus determining the radio loudness of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most AGNs are radio quiet because the thin accretion disks that feed them are inefficient in depositing magnetic flux close to the BH. Flux accumulation is more likely to occur during a hot accretion (or thick disk) phase, and we argue that radio-loud quasars and strong emission-line radio galaxies occur only when a massive, cold accretion event follows an episode of hot accretion. Such an event might be triggered by the merger of a giant elliptical galaxy with a disk galaxy. This picture supports the idea that flux accumulation can lead to the formation of a so-called magnetically choked accretion flow. The large observed range in radio loudness reflects not only the magnitude of the flux pressed against the BH, but also the decrease in UV flux from the disk, due to its disruption by the ''magnetosphere'' associated with the accumulated flux. While the strongest jets result from the secular accumulation of flux, moderate jet activity can also be triggered by fluctuations in the magnetic flux deposited by turbulent, hot inner regions of otherwise thin accretion disks, or by the dissipation of turbulent fields in accretion disk coronae. These processes could be responsible for jet production in Seyferts and low-luminosity AGNs, as well as jets associated with X-ray binaries.

  3. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  4. Magnetic fields from heterotic cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Rhiannon; Alexander, Stephon H.; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Dasgupta, Keshav

    2009-04-15

    Large-scale magnetic fields are observed today to be coherent on galactic scales. While there exists an explanation for their amplification and their specific configuration in spiral galaxies--the dynamo mechanism--a satisfying explanation for the original seed fields required is still lacking. Cosmic strings are compelling candidates because of their scaling properties, which would guarantee the coherence on cosmological scales of any resultant magnetic fields at the time of galaxy formation. We present a mechanism for the production of primordial seed magnetic fields from heterotic cosmic strings arising from M theory. More specifically, we make use of heterotic cosmic strings stemming from M5-branes wrapped around four of the compact internal dimensions. These objects are stable on cosmological time scales and carry charged zero modes. Therefore a scaling solution of such defects will generate seed magnetic fields which are coherent on galactic scales today.

  5. GLOBAL GALACTIC DYNAMO DRIVEN BY COSMIC RAYS AND EXPLODING MAGNETIZED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hanasz, Michal; Woltanski, Dominik; Kowalik, Kacper

    2009-11-20

    We report the first results of the first global galactic-scale cosmic ray (CR)-MHD simulations of CR-driven dynamo. We investigate the dynamics of magnetized interstellar medium (ISM), which is dynamically coupled with CR gas. We assume that exploding stars deposit small-scale, randomly oriented, dipolar magnetic fields into the differentially rotating ISM, together with a portion of CRs, accelerated in supernova shocks. We conduct numerical simulations with the aid of a new parallel MHD code PIERNIK. We find that the initial magnetization of galactic disks by exploding magnetized stars forms favorable conditions for the CR-driven dynamo. We demonstrate that dipolar magnetic fields supplied on small supernova remnant scales can be amplified exponentially by the CR-driven dynamo, to the present equipartition values, and transformed simultaneously to large galactic scales. The resulting magnetic field structure in an evolved galaxy appears spiral in the face-on view and reveals the so-called X-shaped structure in the edge-on view.

  6. Reconstructing magnetic fields of spiral galaxies from radiopolarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, C.

    2015-12-01

    We live in a magnetic universe with magnetic fields spanning an enormous range of spatial and temporal scales. In particular, magnetic fields at the scale of a galaxy are known as galactic magnetic fields and are the focus of this PhD thesis. These galactic magnetic fields are very important since they affect the dynamics of the interstellar gas as well as the gas distribution. The presence of these magnetic fields induces a certain type of radiation to occur at radio frequencies known as synchrotron radiation. The observed polarization properties of this synchrotron radiation then serves to record the imprint of these magnetic fields. The goal of this thesis has been to infer the structure of the magnetic field across various spatial scales in our own Galaxy as well as the strength and structure of the magnetic field in other galaxies using radiopolarimetric observations.

  7. How do galaxies get their magnetic fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Alexander; Dolag, Klaus; Lesch, Harald

    2015-08-01

    The origin of magnetic fields in high-redshift and present-day galaxies is a long-standing problem. In this talk, we present a model for the seeding and evolution of magnetic fields in protogalaxies. Supernova (SN) explosions during the assembly of a protogalaxy self-consistently provide magnetic seed fields, which are subsequently amplified by compression, shear flows and random motions.Our model explains the origin of strong magnetic fields of $\\mu$G amplitude within the first starforming protogalactic structures shortly after the first stars have formed.We present cosmological simulations with the GADGET code of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation using a standard LCDM cosmology and analyse the strength and distribution of the evolving magnetic field.Within starforming regions and given typical dimensions and magnetic field strengths in canonical SN remnants, we inject a dipole-shape magnetic field at a rate of nG/Gyr. Subsequently, the magnetic field strength increases exponentially on timescales of a few ten million years within the innermost regions of the halo.Furthermore, turbulent diffusion, shocks and gas motions transport the magnetic field towards the halo outskirts. At redshift z=0, the entire galactic structures are magnetized and the field amplitude is of the order of a few microG in the center of the halo and nG at the virial radius. Additionally, we analyse the intrinsic rotation measure (RM) of the forming galactic halo over redshift. The mean halo intrinsic RM peaks between redshifts z=4 and z=2 and reaches absolute values around 1000 rad/m^2. Towards redshift z=0, the intrinsic RM values decline to a mean value below 10 rad/m^2. At high redshifts, the distribution of individual starforming and thus magnetized regions is widespread leading to a widespread distribution of large intrinsic RMs. Our model for the evolution of galactic magnetic fields solves the joint problem of magnetic field seeding and subsequent amplification and distribution

  8. How do galaxies get their magnetic fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Alexander M.

    2016-06-01

    The origin of magnetic fields in high-redshift and present-day galaxies is a long-standing problem. In this talk, we present a model for the seeding and evolution of magnetic fields in protogalaxies. Supernova (SN) explosions during the assembly of a protogalaxy self-consistently provide magnetic seed fields, which are subsequently amplified by compression, shear flows and random motions.Our model explains the origin of strong magnetic fields of μG amplitude within the first starforming protogalactic structures shortly after the first stars have formed.We present cosmological simulations with the GADGET code of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation using a standard LCDM cosmology and analyse the strength and distribution of the evolving magnetic field.Within starforming regions and given typical dimensions and magnetic field strengths in canonical SN remnants, we inject a dipole-shape magnetic field at a rate of nG/Gyr. Subsequently, the magnetic field strength increases exponentially on timescales of a few ten million years within the innermost regions of the halo.Furthermore, turbulent diffusion, shocks and gas motions transport the magnetic field towards the halo outskirts. At redshift z=0, the entire galactic structures are magnetized and the field amplitude is of the order of a few microG in the center of the halo and nG at the virial radius. Additionally, we analyse the intrinsic rotation measure (RM) of the forming galactic halo over redshift. The mean halo intrinsic RM peaks between redshifts z=4 and z=2 and reaches absolute values around 1000 rad/m^2. Towards redshift z=0, the intrinsic RM values decline to a mean value below 10 rad/m^2. At high redshifts, the distribution of individual starforming and thus magnetized regions is widespread leading to a widespread distribution of large intrinsic RMs. Our model for the evolution of galactic magnetic fields solves the joint problem of magnetic field seeding and subsequent amplification and distribution. The

  9. Magnetic field evolution in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzazga, R. T.; Chyży, K. T.; Jurusik, W.; Wiórkiewicz, K.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: Violent gravitational interactions can change the morphologies of galaxies and, by means of merging, transform them into elliptical galaxies. We aim to investigate how they affect the evolution of galactic magnetic fields. Methods: We selected 16 systems of interacting galaxies with available VLA archive radio data at 4.86 and 1.4 GHz and compared their radio emission and estimated magnetic field strengths with their star-forming activity, far-infrared emission, and the stage of tidal interaction. Results: The estimated mean of total magnetic field strength for our sample of interacting galaxies is 14 ± 5 μG, which is larger than for the non-interacting objects. The field regularity (of 0.27 ± 0.09) is lower than in typical spirals and indicates enhanced production of random magnetic fields in the interacting objects. We find a general evolution of magnetic fields: for weak interactions the strength of magnetic field is almost constant (10-15 μG) as interaction advances, then it increases up to 2× , peaks at the nuclear coalescence (25 μG), and decreases again, down to 5-6 μG, for the post-merger remnants. The main production of magnetic fields in colliding galaxies thus terminates somewhere close to the nuclear coalescence, after which magnetic field diffuses. The magnetic field strength for whole galaxies is weakly affected by the star formation rate (SFR), while the dependence is higher for galactic centres. We show that the morphological distortions visible in the radio total and polarized emission do not depend statistically on the global or local SFRs, while they do increase (especially in the polarization) with the advance of interaction. The constructed radio-far-infrared relations for interacting and non-interacting galaxies display a similar balance between the generation of cosmic rays, magnetic fields, and the production of the thermal energy and dust radiation. Conclusions: The regular magnetic fields are much more sensitive to

  10. The Evolution of Gas Clouds Falling in the Magnetized Galactic Halo: High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs) Originated in the Galactic Fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Shelton, Robin L.; Raley, Elizabeth A.

    2009-07-01

    In the Galactic fountain scenario, supernovae and/or stellar winds propel material into the Galactic halo. As the material cools, it condenses into clouds. By using FLASH three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we model and study the dynamical evolution of these gas clouds after they form and begin to fall toward the Galactic plane. In our simulations, we assume that the gas clouds form at a height of z = 5 kpc above the Galactic midplane, then begin to fall from rest. We investigate how the cloud's evolution, dynamics, and interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM) are affected by the initial mass of the cloud. We find that clouds with sufficiently large initial densities (n >= 0.1 H atoms cm-3) accelerate sufficiently and maintain sufficiently large column densities as to be observed and identified as high-velocity clouds (HVCs) even if the ISM is weakly magnetized (1.3 μG). However, the ISM can provide noticeable resistance to the motion of a low-density cloud (n <= 0.01 H atoms cm-3) thus making it more probable that a low-density cloud will attain the speed of an intermediate-velocity cloud rather than the speed of an HVC. We also investigate the effects of various possible magnetic field configurations. As expected, the ISM's resistance is greatest when the magnetic field is strong and perpendicular to the motion of the cloud. The trajectory of the cloud is guided by the magnetic field lines in cases where the magnetic field is oriented diagonal to the Galactic plane. The model cloud simulations show that the interactions between the cloud and the ISM can be understood via analogy to the shock tube problem which involves shock and rarefaction waves. We also discuss accelerated ambient gas, streamers of material ablated from the clouds, and the cloud's evolution from a sphere-shaped to a disk- or cigar-shaped object.

  11. Magnetic Fields in Irregular Galaxies: NGC 4214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Wilcots, E. M.; Robishaw, T.; Heiles, C.; Zweibel, E.

    2006-12-01

    Magnetic fields are an important component of the interstellar medium of galaxies. They provide support, transfer energy from supernovae, provide a possible heating mechanism, and channel gas flows (Beck 2004). Despite the importance of magnetic fields in the ISM, it is not well known what generates and sustains galactic magnetic fields or how magnetic fields, gas, and stars interact in galaxies. The magnetic fields may be especially important in low-mass galaxies like irregulars where the magnetic pressure may be great enough for the field to be dynamically important. However, only four irregular galaxies besides the LMC and the SMC have observed magnetic field structures. The goal of our project is to significantly increase the number of irregular galaxies with observed magnetic field structure. Here we present preliminary results for one of the galaxies in our sample: NGC 4214. Using the VLA and the GBT, we have obtained 3cm, 6cm, and 20cm radio continuum polarization observations of this well-studied galaxy. Our observations allow us to investigate the effects of NGC 4214's high star formation rate, slow rotation rate, and weak bar on the structure of its magnetic field. We find that NGC 4214's magnetic field has an S-shaped structure, with the central field following the bar and the outer edges curving to follow the shape of the arms. The mechanism for generating these fields is still uncertain. A. Kepley is funded by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

  12. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marita

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic field structure in edge-on galaxies observed so far shows a plane-parallel magnetic field component in the disk of the galaxy and an X-shaped field in its halo. The plane-parallel field is thought to be the projected axisymmetric (ASS) disk field as observed in face-on galaxies. Some galaxies addionionally exhibit strong vertical magnetic fields in the halo right above and below the central region of the disk. The mean-field dynamo theory in the disk cannot explain these observed fields without the action of a wind, which also probably plays an important role to keep the vertical scale heights constant in galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation activities, as has been observed in the radio continuum: At λ6 cm the vertical scale heights of the thin disk and the thick disk/halo in a sample of five edge-on galaxies are similar with a mean value of 300 +/- 50 pc for the thin disk and 1.8 +/- 0.2 kpc for the thick disk (a table and references are given in Krause 2011) with our sample including the brightest halo observed so far, NGC 253, with strong star formation, as well as one of the weakest halos, NGC 4565, with weak star formation. If synchrotron emission is the dominant loss process of the relativistic electrons the outer shape of the radio emission should be dumbbell-like as has been observed in several edge-on galaxies like e.g. NGC 253 (Heesen et al. 2009) and NGC 4565. As the synchrotron lifetime t syn at a single frequency is proportional to the total magnetic field strength B t -1.5, a cosmic ray bulk speed (velocity of a galactic wind) can be defined as v CR = h CR /t syn = 2 h z /t syn , where h CR and h z are the scale heights of the cosmic rays and the observed radio emission at this freqnency. Similar observed radio scale heights imply a self regulation mechanism between the galactic wind velocity, the total magnetic field strength and the star formation rate SFR in the disk: v CR ~ B t 1.5 ~ SFR ~ 0.5 (Niklas & Beck 1997).

  13. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  14. The orientation of the local interstellar magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Opher, M; Stone, E C; Gombosi, T I

    2007-05-11

    The orientation of the local interstellar magnetic field introduces asymmetries in the heliosphere that affect the location of heliospheric radio emissions and the streaming direction of ions from the termination shock of the solar wind. We combined observations of radio emissions and energetic particle streaming with extensive three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computer simulations of magnetic field draping over the heliopause to show that the plane of the local interstellar field is approximately 60 degrees to 90 degrees from the galactic plane. This finding suggests that the field orientation in the Local Interstellar Cloud differs from that of a larger-scale interstellar magnetic field thought to parallel the galactic plane. PMID:17495167

  15. Collisions between Dark Matter Confined High Velocity Clouds and Magnetized Galactic Disks: The Smith Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L.

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 106M⊙ and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 108, or 1 × 109 M⊙. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 105 M⊙ in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  16. A magnetic torsional wave near the Galactic Centre traced by a 'double helix' nebula.

    PubMed

    Morris, Mark; Uchida, Keven; Do, Tuan

    2006-03-16

    The magnetic field in the central few hundred parsecs of the Milky Way has a dipolar geometry and is substantially stronger than elsewhere in the Galaxy, with estimates ranging up to a milligauss (refs 1-6). Characterization of the magnetic field at the Galactic Centre is important because it can affect the orbits of molecular clouds by exerting a drag on them, inhibit star formation, and could guide a wind of hot gas or cosmic rays away from the central region. Here we report observations of an infrared nebula having the morphology of an intertwined double helix about 100 parsecs from the Galaxy's dynamical centre, with its axis oriented perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The observed segment is about 25 parsecs in length, and contains about 1.25 full turns of each of the two continuous, helically wound strands. We interpret this feature as a torsional Alfvén wave propagating vertically away from the Galactic disk, driven by rotation of the magnetized circumnuclear gas disk. The direct connection between the circumnuclear disk and the double helix is ambiguous, but the images show a possible meandering channel that warrants further investigation. PMID:16541066

  17. On the magnetic fields in voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A. M.; Hanasz, M.; Lesch, H.; Remus, R.-S.; Stasyszyn, F. A.

    2013-02-01

    We study the possible magnetization of cosmic voids by void galaxies. Recently, observations revealed isolated star-forming galaxies within the voids. Furthermore, a major fraction of a voids volume is expected to be filled with magnetic fields of a minimum strength of about 10-15 G on Mpc scales. We estimate the transport of magnetic energy by cosmic rays (CR) from the void galaxies into the voids. We assume that CRs and winds are able to leave small isolated void galaxies shortly after they assembled, and then propagate within the voids. For a typical void, we estimate the magnetic field strength and volume-filling factor depending on its void galaxy population and possible contributions of strong active galactic nuclei (AGNs) which border the voids. We argue that the lower limit on the void magnetic field can be recovered, if a small fraction of the magnetic energy contained in the void galaxies or void bordering AGNs is distributed within the voids.

  18. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  19. Magnetic Bubble Expansion as an Experimental Model for Extra-Galactic Radio Lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alan; Zhang, Yue; Hsu, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) is conducting laboratory experiments to address outstanding nonlinear plasma physics issues related to how magnetic energy and helicity carried by extra-galactic jets interacts with the intergalactic medium to form radio lobe structures. Experiments are being conducted in the 4 meter long, 50 cm diameter HELCAT linear plasma device at UNM. A pulsed magnetized coaxial gun (˜10 kV, ˜100 kA, ˜2 mWb) forms and injects magnetized plasma bubbles perpendicularly into a lower pressure weakly magnetized background plasma formed by a helicon and/or hot cathode source in HELCAT. Ideal MHD simulations show that an MHD shock develops ahead of the bubble as it propagates, and that the bubble develops asymmetries due to the background field [1]. Experimental data from plasma bubble injection into a background plasma, particularly magnetic probe measurements, will be discussed. [4pt] [1] W. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 072905 (2008).

  20. Galactic dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, David

    There is a broad agreement between the predictions of galactic dynamo theory and observations; although there are still some unresolved difficulties, the theory appears to be robust. Now attention is turning from generic models to studies of particular features of the large-scale magnetic fields, and also to models for specific galaxies. The effects of noncircular flows, for example driven by the interaction of spiral arms and galactic bars with the dynamo, are of current interest.

  1. On Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florido, E.; Battaner, E.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic fields are present in all astrophysical media. However, many models and interpretations of observations often ignore them, because magnetic fields are difficult to handle and because they produce complicated morphological features. Here we will comment on the basic intuitive properties, which even if not completely true, provide a first guiding insight on the physics of a particular astrophysical problem. These magnetic properties are not mathematically demonstrated here. How magnetic fields evolve and how they introduce dynamical effects are considered, also including a short comment on General Relativity Magnetohydrodynamics. In a second part we consider some audacious and speculative matters. They are answers to three questions: a) How draw a cube without lifting the pencil from the paper so that when the pen passes through the same side do in the same direction? B) Are MILAGRO anisotropies miraculous? C) Do cosmic magnetic lenses exist?. The last two questions deal with issues related with the interplay between magnetic fields and cosmic ray propagation.

  2. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are a major agent in the interstellar medium. They contribute significantly to the total pressure which balances the gas disk against gravitation. They affect the gas flows in spiral arms (Gómez and Cox, 2002). The effective sound speed of the gas is increased by the presence of strong fields which reduce the shock strength. The interstellar fields are closely connected to gas clouds. They affect the dynamics of the gas clouds (Elmegreen, 1981; de Avillez and Breitschwerdt, 2004). The stability and evolution of gas clouds are also influenced by magnetic fields, but it is not understood how (Crutcher, 1999; see Chap. 7). Magnetic fields are essential for the onset of star formation as they enable the removal of angular momentum from the protostellar cloud during its collapse (magnetic braking, Mouschovias, 1990). Strong fields may shift the stellar mass spectrum towards the more massive stars (Mestel, 1990). MHD turbulence distributes energy from supernova explosions within the ISM (Subramanian, 1998) and regenerates the field via the dynamo process (Wielebinski, R., Krause, 1993, Beck et al., 1996; Sect. 6). Magnetic reconnection is a possible heating source for the ISM and halo gas (Birk et al., 1998). Magnetic fields also control the density and distribution of cosmic rays in the ISM. A realistic model for any process in the ISM needs basic information about the magnetic field which has to be provided by observations.

  3. Stochastic non-circular motion and outflows driven by magnetic activity in the Galactic bulge region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Machida, Mami; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2015-12-01

    By performing a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation for the Milky Way with an axisymmetric gravitational potential, we propose that spatially dependent amplification of magnetic fields possibly explains the observed noncircular motion of the gas in the Galactic centre region. The radial distribution of the rotation frequency in the bulge region is not monotonic in general. The amplification of the magnetic field is enhanced in regions with stronger differential rotation, because magnetorotational instability and field-line stretching are more effective. The strength of the amplified magnetic field reaches ≳0.5 mG, and radial flows of the gas are excited by the inhomogeneous transport of angular momentum through turbulent magnetic field that is amplified in a spatially dependent manner. In addition, the magnetic pressure-gradient force also drives radial flows in a similar manner. As a result, the simulated position-velocity diagram exhibits a time-dependent asymmetric parallelogram-shape owing to the intermittency of the magnetic turbulence; the present model provides a viable alternative to the bar-potential-driven model for the parallelogram shape of the central molecular zone. This is a natural extension into the central few 100 pc of the magnetic activity, which is observed as molecular loops at radii from a few 100 pc to 1 kpc. Furthermore, the time-averaged net gas flow is directed outward, whereas the flows are highly time dependent, which we discuss from a viewpoint of the outflow from the bulge.

  4. Effects of solar magnetic field on cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goncher, G. A.; Kolomeets, E. V.; Lyakhova, A. K.; Slyunyaeva, N. V.; Stekolnikov, N. V.

    1985-01-01

    Aspects of the problem of galactic cosmic ray propagation, including inversion of the solar total magnetic field and an analysis of data related to the heliomagnetic cycle are discussed. It is noted that the global structure of the solar magnetic field results in an additional flux of galactic cosmic rays generated by curvature and gradient drifts. An analysis of heliomagnetic cycle data shows that the latitudinal gradient results in a N-S asymmetry, with the amplitude of the effect growing with depth in the atmosphere. The inversion of the solar total magnetic field, drift effects, and other space distributions are found to contribute to a 22-year cycle of solar activity.

  5. The Primordial Origin Model of Magnetic Fields in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Machida, Mami; Kudoh, Takahiro

    2010-10-01

    We propose a primordial-origin model for composite configurations of global magnetic fields in spiral galaxies. We show that a uniform tilted magnetic field wound up into a rotating disk galaxy can evolve into composite magnetic configurations comprising bisymmetric spiral (S = BSS), axisymmetric spiral (A = ASS), plane-reversed spiral (PR), and/or ring (R) fields in the disk, and vertical (V) fields in the center. By MHD simulations we show that these composite galactic fields are indeed created from a weak primordial uniform field, and that different configurations can co-exist in the same galaxy. We show that spiral fields trigger the growth of two-armed gaseous arms. The centrally accumulated vertical fields are twisted and produce a jet toward the halo. We found that the more vertical was the initial uniform field, the stronger was the formed magnetic field in the galactic disk.

  6. The galactic dynamo, the helical force free field and the emissions of AGN

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.; Li, Hui

    1997-05-01

    We present a theory relating the central galactic black hole (BH) formation to the galactic dynamo through an accretion disk. The associated AGN emissions and the collimated radio sources are then a result of the dynamo process. A unified theory of quasar and BL-Lac formation (hereafter AGN) starts with the collapse of damped Lyman-alpha clouds, presumably proto-galaxies, which then evolve to a central disk and black hole, (BH). An alpha - omega dynamo forms in this accretion disk where the augmentation of the poloidal field from the toroidal field depends upon star disk collisions. The winding number of the inner most orbit of the disk is so large, tilde 10 to the 11th power that the total gain of the dynamo is semi-infinite, and the original seed field of no consequence. The total magnetic flux produced is tilde 10000 times that of the galaxy, sufficient to explain the much larger flux of clusters. The semi-infinite gain of the dynamo implies that the field saturates at the dynamic stress so that most of the free energy of formation of the BH is carried off as magnetic energy in the form of a magnetic helix. The dissipation of this magnetic energy leads to the unique emission spectrum of AGN as well as the equally startling collimated radio and optical sources.

  7. Sturm und Drang: The turbulent, magnetic tempest in the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Brian C.

    2014-05-01

    The Galactic center central molecular zone (GCCMZ) bears similarities with extragalactic starburst regions, including a high supernova (SN) rate density. As in other starbursts like M82, the frequent SNe can heat the ISM until it is filled with a hot (˜ 4 × 107 K) superwind. Furthermore, the random forcing from SNe stirs up the wind, powering Mach 1 turbulence. I argue that a turbulent dynamo explains the strong magnetic fields in starbursts, and I predict an average B ˜70 μG in the GCCMZ. I demonstrate how the SN driving of the ISM leads to equipartition between various pressure components in the ISM. The SN-heated wind escapes the center, but I show that it may be stopped in the Galactic halo. I propose that the Fermi bubbles are the wind's termination shock.

  8. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  9. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  10. Galactic heavy-ion shielding using electrostatic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The shielding of spacecraft against galactic heavy ions, particularly high-energy Fe(56) nuclei, by electrostatic fields is analyzed for an arrangement of spherical concentric shells. Vacuum breakdown considerations are found to limit the minimum radii of the spheres to over 100 m. This limitation makes it impractical to use the fields for shielding small spacecraft. The voltages necessary to repel these Fe(56) nuclei exceed present electrostatic generating capabilities by over 2 orders of magnitude and render the concept useless as an alternative to traditional bulk-material shielding methods.

  11. Parity nonconservation and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilenkin, A.; Leahy, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Three mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field generation are discussed: (1) asymmetric decay of particles emitted by rotating black holes; (2) asymmetric proton emission by black holes due to weak radiative corrections, and (3) equilibrium parity-violating currents. It is shown that all three mechanisms can produce a seed field sufficiently strong to account for the present galactic fields.

  12. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  13. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar; Dunn, Jonathan Hunter

    2007-01-19

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  14. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  15. Magnetic fields at neptune.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuña, M H; Burlaga, L F; Connerney, J E; Lepping, R P; Neubauer, F M

    1989-12-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center-University of Delaware Bartol Research Institute magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft discovered a strong and complex intrinsic magnetic field of Neptune and an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. The detached bow shock wave in the supersonic solar wind flow was detected upstream at 34.9 Neptune radii (R(N)), and the magnetopause boundary was tentatively identified at 26.5 R(N) near the planet-sun line (1 R(N) = 24,765 kilometers). A maximum magnetic field of nearly 10,000 nanoteslas (1 nanotesla = 10(-5) gauss) was observed near closest approach, at a distance of 1.18 R(N). The planetary magnetic field between 4 and 15 R(N) can be well represented by an offset tilted magnetic dipole (OTD), displaced from the center of Neptune by the surprisingly large amount of 0.55 R(N) and inclined by 47 degrees with respect to the rotation axis. The OTD dipole moment is 0.133 gauss-R(N)(3). Within 4 R(N), the magnetic field representation must include localized sources or higher order magnetic multipoles, or both, which are not yet well determined. The obliquity of Neptune and the phase of its rotation at encounter combined serendipitously so that the spacecraft entered the magnetosphere at a time when the polar cusp region was directed almost precisely sunward. As the spacecraft exited the magnetosphere, the magnetic tail appeared to be monopolar, and no crossings of an imbedded magnetic field reversal or plasma neutral sheet were observed. The auroral zones are most likely located far from the rotation poles and may have a complicated geometry. The rings and all the known moons of Neptune are imbedded deep inside the magnetosphere, except for Nereid, which is outside when sunward of the planet. The radiation belts will have a complex structure owing to the absorption of energetic particles by the moons and rings of Neptune and losses associated with the significant changes

  16. Turbulence-induced magnetic fields in shock precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Valle, M. V.; Lazarian, A.; Santos-Lima, R.

    2016-05-01

    Galactic cosmic rays are believed to be mostly accelerated at supernova shocks. However, the interstellar magnetic field is too weak to efficiently accelerate galactic cosmic rays up to the highest energies, i.e. 1015 eV. A stronger magnetic field in the pre-shock region could provide the efficiency required. Bell's cosmic ray non-resonant streaming instability has been claimed to be responsible for the amplification of precursor magnetic fields. However, an alternative mechanism has been proposed in which the cosmic ray pressure gradient forms the shock precursor and drives turbulence, amplifying the magnetic field via the small-scale dynamo. Key ingredients for the mechanism to operate are the inhomogeneities present in the interstellar medium. These inhomogeneities are the consequence of turbulence. In this work we explore the magnetic field amplification in different interstellar medium conditions through 3D magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations.

  17. The AGN origin of cluster magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao

    The origin of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters is one of the most fascinating but challenging problems in astrophysics. In this dissertation, the possibility of an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) origin of cluster magnetic fields is studied through state of the art simulations of magnetic field evolution in large scale structure formation using a newly developed cosmological Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code -- EnzoMHD. After presenting a complete but concise description and verification of the code, we discuss the creation of magnetic fields through the Biermann Battery effect during first star formation and galaxy cluster formation. We find that magnetic fields are produced as predicted by theory in both cases. For the first star formation, we obtain a lower limit of (~ 10 -9 G) for magnetic fields when the first generation stars form. On the other hand, we find that the magnetic energy is amplified 4 orders of magnitude within ~ 10 Gyr during cluster formation. We then study magnetic field injection from AGN into the Intra- Cluster Medium (ICM) and their impact on the ICM. We reproduce the X-ray cavities as well as weak shocks seen in observations in the simulation, and further confirm the idea that AGN outburst must contain lots of magnetic energy (up to 10 61 ergs) and the magnetic fields play an important part in the formation of jet/lobe system. We present high resolution simulations of cluster formation with magnetic fields injected from high redshift AGN. We find that these local magnetic fields are spread quickly throughout the whole cluster by cluster mergers. The ICM is in a turbulent state with a Kolmogorov-like power spectrum. Magnetic fields are amplified to and maintained at the observational level of a few mG by bulk flows at large scale and the ICM turbulence at small scale. The total magnetic energy increases about 25 times to ~ 1.2 × 10^61 ergs at the present time. We conclude that magnetic fields from AGN at high

  18. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  19. The magnetic field in the disk of our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. L.; Qiao, G. J.

    1994-08-01

    The magnetic field in the disk of our Galaxy is investigated by using the Rotation Measures (RMs) of pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Sources (ERSes). Through analyses of the RMs of carefully selected pulsar samples, it is found that the Galaxy has a global field of BiSymmetric Spiral (BSS) configuration, rather than a concentric ring or an AxiSymmetric Spiral (ASS) configuration. The Galactic magnetic field of BSS structure is supposed to be of primordial origin. The pitch angle of the BSS structure is -8.2deg+/-0.5deg. The field geometry shows that the field goes along the Carina-Sagittarius arm, which is delineated by Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). The amplitude of the BSS field is 1.8+/-0.3μG. The first field strength maximum is at r_0_=11.9+/-0.15 kpc in the direction of l=180deg. The field is strong in the interarm regions and it reverses in the arm regions. In the vicinity of the Sun, it has a strength of ~1.4μG and reverses at 0.2-0.3kpc in the direction of l=0deg. Because of the unknown electron distribution of the Galaxy and other difficulties, it is impossible to derive the galactic field from the RMs of ERSes very quantitatively. Nevertheless, the RMs of ERSes located in the region of the two galactic poles are used to estimate the vertical component of the local galactic field, which is found to have a strength of 0.2-0.3μG and is directed from the south galactic pole to the north galactic pole. The scale height of the magnetic disk of the Galaxy is estimated from the RMs of all-sky distributed ERSes, being about 1.2+/-0.4pc. The regular magnetic field of our Galaxy, which is probably similar to that of M81, extends far from the optical disk.

  20. MAGNETICALLY REGULATED GAS ACCRETION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALACTIC DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Birnboim, Yuval

    2009-09-10

    Disk galaxies are in hydrostatic equilibrium along their vertical axis. The pressure allowing for this configuration consists of thermal, turbulent, magnetic, and cosmic-ray components. For the Milky Way the thermal pressure contributes {approx}10% of the total pressure near the plane, with this fraction dropping toward higher altitudes. Out of the rest, magnetic fields contribute {approx}1/3 of the pressure to distances of {approx}3 kpc above the disk plane. In this Letter, we attempt to extrapolate these local values to high-redshift, rapidly accreting, rapidly star-forming disk galaxies and study the effect of the extra pressure sources on the accretion of gas onto the galaxies. In particular, magnetic field tension may convert a smooth cold-flow accretion to clumpy, irregular star formation regions and rates. The infalling gas accumulates on the edge of the magnetic fields, supported by magnetic tension. When the mass of the infalling gas exceeds some threshold mass, its gravitational force cannot be balanced by magnetic tension anymore, and it falls toward the disk's plane, rapidly making stars. Simplified estimations of this threshold mass are consistent with clumpy star formation observed in SINS, UDF, GOODS, and GEMS surveys. We discuss the shortcomings of pure hydrodynamic codes in simulating the accretion of cold flows into galaxies, and emphasize the need for magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  1. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  2. The interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field as determined by the solar wind velocity structure are examined. The various ways in which magnetic fields affect phenomena in the solar wind are summarized. The dominant role of high and low velocity solar wind streams that persist, with fluctuations and evolution, for weeks or months is emphasized. It is suggested that for most purposes the sector structure is better identified with the stream structure than with the magnetic polarity and that the polarity does not necessarily change from one velocity sector to the next. Several mechanisms that might produce the stream structure are considered. The interaction of the high and low velocity streams is analyzed in a model that is steady state when viewed in a frame that corotates with the sun.

  3. On the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2008-04-01

    We review the extensive and controversial literature concerning how the cosmic magnetic fields pervading nearly all galaxies and clusters of galaxies actually got started. Some observational evidence supports a hypothesis that the field is already moderately strong at the beginning of the life of a galaxy and its disc. One argument involves the chemical abundance of the light elements Be and B, while a second one is based on the detection of strong magnetic fields in very young high red shift galaxies. Since this problem of initial amplification of cosmic magnetic fields involves important plasma problems it is obvious that one must know the plasma in which the amplification occurs. Most of this review is devoted to this basic problem and for this it is necessary to devote ourselves to reviewing studies that take place in environments in which the plasma properties are most clearly understood. For this reason the authors have chosen to restrict themselves almost completely to studies of dynamos in our Galaxy. It is true that one can get a much better idea of the grand scope of galactic fields in extragalactic systems. However, most mature galaxies share the same dilemma as ours of overcoming important plasma problems. Since the authors are both trained in plasma physics we may be biased in pursuing this approach, but we feel it is justified by the above argument. In addition we feel we can produce a better review by staying close to that which we know best. In addition we have chosen not to consider the saturation problem of the galactic magnetic field since if the original dynamo amplification fails the saturation question does not arise. It is generally accepted that seed fields, whose strength is of order 10-20 G, easily spring up in the era preceding galaxy formation. Several mechanisms have been proposed to amplify these seed magnetic fields to a coherent structure with the microgauss strengths of the currently observed galactic magnetic fields. The standard

  4. A self-consistent field method for galactic dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1992-01-01

    The present study describes an algorithm for evolving collisionless stellar systems in order to investigate the evolution of systems with density profiles like the R exp 1/4 law, using only a few terms in the expansions. A good fit is obtained for a truncated isothermal distribution, which renders the method appropriate for galaxies with flat rotation curves. Calculations employing N of about 10 exp 6-7 are straightforward on existing supercomputers, making possible simulations having significantly smoother fields than with direct methods such as tree-codes. Orbits are found in a given static or time-dependent gravitational field; the potential, phi(r, t) is revised from the resultant density, rho(r, t). Possible scientific uses of this technique are discussed, including tidal perturbations of dwarf galaxies, the adiabatic growth of central masses in spheroidal galaxies, instabilities in realistic galaxy models, and secular processes in galactic evolution.

  5. DIFFUSE GALACTIC LIGHT IN THE FIELD OF THE TRANSLUCENT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE CLOUD MBM32

    SciTech Connect

    Ienaka, N.; Kawara, K.; Matsuoka, Y.; Oyabu, S.; Sameshima, H.; Tsujimoto, T.; Peterson, B. A.

    2013-04-10

    We have conducted B-, g-, V-, and R-band imaging in a 45' Multiplication-Sign 40' field containing part of the high Galactic latitude translucent cloud MBM32, and correlated the intensity of diffuse optical light S{sub {nu}}({lambda}) with that of 100 {mu}m emission S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m). A {chi}{sup 2} minimum analysis is applied to fit a linear function to the measured correlation and derive the slope parameter b({lambda}) = {Delta}S{sub {nu}}({lambda})/{Delta}S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) of the best-fit linear function. Compiling a sample by combining our b({lambda}) and published ones, we show that the b({lambda}) strength varies from cloud to cloud by a factor of four. Finding that b({lambda}) decreases as S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) increases in the sample, we suggest that a nonlinear correlation including a quadratic term of S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m){sup 2} should be fitted to the measured correlation. The variation of optical depth, which is A{sub V} = 0.16-2.0 in the sample, can change b({lambda}) by a factor of 2-3. There would be some contribution to the large b({lambda}) variation from the forward-scattering characteristic of dust grains which is coupled to the non-isotropic interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Models of the scattering of diffuse Galactic light (DGL) underestimate the b({lambda}) values by a factor of two. This could be reconciled by deficiency in UV photons in the ISRF or by a moderate increase in dust albedo. Our b({lambda}) spectrum favors a contribution from extended red emission (ERE) to the diffuse optical light; b({lambda}) rises from B to V faster than the models, seems to peak around 6000 A and decreases toward long wavelengths. Such a characteristic is expected from the models in which the DGL is combined with ERE.

  6. Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Ravat, D.; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Cosmos 49, Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO-2, 4 and 6)) and Magsat have been the only low-earth orbiting satellites to measure the crustal magnetic field on a global scale. These missions revealed the presence of long- wavelength (> 500 km) crustal anomalies predominantly located over continents. Ground based methods were, for the most part, unable to record these very large-scale features; no doubt due to the problems of assembling continental scale maps from numerous smaller surveys acquired over many years. Questions arose as to the source and nature of these long-wave length anomalies. As a result there was a great stimulant given to the study of the magnetic properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Some indication as to the nature of these deep sources has been provided by the recent results from the deep crustal drilling programs. In addition, the mechanism of magnetization, induced or remanent, was largely unknown. For computational ease these anomalies were considered to result solely from induced magnetization. However, recent results from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), a magnetometer-bearing mission to Mars, have revealed crustal anomalies with dimensions similar to the largest anomalies on Earth. These Martian features could only have been produced by remanent magnetization, since Mars lacks an inducing field. The origin of long-wavelength crustal anomalies, however, has not been completely determined. Several large crustal magnetic anomalies (e.g., Bangui, Kursk, Kiruna and Central Europe) will be discussed and the role of future satellite magnetometer missions (Orsted, SUNSAT and Champ) in their interpretation evaluated.

  7. Magnetization dynamics using ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudosa, Ioan

    Very short and well shaped magnetic field pulses can be generated using ultra-relativistic electron bunches at Stanford Linear Accelerator. These fields of several Tesla with duration of several picoseconds are used to study the response of magnetic materials to a very short excitation. Precession of a magnetic moment by 90 degrees in a field of 1 Tesla takes about 10 picoseconds, so we explore the range of fast switching of the magnetization by precession. Our experiments are in a region of magnetic excitation that is not yet accessible by other methods. The current table top experiments can generate fields longer than 100 ps and with strength of 0.1 Tesla only. Two types of magnetic were used, magnetic recording media and model magnetic thin films. Information about the magnetization dynamics is extracted from the magnetic patterns generated by the magnetic field. The shape and size of these patterns are influenced by the dissipation of angular momentum involved in the switching process. The high-density recording media, both in-plane and perpendicular type, shows a pattern which indicates a high spin momentum dissipation. The perpendicular magnetic recording media was exposed to multiple magnetic field pulses. We observed an extended transition region between switched and non-switched areas indicating a stochastic switching behavior that cannot be explained by thermal fluctuations. The model films consist of very thin crystalline Fe films on GaAs. Even with these model films we see an enhanced dissipation compared to ferromagnetic resonance studies. The magnetic patterns show that damping increases with time and it is not a constant as usually assumed in the equation describing the magnetization dynamics. The simulation using the theory of spin-wave scattering explains only half of the observed damping. An important feature of this theory is that the spin dissipation is time dependent and depends on the large angle between the magnetization and the magnetic

  8. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2015-07-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  9. Cosmic Magnetic Fields from Torsion Modes and Massive Photon Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2014-09-01

    Earlier Barrow & Tsagas (2008) showed that a slower decay of magnetic fields are present in open Friedmann universes, with traditional Maxwell equations. In their paper magnetic fields of the order of B˜10-33 G which are far below the value required to seed galactic dynamos were obtained. In this paper galactic dynamo seeds of the order of B˜10-23 G are obtained from massive electrodynamics in Einstein-Cartan-Proca (ECP) expanding universe of de Sitter type. Slow decay of magnetic fields in photon-torsion coupling in QED (Garcia de Andrade 2011b) have been recently shown by Garcia de Andrade (2012) also not be able to seed galactic dynamos. Torsion modes are constrained by the field equations. Space-time torsion is shown to be explicitly responsible for the slow decay of cosmic magnetic field. In the absence of massive photon torsion coupling the magnetic field decay is of the order B˜t-3/2, while when torsion is turn on B˜t-1.2. The pure massive-photon-torsion contribution amplifies the magnetic field by Btorsion˜t0.1 which characterizes an extremely slow magnetic dynamo action due to purely torsion gravitational effects. Recently, Barrow et al. (2012) have obtained superadiabatic amplification of B-fields in the Friedmann open cosmology which lies within 10-20 G and 10-12 G which falls very comfortable within limits to seed galactic dynamos. Other simple solutions where B-field decays as B˜a-1, relatively weak photon-torsion coupling approximation. These solutions are obtained for the de Sitter and Friedmann metrics.

  10. Superhorizon magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the evolution of superhorizon-scale magnetic fields from the end of inflation till today. Whatever is the mechanism responsible for their generation during inflation, we find that a given magnetic mode with wave number k evolves, after inflation, according to the values of k ηe , nk , and Ωk , where ηe is the conformal time at the end of inflation, nk is the number density spectrum of inflation-produced photons, and Ωk is the phase difference between the two Bogoliubov coefficients which characterize the state of that mode at the end of inflation. For any realistic inflationary magnetogenesis scenario, we find that nk-1≪|k ηe|≪1 , and three evolutionary scenarios are possible: (i) |Ωk∓π |=O (1 ) , in which case the evolution of the magnetic spectrum Bk(η ) is adiabatic, a2Bk(η )=const , with a being the expansion parameter; (ii) |Ωk∓π |≪|k ηe| , in which case the evolution is superadiabatic, a2Bk(η )∝η ; (iii) |k ηe|≪|Ωk∓π |≪1 or |k ηe|˜|Ωk∓π |≪1 , in which case an early phase of adiabatic evolution is followed, after a time η⋆˜|Ωk∓π |/k , by a superadiabatic evolution. Once a given mode reenters the horizon, it remains frozen into the plasma and then evolves adiabatically till today. As a corollary of our results, we find that inflation-generated magnetic fields evolve adiabatically on all scales and for all times in conformal-invariant free Maxwell theory, while they evolve superadiabatically after inflation on superhorizon scales in the nonconformal-invariant Ratra model, where the inflaton is kinematically coupled to the electromagnetic field. The latter result supports and, somehow, clarifies our recent claim that the Ratra model can account for the presence of cosmic magnetic fields without suffering from both backreaction and strong-coupling problems.

  11. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  12. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  13. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  14. UNDERSTANDING THE GEOMETRY OF ASTROPHYSICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Avery E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2010-08-01

    Faraday rotation measurements have provided an invaluable technique for probing the properties of astrophysical magnetized plasmas. Unfortunately, typical observations provide information only about the density-weighted average of the magnetic field component parallel to the line of sight. As a result, the magnetic field geometry along the line of sight, and in many cases even the location of the rotating material, is poorly constrained. Frequently, interpretations of Faraday rotation observations are dependent upon underlying models of the magnetic field being probed (e.g., uniform, turbulent, equipartition). However, we show that at sufficiently low frequencies, specifically below roughly 13(RM/1 rad m{sup -2}){sup 1/4}(B/1 G){sup 1/2} MHz, the character of Faraday rotation changes, entering what we term the 'super-adiabatic regime' in which the rotation measure (RM) is proportional to the integrated absolute value of the line-of-sight component of the field. As a consequence, comparing RMs at high frequencies with those in this new regime provides direct information about the geometry of the magnetic field along the line of sight. Furthermore, the frequency defining the transition to this new regime, {nu}{sub SA}, depends directly upon the local electron density and magnetic field strength where the magnetic field is perpendicular to the line of sight, allowing the unambiguous distinction between Faraday rotation within and in front of the emission region. Typical values of {nu}{sub SA} range from 10 kHz (below the ionospheric cutoff, but above the heliospheric cutoff) to 10 GHz, depending upon the details of the Faraday rotating environment. In particular, for resolved active galactic nuclei, including the black holes at the center of the Milky Way (Sgr A*) and M81, {nu}{sub SA} ranges from roughly 10 MHz to 10 GHz, and thus can be probed via existing and up-coming ground-based radio observatories.

  15. Reconnection of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Spacecraft observations of steady and nonsteady reconnection at the magnetopause are reviewed. Computer simulations of three-dimensional reconnection in the geomagnetic tail are discussed. Theoretical aspects of the energization of particles in current sheets and of the microprocesses in the diffusion region are presented. Terrella experiments in which magnetospheric reconnection is simulated at both the magnetopause and in the tail are described. The possible role of reconnection in the evolution of solar magnetic fields and solar flares is discussed. A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computer simulation of turbulent reconnection is examined. Results concerning reconnection in Tokamak devices are also presented.

  16. Magnetic fields and stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Roger H.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the principles governing the use of far-infrared and submillimeter polarimetry to investigate magnetic fields and dust in interstellar clouds. Particular topics of discussion are the alignment of dust grains in dense clouds, the dependence on wavelength of polarization due to emission or to partial absorption by aligned grains, the nature of that dependence for mixtures of grains with different properties, and the problem of distinguishing between (1) the effects of the shapes and dielectric functions of the grains and (2) the degree and direction of their alignment.

  17. Estimated number of field stars toward Galactic globular clusters and Local Group Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnatunga, K. U.; Bahcall, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Field star densities are estimated for 89 fields with /b/ greater than 10 degrees based on the Galaxy model of Bahcall and Soneira (1980, 1984; Bahcall et al. 1985). Calculated tables are presented for 76 of the fields toward Galactic globular clusters, and 16 Local Group Galaxies in 13 fields. The estimates can be used as an initial guide for planning both ground-based and Space Telescope observations of globular clusters at intermediate-to-high Galactic latitudes.

  18. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  19. Polar Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the initial data reduction and analysis of the magnetic field measurements of the Polar spacecraft. At this writing data for the first three years of the mission have been processed and deposited in the key parameter database. These data are also available in a variety of time resolutions and coordinate systems via a webserver at UCLA that provides both plots and digital data. The flight software has twice been reprogrammed: once to remove a glitch in the data where there were rare collisions between commands in the central processing unit and once to provide burst mode data at 100 samples per second on a regular basis. The instrument continues to function as described in the instrument paper (1.1 in the bibliography attached below). The early observations were compared with observations on the same field lines at lower altitude. The polar magnetic measurements also proved to be most useful for testing the accuracy of MHD models. WE also made important contributions to study of waves and turbulence.

  20. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  1. HUBBLE'S SEARCH FOR FAINT FIELD STARS IN GALACTIC HALO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a randomly selected area of sky taken to search for faint red stars that might constitute dark matter in our Milky Way Galaxy. (Dark matter is material of an unknown type that makes up most of the mass of our galaxy). If the dark matter in our Galaxy was made of faint red stars -- as many scientists have previously conjectured -- then about 38 such stars should have been visible in this HST image. The simulated stars (diamond-shaped symbols), based on theoretical calculations, illustrate what scientists would have seen if the dark matter were locked-up in faint red stars. These surprising results rule out dim stars as an explanation for dark matter in our Galaxy. Right The unmodified HST image shows the region is actually so devoid of stars that far more distant background galaxies can easily be seen. The field is in the constellation Eridanus, far outside the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This region was chosen to highlight stars in the galactic halo, where dark matter exists, and to avoid the contribution of faint stars in the plane of the Galaxy. Technical Information: The image was constructed from seven exposures totaling almost three hours of searching by HST. The field shown is about 1.5 arc-minutes across. The image was taken in near-infrared light (814 nm) with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, on Feb 8, 1994. This observation is part of the HST parallel observing program. Credit: J Bahcall, Institute for Advance Study, Princeton and NASA

  2. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  3. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  4. Martian external magnetic field proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Benoit; Civet, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Mars possesses no dynamic magnetic field of internal origin as it is the case for the Earth or for Mercury. Instead Mars is characterized by an intense and localized magnetic field of crustal origin. This field is the result of past magnetization and demagnetization processes, and reflects its evolution. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) interacts with Mars' ionized environment to create an external magnetic field. This external field is weak compared to lithospheric one but very dynamic, and may hamper the detailed analysis of the internal magnetic field at some places or times. Because there are currently no magnetic field measurements made at Mars' surface, it is not possible to directly monitor the external field temporal variability as it is done in Earth's ground magnetic observatories. In this study we examine to indirect ways of quantifying this external field. First we use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission which measures the solar wind about one hour upstream of the bow-shock resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's internal magnetic field. These measurements are extrapolated to Mars' position taking into account the orbital configurations of the Mars-Earth system and the velocity of particles carrying the IMF. Second we directly use Mars Global Surveyor magnetic field measurements to quantify the level of variability of the external field. We subtract from the measurements the internal field which is otherwise modeled, and bin the residuals first on a spatial and then on a temporal mesh. This allows to compute daily or semi daily index. We present a comparison of these two proxies and demonstrate their complementarity. We also illustrate our analysis by comparing our Martian external field proxies to terrestrial index at epochs of known strong activity. These proxies will especially be useful for upcoming magnetic field measurements made around or at the surface of Mars.

  5. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  6. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate. PMID:25646869

  7. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Miller, G

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields. PMID:3434538

  8. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  9. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Iziumov, Iu G; Izvekov, E I; Nepomniashchikh, V A

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25438567

  10. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25508098

  11. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  12. Simulations of Galactic Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel

    We review our current understanding of galactic dynamo theory, paying particular attention to numerical simulations both of the mean-field equations and the original three-dimensional equations relevant to describing the magnetic field evolution for a turbulent flow. We emphasize the theoretical difficulties in explaining non-axisymmetric magnetic fields in galaxies and discuss the observational basis for such results in terms of rotation measure analysis. Next, we discuss nonlinear theory, the role of magnetic helicity conservation and magnetic helicity fluxes. This leads to the possibility that galactic magnetic fields may be bi-helical, with opposite signs of helicity and large and small length scales. We discuss their observational signatures and close by discussing the possibilities of explaining the origin of primordial magnetic fields.

  13. The effect of the solar field reversal on the modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, B. T.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    There is now a growing awareness that solar cycle related changes in the large-scale structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) may play an important role in the modulation of galactic cosmic rays. To date, attention focussed on two aspects of the magnetic field structure: large scale compression regions produced by fast solar wind streams and solar flares, both of which are known to vary in intensity and number over the solar cycle, and the variable warp of the heliospheric current sheet. It is suggested that another feature of the solar cycle is worthy of consideration: the field reversal itself. If the Sun reverses its polarity by simply overturning the heliospheric current sheet (northern fields migrating southward and vice-versa) then there may well be an effect on cosmic ray intensity. However, such a simple picture of solar reversal seems improbable. Observations of the solar corona suggest the existence of not one but several current sheets in the heliosphere at solar maximum. The results of a simple calculation to demonstrate that the variation in cosmic ray intensities that will result can be as large as is actually observed over the solar cycle are given.

  14. Magnetic fields in Local Group dwarf irregulars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyży, K. T.; Weżgowiec, M.; Beck, R.; Bomans, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We wish to clarify whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in typically low-mass dwarf galaxies and to assess the role of dwarf galaxies in the magnetization of the Universe. Methods: We performed a search for radio emission and magnetic fields in an unbiased sample of 12 Local Group (LG) irregular and dwarf irregular galaxies with the 100-m Effelsberg telescope at 2.64 GHz. Three galaxies were detected. A higher frequency (4.85 GHz) was used to search for polarized emission in five dwarfs that are the most luminous ones in the infrared domain, of which three were detected. Results: Magnetic fields in LG dwarfs are weak, with a mean value of the total field strength of <4.2 ± 1.8 μG, three times lower than in the normal spirals. The strongest field among all LG dwarfs of 10 μG (at 2.64 GHz) is observed in the starburst dwarf IC 10. The production of total magnetic fields in dwarf systems appears to be regulated mainly by the star-formation surface density (with the power-law exponent of 0.30 ± 0.04) or by the gas surface density (with the exponent 0.47 ± 0.09). In addition, we find systematically stronger fields in objects of higher global star-formation rate. The dwarf galaxies follow a similar far-infrared relationship (with a slope of 0.91 ± 0.08) to that determined for high surface brightness spiral galaxies. The magnetic field strength in dwarf galaxies does not correlate with their maximum rotational velocity, indicating that a small-scale rather than a large-scale dynamo process is responsible for producting magnetic fields in dwarfs. If magnetization of the Universe by galactic outflows is coeval with its metal enrichment, we show that more massive objects (such as Lyman break galaxies) can efficiently magnetize the intergalactic medium with a magnetic field strength of about 0.8 nG out to a distance of 160-530 kpc at redshifts 5-3, respectively. Magnetic fields that are several times weaker and shorter magnetization

  15. Magnetic fields in nearby spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Lenc, Emil

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in star formation process and dynamic evolution of galaxies. Previous studies of magnetic fields relied on narrow band polarisation observations and difficult to disentangle magnetised structures along line of sight. Thanks to the broad bandwidth and multi-channels of CABB we are now able to recover the 3D structures of magnetic fields using RM synthesis and QU-fitting. We propose to observe two nearby spirals M83 and NGC 4945 to build clear pictures of their magnetic fields.

  16. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  17. Magnetic fields around evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M.; Vlemmings, W.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Olofsson, G.

    2014-04-01

    A number of mechanisms, such as magnetic fields, (binary) companions and circumstellar disks have been suggested to be the cause of non-spherical PNe and in particular collimated outflows. This work investigates one of these mechanisms: the magnetic fields. While MHD simulations show that the fields can indeed be important, few observations of magnetic fields have been done so far. We used the VLBA to observe five evolved stars, with the goal of detecting the magnetic field by means of water maser polarization. The sample consists in four AGB stars (IK Tau, RT Vir, IRC+60370 and AP Lyn) and one pPN (OH231.8+4.2). In four of the five sources, several strong maser features were detected allowing us to measure the linear and/or circular polarization. Based on the circular polarization detections, we infer the strength of the component of the field along the line of sight to be between ~30 mG and ~330 mG in the water maser regions of these four sources. When extrapolated to the surface of the stars, the magnetic field strength would be between a few hundred mG and a few Gauss when assuming a toroidal field geometry and higher when assuming more complex magnetic fields. We conclude that the magnetic energy we derived in the water maser regions is higher than the thermal and kinetic energy, leading to the conclusion that, indeed, magnetic fields probably play an important role in shaping Planetary Nebulae.

  18. The magnetic-field structure in a stationary accretion disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrovich, M. Yu.; Silant'ev, N. A.; Gnedin, Yu. N.; Natsvlishvili, T. M.; Buliga, S. D.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic-field structure in regions of stationary, planar accretion disks around active galactic nuclei where general-relativistic effects can be neglected (from 10 to 200 gravitational radii) is considered. It is assumed that the magnetic field in the outer edges of the disk, which forms in the magnetosphere of the central black hole during the creation of the relativisitic jets, corresponds to the field of a magnetic dipole perpendicular to the plane of the disk. In this case, the azimuthal field component B φ in the disk arises due to the presence of the radial field B ρ and the azimuthal velocity component U φ . The value of the magnetic field at the inner radius of the disk is taken to correspond to the solution of the induction equation in a diffusion approximation. Numerical solutions of the induction equation are given for a number of cases.

  19. The Magnetic Field in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.

    2004-01-01

    One of the great achievements of Parker was the prediction that the solar magnetic field would be drawn into Archimedian spirals as it is carried away from the Sun by the solar wind. This prediction has been amply confirmed by many in situ measurements in the intervening four decades. But, Parker made his prediction for a solar wind that expands into infinite space while we now know that the local interstellar medium (LISM) is far from empty and, in fact, confines the solar wind to a finite volume, known as the heliosphere, that extends to approximately 100 AU in the upstream direction (the solar system is moving through the LISM). Voyagers 1/2, presently at -80 AU, are approaching the upstream boundaries of the heliosphere and returning data on the properties of the magnetic field. This is important for understanding how galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) reach the Earth. Voyagers show that the IMF at 10-80 AU behaves much as Parker predicted - with two important exceptions. This is not surprising since the field is essentially passively advected by the solar wind out to 80 AU. But, new models say that nearer the heliosphere boundaries the field plays a major role in the solar wind-LISM interaction. However, of the many physical ingredients that constitute the outer heliosphere, the magnetic field poses some of the most interesting and difficult numerical modeling problems. Presently, only a few results have been published and much remains to be done. Here I will summarize the expected and measured behavior of the magnetic field at 80 AU. Then I will describe modeling predictions beyond 80 AU: magnetic "tornadoes", polarity envelopes, the Axford-Cranfill effect, inner and outer magnetic walls and more. I will also list what I believe to be important new modeling objectives. Finally, I will speculate on what is happening with the magnetic field near the nose of the heliosphere. My conclusion is that models of GCR modulation rarely incorporate even crudely realistic

  20. Recombination era magnetic fields from axion dark matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Banik, Nilanjan; Christopherson, Adam J.

    2016-02-04

    We introduce a new mechanism for generating magnetic fields in the recombination era. This Harrison-like mechanism utilizes vorticity in baryons that is sourced through the Bose-Einstein condensate of axions via gravitational interactions. The magnetic fields generated are on galactic scales ~10 kpc and have a magnitude of the order of B~10–23G today. Lastly, the field has a greater magnitude than those generated from other mechanisms relying on second-order perturbation theory, and is sufficient to provide a seed for battery mechanisms.

  1. The Capacitive Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyatkov, D. O.; Yurchenko, A. V.; Balashov, V. B.; Yurchenko, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a study of sensitive element magnetic field sensor are represented in this paper. The sensor is based on the change of the capacitance with an active dielectric (ferrofluid) due to the magnitude of magnetic field. To prepare the ferrofluid magnetic particles are used, which have a followingdispersion equal to 50 < Ø < 56, 45 < Ø < 50, 40 < Ø < 45 and Ø < 40micron of nanocrystalline alloy of brand 5BDSR. The dependence of the sensitivity of the capacitive element from the ferrofluid with different dispersion of magnetic particles is considered. The threshold of sensitivity and sensitivity of a measuring cell with ferrofluid by a magnetic field was determined. The experimental graphs of capacitance change of the magnitude of magnetic field are presented.

  2. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Magnetic fields in young galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlund, Åke; Rögnvaldsson, Örnólfur

    We have studied the fate of initial magnetic fields in the hot halo gas out of which the visible parts of galaxies form, using three-dimensional numerical MHD-experiments. The halo gas undergoes compression by several orders of magnitude in the subsonic cooling flow that forms the cold disk. The magnetic field is carried along and is amplified considerably in the process, reaching μG levels for reasonable values of the initial ratio of magnetic to thermal energy density.

  4. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  5. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  6. Cosmic Magnetic Fields - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard; Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields have been known in antiquity. Aristotle attributes the first of what could be called a scientific discussion on magnetism to Thales, who lived from about 625 BC. In China “magnetic carts” were in use to help the Emperor in his journeys of inspection. Plinius comments that in the Asia Minor province of Magnesia shepherds' staffs get at times “glued” to a stone, a alodestone. In Europe the magnetic compass came through the Arab sailors who met the Portuguese explorers. The first scientific treatise on magnetism, “De Magnete”, was published by William Gilbert who in 1600 described his experiments and suggested that the Earth was a huge magnet. Johannes Kepler was a correspondent of Gilbert and at times suggested that planetary motion was due to magnetic forces. Alas, this concept was demolished by Isaac Newton,who seeing the falling apple decided that gravity was enough. This concept of dealing with gravitational forces only remains en vogue even today. The explanations why magnetic effects must be neglected go from “magnetic energy is only 1% of gravitation” to “magnetic fields only complicate the beautiful computer solutions”. What is disregarded is the fact that magnetic effects are very directional(not omni-directional as gravity) and also the fact that magnetic fields are seen every where in our cosmic universe.

  7. Primordial magnetic fields and dynamos from parity violated torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2012-05-01

    It is well known that torsion induced magnetic fields may seed galactic dynamos, but the price one pays for that is the conformal and gauge invariance breaks and a tiny photon mass. More recently I have shown [L.C. Garcia de Andrade, Phys. Lett. B 468 (2011) 28] that magnetic fields decay in a gauge invariant non-minimal coupling theory of torsion is slow down, which would allow for dynamo action to take place. In this Letter, by adding a parity violation term of the type Rɛ to the non-coupling term, a magnetic dynamo equation is obtained. From dynamo equation it is shown that torsion terms only appear in the dynamo equation when diffusion in the cosmic plasma is present. Torsion breaks the homogeneity of the magnetic field in the universe. Since Zeldovich anti-dynamo theorem assumes that the spacetime should be totally flat, torsion is responsible for violation of anti-dynamo theorem in 2D spatial dimensions. Contrary to previous results torsion induced primordial magnetic fields cannot seed galactic dynamos since from torsion and diffusion coefficient the decaying time of the magnetic field is 106yrs, which is much shorter than the galaxy age.

  8. Magnetic field synthesis for microwave magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, F. R.

    1982-04-01

    The Microwave and Quantum Magnetics Group of the M.I.T. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science undertook a two-year research program directed at developing synthesis procedures that allow magnetostatic and/or magnetoelastic modes to be specially tailored for microwave signal processing applications that include magnetically tunable filters and limiters as well as delay lines that are either linearly dispersive or nondispersive over prescribed bandwidths. Special emphasis was given to devices employing thin films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) that are blessed with spatially nonuniform dc magnetic fields.

  9. Magnetic field structure evolution in rotating magnetic field plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Yuri; Yang Xiaokang; Huang, T.-S.

    2008-07-15

    A study of magnetic field structure evolution during 40-ms plasma discharge has been performed in a new device with 80 cm long/40 cm diameter cylindrical chamber, in which a plasma current I{sub p}{approx_equal}2 kA was driven and sustained by a rotating magnetic field. The main focus of the experiments is on how the changes in externally applied magnetic field affect the current profile and magnetic field in plasma. During plasma discharge, a pulse current was briefly fed to a magnetic coil located at the midplane (middle coil). The magnetic field in cross section of plasma was scanned with pickup probes. Two regimes were studied: without and with an external toroidal field (TF) produced by axial I{sub z} current. With a relatively small current (I{sub m} {<=} 600 A) in the middle coil, the plasma current is boosted up to 5 kA. The magnetic flux surfaces become extended along the axial Z direction, sometimes with the formation of doublet shape plasma. The regime without TF appears to be less stable, presumably due to the reversal of plasma current in central area of plasma column.

  10. PREPROCESSING MAGNETIC FIELDS WITH CHROMOSPHERIC LONGITUDINAL FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Kusano, K.

    2012-06-20

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation is a powerful tool for the modeling of the magnetic field in the solar corona. However, since the photospheric magnetic field does not in general satisfy the force-free condition, some kind of processing is required to assimilate data into the model. In this paper, we report the results of new preprocessing for the NLFFF extrapolation. Through this preprocessing, we expect to obtain magnetic field data similar to those in the chromosphere. In our preprocessing, we add a new term concerning chromospheric longitudinal fields into the optimization function proposed by Wiegelmann et al. We perform a parameter survey of six free parameters to find minimum force- and torque-freeness with the simulated-annealing method. Analyzed data are a photospheric vector magnetogram of AR 10953 observed with the Hinode spectropolarimeter and a chromospheric longitudinal magnetogram observed with SOLIS spectropolarimeter. It is found that some preprocessed fields show the smallest force- and torque-freeness and are very similar to the chromospheric longitudinal fields. On the other hand, other preprocessed fields show noisy maps, although the force- and torque-freeness are of the same order. By analyzing preprocessed noisy maps in the wave number space, we found that small and large wave number components balance out on the force-free index. We also discuss our iteration limit of the simulated-annealing method and magnetic structure broadening in the chromosphere.

  11. Dynamically important magnetic fields near accreting supermassive black holes.

    PubMed

    Zamaninasab, M; Clausen-Brown, E; Savolainen, T; Tchekhovskoy, A

    2014-06-01

    Accreting supermassive black holes at the centres of active galaxies often produce 'jets'--collimated bipolar outflows of relativistic particles. Magnetic fields probably play a critical role in jet formation and in accretion disk physics. A dynamically important magnetic field was recently found near the Galactic Centre black hole. If this is common and if the field continues to near the black hole event horizon, disk structures will be affected, invalidating assumptions made in standard models. Here we report that jet magnetic field and accretion disk luminosity are tightly correlated over seven orders of magnitude for a sample of 76 radio-loud active galaxies. We conclude that the jet-launching regions of these radio-loud galaxies are threaded by dynamically important fields, which will affect the disk properties. These fields obstruct gas infall, compress the accretion disk vertically, slow down the disk rotation by carrying away its angular momentum in an outflow and determine the directionality of jets. PMID:24899311

  12. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  13. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  14. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  15. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  16. Magnetic fields and scintillator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.; Ronzhin, A.; Hagopian, V.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental data have shown that the light output of a scintillator depends on the magnitude of the externally applied magnetic fields, and that this variation can affect the calorimeter calibration and possibly resolution. The goal of the measurements presented here is to study the light yield of scintillators in high magnetic fields in conditions that are similar to those anticipated for the LHC CMS detector. Two independent measurements were performed, the first at Fermilab and the second at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University.

  17. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  18. Bioluminescence under static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Ueno, S.

    1998-06-01

    In the present study, the effect of magnetic fields on the emission of light by a living system was studied. The fireflies Hotaria parvula and Luciola cruciata were used as the bioluminescence systems. The firefly light organ was fixed at the edge of an optical fiber. The emitted light was introduced into a single-channel photon-counting system using an optical fiber. We measured both the spectrum of a constant light emission and, the time course of bioluminescence pulses. Two horizontal-type superconducting magnets, which produced 8 and 14 T magnetic fields at their center, were used as the magnetic-field generators. We also carried out an in vitro study of bioluminescence. The enzymatic activity of luciferase was measured under a 14 T magnetic field. We measured emission spectra of bioluminescence over the interval 500-600 nm at 25 °C in a stable emission state. It was observed that the peak wavelength around 550 nm shifted to 560 nm under a 14 T magnetic field. However, the effects of magnetic fields were not significant. Also, we measured the time course of emissions at 550 nm in a transient emission state. The rate in the light intensity under a 14 T magnetic field increased compared to the control. There is a possibility that the change in the emission intensities under a magnetic field is related to a change in the biochemical systems of the firefly, such as the enzymatic process of luciferase and the excited singlet state with subsequent light emission.

  19. Magnetic field structure of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, K. M.

    2012-04-01

    Recently planet Mercury - an unexplored territory in our solar system - has been of much interest to the scientific community due to recent flybys of the spacecraft MESSENGER that discovered its intrinsic stationary and large-scale dipole like magnetic field structure with an intensity of ˜300nT confirming Mariner 10 observations. In the present study, with the observed constraint of Mercury's atmospheric magnetic field structure, internal magnetic field structure is modeled as a solution of magnetic diffusion equation. In this study, Mercury's internal structure mainly consists of a stable stratified fluid core and the convective mantle. For simplicity, magnetic diffusivity in both parts of the structure is considered to be uniform and constant with a value represented by a suitable averages. It is further assumed that vigorous convection in the mantle disposes of the electric currents leading to a very high diffusivity in that region. Thus, in order to satisfy observed atmospheric magnetic field structure, Mercury's most likely magnetic field structure consists of a solution of MHD diffusion equation in the core and a combined multipolar (dipole and quadrupole like magnetic field structures embedded in the uniform field) solution of a current free like magnetic field structure in the mantle and in the atmosphere. With imposition of appropriate boundary conditions at the core-mantle boundary for the first two diffusion eigen modes, in order to satisfy the observed field structure, present study puts the constraint on Mercury's core radius to be ˜2000km. From the estimated magnetic diffusivity and the core radius, it is also possible to estimate the two diffusion eigen modes with their diffusion time scales of ˜8.6 and 3.7 billion years respectively suggesting that the planet inherits its present-day magnetic field structure from the solar Nebula. It is proposed that permanency of such a large-scale magnetic field structure of the planet is attained during

  20. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Lilia; Melatos, Andrew; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence (particularly thanks to the MiMeS, MAGORI and BOB surveys) through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence, in the generation and stability of neutron star fields.

  1. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [interplanetary magnetic fields/solar activity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    A large-scale, three dimensional magnetic field in the interplanetary medium with an expected classical spiral pattern to zeroth order is discussed. Systematic and random deviations which are expected are treated. The sector structure which should be evident at high latitudes is examined. Interplanetary streams are discussed as determining the patterns of magnetic field intensity. It was proposed that the large-scale spiral field can induce a meridional flow which might alter the field geometry somewhat. The nonuniformities caused by streams will probably significantly influence the motion of solar and galactic particles. It was concluded that knowledge of the 3-dimensional field and its dynamical effects can be obtained by in situ measurements by a probe which goes over the sun's poles. Diagrams of the magnetic fields are given.

  2. Anomalous resistivity and the evolution of magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the topological restructuring of a force-free magnetic field caused by the hypothetical sudden onset of a localized region of strong anomalous resistivity. It is shown that the topological complexity increases, with the primitive planar force-free field with straight field lines developing field lines that wrap half a turn around each other, evidently providing a surface of tangential discontinuity in the wraparound region. It is suggested that the topological restructuring contributes to the complexity of the geomagnetic substorm, the aurora, and perhaps some of the flare activity on the sun, or other star, and the Galactic halo.

  3. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  4. eRMHD simulations of jets with helical magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Sogorb, M.; Perucho, M.; Gómez, J. L.; Martí, J. M.; Antón, L.; Aloy, M. A.; Agudo, I.

    We present numerical magnetohydrodynamic and emission (eRMHD) simulations of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei. We focus our study on the role played by the magnetic field in the dynamics of the jet, analyzing the balance of the main driving forces which determine the jet evolution. Overpressured jets with different magnetizations are considered in order to study their influence in the jet collimation, confinement and overall stability. Computation of the synchrotron emission from these models allows a direct comparison with actual sources. We find that the relative brightness of the knots associated with the recollimation shocks decreases with increasing magnetization, suggesting that overpressured jets presenting stationary components may have a relatively weak magnetization, with magnetic fields of the order of equipartition or below.

  5. The magnetic field of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    The Mariner 10 spacecraft encountered Mercury three times in 1974-1975. The first and third encounters provided detailed observations of a well-developed detached bow shock wave which results from the interaction of the solar wind. The planet possesses a global magnetic field and a modest magnetosphere, which deflects the solar wind. The field is approximately dipolar, with orientation in the same sense as earth, tilted 12 deg from the rotation axis. The magnetic moment corresponds to an undistorted equatorial field intensity of 350 gammas, approximately 1% of earth's. The field, while unequivocally intrinsic to the planet, may be due to remanent magnetization acquired from an extinct dynamo or a primordial magnetic field or due to a presently active dynamo. The latter possibility appears more plausible at present. In any case, the existence of the magnetic field provides very strong evidence of a mature differentiated planetary interior with a large core (core radius about 0.7 Mercury radius) and a record of the history of planetary formation in the magnetization of the crustal rocks.

  6. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  7. Generation and maintenance of bisymmetric spiral magnetic fields in disk galaxies in differential rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawa, Takeyasu; Fujimoto, M.

    1993-05-01

    The approximate dynamo equation, which yields asymptotic solutions for the large scale bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields rotating rigidly over a large area of the galactic disk, is derived. The vertical thickness and the dynamo strength of the gaseous disk which are necessary to generate and sustain the BSS magnetic fields is determined. The globally BSS magnetic fields which propagate over the disk as a wave without being twisted more tightly are reproduced. A poloidal field configuration is theoretically predicted in the halo around the disk, and is observed in the edge-on galaxy NGC4631. Mathematical methods for the galactic dynamo are shown to be equivalent. Those methods give different growth rates between the BSS and the axisymmetric spiral (ASS) magnetic fields in the disk. Magnetohydrodynamical excitation is discussed between the BSS magnetic fields and the two armed spiral density waves.

  8. Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x–y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

  9. Magnetic fields in quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the axial fields in high-latitude quiescent prominences is considered. The fact that almost all quiescent prominences obey the same hemisphere-dependent rule strongly suggests that the solar differential rotation plays an important role in producing the axial fields. However, the observations are inconsistent with the hypothesis that the axial fields are produced by differential rotation acting on an existing coronal magnetic field. Several possible explanations for this discrepancy are considered. The possibility that the sign of the axial field depends on the topology of the magnetic field in which the prominence is embedded is examined, as is the possibility that the neutral line is tilted with respect to the east-west direction, so that differential rotation causes the neutral line also to rotate with time. The possibility that the axial fields of quiescent prominences have their origin below the solar surface is also considered.

  10. A limitation of the generation of magnetic fields. [astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balbus, Steven A.

    1993-01-01

    Simple arguments are put forward to show that the currents produced in disks by radiative or other types of drag forces on electrons must give rise to extraordinarily small magnetic fields. The field strengths are consistent with earlier (more complex) treatments of this class of problem, but inconsistent with the claims of recent papers in the literature. The discrepancies involve the treatment of self-induction. Ion-electron inductive coupling limits the generated magnetic field to have an associated ion Larmor radius greater than or of order of the radius of the disk, a result which follows most directly from conservation of canonical ion momentum, p + eA/c. An explicit time-dependent model for the buildup of the field leads to the same conclusion. If internal velocity gradient scales are smaller than the ion Larmor radius, and the plasma is not collision dominated, standard dynamo amplification within the disk is hardly likely to be effective. But to explain the Galactic field, dynamo amplification in a collisional plasma is also likely to be problematic. The difficulties posed by the existence of ordered Galactic-scale magnetic fields are made all the more acute by the simplicity and the scope of the discussed field limitation.

  11. Magnetic Fields in Stellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, Patrick; Frank, Adam; Varniére, Peggy; Blackman, Eric G.

    2007-06-01

    Although several lines of evidence suggest that jets from young stars are driven magnetically from accretion disks, existing observations of field strengths in the bow shocks of these flows imply that magnetic fields play only a minor role in the dynamics at these locations. To investigate this apparent discrepancy we performed numerical simulations of expanding magnetized jets with stochastically variable input velocities with the AstroBEAR MHD code. Because the magnetic field B is proportional to the density n within compression and rarefaction regions, the magnetic signal speed drops in rarefactions and increases in the compressed areas of velocity-variable flows. In contrast, B~n0.5 for a steady state conical flow with a toroidal field, so the Alfvén speed in that case is constant along the entire jet. The simulations show that the combined effects of shocks, rarefactions, and divergent flow cause magnetic fields to scale with density as an intermediate power 1>p>0.5. Because p>0.5, the Alfvén speed in rarefactions decreases on average as the jet propagates away from the star. Hence, a typical Alfvén velocity in the jet close to the star is significantly larger than it is in the rarefactions ahead of bow shocks at larger distances. We find that the observed values of weak fields at large distances are consistent with strong fields required to drive the observed mass loss close to the star. Typical velocity perturbations, which form shocks at large distances, will produce only magnetic waves close to the star. For a typical stellar jet the crossover point inside which velocity perturbations of 30-40 km s-1 no longer produce shocks is ~300 AU from the source.

  12. Hysteresis in rotation magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyi, Amalia

    2000-01-01

    The different properties of the vector Jiles-Atherton hysteresis operator is proved under forced H- and B-field supply. Feeding the magnetic material with alternating and circular polarised rotational excitation, the different properties of the model under the input field intensity and the flux density are investigated and the results are proved in figures.

  13. MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS FOR FAST-CHANGING MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.; MARONE, A.; THOMAS. R.; WANDERER, P.

    2004-10-03

    Several recent applications for fast ramped magnets have been found that require rapid measurement of the field quality during the ramp. (In one instance, accelerator dipoles will be ramped at 1 T/sec, with measurements needed to the accuracy typically required for accelerators.) We have built and tested a new type of magnetic field measuring system to meet this need. The system consists of 16 stationary pickup windings mounted on a cylinder. The signals induced in the windings in a changing magnetic field are sampled and analyzed to obtain the field harmonics. To minimize costs, printed circuit boards were used for the pickup windings and a combination of amplifiers and ADPs used for the voltage readout system. New software was developed for the analysis. Magnetic field measurements of a model dipole developed for the SIS200 accelerator at GSI are presented. The measurements are needed to insure that eddy currents induced by the fast ramps do not impact the field quality needed for successful accelerator operation.

  14. Magnetic field-aligned electric potentials in nonideal plasma flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, K.; Hesse, M.; Birn, J.

    1991-01-01

    The electric field component parallel to the magnetic field arising from plasma flows which violate the frozen-in field condition of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is discussed. The quantity of interest is the potential U = integral E parallel ds where the integral is extended along field lines. It is shown that U can be directly related to magnetic field properties, expressed by Euler potentials, even when time-dependence is included. These results are applicable to earth's magnetosphere, to solar flares, to aligned-rotator models of compact objects, and to galactic rotation. On the basis of order-of-magnitude estimates, these results support the view that parallel electric fields associated with nonideal plasma flows might play an important role in cosmic particle acceleration.

  15. Magnetic field fluctuations during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Before a magnetospheric substorm and during its early phases the magnetic field magnitude in the geomagnetic tail increases and field lines in the nighttime hemisphere assume a more tail-like configuration. Before the substorm onset a minimum amount of magnetic flux is observed to cross the neutral sheet which means that the neutral sheet currents attain their most earthward locations and their greatest current densities. This configuration apparently results from an increased transport of magnetic flux to the tail caused by a southward interplanetary magnetic field. The field begins relaxing toward a more dipolar configuration at the time of a substorm onset with the recovery probably occurring first between 6 and 10 R sub E. This recovery must be associated with magnetospheric convection which restores magnetic flux to the dayside hemisphere. Field aligned currents appear to be required to connect magnetospheric currents to the auroral electrojets, implying that a net current flows in a limited range of longitudes. Space measurements supporting current systems are limited. More evidence exists for the occurrence of double current sheets which do not involve net current at a given longitude.

  16. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing

  17. Magnetic field of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  18. Observations of Mercury's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic field data obtained by Mariner 10 during the third and final encounter with the planet Mercury on 16 March 1975 were studied. A well developed bow shock and modest magnetosphere, previously observed at first encounter on 29 March 1974, were again observed. In addition, a much stronger magnetic field near closest approach, 400 gamma versus 98 gamma, was observed at an altitude of 327 km and approximately 70 deg north Mercurian latitude. Spherical harmonic analysis of the data provide an estimate of the centered planetary magnetic dipole of 4.7 x 10 to the 22nd power Gauss/cu cm with the axis tilted 12 deg to the rotation axis and in the same sense as Earth's. The interplanetary field was sufficiently different between first and third encounters that in addition to the very large field magnitude observed, it argues strongly against a complex induction process generating the observed planetary field. While a possibility exists that Mercury possesses a remanent field due to magnetization early in its formation, a present day active dynamo seems to be a more likely candidate for its origin.

  19. Mars Crustal Magnetic Field Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The radial magnetic field measured is color coded on a global perspective view that shows measurements derived from spacecraft tracks below 200 km overlain on a monochrome shaded relief map of the topography.

    This image shows especially strong Martian magnetic fields in the southern highlands near the Terra Cimmeria and Terra Sirenum regions, centered around 180 degrees longitude from the equator to the pole. It is where magnetic stripes possibly resulting from crustal movement are most prominent. The bands are oriented approximately east - west and are about 100 miles wide and 600 miles long, although the longest band stretches more than 1200 miles.

    The false blue and red colors represent invisible magnetic fields in the Martian crust that point in opposite directions. The magnetic fields appear to be organized in bands, with adjacent bands pointing in opposite directions, giving these stripes a striking similarity to patterns seen in the Earth's crust at the mid-oceanic ridges.

    These data were compiled by the MGS Magnetometer Team led by Mario Acuna at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD.

  20. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  1. The magnetic field of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Mark J.

    Models of the magnetic field configuration of the Milky Way are reviewed. Current analyses of rotation measure data suggest that the Milky Way possesses a bisymmetric-like spiral magnetic field, that field reversals among spiral arms exist, and that the magnetic spiral may not closely match the mass spiral structure. Zeeman measurements of OH masers may provide alternative magnetic field information.

  2. Magnetic fields in damped Ly-alpha systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, A. M.; Lanzetta, K. M.; Oren, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    The probability of Faraday rotation in various types of metal-line absorbers is computed by combining the incidence of Faraday rotation in a sample of radio-selected QSOs with the incidence of foreground metal-line absorption. The sample is divided into subsets with and without damped Ly-alpha absorption. The probability of Faraday rotation is significantly higher in the damped subset. The probability is higher in the damped subset than in nondamped subsets selected on the basis of Mg II or C IV absorption. From evidence linking damped systems to the progenitors of galactic disks and the Mg II systems to the progenitors of galactic halos, it is concluded that magnetic fields were significantly higher in protogalactic disks than in protogalactic halos. It is estimated that the B fields in two damped Ly-alpha systems with z of about 2 are a few micro-Gauss.

  3. Triangulation of the Interstellar Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.

    2015-11-01

    Determining the direction of the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF) is important for understanding the heliosphere’s global structure, the properties of the interstellar medium, and the propagation of cosmic rays in the local galactic medium. Measurements of interstellar neutral atoms by Ulysses for He and by SOHO/SWAN for H provided some of the first observational insights into the LISMF direction. Because secondary neutral H is partially deflected by the interstellar flow in the outer heliosheath and this deflection is influenced by the LISMF, the relative deflection of H versus He provides a plane—the so-called B-V plane in which the LISMF direction should lie. Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) subsequently discovered a ribbon, the center of which is conjectured to be the LISMF direction. The most recent He velocity measurements from IBEX and those from Ulysses yield a B-V plane with uncertainty limits that contain the centers of the IBEX ribbon at 0.7-2.7 keV. The possibility that Voyager 1 has moved into the outer heliosheath now suggests that Voyager 1's direct observations provide another independent determination of the LISMF. We show that LISMF direction measured by Voyager 1 is >40° off from the IBEX ribbon center and the B-V plane. Taking into account the temporal gradient of the field direction measured by Voyager 1, we extrapolate to a field direction that passes directly through the IBEX ribbon center (0.7-2.7 keV) and the B-V plane, allowing us to triangulate the LISMF direction and estimate the gradient scale size of the magnetic field.

  4. Triangulation of the Interstellar Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.

    2015-11-01

    Determining the direction of the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF) is important for understanding the heliosphere’s global structure, the properties of the interstellar medium, and the propagation of cosmic rays in the local galactic medium. Measurements of interstellar neutral atoms by Ulysses for He and by SOHO/SWAN for H provided some of the first observational insights into the LISMF direction. Because secondary neutral H is partially deflected by the interstellar flow in the outer heliosheath and this deflection is influenced by the LISMF, the relative deflection of H versus He provides a plane—the so-called B–V plane in which the LISMF direction should lie. Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) subsequently discovered a ribbon, the center of which is conjectured to be the LISMF direction. The most recent He velocity measurements from IBEX and those from Ulysses yield a B–V plane with uncertainty limits that contain the centers of the IBEX ribbon at 0.7–2.7 keV. The possibility that Voyager 1 has moved into the outer heliosheath now suggests that Voyager 1's direct observations provide another independent determination of the LISMF. We show that LISMF direction measured by Voyager 1 is >40° off from the IBEX ribbon center and the B–V plane. Taking into account the temporal gradient of the field direction measured by Voyager 1, we extrapolate to a field direction that passes directly through the IBEX ribbon center (0.7–2.7 keV) and the B–V plane, allowing us to triangulate the LISMF direction and estimate the gradient scale size of the magnetic field.

  5. KiloHertz Radio Burst by GW conversion in Galactic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The very recent Gravitational Wave detection at several hundreds Hertz by LIGO due to a few tens solar masses binary black hole collapse at 400 Mpc distance imply a much abundant population of a few solar masses BH systems, bounded in a very similar but more rapid collapse event. Their number rate might be much higher than heavier tens Solar masses BH events, but their signal might be below the present LIGO detection threshold. Therefore their few or tens kiloHerts GW might be detected rarely by LIGO only when occurring in a much nearby and smaller (30 Mpc) Universe. However their graviton conversion along their flight by solar and galactic magnetic fields into radio waves may lead to tens KHz sudden radio burst. These radio bangs, foreseen more than tweny years ago, might be observed today at best from r screened radio array antenna on the Moon. If such radio array might be sent at solar system edges (Voyager distances) then the plasma dilution will allow detection even of the KHz radio waves, comparable to the recent rare LIGO frequency.

  6. Photospheric and coronal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N.R., Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on small-scale and large-scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields during 1987-1990 is reviewed, focusing on observational studies. Particular attention is given to the new techniques, which include the correlation tracking of granules, the use of highly Zeeman-sensitive infrared spectral lines and multiple lines to deduce small-scale field strength, the application of long integration times coupled with good seeing conditions to study weak fields, and the use of high-resolution CCD detectors together with computer image-processing techniques to obtain images with unsurpassed spatial resolution. Synoptic observations of large-scale fields during the sunspot cycle are also discussed. 101 refs.

  7. Cosmological magnetic fields from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Leonardo

    In this thesis we review the methods for computation of cosmological correlations in the early universe known as the in-in formalism which are then applied to the problem of magnetogenesis from inflation. For this computation, a power-law single field slow- roll inflation is assumed together with a coupling of the form eφ/nuF μnuFμnu between the inflaton φ and the electrodynamical field strength Fμnu. For certain choice of parameters, the model produces a scale-invariant power spectrum that can be as high as 10-12 G at cosmological scales at present time. Finally, we compute the correlation between the magnetic field energy density and scalar metric fluctuations at tree-level from which the shape of the resulting non-gaussianity is analyzed.We show that the corresponding bispectrum is of order 10-5 times the power spectrum of magnetic fields.

  8. Electro-Magnetic Fields and Plasma in the Cosmos

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Donald E.

    2006-03-21

    It is becoming widely recognized that a majority of baryons in the cosmos are in the plasma state. But, fundamental disagreements about the properties and behavior of electro-magnetic fields in these plasmas exist between the science of modern astronomy and the experimentally verified laws of electrical engineering and physics. Some astronomers claim that magnetic fields can be open-ended - that they begin on or beneath the Sun's surface and extend outward to infinity. Astrophysicists have claimed that galactic magnetic fields begin and end on molecular clouds. Electrical engineers, most physicists, and the pioneers in electromagnetic field theory disagree - magnetic fields have no beginning or end. Since these two viewpoints are mutually exclusive, both cannot be correct; one must be completely false. Many astrophysicists claim that magnetic fields are 'frozen into' electric plasma. We also examine the basis for this claim. It has been shown to be incorrect in the laboratory. The hypothetical 'magnetic merging' mechanism is also reviewed in light of both theoretical and experimental investigations. The cause of large-scale filamentation in the cosmos is also simply revealed by experimental results obtained in plasma laboratories.

  9. Crystal field and magnetic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made in the temperature range 1.3 to 4.2 K on powdered samples of ErH3. The susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 4.2 to 2 K, and intercepts the negative temperature axis at theta = 1.05 + or - 0.05 K, indicating that the material is antiferromagnetic. The low field effective moment is 6.77 + or - 0.27 Bohr magnetons per ion. The magnetization exhibits a temperature independent contribution, the slope of which is (5 + or - 1.2) x 10 to the -6th Weber m/kg Tesla. The saturation moment is 3.84 + or - 1 - 0.15 Bohr magnetons per ion. The results can be qualitatively explained by the effects of crystal fields on the magnetic ions. No definitive assignment of a crystal field ground state can be given, nor can a clear choice between cubically or hexagonally symmetric crystal fields be made. For hexagonal symmetry, the first excited state is estimated to be 86 to 100 K above the ground state. For cubic symmetry, the splitting is on the order of 160 to 180 K.

  10. Transverse Magnetic Field Propellant Isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2000-01-01

    An alternative high voltage isolator for electric propulsion and ground-based ion source applications has been designed and tested. This design employs a transverse magnetic field that increases the breakdown voltage. The design can greatly enhance the operating range of laboratory isolators used for high voltage applications.

  11. Magnetic fields in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The observed properties of solar magnetic fields are reviewed, with particular reference to the complexities imposed on the field by motions of the highly conducting gas. Turbulent interactions between gas and field lead to heating or cooling of the gas according to whether the field energy density is less or greater than the maximum kinetic energy density in the convection zone. The field strength above which cooling sets in is 700 gauss. A weak solar dipole field may be primeval, but dynamo action is also important in generating new flux. The dynamo is probably not confined to the convection zone, but extends throughout most of the volume of the sun. Planetary tides appear to play a role in driving the dynamo.

  12. The resolved magnetic fields of the quiescent cloud GRSMC 45.60+0.30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Michael D.; Marchwinski, Robert C.; Clemens, Dan P.

    2015-03-01

    Marchwinski et al. (2012) mapped the magnetic field strength across the quiescent cloud GRSMC 45.60+0.30 (shown in Figure 1 subtending 40x10 pc at a distance of 1.88 kpc) with the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method CF; Chandrasekhar & Fermi 1953) using near-infrared starlight polarimetry from the Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey (Clemens et al. 2012a, b) and gas properties from the Galactic Ring Survey (Jackson et al. 2006). The large-scale magnetic field is oriented parallel to the gas-traced `spine' of the cloud. Seven `magnetic cores' with high magnetic field strength were identified and are coincident with peaks in the gas column density. Calculation of the mass-to-flux ratio (Crutcher 1999) shows that these cores are exclusively magnetically subcritical and that magnetostatic pressure can support them against gravitational collapse.

  13. The magnetic field of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    The paper is concerned mainly with the intrinsic planetary field which dominates the inner magnetosphere up to a distance of 10 to 12 Jovian radii where other phenomena, such as ring currents and diamagnetic effects of trapped charged particles, become significant. The main magnetic field of Jupiter as determined by in-situ observations by Pioner 10 and 11 is found to be relatively more complex than a simple offset tilted dipole. Deviations from a simple dipole geometry lead to distortions of the charged particle L shells and warping of the magnetic equator. Enhanced absorption effects associated with Io and Amalthea are predicted. The results are consistent with the conclusions derived from extensive radio observations at decimetric and decametric wavelengths for the planetary field.

  14. Magnetic field of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  15. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of the broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  16. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  17. 2.2-micron field stars at the North Galactic Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elias, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The properties of the 2.2-micron field stars seen near the North Galactic Pole by the Two Micron Sky Survey and by surveys at higher sensitivity are discussed. All the 2.2-micron sources found in these surveys can be identified with stars with known spectral types. The distribution of the 2.2-micron field stars appears to be well-understood.

  18. Recent results on magnetic fields in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, R.; Reich, W.; Fürst, E.

    Of all the methods available to observe magnetic fields in the Milky Way, the mapping of linear polarization at cm wavelengths has proven to be most successful. The instruments that have contributed most of the new data are the 100 m Effelsberg telescope and the Parkes 64 m dish. Their Galactic plane surveys gave us a new conception of the linear polarization distribution. A new Effelsberg 1.4 GHz "medium latitude polarization survey" now being made gives us data about large sections of the Galaxy. Polarization maps of selected regions of the Galaxy are now being made at several frequencies up to 32 GHz. Data from Westerbork at ~325 MHz, as well as data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS) at 1.4 GHz give new exciting information.

  19. Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity Response to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections/Magnetic Clouds in 1995-2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the response of the galactic cosmic ray (CGR) intensity to the passage of the more than 300 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and their associated shocks that passed the Earth during 1995-2009, a period that encompasses the whole of Solar Cycle 23. In approx.80% of cases, the GCR intensity decreased during the passage of these structures, i.e., a "Forbush decrease" occurred, while in approx.10% there was no significant change. In the remaining cases, the GCR intensity increased. Where there was an intensity decrease, minimum intensity was observed inside the ICME in approx.90% of these events. The observations confirm the role of both post-shock regions and ICMEs in the generation of these decreases, consistent with many previous studies, but contrary to the conclusion of Reames, Kahler, and Tylka (Astrophys. 1. Lett. 700, L199, 2009) who, from examining a subset of ICMEs with flux-rope-like magnetic fields (magnetic clouds) argued that these are "open structures" that allow free access of particles including GCRs to their interior. In fact, we find that magnetic clouds are more likely to participate in the deepest GCR decreases than ICMEs that are not magnetic clouds.

  20. ASSESSING THE FEASIBILITY OF COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION BY MAGNETIC TURBULENCE AT THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Fatuzzo, M.; Melia, F. E-mail: fmelia@email.arizona.edu

    2012-05-01

    The presence of relativistic particles at the center of our Galaxy is evidenced by the diffuse TeV emission detected from the inner {approx}2 Degree-Sign of the Galaxy. Although it is not yet entirely clear whether the origin of the TeV photons is due to hadronic or leptonic interactions, the tight correlation of the intensity distribution with the distribution of molecular gas along the Galactic ridge strongly points to a pionic-decay process involving relativistic protons. In previous work, we concluded that point-source candidates, such as the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* (identified with the High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) source J1745-290) or the pulsar wind nebulae dispersed along the Galactic plane, could not account for the observed diffuse TeV emission from this region. Motivated by this result, we consider here the feasibility that the cosmic rays populating the Galactic center region are accelerated in situ by magnetic turbulence. Our results indicate that even in a highly conductive environment, this mechanism is efficient enough to energize protons within the intercloud medium to the {approx}>TeV energies required to produce the HESS emission.

  1. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, G. Jerry; Hartmann, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernova remnants, and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration' is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different spectral properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations of relativistic jets and try to make a connection with observations.

  2. Torsion constraints from cosmological magnetic field and QCD domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2014-10-01

    Earlier Kostelecky [Phys. Rev. D 69, 105009 (2004)] has investigated the role of gravitational sector in Riemann-Cartan (RC) spacetime with torsion, in Lorentz and CPT violating (LV) Standard Model extension (SME). In his paper use of quantum electrodynamic (QED) extension in RC spacetime is made. More recently L. C. Garcia de Andrade [Phys. Lett. B 468, 28 (2011)] obtained magnetic field galactic dynamo seeds in the bosonic sector with massless photons, which proved to decay faster than necessary [Phys. Lett. B 711, 143 (2012)] to be able to seed galactic dynamos. In this paper it is shown that by using the fermionic sector of Kostelecky-Lagrangian and torsion written as a chiral current, one obtains torsion and magnetic fields explicitly from a Heisenberg-Ivanenko form of Dirac equation whose solution allows us to express torsion in terms of LV coefficients and magnetic field in terms of fermionic matter fields. When minimal coupling between electromagnetic and torsion fields is used it is shown that the fermionic sector of QED with torsion leads to resonantly amplify magnetic fields which mimics an α2-dynamo mechanism. Fine-tuning of torsion is shown to result in the dynamo reversal, a phenomenon so important in solar physics and geophysics. Of course this is only an analogy since torsion is very weak in solar and geophysics contexts. An analogous expression for the α-effect of mean-field dynamos is also obtained where the α-effect is mimic by torsion. Similar resonant amplification mechanisms connected to early universe have been considered by Finelli and Gruppuso.

  3. Anisotropy and corotation of galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Amenomori, M; Ayabe, S; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y-Q; Lu, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2006-10-20

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays is nearly isotropic because of the influence of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Here, we present two-dimensional high-precision anisotropy measurement for energies from a few to several hundred teraelectronvolts (TeV), using the large data sample of the Tibet Air Shower Arrays. Besides revealing finer details of the known anisotropies, a new component of Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy in sidereal time is uncovered around the Cygnus region direction. For cosmic-ray energies up to a few hundred TeV, all components of anisotropies fade away, showing a corotation of Galactic cosmic rays with the local Galactic magnetic environment. These results have broad implications for a comprehensive understanding of cosmic rays, supernovae, magnetic fields, and heliospheric and Galactic dynamic environments. PMID:17053141

  4. The QUAX proposal: a search of galactic axion with magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoso, G.; Lombardi, A.; Ortolan, A.; Pengo, R.; Braggio, C.; Carugno, G.; Gallo, C. S.; Speake, C. C.

    2016-05-01

    Aim of the QUAX (QUaerere AXion) proposal is to exploit the interaction of cosmological axions with the spin of electrons in a magnetized sample. Their effect is equivalent to the application of an oscillating rf field with frequency and amplitude which are fixed by axion mass and coupling constant, respectively. The rf receiver module of the QUAX detector consists of magnetized samples with the Larmor resonance frequency tuned to the axion mass by a polarizing static magnetic field. The interaction of electrons with the axion-equivalent rf field produces oscillations in the total magnetization of the samples. To amplify such a tiny field, a pump field at the same frequency is applied in a direction orthogonal to the polarizing field. The induced oscillatory magnetization along the polarizing field is measured by a SQUID amplifier operated at its quantum noise level.

  5. Magnetic field reversals in the Milky Way- "cherchez le champ magnetique".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallee, J. P.

    1996-04-01

    Radio observations of nearby spiral galaxies have tremendously enhanced our knowledge of their global magnetic field distributions. Recent theoretical developments in the area of dynamos have also helped in the interpretation of magnetic field data in spiral galaxies. When it comes to the magnetic field in the Milky Way galaxy, our position in the Milky Way's galactic disk hinders our attempts at interpreting the observational data. This makes the proposition of "cherchez le champ magnetique" a difficult one to follow. Some recent papers have attempted to fit magnetic field models to spiral galaxies, and in particular to the Milky Way galaxy. Magnetic field reversals in the Milky Way are crucial to all interpretations, be they axisymmetric spiral (ASS) or bisymmetric spiral (BSS) global magnetic field models. Magnetic field reversals can be found in both ASS and BSS magnetic field models, not just BSS ones. The axisymmetric spiral (ASS) magnetic field models produced by the dynamo theory already predict magnetic field reversals, and they are of the type observed in the Milky Way. The small number of magnetic field reversals observed in the Milky Way is compatible with the ASS magnetic field models. The bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic field models as applied to the pulsar RM data and to the QSO and galaxies data have many problems, due to the many pitfalls in model fitting the magnetic field reversals observed in the Milky Way. Many pitfalls are discussed here, including the incomplete comparisons of BSS versus ASS models, the number of spiral arms to be used in modelling, and the proper distance to pulsars via the more accurate distribution of thermal electrons within spiral arms. The two magnetic field reversals in our Milky Way are clearly located in the interarm regions. Predicted magnetic field reversals are periodic, while observed ones are not periodic. Magnetic field reversals cannot be masked effectively by local interstellar magnetised shells. The

  6. Field errors in superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M. Q.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of this workshop is a discussion of the techniques for tracking particles through arbitrary accelerator field configurations to look for dynamical effects that are suggested by various theoretical models but are not amenable to detailed analysis. A major motivation for this type of study is that many of our accelerator projects are based on the use of superconducting magnets which have field imperfections that are larger and of a more complex nature than those of conventional magnets. Questions such as resonances, uncorrectable closed orbit effects, coupling between planes, and diffusion mechanisms all assume new importance. Since, simultaneously, we are trying to do sophisticated beam manipulations such as stacking, high current accelerator, long life storage, and low loss extraction, we clearly need efficient and accurate tracking programs to proceed with confidence.

  7. Magnetic fields in irregular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzy, Krzysztof T.

    Radio data of large irregular galaxies reveal some extended synchrotron emission with a substantial degree of polarization. In the case of NGC 4449 strong galaxy-scale regular magnetic fields were found, in spite of the lack of ordered rotation required for the conventional dynamo action. The rigidly rotating large irregular NGC 55 shows vertical polarized spurs connected with a network of ionized gas filaments. Small dwarf irregulars show only isolated polarized spots.

  8. Biological effects due to weak magnetic field on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the evolution process, Earth's magnetic field (MF, about 50 μT) was a natural component of the environment for living organisms. Biological objects, flying on planned long-term interplanetary missions, would experience much weaker magnetic fields, since galactic MF is known to be 0.1-1 nT. However, the role of weak magnetic fields and their influence on functioning of biological organisms are still insufficiently understood, and is actively studied. Numerous experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in weak magnetic field have shown that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during early germination stages in comparison with control. The proliferative activity and cell reproduction in meristem of plant roots are reduced in weak magnetic field. Cell reproductive cycle slows down due to the expansion of G 1 phase in many plant species (and of G 2 phase in flax and lentil roots), while other phases of cell cycle remain relatively stabile. In plant cells exposed to weak magnetic field, the functional activity of genome at early pre-replicate period is shown to decrease. Weak magnetic field causes intensification of protein synthesis and disintegration in plant roots. At ultrastructural level, changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells were observed in pea roots exposed to weak magnetic field. Mitochondria were found to be very sensitive to weak magnetic field: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix becomes electron-transparent, and cristae reduce. Cytochemical studies indicate that cells of plant roots exposed to weak magnetic field show Ca 2+ over-saturation in all organelles and in cytoplasm unlike the control ones. The data presented suggest that prolonged exposures of plants to weak

  9. Blue Straggler-White Dwarf binaries in Galactic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekanayake, Gemunu B.; Wilhelm, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    The mass transfer in close binaries has been identified as the most probable formation channel for field blue straggler stars (BSSs). The companions to these BSSs are white dwarf stars (WDs) and can be detected at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths in the spectral energy distribution of the binary, if the mass transfer happened recently so that WD is young and hot.We chose a sample of 2,188 BSSs in the temperature range of 7,000 - 9000 K. and surface gravity, Log g > 3.8, using the Sloan Stellar Parameter Pipeline, from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS).From this, a sub-sample of 80 UV excess field BSSs were identified using UV photometry from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). By using a chi-square minimization technique we fit the observed SED of these UVe-BSSs to set of combined BS+WD models to find the best fitting WD parameters. By considering our fitting results and the theoretical estimates of mass-temperature relation for BSSs , we find that the likely companions to our sample of UVe-BSSs are He WDs. This means that the most likely scenario of formation of these UVe-BSSs is mass transfer onto a normal main sequence star from a red giant star.

  10. Anisotropic Magnetism in Field-Structured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert A.; Martin, James E.; Odinek, Judy; Venturini, Eugene

    1999-06-24

    Magnetic field-structured-composites (FSCs) are made by structuring magnetic particle suspensions in uniaxial or biaxial (e.g. rotating) magnetic fields, while polymerizing the suspending resin. A uniaxial field produces chain-like particle structures, and a biaxial field produces sheet-like particle structures. In either case, these anisotropic structures affect the measured magnetic hysteresis loops, with the magnetic remanence and susceptibility increased significantly along the axis of the structuring field, and decreased slightly orthogonal to the structuring field, relative to the unstructured particle composite. The coercivity is essentially unaffected by structuring. We present data for FSCs of magnetically soft particles, and demonstrate that the altered magnetism can be accounted for by considering the large local fields that occur in FSCs. FSCS of magnetically hard particles show unexpectedly large anisotropies in the remanence, and this is due to the local field effects in combination with the large crystalline anisotropy of this material.

  11. Comparing Magnetic Fields on Earth and Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation compares the magnetic fields on Earth and Mars. The Earth has a large-scale planetary magnetic field that can protect it from space weather and other hazards. Mars, on the other hand...

  12. Field quality aspects of CBA superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S.; Engelmann, R.; Fernow, R.; Greene, A.F.; Herrera, J.; Kirk, H.; Skaritka, J.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.

    1983-01-01

    A series of superconducting dipole magnets for the BNL Colliding Beam Accelerator which were manufactured to have the proper field quality characteristics has been tested. This report presents the analysis of the field harmonics of these magnets.

  13. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

  14. Magnetic holes in the solar wind. [(interplanetary magnetic fields)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. M.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis is presented of high resolution interplanetary magnetic field measurements from the magnetometer on Explorer 43 which showed that low magnetic field intensities in the solar wind at 1 AU occur as distinct depressions or 'holes'. These magnetic holes are new kinetic-scale phenomena, having a characteristic dimension on the order of 20,000 km. They occurred at a rate of 1.5/day in the 18-day time span (March 18 to April 6, 1971) that was analyzed. Most of the magnetic holes are characterized by both a depression in the absolute value of the magnetic field, and a change in the magnetic field direction; some of these are possibly the result of magnetic merging. However, in other cases the magnetic field direction does not change; such holes are not due to magnetic merging, but might be a diamagnetic effect due to localized plasma inhomogeneities.

  15. A study of the force-field equation for the propagation of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleeson, L. J.; Urch, I. H.

    1973-01-01

    A new development is given of the solution of the equation of the force-field approximation for the propagation of galactic cosmic rays in the interplanetary region. It leads to simpler methods for determining the force-field parameters. A method is given for determining the separable diffusion coefficient from observations of galactic electron spectrum and near-earth electron spectra; it is shown that this diffusion coefficient is not unique but may have a periodic-like dependence upon rigidity; and the method is used to obtain diffusion coefficients for 1965 and 1968. Approximate formulae relating small changes in intensity and diffusion coefficient are developed and some applications of these noted; in one it is shown that the form of, and changes in, diffusion coefficient deduced previously for a neutron monitor event during June-September 1969 are unnecessarily constrained and therefore probably not correct.

  16. Swarm: ESA's Magnetic Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haagmans, R.; Menard, Y.; Floberghagen, R.; Plank, G.; Drinkwater, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Swarm is the fifth Earth Explorer mission in ESA’s Living Planet Programme. The objective of the Swarm mission is to provide the best ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution. The Mission shall deliver data that allow access to new insights into the Earth system by improving our understanding of the Earth’s interior and near-Earth electro-magnetic environment. After release from a single launcher, a side-by-side flying slowly decaying lower pair of satellites will be released at an initial altitude of about 490 km together with a third satellite that will be lifted to 530 km to complete the Swarm constellation. High-precision and high-resolution measurements of the strength, direction and variation of the magnetic field, complemented by precise navigation, accelerometer and electric field measurements, will provide the observations that are required to separate and model various sources of the geomagnetic field and near-Earth current systems. The mission aims to provide a unique view into Earth core dynamics, mantle conductivity, crustal magnetisation, ionospheric and magnetospheric current systems and upper atmosphere dynamics - ranging from understanding the geodynamo to contributing to space weather. The scientific objectives and results from recent scientific studies will be presented. In addition the current status of the project, which is presently in the development phase, will be addressed. The mission is scheduled for launch in 2012.

  17. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  18. Vertical Equilibrium, Energetics, and Star Formation Rates in Magnetized Galactic Disks Regulated by Momentum Feedback from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent hydrodynamic (HD) simulations have shown that galactic disks evolve to reach well-defined statistical equilibrium states. The star formation rate (SFR) self-regulates until energy injection by star formation feedback balances dissipation and cooling in the interstellar medium (ISM), and provides vertical pressure support to balance gravity. In this paper, we extend our previous models to allow for a range of initial magnetic field strengths and configurations, utilizing three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We show that a quasi-steady equilibrium state is established as rapidly for MHD as for HD models unless the initial magnetic field is very strong or very weak, which requires more time to reach saturation. Remarkably, models with initial magnetic energy varying by two orders of magnitude approach the same asymptotic state. In the fully saturated state of the fiducial model, the integrated energy proportions Eturb:Eth:δ Emag:\\bar Emag are 0.35:0.39:0.15:0.11, while the proportions of midplane support Pturb:Pth:δ Πmag:\\barΠmag are 0.49:0.18:0.18:0.15. Vertical profiles of total effective pressure satisfy vertical dynamical equilibrium with the total gas weight at all heights. We measure the "feedback yields" ηc≡ Pc/ΣSFR (in suitable units) for each pressure component, finding that ηturb∼ 3.5-4 and ηth∼ 1.1-1.4 are the same for MHD as in previous HD simulations, and δ ηmag∼ 1.3-1.5. These yields can be used to predict the equilibrium SFR for a local region in a galaxy based on its observed gas and stellar surface densities and velocity dispersions. As the ISM weight (or dynamical equilibrium pressure) is fixed, an increase in η from turbulent magnetic fields reduces the predicted ΣSFR by ∼ 20-30% relative to the HD case.

  19. Magnetic field perturbartions in closed-field-line systems with zero toroidal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mauel, M; Ryutov, D; Kesner, J

    2003-12-02

    In some plasma confinement systems (e.g., field-reversed configurations and levitated dipoles) the confinement is provided by a closed-field-line poloidal magnetic field. We consider the influence of the magnetic field perturbations on the structure of the magnetic field in such systems and find that the effect of perturbations is quite different from that in the systems with a substantial toroidal field. In particular, even infinitesimal perturbations can, in principle, lead to large radial excursions of the field lines in FRCs and levitated dipoles. Under such circumstances, particle drifts and particle collisions may give rise to significant neoclassical transport. Introduction of a weak regular toroidal magnetic field reduces radial excursions of the field lines and neoclassical transport.

  20. Superposition of DC magnetic fields by cascading multiple magnets in magnetic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2015-09-01

    A novel method that can effectively collect the DC magnetic field produced by multiple separated magnets is proposed. With the proposed idea of a magnetic loop, the DC magnetic field produced by these separated magnets can be effectively superimposed together. The separated magnets can be cascaded in series or in parallel. A novel nested magnetic loop is also proposed to achieve a higher DC magnetic field in the common air region without increasing the DC magnetic field in each magnetic loop. The magnetic loop can be made by a magnetic hose, which is designed by transformation optics and can be realized by the combination of super-conductors and ferromagnetic materials.

  1. Primordial magnetic field limits from cosmological data

    SciTech Connect

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Tevzadze, Alexander G.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Pandey, Kanhaiya; Ratra, Bharat

    2010-10-15

    We study limits on a primordial magnetic field arising from cosmological data, including that from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background polarization plane Faraday rotation limits, and large-scale structure formation. We show that the physically relevant quantity is the value of the effective magnetic field, and limits on it are independent of how the magnetic field was generated.

  2. Interplanetary magnetic field data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data set is presented that is uniform with respect to inclusion of cislunar IMF data only, and which has as complete time coverage as presently possible over a full solar cycle. Macroscale phenomena in the interplanetary medium (sector structure, heliolatitude variations, solar cycle variations, etc.) and other phenomena (e.g., ground level cosmic-ray events) for which knowledge of the IMF with hourly resolution is necessary, are discussed. Listings and plots of cislunar hourly averaged IMP parameters over the period November 27, 1963, to May 17, 1974, are presented along with discussion of the mutual consistency of the IMF data used herein. The magnetic tape from which the plots and listings were generated, which is available from the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), is also discussed.

  3. The Giotto magnetic field investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, F. M.; Musmann, G.; Acuna, M. H.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Mariani, F.; Wallis, M.; Ungstrup, E.; Schmidt, H.

    1983-01-01

    The Giotto spacecraft will carry sensors for investigating the interplanetary magnetic field while en route and the interaction between the solar wind magnetoplasma and Halley's Comet neutral gas outflow during close approach. Giotto will carry an outboard biaxial fluxgate system and inboard electronics. The instrumentation draws 1.2 kW and weighs 1.31 kg. Sampling rates will be 28/sec during close encounter, covering selectable ranges from 16 nT to 65,535 nT. In-flight calibration techniques are under development to ensure magnetic cleanliness will be obtained. Measurements are also planned of the inbound bow shock, the magnetosheath and the cometary ionopause. The data will be collected as close as 1000 km from the comet surface.

  4. Magnetic field structure and halo in NGC 4631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Silvia Carolina; Krause, Marita

    2013-12-01

    Context. All of the edge-on spiral galaxies observed so far present a similar magnetic field configuration, which consists of a plane-parallel field in the disk and an X-shaped field at larger z-distances from the plane of the galaxy. Only NGC 4631 seems to have a different field orientation in its disk. Along the eastern and western halves of the disk of NGC 4631 the magnetic field orientation is parallel to the galactic plane, but in the central region of the disk a vertical field seems to dominate. Aims: In order to clarify whether NGC 4631 has a unique magnetic field configuration in the central region along its disk, we present high-resolution Faraday-corrected polarization data. Methods: Radio continuum observations of NGC 4631 at 4.85 GHz were performed with the VLA. In addition, observations were made with the Effelsberg telescope at 4.85 GHz and at 8.35 GHz. These were analyzed together with archival VLA-data at 8.35 GHz. The single-dish and interferometer data were combined to recover the missing zero-spacings. Results: We determined an integrated total spectral index of αtot = -0.78 ± 0.04 and a nonthermal integrated spectral index of αnth = -0.87 ± 0.03. The vertical scale heights in NGC 4631 vary significantly in different regions within the galaxy and their mean values at 4.85 GHz are with 2.3 kpc (370 pc) for the thick (thin) disk higher than the mean values found so far in six other edge-on spiral galaxies. This may originate in the tidal interaction of NGC 4631 with its neighbouring galaxies. The rotation measures are characterized by a smooth large-scale distribution. Along the galactic plane the degree of Faraday depolarization is significantly high. We estimated a total magnetic field strength in the disk of NGC 4631 of Bt ≈ 9 ± 2 μG and an ordered field strength of Bord ≈ 2 ± 1 μG. The total field strengths in the halo are of the order of the total magnetic field strength in the disk, whereas the ordered field strengths in the halo

  5. Magnetic fields and the cluster cooling flow hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasi, Christopher Joseph

    2001-12-01

    Through the development of modern observations and computational techniques, the picture associated with clusters of galaxies has become more complex. Initially thought to be isothermal and hydrostatic, the X-ray emitting intracluster medium (ICM) is now viewed as a turbulent, magnetized environment. Mergers, ejecta from member galaxies, and jets from active galactic nuclei all serve to perturb the ICM. Magnetic field has been detected at all spatial scales within the ICM, with magnetic pressure close to equipartition with the gas pressure near some cluster cores. All of these phenomena have an impact on the ICM. Nearly thirty years ago a subset of clusters of galaxies referred to as ``cooling flows'' were identified through enhanced X-ray emission above the typical cluster sample. The radiative cooling time for these systems was found to be shorter than the cluster age. It was hypothesized that radiative cooling should bring the ICM out of hydrostatic balance, evolving into a steady-state radial inflow. Since direct observation of material inflow is not yet possible, estimates of the mass accretion rate have come from X-ray observations. The dominant mechanism governing the dynamics of these environments was assumed to be purely hydrodynamic. The role which magnetic fields play within the ICM has come into question due to magnetic field measurements within the cores of ``cooling flows.'' Previous attempts have been made to address the importance of magnetic fields within the ICM, however, the conclusions have been conflicting. We investigate the impact which magnetic fields have on a radiatively collapsing environment using one-dimensional numerical simulations. A hydrodynamic baseline is first established, and then followed by simulations invoking ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) as well as magnetic dissipation. The results from the simulations indicate that hydrodynamics alone will not produce a solution which matches the observed characteristics of cooling

  6. The dynamical fate of binary star clusters in the Galactic tidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyatikanto, R.; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Arifyanto, M. I.; Wulandari, H. R. T.; Siregar, S.

    2016-04-01

    Fragmentation and fission of giant molecular clouds occasionally results in a pair of gravitationally bound star clusters that orbit their mutual centre of mass for some time, under the influence of internal and external perturbations. We investigate the evolution of binary star clusters with different orbital configurations, with a particular focus on the Galactic tidal field. We carry out N-body simulations of evolving binary star clusters and compare our results with estimates from our semi-analytic model. The latter accounts for mass-loss due to stellar evolution and two-body relaxation, and for evolution due to external tides. Using the semi-analytic model, we predict the long-term evolution for a wide range of initial conditions. It accurately describes the global evolution of such systems, until the moment when a cluster merger is imminent. N-body simulations are used to test our semi-analytic model and also to study additional features of evolving binary clusters, such as the kinematics of stars, global cluster rotation, evaporation rates, and the cluster merger process. We find that the initial orientation of a binary star cluster with respect to the Galactic field, and also the initial orbital phase, is crucial for its fate. Depending on these properties, the binaries may experience orbital reversal, spiral-in, or vertical oscillation about the Galactic plane before they actually merge at t ≈ 100 Myr, and produce rotating star clusters with slightly higher evaporation rates. The merger process of a binary cluster induces an outburst that ejects ˜10 per cent of the stellar members into the Galactic field.

  7. Magnetic field sources and their threat to magnetic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewell, Steve

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic storage media (tapes, disks, cards, etc.) may be damaged by external magnetic fields. The potential for such damage has been researched, but no objective standard exists for the protection of such media. This paper summarizes a magnetic storage facility standard, Publication 933, that ensures magnetic protection of data storage media.

  8. Suppression of magnetic relaxation by a transverse alternating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Voloshin, I. F.; Kalinov, A. V.; Fisher, L. M. Yampol'skii, V. A.

    2007-07-15

    The evolution of the spatial distribution of the magnetic induction in a superconductor after the action of the alternating magnetic field perpendicular to the trapped magnetic flux has been analyzed. The observed stabilization of the magnetic induction profile is attributed to the increase in the pinning force, so that the screening current density becomes subcritical. The last statement is corroborated by direct measurements.

  9. Astrophysical dynamos and the growth of magnetic fields in high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Michael; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-08-01

    The origin and evolution of magnetic fields in the Universe is still an open question. Observations of galaxies at high-redshift give evidence for strong galactic magnetic fields even in the early Universe which are consistently measured at later times up to the present age. However, primordial magnetic fields and seed field generation by battery processes cannot explain such high field strengths, suggesting the presence of a rapid growth mechanism in those high-redshift galaxies and subsequent maintenance against decay. Astrophysical dynamo theory provides efficient means of field amplification where even weak initial fields can grow exponentially on sufficiently fast timescales, driving the conversion of kinetic energy into magnetic energy. We investigate the role which feedback mechanisms play in the creation of the turbulence necessary for dynamos to operate. Performing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cooling halos of dwarf and Milky Way-like high-redshift progenitors, we compare the magnetic field evolution of weak seed fields with various topologies and stellar feedback mechanisms. We find that strong feedback can drive galactic gas turbulence which gives rise to velocity fields with fast exponential magnetic field growth. The simulations display a high gas fraction and a clumpy morphology with kinematics resembling Kolmogorov turbulence and magnetic energy spectra as predicted by Kazantsev dynamo theory. Magnetic fields reach equipartition with $\\mu$G field strength. In a final quiescent phase where feedback is turned off, gas turbulence is reduced and a quadrupole symmetry is observed in the magnetic field. These findings support the theory of rapid magnetic field amplification inside high-redshift galaxies, when the Universe was still young.

  10. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma-ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitude 310 and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315 deg, 330 deg, 345 deg, 0 deg, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with such galactic features and components as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  11. Magnetic Fields Around the Heliosphere: Theory vs Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    Voyager in situ measurements of the magnetic field around the heliosphere are the source of invaluable information about the interface between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium (LISM). On the other hand, they are quite challenging for theoretical analysis unless accompanied by remote observations of neutral atoms the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) and Ulysses missions. Of particular interest is the fine structure of the heliopause due to its instability and possible magnetic reconnection. Both phenomena may have contributed to the remarkable changes in the galactic and anomalous cosmic ray fluxes observed by Voyager 1 within a one-month period of 2012 after which the spacecraft penetrated into the LISM. Draping of the heliopause by the interstellar magnetic field affects the position of the bright ribbon of enhanced ENA flux observed by IBEX on the celestial sphere and 2-3 kHz radio emission caused by shock propagation through the outer heliosheath observed by Voyager 1. Interstellar magnetic field determines the structure of the bow wave in front of the heliopause. Moreover, magnetic fields define the orientation and shape of the heliotail, the features of which have been observed by IBEX. Recent numerical simulations show that the details of the large-scale interstellar magnetic field modification caused by the presence of the heliotail may be the source of the observed 1-10 TeV cosmic ray anisotropy studied in detail in numerous air shower measurements around the world. In this paper, an overview will be given of the recent theoretical and simulations results describing the magnetic field distribution around the heliosphere. The objective of the talk is to connect observational and theoretical results, and outline challenges that are going to inspire the heliospheric community in the coming years.

  12. A supernova scenario for magnetic fields and rotation measures in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Alexander; Dolag, Klaus; Lesch, Harald

    2015-08-01

    We present a model for the seeding and evolution of magnetic fields in protogalaxies. Supernova SN explosions during the assembly of a protogalaxy provide magnetic seed fields, which are subsequently amplified by compression, shear flows and random motions. Our model explains the origin of strong magnetic fields of microG amplitude within the first starforming protogalactic structures shortly after onset of star formation. We implement the model into the MHD version of the cosmological N-body / SPH simulation code GADGET and we couple the magnetic seeding directly to the underlying multi-phase description of star formation. We perform simulations of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation using a standard LCDM cosmology and analyse the strength and distribution of the subsequent evolving magnetic field.Within starforming regions and given typical dimensions and magnetic field strengths in canonical SN remnants, we inject a dipole-shape magnetic field at a rate of nG/Gyr.Subsequently, the magnetic field strength increases exponentially on timescales of a few ten million years within the innermost regions of the halo. Furthermore, turbulent diffusion, shocks and gas motions transport the magnetic field towards the halo outskirts. At redshift z=0, the entire galactic halo is magnetized and the field amplitude is of the order of a few microG in the center of the halo and nG at the virial radius. Additionally, we analyse the intrinsic rotation measure (RM) of the forming galactic halo over redshift. The mean halo intrinsic RM peaks between redshifts z=4 and z=2 and reaches absolute values around 1000 rad/m^2.While the halo virializes towards redshift z=0, the intrinsic RM values decline to a mean value below 10 rad/m^2. At high redshifts, the distribution of individual starforming and thus magnetized regions is widespread. This leads to a widespread distribution of large intrinsic RM values. In our model, galactic magnetic fields are a consequence of the star formation

  13. Far-ultraviolet studies. II - Galactic-latitude dependence of the 1530 A interstellar radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.; Swandic, J. R.; Shulman, S. D.; Fritz, G.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.62-sq cm Geiger counter, sensitive between 1425 and 1640 A, was used to map the far-ultraviolet brightness of about half the sky, providing an experimental measurement of the far-ultraviolet interstellar radiation field. At 1530 A, the energy density is approximately 7.4 by 10 to the -17th power erg/cu cm per A. Comparison with integrations of star catalogs calibrated to the ultraviolet shows, as expected, that the bulk of the radiation comes directly from B- and A-type stars. The galactic-latitude dependence of the radiation is analyzed in an unsuccessful attempt to set limits on the absorbing and scattering properties of the interstellar grains in the far-ultraviolet. Excess radiation observed at the galactic pole is probably residual airglow from above the rocket altitude.

  14. Homogeneous photometry and star counts in the field of 9 Galactic star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, A. F.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.; Loktin, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    We present homogeneous V, I CCD photometry of nine stellar fields in the two inner quadrants of the Galactic plane. The lines-of-view to most of these fields aim in the direction of the very inner Galaxy, where the Galactic field is very dense, and extinction is high and patchy. Our nine fields are, according to several catalogs, centred on Galactic star clusters, namely Trumpler 13, Trumpler 20, Lynga 4, Hogg 19, Lynga 12, Trumpler 25, Trumpler 26, Ruprecht 128, and Trumpler 34. Apart from their coordinates, and in some cases additional basic data (mainly from the 2MASS archive), their properties are poorly known. By means of star count techniques and field star decontaminated Color Magnitude diagrams, the nature and size of these visual over-densities has been established; and, when possible, new cluster fundamental parameters have been derived. To strengthen our findings, we complement our data-set with JHKs photometry from the 2MASS archive, that we analyze using a suitably defined Q-parameter. Most clusters are projected towards the Carina-Sagittarium spiral arm. Because of that, we detect in the Color Magnitude diagrams of most of the other fields several distinctive sequences produced by young population within the arm. All the clusters are of intermediate or old age. The most interesting cases detected by our study are, perhaps, that of Trumpler 20, which seems to be much older than previously believed, as indicated by its prominent - and double - red clump; and that of Hogg 19, a previously overlooked old open cluster, whose existence in such regions of the Milky Way is puzzling.

  15. Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization

    DOEpatents

    Doughty, Frank C.; Spencer, John E.

    2000-12-19

    In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

  16. Chiral plasmons without magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Song, Justin C W; Rudner, Mark S

    2016-04-26

    Plasmons, the collective oscillations of interacting electrons, possess emergent properties that dramatically alter the optical response of metals. We predict the existence of a new class of plasmons-chiral Berry plasmons (CBPs)-for a wide range of 2D metallic systems including gapped Dirac materials. As we show, in these materials the interplay between Berry curvature and electron-electron interactions yields chiral plasmonic modes at zero magnetic field. The CBP modes are confined to system boundaries, even in the absence of topological edge states, with chirality manifested in split energy dispersions for oppositely directed plasmon waves. We unveil a rich CBP phenomenology and propose setups for realizing them, including in anomalous Hall metals and optically pumped 2D Dirac materials. Realization of CBPs will offer a powerful paradigm for magnetic field-free, subwavelength optical nonreciprocity, in the mid-IR to terahertz range, with tunable splittings as large as tens of THz, as well as sensitive all-optical diagnostics of topological bands. PMID:27071090

  17. Chiral plasmons without magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Justin C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmons, the collective oscillations of interacting electrons, possess emergent properties that dramatically alter the optical response of metals. We predict the existence of a new class of plasmons—chiral Berry plasmons (CBPs)—for a wide range of 2D metallic systems including gapped Dirac materials. As we show, in these materials the interplay between Berry curvature and electron–electron interactions yields chiral plasmonic modes at zero magnetic field. The CBP modes are confined to system boundaries, even in the absence of topological edge states, with chirality manifested in split energy dispersions for oppositely directed plasmon waves. We unveil a rich CBP phenomenology and propose setups for realizing them, including in anomalous Hall metals and optically pumped 2D Dirac materials. Realization of CBPs will offer a powerful paradigm for magnetic field-free, subwavelength optical nonreciprocity, in the mid-IR to terahertz range, with tunable splittings as large as tens of THz, as well as sensitive all-optical diagnostics of topological bands.

  18. Near-Field Magnetic Dipole Moment Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Patrick K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the data analysis technique used for magnetic testing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Excellent results have been obtained using this technique to convert a spacecraft s measured magnetic field data into its respective magnetic dipole moment model. The model is most accurate with the earth s geomagnetic field cancelled in a spherical region bounded by the measurement magnetometers with a minimum radius large enough to enclose the magnetic source. Considerably enhanced spacecraft magnetic testing is offered by using this technique in conjunction with a computer-controlled magnetic field measurement system. Such a system, with real-time magnetic field display capabilities, has been incorporated into other existing magnetic measurement facilities and is also used at remote locations where transport to a magnetics test facility is impractical.

  19. Wide-field Monitoring of the Galactic Plane in the K- and the H-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, K.; Nakada, Y.; Izumiura, H.; Watanabe, E.; Shimizu, Y.; Okada, N.; Okita, K.; Norimoto, K.; Okata, T.; Koyano, H.; Yoshida, M.

    The Okayama Astrophysical Observatory of NAOJ started the monitoring program of mass-losing AGB stars using an imaging camera named Okayama Astrophysical Observatory Wide Field Camera. The fast optics yields a field of view of 1¡ß1 deg2 and the pixel resolution of 2 arcsec at the focus of the 91-cm telescope. A HAWAII2 array will be installed inside the camera reaching the limiting magnitude of K=13 with a 45-s exposure. In 2003 the monitoring will start covering the Galactic plane from l=0 to 270 deg every three weeks.

  20. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1994-01-01

    The research efforts funded by the Uranus Data Analysis Program (UDAP) grant to the Bartol Research Institute (BRI) involved the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. Upstream wave studies are motivated as a study of the physics of collisionless shocks. Collisionless shocks in plasmas are capable of 'reflecting' a fraction of the incoming thermal particle distribution and directing the resulting energetic particle motion back into the upstream region. Once within the upstream region, the backward streaming energetic particles convey information of the approaching shock to the supersonic flow. This particle population is responsible for the generation of upstream magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations known as 'upstream waves', for slowing the incoming wind prior to the formation of the shock ramp, and for heating of the upstream plasma. The waves produced at Uranus not only differed in several regards from the observations at other planetary bow shocks, but also gave new information regarding the nature of the reflected particle populations which were largely unmeasurable by the particle instruments. Four distinct magnetic field wave types were observed upstream of the Uranian bow shock: low-frequency Alfven or fast magnetosonic waves excited by energetic protons originating at or behind the bow shock; whistler wave bursts driven by gyrating ion distributions within the shock ramp; and two whistler wave types simultaneously observed upstream of the flanks of the shock and argued to arise from resonance with energetic electrons. In addition, observations of energetic particle distributions by the LECP experiment, thermal particle populations observed by the PLS experiment, and electron plasma oscillations recorded by the PWS experiment proved instrumental to this study and are included to some degree in the papers and presentations supported by this grant.

  1. Magnetic field observations in Comet Halley's coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Yeroshenko, Ye. G.; Styashkin, V. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-05-01

    During the encounter with Comet Halley, the magnetometer (MISCHA) aboard the Vega 1 spacecraft observed an increased level of magnetic field turbulence, resulting from an upstream bow wave. Both Vega spacecraft measured a peak field strength of 70-80 nT and observed draping of magnetic field lines around the cometary obstacle. An unexpected rotation of the magnetic field vector was observed, which may reflect either penetration of magnetic field lines into a diffuse layer related to the contact surface separating the solar-wind and cometary plasma, or the persistence of pre-existing interplanetary field structures.

  2. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  3. Cosmological magnetic fields as string dynamo seeds and axion fields in torsioned spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    De Andrade, L.C. Garcia

    2014-08-01

    In this paper two examples of the generation cosmological magnetic fields (CMF) are given. The first is the string dynamo seed cosmological magnetic field estimated as B{sub seed}∼10{sup -24} Gauss from a static spin polarised cylinder in Einstein-Cartan-Maxwell spacetime. The string dynamo seeds from a static spin polarised cylinder is given by B∼σ{sup 2}R{sup 2} where σ is the spin-torsion density while R is the string radius. The B-field value above is able to seed galactic dynamo. In the BBN the magnetic fields around 10{sup 12} Gauss give rise to a string radius as small as 10{sup 17}l{sub P} where l{sub P} is the Planck length. The second is the CMF from axionic torsion field which is given by B{sub seed}∼10{sup -27} Gauss which is stronger than the primordial magnetic field B{sub BICEP2}∼10{sup -30} Gauss from the BICEP2 recent experiment on primordial gravitational waves and cosmological inflation to axionic torsion. The interaction Lagrangean between axionic torsion scalar φ and magnetic fields used in this last example is given by f{sup 2}(φ)F{sub μν}F{sup μν}. A similar lagrangean has been used by K. Bamba et al. [JCAP 10 (2012) 058] so generate magnetic fields without dynamo action. Since axionic torsion can be associated with axionic domain walls both examples discussed here could be consider as topological defects examples of the generation of primordial magnetic fields in universes endowed with spacetime torsion.

  4. Exploring Magnetic Fields with a Compass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunk, Brandon; Beichner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A compass is an excellent classroom tool for the exploration of magnetic fields. Any student can tell you that a compass is used to determine which direction is north, but when paired with some basic trigonometry, the compass can be used to actually measure the strength of the magnetic field due to a nearby magnet or current-carrying wire. In this…

  5. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  6. Magnetic field effect on charged Brownian swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, M.; Velasco, R. M.; Jiménez-Aquino, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the effective diffusion of a spherical self-propelled charged particle swimming at low Reynolds number, and subject to a time-dependent magnetic field and thermal agitation. We find that the presence of an external magnetic field may reduce or enhance (depending on the type of swimming and magnetic field applied) the swimmer's effective diffusion, hence we get another possible strategy to control its displacement. For swimmers performing reciprocal motion, and under an oscillating time-dependent magnetic field, mechanical resonance appears when the swimmer and magnetic frequencies coincide, thus enhancing the particle's effective diffusion. Our analytical results are compared with Brownian Dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement.

  7. Magnetic Trapping of Bacteria at Low Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z M; Wu, R G; Wang, Z P; Ramanujan, R V

    2016-01-01

    A suspension of non-magnetic entities in a ferrofluid is referred to as an inverse ferrofluid. Current research to trap non-magnetic entities in an inverse ferrofluid focuses on using large permanent magnets to generate high magnetic field gradients, which seriously limits Lab-on-a-Chip applications. On the other hand, in this work, trapping of non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria in a uniform external magnetic field was studied with a novel chip design. An inverse ferrofluid flows in a channel and a non-magnetic island is placed in the middle of this channel. The magnetic field was distorted by this island due to the magnetic susceptibility difference between this island and the surrounding ferrofluid, resulting in magnetic forces applied on the non-magnetic entities. Both the ferromagnetic particles and the non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria were attracted towards the island, and subsequently accumulate in different regions. The alignment of the ferrimagnetic particles and optical transparency of the ferrofluid was greatly enhanced by the bacteria at low applied magnetic fields. This work is applicable to lab-on-a-chip based detection and trapping of non-magnetic entities bacteria and cells. PMID:27254771

  8. Magnetic field calculation and measurement of active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoping; Zhou, Zude; Hu, Yefa

    2006-11-01

    Magnetic Bearings are typical devices in which electric energy and mechanical energy convert mutually. Magnetic Field indicates the relationship between 2 of the most important parameters in a magnetic bearing - current and force. This paper presents calculation and measurement of the magnetic field distribution of a self-designed magnetic bearing. Firstly, the static Maxwell's equations of the magnetic bearing are presented and a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is found to solve the equations and get post-process results by means of ANSYS software. Secondly, to confirm the calculation results a Lakeshore460 3-channel Gaussmeter is used to measure the magnetic flux density of the magnetic bearing in X, Y, Z directions accurately. According to the measurement data the author constructs a 3D magnetic field distribution digital model by means of MATLAB software. Thirdly, the calculation results and the measurement data are compared and analyzed; the comparing result indicates that the calculation results are consistent with the measurement data in allowable dimension variation, which means that the FEA calculation method of the magnetic bearing has high precision. Finally, it is concluded that the magnetic field calculation and measurement can accurately reflect the real magnetic distribution in the magnetic bearing and the result can guide the design and analysis of the magnetic bearing effectively.

  9. Magnetic Trapping of Bacteria at Low Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. M.; Wu, R. G.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2016-06-01

    A suspension of non-magnetic entities in a ferrofluid is referred to as an inverse ferrofluid. Current research to trap non-magnetic entities in an inverse ferrofluid focuses on using large permanent magnets to generate high magnetic field gradients, which seriously limits Lab-on-a-Chip applications. On the other hand, in this work, trapping of non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria in a uniform external magnetic field was studied with a novel chip design. An inverse ferrofluid flows in a channel and a non-magnetic island is placed in the middle of this channel. The magnetic field was distorted by this island due to the magnetic susceptibility difference between this island and the surrounding ferrofluid, resulting in magnetic forces applied on the non-magnetic entities. Both the ferromagnetic particles and the non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria were attracted towards the island, and subsequently accumulate in different regions. The alignment of the ferrimagnetic particles and optical transparency of the ferrofluid was greatly enhanced by the bacteria at low applied magnetic fields. This work is applicable to lab-on-a-chip based detection and trapping of non-magnetic entities bacteria and cells.

  10. Magnetic Trapping of Bacteria at Low Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. M.; Wu, R. G.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A suspension of non-magnetic entities in a ferrofluid is referred to as an inverse ferrofluid. Current research to trap non-magnetic entities in an inverse ferrofluid focuses on using large permanent magnets to generate high magnetic field gradients, which seriously limits Lab-on-a-Chip applications. On the other hand, in this work, trapping of non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria in a uniform external magnetic field was studied with a novel chip design. An inverse ferrofluid flows in a channel and a non-magnetic island is placed in the middle of this channel. The magnetic field was distorted by this island due to the magnetic susceptibility difference between this island and the surrounding ferrofluid, resulting in magnetic forces applied on the non-magnetic entities. Both the ferromagnetic particles and the non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria were attracted towards the island, and subsequently accumulate in different regions. The alignment of the ferrimagnetic particles and optical transparency of the ferrofluid was greatly enhanced by the bacteria at low applied magnetic fields. This work is applicable to lab-on-a-chip based detection and trapping of non-magnetic entities bacteria and cells. PMID:27254771